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Sample records for hydrogen sulphide toxicity

  1. Hydrogen sulphide and phosphine interactions with human skin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Sharyn; Heath, Linda; Pisaniello, Dino; Evans, Richard; Edwards, John W; Logan, Michael; Baxter, Christina

    2017-04-01

    Accidental or intentional releases of toxic gases can have significant public health consequences and emergency resource demands. Management of exposed individuals during hazardous material incidents should be risk and evidence based, but there are knowledge gaps in relation to dermal absorption of gases and management advice for potentially exposed individuals. Using a modified Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in vitro toxicology protocol with human donor skin, this article reports on two common and odorous chemicals, hydrogen sulphide and phosphine. Results show that undamaged human skin provides a good barrier to hydrogen sulphide (up to 800 ppm) and phosphine (up to 1000 ppm) penetration for up to 30 min exposures, with little variability in the presence of clothing or in elevated temperature and humidity conditions. A practical guideline template for skin decontamination has been developed, and implications of the research for first responders are outlined.

  2. Detection of exhaled hydrogen sulphide gas in healthy human volunteers during intravenous administration of sodium sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toombs, Christopher F; Insko, Michael A; Wintner, Edward A; Deckwerth, Thomas L; Usansky, Helen; Jamil, Khurram; Goldstein, Brahm; Cooreman, Michael; Szabo, Csaba

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule and potential therapeutic agent. Emerging studies indicate its therapeutic potential in a variety of cardiovascular diseases and in critical illness. Augmentation of endogenous sulphide concentrations by intravenous administration of sodium sulphide can be used for the delivery of H(2)S to the tissues. In the current study, we have measured H(2)S concentrations in the exhaled breath of healthy human volunteers subjected to increasing doses sodium sulphide in a human phase I safety and tolerability study. We have measured reactive sulphide in the blood via ex vivo derivatization of sulphide with monobromobimane to form sulphide-dibimane and blood concentrations of thiosulfate (major oxidative metabolite of sulphide) via ion chromatography. We have measured exhaled H(2)S concentrations using a custom-made device based on a sulphide gas detector (Interscan). Administration of IK-1001, a parenteral formulation of Na(2)S (0.005-0.20 mg kg(-1), i.v., infused over 1 min) induced an elevation of blood sulphide and thiosulfate concentrations over baseline, which was observed within the first 1-5 min following administration of IK-1001 at 0.10 mg kg(-1) dose and higher. In all subjects, basal exhaled H(2)S was observed to be higher than the ambient concentration of H(2)S gas in room air, indicative of on-going endogenous H(2)S production in human subjects. Upon intravenous administration of Na(2)S, a rapid elevation of exhaled H(2)S concentrations was observed. The amount of exhaled H(2)S rapidly decreased after discontinuation of the infusion of Na(2)S. Exhaled H(2)S represents a detectable route of elimination after parenteral administration of Na(2)S.

  3. Detection of exhaled hydrogen sulphide gas in rats exposed to intravenous sodium sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insko, Michael A; Deckwerth, Thomas L; Hill, Paul; Toombs, Christopher F; Szabo, Csaba

    2009-07-01

    Sodium sulphide (Na(2)S) disassociates to sodium (Na(+)) hydrosulphide, anion (HS(-)) and hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) in aqueous solutions. Here we have established and characterized a method to detect H(2)S gas in the exhaled breath of rats. Male rats were anaesthetized with ketamine and xylazine, instrumented with intravenous (i.v.) jugular vein catheters, and a tube inserted into the trachea was connected to a pneumotach connected to a H(2)S gas detector. Sodium sulphide, cysteine or the natural polysulphide compound diallyl disulphide were infused intravenously while the airway was monitored for exhaled H(2)S real time. Exhaled sulphide concentration was calculated to be in the range of 0.4-11 ppm in response to i.v. infusion rates ranging between 0.3 and 1.1 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1). When nitric oxide synthesis was inhibited with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester the amount of H(2)S exhaled during i.v. infusions of sodium sulphide was significantly increased compared with that obtained with the vehicle control. An increase in circulating nitric oxide using DETA NONOate [3,3-bis(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene] did not alter the levels of exhaled H(2)S during an i.v. infusion of sodium sulphide. An i.v. bolus of L-cysteine, 1 g.kg(-1), and an i.v. infusion of the garlic derived natural compound diallyl disulphide, 1.8 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1), also caused exhalation of H(2)S gas. This method has shown that significant amounts of H(2)S are exhaled in rats during sodium sulphide infusions, and the amount exhaled can be modulated by various pharmacological interventions.

  4. Tolerance of benthic foraminifera (Protista : Sarcodina) to hydrogen sulphide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moodley, L.; Schaub, B.; Van der Zwaan, G.J.; Herman, P.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Benthic foraminifera are dominant members of tb meiofauna, commonly occurring below the anoxic-oxic interface in marine sediments. The absence of oxygen in marine coastal sediments is often correlated with the formation of hydrogen sulphide. In this study the tolerance of benthic foraminifera (from

  5. High-temperature biotrickling filtration of hydrogen sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Indrani; Fulthorpe, Roberta R; Sharma, Shobha; Allen, D Grant

    2007-03-01

    Biofiltration of malodorous reduced sulphur compounds such as hydrogen sulphide has been confined to emissions that are at temperatures below 40 degrees C despite the fact that there are many industrial emissions (e.g. in the pulp and paper industry) at temperatures well above 40 degrees C. This paper describes our study on the successful treatment of hydrogen sulphide gas at temperatures of 40, 50, 60 and 70 degrees C using a microbial community obtained from a hot spring. Three biotrickling filter (BTF) systems were set up in parallel for a continuous run of 9 months to operate at three different temperatures, one of which was always at 40 degrees C as a mesophilic control and the other two were for exploring high-temperature operation up to 70 degrees C. The continuous experiment and a series of batch experiments in glass bottles (250 ml) showed that addition of glucose and monosodium glutamate enhanced thermophilic biofiltration of hydrogen sulphide gas and a removal rate of 40 g m(-3) h(-1) was achieved at 70 degrees C. We suggest that the glucose is acting as a carbon source for the existing microbial community in the BTFs, whereas glutamate is acting as a compatible solute. The use of such organic compounds to enhance biodegradation of hydrogen sulphide, particularly at high temperatures, has not been demonstrated to our knowledge and, hence, has opened up a range of possibilities for applying biofiltration to hot gas effluent.

  6. Removing hydrogen sulphide from a gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christy, J.G.

    1990-07-31

    This invention relates, in particular, to removing hydrogen sulfide from a gas mixture in which the molar ratio of carbon dioxide to hydrogen sulfide is very large, for example between 20 and 45. Examples of such mixtures include natural gas or gas produced by coal gasification. According to the invention, the gas mixture is contacted in a main absorber at an elevated temperature with lean and regenerable aqueous absorbent to obtain a purified gas mixture and a loaded absorbent. The loaded absorbent is introduced into a separation vessel at a reduced pressure, and flash-off gas and partially regenerated absorbent are removed from the vessel. Hydrogen sulfide is removed from the flash-off gas to obtain a lean gas, and the removed hydrogen sulfide is converted into elemental sulfur. The partially regenerated absorbent is introduced into a regenerator to obtain lean absorbent for use in the first step, and a regenerator off-gas including hydrogen sulfide. The regenerator off-gas is supplied to a sulfur recovery plant to obtain elemental sulfur and a SO{sub 2}-containing off-gas. This off-gas is treated in a converter to obtain a reduced off-gas. At least part of the lean gas obtained in a previous step is mixed with the reduced plant off-gas, and the remainder is mixed with the plant off-gas. Hydrogen sulfide is removed from the mixture of reduced off-gas and lean gas to obtain substantially hydrogen sulfide-free off-gas; the removed hydrogen sulfide is converted into elemental sulfur. The absorbent used in this process includes a chemical absorbent, such as an amine, and a physical absorbent, such as sulfolane. 1 fig.

  7. Adsorption of hydrogen sulphide on Metal-Organic Frameworks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutiérrez-Sevillano, J.J.; Martin-Calvo, A.; Dubbeldam, D.; Calero, S.; Hamad, S.

    2013-01-01

    Three new sets of interatomic potentials to model hydrogen sulphide (H2S) have been fitted. One of them is a 3-sites potential (which we named 3S) and the other two are 5-sites potentials (which we named 5S and 5Sd). The molecular dipole of the 3S and 5S potentials is 1.43 D, which is the value

  8. Removing hydrogen sulphide from a gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baar, J.F. Van; Lith, W.J. Van.

    1990-05-08

    A process is provided for selectively removing hydrogen sulfide from a gas mixture containing hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, such as natural gas or a reduced off-gas from the Claus process. The process comprises contacting the gas mixture with a liquid absorbent composition including an aminopyridine, such as 4-dimethylaminopyridine. The absorbent composition suitably contains between 1 and 2 moles of aminopyridine per liter of physical solvent (such as sulfolane). Contacting is carried out at 20-80{degree}C and at approximately atmospheric pressure, usually in countercurrent fashion in a gas/liquid contacting column. The rich absorbent composition laden with hydrogen sulfide is regenerated by heating the solution and/or stripping the composition with an inert gas such as steam. Experiments are described to illustrate the process of the invention. 2 tabs.

  9. Acid volatile sulphide as an indicator for sediment toxicity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyvaerts, M.P.; Brucker, N. De; Geuzens, P. [VITO, Mol (Belgium)

    1995-12-31

    The ratio SEM (Simultaneously Extracted Metals) to AVS (Acid Volatile Sulfide) is considered to be a measure for heavy metal bioavailability for benthic species. When the SEM/AVS ratio exceeds 1 heavy metal toxicity for the benthic organisms is expected. The correlation between the SEM/AVS and the toxicity for the bioluminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum is investigated. Freshwater sediments originating from different locations with high and low heavy metal contamination are tested. The toxicity test is performed according to the Solid Phase Microtox test (SPT). Unexpectedly, negative correlation between SEM/AVS and SPT toxicity was found (r = {minus}0.82, n = 44). However, sediments with a high sulphide content show a correlation between AVS and toxicity determined by SPT (r = 0.90, n = 18). Comparison with literature data and possible hypothesis for the discrepancies with the data will be presented. Additionally, a validation study concerning the AVS determination has been performed. Some of the aspects involved are: the sampling technique preserving the anoxic conditions of the sediment, the influence of the storage time and storage conditions on the AVS content of the standard conditions and the recovery of the metal sulphides used for the SEM calculation.

  10. Porous silicon-based direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhafarov, T D; Yuksel, S Aydin

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, the use of Au/porous silicon/Silicon Schottky type structure, as a direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cell is demonstrated. The porous silicon filled with hydrochlorid acid was developed as a proton conduction membrane. The Au/Porous Silicon/Silicon cells were fabricated by first creating the porous silicon layer in single-crystalline Si using the anodic etching under illumination and then deposition Au catalyst layer onto the porous silicon. Using 80 mM H2S solution as fuel the open circuit voltage of 0.4 V was obtained and maximum power density of 30 W/m2 at room temperature was achieved. These results demonstrate that the Au/Porous Silicon/Silicon direct hydrogen sulphide fuel cell which uses H2S:dH2O solution as fuel and operates at room temperature can be considered as the most promising type of low cost fuel cell for small power-supply units.

  11. What's that smell? Hydrogen sulphide transport from Bardarbunga to Scandinavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Håkan; von Schoenberg, Pontus; Brännström, Niklas

    2015-09-01

    On Sep 9 2014 several incidences of foul smell (rotten eggs) were reported on the coast of Norway (in particular in the vicinity of Molde) and then on Sep 10 in the interior parts of county Västerbotten, Sweden. One of the theories that were put forward was that the foul smell was due to degassing of the Bardarbunga volcano on Iceland. Using satellite images (GOME-1,-2) of the sulphur dioxide, SO2, contents in the atmosphere surrounding Iceland to estimate flux of SO2 from the volcano and an atmospheric transport model, PELLO, we vindicate this theory: we argue that the cause for the foul smell was hydrogen sulphide originating from Bardarbunga. The model concentrations are also compared to SO2 concentration measurements from Muonio, Finland.

  12. Who farted? Hydrogen sulphide transport from Bardarbunga to Scandinavia

    CERN Document Server

    Grahn, Håkan; Brännström, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    On September 9 2014 several incidences of foul smell (rotten eggs) were reported on the coast of Norway (in particular in the vicinity of Molde) and then on September 10 in the interior parts of county V\\"asterbotten, Sweden. One of the theories that were put forward was that the foul smell was due to degassing of the Bardarbunga volcano on Iceland. Using satellite images (GOME-1,-2) of the sulphur dioxide, SO_2, contents in the atmosphere surrounding Iceland to estimate flux of SO_2 from the volcano and an atmospheric transport model, PELLO, we vindicate this theory: we argue that the cause for the foul smell was hydrogen sulphide originating from Bardarbunga. The model concentrations are also compared to SO_2 concentration measurements from Muonio, Finland.

  13. Hydrogen sulphide in cardiovascular system: A cascade from interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Jie; Cai, Wen-Jie; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-05-15

    As a gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulphide exerts its extensive physiological and pathophysiological effects in mammals. The interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules forms a cascade that modulates cellular functions and homeostasis. In this review, we focus on the signalling mechanism underlying the effect of hydrogen sulphide in the cardiovascular system and metabolism as well as the biological relevance to human diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Organosulphide profile and hydrogen sulphide-releasing activity of garlic fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tocmo, Restituto; Lai, Abigail Nianci; Wu, Yuchen; Liang, Dong; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Huang, Dejian

    2017-01-01

    Blanched and unblanched garlic were fermented using L. plantarum for investigation of organosulphide profiles, hydrogen sulphide-releasing activity, pH, titratable activity and microbial growth. Both raw and blanched garlic preparations allowed growth of L. plantarum with corresponding lowering of

  15. Treating landfill gas hydrogen sulphide with mineral wool waste (MWW) and rod mill waste (RMW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergersen, Ove; Haarstad, Ketil

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) gas is a major odorant at municipal landfills. The gas can be generated from different waste fractions, for example demolition waste containing gypsum based plaster board. The removal of H2S from landfill gas was investigated by filtering it through mineral wool waste products. The flow of gas varied from 0.3 l/min to 3.0 l/min. The gas was typical for landfill gas with a mean H2S concentration of ca. 4500 ppm. The results show that the sulphide gas can effectively be removed by mineral wool waste products. The ratios of the estimated potential for sulphide precipitation were 19:1 for rod mill waste (RMW) and mineral wool waste (MWW). A filter consisting of a mixture of MWW and RMW, with a vertical perforated gas tube through the center of filter material and with a downward gas flow, removed 98% of the sulfide gas over a period of 80 days. A downward gas flow was more efficient in contacting the filter materials. Mineral wool waste products are effective in removing hydrogen sulphide from landfill gas given an adequate contact time and water content in the filter material. Based on the estimated sulphide removal potential of mineral wool and rod mill waste of 14 g/kg and 261 g/kg, and assuming an average sulphide gas concentration of 4500 ppm, the removal capacity in the filter materials has been estimated to last between 11 and 308 days. At the studied location the experimental gas flow was 100 times less than the actual gas flow. We believe that the system described here can be upscaled in order to treat this gas flow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sulphide quinone reductase contributes to hydrogen sulphide metabolism in murine peripheral tissues but not in the CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, DR; Furne, J; Stoltz, GJ; Abdel-Rehim, MS; Levitt, MD; Szurszewski, JH

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is gaining acceptance as a gaseous signal molecule. However, mechanisms regarding signal termination are not understood. We used stigmatellin and antimycin A, inhibitors of sulphide quinone reductase (SQR), to test the hypothesis that the catabolism of H2S involves SQR. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH H2S production and consumption were determined in living and intact mouse brain, liver and colonic muscularis externa using gas chromatography and HPLC. Expressions of SQR, ethylmalonic encephalopathy 1 (Ethe1) and thiosulphate transferase (TST; rhodanese) were determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. KEY RESULTS In the colonic muscularis externa, H235S was catabolized to [35S]-thiosulphate and [35S]-sulphate, and stigmatellin reduced both the consumption of H235S and formation of [35S]-thiosulphate. Stigmatellin also enhanced H2S release by the colonic muscularis externa. In the brain, catabolism of H235S to [35S]-thiosulphate and [35S]-sulphate, which was stigmatellin-insensitive, partially accounted for H235S consumption, while the remainder was captured as unidentified 35S that was probably bound to proteins. Levels of mRNA encoding SQR were higher in the colonic muscularis externa and the liver than in the brain. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These data support the concept that termination of endogenous H2S signalling in the colonic muscularis externa occurs via catabolism to thiosulphate and sulphate partially via a mechanism involving SQR. In the brain, it appears that H2S signal termination occurs partially through protein sequestration and partially through catabolism not involving SQR. As H2S has beneficial effects in animal models of human disease, we suggest that selective inhibition of SQR is an attractive target for pharmaceutical development. PMID:21950400

  17. Selective Hydrogen Sulphide Removal from Acid Gas by Alkali Chemisorption in a Jet Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobek Janka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas is a primary energy source that contains a number of light paraffins. It also contains several undesirable components, such as water, ammonia, hydrogen sulphide, etc. In our study, a selective hydrogen sulphide removal process was achieved by alkali chemisorption in a custom-designed jet reactor. Several model gas compositions (CO2-H2S-N2 were evaluated to find parameters that enable H2S absorption instead of CO2. The negative effect of the presence of CO2 in the raw gas on the efficiency of H2S removal was observed. The beneficial effect of the low residence time (less than 1 s on the efficiency of H2S removal was recognized. Optimal operational parameters were defined to reach at least a 50% efficiency of H2S removal and minimal alkali consumption.

  18. Biogenic Properties of Deep Waters from the Black Sea Reduction (Hydrogen Sulphide) Zone for Marine Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Polikarpov, Gennady G.; Lazorenko, Galina Е.; Тereschenko, Natalya N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Generalized data of biogenic properties investigations of the Black Sea deep waters from its reduction zone for marine algae are presented. It is shown on board and in laboratory that after pre-oxidation of hydrogen sulphide by intensive aeration of the deep waters lifted to the surface of the sea, they are ready to be used for cultivation of the Black Sea unicellular, planktonic, and multicellular, benthic, algae instead of artificial medium. Naturally balanced micro- and macroeleme...

  19. Case studies of hydrogen sulphide occupational exposure incidents in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kate

    2014-12-15

    The UK Health and Safety Executive has investigated several incidents of workplace accidents involving hydrogen sulphide exposure in recent years. Biological monitoring has been used in some incidents to determine the cause of unconsciousness resulting from these incidents and as a supporting evidence in regulatory enforcement. This paper reports on three case incidents and discusses the use of biological monitoring in such cases. Biological monitoring has a role in identifying hydrogen sulphide exposure in incidents, whether these are occupational or in the wider environment. Sample type, time of collection and sample storage are important factors in the applicability of this technique. For non-fatal incidents, multiple urine samples are recommended at two or more time points between the incident and 15 h post-exposure. For routine occupational monitoring, post-shift samples should be adequate. Due to endogenous levels of urinary thiosulphate, it is likely that exposures in excess of 12 ppm for 30 min (or 360 ppm/min equivalent) would be detectable using biological monitoring. This is within the Acute Exposure Guideline Level 2 (the level of the chemical in air at or above which there may be irreversible or other serious long-lasting effects or impaired ability to escape) for hydrogen sulphide. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of recycled rubber media for hydrogen sulphide (H2S) control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Park, Jaeyoung; Evans, Eric A; Ellis, Timothy G

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) adsorption capacities on recycled rubber media, tyre-derived rubber particle (TDRP), and other rubber material (ORM) have been evaluated. As part of the research, densities, moisture contents, and surface properties of TDRP and ORM have been determined. The research team findings show that TDRP and ORM are more particulate in nature and not highly porous-like activated carbon. The characteristics of surface area, pore size, and moisture content support chemisorption on the macrosurface rather than physical adsorption in micropores. For example, moisture content is essential for H2S adsorption on ORM, and an increase in moisture content results in an increase in adsorption capacity.

  1. Performance evaluation of oxygen, air and nitrate for the microaerobic removal of hydrogen sulphide in biogas from sludge digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, I; Lopes, A C; Pérez, S I; Fdz-Polanco, M

    2010-10-01

    The removal performance of hydrogen sulphide in severely polluted biogas produced during the anaerobic digestion of sludge was studied by employing pure oxygen, air and nitrate as oxidant reactives supplied to the biodigester. Research was performed in a 200-L digester with an hydraulic retention time (HRT) of ∼20 days under mesophilic conditions. The oxygen supply (0.25 N m³/m³ feed) to the bioreactor successfully reduced the hydrogen sulphide content from 15,811 mg/N m³ to less than 400 mg/N m³. The introduction of air (1.27 N m³/m³ feed) removed more than 99% of the hydrogen sulphide content, with a final concentration of ∼55 mg/N m³. COD removal, VS reduction and methane yield were not affected under microaerobic conditions; however, methane concentration in the biogas decreased when air was employed as a result of nitrogen dilution. The nitrate addition was not effective for hydrogen sulphide removal in the biogas. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Metal-organic framework based highly selective fluorescence turn-on probe for hydrogen sulphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Sanjog S.; Saha, Tanmoy; Desai, Aamod V.; Talukdar, Pinaki; Ghosh, Sujit K.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is known to play a vital role in human physiology and pathology which stimulated interest in understanding complex behaviour of H2S. Discerning the pathways of H2S production and its mode of action is still a challenge owing to its volatile and reactive nature. Herein we report azide functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF) as a selective turn-on fluorescent probe for H2S detection. The MOF shows highly selective and fast response towards H2S even in presence of other relevant biomolecules. Low cytotoxicity and H2S detection in live cells, demonstrate the potential of MOF towards monitoring H2S chemistry in biological system. To the best of our knowledge this is the first example of MOF that exhibit fast and highly selective fluorescence turn-on response towards H2S under physiological conditions.

  3. Hydrogen sulphide in the RVLM and PVN has no effect on cardiovascular regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloise eStreeter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S is now recognised as an important signalling molecule and has been shown to have vasodilator and cardio-protectant effects. More recently it has been suggested that H2S may also act within the brain to reduce blood pressure. In the present study we have demonstrated the presence of the H2S producing enzyme, cystathionine  synthase (CBS in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, brain regions with key cardiovascular regulatory functions. The cardiovascular role of H2S was investigated by determining the blood pressure (BP, heart rate (HR and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA responses elicited by a H2S donor (NaHS, sodium hydrogen sulphide or inhibitors of CBS, microinjected into the RVLM and PVN. In anaesthetised WKY rats bilateral microinjections of NaHS (0.2 – 2000 pmol/side into the RVLM did not significantly affect BP, HR or LSNA, compared to vehicle. Similarly, when the CBS inhibitors, amino-oxyacetate (AOA (0.1 – 1.0 nmol/side or hydroxylamine (HA (0.2 – 2.0 nmol/side, were administered into the RVLM, there were no significant effects on the cardiovascular variables compared to vehicle. Microinjections into the PVN of NaHS, HA and AOA had no consistent significant effects on BP, HR or LSNA compared to vehicle. We also investigated the cardiovascular responses to NaHS microinjected into the RVLM and PVN in SHR rats. Again, there were no significant effects on BP, HR and LSNA. Together, these results suggest that H2S in the RVLM and PVN does not have a major role in cardiovascular regulation.

  4. Evidence for a functional vasodilatatory role for hydrogen sulphide in the human cutaneous microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Jessica L; Greaney, Jody L; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Alexander, Lacy M

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2 S) is vasoprotective, attenuates inflammation and modulates blood pressure in animal models; however, its specific mechanistic role in the human vasculature remains unclear. In the present study, we report the novel finding that the enzymes responsible for endogenous H2 S production, cystathionine-γ-lyase and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulphurtransferase, are expressed in the human cutaneous circulation. Functionally, we show that H2 S-induced cutaneous vasodilatation is mediated, in part, by tetraethylammonium-sensitive calcium-dependent potassium channels and not by ATP-sensitive potassium channels. In addition, nitric oxide and cyclo-oxygenase-derived byproducts are required for full expression of exogenous H2 S-mediated cutaneous vasodilatation. Future investigations of the potential role for H2 S with respect to modulating vascular function in humans may have important clinical implications for understanding the mechanisms underlying vascular dysfunction characteristic of multiple cardiovascular pathologies. The present study aimed to identify the presence of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulphurtransferase (3-MST), which endogenously produce hydrogen sulphide (H2 S), and to functionally examine the mechanisms of H2 S-induced vasodilatation in the human cutaneous microcirculation. CSE and 3-MST were quantified in forearm skin samples from 5 healthy adults (24 ± 3 years) using western blot analysis. For functional studies, microdialysis fibres were placed in the forearm skin of 12 healthy adults (25 ± 3 years) for graded infusions (0.01-100 mm) of sodium sulphide (Na2 S) and sodium hydrogen sulphide (NaHS). To define the mechanisms mediating H2 S-induced vasodilatation, microdialysis fibres were perfused with Ringer solution (control), a ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP ) inhibitor, an intermediate calcium-dependent potassium channel (KCa ) inhibitor, a non-specific KCa channel inhibitor or triple blockade. To

  5. Patterns of Macroinvertebrate and Fish Diversity in Freshwater Sulphide Springs

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    Ryan Greenway

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Extreme environments are characterised by the presence of physicochemical stressors and provide unique study systems to address problems in evolutionary ecology research. Sulphide springs provide an example of extreme freshwater environments; because hydrogen sulphide’s adverse physiological effects induce mortality in metazoans even at micromolar concentrations. Sulphide springs occur worldwide, but while microbial communities in sulphide springs have received broad attention, little is known about macroinvertebrates and fish inhabiting these toxic environments. We reviewed qualitative occurrence records of sulphide spring faunas on a global scale and present a quantitative case study comparing diversity patterns in sulphidic and adjacent non-sulphidic habitats across replicated river drainages in Southern Mexico. While detailed studies in most regions of the world remain scarce, available data suggests that sulphide spring faunas are characterised by low species richness. Dipterans (among macroinvertebrates and cyprinodontiforms (among fishes appear to dominate the communities in these habitats. At least in fish, there is evidence for the presence of highly endemic species and populations exclusively inhabiting sulphide springs. We provide a detailed discussion of traits that might predispose certain taxonomic groups to colonize sulphide springs, how colonizers subsequently adapt to cope with sulphide toxicity, and how adaptation may be linked to speciation processes.

  6. Interacting effects of sulphate pollution, sulphide toxicity and eutrophication on vegetation development in fens: a mesocosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Jeroen J M; Sarneel, Judith M; Willers, Bart J C; Roelofs, Jan G M; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Lamers, Leon P M

    2009-07-01

    Both eutrophication and SO4 pollution can lead to higher availability of nutrients and potentially toxic compounds in wetlands. To unravel the interaction between the level of eutrophication and toxicity at species and community level, effects of SO4 were tested in nutrient-poor and nutrient-rich fen mesocosms. Biomass production of aquatic and semi-aquatic macrophytes and colonization of the water layer increased after fertilization, leading to dominance of highly competitive species. SO4 addition increased alkalinity and sulphide concentrations, leading to decomposition and additional eutrophication. SO4 pollution and concomitant sulphide production considerably reduced biomass production and colonization, but macrophytes were less vulnerable in fertilized conditions. The experiment shows that competition between species, vegetation succession and terrestrialization are not only influenced by nutrient availability, but also by toxicity, which strongly interacts with the level of eutrophication. This implies that previously neutralized toxicity effects in eutrophied fens may appear after nutrient reduction measures have been taken.

  7. Interacting effects of sulphate pollution, sulphide toxicity and eutrophication on vegetation development in fens: A mesocosm experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geurts, Jeroen J.M., E-mail: j.geurts@b-ware.e [Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Institute for Wetland and Water Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); B-WARE Research Centre, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sarneel, Judith M. [Landscape Ecology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Willers, Bart J.C.; Roelofs, Jan G.M. [Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Institute for Wetland and Water Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Verhoeven, Jos T.A. [Landscape Ecology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Lamers, Leon P.M. [Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Institute for Wetland and Water Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    Both eutrophication and SO{sub 4} pollution can lead to higher availability of nutrients and potentially toxic compounds in wetlands. To unravel the interaction between the level of eutrophication and toxicity at species and community level, effects of SO{sub 4} were tested in nutrient-poor and nutrient-rich fen mesocosms. Biomass production of aquatic and semi-aquatic macrophytes and colonization of the water layer increased after fertilization, leading to dominance of highly competitive species. SO{sub 4} addition increased alkalinity and sulphide concentrations, leading to decomposition and additional eutrophication. SO{sub 4} pollution and concomitant sulphide production considerably reduced biomass production and colonization, but macrophytes were less vulnerable in fertilized conditions. The experiment shows that competition between species, vegetation succession and terrestrialization are not only influenced by nutrient availability, but also by toxicity, which strongly interacts with the level of eutrophication. This implies that previously neutralized toxicity effects in eutrophied fens may appear after nutrient reduction measures have been taken. - Interspecific competition, vegetation succession and terrestrialization in fens depend on the interacting effects of SO{sub 4} pollution, sulphide toxicity and nutrient availability.

  8. Chemical-oxidative scrubbing for the removal of hydrogen sulphide from raw biogas: potentials and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltner, M; Makaruk, A; Krischan, J; Harasek, M

    2012-01-01

    In the present work chemical-oxidative scrubbing as a novel method for the desulphurisation of raw biogas is presented with a special focus on the process potentials and economics. The selective absorption of hydrogen sulphide from gas streams containing high amounts of carbon dioxide using caustic solutions is not trivial but has been treated in literature. However, the application of this method to biogas desulphurisation has not been established so far. Based on rigorous experimental work, an industrial-scale pilot plant has been designed, erected and commissioned at a biogas plant with biogas upgrading and gas grid injection in Austria. Data collected from the 12-month monitored operation has been used to elaborate performance as well as economic parameters for the novel desulphurisation method. The proposed technology offers significant operational advantages regarding the degree of automation and the flexibility towards fluctuations in process boundary conditions. Furthermore, the economic assessment revealed the high competitiveness of the chemical-oxidative scrubbing process compared with other desulphurisation technologies with the named advantageous operational behaviour.

  9. Lithogeochemical, mineralogical analyses and oxygen-hydrogen isotopes of the Hercynian Koudiat Aïcha massive sulphide deposit, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, F.; Belkabir, A.; Brunet, S.; Brown, A. C.; Marcoux, E.

    2010-03-01

    with chlorite located in and adjacent to sulphide mineralization, whereas lower temperatures correlate with distal chlorite in both the footwall and hanging wall rocks. Chemical trends in altered footwall rocks are shown by absolute mass gains for Fe 2O 3total, MnO and MgO, by absolute mass losses for CaO, K 2O and Na 2O, and by a moderate loss in SiO 2. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of Koudiat Aïcha lithofacies (6.2-12.4‰ for oxygen and -51‰ to -36‰ for hydrogen) have also been used to determine the temperature and origin of metalliferous fluids. The couple plagioclase-amphibole of gabbros provides equilibrium temperatures between 310 and 380 °C and suggests that the heat source for the ore-forming fluid system may have been igneous. On the other hand, oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios cluster between normal values for sedimentary and magmatic rocks, suggesting a magmatic-metamorphic origin for the ore fluid.

  10. Hydrogen sulphide improves adaptation of Zea mays seedlings to iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Shang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is emerging as a potential molecule involved in physiological regulation in plants. However, whether H2S regulates iron-shortage responses in plants is largely unknown. Here, the role of H2S in modulating iron availability in maize (Zea mays L. cv Canner) seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution is reported. The main results are as follows: Firstly, NaHS, a donor of H2S, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution. Secondly, electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize seedlings revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. On the contrary, mesophyll chloroplasts appeared completely developed in H2S-treated maize seedlings. Thirdly, H2S treatment increased iron accumulation in maize seedlings by changing the expression levels of iron homeostasis- and sulphur metabolism-related genes. Fourthly, phytosiderophore (PS) accumulation and secretion were enhanced by H2S treatment in seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. Indeed, the gene expression of ferric-phytosiderophore transporter (ZmYS1) was specifically induced by iron deficiency in maize leaves and roots, whereas their abundance was decreased by NaHS treatment. Lastly, H2S significantly enhanced photosynthesis through promoting the protein expression of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (RuBISCO LSU) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the expression of genes encoding RuBISCO large subunit (RBCL), small subunit (RBCS), D1 protein (psbA), and PEPC in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. These results indicate that H2S is closely related to iron uptake, transport, and accumulation, and consequently increases chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast development, and photosynthesis in plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Biotechnological sulphide removal with oxygen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buisman, C.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of a new process for biotechnological sulphide removal from wastewater, in which it is attempted to convert sulphide into elemental sulphur by colourless sulphur bacteria. The toxicity, corrosive properties, unpleasant odor and high oxygen demand of sulphide

  12. Detection of Hydrogen Sulphide Gas Sensor Based Nanostructured Ba2CrMoO6 Thick Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kadu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline pure and doped Ba2CrMoO6, having an average crystallite size of 40 nm were synthesized by the sol-gel citrate method. Structural and gas-sensing characteristics were performed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD and sensitivity measurements. The gas sensing properties to reducing gases like Hydrogen sulphide (H2S, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG, carbon monoxide (CO and hydrogen gas (H2 were also discussed. The maximum sensitivity was obtained for 5 wt % Ni doped Ba2CrMoO6 at an operating temperature 250oC for H2S gas. Pd incorporation over 5 wt% Ni doped Ba2CrMoO6 improved the sensitivity, selectivity, response time, and reduced the operating temperature from 250 to 200oC of the sensor for H2S gas. This sensor also shows good satiability.

  13. Simultaneous determination of nanomole amounts of sulphur dioxide and hydrogen sulphide by flow injection analysis with on-line preconcentration by means of capillary denuder tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilli, Marco; Gács, Istvan

    2002-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for trace determination of SO2 and H2S in gaseous samples by using a flow injection system with on line preconcentration on capillary denuder is described. The gaseous samples are led through a 0.4 M sulphamic acid solution, retaining nitrogen dioxide, ammonia and hydrogen chloride. The sulphur dioxide is collected from the carrier gas stream (250 cm3 min-1) as sulphuric acid in a capillary denuder tube coated with a thin layer of 0.01-0.03 M hydrogen peroxide solution of 0.05 mM sulphuric acid; hydrogen sulphide passes into a second tube coated with 0.075 mM sodium sulphide solution of 0.1 M aqueous sodium hydroxide. The films containing the sulphuric acid and the sodium sulphide, respectively, are eluted with the corresponding circulating absorbent streams and pass through the detectors. Sulphuric acid is detected by conductimetry and sulphide is determined spectrophotometrically at 230 nm. If nanoequivalent amounts of H2S are present in the sample containing a large concentration of SO2 (SO2/H2S concentration ratio > 20), the sulphur dioxide is filtered out of the sample gas stream by solid sodium hydrogen carbonate. A limit of detection of 3.5 micrograms m-3 is obtained.

  14. Heat Exchange and Fouling Analysis on a Set of Hydrogen Sulphide Gas Coolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Adrian Sánchez-Escalona

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The sulphide acid coolers are tube and shell jacketed heat exchangers designed to cool down the produced gas from 416,15 K to 310,15 K in addition to separate the sulphur carried over by the outlet gas from the reactor tower. The investigation was carried out by applying the passive experimentation process in an online cooler set in order to determine the heat transfer rates and fouling based on heat resistance. It was corroborated that the operation of this equipment outside design parameters increases outlet gas temperature and liquid sulphur carryovers. Efficiency loss is caused by fouling elements in the fluid, which results in changes in the overall heat transfer rate. The linear tendency of the fouling heat resistance based on time for three gas flowrates.

  15. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  16. Photocatalytically active colloidal platinum-decorated cadmium sulphide nanorods for hydrogen production; Photokatalytisch Aktive Kolloidale Platindekorierte Cadmiumsulfidnanostaebchen zur Wasserstoffproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berr, Maximilian Josef

    2012-12-07

    This is the first study to have been successful in producing hydrogen by means of photocatalytically active colloidal semiconductor particles. Specifically, colloidal platinum-decorated cadmium sulphide nanorods were used to reduce water to hydrogen. Oxidation of water to oxygen was substituted by addition of a reducing agent (hole collector), e.g. sulphite, which itself is oxidised to sulphate by the photohole. During photochemical platinum decoration it was discovered that in addition to the expected platinum nanoparticles there had also formed platinum clusters in the subnanometer range. In spite of the small quantity of platinum deposited on the nanorods these clusters showed the same quantum efficiency as the intended product. [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde erstmals mit kolloidalen Halbleiternanopartikeln photokatalytische Wasserstoffproduktion erzielt. Im Detail wurde Wasser mit kolloidalen, platindekorierten Cadmiumsulfidnanostaebchen zu Wasserstoff reduziert. Die Oxidation des Wasser zu Sauerstoff wurde durch Zugabe eines Reduktionsmittels (Lochfaenger) substituiert, z.B. Sulfit, das durch das Photoloch zu Sulfat reduziert wird. Bei der photochemischen Platindekoration wurden neben den erwarteten Platinnanopartikeln mit 4 - 5 nm Durchmesser auch Subnanometer grosse Platincluster entdeckt, die trotz der geringeren Menge an deponierten Platin auf den Nanostaebchen die gleiche Quanteneffizienz demonstrieren.

  17. Modelling of Cavitation of Wash-Out Water, Ammonia Water, Ammonia Water with Increased Content Ammonia and Hydrogen Sulphide, Tar Condensate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef DOBEŠ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to design and implement a procedure of numerical modelling of cavitation of working mixtures: wash-out water, ammonia water, ammonia water with an increased content of hydrogen sulphide and ammonia, tar condensate. The numeric modelling is designed in the program Ansys Fluent using Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model. The issue of these liquids modelling can be solved by the cavitation simulation of water admixtures. Working fluids contain the following main ingredients: water, ammonia, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide. Subsequently, a comparison of the amount of water vapor (reference liquid and given fluid vapor is executed. The Schnerr-Sauer model is chosen because of good results in previous simulations for water cavitation. As a geometry is selected Laval nozzle. Modelled liquid mixtures are used in the petrochemical industry, as a filling for fluid circuits where cavitation may occur and therefore the research is needed.

  18. A high-porosity carbon molybdenum sulphide composite with enhanced electrochemical hydrogen evolution and stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anders B.; Vesborg, Peter C. K.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a highly active and stable acid activated carbon fibre and amorphous MoSx composite hydrogen evolution catalyst. The increased electrochemical-surface area is demonstrated to cause increased catalyst electrodeposition and activity. These composite electrodes also show an impro......This work describes a highly active and stable acid activated carbon fibre and amorphous MoSx composite hydrogen evolution catalyst. The increased electrochemical-surface area is demonstrated to cause increased catalyst electrodeposition and activity. These composite electrodes also show...

  19. Biochemical adaptations of four submerged macrophytes under combined exposure to hypoxia and hydrogen sulphide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfuza Parveen

    Full Text Available A hydroponic experiment was performed to investigate the stress responses and biochemical adaptations of four submerged macrophytes, Potamogeton crispus, Myriophyllum spicatum, Egeria densa, and Potamogeton oxyphyllus, to the combined exposure of hypoxia and hydrogen sulfide (H2S, provided by NaHS. The investigated plants were subjected to a control, hypoxia, 0.1mM NaHS, 0.5 mM NaHS, 0.1 mM NaHS+hypoxia and 0.5 mM NaHS+hypoxia conditions. All experimental plants grew optimally under control, hypoxic and NaHS conditions in comparison to that grown in the combined exposure of hypoxia and hydrogen sulfide. For P. crispus and M. spicatum, significant decreases of total chlorophyll and increases in oxidative stress (measured by hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, and malondialdehyde, MDA were observed with exposure to both sulfide concentrations. However, the decrease in catalase (CAT and ascorbate peroxidase (APX from exposure to 0.5 mM NaHS suggests that the function of the protective enzymes reached their limit under these conditions. In contrast, for E. densa and P. oxyphyllus, the higher activities of the three antioxidative enzymes and their anaerobic respiration abilities (ADH activity resulted in higher tolerance and susceptibility under high sulfide concentrations.

  20. The tropospheric processing of acidic gases and hydrogen sulphide in volcanic gas plumes as inferred from field and model investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aiuppa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the constraints on the atmospheric fate and depletion rates of acidic compounds persistently emitted by non-erupting (quiescent volcanoes is important for quantitatively predicting the environmental impact of volcanic gas plumes. Here, we present new experimental data coupled with modelling studies to investigate the chemical processing of acidic volcanogenic species during tropospheric dispersion. Diffusive tube samplers were deployed at Mount Etna, a very active open-conduit basaltic volcano in eastern Sicily, and Vulcano Island, a closed-conduit quiescent volcano in the Aeolian Islands (northern Sicily. Sulphur dioxide (SO2, hydrogen sulphide (H2S, hydrogen chloride (HCl and hydrogen fluoride (HF concentrations in the volcanic plumes (typically several minutes to a few hours old were repeatedly determined at distances from the summit vents ranging from 0.1 to ~10 km, and under different environmental conditions. At both volcanoes, acidic gas concentrations were found to decrease exponentially with distance from the summit vents (e.g., SO2 decreases from ~10 000 μg/m3at 0.1 km from Etna's vents down to ~7 μg/m3 at ~10 km distance, reflecting the atmospheric dilution of the plume within the acid gas-free background troposphere. Conversely, SO2/HCl, SO2/HF, and SO2/H2S ratios in the plume showed no systematic changes with plume aging, and fit source compositions within analytical error. Assuming that SO2 losses by reaction are small during short-range atmospheric transport within quiescent (ash-free volcanic plumes, our observations suggest that, for these short transport distances, atmospheric reactions for H2S and halogens are also negligible. The one-dimensional model MISTRA was used to simulate quantitatively the evolution of halogen and sulphur compounds in the plume of Mt. Etna. Model predictions support the hypothesis of minor HCl chemical processing during plume transport, at least in cloud-free conditions. Larger

  1. Hydrogen sulphide enhances photosynthesis through promoting chloroplast biogenesis, photosynthetic enzyme expression, and thiol redox modification in Spinacia oleracea seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Wang, Wen-Hua; Zheng, Chen-Juan; Lin, Guang-Hui; Dong, Xue-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is emerging as a potential messenger molecule involved in modulation of physiological processes in animals and plants. In this report, the role of H(2)S in modulating photosynthesis of Spinacia oleracea seedlings was investigated. The main results are as follows. (i) NaHS, a donor of H(2)S, was found to increase the chlorophyll content in leaves. (ii) Seedlings treated with different concentrations of NaHS for 30 d exhibited a significant increase in seedling growth, soluble protein content, and photosynthesis in a dose-dependent manner, with 100 μM NaHS being the optimal concentration. (iii) The number of grana lamellae stacking into the functional chloroplasts was also markedly increased by treatment with the optimal NaHS concentration. (iv) The light saturation point (Lsp), maximum net photosynthetic rate (Pmax), carboxylation efficiency (CE), and maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)) reached their maximal values, whereas the light compensation point (Lcp) and dark respiration (Rd) decreased significantly under the optimal NaHS concentration. (v) The activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBISCO) and the protein expression of the RuBISCO large subunit (RuBISCO LSU) were also significantly enhanced by NaHS. (vi) The total thiol content, glutathione and cysteine levels, internal concentration of H(2)S, and O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase and L-cysteine desulphydrase activities were increased to some extent, suggesting that NaHS also induced the activity of thiol redox modification. (vii) Further studies using quantitative real-time PCR showed that the gene encoding the RuBISCO large subunit (RBCL), small subunit (RBCS), ferredoxin thioredoxin reductase (FTR), ferredoxin (FRX), thioredoxin m (TRX-m), thioredoxin f (TRX-f), NADP-malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH), and O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OAS) were up-regulated, but genes encoding serine acetyltransferase (SERAT), glycolate oxidase (GYX), and cytochrome

  2. Evaluation of the resistance of API 5L-X80 girth welds to sulphide stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forero, Adriana [Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ponciano, Jose A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia; Bott, Ivani de S. [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia

    2009-07-01

    The susceptibility of pipeline steels to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) depends on a series of factors ranging from the manufacture of the steel, the pipe fabrication and the assembly of the pipeline to the type of substances to be transported. The welding procedures adopted during the production and construction of the pipelines (field welding), can modify the properties of the base metal in the heat affected zone (HAZ), potentially rendering this region susceptible to SCC. This study evaluates the resistance of girth welds, in API 5L X80 pipes, to hydrogen embrittlement and to stress corrosion cracking in the presence of sulphides. The evaluation was performed according to NACE TM0177/96, Method A, applying the criterion of fracture/no fracture, and Slow Strain Rate Tensile tests (SSRT) were undertaken using a sodium thiosulphate solution according to the ASTM G129-00 Standard. According NACE requirements, the base metal was approved. The weld metal exhibited susceptibility to SCC in the presence of sulphides, failing in a period of less than 720h. This was confirmed by SSR tensile tests, where a significant decrease in the ultimate tensile strength, the elongation and the time to fracture were observed. The mechanism of fracture was transgranular. (author)

  3. Hydrogen Sulphide Corrosion of Carbon and Stainless Steel Alloys Immersed in Mixtures of Renewable Fuel Sources and Tested Under Co-processing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely András

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with modern regulations and directives, the use of renewable biomass materials as precursors for the production of fuels for transportation purposes is to be strictly followed. Even though, there are problems related to processing, storage and handling in wide range of subsequent uses, since there must be a limit to the ratio of biofuels mixed with mineral raw materials. As a key factor with regards to these biomass sources pose a great risk of causing multiple forms of corrosion both to metallic and non-metallic structural materials. To assess the degree of corrosion risk to a variety of engineering alloys like low-carbon and stainless steels widely used as structural metals, this work is dedicated to investigating corrosion rates of economically reasonable engineering steel alloys in mixtures of raw gas oil and renewable biomass fuel sources under typical co-processing conditions. To model a desulphurising refining process, corrosion tests were carried out with raw mineral gasoline and its mixture with used cooking oil and animal waste lard in relative quantities of 10% (g/g. Co-processing was simulated by batch-reactor laboratory experiments. Experiments were performed at temperatures between 200 and 300ºC and a pressure in the gas phase of 90 bar containing 2% (m3/m3 hydrogen sulphide. The time span of individual tests were varied between 1 and 21 days so that we can conclude about changes in the reaction rates against time exposure of and extrapolate for longer periods of exposure. Initial and integral corrosion rates were defined by a weight loss method on standard size of coupons of all sorts of steel alloys. Corrosion rates of carbon steels indicated a linear increase with temperature and little variation with composition of the biomass fuel sources. Apparent activation energies over the first 24-hour period remained moderate, varying between 35.5 and 50.3 kJ mol−1. Scales developed on carbon steels at higher

  4. Seasonal and annual changes in the macrozoobenthic populations of the Gulf of Gdańsk with respect to hypoxia and hydrogen sulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Janas

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate seasonal and annual changes in the benthic macrofauna in relation to changes in hydrogen sulphide concentration in the sediment and the oxygen content in the water column. Data were collected over a three-year period from 1994 to 1997. The benthic macrofauna inhabiting the sediments of the Gulf of Gdansk, in which H2S is permanently present, consists mostly of species with a high tolerance to oxygen deficiency and the presence of H2S. These species are: Macoma balthica, Harmothoe sarsi, Nereis diversicolor, Saduria entomon and Halicryptus spinulosus, as well as Pontoporeia femorata and Corophium volutator, which are more sensitive to these factors. In 1996-1997 a decline in the abundance of almost all benthic species, and especially of the bivalve M. balthica at all the stations was observed in comparison to 1994-1995.

  5. Hydrogen sulphide removal in the anaerobic digestion of sludge by micro-aerobic processes: pilot plant experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fdz-Polanco, M; Díaz, I; Pérez, S I; Lopes, A C; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2009-01-01

    H(2)S removal from biogas produced in anaerobic digestion of sludge through the introduction of oxygen under micro-aerobic conditions is studied. Research was carried out in two pilot plant reactors (working volume, 200 L each) treating sludge from WWTP with HRT of 20 days. Mixing was provided via sludge or biogas recirculation. Introduction of very low oxygen flow (0.013-0.024 L/L(reactor) d) successfully removed H(2)S content in biogas with an efficiency above 99%. Reactor performance during micro-aerobic operation in terms of biogas production, methane yield and COD removal were not affected by the amount of oxygen supplied, remaining stable and similar to the anaerobic behaviour. Sludge recirculation ( approximately 50 L/h) and biogas recirculation ( approximately 3.5 L/min) as mixing methods were found not significant in H(2)S removal from biogas while biogas recirculation reduced by 10 times dissolved sulphide concentration compared to sludge recirculation.

  6. AN APPLICATION OF FLOW INJECTION ANALYSIS WITH GAS DIFFUSION AND SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETECTION FOR THE MONITORING OF DISSOLVED SULPHIDE CONCENTRATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malwina Cykowska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of the concentration of sulphide is very important from the environment point of view because of high toxicity of hydrogen sulphide. What is more hydrogen sulphide is an important pollution indicator. In many cases the determination of sulphide is very difficult due to complicated matrix of some environmental samples, which causes that most analytical methods cannot be used. Flow injection analysis allows to avoid matrix problem what makes it suitable for a wide range of applications in analytical laboratories. In this paper determination of dissolved sulphide in environmental samples by gas-diffusion flow injection analysis with spectrophotometric detection was presented. Used gas-diffusion separation ensures the elimination of interferences caused by sample matrix and gives the ability of determination of sulphides in coloured and turbid samples. Studies to optimize the measurement conditions and to determine the value of the validation parameters (e.g. limit of detection, limit of quantification, precision, accuracy were carried out. Obtained results confirm the usefulness of the method for monitoring the concentration of dissolved sulphides in water and waste water. Full automation and work in a closed system greatly reduces time of analysis, minimizes consumption of sample and reagents and increases safety of analyst’s work.

  7. 75 FR 8889 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 372 RIN 2025-AA27 Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release... toxic chemical release reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical Abstracts Service Number (CAS No.) 7783-06-4). Hydrogen sulfide was added to the EPCRA section 313 list of toxic chemicals in a...

  8. Effects of fermented corni fructus and fermented kelp on growth performance, meat quality, and emission of ammonia and hydrogen sulphide from broiler chicken droppings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S T; Mun, H-S; Islam, M M; Yang, C-J

    2014-01-01

    1. Corni fructus is the fruit of Cornus officinalis, a dogwood species. This study was conducted to prepare fermented corni fructus preparation (FCFP) and fermented kelp (FK) from corni fructus and by-products of Laminaria japonica fermented with Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus oryzae. 2. The effects of dietary FCFP and FK as replacer of oxytetracycline (OTC) on growth performance, meat composition, meat oxidative stability, and emissions of ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) from broiler chicken droppings were investigated. 3. A total of 140 d-old broiler chicks were randomly allotted to 4 dietary treatments including control, OTC (0.05 g/kg), FCFP (5 g/kg), and FK (5 g/kg). 4. Overall, inclusion of FCFP resulted in lower weight gain and feed intake during the overall experimental period. Broilers fed FCFP diets tended to have lower crude fat and higher crude ash content in the carcasses. 5. In the fresh state, the malondialdehyde (MDA) value of broiler meat was lower in the FK supplemented group. At one week, meat from broilers fed antibiotic and FK diets had lower MDA values, whereas at 2 weeks broiler meat from all dietary treatment groups had lower MDA values than the control. 6. Dietary supplementation with FK significantly reduced faecal NH3 emissions throughout the experimental period, whereas dietary OTC and FCFP supplementation increased NH3 emissions at 2 and 4 weeks. There were no significant effects of dietary treatments on H2S emissions throughout the experimental period, except during week one, when FCFP supplementation reduced the emission. 7. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with 5 g/kg FK improved the oxidative stability of broiler meat and reduce faecal NH3 emissions without affecting growth performance.

  9. Heavy metals removal from acid mine drainage water using biogenic hydrogen sulphide and effluent from anaerobic treatment: effect of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, A M; Durán-Barrantes, M M; Borja, R; Sánchez, E; Colmenarejo, M F; Raposo, F

    2009-06-15

    Four alternatives (runs A, B, C and D) for heavy metals removal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Al) from acid mine drainage water (AMDW) produced in the mining areas of the Huelva Province, Spain, were evaluated. In run A, the anaerobic effluent from the treatment of acid mine drainage water (cheese whey added as a source of carbon) was mixed with the raw AMDW. The pH increased to 3.5 with the addition of KOH. In run B, biogas with around 30% of hydrogen sulphide obtained in the anaerobic reactor was sparged to the mixture obtained in run A, but in this case at a pH of 5.5. In run C, the pH of the raw AMDW was increased to 3.5 by the addition of KOH solution. Finally, in run D, the pH of the raw AMDW was increased to 5.5 by the addition of KOH solution and further biogas was sparged under the same conditions as in run A. It was found that heavy metal removal was a function of pH. At a pH of 3.5 most of the iron was removed while Zn and Cu were partially removed. At a pH of 5.5 the removal of all metals increased considerably. The best results were obtained in run B where the percentages of removal of Fe, Cu, Zn and Al achieved values of 91.3, 96.1, 79.0 and 99.0%, respectively. According to the experimental results obtained tentative schemas of the flow diagram of the processes were proposed.

  10. Heavy metals removal from acid mine drainage water using biogenic hydrogen sulphide and effluent from anaerobic treatment: Effect of pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Rodriguez, A.M. [Departamento de Sistemas Fisicos, Quimicos y Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias Ambientales, Universidad Pablo de Olavide. Carretera de Utrera, km 1. 41013 Sevilla (Spain); Duran-Barrantes, M.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de Sevilla, C/Profesor Garcia Gonzalez, s/n, 41071 Sevilla (Spain); Borja, R., E-mail: rborja@cica.es [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Instituto de la Grasa, Avda. Padre Garcia Tejero 4, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Sanchez, E.; Colmenarejo, M.F. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, C/Serrano, 115-duplicado, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Raposo, F. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Instituto de la Grasa, Avda. Padre Garcia Tejero 4, 41012 Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Four alternatives (runs A, B, C and D) for heavy metals removal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Al) from acid mine drainage water (AMDW) produced in the mining areas of the Huelva Province, Spain, were evaluated. In run A, the anaerobic effluent from the treatment of acid mine drainage water (cheese whey added as a source of carbon) was mixed with the raw AMDW. The pH increased to 3.5 with the addition of KOH. In run B, biogas with around 30% of hydrogen sulphide obtained in the anaerobic reactor was sparged to the mixture obtained in run A, but in this case at a pH of 5.5. In run C, the pH of the raw AMDW was increased to 3.5 by the addition of KOH solution. Finally, in run D, the pH of the raw AMDW was increased to 5.5 by the addition of KOH solution and further biogas was sparged under the same conditions as in run A. It was found that heavy metal removal was a function of pH. At a pH of 3.5 most of the iron was removed while Zn and Cu were partially removed. At a pH of 5.5 the removal of all metals increased considerably. The best results were obtained in run B where the percentages of removal of Fe, Cu, Zn and Al achieved values of 91.3, 96.1, 79.0 and 99.0%, respectively. According to the experimental results obtained tentative schemas of the flow diagram of the processes were proposed.

  11. The administration of hydrogen sulphide prior to ischemic reperfusion has neuroprotective effects in an acute stroke model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Woong Woo

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence has suggested that hydrogen sulfide (H2S may alleviate the cellular damage associated with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. In this study, we assessed using 1H-magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRI/MRS and histologic analysis whether H2S administration prior to reperfusion has neuroprotective effects. We also evaluated for differences in the effects of H2S treatment at 2 time points. 1H-MRI/MRS data were obtained at baseline, and at 3, 9, and 24 h after ischemia from 4 groups: sham, control (I/R injury, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS-30 and NaHS-1 (NaHS delivery at 30 and 1 min before reperfusion, respectively. The total infarct volume and the midline shift at 24 h post-ischemia were lowest in the NaHS-1, followed by the NaHS-30 and control groups. Peri-infarct volume was significantly lower in the NaHS-1 compared to NaHS-30 and control animals. The relative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC in the peri-infarct region showed that the NaHS-1 group had significantly lower values compared to the NaHS-30 and control animals and that NaHS-1 rats showed significantly higher relative T2 values in the peri-infarct region compared to the controls. The relative ADC value, relative T2 value, levels of N-acetyl-L-aspartate (NAA, and the NAA, glutamate, and taurine combination score (NGT in the ischemic core region at 24 h post-ischemia did not differ significantly between the 2 NaHS groups and the control except that the NAA and NGT values were higher in the peri-infarct region of the NaHS-1 animals at 9 h post-ischemia. In the ischemic core and peri-infarct regions, the apoptosis rate was lowest in the NaHS-1 group, followed by the NaHS-30 and control groups. Our results suggest that H2S treatment has neuroprotective effects on the peri-infarct region during the evolution of I/R injury. Furthermore, our findings indicate that the administration of H2S immediately prior to reperfusion produces the

  12. Combustion synthesis of cadmium sulphide nanomaterials for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The observed enhanced photocatalytic activity of the CdS nanomaterials for the hydrogen production from water (2120 μmol/h) can be attributed to high crystallinity, low band gap and less exciton recombination due to the C and N doping. Keywords. Cadmium sulphide; combustion synthesis; anion doping; water splitting; ...

  13. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 372 RIN 2025-AA27 Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen... hydrogen sulfide (Chemical Abstracts Service Number (CAS No.) 7783-06-4). Hydrogen sulfide was added to the...

  14. Hydrogen sulfide toxicity in a thermal spring: a fatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daldal, Hale; Beder, Bayram; Serin, Simay; Sungurtekin, Hulya

    2010-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a toxic gas with the smells of "rotten egg"; its toxic effects are due to the blocking of cellular respiratory enzymes leading to cell anoxia and cell damage. We report two cases with acute H(2)S intoxication caused by inhalation of H(2)S evaporated from the water of a thermal spring. Two victims were found in a hotel room were they could take a thermal bath. A 26-year-old male was found unconscious; he was resuscitated, received supportive treatment and survived. A 25-year-old female was found dead. Autopsy showed diffuse edema and pulmonary congestion. Toxicological blood analysis of the female revealed the following concentrations: 0.68 mg/L sulfide and 0.21 mmol/L thiosulfate. The urine thiosulfate concentration was normal. Forensic investigation established that the thermal water was coming from the hotel's own illegal well. The hotel was closed. This report highlights the danger of H(2)S toxicity not only for reservoir and sewer cleaners, but also for individuals bathing in thermal springs.

  15. Well materials durability in case of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide geological sequestration; Durabilite des materiaux de puits petroliers dans le cadre d'une sequestration geologique de dioxyde de carbone et d'hydrogene sulfure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemet, N

    2006-01-15

    The geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S) is a promising solution for the long-term storage of these undesirable gases. It consists in injecting them via wells into deep geological reservoirs. The steel and cement employed in the well casing can be altered and provide pathways for leakage with subsequent human and environmental consequences. The materials ageing was investigated by laboratory experiments in geologically relevant P-T conditions. A new experimental and analysis procedure was designed for this purpose. A numerical approach was also done. The cement and steel were altered in various fluid phases at 500 bar-120 C and 500 bar-200 C: a brine, a brine saturated with H{sub 2}S-CO{sub 2}, a mixture of brine saturated with H{sub 2}S-CO{sub 2} and of supercritical H{sub 2}S-CO{sub 2} phase, a dry supercritical H{sub 2}S-CO{sub 2} phase without liquid water. In all cases, two distinct reactions are observed: the cement carbonation by the CO{sub 2} and the steel sulfidation by the H{sub 2}S. The carbonation and sulfidation are respectively maximal and minimal when they occur within the dry supercritical phase without liquid water. The textural and porosity properties of the cement are weakly affected by all the treatments at 120 C. The porosity even decreases in presence of H{sub 2}S-CO{sub 2}. But these properties are affected at 200 C when liquid water is present in the system. At this temperature, the initial properties are only preserved or improved by the treatments within the dry supercritical phase. The steel is corroded in all cases and thus is the vulnerable material of the wells. (author)

  16. Prediction of sulphide build-up in filled sewer pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, Amir M; Faramarzi, Asaad; Mahmoodian, Mojtaba; Tee, Kong Fah

    2014-08-01

    Millions of dollars are being spent worldwide on the repair and maintenance of sewer networks and wastewater treatment plants. The production and emission of hydrogen sulphide has been identified as a major cause of corrosion and odour problems in sewer networks. Accurate prediction of sulphide build-up in a sewer system helps engineers and asset managers to appropriately formulate strategies for optimal sewer management and reliability analysis. This paper presents a novel methodology to model and predict the sulphide build-up for steady state condition in filled sewer pipes. The proposed model is developed using a novel data-driven technique called evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR) and it involves the most effective parameters in the sulphide build-up problem. EPR is a hybrid technique, combining genetic algorithm and least square. It is shown that the proposed model can provide a better prediction for the sulphide build-up as compared with conventional models.

  17. Inhibition of the radiolytic hydrogen production in the nuclear waste of 'bitumen coated' type: study of the interaction between hydrogen and cobalt hydroxo-sulphide; Inhibition de la production d'hydrogene radiolytique dans les dechets nucleaires de type 'enrobes bitumineux': etude de l'interaction entre l'hydrogene et l'hydroxosulfure de cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, C

    2006-11-15

    In the nuclear field in France, the bitumen is mainly used for the conditioning of the radioactive muds generated by the fuel reprocessing. However, the self-irradiation of the bitumen induces a production of hydrogen which generates safety problems. The comparison of various storage sites showed that the presence of cobalt hydroxo sulphide limited such a production. Consequently, this compound was regarded as an 'inhibitor of radiolytic hydrogen production'. However, the origin of this phenomenon was not clearly identified. In order to propose an explanation to this inhibition phenomenon, model organic molecules were used to represent the components of the bitumen. Irradiations were carried out by protons to simulate the alpha radiolysis. The organic molecules irradiations by a proton beam showed that cobalt hydroxo sulphide CoSOH, does not act as a hydrogenation catalyst of unsaturated hydrocarbons, nor as a radicals scavenger, but consists of a trap of hydrogen. Experiments of hydrogen trapping at ambient temperature were carried out according to two techniques: gravimetry and manometry. The solid was characterized before and after interaction with hydrogen (infrared and Raman spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction). The initial solid was composed of amorphous cobalt hydroxo sulphide and a minor phase of cobalt hydroxide. The gravimetry and manometry experiments showed that the maximum of hydrogen trapping capacity is equal to 0.59 {+-} 0.18 mole of hydrogen per mole of cobalt. After interaction with hydrogen, the Co(OH){sub 2} phase disappeared and a new solid phase appeared corresponding to Co{sub 9}S{sub 8}. These observations, as well as the analysis of the gas phase, made it possible to conclude with the following reaction (1): 9 CoSOH + 11/2 H{sub 2} = Co{sub 9}S{sub 8} + 9 H{sub 2}O + H{sub 2}S (1). Gravimetry experiments at temperatures between 50 and 210 C revealed the desorption of water but not of hydrogen sulphide. The absence of hydrogen

  18. 76 FR 69136 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 372 RIN 2025-AA27 Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen... October 17, 2011, a document lifting the Administrative Stay of the reporting requirements for hydrogen...

  19. 75 FR 19319 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Extension of Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 372 RIN 2025-AA27 Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release...) section 313 toxic chemical release reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical Abstracts Service... otherwise use hydrogen sulfide. Potentially affected categories and entities may include, but are not...

  20. Page 1 THE OXIDATION OF HYDRO GEN SULPHIDE BY ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to prevent the hydrolysis of iodine monochloride, the sulphur was quanti- tatively oxidised to Sulphate. Our preliminary experiments showed that as in the case of chloramine-T the products formed by the oxidation of hydrogen sulphide by potassium iodate Were Sulphur and sulphate, depending upon the pH of the system.

  1. Electrically Conducting Polymer-Copper Sulphide Composite Films, Preparation by Treatment of Polymer-Copper (2) Acetate Composites with Hydrogen Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takakazu; Kamigaki, Takahira; Kubota, Etsuo

    1988-01-01

    Polymer copper sulfide composite films were prepared by treatment of polymer poly(vinyl chloride), poly(acrylonitrile), copolymer of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate (90:10), and ABS resin copper (2) acetate composites with hydrogen sulfide. The films showed electrical conductivity higher than 0.015 S/cm when they contained more than 20 wt percent of copper sulfide. A poly(acrylonitrile)-copper sulfide composite film containing 40 to 50 wt percent of copper sulfide showed electrical conductivity of 10 to 150.0 S/cm and had relatively high mechanical strength to be used in practical purposes.

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity Induces Ras Signaling in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cultured Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirapa Chetsawang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that overproduction of reactive oxygen species occurs after brain injury and mediates neuronal cells degeneration. In the present study, we examined the role of Ras signaling on hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cells degeneration in dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced cell viability in SH-SY5Y cultured cells. An inhibitor of the enzyme that catalyzes the farnesylation of Ras proteins, FTI-277, and a competitive inhibitor of GTP-binding proteins, GDP-beta-S significantly decreased hydrogen peroxide-induced reduction in cell viability in SH-SY5Y cultured cells. The results of this study might indicate that a Ras-dependent signaling pathway plays a role in hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in neuronal cells.

  3. Alleviation of chromium toxicity by hydrogen sulfide in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shafaqat; Farooq, Muhammad Ahsan; Hussain, Sabir; Yasmeen, Tahira; Abbasi, G H; Zhang, Guoping

    2013-10-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to examine the effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) in alleviating chromium (Cr) stress in barley. A 2-factorial design with 6 replications was selected, including 3 levels of NaHS (0 μM, 100 μM, and 200 μM) and 2 levels of Cr (0 μM and 100 μM) as treatments. The results showed that NaHS addition enhances plant growth and photosynthesis slightly compared with the control. Moreover, NaHS alleviated the inhibition in plant growth and photosynthesis by Cr stress. Higher levels of NaHS exhibited more pronounced effects in reducing Cr concentrations in roots, shoots, and leaves. Ultrastructural examination of plant cells supported the facts by indication of visible alleviation of cell disorders in both root and leaf with exogenous application of NaHS. An increased number of plastoglobuli, disintegration, and disappearance of thylakoid membranes and starch granules were visualized inside the chloroplast of Cr-stressed plants. Starch accumulation in the chloroplasts was also noticed in the Cr-treated cells, with the effect being much less in Cr + NaHS-treated plants. Hence, it is concluded that H2 S produced from NaHS can improve plant tolerance under Cr stress. © 2013 SETAC.

  4. Toxicity of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide on human chondrocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhner, Eric; Seeger, Joern B; Hoff, Paula; Dähn-Wollenberg, Stephanie; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-07-07

    The treatment of acute joint infections has an important impact on long-term outcome and remains an unsolved problem. The most frequent bacteria are staphylococci, streptococci, and gram-negative bacteria. In septic surgery, polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide are the most frequently used local antiseptics. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that antiseptics induce cell death of human chondrocytes after a short incubation time.Human chondrocytes were treated with different concentrations of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide. Toxicity analysis was determined by visualization of cell structure using light microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release, and determination of living and total cell numbers after addition of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide. Light microscopic data revealed a defect cell structure after addition of both antiseptics. Lactate dehydrogenase activity showed a significant increase of enzyme expression after a short incubation with polyhexanide. The determination of vital chondrocytes showed a significant decrease of vital and total cell numbers after addition with polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide.Both antiseptic solutions induce significant cell death of human chondrocytes after a short incubation time. Polyhexanide possibly has more toxic potential than hydrogen peroxide against human chondrocytes after an application >15 minutes. Therefore, both substances should only be applied for a short time (<15 minutes) and the joint irrigated to wash out the antiseptic substance prior to wound closure. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Microaerobic removal of hydrogen sulphide from biogas

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos Castaño, Iris

    2014-01-01

    El sulfuro de hidrógeno es uno de los contaminantes más comunes del biogás. Existen varias estrategias físico-químicas y biológicas para su control, siendo estas últimas la alternativa más económica y respetuosa con el medio ambiente. La eliminación de sulfuro de hidrógeno en el reactor aplicando condiciones limitantes de oxígeno/microaerobias es la solución biológica más atractiva debido a su simplicidad de implementación y operación, y a que el biogás se produce y trata en un único equipo....

  6. Dynamic protein coronas revealed as a modulator of silver nanoparticle sulphidation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miclăuş, Teodora; Beer, Christiane; Chevallier, Jacques; Scavenius, Carsten; Bochenkov, Vladimir E.; Enghild, Jan J.; Sutherland, Duncan S.

    2016-06-01

    Proteins adsorbing at nanoparticles have been proposed as critical toxicity mediators and are included in ongoing efforts to develop predictive tools for safety assessment. Strongly attached proteins can be isolated, identified and correlated to changes in nanoparticle state, cellular association or toxicity. Weakly attached, rapidly exchanging proteins are also present at nanoparticles, but are difficult to isolate and have hardly been examined. Here we study rapidly exchanging proteins and show for the first time that they have a strong modulatory effect on the biotransformation of silver nanoparticles. Released silver ions, known for their role in particle toxicity, are found to be trapped as silver sulphide nanocrystals within the protein corona at silver nanoparticles in serum-containing cell culture media. The strongly attached corona acts as a site for sulphidation, while the weakly attached proteins reduce nanocrystal formation in a serum-concentration-dependent manner. Sulphidation results in decreased toxicity of Ag NPs.

  7. Alleviation of cadmium toxicity in Medicago sativa by hydrogen-rich water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weiti; Gao, Cunyi; Fang, Peng; Lin, Guoqing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2013-09-15

    Hydrogen gas (H₂) induces plant tolerance to several abiotic stresses, including salinity and paraquat exposure. However, the role of H₂ in cadmium (Cd)-induced stress amelioration is largely unknown. Here, pretreatment with hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of H₂ in the alleviation of Cd toxicity in alfalfa plants. Our results showed that the addition of HRW at 10% saturation significantly decreased contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) caused by Cd, and inhibited the appearance of Cd toxicity symptoms, including the improvement of root elongation and seedling growth. These responses were related to a significant increase in the total or isozymatic activities of representative antioxidant enzymes, or their corresponding transcripts. In vivo imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the detection of lipid peroxidation and the loss of plasma membrane integrity provided further evidence for the ability of HRW to improve Cd tolerance significantly, which was consistent with a significant enhancement of the ratio of reduced/oxidized (homo)glutathione ((h)GSH). Additionally, plants pretreated with HRW accumulated less amounts of Cd. Together, this study suggested that the usage of HRW could be an effective approach for Cd detoxification and could be explored in agricultural production systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Boron toxicity is alleviated by hydrogen sulfide in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao-Lan; Shi, Lei; Li, Yin-Xing; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2010-05-01

    Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient for plants, which when occurs in excess in the growth medium, becomes toxic to plants. Rapid inhibition of root elongation is one of the most distinct symptoms of B toxicity. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is emerging as a potential messenger molecule involved in modulation of physiological processes in plants. In the present study, we investigated the role of H(2)S in B toxicity in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings. Root elongation was significantly inhibited by exposure of cucumber seedlings to solutions containing 5 mM B. The inhibitory effect of B on root elongation was substantially alleviated by treatment with H(2)S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). There was an increase in the activity of pectin methylesterase (PME) and up-regulated expression of genes encoding PME (CsPME) and expansin (CsExp) on exposure to high B concentration. The increase in PME activity and up-regulation of expression of CsPME and CsExp induced by high B concentration were markedly reduced in the presence of H(2)S donor. There was a rapid increase in soluble B concentrations in roots on exposure to high concentration B solutions. Treatment with H(2)S donor led to a transient reduction in soluble B concentration in roots such that no differences in soluble B concentrations in roots in the absence and presence of NaHS were found after 8 h exposure to the high concentration B solutions. These findings suggest that increases in activities of PME and expansin may underlie the inhibition of root elongation by toxic B, and that H(2)S plays an ameliorative role in protection of plants from B toxicity by counteracting B-induced up-regulation of cell wall-associated proteins of PME and expansins.

  9. Acute toxicity study of tilmicosin-loaded hydrogenated castor oil-solid lipid nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Shuyu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous studies demonstrated that tilmicosin-loaded hydrogenated castor oil solid lipid nanoparticles (Til-HCO-SLN are a promising formulation for enhanced pharmacological activity and therapeutic efficacy in veterinary use. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the acute toxicity of Til-HCO-SLN. Methods Two nanoparticle doses were used for the study in ICR mice. The low dose (766 mg/kg.bw with tilmicosin 7.5 times of the clinic dosage and below the median lethal dose (LD50 was subcutaneously administered twice on the first and 7th day. The single high dose (5 g/kg.bw was the practical upper limit in an acute toxicity study and was administered subcutaneously on the first day. Blank HCO-SLN, native tilmicosin, and saline solution were included as controls. After medication, animals were monitored over 14 days, and then necropsied. Signs of toxicity were evaluated via mortality, symptoms of treatment effect, gross and microscopic pathology, and hematologic and biochemical parameters. Results After administration of native tilmicosin, all mice died within 2 h in the high dose group, in the low dose group 3 died after the first and 2 died after the second injections. The surviving mice in the tilmicosin low dose group showed hypoactivity, accelerated breath, gloomy spirit and lethargy. In contrast, all mice in Til-HCO-SLN and blank HCO-SLN groups survived at both low and high doses. The high nanoparticle dose induced transient clinical symptoms of treatment effect such as transient reversible action retardation, anorexy and gloomy spirit, increased spleen and liver coefficients and decreased heart coefficients, microscopic pathological changes of liver, spleen and heart, and minor changes in hematologic and biochemical parameters, but no adverse effects were observed in the nanoparticle low dose group. Conclusions The results revealed that the LD50 of Til-HCO-SLN and blank HCO-SLN exceeded 5 g/kg.bw and thus the

  10. Improved sulphate removal rates at increased sulphide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improved sulphate removal rates at increased sulphide concentration in the sulphidogenic bioreactor. ... The results of three investigations operating a continuous reactor, a column reactor and batch-test reactors have shown that increased sulphide concentrations have resulted in improved biological sulphate reduction.

  11. Alleviation of cadmium toxicity in Medicago sativa by hydrogen-rich water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Weiti; Gao, Cunyi; Fang, Peng [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Lin, Guoqing [Laboratory Center of Life Sciences, Co. Laboratory of Nanjing Agricultural University and Carl Zeiss Far East, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shen, Wenbiao, E-mail: wbshenh@njau.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • HRW can alleviate Cd-induced alfalfa seedling growth inhibition and DNA laddering. • HRW alleviates Cd-induced oxidative stress by activating antioxidant enzymes. • Cd uptake in alfalfa seedling roots was decreased by HRW. • HRW can re-establish glutathione homeostasis under Cd stress. -- Abstract: Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) induces plant tolerance to several abiotic stresses, including salinity and paraquat exposure. However, the role of H{sub 2} in cadmium (Cd)-induced stress amelioration is largely unknown. Here, pretreatment with hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of H{sub 2} in the alleviation of Cd toxicity in alfalfa plants. Our results showed that the addition of HRW at 10% saturation significantly decreased contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) caused by Cd, and inhibited the appearance of Cd toxicity symptoms, including the improvement of root elongation and seedling growth. These responses were related to a significant increase in the total or isozymatic activities of representative antioxidant enzymes, or their corresponding transcripts. In vivo imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the detection of lipid peroxidation and the loss of plasma membrane integrity provided further evidence for the ability of HRW to improve Cd tolerance significantly, which was consistent with a significant enhancement of the ratio of reduced/oxidized (homo)glutathione ((h)GSH). Additionally, plants pretreated with HRW accumulated less amounts of Cd. Together, this study suggested that the usage of HRW could be an effective approach for Cd detoxification and could be explored in agricultural production systems.

  12. Hydrogen gas alleviates oxygen toxicity by reducing hydroxyl radical levels in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Yu

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy through breathing oxygen at the pressure of above 1 atmosphere absolute (ATA is useful for varieties of clinical conditions, especially hypoxic-ischemic diseases. Because of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, breathing oxygen gas at high pressures can cause oxygen toxicity in the central nervous system, leading to multiple neurological dysfunction, which limits the use of HBO therapy. Studies have shown that Hydrogen gas (H2 can diminish oxidative stress and effectively reduce active ROS associated with diseases. However, the effect of H2 on ROS generated from HBO therapy remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of H2 on ROS during HBO therapy using PC12 cells. PC12 cells cultured in medium were exposed to oxygen gas or mixed oxygen gas and H2 at 1 ATA or 5 ATA. Cells viability and oxidation products and ROS were determined. The data showed that H2 promoted the cell viability and inhibited the damage in the cell and mitochondria membrane, reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and selectively decreased the levels of •OH but not disturbing the levels of O2•-, H2O2, or NO• in PC12 cells during HBO therapy. These results indicated that H2 effectively reduced •OH, protected cells against oxygen toxicity resulting from HBO therapy, and had no effect on other ROS. Our data supported that H2 could be potentially used as an antioxidant during HBO therapy.

  13. Raman spectra and cross sections of ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in the fingerprint region 400 1400 cm 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-24

    chlorine , hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in the fingerprint region 400...ammonia (NH3), chlorine (Cl2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), phosgene (COCl2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) toxic gases have been measured in the fingerprint...which are due to the 35/35 35/ 37 , and 37 / 37 Cl isotopes, respectively. Raman modes are observed at 870, 570, and 1151 cm‐1 in H2S, COCl2, and

  14. Determination of sulphides in cements by using potentiometry with a selective electrode of sulphides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernal, José Luis

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available A procedure for the determination of sulphides attackable by HCI (1 :3 in cements by means of a potentiometric determination with a selective electrodo of sulphides, is proposed.

    Se propone un método para la determinación de sulfuros, basado en el ataque con HCI (1:3, destilación y posterior medida potenciométrica con un electrodo selectivo de sulfuros.

  15. Combustion synthesis of cadmium sulphide nanomaterials for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anion-doped cadmium sulphide nanomaterials have been synthesized by using combustionmethod at normal atmospheric conditions. Oxidant/fuel ratios have been optimized in order to obtain CdS with best characteristics. Formation of CdS and size of crystallite were identified by X-ray diffraction and confirmed by ...

  16. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  17. Post-hoc comparisons among iron electrode formulations based on bismuth, bismuth sulphide, iron sulphide, and potassium sulphide under strong alkaline conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Posada, Jorge Omar; Hall, Peter J.

    2014-12-01

    Iron electrodes were prepared by hot-pressing iron-polyethylene based formulations on nickel foam stripes. NiFe cells were tested by using commercial nickel electrodes and our iron electrodes. Post-hoc comparisons were used to identify meaningful differences between iron electrode formulations (based upon bismuth, bismuth sulphate, potassium sulphide and iron sulphide as additives). Our results confirm that both bismuth sulphide and iron sulphide favour the process of charge/discharge of a NiFe cell. In addition, we have found that the use of metallic bismuth only marginally influences coulombic efficiency; likewise, the presence of the soluble bisulfide anion is not sufficient to increase coulombic efficiency. Finally, NiFe cells prepared with bismuth sulphide outperformed their iron sulphide counterparts.

  18. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  19. Photoconductivity of copper sulphide polycrystalline thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soriano, L.; Leon, M.; Arjona, F.; Garcia Camarero, E.

    1985-06-01

    The spectral response of the photoconductivity of copper sulphide polycrystalline films obtained by thermal evaporation has been studied. The phase content of the samples was determined by electron diffraction and the stoichiometry by potentiostatic methods. The electrical properties, resistivity and Hall effect, were determined by the Van der Pauw method. The photoconductivity quantum efficiency spectra show structures clearly characteristic of the phases chalcocite and djurleite. Chalcocite shows peaks at 900, 720 and 500 nm and Djurleite at 620 and 500 nm. Samples with less copper always show the 500 nm peak. This work shows that a peak at 500 nm appears in the photoconductivity spectral response of all copper sulphides studied: Cu(x)S (with x at least 1.89 and no more than 2). 22 references.

  20. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  1. Thermodynamic study of metal sulphides conversion to oxides in hydrometallurgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bocan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents thermodynamic study of the conversion of metal sulphides to oxides of the CuAg sulphide concentrate as a final product after mechano-chemical leaching of tetrahedrite. The conversion of sulphides to oxides is carried out by oxidation leaching in NaOH solution. The thermodynamic calculation was performed for the sulphide concentrate containing the following sulphides: CuS, CuFeS2, FeS, Sb2S3, As2S3, Bi2S3 and HgS. Based on the change of Gibbs free energy (ΔG° and the equilibrium constant (K, conversion of metal sulphides to oxides from the qualitative assessment of the chemical reaction can occur as the result of the thermodynamic reaction abilities.

  2. Evaluation of hydrogen sulphide test for detection of fecal coliform ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The assessment of H2S field test for detection of potability of drinking water was evaluated by analysing 1050 water samples from various sources at room temperature and at 37ºC after 18, 24, and 48 h of incubation. The H2S test showed 100, 84 and 89% correlation with Eijkman test, Membrane Filter Technique (MFT) and ...

  3. Evaluation of hydrogen sulphide test for detection of fecal coliform ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-19

    Mar 19, 2007 ... The assessment of H2S field test for detection of potability of drinking water was evaluated by analysing. 1050 water samples from various sources at room temperature and at 37ºC after 18, 24, and 48 h of incubation. The H2S test showed 100, 84 and 89% correlation with Eijkman test, Membrane Filter.

  4. Evaluation of hydrogen sulphide test for detection of fecal coliform ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-19

    Mar 19, 2007 ... standard methods, which are available for detection of fecal contamination in ... and deep wells, rainwater, pond water) in Thailand by the ... AND METHODS. A total of 1050 water samples collected from tube well (355 water.

  5. Microbiological oxidation of hydrogen sulphide in a biofilter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kowal, S; Cloirec, P. Le; Degorce-Dumas, J. R

    1997-01-01

    ... (BSE, boues de station d'épuration) from an urban wastewater treatment plant. This granular and heterogeneous material contains organic and mineral components which favour colonization by bacteria...

  6. Roles of Catalase and Trehalose in the Protection from Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Watanabe, Takeru; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The roles of catalase and trehalose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae subject to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment were examined by measuring the catalase activity and intracellular trehalose levels in mutants lacking catalase or trehalose synthetase. Intracellular trehalose was elevated but the survival rate after H2O2 treatment remained low in mutants with deletion of the Catalase T gene. On the other hand, deletion of the trehalose synthetase gene increased the catalase activity in mutated yeast to levels higher than those in the wild-type strain, and these mutants exhibited some degree of tolerance to H2O2 treatment. These results suggest that Catalase T is critical in the yeast response to oxidative damage caused by H2O2 treatment, but trehalose also plays a role in protection against H2O2 treatment.

  7. Optimisation of light output from zinc sulphide scintillators for fast neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanian, H.; Watterson, J. I. W.

    1998-04-01

    Fast neutron radiography (FNA) is a promising new application for small accelerators. The potential effectiveness of this technique depends on the development of suitable imaging detectors for fast neutrons. Zinc sulphide based scintillators have the largest light output per event in the family of imaging scintillators used so far in fast neutron radiography. but zinc sulphide is not transparent to its own light. This paper investigates different aspects of this scintillator in order to establish the factors affecting the light output. Zinc sulphide screens were prepared by suspending ZnS(Ag) particles at different concentration in a hydrogen rich matrix. The light output of these scintillators have been tested in fast neutron fields generated by the 7Li(p,n) 7Be and D(d,n) 3He reactions. The light output was detected using a CCD camera coupled to the scintillator screen by an optical fiber through an image intensifier. The results are presented in the form of graphs for different sets of particle sizes and concentrations. A comparison has been made with a simple theoretical model.

  8. Sulphide Microchemistry and Hydrothermal Fluid Evolution in Quartz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-06-14

    Jun 14, 2008 ... was calculated from the final ice melting temperatures while the Th CO2 was used to calculate CO2 densities. (Roedder 1984). OBSERVATIONS AND. INTERPRETATIONS. Sulphide microchemistry. The results of the microprobe analyses of the main sulphide minerals in the Batouri gold district are.

  9. Effect of sulphide on corrosion of copper in seawater

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishna Pillai, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    The corrosion of ETP copper in natural seawater and putrid seawater has been studied. The corrosion rates and the sulphide content were monitored at regular intervals. In the absence of oxygen in the putrid media, the presence of sulphide favoured a reduction in the corrosion rate.

  10. Indicator minerals as guides to base metal sulphide mineralisation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zn-bearing minerals that act as indicator minerals for base metal sulphide mineralization from the Proterozoic Betul Belt,central India with special emphasis on their genetic significance have been discussed.Sulphide mineralisation is hosted by the felsic volcanic rocks and has similarities with volcanic-hosted massive ...

  11. Formation of highly toxic hydrogen cyanide upon ruby laser irradiation of the tattoo pigment phthalocyanine blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Laux, Peter; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Since laser treatment of tattoos is the favored method for the removing of no longer wanted permanent skin paintings, analytical, biokinetics and toxicological data on the fragmentation pattern of commonly used pigments are urgently required for health safety reasons. Applying dynamic headspace—gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (DHS—GC/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC—ToF-MS), we identified 1,2-benzene dicarbonitrile, benzonitrile, benzene, and the poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN) as main fragmentation products emerging dose-dependently upon ruby laser irradiation of the popular blue pigment copper phthalocyanine in suspension. Skin cell viability was found to be significantly compromised at cyanide levels of ≥1 mM liberated during ruby laser irradiation of >1.5 mg/ml phthalocyanine blue. Further, for the first time we introduce pyrolysis-GC/MS as method suitable to simulate pigment fragmentation that may occur spontaneously or during laser removal of organic pigments in the living skin of tattooed people. According to the literature such regular tattoos hold up to 9 mg pigment/cm2 skin.

  12. Triethylenetetramine Synergizes with Pharmacologic Ascorbic Acid in Hydrogen Peroxide Mediated Selective Toxicity to Breast Cancer Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianlian Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is characterized by overexpression of superoxide dismutase (SOD and downregulation of catalase and more resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 than normal cells. Thus, relatively high H2O2 promotes breast cancer cell growth and proliferation. However, excessive intracellular H2O2 leads to death of breast cancer cells. In cancer cells, high level ascorbic acid (Asc is able to be autoxidized and thus provides an electron to oxygen to generate H2O2. In the present study, we demonstrated that triethylenetetramine (TETA enhances Asc autoxidation and thus elevates H2O2 production in MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, Asc/TETA combination significantly impaired cancer cell viability, while having much milder effects on normal cells, indicating Asc/TETA could be a promising therapy for breast cancer. Moreover, SOD1 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine failed to improve MCF-7 cells viability in the presence of Asc/TETA, while catalase significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to breast cancer cells, strongly suggesting that the selective cytotoxicity of Asc/TETA to cancer cells is H2O2-dependent. In addition, Asc/TETA induces RAS/ERK downregulation in breast cancer cells. Animal studies confirmed that Asc/TETA effectively suppressed tumor growth in vivo. In conclusion, TETA synergizes pharmacologic Asc autoxidation and H2O2 overproduction in breast cancer cells, which suppresses RAS/ERK pathway and results in apoptosis.

  13. A Study of Substituted Aliphatic Sulphides on the Corrosion Behaviour of Zinc in Ammonium Chloride Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Venckatesh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulphur containing organic compounds decreases the corrosion rate by increasing the hydrogen over potential on zinc metal due to their electron donating groups. Their inhibiting effect was found to be associated with their adsorption on the active centers of the metal. The inhibition efficiencies of some aliphatic sulphides in ammonium chloride solution have been studied by weight loss studies, polarization and impedance measurements. The effect of substituent groups is correlated with their inhibition performance. These studies due to their relevance in Zn-Manganese dry batteries assume their importance.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates cadmium toxicity through regulations of cadmium transport across the plasma and vacuolar membranes in Populus euphratica cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Wang, Ruigang; Zhang, Xuan; Yu, Yicheng; Zhao, Rui; Li, Zongyun; Chen, Shaoliang

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is emerging as a novel signalling molecule involved in plant growth and responses against abiotic stresses. However, little information is known about its role in cadmium (Cd) detoxification. In the present study, the effects of H2S on Cd toxicity were investigated in Populus euphratica cells using fluorescence imaging technique and a non-invasive vibrating ion-selective microelectrode. Pretreatment with a H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), significantly mitigated the Cd-induced programmed cell death in P. euphratica cells. The alleviation effect of NaHS was more pronounced at 50-100 μM as compared to low (25 μM) and high doses (200 μM). Under Cd stress, total activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase, were significantly enhanced in NaHS-treated cells, leading to a decline of H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation. Moreover, NaHS reduced Cd accumulation in the cytoplasm but increased the fraction of Cd in the vacuole. Cd flux profiles revealed that H2S inhibited the Cd influx through the plasma membrane (PM) calcium channels that activated by H2O2. NaHS enhanced Cd influx into the vacuole, and the Cd influx was dependent on the pH gradients across the tonoplast. Taken together, these results suggest that H2S alleviates Cd toxicity via the improvement of antioxidant system and cellular Cd homeostasis. The up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes by H2S reduced the accumulation of H2O2, and thus decreased Cd influx through the H2O2-activated PM calcium channels. The H2S-simulated vacuolar Cd sequestration was presumably due to the activation of tonoplast Cd(2+)/H(+) antiporters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide accumulation and toxicity by a catalase from Mycoplasma iowae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E Pritchard

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma iowae is a well-established avian pathogen that can infect and damage many sites throughout the body. One potential mediator of cellular damage by mycoplasmas is the production of H2O2 via a glycerol catabolic pathway whose genes are widespread amongst many mycoplasma species. Previous sequencing of M. iowae serovar I strain 695 revealed the presence of not only genes for H2O2 production through glycerol catabolism but also the first documented mycoplasma gene for catalase, which degrades H2O2. To test the activity of M. iowae catalase in degrading H2O2, we studied catalase activity and H2O2 accumulation by both M. iowae serovar K strain DK-CPA, whose genome we sequenced, and strains of the H2O2-producing species Mycoplasma gallisepticum engineered to produce M. iowae catalase by transformation with the M. iowae putative catalase gene, katE. H2O2-mediated virulence by M. iowae serovar K and catalase-producing M. gallisepticum transformants were also analyzed using a Caenorhabditis elegans toxicity assay, which has never previously been used in conjunction with mycoplasmas. We found that M. iowae katE encodes an active catalase that, when expressed in M. gallisepticum, reduces both the amount of H2O2 produced and the amount of damage to C. elegans in the presence of glycerol. Therefore, the correlation between the presence of glycerol catabolism genes and the use of H2O2 as a virulence factor by mycoplasmas might not be absolute.

  16. Analysis of DNA damage in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) spermatozoa by UV, hydrogen peroxide, and the toxicant bisazir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciereszko, Andrzej [School of Natural Resources, Ohio State University, 210 Kottman Hall, 2021 Coffey Rd., Columbus, OH 434210 (United States); Semen Biology Group, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, 10-747 Olsztyn (Poland); Wolfe, Tobie D. [School of Natural Resources, Ohio State University, 210 Kottman Hall, 2021 Coffey Rd., Columbus, OH 434210 (United States); Dabrowski, Konrad [School of Natural Resources, Ohio State University, 210 Kottman Hall, 2021 Coffey Rd., Columbus, OH 434210 (United States)]. E-mail: dabrowski.1@osu.edu

    2005-06-15

    In this study we sought to demonstrate that Comet assay can be applied to sea lamprey sperm DNA fragmentation and used to describe the relationship between sperm DNA damage and sperm fertilizing ability. We show that the assay can be used reliably and accurately, and unlike in the case of mammals, there is no need for additional steps related to improvement of efficacy of lysis and DNA decondensation. This agrees with the presence of histone proteins in lamprey sperm. An increase in DNA fragmentation was noted during short-term storage of milt on ice (0-4 days). We demonstrated genotoxic effects of UV radiation and oxidative stress (exposure to hydrogen peroxide) and found that oxidative damage to sperm DNA was likely repaired after fertilization in the embryo. Repairing capacity of the oocyte toward sperm DNA lesions caused by UV was restricted. Toxic effect of p,p-bis-(1-aziridinyl)-N-methylphosphinothioic acid (p,p-bis(1-aziridinyl)-N-methylphosphinothioic amide), a sea lamprey chemosterilant, could not be linked to DNA fragmentation in the in vitro tests. Its genotoxicity in vivo may possibly be associated with other mechanisms of DNA degradation (oxidation or DNA-protein and DNA-DNA cross-linking). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Comet assay can be successfully applied to monitor effects of environmental disturbances and imposed injuries in sea lamprey spermatozoa and possibly other species of ancient fish with acrosomal sperm.

  17. Algal toxicity of the alternative disinfectants performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA), chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and their by-products hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite (ClO2-)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Baun, Anders; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    : performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as well as two by-products of their use: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite. All of the five chemicals investigated showed clear toxicity to the algae with well-defined dose response curves. The EC50 values ranged from 0.16 to 2.9 mg....../L based on nominal concentrations leading to the labeling of the chemicals as either toxic or very toxic. The five investigated chemicals decreased in toxicity in the order chlorine dioxide, performic acid, peracetic acid, chlorite and hydrogen peroxide. The stability of the chemicals increased...

  18. Production of volatile Sulphides in Allium Porrum cell cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Asghari Gh.R; Lockwood GB; Houshfar Gh.A "

    2002-01-01

    Production of volatile sulphides in cell cultures of Allium porrum is described. Allium porrum calluses were initiated from whole seedlings. The high growth rate of Allium porrum callus was achived in Murashige and Skoog media containing only 1 ppm 2, 4-Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid. The routine method of solvent extraction of volatile sulphides was used for Allium porrum and the concentrated extract was subjected to capillary GC and GC-MS. Dipropyl disulphide and 4-methyl thiazolethanol were i...

  19. Effect of periodontal therapy on sulcular sulphide level a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleissner, Christiane; Springborn, I; Willershausen, B

    2003-01-28

    The identification of active disease sites is a leading goal in basic periodontal research. Of toxic bacterial metabolites detectable in gingival crevicular fluid, volatile sulphur compounds (VSC) have been implicated in periodontal tissue destruction. Several bacteria associated with active destructive disease are capable of producing VSC, this fact supporting the idea of sulcular VSC being a possible marker of disease activity. A new portable sulphide monitor providing chairside information on sulcular sulphide level (SU) has been developed. The aim of this study was 1) to monitor the effect of mechanical therapy on SU and clinical parameters and 2) to clarify whether SU-measurements might have the potential to detect disease activity. 34 patients (22 M, 12 F) with generalized or localized chronic periodontitis received periodontal treatment in a private practice consisting of an oral hygiene phase (HP) lasting several weeks, scaling and root planing (SRP), and flap surgery at sites >5 mm or with furcation involvement. Subjects were examined three times (1 week after the diagnosis was made, at the end of HP and at the 1st maintenance session 3 months after SRP) recording clinical parameters (clinical attachment loss CAL, probing depth PD, bleeding on probing intensity BI, plaque index PI) and sulcular sulphide level (SU) measured by the portable monitor as as digital score ranging from 0.0 (Periodontal therapy resulted in a significant reduction of mean BI by 0.69 +/- 0.45, of mean PD by 1.39 +/- 0.33 mm and in a mean gain of attachment of 1.07 +/- 0.38 mm (p = 0.0001). The clinical improvement was accompanied by a reduction of mean SU by 0.20 +/- 0.13 and of the mean percentage of SU-positive sites per patient (SUp) by 20.09 +/- 13. SU-positive sites were located at all types of teeth. 67.9 % of SU-positive sites and 83.8 % of sites with a SU > 1 were found at the molars. 16.1 % of initially 579 SU-positive sites remained SU-positive. For these sites, BI

  20. Palladium sulphide (PdS) films as a new thermoelectric sulphide compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ares, J.R.; Diaz-Chao, P.; Clamagirand, J.; Macia, M.D.; Ferrer, I.J.; Sanchez, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Lab. de Materiales de Interes en Energias Renovables

    2010-07-01

    Palladium sulphide (PdS) films have been prepared by direct sulphuration of 20 nm thick palladium films at different temperatures (200 C < T < 450 C). Sulphurated films exhibit an unique crystalline phase: PdS. Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity of these films are between -110 and -150 {mu}V/K and {proportional_to} 0.08 to 0.8 {omega}cm depending on the sulphuration temperature. Negative sign of Seebeck coefficient indicates an n type conduction in all films. Discussion is focused on the influence of atomic ratio between sulphur and palladium as well as impurities arising from the substrate on transport properties. (orig.)

  1. Algae mediated synthesis of cadmium sulphide nanoparticles and their application in bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Mandal, Ranju; Sekh, Sanoyaz; Sarkar, Neera Sen; Chattopadhyay, Dipankar; De, Swati

    2016-05-01

    The present work is a study on the biological synthesis of cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles using blue-green algae that is popularly used as a food supplement. This synthesis is unique in the sense that no external sulphur precursor is required, the CdS nanoparticles are synthesized in situ in the algal medium. The CdS nanoparticles thus synthesized are photoluminescent and can act as highly efficient photocatalysts for degradation of the dye pollutant malachite green. Thus the CdS nanoparticles synthesized in situ in the algae conform to the desired criteria of waste water treatment i.e. biosorption of the pollutant and its subsequent degradation. The novelty of this work also lies in its potential for use in bioremediation by conversion of the toxic Cd(II) ion to less toxic CdS nanoparticles within the algal framework.

  2. SR-Site - sulphide content in the groundwater at Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullborg, E-L (Terralogica (Sweden)); Smellie, J (Conterra (Sweden)); Nilsson, A-Ch (Geosigma (Sweden)); Gimeno, M J; Auque, LF (Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain)); Bruchert, V (Stockholms Universitet (Sweden)); Molinero, J (Amphos21 (Spain))

    2010-12-15

    Sulphide concentrations in groundwater play a key role in the long-term reliability of the metal canisters containing the radioactive waste within a disposal facility for nuclear waste. This is because sulphide in the groundwaters circulating in the vicinity of the deposition tunnels can react with copper in the canisters causing corrosion and therefore reducing their expected lifetime; in a worst case scenario erosion of the bentonite buffer material will expose the canister more rapidly to the fracture groundwater.Sulphide in the groundwater is predominantly microbially produced and thereby controlled by the content of oxidised sulphur sources, organics (carbon sources), reductants (mainly Fe(II), DOC, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), and also flow and mixing of different groundwater types. In addition, achieved saturation in respect to amorphous Fe-monosulphide will control the possible maximum values and will also limit the Fe2+ and S2- values in the groundwater. The aim of this report is to assess realistic, representative and reliable sulphide groundwater concentrations at present conditions in Forsmark and also to evaluate possible changes during different climatic conditions covering the repository operation period (some tens to hundreds of years), post closure conditions (some thousand of years) and the proceeding temperate period (some tens of thousands of years) which may be extended due to enhanced greenhouse effects etc. It is expected that this period will be followed by the onset of the next glaciation during which periglacial (permafrost), glacial and postglacial conditions may succeed each other. To achieve these aims, an evaluation is performed of all the sulphide-related data reported from the Forsmark site investigations /Laaksoharju et al. 2008/ and later monitoring campaigns, all of which are stored in the Sicada database. This evaluation shows that values from the Complete Chemical Characterisation (CCC) sampling are usually lower than those measured

  3. Colonisation of toxic environments drives predictable life-history evolution in livebearing fishes (Poeciliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin; Schlupp, Ingo; Tobler, Michael; Brian Langerhans, R

    2014-01-01

    New World livebearing fishes (family Poeciliidae) have repeatedly colonised toxic, hydrogen sulphide-rich waters across their natural distribution. Physiological considerations and life-history theory predict that these adverse conditions should favour the evolution of larger offspring. Here, we examined nine poeciliid species that independently colonised toxic environments, and show that these fishes have indeed repeatedly evolved much larger offspring size at birth in sulphidic waters, thus uncovering a widespread pattern of predictable evolution. However, a second pattern, only indirectly predicted by theory, proved additionally common: a reduction in the number of offspring carried per clutch (i.e. lower fecundity). Our analyses reveal that this secondary pattern represents a mere consequence of a classic life-history trade-off combined with strong selection on offspring size alone. With such strong natural selection in extreme environments, extremophile organisms may commonly exhibit multivariate phenotypic shifts even though not all diverging traits necessarily represent adaptations to the extreme conditions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  4. Late Jurassic ocean anoxic event: evidence from voluminous sulphide deposition and preservation in the Panthalassa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Kato, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The historically productive copper-bearing Besshi-type sulphide deposits in the Japanese accretionary complex were formed as volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits on the deep-sea floor of the Panthalassa Ocean...

  5. Recovery of Cu and Zn from Complex Sulphide Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talapaneni, Trinath; Sarkar, S.; Yedla, N.; Reddy, P. L. N., Dr

    2015-02-01

    Complex Sulphide Ores are often found to be a close mutual association with each other and with the nonmetallic gangue. The beneficiation experiments showed that it would be very difficult to recover Cu and Zn from the lean complex Sulphide ores using traditional ore beneficiation methods. In the present work, leaching of complex sulfide ores in sulfuric acid was investigated by the Electro hydrometallurgy process. The lab-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the influences of pulp-density, electrolyte concentration, particle size, current density and time on recovery of Cu and Zn. The leach liquor obtained after electrolysis was subjected to Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy analysis for the recovery of minerals.

  6. Production of volatile Sulphides in Allium Porrum cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Asghari Gh.R

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Production of volatile sulphides in cell cultures of Allium porrum is described. Allium porrum calluses were initiated from whole seedlings. The high growth rate of Allium porrum callus was achived in Murashige and Skoog media containing only 1 ppm 2, 4-Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid. The routine method of solvent extraction of volatile sulphides was used for Allium porrum and the concentrated extract was subjected to capillary GC and GC-MS. Dipropyl disulphide and 4-methyl thiazolethanol were identified in A. porrum aggregated suspension cells.

  7. Corrosion of copper alloys in sulphide containing district heting systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorarinsdottir, R.I.; Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1999-01-01

    Copper and some copper alloys are prone to corrosion in sulphide containing geothermal water analogous to corrosion observed in district heating systems containing sulphide due to sulphate reducing bacteria. In order to study the corrosion of copper alloys under practical conditions a test...... was carried out at four sites in the Reykjavik District Heating System. The geothermal water chemistry is different at each site. The corrosion rate and the amount and chemical composition of deposits on weight loss coupons of six different copper alloys are described after exposure of 12 and 18 months......, respectively. Some major differences in scaling composition and the degree of corrosion attack are observed between alloys and water types....

  8. Synthesis of TOPO-capped Nanocrystals of Copper Sulphide from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nanocrystals, copper(I) sulphide, TOPO, photoluminescence, TEM, SAED. 1. Introduction. Copper sulphide is a potentially cheap and less hazardous material than CdS, CdSe and PbS but has received scant atten- tion. The synthesis of copper sulphide has been achieved from aqueous sols,1 monolayers,2 bilayer lipid ...

  9. SR-Site - sulphide content in the groundwater at Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullborg, E-L (Terralogica, Graabo (Sweden)); Smellie, J. (Conterra, Uppsala (Sweden)); Nilsson, A-Ch (Geosigma, Uppsala (Sweden)); Gimeno, M.J.; Auque, L.F. (Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain)); Wallin, B. (Geokema, Lidingoe (Sweden)); Bruechert, V. (Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)); Molinero, J. (Amphos21, Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-12-15

    Sulphide concentrations in groundwater play a key role in the long term reliability of the metal canisters containing the radioactive waste within a disposal facility for nuclear waste. This is because sulphide in the groundwaters circulating in the vicinity of the deposition tunnels can react with copper in the canisters causing corrosion and therefore reducing their expected lifetime; in a worst case scenario erosion of the bentonite buffer material will expose the canister more rapidly to the fracture groundwater. Sulphide in the groundwater is predominantly microbially produced and thereby controlled by the content of oxidised sulphur sources, organics (carbon sources), reductants (mainly Fe(II), DOC, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), and also flow. In addition, achieved saturation in respect to amorphous Fe-monosulphide will control the possible maximum values and thus limit the Fe2+ and S2- values in the groundwater. The aim of this report is to assess realistic, representative and reliable sulphide groundwater concentrations at present conditions in Laxemar to be considered for use in (future) safety assessments. To achieve this, an evaluation is performed of all the sulphide related data reported from the Laxemar site investigations /Laaksoharju et al. 2009/ and later monitoring campaigns, all of which are stored in the Sicada database. This evaluation shows that values from the Complete Chemical Characterisation (CCC) (i.e. in situ sampling from one or more borehole sections using mobile equipment) are usually lower than those measured during the monitoring phase (i.e. in situ sampling from one borehole section using permanently installed equipment). An exception is borehole KLX01, where values generally lie within the same range as the monitoring samples. For most of the CCC and monitoring sections the last sample in the time series is suggested as representing the 'best possible' sulphide value. When both initial values from CCC (or samples taken with

  10. Understanding the radiolabelling mechanism of 99mTc-antimony sulphide colloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsopelas, Chris

    2003-01-01

    The chemistry of antimony trisulphide colloid (ATC) was examined to elucidate the radiolabelling mechanism with 99mTcO4(-). Ion exchange chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry techniques determined ATC to be resistant to hydrolysis in 0.1M hydrochloric acid (HCl) at 25 degrees C or 100 degrees C (>97% recovery, Sb3+ absent). Hydrogen sulphide gas detected did not participate in the mechanism, where antimony trisulphide and 99mTcO4(-) in HCl/100 degrees C yielded 96% 99mTc-product from a K2S-free formulation (versus 98% when K2S was present). 99mTcO4(-) was reduced >90% by DMSA or dithiothreitol under the same conditions, identifying involvement of thiol groups. Infrared analysis of Re-ATC showed S=O bonds, indicating excess thiol groups at the colloid surface were oxidised at the expense of 99mTcO4(-) reduction.

  11. Optical Properties of Lead Silver Sulphide Ternary Thin Films ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lead Silver Sulphide (PbAgS) thin films on glass substrate have been deposited by chemical bath deposition technique with EDTA and TEA as complexing agents, while ammonium solution served as pH adjuster. The films were deposited at room temperature of 300K. The deposited films were characterized using UV ...

  12. Application of induced polarization method to delineate sulphide ore ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of sulphide ore bodies in Osina area of Benue state has been reported earlier in the geology of Nigeria map, but the extent and abundance of the mineral was not known. In this work, we investigated the thickness and depth of the mineral deposit. Ground Induced Polarization (GIP) survey employing the ...

  13. Fungal-Transformation of Surrogate Sulphides and Carbonaceous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2017-12-02

    Dec 2, 2017 ... In the recovery of gold from refractory gold ores, pretreatment is required to decompose sulphides and liberate occluded gold before cyanidation, and to deactivate carbonaceous matter and prevent it from adsorbing dissolved gold. Until the past three decades, most commercial pretreatment processes had ...

  14. Fungal-Transformation of Surrogate Sulphides and Carbonaceous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the recovery of gold from refractory gold ores, pretreatment is required to decompose sulphides and liberate occluded gold before cyanidation, and to deactivate carbonaceous matter and prevent it from adsorbing dissolved gold. Until the past three decades, most commercial pretreatment processes had been by abiotic ...

  15. Cadmium sulphide thin film for application in gamma radiation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) thin film was prepared using pyrolytic spraying technique and then irradiated at varied gamma dosage. The CdS thin film absorption before gamma irradiation was 0.6497. Absorbed doses were computed using standard equation established for an integrating dosimeter. The plot of absorbed dose ...

  16. Preparation of copper sulphide clusters in organic–inorganic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Copper sulphide clusters; Langmuir–Blodgett films; organic–inorganic composites; amphiphilic Schiff ... have reported that gold nanoparticles modified with single stranded DNA oligonucleotides can be ... been known to form stable monolayers at the air/water interface and can complex with a variety of metal ions 20,21.

  17. Pengaruh Penggunaan Konsentrasi Amonium Sulphide pada Pewarnaan Kerajinan Logam Perak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Suheryanto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proses pewarnaan kerajinan logam perak dengan amonium sulphide dapat memberikan hasil yang memberi kesan dekoratif dan menarik, karena proses tersebut merupakan hasil reaksi antara zat tersebut dengan logam perak sebagai benda kerja.Proses pewarnaan logam perak menggunakan variasi konsentrasi ammonium sulphide 100 cc, 125 cc, dan 125 cc per 850 cc air dengan variasi waktu 5 menit; 7,5 menit; dan 10 menit. Logam perak yang digunakan perak 925 ukuran 2 x 3 cm berat 25 gram, dan teknik yang digunakan dengan cara merendam benda kerja pada larutan ammonium sulphide pada suhu 50o C.Hasil pengujian terhadap ketahanan atau perubahan warna dan ketuaan warna menunjukkan bahwa proses pewarnaan logam perak 925 pada temperatur 50o C, dengan konsentrasi 125 cc dengan waktu 7,5 menit memberikan hasil ketuaan dan ketahanan warna yang baik dengan nilai rata – rata 1 dan menimbulkan warna hitam keabu – abuan dengan nilai rata – rata 1 – 2. Kata kunci : ammonium sulphide, perak, pewarnaan

  18. Chronic toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to Daphnia magna in a continuous exposure, flow-through test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, J.R.; Greseth, Shari L.; Gaikowski, M.P.; Schmidt, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    A flow-through, continuous exposure test system was developed to expose Daphnia magna to an unstable compound. 35% Perox-Aid?? is a specially formulated hydrogen peroxide (a highly oxidative chemical) product approved for use in U.S. aquaculture and therefore has the potential to be released from aquaculture facilities and pose a risk to aquatic invertebrates. The study objective was to assess the effects of 35% Perox-Aid?? on an aquatic invertebrate by evaluating the survival, growth, production, and gender ratio of progeny from a representative aquatic invertebrate continuously exposed to 35% Perox-Aid??. The study design consisted of 6 treatment groups (10 test chambers each) with target hydrogen peroxide concentrations of 0.0, 0.32, 0.63, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0??mg L- 1. The study was initiated with effect on Daphnia time to death compared to controls and no significant effect on the time to first brood production and the number of broods produced. Concentrations ??? 0.63??mg L- 1 had no significant effect on the total number of young produced. Concentrations ??? 0.32??mg L- 1 had a negative effect on Daphnia growth. Hydrogen peroxide had no significant effect on the gender ratio of young produced. All second generation Daphnia were female. A continuous discharge of hydrogen peroxide into aquatic ecosystems is not likely to affect cladocerans if the concentration is maintained at ??? 0.63??mg L- 1 for less than 21??days.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide - cysteine cycle system enhances cadmium tolerance through alleviating cadmium-induced oxidative stress and ion toxicity in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Honglei; Wang, Xiaofeng; Dou, Yanhua; Liu, Dan; Si, Wantong; Fang, Hao; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Shaolin; Xi, Jiejun; Li, Jisheng

    2016-12-22

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a common toxic heavy metal ion. We investigated the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and cysteine (Cys) in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The expression of H2S synthetic genes LCD and DES1 were induced by Cd2+ within 3 h, and endogenous H2S was then rapidly released. H2S promoted the expression of Cys synthesis-related genes SAT1 and OASA1, which led to endogenous Cys accumulation. The H2S and Cys cycle system was stimulated by Cd2+ stress, and it maintained high levels in plant cells. H2S inhibited the ROS burst by inducing alternative respiration capacity (AP) and antioxidase activity. H2S weakened Cd2+ toxicity by inducing the metallothionein (MTs) genes expression. Cys promoted GSH accumulation and inhibited the ROS burst, and GSH induced the expression of phytochelatin (PCs) genes, counteracting Cd2+ toxicity. In summary, the H2S and Cys cycle system played a key role in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The Cd2+ tolerance was weakened when the cycle system was blocked in lcddes1-1 and oasa1 mutants. This paper is the first to describe the role of the H2S and Cys cycle system in Cd2+ stress and to explore the relevant and specificity mechanisms of H2S and Cys in mediating Cd2+ stress.

  20. Biosynthesis and characterization of mercury sulphide nanoparticles produced by Bacillus cereus MRS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyavathi, Sundararaju; Manjula, Arumugam; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2013-11-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic heavy metal accumulated in the environment, which can be detoxified by reducing Hg2+ to non toxic form. Bacteria resistant to toxic metals and capable of converting them into non toxic forms have a direct application in the bioremediation of contaminated sites. In this study, mercury resistant strain Bacillus cereus MRS-1 was isolated from electroplating industrial effluent. This strain exhibited the ability to convert mercury into extracellular sulphide nanoparticles of mercury. The recovered HgS nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-VIS spectrophotometer, FT-IR, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, powder X-ray diffraction pattern and thermogravimetric analysis. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical with a size range of 10-100 nm. This strain can be potentially exploited for the production of HgS nanoparticles as well as for detoxification of mercury in the environment without producing secondary pollution of mercury methylation or Hg (0) volatilization.

  1. Data on HepG2 cells changes following exposure to cadmium sulphide quantum dots (CdS QDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Paesano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The data included in this paper are associated with the research article entitled "Markers for toxicity to HepG2 exposed to cadmium sulphide quantum dots; damage to mitochondria" (Paesano et al. [1]. The article concerns the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of CdS QDs in HepG2 cells and the mechanisms involved. In this dataset, changes in expression levels of candidate genes are reported, together with details concerning synthesis and properties of CdS QDs, additional information obtained through literature survey, measures of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the glutathione redox state.

  2. Algal toxicity of the alternative disinfectants performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA), chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and their by-products hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite (ClO2-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Baun, Anders; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-05-01

    Environmental effect evaluation of disinfection of combined sewer overflow events with alternative chemical disinfectants requires that the environmental toxicity of the disinfectants and the main by-products of their use are known. Many disinfectants degrade quickly in water which should be included in the evaluation of both their toxicity as determined in standardized tests and their possible negative effect in the water environment. Here we evaluated according to the standardized ISO 8692 test the toxicity towards the green microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, of three disinfectants: performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as well as two by-products of their use: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite. All of the five chemicals investigated showed clear toxicity to the algae with well-defined dose response curves. The EC50 values ranged from 0.16 to 2.9mg/L based on nominal concentrations leading to the labeling of the chemicals as either toxic or very toxic. The five investigated chemicals decreased in toxicity in the order chlorine dioxide, performic acid, peracetic acid, chlorite and hydrogen peroxide. The stability of the chemicals increased in the same order as the toxicity decrease. This indicates that even though ClO2 has the highest environmental hazard potential, it may still be suitable as an alternative disinfectant due to its rapid degradation in water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Linking hydrogen-mediated boron toxicity tolerance with improvement of root elongation, water status and reactive oxygen species balance: a case study for rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Duan, Xingliang; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Ren; Ouyang, Zhaozeng; Shen, Wenbiao

    2016-12-01

    Boron is essential for plant growth but hazardous when present in excess. As the antioxidant properties of hydrogen gas (H2) were recently described in plants, oxidative stress induced by excess boron was investigated along with other biological responses during rice (Oryza sativa) seed germination to study the beneficial role of H2 METHODS: Rice seeds were pretreated with exogenous H2 Using physiological, pharmacological and molecular approaches, the production of endogenous H2, growth status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance and relative gene expression in rice were measured under boron stress to investigate mechanisms of H2-mediated boron toxicity tolerance. In our test, boron-inhibited seed germination and seedling growth, and endogenous H2 production, were obviously blocked by exogenously applying H2 The re-establishment of ROS balance was confirmed by reduced lipid peroxidation and ROS accumulation. Meanwhile, activities of catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) were increased. Suppression of pectin methylesterase (PME) activity and downregulation of PME transcripts by H2 were consistent with the alleviation of root growth inhibition caused by boron. Water status was improved as well. This result was confirmed by the upregulation of genes encoding specific aquaporins (AQPs), the maintenance of low osmotic potential and high content of soluble sugar. Increased transcription of representative AQP genes (PIP2;7 in particular) and BOR2 along with decreased BOR1 mRNA may contribute to lowering boron accumulation. Hydrogen provides boron toxicity tolerance mainly by improving root elongation, water status and ROS balance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Sulphide phases in Y zeolite for hydro-treatment reactions; Phase sulfures dans une zeolithe Y pour l'hydrotraitement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyrit, P.

    1999-06-28

    Several types of single (Mo, Co, Pd, Pt) or binary (MoCo, PdCo, PtCo) sulphides phases supported on a HY zeolite were studied. The catalysts were first prepared and characterised in the oxide form. Their reactivity was then evaluated in toluene hydrogenation and 4.6-dimethyl-dibenzo-thiophene hydro-desulfurization reactions. Characterisation of sulphide phases supported on HY zeolite was carried out by elemental analysis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and Temperature Programmed Reduction coupled with HS analysis. The results show that. compared with alumina supported catalysts, zeolite used as a support enables extremely active catalysts to be obtained. It appears in particular that molybdenum sulphide phases inside the zeolite have a very high intrinsic activity at low molybdenum content. This activity is attributed to highly dispersed molybdenum sulphide phases differing from MoS{sub 2} slabs and probably present as clusters. The influence of cobalt depends of its concentration. Thus at low loadings cobalt has a strong negative effect. It has been shown, in the molybdenum case, that cobalt interaction leads to an increase in the sulphur content of the molybdenum phases. At higher cobalt loading, the formation of a mixed phase is possible but the degree of promotion remains limited. This work emphasises the advantages of using zeolite supported sulphide phases, and especially Mo and Pd phases, in the hydro-treatment reactions. It seems however that single phases present a greater interest than binary phases. (author)

  5. Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube, CRT: Zn removal by sulphide precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenzi, Valentina; De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca; Kopacek, Bernd; Vegliò, Francesco

    2013-11-01

    This work is focused on the recovery of yttrium and zinc from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube (CRT). Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 2(2) full factorial plan and the highest extraction yields for yttrium and zinc equal to 100% are observed under the following conditions: 3M of sulphuric acid, 10% v/v of H2O2 concentrated solution at 30% v/v, 10% w/w pulp density, 70°C and 3h of reaction. Two series of precipitation tests for zinc are carried out: a 2(2) full factorial design and a completely randomized factorial design. In these series the factors investigated are pH of solution during the precipitation and the amount of sodium sulphide added to precipitate zinc sulphide. The data of these tests are used to describe two empirical mathematical models for zinc and yttrium precipitation yields by regression analysis. The highest precipitation yields for zinc are obtained under the following conditions: pH equal to 2-2.5% and 10-12%v/v of Na2S concentrated solution at 10%w/v. In these conditions the coprecipitation of yttrium is of 15-20%. Finally further yttrium precipitation experiments by oxalic acid on the residual solutions, after removing of zinc, show that yttrium could be recovered and calcined to obtain the final product as yttrium oxide. The achieved results allow to propose a CRT recycling process based on leaching of fluorescent powder from cathode ray tube and recovery of yttrium oxide after removing of zinc by precipitation. The final recovery of yttrium is 75-80%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sensors for Highly Toxic Gases: Methylamine and Hydrogen Chloride Detection at Low Concentrations in an Ionic Liquid on Pt Screen Printed Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Murugappan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Commercially available Pt screen printed electrodes (SPEs have been employed as possible electrode materials for methylamine (MA and hydrogen chloride (HCl gas detection. The room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonylimide ([C2mim][NTf2] was used as a solvent and the electrochemical behaviour of both gases was first examined using cyclic voltammetry. The reaction mechanism appears to be the same on Pt SPEs as on Pt microelectrodes. Furthermore, the analytical utility was studied to understand the behaviour of these highly toxic gases at low concentrations on SPEs, with calibration graphs obtained from 10 to 80 ppm. Three different electrochemical techniques were employed: linear sweep voltammetry (LSV, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV and square wave voltammetry (SWV, with no significant differences in the limits of detection (LODs between the techniques (LODs were between 1.4 to 3.6 ppm for all three techniques for both gases. The LODs achieved on Pt SPEs were lower than the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limit (OSHA PEL limits of the two gases (5 ppm for HCl and 10 ppm for MA, suggesting that Pt SPEs can successfully be combined with RTILs to be used as cheap alternatives for amperometric gas sensing in applications where these toxic gases may be released.

  7. Optical Properties of Silver Aluminium Sulphide Ternary Thin Films ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ternary thin films of Silver Aluminium Sulphide (AgAlS2) have been prepared by chemical bath deposition techniques. Aqueous solution of 41.5 mls containing AgNO3, Al2(SO4)3, thiourea and EDTA was used, where AgNO3, Al2(SO4)3, thiourea were the source of Ag+, Al+ and S- respectively and EDTA was used as a ...

  8. Sulphidation of the oceanic lithosphere: an experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Catharina; Hansen, Christian; Bach, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Newly formed oceanic lithosphere close to spreading centers can be influenced by fluids that feed hydrothermal vents. These fluids often carry high amounts of dissolved gases such as H2S, which can trigger precipitation of sulphide minerals in the interacting rock during percolation. This process occurs equally in exposed mantle rock, serpentinised mantle rock, troctolite or gabbro and basalt, the lithology depending on the spreading rate at the ridge where hydrothermal activity is present. These later-stage fluid-rock interactions can develop different types of sulphide mineralization in the lithosphere. In order to better understand these sulphidation reactions, we have conducted several batch experiments that placed different oceanic lithologies in contact with an H2S saturated, iron-free solution. The mixture was heated to 250°C at 400 bars and kept under these conditions for 2-8 weeks. In situ fluid and gas sampling was used to monitor reaction progress. REM-analysis of the solid products has shown the growth of euhedral pyrite and magnetite crystals as well as dissolution textures in feldspar and olivine. The presence of pyrite (gabbro experiment) and magnetite (troctolite and serpentinite) is in agreement with the measured H2- and H2S-content in the analysed fluids. These Fe-bearing minerals grew although no iron was added to the fluid, showing the replacive nature of the reaction. Geochemical modeling can be used to extend the application of these observations to different PT-conditions. Using this technique, we can start tackling the problem of replacive sulphide formation within hydrothermal discharge zones in oceanic basement of variable composition.

  9. Algal toxicity of the alternative disinfectants performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA), chlorine dioxide (ClO2) and their by-products hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite (ClO2-)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Baun, Anders; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    : performic acid (PFA), peracetic acid (PAA) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2) as well as two by-products of their use: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chlorite. All of the five chemicals investigated showed clear toxicity to the algae with well-defined dose response curves. The EC50 values ranged from 0.16 to 2.9 mg...

  10. Knowledge on possibilities of applying mineral biotechnology to treatment of Slovak sulphide ores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štyriaková Iveta

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The summary of results from research aimed at possibilities to use biotechnological procedures for treatment of Slovak sulphide ores is presented in this study. The object of the research is an extraction of valuable metals, undesirable admixtures and degradation of crystallic lattice of sulphides for subsequent chemical leaching processing of precious metals. Further, the results of experiments on existence of biogenic processes in situ on waste dumps from exploitation containing residual sulphides are presented.

  11. Influence of iron valency on the magnetic susceptibility of a microbially produced iron sulphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marius, M S; James, P A B; Bahaj, A S; Smallman, D J [University of Southampton, School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    Microbial iron sulphide is well known as an adsorbent for the treatment of metallic ion polluted wastewater. Under certain culture conditions a highly magnetic iron sulphide can be produced which would enable a low cost biomagnetic separation process to be developed. This paper illustrates that by raising the ferrous content of a ferrous - ferric sulphate rich medium the magnetic susceptibility of the iron sulphide produced is increased.

  12. Influence of iron valency on the magnetic susceptibility of a microbially produced iron sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marius, M. S.; James, P. A. B.; Bahaj, A. S.; Smallman, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    Microbial iron sulphide is well known as an adsorbent for the treatment of metallic ion polluted wastewater. Under certain culture conditions a highly magnetic iron sulphide can be produced which would enable a low cost biomagnetic separation process to be developed. This paper illustrates that by raising the ferrous content of a ferrous - ferric sulphate rich medium the magnetic susceptibility of the iron sulphide produced is increased.

  13. A new model for the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Aluminium toxicity is exacerbated by hydrogen peroxide and attenuated by an amyloid protein fragment and melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, S J; Daniels, W M; Potocnik, F C; van Zyl, J M; Taljaard, J J; Emsley, R A

    1997-09-01

    Although Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in developed countries, there is an as yet unexplained lower prevalence of the disease in parts of Africa. AD is characterised by a catastrophic loss of neurons; free radicals (oxidative toxins) have been implicated in the destruction of the cells through the process of lipid peroxidative damage of cell membranes. Previously aluminium (Al) and a fragment of beta amyloid (A beta 25-35) were shown to exacerbate free-radical damage, while melatonin reduced this effect. The aim of the present study was: (i) to investigate the conditions determining the toxicity of Al and A beta 25-35; and (ii) to assess whether melatonin could attenuate the damage done by both aluminium and the amyloid fragment, thus suggesting a pathway for the aetiology of AD. An in vitro model system was used in which free radicals were generated, causing lipid peroxidation of platelet membranes, thus simulating the disease process found in the brain. 1. Al and A beta 25-35 caused lipid peroxidation in the presence of the iron (II) ion (Pe2+), Al being more toxic than A beta 25-35. 2. A beta 25-35 attenuated the lipid peroxidation promoted by Al. 3. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) greatly exacerbated the toxicity of Al and A beta 25-35. 4. Melatonin prevented lipid peroxidation by Al and A beta 25-35 in the absence of H2O2, but only reduced the process when H2O2 was present. In the light of the results obtained from the present study, the following hypotheses are formulated. 1. In AD, excessive quantities of Al are taken up into the brain, where the Al exacerbates iron-induced lipid peroxidation in the lysosomes. 2. In response, the normal synthetic pathway of amyloid protein is altered to produce A beta fragments which attenuate the toxicity of Al. In the process of sequestering the Al and iron, immature plaques are formed in the brain. 3. Microglia are activated, in an attempt to destroy the plaques by secreting reactive oxygen species

  14. Chamomile confers protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity through activation of Nrf2-mediated defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Srivastava, Janmejai K; Shukla, Sanjeev; Gupta, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of various human diseases. Aqueous chamomile extract is used as herbal medicine, in the form of tea, demonstrated to possess antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties. We demonstrate the cytoprotective effects of chamomile on hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced cellular damage in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Pretreatment of cells with chamomile markedly attenuated H₂O₂-induced cell viability loss in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanisms by which chamomile-protected macrophages from oxidative stress was through the induction of several antioxidant enzymes including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase and increase nuclear accumulation of the transcription factor Nrf2 and its binding to antioxidant response elements. Furthermore, chamomile dose-dependently reduced H₂O₂-mediated increase in the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species. Our results, for the first time, demonstrate that chamomile has protective effects against oxidative stress and might be beneficial to provide defense against cellular damage. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Antibacterial and Toxic Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide Combined with Different Concentrations of Chlorhexidine in Comparison with Sodium Hypochlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhadi, Hosein; Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Ranjbar, Mohammad Ali; Azar, Mohammad Reza; Geramizadeh, Bita; Torabi, Shima; Sadat Aleyasin, Zeinab; Gholami, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been suggested to be used in sequence or in combination with chlorhexidine (CHX) to enhance the antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis, but there is no research in the literature on the safety and effectiveness of this irrigation protocol. This study aimed to assess the cytocompatibility and antibacterial activity of different concentrations of CHX combined with H2O2in comparison with the activity of 5.25 and 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). Different concentrations of H2O2 (10, 5, 3 and 1%) were exposed to the PDL cells. Then, the solution with minimal cytotoxicity was selected (3% H2O2). The cytocompatibility and antibacterial activity of 0.1, 0.2, 1 and 2% CHX combined with 3% H2O2 were evaluated and compared with 5.25 and 2.5% NaOCl. The differences in the mean viability of PDL cells were evaluated by one-way ANOVA. Kruskal-Wallis and post-hoc Dunn's tests were adopted to compare the antibacterial activity of the solutions against E.faecalis. The viability of PDL cells was lower when treated with 5.25 or 2.5% NaOCl than all combinations of CHX and H2O2.There was no significant difference in the antibacterial activity of the solutions against E.faecalis, except for the 0.1% CHX + 3% H2O2 combination, which had significantly lower efficacy than other groups. All combinations of CHX and H2O2 (used in this study)except 0.1% CHX + 3% H2O2 were efficient irrigants against planktonic E.faecalis and had a better cytocompatibility with PDL cells than 5.25 and 2.5% NaOCl.

  16. The effects of incubation period and temperature on the Hydrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) technique for detection of faecal contamination in water. Morteza Izadi1, Ahmad Sabzali2*, Bijan Bina2, Nematt A. Jonidi Jafari1,. Maryam Hatamzdeh2 and Hossein Farrokhzadeh2. 1Health Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of medical sciences, Tehran, Iran. 2Department of Environmental ...

  17. Prediction and optimisation of Pb/Zn/Fe sulphide scales in gas production fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, Sarah; Orski, Karine; Menezes, Carlos; Heath, Steve; MacPherson, Calum; Simpson, Caroline; Graham, Gordon

    2006-03-15

    Lead, zinc and iron sulphide scales are known to be a particular issue with gas production fields, particularly those producing from HP/HT reservoirs. However the prediction of sulphide scale and the methodologies available for their laboratory assessment are not as well developed as those for the more conventional sulphate and carbonate scales. This work examines a particular sulphide scaling regime from a North Sea high temperature gas condensate production field containing only 0.8ppm of sulphide ions. Sulphide scales were identified in the production system which was shown to be a mixture of lead and zinc sulphide, primarily lead sulphide. This formed as a result of cooling during production resulting in the over saturation of these minerals. This paper describes scale prediction and modified laboratory test protocols used to re-create the scales formed in the field prior to chemical performance testing. From the brine composition, scale prediction identified that the major scales that could be formed were calcium carbonate, iron carbonate, iron sulphide, lead sulphide and zinc sulphide. In addition, modification of the brine compositions led to prediction of primarily one scale or the other. Given the predicted over saturation of various minerals, preliminary laboratory tests were therefore conducted in order to ensure that the scale formed under laboratory conditions was representative of the field scale. Laboratory protocols were therefore developed to ensure that the scales formed in fully anaerobic dynamic performance tests and static performance tests were similar to those encountered in the field. The paper compares results from field analysis, scale predictions and laboratory scale formation tests using newly developed test protocols and shows differences between prediction and laboratory data. The paper therefore demonstrates the importance of ensuring that the correct scale is formed under laboratory test conditions and also indicates some potential

  18. Allyl sulphides in olefin metathesis: catalyst considerations and traceless promotion of ring-closing metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Grant A; Culp, Phillip A; Chalker, Justin M

    2015-01-11

    Allyl sulphides are reactive substrates in ruthenium-catalysed olefin metathesis reactions, provided each substrate is matched with a suitable catalyst. A profile of catalyst activity is described, along with the first demonstration of allyl sulphides as traceless promoters in relayed ring-closing metathesis reactions.

  19. Improved sulphate removal rates at increased sulphide concentration in the sulphidogenic bioreactor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greben, HA

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The product of the biological sulphate reduction is sulphide. High concentrations of molecular H2S(g) can be inhibitory for microbial activity, especially at a reactor pH of 6 to 7. This paper focuses on the effect of high sulphide concentrations...

  20. Global warming enhances sulphide stress in a key seagrass species (NW Mediterranean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Rosa; Holmer, Marianne; Duarte, Carlos M; Marbà, Núria

    2013-12-01

    The build-up of sulphide concentrations in sediments, resulting from high inputs of organic matter and the mineralization through sulphate reduction, can be lethal to the benthos. Sulphate reduction is temperature dependent, thus global warming may contribute to even higher sulphide concentrations and benthos mortality. The seagrass Posidonia oceanica is very sensitive to sulphide stress. Hence, if concentrations build up with global warming, this key Mediterranean species could be seriously endangered. An 8-year monitoring of daily seawater temperature, the sulphur isotopic signatures of water (δ(34)S(water)), sediment (δ(34)SCRS ) and P. oceanica leaf tissue (δ(34)S(leaves)), along with total sulphur in leaves (TS(leaves)) and annual net population growth along the coast of the Balearic archipelago (Western Mediterranean) allowed us to determine if warming triggers P. oceanica sulphide stress and constrains seagrass survival. From the isotopic S signatures, we estimated sulphide intrusion into the leaves (F(sulphide)) and sulphur incorporation into the leaves from sedimentary sulphides (SS(leaves)). We observed lower δ(34)S(leaves), higher F(sulphide) and SS(leaves) coinciding with a 6-year period when two heat waves were recorded. Warming triggered sulphide stress as evidenced by the negative temperature dependence of δ(34)S(leaves) and the positive one of F(sulphide), TS(leaves) and SS(leaves). Lower P. oceanica net population growth rates were directly related to higher contents of TS(leaves). At equivalent annual maximum sea surface water temperature (SST(max)), deep meadows were less affected by sulphide intrusion than shallow ones. Thus, water depth acts as a protecting mechanism against sulphide intrusion. However, water depth would be insufficient to buffer seagrass sulphide stress triggered by Mediterranean seawater summer temperatures projected for the end of the 21st century even under scenarios of moderate greenhouse gas emissions, A1B

  1. The distribution of trace elements in a range of deep-sea sulphide ore deposits and their impact on seafloor mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, E. K.; Scott, T. B.; Brooker, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Acid rock drainage is a natural weathering process that is often exacerbated by mining activities, common in onshore sulphide ore deposits, that can lead to considerable environmental impact. A similar 'weathering process' occurs at seafloor massive sulphide (SMS) ore deposits. In contrast to the onshore situation, the expected consequence in the marine environment is often considered to be oxide formation, negligible metal release and minimal net acid generation due to the high buffering capacity of seawater and low solubility of iron at near neutral pH. However, no dissolution studies exist that emulate the true composition of sulphide ore deposits that either sit passively on the seafloor or are actively mined in this colder, more saline, and alkaline environment. In particular, these deposits will include a variety of minerals, and it is the interaction of these minerals and inclusions in regards to galvanic cells that can subsequently increase the dissolution of metals into the water column. Any heavy metal release that is not balanced by subsequent oxidation and precipitation, has the potential to produce toxicity for benthic ecosystems, bioaccumulation and dispersal through currents. The present work has sought to provide a pilot investigation on the deep sea weathering of sulphide minerals, by identifying the mineral phases, trace elements and potential galvanic couples that may arise in sulphide mineral samples collected from various tectonic settings. Samples have been analysed using EMPA and LA-ICPMS in order to identify the range of trace elements and toxins that may be contributed to the water column, especially heavy metals and environmental toxins (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, Ni, Cd, As, Sb, Sn, Hg). Our observations raise important questions about which ore deposits could have more or less environmental impact during any mining activity. These observations will be used to design oxidative dissolution experiments at deep-sea conditions utilising the

  2. Environmental Benign Process for Production of Molybdenum Metal from Sulphide Based Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Priyanka; Janakiram, Vangada; Jayasankar, Kalidoss; Angadi, Shivakumar; Bhoi, Bhagyadhar; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2017-10-01

    Molybdenum is a strategic and high temperature refractory metal which is not found in nature in free state, it is predominantly found in earth's crust in the form of MoO3/MoS2. The main disadvantage of the industrial treatment of Mo concentrate is that the process contains many stages and requires very high temperature. Almost in every step many gaseous, liquid, solid chemical substances are formed which require further treatment. To overcome the above drawback, a new alternative one step novel process is developed for the treatment of sulphide and trioxide molybdenum concentrates. This paper presents the results of the investigations on molybdenite dissociation (MoS2) using microwave assisted plasma unit as well as transferred arc thermal plasma torch. It is a single step process for the preparation of pure molybdenum metal from MoS2 by hydrogen reduction in thermal plasma. Process variable such as H2 gas, Ar gas, input current, voltage and time have been examined to prepare molybdenum metal. Molybdenum recovery of the order of 95% was achieved. The XRD results confirm the phases of molybdenum metal and the chemical analysis of the end product indicate the formation of metallic molybdenum (Mo 98%).

  3. An assessment of the concentration levels of toxic chemicals within ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ingestion of crop produce from the dumpsite area and its vicinity is likely to put lives at risk. This paper assesses the concentration levels of toxic chemicals lead (pb), cadmium (cd) and sulphides (so2) within and around Gweru dumpsite. Sampling points for soil were randomly selected using Arcview GIS along each transect ...

  4. Enhanced protection of PDMS-embedded palladium catalysts by co-embedding of sulphide-scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandella, Daniele; Ahn, Min Hyung; Kim, Hojeong; Mackenzie, Katrin

    2017-12-01

    For Pd-containing hydrodechlorination catalysts, coating with poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) was proposed earlier as promising protection scheme against poisoning. The PDMS coating can effectively repel non-permeating poisons (such as SO3(2-)) retaining the hydrodechlorination Pd activity. In the present study, the previously achieved protection efficiency was enhanced by incorporation of sulphide scavengers into the polymer. The embedded scavengers were able to bind permeating non-ionic poisons (such as H2S) during their passage through PDMS prior to Pd contact which ensured an extended catalyst lifetime. Three scavenger types forming non-permeable sulphur species from H2S - alkaline, oxidative or iron-based compounds - were either incorporated into single-layer coats around individual Pd/Al2O3 particles or into a second layer above Pd-containing PDMS films (Pd-PDMS). Hydrodechlorination and hydrogenation were chosen as model reactions, carried out in batch and continuous-flow reactors. Batch tests with all scavenger-containing catalysts showed extended Pd protection compared to scavenger-free catalysts. Solid alkaline compounds (Ca(OH)2, NaOH, CaO) and MnO2 showed the highest instantaneous scavenger efficiencies (retained Pd activity=30-60%), while iron-based catalysts, such as nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) or ferrocene (FeCp2), proved less efficient (1-10%). When stepwise poisoning was applied, the protection efficiency of iron-based and oxidizing compounds was higher in the long term than that of alkaline solids. Long-term experiments in mixed-flow reactors were performed with selected scavengers, revealing the following trend of protection efficiency: CaO2>Ca(OH)2>FeCp2. Under field-simulating conditions using a fixed-bed reactor, the combination of sulphide pre-oxidation in the water phase by H2O2 and local scavenger-enhanced Pd protection was successful. The oxidizing agent H2O2 does not disturb the Pd-catalysed reduction, while the PDMS

  5. Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube, CRT: Zn removal by sulphide precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Innocenzi, Valentina, E-mail: valentina.innocenzi1@univaq.it [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Beolchini, Francesca [Department of Marine Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Kopacek, Bernd [SAT, Austrian Society for Systems Engineering and Automation, Gurkasse 43/2, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Vegliò, Francesco [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Treatment of fluorescent powder of CRT waste. • Factorial experimental designs to study acid leaching of fluorescent powder and the purification of leach liquors. • Recover of yttrium by precipitation using oxalic acid. • Suitable flowsheet to recover yttrium from fluorescent powder. - Abstract: This work is focused on the recovery of yttrium and zinc from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube (CRT). Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 2{sup 2} full factorial plan and the highest extraction yields for yttrium and zinc equal to 100% are observed under the following conditions: 3 M of sulphuric acid, 10% v/v of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrated solution at 30% v/v, 10% w/w pulp density, 70 °C and 3 h of reaction. Two series of precipitation tests for zinc are carried out: a 2{sup 2} full factorial design and a completely randomized factorial design. In these series the factors investigated are pH of solution during the precipitation and the amount of sodium sulphide added to precipitate zinc sulphide. The data of these tests are used to describe two empirical mathematical models for zinc and yttrium precipitation yields by regression analysis. The highest precipitation yields for zinc are obtained under the following conditions: pH equal to 2–2.5% and 10–12% v/v of Na{sub 2}S concentrated solution at 10% w/v. In these conditions the coprecipitation of yttrium is of 15–20%. Finally further yttrium precipitation experiments by oxalic acid on the residual solutions, after removing of zinc, show that yttrium could be recovered and calcined to obtain the final product as yttrium oxide. The achieved results allow to propose a CRT recycling process based on leaching of fluorescent powder from cathode ray tube and recovery of yttrium oxide after removing of zinc by precipitation. The final recovery of yttrium is 75–80%.

  6. Raman spectra and cross sections of ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in the fingerprint region 400-1400 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, R. L.; Farrar, L. W.; Di Cecca, S.; Jeys, T. H.

    2016-02-01

    Raman spectra of ammonia (NH3), chlorine (Cl2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), phosgene (COCl2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) toxic gases have been measured in the fingerprint region 400-1400 cm-1. A relatively compact (37, and 37/37 Cl isotopes, respectively. Raman modes are observed at 870, 570, and 1151 cm-1 in H2S, COCl2, and SO2, respectively. Values of 3.68 ± 0.26x10-32 cm2/sr (3.68 ± 0.26x10-36 m2/sr), 1.37 ± 0.10x10-30 cm2/sr (1.37 ± 0.10x10-34 m2/sr), 3.25 ± 0.23x10-31 cm2/sr (3.25 ± 0.23x10-35 m2/sr), 1.63 ± 0.14x10-30 cm2/sr (1.63 ± 0.14x10-34 m2/sr), and 3.08 ± 0.22x10-30 cm2/sr (and 3.08 ± 0.22x10-34 m2/sr) were determined for the differential Raman cross section of the 967 cm-1 mode of NH3, sum of the 554, 547, and 539 cm-1 modes of Cl2, 870 cm-1 mode of H2S, 570 cm-1 mode of COCl2, and 1151 cm-1 mode of SO2, respectively, using the differential Raman cross section of 3.56 ± 0.14x10-31 cm2/sr (3.56 ± 0.14x10-35 m2/sr) for the 1285 cm-1 mode of CO2 as the reference.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of copper antimony tin sulphide thin films for solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, N., E-mail: nisar.ali@utm.my [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, UTM Skudai, 81310 Johor (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Govt. Post Graduate Jehanzeb College Saidu Sharif, Swat, 19200 (Pakistan); Hussain, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, UTM Skudai, 81310 Johor (Malaysia); Ahmed, R., E-mail: rashidahmed@utm.my [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, UTM Skudai, 81310 Johor (Malaysia); Wan Shamsuri, W.N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, UTM Skudai, 81310 Johor (Malaysia); Fu, Y.Q., E-mail: richard.fu@northumbria.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering & Environment, University of Northumbria, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • A new and novel material for solar cell applications is demonstrated as a replacement for toxic and expansive compounds. • The materials used in this compound are abundant and low cost. • Compound exhibit unusual optical and electrical properties. • The band gap was found to be comparable with that of GaAs. - Abstract: Low price thin film modules based on Copper antimony tin sulphide (CATS) are introduced for solar harvesting to compete for the already developed compound semiconductors. Here, CATS thin films were deposited on soda lime glass by thermal evaporation technique followed by a rapid thermal annealing in an argon atmosphere. From Our XRD analysis, it was revealed that the annealed samples were poly-crystalline and their crystallinity was improved with increasing annealing temperature. The constituent elements and their corresponding chemical states were identified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The obtained optical band gap of 1.4 eV for CATS thin film is found nearly equal to GaAs – one of the highly efficient thin film material for solar cell technology. Furthermore, our observed good optical absorbance and low transmittance for the annealed CATS thin films in the visible region of light spectrum assured the aptness of the CATS thin films for solar cell applications.

  8. Extremophiles in Mineral Sulphide Heaps: Some Bacterial Responses to Variable Temperature, Acidity and Solution Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R. Watling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In heap bioleaching, acidophilic extremophiles contribute to enhanced metal extraction from mineral sulphides through the oxidation of Fe(II and/or reduced inorganic sulphur compounds (RISC, such as elemental sulphur or mineral sulphides, or the degradation of organic compounds derived from the ore, biota or reagents used during mineral processing. The impacts of variable solution acidity and composition, as well as temperature on the three microbiological functions have been examined for up to four bacterial species found in mineral sulphide heaps. The results indicate that bacteria adapt to sufficiently high metal concentrations (Cu, Ni, Co, Zn, As to allow them to function in mineral sulphide heaps and, by engaging alternative metabolic pathways, to extend the solution pH range over which growth is sustained. Fluctuating temperatures during start up in sulphide heaps pose the greatest threat to efficient bacterial colonisation. The large masses of ores in bioleaching heaps mean that high temperatures arising from sulphide oxidation are hard to control initially, when the sulphide content of the ore is greatest. During that period, mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria are markedly reduced in both numbers and activity.

  9. Effect of aluminum and yttrium doping on zinc sulphide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Swati, E-mail: sharma.swati1507@gmail.com; Kashyap, Jyoti; Kapoor, A. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021 (India); Gupta, Shubhra [Sri Venkateswara College, University of Delhi, New Delhi-110021 (India); Natasha [Maharaja Agrasen College, University of Delhi-110053 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this work, pristine and doped Zinc Sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles have been synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method. ZnS nanoparticles have been doped with Aluminium (Al) and Yttrium (Y) with doping concentration of 5wt% each. The structural and optical properties of the as prepared nanoparticles have been studied using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) technique and Photoluminescence spectroscopy. Average grain size of 2-3nm is observed through the XRD analysis. Effect of doping on stress, strain and lattice constant of the nanoparticles has also been analyzed. Photoluminescence spectra of the as prepared nanoparticles is enhanced due to Al doping and quenched due to Y doping. EDAX studies confirm the relative doping percentage to be 3.47 % and 3.94% by wt. for Al and Y doped nanoparticles respectively. Morphology of the nanoparticles studied using TEM and SEM indicates uniform distribution of spherical nanoparticles.

  10. Effect of aluminum and yttrium doping on zinc sulphide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Swati; Kashyap, Jyoti; Gupta, Shubhra; Natasha, Kapoor, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, pristine and doped Zinc Sulphide (ZnS) nanoparticles have been synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method. ZnS nanoparticles have been doped with Aluminium (Al) and Yttrium (Y) with doping concentration of 5wt% each. The structural and optical properties of the as prepared nanoparticles have been studied using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) technique and Photoluminescence spectroscopy. Average grain size of 2-3nm is observed through the XRD analysis. Effect of doping on stress, strain and lattice constant of the nanoparticles has also been analyzed. Photoluminescence spectra of the as prepared nanoparticles is enhanced due to Al doping and quenched due to Y doping. EDAX studies confirm the relative doping percentage to be 3.47 % and 3.94% by wt. for Al and Y doped nanoparticles respectively. Morphology of the nanoparticles studied using TEM and SEM indicates uniform distribution of spherical nanoparticles.

  11. Bioleaching of pollymetallic sulphide concentrate using thermophilic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Milovan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An extreme thermophilic, iron-sulphur oxidising bacterial culture was isolated and adapted to tolerate high metal and solids concentrations at 70°C. Following isolation and adaptation, the culture was used in a batch bioleach test employing a 5-l glass standard magnetic agitated and aerated reactor, for the bioleaching of a copper-lead-zinc collective concentrate. The culture exhibited stable leach performance over the period of leach operation and overall copper and zinc extractions higher than 97%. Lead sulphide is transformed into lead sulphate remaining in the bioleach residue due to the low solubility in sulphate media. Brine leaching of bioleach residue yields 95% lead extraction. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 34023

  12. Magmatic Controls on the Genesis of Ni-Cu-PGE Sulphide Mineralisation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, R. J.; Fiorentini, M.; Baratoux, D.; Micklethwaite, S.; Sener, K.; McCuaig, C.

    2014-12-01

    Widespread igneous activity, which shows striking mineralogical, petrographical and chemical similarities with terrestrial komatiites and ferropicrites, intensely affected, reshaped and buried the primordial Martian crust. This study evaluates for the first time whether the broad igneous activity on Mars may have led to the formation of orthomagmatic Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide mineralisation similar to that associated with terrestrial komatiites and ferropicrites. Particular focus is laid on two different components of the Martian Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide mineral system: 1) the potential metal and sulphur fertility of source regions, and 2) the physical/chemical processes that enable sulphide supersaturation and metal concentration into an immiscible sulphide liquid. We show that potentially metal-rich Martian mantle melts likely reach sulphide saturation within 20-35 wt% of simple silicate fractionation; a value that is comparable to that of the terrestrial equivalents (i.e. ferropicrites and komatiites). However, the majority of terrestrial world-class Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide deposits originated by the assimilation of crustal sulphur-rich country rocks, allowing the attainment of sulphide supersaturation and liquid segregation during early stages of magma evolution. The high sulphur content in Martian crustal lithologies, ranging from sulphide bearing magmatic rocks to sulphate-rich regoliths and sedimentary deposits, imply that mantle melts potentially assimilated significant amounts of crustal sulphur during their ascent and emplacement. As a main outcome we show that channelled and fluid lava flows, which potentially emplaced and incised into these sulphur-rich crustal lithologies, are the most promising systems that may have led to the formation of Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide mineralisation on Mars.

  13. Sulphide oxidation in ornamental slates: protective treatment with siloxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivas, T.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the results of the measurement of the effectiveness of two silanes-siloxanes based products applied on roofing slates with the aim of slowing down the oxidation of the iron sulphide inclusions. The products were applied by immersion and spraying and also at different dilutions. The effectiveness of the treatments were evaluated by means of static contact angle measurements and water absorption coefficient variations; also, the durability under thermal cycles and the colour variations before treatment and before UVA exposition were tested. In all the cases, a very low product consumptions were obtained, due to the particular porous system of these rocks; also, any of the treatments increased the static angle. Nevertheless, the products tested remarkably increased the resistance of sulphides to the oxidation during thermal cycles without producing important changes in rock colour and also they have shown a good durability under UVA exposition

    En este trabajo se presentan los resultados de la medida de la eficacia de dos silanos-siloxanos aplicados en pizarras de techar con el objetivo de reducir la oxidación de las inclusiones de sulfuros de hierro. Los productos fueron aplicados por inmersión y spray a diferentes concentraciones. La efectividad de los tratamientos fue evaluada mediante la medida del ángulo de contacto estático y las variaciones del coeficiente de absorción de agua y su durabilidad mediante ciclos térmicos y de exposición a luz ultravioleta. A pesar del bajo consumo de ambos productos, debido al particular sistema poroso de estas rocas, y del bajo incremento del ángulo de contacto, ambos silanos-siloxanos incrementan notablemente la resistencia de los sulfuros a la oxidación durante los ciclos térmicos sin producir cambios relevantes en el color de la roca y muestran una aceptable durabilidad bajo la luz ultravioleta.

  14. Investigation of sulphide in core drilled boreholes KLX06, KAS03 and KAS09 at Laxemar and Aespoe Chemical-, microbiological- and dissolved gas data from groundwater in four borehole sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosdahl, Anette (Geosigma AB (Sweden)); Pedersen, Karsten; Hallbeck, Lotta (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden)); Wallin, Bill (Geokema AB (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    samples. Analyses of delta34S in dissolved sulphide and sulphate showed a fractionation corresponding to about +20 per mille, which is expected for open systems where microbial sulphate reduction occurs. Analyses of dissolved gases showed that those gases that are biochemically active (carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane) decreased in concentration during pumping, while the concentrations of gaseous compounds such as nitrogen and argon were unchanged. In KAS03 and KAS09, drilled and equipped at the end of the 1980s, the installed equipment was lifted up and inspected visually following completion of sampling. Water standpipes were partially filled with black sludge; connection pipes and tubing were covered with deposits that seemed to be of salt and rust. Analyses of the water in the standpipes reflected the conditions in which water was not exposed to the impact of pumping for a couple of years back. The concentrations of SRB were high (> 104 cells mL-1), especially in KAS09, where sulphides were sometimes also very high . between 92 and 102 mg L-1. A comparison of the ionic product of iron (II) and sulphide with the saturation indices of amorphous and crystalline (mackinawite) mono sulphides shows that the measured sulphide in KAS09 results in significant supersaturation. Given the fast kinetic processes for precipitation of mono sulphides, supersaturation is unlikely. A possible reason for the supersaturation, which was mainly observed in samples with high content of organic matter and particulates, could be that the analysis of sulphide most likely included both dissolved and particulate sulphide. Overall, this study has shown that elevated sulphide concentrations in core drilled boreholes may occur in the periods between pumping. Different chemical and physical conditions prevail in the isolated borehole section, in the tubes and in the standpipe as compared with the surrounding rock fractures. For example, new surfaces and materials are added (drilled borehole

  15. Raman spectra and cross sections of ammonia, chlorine, hydrogen sulfide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide toxic gases in the fingerprint region 400-1400 cm−1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Aggarwal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectra of ammonia (NH3, chlorine (Cl2, hydrogen sulfide (H2S, phosgene (COCl2, and sulfur dioxide (SO2 toxic gases have been measured in the fingerprint region 400-1400 cm−1. A relatively compact (<2′x2′x2′, sensitive, 532 nm 10 W CW Raman system with double-pass laser and double-sided collection was used for these measurements. Two Raman modes are observed at 934 and 967 cm−1 in NH3. Three Raman modes are observed in Cl2 at 554, 547, and 539 cm−1, which are due to the 35/35 35/37, and 37/37 Cl isotopes, respectively. Raman modes are observed at 870, 570, and 1151 cm−1 in H2S, COCl2, and SO2, respectively. Values of 3.68 ± 0.26x10−32 cm2/sr (3.68 ± 0.26x10−36 m2/sr, 1.37 ± 0.10x10−30 cm2/sr (1.37 ± 0.10x10−34 m2/sr, 3.25 ± 0.23x10−31 cm2/sr (3.25 ± 0.23x10−35 m2/sr, 1.63 ± 0.14x10−30 cm2/sr (1.63 ± 0.14x10−34 m2/sr, and 3.08 ± 0.22x10−30 cm2/sr (and 3.08 ± 0.22x10−34 m2/sr were determined for the differential Raman cross section of the 967 cm−1 mode of NH3, sum of the 554, 547, and 539 cm−1 modes of Cl2, 870 cm−1 mode of H2S, 570 cm−1 mode of COCl2, and 1151 cm-1 mode of SO2, respectively, using the differential Raman cross section of 3.56 ± 0.14x10−31 cm2/sr (3.56 ± 0.14x10−35 m2/sr for the 1285 cm−1 mode of CO2 as the reference.

  16. The Ioko-Dovyren layered massif (Southern Siberia, Russia): 2. Melt vs sulphide percolation process and modeling sulphide saturation in the parental magmas and original cumulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariskin, Alexey; Danyushevsky, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    An important feature of the Dovyren intrusive complex [1] is its fertility due to the presence of massive sulphide ores near the bottom of the Ioko-Dovyren massif (YDM, SW and NE margins), as well as PGE-reefs in anorthosites from the Ol-gabbronorite zone in the centre [2]. These observations argue for the importance of downward percolation of sulphides through the porous space of cumulates and probable link of this process with upward migration of intercumulus melts at a post-cumulus stage. Indirectly, this is supported by the basic conclusion on the open-system behavior of the magma chamber [1]. A key aspect of these speculations is the onset of sulphide immiscibility in YDM parental magmas and the original cumulates. To reconstruct the sulphide saturation history, we applied a newly developed sulphide version of COMAGMAT (ver. 5.2 [3]) to the rocks from the chilled zone of YDM and underlying ultramafic sills, by simulating the course of their crystallization coupled with the SCSS calculations. Modeled crystallization trajectories evidence for under-saturated nature of the most primitive parental magmas (1310oC, Fo88) from which the chilled rocks were crystallized, whereas more evolved rocks from the sills demonstrate sulphide saturation starting from their initial temperature (1190oC, Fo85), see [1]. This correlates with the absence of sulphide ores in the central parts of the pluton and their occurrence in underlying ultramafics and YDM border series containing olivine Fo~85. Another set of calculations was carried out to demonstrate the effect of bulk Ni contents in Ol cumulate piles on the evolution of SCSS during their post-cumulus crystallization [3]. To achieve the goal, two calculations by the COMAGMAT-5.2 model were carried out. The first one involved modelling equilibrium crystallization for an initial mixture of Ol (Fo88) and intercumulus melt (~1320oC), with the starting composition corresponding to that of a bottom Pl-dunite (2315 ppm NiO, 0.030 wt

  17. Use of discriminant analysis to evaluate compositional controls of stratiform massive sulphide deposits in Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Divi, S. R; Thorpe, R. I; Franklin, J. M

    1980-01-01

    Multiple discriminant analysis of Cu, Pb, Zn, Ag, and Au grades in Canadian stratiform massive sulphide deposits revealed that the relative grade values show a systematic variation with the geological...

  18. Sulphide Resistance in the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa: a Comparative Study of Morphology and Photosynthetic Performance Between the Sulphide-Resistant Mutant and the Wild-Type Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañares-España, Elena; del Mar Fernández-Arjona, María; García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Hernández-López, Miguel; Reul, Andreas; Mariné, Mariona Hernández; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is a mesophilic freshwater organism, which cannot tolerate sulphide. However, it was possible to isolate a sulphide-resistant (S(r)) mutant strain that was able to survive in a normally lethal medium sulphide. In order to evaluate the cost of the mutation conferring sulphide resistance in the S(r) strain of M. aeruginosa, the morphology and the photosynthetic performance were compared to that found in the wild-type, sulphide-sensitive (S(s)) strain. An increase in size and a disrupted morphology was observed in S(r) cells in comparison to the S(s) counterpart. Phycoerythrin and phycocyanin levels were higher in the S(r) than in the S(s) cells, whereas a higher carotenoid content, per unit volume, was found in the S(s) strain. The irradiance-saturated photosynthetic oxygen-production rate (GPR max) and the photosynthetic efficiency (measured both by oxygen production and fluorescence, α(GPR) and α(ETR)) were lower in the S(r) strain than in the wild-type. These results appear to be the result of package effect. On the other hand, the S(r) strain showed higher quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching, especially those regulated mechanisms (estimated throughout qN and Y(NPQ)) and a significantly lower slope in the maximum quantum yield of light-adapted samples (Fv'/Fm') compared to the S(s) strain. These findings point to a change in the regulation of the quenching of the transition states (qT) in the S(r) strain which may be generated by a change in the distribution of thylakoidal membranes, which somehow could protect metalloenzymes of the electron transport chain from the lethal effect of sulphide.

  19. Dolomite limits acidification of a biofilter degrading dimethyl sulphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet; Van Langenhove H; Philips

    1999-01-01

    The applicability of dolomite particles to control acidification in a Hyphomicrobium MS3 inoculated biofilter removing dimethyl sulphide (Me2S) was studied. While direct inoculation of the dolomite particles with the liquid microbial culture was not successful, start-up of Me2S-degradation in the biofilter was observed when the dolomite particles were mixed with 33% (wt/wt) of Hyphomicrobium MS3-inoculated compost or wood bark material. Under optimal conditions, an elimination capacity (EC) of 1680 g Me2S m(-3) d(-1) was obtained for the compost/dolomite biofilter. Contrary to a wood bark or compost biofilter, no reduction in activity due to acidification was observed in these biofilters over a 235 day period because of the micro environment neutralisation of the microbial metabolite H2SO4 with the carbonate in the dolomite material. However, performance of the biofilter decreased when the moisture content of the mixed compost/dolomite material dropped below 15%. Next to this, nutrient limitation resulted in a gradual decrease of the EC and supplementation of a nitrogen source was a prerequisite to obtain a long-term high EC (> 250 g Me2S m(-3) d(-1)) for Me2S. In relation to this nitrogen supplementation, it was observed that stable ECs for Me2S were obtained when this nutrient was dosed to the biofilter at a Me2S-C/NH4Cl-N ratio of about 10.

  20. Water-driven stabilization of cadmium sulphide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Navendu; Sen, P.

    2017-12-01

    Water driven stabilization of cadmium sulphide (CdS) nanoparticles, synthesized through a novel and facile electro-explosion of wire (EEW) technique, is reported by us. The transformation of prepared material was visually evident; as greenish black colour of the colloidal as well as the powder particles, obtained just after the synthesis, changed to orange colour after one month. Cubic Hawleyite phase CdS nanoparticles with 2.3-13.4 nm average crystallite size were ascertained by XRD analysis. HRTEM and AFM analysis collectively confirmed the formation of stable CdS nanoparticles. The crucial S-H vibrational mode, a signature interaction of CdS nanoparticles with surrounding water molecules, was revealed by FTIR analysis. The composition of prepared nanoparticles was accessed through XPS analysis. Not only structural but optical properties of nanoparticles also altered due to aging of nanoparticles. Enhanced band gap of CdS nanoparticles and gradual prominence of absorption energy with aging were demonstrated through UV-vis analysis. Complementary to this, PL spectroscopic analysis revealed the photophysics of CdS nanoparticles by providing details of radiative recombination channels. Thus, intricacies of CdS nanoparticles stabilization in aqueous environment were unravelled on the basis of variations in crystallinity, local chemical environment, alterations in electronic structure and optical processes occurring therein.

  1. Penguins are attracted to dimethyl sulphide at sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kyran L B; Pichegru, Lorien; Ryan, Peter G

    2011-08-01

    Breeding Spheniscus penguins are central place foragers that feed primarily on schooling pelagic fish. They are visual hunters, but it is unclear how they locate prey patches on a coarse scale. Many petrels and storm petrels (Procellariiformes), the penguins' closest relatives, use olfactory cues to locate prey concentrations at sea, but this has not been demonstrated for penguins. Procellariiforms are attracted to a variety of olfactory cues, including dimethyl sulphide (DMS), an organosulphur compound released when phytoplankton is grazed, as well as fish odorants such as cod liver oil. A recent study found that African penguins Spheniscus demersus react to DMS on land. We confirm this result and show that African penguins are also attracted by DMS at sea. DMS-scented oil slicks attracted 2-3 times more penguins than control slicks, whereas penguins showed no response to slicks containing cod liver oil. The number of penguins attracted to DMS increased for at least 30 min, suggesting penguins could travel up to 2 km to reach scent cues. Repeats of land-based trials confirmed previous results showing DMS sensitivity of penguins on land. Our results also support the hypothesis that African penguins use DMS as an olfactory cue to locate prey patches at sea from a distance, which is particularly important given their slow commuting speed relative to that of flying seabirds.

  2. Hydrogen sulphide poisoning of shallow seas following the end-Triassic extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richoz, S.; van de Schootbrugge, B.; Pross, J.; Püttmann, W.; Quan, T.M.; Lindström, S.; Heunisch, C.; Fiebig, J.; Maquil, R.; Schouten, S.; Hauzenberger, C.A.; Wignall, P.B.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of complex life over the past 600 million years was disrupted by at least five mass extinctions, one of which occurred at the close of the Triassic period. The end-Triassic extinction corresponds to a period of high atmospheric-CO2 concentrations caused by massive volcanism and biomass

  3. Hydrogen sulphide poisoning of shallow seas following the end-Triassic extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richoz, S.; van de Schootbrugge, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/376758562; Pross, J.; Püttmann, W.; Quan, T.M.; Lindström, S.; Heunisch, C.; Fiebig, J.; Maquil, R.; Schouten, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/137124929; Hauzenberger, C.A.; Wignall, P.B.

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of complex life over the past 600 million years was disrupted by at least five mass extinctions, one of which occurred at the close of the Triassic period. The end-Triassic extinction corresponds to a period of high atmospheric-CO 2 concentrations caused by massive volcanism and

  4. Pharmacological tools for hydrogen sulphide research: a brief, introductory guide for beginners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Whiteman, Matthew; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this brief review is to help researchers in their initial approach to the H2S field and to provide answers for the most frequently posed questions by newcomers to the topic related to H2S donors and inhibitors of H2S synthesis, as well as methods to measure H2S production. Here the reader will find a practical guide that provides fast and to the point information on how to (i) deliver H2S to cells; (ii) modulate its endogenous production; and (iii) measure its levels in fluids, cells and tissues in order to gain an understanding of its role in health and disease. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. A Density Functional Theory Study of Raman Modes of Hydrogenated Cadmium Sulphide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Majid

    2012-07-01

    results generated are found to be in close agreement with the literature. The observed red shift in different modes is assigned to stimulated Raman stretching and blue shift is ascribed to the coherent anti‐stokes Raman scattering.

  6. Simultaneous Hydrogen Sulphide and Carbon Dioxide Removal from Biogas by Water-Swollen Reverse Osmosis Membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dolejš, Petr; Poštulka, Václav; Sedláková, Zuzana; Jandová, Věra; Vejražka, Jiří; Esposito, E.; Jansen, J.C.; Izák, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 131, JUN 27 (2014), s. 108-116 ISSN 1383-5866 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/10/1194; GA ČR GA14-12695S; GA TA ČR TE01020080; GA MŠk LH14006; GA MŠk(CZ) 7C11009; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13018 Grant - others:RFCS(XE) RFCRCT-2010-00009; PONRC(IT) PON01_01840 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : agro-biogas upgrading * biomethane * water vapour Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.091, year: 2014

  7. Sulphur-bearing molecules in AGB stars. I. The occurrence of hydrogen sulphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilovich, T.; Van de Sande, M.; De Beck, E.; Decin, L.; Olofsson, H.; Ramstedt, S.; Millar, T. J.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Sulphur is a relatively abundant element in the local Galaxy that is known to form a variety of molecules in the circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars. The abundances of these molecules vary based on the chemical types and mass-loss rates of AGB stars. Aims: Through a survey of (sub-)millimetre emission lines of various sulphur-bearing molecules, we aim to determine which molecules are the primary carriers of sulphur in different types of AGB stars. In this paper, the first in a series, we investigate the occurrence of H2S in AGB circumstellar envelopes and determine its abundance, where possible. Methods: We surveyed 20 AGB stars with a range of mass-loss rates and different chemical types using the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope to search for rotational transition lines of five key sulphur-bearing molecules: CS, SiS, SO, SO2, and H2S. Here we present our results for H2S, including detections, non-detections, and detailed radiative transfer modelling of the detected lines. We compared results based on various descriptions of the molecular excitation of H2S and different abundance distributions, including Gaussian abundances, where possible, and two different abundance distributions derived from chemical modelling results. Results: We detected H2S towards five AGB stars, all of which have high mass-loss rates of Ṁ ≥ 5 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 and are oxygen rich. H2S was not detected towards the carbon or S-type stars that fall in a similar mass-loss range. For the stars in our sample with detections, we find peak o-H2S abundances relative to H2 between 4 × 10-7 and 2.5 × 10-5. Conclusions: Overall, we conclude that H2S can play a significant role in oxygen-rich AGB stars with higher mass-loss rates, but is unlikely to play a key role in stars of other chemical types or in lower mass-loss rate oxygen-rich stars. For two sources, V1300 Aql and GX Mon, H2S is most likely the dominant sulphur-bearing molecule in the circumstellar envelope.

  8. Modification of sulphide catalysts for hydro-treatment by addition of fluorine; Modification de catalyseurs sulfure pour l'hydrotraitement par ajout de fluor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, L.

    1999-12-15

    Ni, Mo and NiMo sulphide catalysts supported on alumina were modified with fluorine in the range of 0.8 to 17 weight % F and tested in ortho-xylene hydrogenation under 60 bar total pressure and in presence of 1 bar H{sub 2}S. A positive effect of fluorine on Ni and NiMo catalytic activity was found. The tested catalysts were characterised by electronic microscopy and X-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy. The observed variations in dispersion and sulfidation degree of the active phase are not important enough to explain the good catalytic activity. The catalytic test was adapted in a way that allows a determination of electronic effects on sulphide catalysts under typical hydro-treating conditions. The product distribution in cis- and trans- 1,2-dimethyl-cyclohexane was found to be sensitive to the electronic state of the catalyst's active site. This was verified by addition of electron-donating NH{sub 3} as well as other evidences. According to this test, fluorine acts as an electron-donator on Ni and NiMo catalysts' active sites. A volcano curve of catalytic activity in function of electronic density is obtained for MoS{sub 2} based catalysts (Mo and NiMo), suggesting the existence of an optimum electronic density which would be achieved by introduction of about 6 weight % F into a NiMo catalyst. Characterization by infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed CO confirms the electron-donating effect of fluorine. Fluoridation tests of bulk catalysts permitted to exclude a bonding between fluorine and the active sulphide phase in absence of a support. It is suggested that electron-donating fluoride located on the surface of alumina, the interaction with nickel being of van-der-Waals type. (author)

  9. Evaluation of the dimethyl sulphide distribution in the ECHAM model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, P.; Kjellstroem, E. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology, Arrhenius Lab.; Feichter, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    The three-dimensional model ECHAM has been used to simulate dimethyl sulphide (DMS) concentrations in the global troposphere. Emission of DMS from natural sources and a simple scheme for the oxidation of DMS have been introduced in the ECHAM sulphur model developed at the Max-Planck-Institute for meteorology in Hamburg. In this study we focus on the contribution to the atmospheric sulphur burden of DMS emissions from the oceans. Calculation with the ECHAM model, based on prescribed ocean water concentrations, gives a global annual oceanic emission of 13 Tg DMS-S. This figure has been adjusted to 16 Tg in order to bring it in better agreement with other estimates. The calculated turn-over time for DMS is 2.2 days globally, which is in the range of previous estimates. For DMS in the atmospheric surface layer, the agreement between simulated and observed concentrations is within a factor of {+-} 2 at low latitudes. However, in the southern hemisphere a significant overestimate of the simulated DMS occurs at high latitudes in summer and at mid and high latitudes in winter. Comparing with long-term measurements at Cape Grim and Amsterdam Island in the Southern Ocean during winter gives a difference of one order of magnitude and a factor of 3, respectively. At Drake Passage in the Antarctic Ocean during November the model predicts a factor of 5 higher concentrations than measurements performed over this area. The limited number of observations of DMS concentrations in sea-water indicates that the concentrations prescribed in the model might be nearly a factor of 2 too high in the southern hemisphere during fall, winter and spring. The results indicate the need for future model refinements with respect both to the biogenic emission and possibly also oxidants. 48 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  10. The Effect of Msh2 Knockdown on Toxicity Induced by tert-Butyl-hydroperoxide, Potassium Bromate, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Base Excision Repair Proficient and Deficient Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cooley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA mismatch repair (MMR and base excision repair (BER systems are important determinants of cellular toxicity following exposure to agents that cause oxidative DNA damage. To examine the interactions between these different repair systems, we examined whether toxicity, induced by t-BOOH and KBrO3, differs in BER proficient (Mpg+/+, Nth1+/+ and deficient (Mpg−/−, Nth1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs following Msh2 knockdown of between 79 and 88% using an shRNA expression vector. Msh2 knockdown in Nth1+/+ cells had no effect on t-BOOH and KBrO3 induced toxicity as assessed by an MTT assay; knockdown in Nth1−/− cells resulted in increased resistance to t-BOOH and KBrO3, a result consistent with Nth1 removing oxidised pyrimidines. Msh2 knockdown in Mpg+/+ cells had no effect on t-BOOH toxicity but increased resistance to KBrO3; in Mpg−/− cells, Msh2 knockdown increased cellular sensitivity to KBrO3 but increased resistance to t-BOOH, suggesting a role for Mpg in removing DNA damage induced by these agents. MSH2 dependent and independent pathways then determine cellular toxicity induced by oxidising agents. A complex interaction between MMR and BER repair systems, that is, exposure dependent, also exists to determine cellular toxicity.

  11. The Effect of Msh2 Knockdown on Toxicity Induced by tert-Butyl-hydroperoxide, Potassium Bromate, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Base Excision Repair Proficient and Deficient Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, N.; Elder, R. H.; Povey, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and base excision repair (BER) systems are important determinants of cellular toxicity following exposure to agents that cause oxidative DNA damage. To examine the interactions between these different repair systems, we examined whether toxicity, induced by t-BOOH and KBrO3, differs in BER proficient (Mpg +/+, Nth1 +/+) and deficient (Mpg −/−, Nth1 −/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) following Msh2 knockdown of between 79 and 88% using an shRNA expression vector. Msh2 knockdown in Nth1 +/+ cells had no effect on t-BOOH and KBrO3 induced toxicity as assessed by an MTT assay; knockdown in Nth1 −/− cells resulted in increased resistance to t-BOOH and KBrO3, a result consistent with Nth1 removing oxidised pyrimidines. Msh2 knockdown in Mpg +/+ cells had no effect on t-BOOH toxicity but increased resistance to KBrO3; in Mpg −/− cells, Msh2 knockdown increased cellular sensitivity to KBrO3 but increased resistance to t-BOOH, suggesting a role for Mpg in removing DNA damage induced by these agents. MSH2 dependent and independent pathways then determine cellular toxicity induced by oxidising agents. A complex interaction between MMR and BER repair systems, that is, exposure dependent, also exists to determine cellular toxicity. PMID:23984319

  12. Experimental observation of zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-induced iron sulphide formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltanahmadi, Siavash, E-mail: s.soltanahmadi@leeds.ac.uk [Institute of Functional Surfaces, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Morina, Ardian [Institute of Functional Surfaces, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Eijk, Marcel C.P. van; Nedelcu, Ileana [SKF Engineering and Research Centre, 3430 DT Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Neville, Anne [Institute of Functional Surfaces, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-31

    Graphical abstract: Chemical analysis of ZDDP-induced tribofilm under severe boundary lubricated regime in nano and micro-meter scales.▪ - Highlights: • A ZDDP-derived locally formed iron-sulphide layer is detected on the steel surface. • The iron-sulphide is a 5–10 nm thin distinct layer at steel-phosphate interface. • Near the surface-crack site the elemental distribution of the tribofilm is altered. • Sulphur concentration is enhanced in the iron-sulphide layer near the cracked-site. • ZDDP elements are detected inside the crack with a greater contribution of sulphur. - Abstract: Zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP) as a well-known anti-wear additive enhances the performance of the lubricant beyond its wear-protection action, through its anti-oxidant and Extreme Pressure (EP) functionality. In spite of over thirty years of research attempting to reveal the mechanism of action of ZDDP, there are still some uncertainties around the exact mechanisms of its action. This is especially the case with the role of sulphide layer formed in the tribofilm and its impact on surface fatigue. Although iron sulphide on the substrate is hypothesised in literature to form as a separate layer, there has been no concrete experimental observation on the distribution of the iron sulphide as a dispersed precipitate, distinct layer at the steel substrate or both. It remains to be clarified whether the iron sulphide layer homogeneously covers the surface or locally forms at the surface. In the current study a cross section of the specimen after experiment was prepared and has been investigated with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis. A 5–10 nm iron sulphide layer is visualised on the interface as a separate layer underneath the phosphate layer with an altered distribution of tribofilm elements near the crack site. The iron sulphide interface layer is more visible near the crack site where the concentration of the

  13. Comparative study of ketoconazole versus selenium sulphide shampoo in pityriasis versicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal K

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Forty patients suffering from pityriasis versicolor were treated with either 2% ketoconazole shampoo (20 patients or 2.5% selenium sulphide shampoo (20 patients, once a week for three weeks. On global assessment after one month of start of therapy, 19 (95% out of 20 patients treated with ketoconazole shampoo were cured while one case had mild residual disease. In selenium sulphide shampoo group, 17 (85% out of 20 patients were cured, one had mild residual disease and two had considerable residual disease. No significant difference was observed in the response rates in the two groups. Relapse occurred in one patient of ketoconazole group and two patients of selenium sulphide group during the follow - up period of three months.

  14. Preparation of cu/fes nanoparticles by mechanochemical reduction of copper sulphide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Takacs, L.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    mechanochemical reduction of copper sulphide by elemental iron. Platelets of Cu/FeS nanoparticles are formed as aggregates, tenths of micrometers in diameter. However, the average grain size of the freshly formed copper is between 10 and 25 nanometers depending on the milling conditions.......The mechanochemical reduction of copper sulphide with elemental iron was studied. The methods of XPS, SEM, EDX, and low temperature nitrogen sorption were used to analyse the surface composition and the composite particles formed from elemental copper and hexagonal 2C-troilite. The study...... of the mechanism and kinetics of the mechanochemical reaction by magnetic measurements, XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy has revealed the details of the process.The transformations of copper sulphide, the synthesis of cubic FeS and its transformation to the hexagonal form are associated with the primary...

  15. Experimental observation of zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-induced iron sulphide formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanahmadi, Siavash; Morina, Ardian; van Eijk, Marcel C. P.; Nedelcu, Ileana; Neville, Anne

    2017-08-01

    Zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP) as a well-known anti-wear additive enhances the performance of the lubricant beyond its wear-protection action, through its anti-oxidant and Extreme Pressure (EP) functionality. In spite of over thirty years of research attempting to reveal the mechanism of action of ZDDP, there are still some uncertainties around the exact mechanisms of its action. This is especially the case with the role of sulphide layer formed in the tribofilm and its impact on surface fatigue. Although iron sulphide on the substrate is hypothesised in literature to form as a separate layer, there has been no concrete experimental observation on the distribution of the iron sulphide as a dispersed precipitate, distinct layer at the steel substrate or both. It remains to be clarified whether the iron sulphide layer homogeneously covers the surface or locally forms at the surface. In the current study a cross section of the specimen after experiment was prepared and has been investigated with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis. A 5-10 nm iron sulphide layer is visualised on the interface as a separate layer underneath the phosphate layer with an altered distribution of tribofilm elements near the crack site. The iron sulphide interface layer is more visible near the crack site where the concentration of the sulphur is enhanced. Also, ZDDP elements were clearly detected inside the crack with a varied relative concentration from the crack-mouth to the crack-tip. Sulphur is present inside the crack to a higher extent than in the bulk of the tribofilm.

  16. Long-term effects of sulphide on the enhanced biological removal of phosphorus : The symbiotic role of Thiothrix caldifontis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio Rincon, F.J.; Welles, L.; Lopez Vazquez, Carlos; Nierychlo, M.; Abbas, B.A.; Geleijnse, M.A.A.; Nielsen, PH; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.; Brdanovic, Damir

    Thiothrix caldifontis was the dominant microorganism (with an estimated bio-volume of 65 ± 3%) in a lab-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) system containing 100 mg of sulphide per litre in the influent. After a gradual exposure to the presence of sulphide, the EBPR system initially

  17. Extraction of antimony and arsenic from sulphidic concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BalហPeter

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of both mineral processing and extractive metallurgy of minerals depends on the separation of individual mineral components and on the exposure of their surface. The production of flotation concentrates, with particle sizes of tens of microns, is not sufficient for many hydrometallurgical processes to operate at their optimum. As a consequence, metallurgical plants require for the effective processing high temperatures and pressures and some sort of concentrate pretreatment. Mechanical activation is an innovative procedure where an improvement in hydrometallurgical processes can be attained via a combination of new surface area and formation of crystalline defects in minerals. The lowering of reaction temperatures, the increase of rate and amount of solubility, preparation of water soluble compounds, the necessity for simpler and less expensive reactors and shorter reaction times are some of the advantages of mechanical activation. The environmental aspects of these processes are particularly attractive.This paper is devoted to the examples of application of mechanochemical treatment in the processing of sulfidic concentrates. The sulphide concentrates of various origin (Peru, Chile, Slovakia were succesfully tested for antimony and arsenic extraction. The mechanochemical treatment improve the degree of recovery and the rate of leaching of both metals. Two modes of mechanochemical treatment were tested: the mechanical activation before leaching and the mechanochemical leaching which integrates mechanical activation and leaching into a common step. The flowsheet consisted of mechanochemical leaching in an attritor and further operations as filtration, cementation, antimony precipitation, crystallization and arsenic precipitation. The pilot plant unit was designed for 500 kg per day feed of tetrahedrite concentrate. For the antimony extraction, electrowinning has also been considered. The residue which is a CuAgAu concentrate was

  18. Dynamic of cadmium accumulation in the internal organs of rats after exposure to cadmium chloride and cadmium sulphide nanoparticules of various sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apykhtina O.L.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of study of cadmium accumulation in the internal organs of Wistar rats after prolonged intraperitoneal administration of cadmium chloride and cadmium sulphide nanoparticles of 4-6 nm and 9-11 nm in size in a dose of 0.08 mg /kg/day calculated as cadmium. Toxic effects were evaluated after 30 injections (1.5 months, 60 injections (3 months, and 1.5 months after the exposure has been ceased. The results of the study showed that the most intensive accumulation of cadmium was observed in the kidneys and liver of experimental animals, which is due to the peculiarities of the toxicokinetics and the route of administration of cadmium compounds. In the kidneys, spleen and thymus of animals exposed to cadmium sulphide nanoparticles, a greater concentration of cadmium than in the organs of animals exposed to cadmium chloride was found. Cadmium accumulated more intensively in the spleen after exposure to larger nanoparticles, than in the kidneys and thymus. In the liver, heart, aorta and brain significant accumulation was observed after cadmium chloride exposure.

  19. Sulphide mineralization and wall-rock alteration in ophiolites and modern oceanic spreading centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Massive and stockwork Fe-Cu-Zn (Cyprus type) sulphide deposits in the upper parts of ophiolite complexes represent hydrothermal mineralization at ancient accretionary plate boundaries. These deposits are probable metallogenic analogues of the polymetallic sulphide deposits recently discovered along modern oceanic spreading centres. Genetic models for these deposits suggest that mineralization results from large-scale circulation of sea-water through basaltic basement along the tectonically active axis of spreading, a zone of high heat flow. The high geothermal gradient above 1 to 2 km deep magma chambers emplaced below the ridge axis drives the convective circulation cell. Cold oxidizing sea-water penetrating the crust on the ridge flanks becomes heated and evolves into a highly reduced somewhat acidic hydrothermal solvent during interaction with basaltic wall-rock. Depending on the temperature and water/rock ratio, this fluid is capable of leaching and transporting iron, manganese, and base metals; dissolved sea-water sulphate is reduced to sulphide. At the ridge axis, the buoyant hydrothermal fluid rises through permeable wall-rocks, and fluid flow may be focussed along deep-seated fractures related to extensional tectonic processes. Metal sulphides are precipitated along channelways as the ascending fluid undergoes adiabatic expansion and then further cooling during mixing with ambient sub-sea-floor water. Vigorous fluid flow results in venting of reduced fluid at the sea-floor/sea-water interface and deposition of massive sulphide. A comparison of sulphide mineralization and wall-rock alteration in ancient and modern spreading centre environments supports this genetic concept. Massive sulphide deposits in ophiolites generally occur in clusters of closely spaced (sheeted-dike complex. Several deposits in Cyprus are confined to grabens or the hanging wall of premineralization normal faults. Polymetallic massive sulphide deposits and active hydrothermal vents at

  20. The investigation of the kinetics of hydrochemical oxidation of metal sulphides with the aim of determination of the optimal conditions for the selective extraction of molybdenum from ores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutsik V.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the oxidation of molybdenyte, pyrite and sphalerite in solutions of nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium hypochlorite was studied by the rotating disk method. The influence of the molar concentration of reagent, pH of solution, temperature, disk rotation frequency, and duration of measurements on the specific rate of hydrochemical oxidation of sulpfides was determined. The kinetic models allowing to calculate the dissolution rate of sulphides when these parameters change simultaneously were obtained. The conditions of kinetically and diffusion-controlled processes were detected. The details of mechanism of the studied processes were revealed. The nature of intermediate solid products, the reasons and the conditions of their formation as well as the character of their influence on the kinetics of dissolution processes were determined. The probable schemes of interactions corresponding to the observable kinetic dependences were offered. The conditions of the effective and selective molybdenum leaching directly from ore without its concentration were found.

  1. Effect of sulphide on enhanced biological phosphorus removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio Rincon, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    The enhanced biological removal of phosphorus (EBPR) is a popular process due to high removal efficiency, low operational costs, and the possibility of phosphorus recovery. Nevertheless, the stability of the EBPR depends on different factors such as: temperature, pH, and the presence of toxic

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of organic sulphides by 2,2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    o-compounds, the contribution of delocalized effect is slightly more than that of the field effect. The oxidation of alkyl phenyl sulphides is subject to both polar and steric effects of the alkyl groups. Polar reaction constants are negative, indicating an electron-deficient sulphur centre in the rate-determining step. A mechanism ...

  3. Statistical optimization of gold recovery from difficult leachable sulphide minerals using bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Hussin A.M. [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Mining Engineering Dept.; El-Midany, Ayman A. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-07-01

    Some of refractory gold ores represent one of the difficult processable ores due to fine dissemination and interlocking of the gold grains with the associated sulphide minerals. This makes it impossible to recover precious metals from sulphide matrices by direct cyanide leaching even at high consumption of cyanide solution. Research to solve this problem is numerous. Application of bacteria shows that, some types of bacteria have great affect on sulphides bio-oxidation and consequently facilitate the leaching process. In this paper, leaching of Saudi gold ore, from Alhura area, containing sulphides before cyanidation is studied to recover gold from such ores applying bacteria. The process is investigated using stirred reactor bio-leaching rather than heap bio-leaching. Using statistical analysis the main affecting variables under studied conditions were identified. The design results indicated that the dose of bacteria, retention time and nutrition K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} are the most significant parameters. The higher the bacterial dose and the bacterial nutrition, the better is the concentrate grade. Results show that the method is technically effective in gold recovery. A gold concentrate containing > 100 g/t gold was obtained at optimum conditions, from an ore containing < 2 g/t gold i.e., 10 ml bacterial dose, 6 days retention time, and 6.5 kg/t K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}as bacteria nutrition. (orig.)

  4. Focus on CSIR research in pollution and waste: High sulphide Concentrations tolerated by sulphate reducing bacteria

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greben, H

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a common result of mining activities caused by bacterial oxidation of sulphide minerals (pyrite) that results in sulphate rich waste water. AMD can be treated biologically in the presence of sulphate reducing bacteria...

  5. Interaction of Peat Soil and Sulphidic Material Substratum: Role of Peat Layer and Groundwater Level Fluctuations on Phosphorus Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Heru Purwanto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P often becomes limiting factor for plants growth. Phosphorus geochemistry in peatland soil is associated with the presence of peat layer and groundwater level fluctuations. The research was conducted to study the role of peat layer and groundwater level fluctuations on P concentration in peatland. The research was conducted on deep, moderate and shallow peat with sulphidic material as substratum, peaty acid sulphate soil, and potential acid sulphate soil. While P concentration was observed in wet season, in transition from wet to dry season, and in dry season. Soil samples were collected by using peat borer according to interlayer and soil horizon. The results showed that peat layer might act as the main source of P in peatland with sulphidic material substratum. The upper peat layer on sulphidic material caused by groundwater level fluctuations had no directly effect on P concentration in the peat layers. Increased of P concentration in the lowest sulphidic layer might relate to redox reaction of iron in the sulphidic layer and precipitation process. Phosphorus concentration in peatland with sulphidic material as substratum was not influenced by peat thickness. However, depletion or disappearance of peat layer decreased P concentration in soil solution. Disappearance of peat layer means loss of a natural source of P for peatland with sulphidic material as substratum, therefore peat layer must be kept in order to maintain of peatlands.

  6. Metals sediment toxicity: Chemical approach by SEM/AVS ratio. Application on Seine estuary sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarisse, O.; Ouddane, B.; Fischer, J. C.; Wartel, M.

    2003-05-01

    Within the framework of environmental quality criteria for certain heavy metals in sediment, Acid Volatile Sulphides (AVS) has been proposed as the primary standardisation parameter in combination with the amount of simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) [1]. AVS, comprising essentially iron monosulphides in sediments, are available for binding divalent cationic metals through the formation of insoluble metal-sulphide complexes, thereby controlling the metal bioavailability and subsequent toxicity for benthic biocommunities. AVS is operationally defined as the amount of sulphides that can be volatilised during a cold acid extraction. The AVS-bound metals, with environmental concern (usually Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn), are extracted at the same time and are called simultaneously extracted metals (SEM). The ratio or the difference between AVS and SEM gives an indication of the potential sediment toxicity. Such problems on extraction procedure appears: for AVS hydrochloric acid 6 mol.dm^{-3} is current1y used [2-3] even so for SEM use of hydrochloric acid 1 mol.dm^{-3} is advised [4-5]. To investigate the influence of acid strength, sulphides and metals extractions are realized on anoxic sediments from seine estuary. SEM/AVS ratio for different acid was calculated and toxicity associated is discussed.

  7. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  8. Synthesis of Tunable Band Gap Semiconductor Nickel Sulphide Nanoparticles: Rapid and Round the Clock Degradation of Organic Dyes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Molla, Aniruddha; Sahu, Meenakshi; Hussain, Sahid

    2016-01-01

    Controlled shape and size with tuneable band gap (1.92-2.41 eV), nickel sulphide NPs was achieved in presence of thiourea or thioacetamide as sulphur sources with the variations of temperature and capping agents...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of copper sulphide (CuS) nano particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, Nirali. S.; Parikh, K. D.; Joshi, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    Copper sulphide nano materials possess different applications, such as p-type semiconductors in solar cells, optical filters, super ionic material, photo-voltaic applications, microwave shielding coatings and in combined photo acoustic imaging. In present study, copper sulphide (CuS) nano particles were synthesized by wet chemical co-precipitation method using CuCl2 and Na2S as precursors. The synthesized CuS nano particles were characterized by powder XRD, FT-IR and thermo-gravimetriy. From the powder XRD, the hexagonal crystal structure was found and the average particle size was estimated to be 10.5 nm by using Scherrer's formula. The FTIR spectral study confirmed the presence of S-O stretching, O-H bending, and S-S disulphide stretching vibrations. The Thermal Analysis was carried out from room temperature to 700°C. The nano-particles remained stable up to 160°

  10. Formation and composition of cemented layers in low-sulphide mine tailings, Laver, northern Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakangas, Lena; Öhlander, Björn

    2006-08-01

    Cemented layers (hardpans) are common in carbonate or sulphide-rich mine tailings and where pyrrhotite is the predominating Fe-sulphide. Laver, northern Sweden, is an abandoned Cu-mine where the tailings have low pyrrhotite content, almost no pyrite and no carbonates. Two cemented layers at different locations in the Laver tailings impoundment were investigated, with the aim to determine their effects on metal mobility. The cementing agents were mainly jarosite and Fe-oxyhydroxides in the layer formed where the tailings have a barren surface, whereas only Fe-oxyhydroxides were identified below grass-covered tailings surface. Arsenic was enriched in both layers which also exhibit high concentrations of Mo, V, Hg and Pb compared to unoxidised tailings. Sequential extraction indicates that these metals and As were mainly retained with crystalline Fe-oxides, and therefore potentially will be remobilised if the oxic conditions become more reducing, for instance as a result of remediation of the tailings impoundment.

  11. Inkjet-printed disposable metal complexing indicator-displacement assay for sulphide determination in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza-Avidad, M; Agudo-Acemel, M; Salinas-Castillo, A; Capitán-Vallvey, L F

    2015-05-04

    A sulphide selective colorimetric metal complexing indicator-displacement assay has been developed using an immobilized copper(II) complex of the azo dye 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol printed by inkjetting on a nylon support. The change in colour measured from the image of the disposable membrane acquired by a digital camera using the H coordinate of the HSV colour space as the analytical parameter is able to sense sulphide in aqueous solution at pH 7.4 with a dynamic range up to 145 μM, a detection limit of 0.10 μM and a precision between 2 and 11%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantitative examination of carbide and sulphide precipitates in chemically complex steels processed by direct strip casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorin, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorin@deakin.edu.au [Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Geelong, Victoria, 3216 (Australia); Wood, Kathleen [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Bragg Institute, New South Wales, 2234, Menai (Australia); Taylor, Adam; Hodgson, Peter; Stanford, Nicole [Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Geelong, Victoria, 3216 (Australia)

    2016-02-15

    A high strength low alloy steel composition has been melted and processed by two different routes: simulated direct strip casting and slow cooled ingot casting. The microstructures were examined with scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The formation of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C), manganese sulphides (MnS) and niobium carbo-nitrides (Nb(C,N)) was investigated in both casting conditions. The sulphides were found to be significantly refined by the higher cooling rate, and developed an average diameter of only 100 nm for the fast cooled sample, and a diameter too large to be measured with SANS in the slow cooled condition (> 1.1 μm). Slow cooling resulted in the development of classical Nb(C,N) precipitation, with an average diameter of 7.2 nm. However, after rapid cooling both the SANS and atom probe tomography data indicated that the Nb was retained in the matrix as a random solid solution. There was also some evidence that O, N and S are also retained in solid solution in levels not found during conventional processing. - Highlights: • The influence of cooling rate on microstructure is investigated in a HSLA steel. • SANS, TEM and APT are used to characterise the sulphides and Nb(C,N) precipitates. • The slow cooling rate result in the formation of Nb(C,N) precipitates. • The fast cooling rate results in a microstructure supersaturated in Nb, C and N. • The sulphides are 100 nm in the fast cooled sample and > 1 μm in the slow cooled one.

  13. MATHEMATICAL OPTIMIZATION METHODS TO ESTABLISH ACTIVE PHASES ON HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS: CASE OF BULK TRANSITION METAL SULPHIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Machín

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of procedures based on mathematical optimization methods to establish optimal active sulphide phases with higher HDS activity. This paper proposes a list of active phases as a guide for orienting the experimental work in the search of new catalysts that permit optimize the HDS process. Studies in this paper establish Co-S, Cr-S, Nb-S and Ni-S systems have the greatest potential to improve HDS activity.

  14. Characterization of nanocrystalline products prepared by mechanochemical reduction of copper sulphide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Godocikova, E.; Boldizarova, E.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanochemical processing of the copper sulphide with iron in a high-energy mill was studied. The nanosized copper of 10 nm crystallite size and the hexagonal pyrrhotite 1C were identified among products of the reaction by methods of XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. In the surface layer...... of products after the mechanochemical processing copper in its mono- and bivalent forms was identified by XPS method....

  15. Emerging Photovoltaics: Organic, Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide, and Perovskite-Based Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraavya Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the photovoltaics industry continues to grow rapidly, materials other than silicon are being explored. The aim is to develop technologies that use environmentally friendly, abundant materials, low-cost manufacturing processes without compromising on efficiencies and lifetimes. This paper discusses three of the emerging technologies, organic, copper zinc tin sulphide (CZTS, and perovskite-based solar cells, their advantages, and the possible challenges in making these technologies commercially available.

  16. Photocatalytic degradation of rose Bengal by semiconducting zinc sulphide used as a photocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Shweta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various semiconductors have been used as photocatalysts for removal of different dyes from their aqueous solutions. Zinc sulphide semiconductor is used in the present investigation as a photocatalyst for the removal of rose Bengal dye. Effect of different parameters, which affect the rate of reaction; like pH, concentration of dye, amount of semiconductor and light intensity have been studied. A mechanism has also been proposed in which hydroxyl radicals are shown as an active oxidizing species.

  17. Mechanochemical pretreatment and thiosulphate leaching of silver from complex sulphide concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boldižárová Eva

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The refractory character of complex ores and concentrates is at present one of the main problems of their metallurgical processing. The research activity in this sphere is aimed at the methods of improving the process of metal extraction from the sulphidic minerals representing the major components of these ores and concentrates.One of the sulphidics components of complex ores is tetrahedrite. It represents a compound of complicated structure containing several metals among which copper, antimony and arsenic prevail. Some deposits are aspecially rich in silver. The Peruvian complex sulphidic concentrate of provenience Casapalca is each from these rich deposits.In this study the physico-chemical transformations and leachability of silver from Peruvian sulphide concentrate mechanochemically activated by ultrafine alkaline milling in the attritor were investigated. The experiments with alkaline leaching of using samples have shown that this hydrometallurgical process represents an effective method to prepare of treated concentrate with physico-chemical means for further leaching process. Ammonium thiosulphate were used as agent for obtain of silver to leaching solution.The leaching of as-received concentrate with the alkaline thiosulphate solution afforded only 6 % Ag into leach. The use of milling in attritor as an innovation method of pretreatment brought about 57% of structure degradation of tetrahedrite as silver-bearing mineral in concentrate as well as to the increase in specific surface area from the original value 0.26 m2g-1 to the maximum value of 16 m2g-1. This pretreatment has been performed in an attritor using the method of experiment design. The physico-chemical changes had influence on the two step process of thiosulphate leaching of silver.The optimum results obtained by mechanochemical pretreatment and subsequent leaching of the concentrate with ammonium thiosulphate were achieved by using milling time 30 min and weight of sample

  18. Synthesis of TOPO-capped Nanocrystals of Copper Sulphide from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nearly mono-dispersed TOPO-capped copper sulphide nanocrystals of ca. 4.5 nm (diameter) have been synthesized from [Cu(S2CNMe(nHex))2]. The absorption spectrum of the (Cu2S) nanoparticles shows a large blue shift (2.09 eV) in relation to bulk Cu2S (1022 nm, 1.21 eV). The PL gives a broad spectrum with an ...

  19. Dimethylsulphidemia: the significance of dimethyl sulphide in extra-oral, blood borne halitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Woodworth, C N

    2013-04-01

    Halitosis is a symptom and not a diagnosis. Rather, the topic represents a spectrum of disorders, including intra-oral, otorhinolaryngological, metabolic, systemic, pulmonary, psychological and neurological conditions. Halitosis may be the third most common trigger for patients to seek dental care and can cause significant impact on patient quality of life. About 10% of all genuine halitosis cases are attributed to extra-oral processes. Some authorities have reported that the nasal cavity and the oropharynx are the most common sites of origin of extra-oral halitosis. However, recent evidence appears to suggest that blood borne halitosis may be the most common subtype of extra-oral halitosis. Tangerman and Winkel report that dimethyl sulphide was the main volatile implicated in extra-oral blood borne halitosis. They proposed a hitherto unknown metabolic condition by way of explanation for this finding, resulting in systemic presence of dimethyl sulphide in blood and alveolar breath. This paper reviews the knowledge base regarding the behaviour of dimethyl sulphide in physiological systems and those disorders in which blood borne halitosis secondary to dimethylsulphidemia is thought to have an aetiopathological role.

  20. Sizing, stoichiometry and optical absorbance variations of colloidal cadmium sulphide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbing, S R; Hughes, R W; Reynolds, P A

    2009-01-01

    Simple preparative methods were used to synthesise cadmium sulphide particles in the size ranges larger than those associated with quantum confinement. UV/visible absorption spectra were measured. Rayleigh and Mie theories were used to analyse normalised absorption spectra to allow estimates of particle size and number to be obtained simultaneously. Each model was utilised in an appropriate size and wavelength range. Surprisingly, Mie calculations were found to over-estimate the absorbance of particles below 50 nm radius. Powder X-ray diffraction results showed the crystallites to be independent of particle size and suggested that the particles grew through aggregation of smaller bodies. The Mie results could therefore be interpreted in terms of changes in the particles' optical indicatrix with radius. Large poly-crystalline particles (>50 nm radius) should possess a near spherical indicatrix, fulfilling the assumptions of the Mie theory. The indicatrix of particles smaller than 50 nm should become increasingly anisotropic with decreasing size, leading to discrepancies between the Mie model and measured data. Although the results could also be explained through changes in the magnitude of the particle refractive index, compositional (Auger electron spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis) and structural (powder X-ray diffraction) analyses of the particles complicate the hypothesis. Energy dispersive X-ray results showed that small cadmium sulphide particles possessed a large excess of sulphur suggesting a change in effective cadmium sulphide stoichiometry.

  1. In situ fluctuations of oxygen and sulphide in marine microbial sediment ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wit, Rutger; Jonkers, Henk M.; Van Den Ende, Frank P.; Van Gemerden, Hans

    Laminated microbial ecosystems (microbial mats) on the island of Schiermonnikoog (The Netherlands) were studied with respect to variation in oxygen and sulphide profiles, depth distributions of photopigments and viable number and cell volume of purple sulphur bacteria. Cyanobacteria occurred in the top 2 mm, the dominant species being Microcoleus chthonoplastes. The blooming of purple sulphur bacteria below the cyanobacterial layer was observed in autumn, the dominant species being the immotile Thiocapsa roseopersicina. Cell volume of this species is indicative of its growth rate. In situ measurements showed strong diel fluctuations in oxygen and sulphide profiles. Frequently, cyanobacteria and purple sulphur bacteria were exposed to oxygen during the day, and to anoxic conditions at night. Sulphide sometimes reached the layer of the cyanobacteria. The cyanobacteria and the purple sulphur bacteria both are very well adapted to these diel fluctuations. In addition, strong seasonal variations were observed, whereas short-term fluctuations of oxygen occurred due to changing light-climate and rainfall. Attention was paid to the unusual occurrence of microbial mats on the North Sea beach during the autumn of 1987.

  2. Growth of cadmium oxide whiskers on cadmium sulphide single crystals with copper as growth activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koparanova, N.; Simov, S. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia. Inst. po Fizika na Tvyrdoto Tyalo); Genchev, D. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia. Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika); Metchenov, G. (Research Inst. of Criminalistics and Criminology, Sofia (Bulgaria))

    1985-02-01

    Some results on the growth and morphology of cadmium oxide whiskers, obtained on cadmium sulphide single crystals with copper as a growth activator, are presented in this work. Cadmium oxide whiskers have been obtained on brace 112-bar0 brace faces of cadmium sulphide plates with a copper layer deposited in advance. The whiskers grew during the annealing of the plates in a weak stream of technically pure argon at temperatures 670 to 730 deg C for 15 min to 3.5 h. Details about the procedure have been given elsewhere. The composition and morphology of the whiskers have been studied by an X-ray microanalyser JEOL 35 DDS and a scanning electron microscope JEOL, JSM 35. The optical microscopic observations have shown that after annealing, a gray-black granular layer is formed on the cadmium sulphide single crystals and this layer can easily be separated from the crystal substrate. Under the granular layer the crystal is heavily damaged. The whiskers grow on the granular layer and they are coloured yellow-brown or red-brown. The maximum whisker length attains several hundreds of micrometres and in some cases up to 1 mm or more.

  3. Sulphide mineral evolution and metal mobility during alteration of the oceanic crust: Insights from ODP Hole 1256D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, C. G. C.; Pitcairn, I. K.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Harris, M.

    2016-11-01

    Fluxes of metals during the hydrothermal alteration of the oceanic crust have far reaching effects including buffering of the compositions of the ocean and lithosphere, supporting microbial life and the formation of sulphide ore deposits. The mechanisms responsible for metal mobilisation during the evolution of the oceanic crust are complex and are neither fully constrained nor quantified. Investigations into the mineral reactions that release metals, such as sulphide leaching, would generate better understanding of the controls on metal mobility in the oceanic crust. We investigate the sulphide and oxide mineral paragenesis and the extent to which these minerals control the metal budget in samples from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 1256D. The ODP Hole 1256D drill core provides a unique sample suite representative of a complete section of a fast-spreading oceanic crust from the volcanic section down to the plutonic complex. The sulphide population at Hole 1256D is divided into five groups based on mineralogical assemblage, lithological location and texture: the magmatic, metasomatised, high temperature hydrothermal, low temperature and patchy sulphides. The initiation of hydrothermal alteration by downward flow of moderate temperature (250-350 °C) hydrothermal fluids under oxidising conditions leads to metasomatism of the magmatic sulphides in the sheeted dyke and plutonic complexes. Subsequent increase in the degree of hydrothermal alteration at temperatures >350 °C under reducing conditions then leads to the leaching of the metasomatised sulphides by rising hydrothermal fluids. Mass balance calculations show that the mobility of Cu, Se and Au occurs through sulphide leaching during high temperature hydrothermal alteration and that the mobility of Zn, As, Sb and Pb is controlled by silicate rather than sulphide alteration. Sulphide leaching is not complete at Hole 1256D and more advanced alteration would mobilise greater masses of metals. Alteration of oxide

  4. Kale Extract Increases Glutathione Levels in V79 Cells, but Does not Protect Them against Acute Toxicity Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula B. Andrade

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the antioxidant potential of extracts of Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala DC. (kale and several materials of Pieris brassicae L., a common pest of Brassica cultures using a cellular model with hamster lung fibroblast (V79 cells under quiescent conditions and subjected to H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and glutathione was determined by the 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB-oxidized glutathione (GSSG reductase recycling assay. The phenolic composition of the extracts was also established by HPLC-DAD. They presented acylated and non acylated flavonoid glycosides, some of them sulfated, and hydroxycinnamic acyl gentiobiosides. All extracts were cytotoxic by themselves at high concentrations and failed to protect V79 cells against H2O2 acute toxicity. No relationship between phenolic composition and cytotoxicity of the extracts was found. Rather, a significant increase in glutathione was observed in cells exposed to kale extract, which contained the highest amount and variety of flavonoids. It can be concluded that although flavonoids-rich extracts have the ability to increase cellular antioxidant defenses, the use of extracts of kale and P. brassicae materials by pharmaceutical or food industries, may constitute an insult to health, especially to debilitated individuals, if high doses are consumed.

  5. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide revisited: Comparison of models to disentangle the concentration × time conundrum of lethality and incapacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauluhn, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary emergency response planning guidelines are stratified to consider the threshold for serious toxicity and/or impairment of escape, relative to the potentially lethal level above this threshold and the lower level at which individuals should not experience or develop effects more serious than mild irritation. While harmonized testing guidelines and risk assessment paradigms are available for the quantification of thresholds for lethality or establishing no adverse effect levels, the quantification of 'impairment of escape' appears to be a more elusive goal. Approaches were explored in context with CO and HCN in past experimental combustion toxicology studies to estimate the time available for escape. This point of departure (POD) was compared with the non-lethal threshold (LC01) and one third thereof from published recent acute inhalation studies in rats examining the Cxt-matrix of both CO and HCN. The findings from this analysis suggest that the rat delivers the most consistent data. However, it remains challenging yet to bridge the behavioral variables of human behavior typical of escape to any surrogate animal model. For the asphyxiant gases examined, the PODs characterizing 'impairment of escape' were difficult to distinguish from those indicative of impending death. No specific modeled carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level could be linked to onset of incapacitation. In summary, the higher ventilation of rats (kg body weight adjusted) renders this species even more susceptible than heavy breathing humans. LCt01 × 1/3 values derived from the comprehensive Cxt matrix of rat inhalation studies are considered to be most suitable and robust to estimate the human equivalent threshold (POD) of 'impairment of escape'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Organic silicon compounds anf hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas by mineral and adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Biogas utilized for energy production needs to be free from organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide , as their burning has damaging effects on utilities and humans; organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide can be found in biogas produced from biomass wastes, due to their massive industrial use in synthetic product,such as cosmetics, detergents and paints.Siloxanes and hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas can be carried out by various methods (Ajhar et al., 2010); aim of the present work is to find a single practical andeconomic way to drastically and simultaneously reduce both hydrogen sulfide and the siloxanes concentration to less than 1 ppm. Some commercial activated carbons previously selected (Monteleoneet al., 2011) as being effective in hydrogen sulfide up taking have been tested in an adsorption measurement apparatus, by flowing both hydrogen sulphide and volatile siloxane (Decamethycyclopentasiloxane or D5) in a nitrogen stream,typically 25-300 ppm D5 over N2, through an clay minerals, Fe oxides and Silica; the adsorption process was analyzed by varying some experimental parameters (concentration, grain size, bed height). The best silica shows an adsorption capacity of 0.2 g D5 per gram of silica. The next thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms the capacity data obtained experimentally by the breakthrough curve tests.The capacity results depend on D5 and hydrogen sulphide concentrations. A regenerative silica process is then carried out byheating the silica bed up to 200 ° C and flushing out the adsorbed D5 and hydrogen sulphide samples in a nitrogen stream in athree step heating procedure up to 200 ° C. The adsorption capacity is observed to degrade after cyclingthe samples through several adsorption-desorption cycles.

  7. Experimental study of Ni solubility in sulphidic groundwater and cement water under anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, T.; Vuorinen, U.; Kekki, T.; Aalto, H. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    2001-06-01

    The nickel solubility was studied during a 177-day period under anoxic conditions in three types of waters: a synthetic reference groundwater (OL-SR), a natural Olkiluoto groundwater (PVA2), and a cement-conditioned groundwater (C-PVA2). To each water, nickel, ferrous iron and sulphide were added yielding eight combinations of, approximately, the following initial concentrations: nickel: 1.0x10{sup -6} and 1.0x10{sup -3} mol/L, ferrous iron: 1.8 10{sup -6} and 1.8x10{sup -5} mol/L, and sulphide: 3.1x10{sup -6} and 9.4x10{sup -5} mol/L. The concentrations of these elements in the natural groundwater PVA2 as well as in the cement-conditioned water C-PVA2 was insignificant. In the synthetic water, the nickel concentration was unchanged in all samples having a high initial nickel concentration of 1.0x10{sup -3} mol/L. In the samples with an initial low nickel concentration of 1.0x10{sup -6} mol/L, the sulphide content determined the final nickel concentration. Where the initial sulphide concentration was low, the nickel concentration remained at the level of 1.0x10{sup -6} mol/L, but the higher sulphide concentration caused the nickel concentration to drop to below 10{sup -8} mol/L. In the natural groundwater PVA2, the nickel concentration dropped to below 10{sup -4} mol/L in all samples with an initially high nickel concentration, and to values of roughly 10{sup -7} mol/L in samples with an initially low nickel content. In the cement-conditioned water, the nickel concentration reached a value of 3x10{sup -6} mol/L in samples with initial high nickel concentrations, and to a value of 1x10{sup -7} mol/L in samples with a low initial nickel content. The added amounts of iron and sulphide did not have any significant effect on the observed nickel solubility. The solid phases formed in the natural and synthetic groundwater were analyzed by XRD but could not be identified. In the case of cement-conditioned water the XRD analyses showed the presence of Ni(OH){sub 2} as well

  8. Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  9. Photography - Determination of thiosulphate and other residual chemicals in processed photographic films, plates and papers - Methylene blue photometric method and silver sulphide densitometric method

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    1977-01-01

    Photography - Determination of thiosulphate and other residual chemicals in processed photographic films, plates and papers - Methylene blue photometric method and silver sulphide densitometric method

  10. Short and long-term experiments on the effect of sulphide on microalgae cultivation in tertiary sewage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Camejo, J; Serna-García, R; Viruela, A; Pachés, M; Durán, F; Robles, A; Ruano, M V; Barat, R; Seco, A

    2017-11-01

    Microalgae cultivation appears to be a promising technology for treating nutrient-rich effluents from anaerobic membrane bioreactors, as microalgae are able to consume nutrients from sewage without an organic carbon source, although the sulphide formed during the anaerobic treatment does have negative effects on microalgae growth. Short and long-term experiments were carried out on the effects of sulphide on a mixed microalgae culture. The short-term experiments showed that the oxygen production rate (OPR) dropped as sulphide concentration increased: a concentration of 5mgSL -1 reduced OPR by 43%, while a concentration of 50mgSL -1 came close to completely inhibiting microalgae growth. The long-term experiments revealed that the presence of sulphide in the influent had inhibitory effects at sulphide concentrations above 20mgSL -1 in the culture, but not at concentrations below 5mgSL -1 . These conditions favoured Chlorella growth over that of Scenedesmus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Anaerobic ciliates from a sulphide-rich solution lake in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, B J; Clarke, K J; Vicente, E; Miracle, M R

    1991-06-21

    We have examined and quantified the anaerobic ciliates living in the hypolimnion of a 14 m deep sulphide-rich (up to 0.73 mM) solution lake in Spain. At least seven ciliate species were found, numbering up to 50 ml-1 in total and reaching maximum abundance close to the sediment. Caenomorpha medusula, Lacrymaria elegans, L. sapropelica and Lagynus sp. were the most abundant species. Their vertical distributions were not related to the sulphide profile. Most ciliates were dependent on the sedimentation of cryptomonads, photosynthetic bacteria (especially Chromatium and Oscillatoria) and other bacteria from their sites of production in closely-juxtaposed mid-water plates. All anaerobic ciliates contained at least one type of symbiotic bacterium which showed methanogen autofluorescence. C. medusula, Lagynus sp. and Lacrymaria sapropelica also contained a large, non-fluorescing rod-shaped bacterium. In C. medusula, the methanogens and the non-fluorescing rods were both attached to the hydrogenosomes. In this ciliate alone, a third bacterial type was attached to the external ventral surface of the ciliate. Digestion of sulphide-oxidising bacteria by ciliates which harbour methanogenic bacteria provides a short bridge between the anaerobic sulphur and carbon cycles. Theoretical considerations of the rate of ciliate consumption of microbial carbon in the anoxic hypolimnion indicate that it is significant and that it may amount to 4 × 10(-5) g cm(-2)d(-1). Copyright © 1991 Gustav Fischer Verlag · Stuttgart · Jena · New York. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  12. Temperature evolution of nickel sulphide phases from thiourea complex and their exchange bias effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nitesh [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit and International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore-560 064 (India); Raman, N. [Department of Chemistry, VHNSN College, Virudhunagar-626 001 (India); Sundaresan, A., E-mail: sundaresan@jncasr.ac.in [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit and International Centre for Materials Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore-560 064 (India)

    2013-12-15

    Considering the very complex phase diagram of nickel sulphide, it is quite challenging to stabilize pure phases from a single precursor. Here, we obtain nanoparticles of various phases of nickel sulphide by decomposing nickel–thiourea complex at different temperatures. The first phase in the evolution is the one with the maximum sulphur content, namely, NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles obtained at 400 °C. As the temperature is increased, nanoparticles of phases with lesser sulphur content, NiS (600 °C) and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} (800 °C) are formed. NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit weak ferromagnetic transition at 30 K and show a large exchange bias at 2 K. NiS nanoparticles are antiferromagnetic and show relatively smaller exchange bias effect. On the other hand, Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit very weak temperature dependent magnetization. Electrical measurements show that both NiS{sub 2} and NiS are semiconductors whereas Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} is a metal. - Graphical abstract: Pure phases of NiS{sub 2}, NiS and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} have been obtained by thermal decomposition of nickel–thiourea complex wherein, NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles exhibit remarkable exchange bias effect at 2 K. - Highlights: • NiS{sub 2}, NiS and Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} nanoparticles are obtained by thermal decomposition of nickel–thiourea complex at different temperatures. • As the temperature is increased, nickel sulphide phase with lesser sulphur content is obtained. • NiS{sub 2} nanoparticles show good exchange bias property which can be explained by antiferromagnetic core and ferromagnetic shell model. • NiS{sub 2} and NiS are semiconducting while Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} shows metallic behavior.

  13. Laser-induced photodynamic effects at silica nanocomposite based on cadmium sulphide quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voznesenskiy, S S; Sergeev, A A; Galkina, A N; Kulchin, Yu N; Shchipunov, Yu A; Postnova, I V

    2014-01-27

    In this paper we study the laser-induced modification of optical properties of nanocomposite based on cadmium sulphide quantum dots encapsulated into thiomalic acid shell which were embedded into a porous silica matrix. We found red shift of luminescence of the nanocomposite when exposed to laser radiation at λ = 405 nm. Using pump-probe method and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering technique it was found that laser radiation at λ = 405 nm also increases the absorption coefficient of the nanocomposite in 15 times due to agglomeration of quantum dots. The modification of absorption properties is fully reversible.

  14. Pressure-induced phase transition of nanocrystalline iron sulphide coated by polyvinyl alcohol

    CERN Document Server

    Gao Wei; Kan-Shihai; Pan Yue Wu; Wang Xin; Zou Guang Tian; LiuJing

    2002-01-01

    Nanocrystalline iron sulphide (FeS) coated with polyvinyl alcohol, with particle size ranging from several to several tens of nanometres, has been prepared by the chemical precipitation synthesis method. The phase transition of FeS has been investigated by using in situ high-pressure diffraction with synchrotron radiation at pressures up to 42.5 GPa. Most of the diffraction lines are broadened and weakened. At the pressure of 11.8 GPa, a new phase transition was observed. However, only eleven x-ray reflections were recorded under high pressure; the crystal structure is unknown.

  15. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  16. Application of lithogeochemistry in the assessment of nickel-sulphide potential in komatiite belts from northern Finland and Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.J. Heggie

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study tests the application of chalcophile elements such as nickel, copper and the platinum-group elements as indicators of nickel-sulphide prospectivity in komatiites from terranes of the Karelian Craton in northern Finland and Norway. Major element abundances reflect volcanic processes associated with the emplacement dynamics of ultramafic lavas, whereas the variable chalcophile element concentrations record the ore-forming process, mainly as an anomalous metal depletion and enrichment relative to the calculated background. Geochemical data from this study indicate that Paleoproterozoic komatiites in the Pulju Greenstone Belts and Archean komatiites in the Enontekiö area are prospective for nickel-sulphide mineralisation. Conversely, on the basis of the present dataset, ultramafic rocks from the Palaeoproterozoic Karasjok Greenstone Belt display lower prospectivity for nickel-sulphides, although potential exists if high-volume flow conduits and channels within the large volcanic flow field could be identified.

  17. Refractive index and dispersion control of ultrafast laser inscribed waveguides in gallium lanthanum sulphide for near and mid-infrared applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demetriou, Giorgos; Berube, Jean-Philippe; Vallee, Real

    2016-01-01

    The powerful ultrafast laser inscription technique is used to fabricate optical waveguides in gallium lanthanum sulphide substrates. For the first time the refractive index profile and the dispersion of such ultrafast laser inscribed waveguides are experimentally measured. In addition the Zero...... in gallium lanthanum sulphide glasses for near and mid-IR applications. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  18. Multiple sulphur and lead sources recorded in hydrothermal exhalites associated with the Lemarchant volcanogenic massive sulphide deposit, central Newfoundland, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lode, Stefanie; Piercey, Stephen J.; Layne, Graham D.; Piercey, Glenn; Cloutier, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Metalliferous sedimentary rocks (mudstones, exhalites) associated with the Cambrian precious metal-bearing Lemarchant Zn-Pb-Cu-Au-Ag-Ba volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) deposit, Tally Pond volcanic belt, precipitated both before and after VMS mineralization. Sulphur and Pb isotopic studies of sulphides within the Lemarchant exhalites provide insight into the sources of S and Pb in the exhalites as a function of paragenesis and evolution of the deposit and subsequent post-depositional modification. In situ S isotope microanalyses of polymetallic sulphides (euhedral and framboidal pyrite, anhedral chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, galena and euhedral arsenopyrite) by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) yielded δ34S values ranging from -38.8 to +14.4 ‰, with an average of ˜ -12.8 ‰. The δ34S systematics indicate sulphur was predominantly biogenically derived via microbial/biogenic sulphate reduction of seawater sulphate, microbial sulphide oxidation and microbial disproportionation of intermediate S compounds. These biogenic processes are coupled and occur within layers of microbial mats consisting of different bacterial/archaeal species, i.e., sulphate reducers, sulphide oxidizers and those that disproportionate sulphur compounds. Inorganic processes or sources (i.e., thermochemical sulphate reduction of seawater sulphate, leached or direct igneous sulphur) also contributed to the S budget in the hydrothermal exhalites and are more pronounced in exhalites that are immediately associated with massive sulphides. Galena Pb isotopic compositions by SIMS microanalysis suggest derivation of Pb from underlying crustal basement (felsic volcanic rocks of Sandy Brook Group), whereas less radiogenic Pb derived from juvenile sources leached from mafic volcanic rocks of the Sandy Brook Group and/or Tally Pond group. This requires that the hydrothermal fluids interacted with juvenile and evolved crust during hydrothermal circulation, which is consistent with the existing

  19. Fundamental Studies on the Electrochemical Behaviour of Carbon Steel Exposed in Sulphide and Sulphate-Reducing Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    The aim of the report is to give a fundamental understanding of the response of different electrochemical techniques on carbon steel in a sulphide environment as well as in a biologically active sulphate-reducing environment (SRB). This will form the basis for further studies and for recommendati......The aim of the report is to give a fundamental understanding of the response of different electrochemical techniques on carbon steel in a sulphide environment as well as in a biologically active sulphate-reducing environment (SRB). This will form the basis for further studies...

  20. Structure identification and optical and electrical properties of cuprous sulphide layers in relation with solar energy application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjona, F.; Elizalde, E.; Garcia-Camarero, E.; Feu, A.; Lacal, B.; Leon, M.; Llabres, J.; Rueda, F.

    1979-06-01

    Polycrystalline thin films of cuprous sulphide having chalcocite as their main component have been obtained by two methods: (a) sulphuration of a copper film in a solution of thiourea; and (b) vacuum evaporation of a synthetic copper sulphide and condensation on a heated glass substrate. By x-ray diffraction the chalcocite ratio is estimated to be about 85% for a and 100% for b. Optical transmittance and reflectance measurements give values of the direct and indirect transition gaps and of the real part of the refraction index. Measurements of Hall effect and conductivity are also included.

  1. Temperature dependent rate coefficients for the reactions of Criegee biradicals with selected alcohols and sulphides

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillen, Max; McMahon, Laura; Curchod, Basile; Shallcross, Dudley; Orr-Ewing, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The reactions of Criegee biradicals have received much attention in recent years, yet few reactive systems have undergone direct experimental measurement, and fewer still have been measured as a function of temperature. In this study, absolute temperature-dependent rate coefficients for the gas-phase reactions of a suite of alcohols and sulphides with both formaldehyde oxide (CH2OO) and acetone oxide ((CH3)2COO) are determined experimentally between 254 and 328 K using cavity ringdown spectroscopy for detecting Criegee biradicals. Major differences in reactivity and temperature dependence are observed both in terms of the functionality (between alcohols and sulphides) and also the degree of alkyl substitution about the Criegee biradical. This diverse behaviour represents a uniquely challenging problem for atmospheric chemistry since the atmosphere contains a large variety of both functionalized compounds and Criegee biradicals, leading to a formidable parameter space which may be impossible to cover experimentally. Notwithstanding, new experimental data such as these are vital for understanding the general behaviour of Criegee biradicals in the atmosphere.

  2. Towards colloidal spintronics through Rashba spin-orbit interaction in lead sulphide nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramin Moayed, Mohammad Mehdi; Bielewicz, Thomas; Zöllner, Martin Sebastian; Herrmann, Carmen; Klinke, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Employing the spin degree of freedom of charge carriers offers the possibility to extend the functionality of conventional electronic devices, while colloidal chemistry can be used to synthesize inexpensive and tunable nanomaterials. Here, in order to benefit from both concepts, we investigate Rashba spin-orbit interaction in colloidal lead sulphide nanosheets by electrical measurements on the circular photo-galvanic effect. Lead sulphide nanosheets possess rock salt crystal structure, which is centrosymmetric. The symmetry can be broken by quantum confinement, asymmetric vertical interfaces and a gate electric field leading to Rashba-type band splitting in momentum space at the M points, which results in an unconventional selection mechanism for the excitation of the carriers. The effect, which is supported by simulations of the band structure using density functional theory, can be tuned by the gate electric field and by the thickness of the sheets. Spin-related electrical transport phenomena in colloidal materials open a promising pathway towards future inexpensive spintronic devices.

  3. In-situ fabrication of cobalt oxide / sulphide mixed phase nanoparticles in Polyphenylenesulphide matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Rumale

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach for the in-situ fabrication of combined cobalt oxide / sulphide nanoparticles in sulphur containing polymer polyphenylenesulphide (PPS by polymer inorganic solid-solid reaction technique is reported here. At present, there is considerable interest in polymer-metal chalcogenides / oxides based nano-composites on account of their optical, magnetic, electronic and catalytic properties. We have demonstrated the suitability of solid-solid reaction methodology by reacting commonly available cobalt precursors with engineering thermoplastic PPS. The cobalt precursor was reacted with PPS in 1:1, 1:5, 1:10, and 1:15 molar ratios, respectively, by heating the mixture at the melting temperature of the polymer (285 ºC for six hours. The resultant products were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD, Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS techniques and High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM. The shift in melting temperature of PPS was observed. Increase in absorption peak is observed in the range of 320 to 370 nm with the increase in PPS concentration. Resultant nanoparticles of cobalt sulphide and cobalt oxide embedded in the PPS matrix showed spherical and distorted rod like morphology.

  4. Half-cell potentials of semiconductive simple binary sulphides in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.

    1966-01-01

    Theoretical consideration of the charge-transfer mechanism operative in cells with an electrode of a semiconductive binary compound leads to the conclusion that the half-cell potential of such a compound is not only a function of ionic activities in the electrolytic solution, but also a function of the activities of the component elements in the compound phase. The most general form of the electrode equation derived for such a compound with a formula MiXj which dissociates into Mj+ and Xi- ions in aqueous solution is. EMiXj = EMiXj0 + R T 2 ij ln [ (sua Mj+)aqi ?? (suaX)jMiXj/ (suaXi-)aqj ?? (suaM)iMiXj],. where. EMiXj0 = 1 2(EM,Mj+0 + EXi-,X). The equation can be modified to other forms. When applied to semiconductive simple binary sulphides, these equations appear to give better descriptions of the observed electrode potentials of such sulphides than any other proposed equations. ?? 1966.

  5. Controllable Phase Transformation in Extracting Valuable Metals from Chinese Low-Grade Nickel Sulphide Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fuhui; Mu, Wenning; Wang, Shuai; Xu, Qian; Zhai, Yuchun; Luo, Shaohua

    2017-10-01

    In this work, a two-stage sulphuric acid roasting and water leaching system was chosen to extract valuable metals from Chinese low-grade nickel sulphide ore. By optimizing the two-stage roasting process, first roasting temperature at 295°C with particle size of 80-91 μm with an acid-ore ratio of 1.1:1 for 2 h, and second roasting temperature at 620°C for 2 h, it was found that more than 98% of the nickel and 99% of the copper but less than 14.38% of Fe were leached into the water. Attempts were made via x-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, chemical phase analysis, and differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis to reveal the phase transformations for Ni, Cu, and Mg, which could be expressed as mineral phases → sulphates hydrate → sulphates and for iron as mineral phases → hydrated ferrous sulphate → ferric sulphates and ferric oxide → oxide. The results of this work suggest that a controllable phase transformation by using a two-stage sulphuric acid roasting process is a feasible method for efficiently extracting valuable metals from Chinese nickel sulphide ore.

  6. A double Fe-Ti oxide and Fe-sulphide liquid immiscibility in the Itsindro Gabbro Complex, Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augé, Thierry; Bailly, Laurent; Roig, Jean-Yves

    2017-11-01

    The petrology and mineralogy of the Itsindro complex in south-central Madagascar has been investigated through samples obtained from the 320.7 m-deep Lanjanina borehole. The section consists of a 254 m-thick pyroxenite unit with interbedded gabbro layers that overlies a gabbro unit and is itself overlain by a 19 m-thick granite unit. Most of the structures are sub-horizontal. A weak magmatic layering is locally observed but at the scale of the core, the intrusion does not appear to be a layered complex. Pyroxenite and gabbro show a systematic disseminated mineralization consisting of Fe-Ti-P oxides and Fe-(Cu-Ni) sulphides that takes the form of ilmenite-titanomagnetite ± apatite and pyrrhotite ± chalcopyrite ± pentlandite. In the upper zone, from 90 to 72 m, sub-massive centimetre-to decimetre-sized layers of oxides and sulphides comprise a total of 16 m of sub-massive sulphide (the main mineralized zone). In this mineralized zone the oxide/sulphide ratio is close to 1/1. The sulphide is strongly dominated by pyrrhotite, which may locally contain inclusions of molybdenite crystals with the Re sulphide rheniite (ReS2). Oxides are generally euhedral, included in or attached to the Fe-sulphide, and also locally form sub-massive centimetre-sized bands. Apatite as a cumulus phase is ubiquitous. Locally it may account for 30% of the ore-rich samples and some samples consist of apatite-Fe-Ti oxides-Fe-Cu-Ni sulphides with virtually no silicate. Apatite is the main REE carrier but the total REE content remains low (<90 ppm). Mineral compositions and whole rock geochemistry indicate that the rocks are highly differentiated, and in spite of a relatively limited thickness, the differentiation process is observed. Two zones can be distinguished: from the bottom to 162.8 m we see a decrease in the Mg number of olivine and pyroxene, and a drop in TiO2 and Al2O3 for the latter. A reverse trend is then observed within the pyroxenite unit from the 162.8 m level upwards. The

  7. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  8. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  9. Toxic Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors...... to human exposure. The occurrence of each element in food classes from different regions is presented. Some of the current toxicological risk assessments on toxic elements, the human health effect of each toxic element, and their contents in the food legislations are presented. An overview of analytical...... techniques and challenges for determination of toxic elements in food is also given....

  10. Hydrogen sulphide, odor, and VOC air emission control systems for heavy oil storage, transport, and processing operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tandon, H.P. [APC Technologies, Inc. (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, companies have to control their air emissions in compliance with regulatory and process improvement objectives. The industry therefore operates air emission control systems to eliminate odor complaints, reduce personnel exposure to H2S and remove BTEX and VOC emissions. This paper studies different cases of companies which have chosen to use a fixed activated carbon adsorption unit. The study was conducted on three cases of heavy oil industries which installed the CarbonPure adsorption system and describes their objectives, processes, emissions, technology options and performances. Results showed an elimination of odor complaints, a reduction of personnel exposure to harmful air contaminants and a reduction of VOC concentrations in a reliable, low maintenance and economic manner. This study presents the greater benefits of the CarbonPure adsorption system combined with an ultra high efficiency unit over those of other adsorption systems.

  11. The properties of protective oxide scales containing cerium on alloy 800H in oxidizing and oxidizing/sulphidizing environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; Fransen, T.; Geerdink, Bert; Gellings, P.J.; Stroosnijder, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion protection of oxide scales formed by electrophoretic deposition in a cerium-containing sol on Alloy 800H, a 32Ni-20Cr steel, followed by firing in air at 1123 K was studied in oxidizing and mixed oxidizing/sulphidizing environments at elevated temperatures. In particular, the influence

  12. Utilization of X-ray computed micro-tomography to evaluate iron sulphide distribution in roofing slates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavro, Martin; Souček, Kamil; Daněk, T.; Matýsek, D.; Georgiovská, Lucie; Zajícová, Vendula

    (2018) ISSN 1470-9236 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : roofing slate * iron sulphides * X-ray CT * slate pathologies * dimension stone Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 1.102, year: 2016 http://qjegh.lyellcollection.org/

  13. Conversion of calcium sulphide to calcium carbonate during the process of recovery of elemental sulphur from gypsum waste

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The production of elemental sulphur and calcium carbonate (CaCO(sub3)) from gypsum waste can be achieved by thermally reducing the waste into calcium sulphide (CaS), which is then subjected to a direct aqueous carbonation step for the generation...

  14. Silver and silver-bearing minerals at the Um Samiuki volcanogenic massive sulphide deposit, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Ibrahim M.; Stumpfl, Eugen; Helmy, Hassan M.; El Mahallawi, Mahmoud M.; Kamel, Omar A.

    2004-10-01

    The Um Samiuki Zn Cu Pb Ag mineralisation, south Eastern Desert, Egypt is hosted by felsic volcanic rocks which form part of the 712-Ma-old, east-west-trending Shadli Volcanic Belt. Two major occurrences of massive sulphides are present at the top of rhyolitic breccia in the Western and Eastern mine areas. In each occurrence, a bornite-bearing zone is overlain by a pyrite-chalcopyrite-bearing zone and underlain by a disseminated, Cu-depleted zone. In the massive sulphide ore, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, pyrite, galena, bornite and tetrahedrite tennantite are major minerals, whereas arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite, molybdenite and magnetite are accessory phases. Covellite and digenite are common secondary minerals. Bornite, tetrahedrite tennantite and covellite contain high amounts of silver (averages of 1.97, 1.39 and 1.82 wt% respectively). Based on mineralogical balance calculations, bornite and covellite accommodate 80% of silver in the Um Samiuki deposit. Ag was incorporated in the crystal structure of the early-crystallised copper sulphides and sulphosalts and silver minerals. The temperature, sequential precipitation of the fluids and the structure of the crystallising phases control the distribution of silver. Post-depositional deformation and metamorphic processes caused liberation, remobilisation and redeposition of silver within the massive sulphides.

  15. Efficient removal of rhodamine 6G dye from aqueous solution using nickel sulphide incorporated polyacrylamide grafted gum karaya bionanocomposite hydrogel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, N

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research paper reports the synthesis and usage of the polyacrylamide (PAAm) grafted gum karaya (Gk) and nickel sulphide nanoparticle based hydrogel to effectively remove rhodamine 6G dye (R6G) from aqueous solution. Initially, the hydrogel...

  16. Magnetic iron-nickel sulphides in the Pliocene and Pleistocene marine marls from the Vrica section (Calabria, Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velzen, A.J. van; Dekkers, M.J.; Zijderveld, J.D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The rock magnetic properties of the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene open-marine marls from the Vrica section in Calabria (Italy) point to magnetic sulphide as the main magnetic mineral and remanence carrier. The maximum blocking temperatures, however, are between 340 and 360°C, which is too

  17. Hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, E.

    1942-10-16

    This report mentioned that not very severe demands for purity were made on the hydrogen used in hydrogenation of coal or similar raw materials, because the catalysts were not very sensitive to poisoning. However, the hydrogenation plants tried to remove most impurities anyway by means of oil washes. The report included a table giving the amount of wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil in order to remove 1% of various impurities from 1000 m/sup 3/ of the circulating gas. The amounts of wash oil used up were 1.1 m/sup 3/ for removing 1% nitrogen, 0.3 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide, 0.03 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane. The amount of hydrogen lost was 28 m/sup 3/ for 1% nitrogen, 9 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane and ranged from 9 m/sup 3/ to 39 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide and 1 m/sup 3/ to 41 m/sup 3/ for carbon dioxide depending on whether the removal was done in liquid phase or vapor phase and with or without reduction of the oxide to methane. Next the report listed and described the major processes used in German hydrogenation plants to produce hydrogen. Most of them produced water gas, which then had its carbon monoxide changed to carbon dioxide, and the carbon oxides washed out with water under pressure and copper hydroxide solution. The methods included the Winkler, Pintsch-Hillebrand, and Schmalfeldt-Wintershall processes, as well as roasting of coke in a rotating generator, splitting of gases formed during hydrogenation, and separation of cokery gas into its components by the Linde process.

  18. Homogenisation of sulphide inclusions within diamonds: A new approach to diamond inclusion geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Iain; Hughes, Hannah S. R.; Butler, Ian B.; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Muir, Duncan

    2017-11-01

    Base metal sulphide (BMS) inclusions in diamonds provide a unique insight into the chalcophile and highly siderophile element composition of the mantle. Entombed within their diamond hosts, these provide a more robust (closed system) sample, from which to determine the trace element, Re-Os and S-isotopic compositions of the mantle than mantle xenoliths or orogenic peridotites, as they are shielded from alteration during ascent to the Earth's crust and subsequent surface weathering. However, at temperatures below 1100 °C some BMS inclusions undergo subsolidus re-equilibration from an original monosulphide solid solution (Mss) and this causes fractionation of the major and trace elements within the inclusions. Thus to study the subjects noted above, current techniques require the entire BMS inclusion to be extracted for analyses. Unfortunately, 'flaking' of inclusions during break-out is a frequent occurrence and hence the risk of accidentally under-sampling a portion of the BMS inclusion is inherent in current practices. This loss may have significant implications for Re-Os isotope analyses where incomplete sampling of a Re-rich phase, such as chalcopyrite that typically occurs at the outer margins of BMS inclusions, may induce significant bias in the Re-Os and 187Os/188Os measurements and resulting model and isochron ages. We have developed a method for the homogenisation of BMS inclusions in diamond prior to their break-out from the host stone. Diamonds are heated to 1100 °C and then quenched to chemically homogenise any sulphide inclusions for both major and trace elements. Using X-ray Computed Microtomography (μCT) we determine the shape and spatial setting of multiple inclusions within a host stone and crucially show that the volume of a BMS inclusion is the same both before and after homogenisation. We show that the homogenisation process significantly reduces the inherent variability of in situ analysis when compared with unhomogenised BMS, thereby

  19. Trichothecenes: structure-toxic activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinghua; Dohnal, Vlastimil; Kuca, Kamil; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-07-01

    Trichothecenes comprise a large family of structurally related toxins mainly produced by fungi belonging to the genus Fusarium. Among trichothecenes, type A and type B are of the most concern due to their broad and highly toxic nature. In order to address structure-activity relationships (SAR) of trichothecenes, relationships between structural features and biological effects of trichothecene mycotoxins in mammalian systems are summarized in this paper. The double bond between C-9-C-10 and the 12,13-epoxide ring are essential structural features for trichothecene toxicity. Removal of these groups results in a complete loss of toxicity. A hydroxyl group at C-3 enhances trichothecene toxicity, while this activity decreases gradually when C-3 is substituted with either hydrogen or an acetoxy group. The presence of a hydroxyl group at C-4 promotes slightly lower toxicity than an acetoxy group at the same position. The toxicity for type B trichothecenes decreases if the substituent at C-4 is changed from acetoxy to hydroxyl or hydrogen at C-4 position. The presence of hydroxyl and hydrogen groups on C-15 decreases the trichothecene toxicity in comparison with an acetoxy group attached to this carbon. Trichothecenes toxicity increases when a macrocyclic ring exists between the C-4 and C-15. At C-8 position, an oxygenated substitution at C-8 is essential for trichothecene toxicity, indicating a decrease in the toxicity if substituent change from isovaleryloxy through hydrogen to the hydroxyl group. The presence of a second epoxy ring at C-7-C-8 reduces the toxicity, whereas epoxidation at C-9-C-10 of some macrocyclic trichothecenes increases the activity. Conjugated trichothecenes could release their toxic precursors after hydrolysis in animals, and present an additional potential risk. The SAR study of trichothecenes should provide some crucial information for a better understanding of trichothecene chemical and biological properties in food contamination.

  20. In vivo measurements of the internal pH of Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor (Annelida, Polychaeta) exposed to ambient sulphidic conditions using pH microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Stefan; Jahn, Andreas; Funke, Friederike; Brenke, Nils

    The effect of different ambient sulphide concentrations on the internal pH regime of Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor was studied under in vivo conditions using liquid membrane pH microelectrodes, a method which is new to marine sciences. As a case study, the hypothesis was tested whether organisms exposed to ambient sulphidic conditions are able to lower their internal pH which, in effect, would reduce sulphide influx into the animals and thus could represent an effective detoxification mechanism. It was shown that a significant lowering of the internal pH occurred within only 20min after adding sulphide. This pH lowering appeared to be dependent on the external sulphide concentration of the ambient medium and showed a saturation beyond a threshold level of about 130μM. It is discussed whether this sulphide-induced pH drop is an active regulatory mechanism and acts as an effective protection mechanism against sulphide during short-term exposures.

  1. Bacterial consortium for copper extraction from sulphide ore consisting mainly of chalcopyrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Romo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mining industry is looking forward for bacterial consortia for economic extraction of copper from low-grade ores. The main objective was to determine an optimal bacterial consortium from several bacterial strains to obtain copper from the leach of chalcopyrite. The major native bacterial species involved in the bioleaching of sulphide ore (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferriphilum were isolated and the assays were performed with individual bacteria and in combination with At. thiooxidans. In conclusion, it was found that the consortium integrated by At. ferrooxidans and At. thiooxidans removed 70% of copper in 35 days from the selected ore, showing significant differences with the other consortia, which removed only 35% of copper in 35 days. To validate the assays was done an escalation in columns, where the bacterial consortium achieved a higher percentage of copper extraction regarding to control.

  2. Molecular hydrogen: a therapeutic antioxidant and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular hydrogen (H2 medicine research has flourished since a landmark publication in Nature Medicine that revealed the antioxidant and cytoprotective effects of hydrogen gas in a focal stroke model. Emerging evidence has consistently demonstrated that molecular hydrogen is a promising therapeutic option for a variety of diseases and the underlying comprehensive mechanisms is beyond pure hydroxyl radicals scavenging. The non-toxicity at high concentrations and rapid cellular diffusion features of molecular hydrogen ensure the feasibility and readiness of its clinical translation to human patients.

  3. Antimony toxicity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms...

  4. Optimization of Cu-Zn Massive Sulphide Flotation by Selective Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, F.; Koleini, S. M. J.; Abdollahy, M.

    2014-10-01

    Selective floatation of base metal sulphide minerals can be achieved by using selective reagents. Sequential floatation of chalcopyrite-sphalerite from Taknar (Iran) massive sulphide ore with 3.5 % Zn and 1.26 % Cu was studied. D-optimal design of response surface methodology was used. Four mixed collector types (Aer238 + SIPX, Aero3477 + SIPX, TC1000 + SIPX and X231 + SIPX), two depressant systems (CuCN-ZnSO4 and dextrin-ZnSO4), pH and ZnSO4 dosage were considered as operational factors in the first stage of flotation. Different conditions of pH, CuSO4 dosage and SIPX dosage were studied for sphalerite flotation from first stage tailings. Aero238 + SIPX induced better selectivity for chalcopyrite against pyrite and sphalerite. Dextrin-ZnSO4 was as effective as CuCN-ZnSO4 in sphalerite-pyrite depression. Under optimum conditions, Cu recovery, Zn recovery and pyrite content in Cu concentrate were 88.99, 33.49 and 1.34 % by using Aero238 + SIPX as mixed collector, CuCN-ZnSO4 as depressant system, at ZnSO4 dosage of 200 g/t and pH 10.54. When CuCN was used at the first stage, CuSO4 consumption increased and Zn recovery decreased during the second stage. Maximum Zn recovery was 72.19 % by using 343.66 g/t of CuSO4, 22.22 g/t of SIPX and pH 9.99 at the second stage.

  5. POLYMETALLIC SULPHIDE OCCURRENCES IN THE UPPER PALEOZOIC COMPLEXES OF NORTHEASTERN MONTENEGRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Jurković

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the NE Montenegro, in the area Mt. Javorje and in the surrounding of the towns Bijelo Polje, Mojkovac, Ivangrad (Berane, Murino, Plav and Konjusi (Konjuhe there are numerous small ore occurrences of pyrite and subordinately pyrrhotite with few per cent of Cu-, Zn- and Pb-sulphide in the small quantity of quartz and carbonate gangue minerals in Upper Paleozoic deposits. Different opinions considering the age of this ore occurrences exist in the literature of Montenegro: Upper Paleozoic or Middle Triassic. This study has revealed that most of this ore occurrences are of Permian age. Such statement relies on the discovery of Lower-Middle Permian fossils, on the specific occurrence of intercalated conglomerates, coarse grained sandstones and recrystallized limestones in the immediate vicinity and on the frequent stratiform (concordant form of the occurence of ore and magmatic lenses and layers, or on the stratabound occurrences of ore impregnations and veins, respectively. It was concluded that all Pb-Zn ore deposits of Montenegro were derived from the same magma. It gave in three successive pulsations Permian small ore occurrences in early rift stage, larger Lower Triassic ore occurrences in the intermediate rift stage and the largest Middle Triassic Pb-Zn ore deposits in the main rift stage. This hypothesis is based on the isogenetic character of Pb204 and on the uniform values of endogene sulphide sulphur S34 of galena and pyrite in the ore deposits of all three stratigraphic horizons. The important indicator is permanent presence of Cu minerals, what is typical for Paleozoic ore deposits of whole Dinarides.

  6. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  7. Hydrogen usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1942-10-22

    This short tabular report listed the number of m/sup 3/ of hydrogen required for a (metric) ton of product for various combinations of raw material and product in a hydrogenation procedure. In producing auto gasoline, bituminous coal required 2800 m/sup 3/, brown coal required 2400 m/sup 3/, high-temperature-carbonization tar required 2100 m/sup 3/, bituminous coal distillation tar required 1300 m/sup 3/, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 850 m/sup 3/, petroleum residues required 900 m/sup 3/, and gas oil required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, brown coal required 1900 m/sup 3/, whereas petroleum residues required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, lubricants, and paraffin by the TTH (low-temperature-hydrogenation) process, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 550 m/sup 3/. 1 table.

  8. Ammonia for hydrogen storage: challenges and opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Christensen, Claus H.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2008-01-01

    and alcohols, it has the advantage that there is no CO2 emission at the end user. The drawbacks are mainly the toxicity of liquid ammonia and the problems related to trace amounts of ammonia in the hydrogen after decomposition. Storage of ammonia in metal ammine salts is discussed, and it is shown......The possibility of using ammonia as a hydrogen carrier is discussed. Compared to other hydrogen storage materials, ammonia has the advantages of a high hydrogen density, a well-developed technology for synthesis and distribution, and easy catalytic decomposition. Compared to hydrocarbons...... that this maintains the high volumetric hydrogen density while alleviating the problems of handling the ammonia. Some of the remaining challenges for research in ammonia as a hydrogen carrier are outlined....

  9. Imaging Seafloor Massive Sulphides at the TAG hydrothermal fields, from the Blue Mining seismic project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil de la Iglesia, Alba; Vardy, Mark; Bialas, Jörg; Dannowski, Anke; Schröder, Henning; Minshull, Tim; Chidlow, Kasia; Murton, Bramly

    2017-04-01

    The Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) hydrothermal field, located at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (26°N), is known for the existence of Seafloor Massive Sulphides (SMS) discovered by the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse cruise (Rona et al., 1986). The TAG comprises a low-temperature alteration zone, five inactive, high-temperature hydrothermal deposits, and the hydrothermal active TAG mound. TAG is also known for being one of the eight known SMS with a size larger than 2M tones (Hannington et al., 2011). The known SMS deposits do not have the same dimensions as the Massive Sulphides (MS) found on land, covering areas from 10s-100s m2 and their accessibility is more complicated, being located at 800-6000 m water depth. Although they do not seem to be economically exploitable at present, those deep-sea mineral resources could be important targets in the near future. One of the aims of the European-funded Blue Mining project is to identify the SMS deposit dimensions for the future environmentally sustainable and clean deep-sea mining. The Blue Mining project is focused on the extinct Seafloor Massive Sulphides (eSMS) in the TAG hydrothermal field, in particular Shinkai, Southern and Shimmering mounds. In May/June 2016 the German RV METEOR carried out a seismic refraction/reflection wide-angle (WA) experiment acquiring thirty multichannel seismic (MCS) profiles crossing the TAG hydrothermal field. GEOMAR's 2-unit air-gun array with a total volume of 760 cubic-inches was used, triggering seismic pulses every 12 s along the MCS profiles. Reflected and refracted events from the shallow-towed sources were recorded by 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) and 5 Ocean Bottom Hydrophones (OBH). To obtain the internal velocities and gross geometries of these deposits, 10 of 20 OBS were located on top of the eSMS, Shinaki and Southern mounds, while the other 10 instruments were located in extension of the profiles, covering Shimmering mounds and regional targets. In this presentation, we

  10. SULPHIDE MINERALIZATION IN UPPER WESTPHALIAN COAL SEAMS FROM THE EASTERN PART OF THE UPPER SILESIAN COAL BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipiarski Ireneusz

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Morphologically diversified sulphide mineralization has been found in No. 301 and 302 coal seams (Westphalian B. The main sulphide is pyrite which forms veinlets cross-cutting the sedimentary fabrics of the coal, encrusts the cellular structures and intergrowths with oxysulphides. Two generations of pyrites were observed: the preceding and the following the oxysulphides. Pyrite composition is stoichiometric, rare admixtures are up to(in wt.%: Mn - 0.19, Co - 0.48, Ni - 0.42 and As - 1.41. Iron oxysulphides contain up to 35.06 wt.% oxygen. Their composition varies between FeS2O and FeS2O3. Increased contents of As (up to 1.46 wt.% and Pb (up to 0.96 wt.% were detected.

  11. Antimony Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Shyam; Chakravarty, Jaya

    2010-01-01

    Antimony toxicity occurs either due to occupational exposure or during therapy. Occupational exposure may cause respiratory irritation, pneumoconiosis, antimony spots on the skin and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition antimony trioxide is possibly carcinogenic to humans. Improvements in working conditions have remarkably decreased the incidence of antimony toxicity in the workplace. As a therapeutic, antimony has been mostly used for the treatment of leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis. The major toxic side-effects of antimonials as a result of therapy are cardiotoxicity (~9% of patients) and pancreatitis, which is seen commonly in HIV and visceral leishmaniasis co-infections. Quality control of each batch of drugs produced and regular monitoring for toxicity is required when antimonials are used therapeutically. PMID:21318007

  12. Versatile Hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen is probably the most intriguing ele- ment in the periodic table. Although it is only the seventh most abundant element on earth, it is the most abundant element in the uni- verse. It combines with almost all the ele- ments of the periodic table, except for a few transition elements, to form binary compounds of the type E.

  13. Determination of sulphide concentrates of ore copper by XRPD and chemical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cocić Mira B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Roasting process of sulphide copper concentrates in fluo-solid reactor is an oxidation process, and presents the first stage of copper concentrate processing in Copper Mining and Smelting Complex Bor, RTB Bor. Therefore, the importance of accurate and up to date process control is an apparent precondition for the correct treatment in the following stages and also for of high grade cathode copper. As concentrate is fed into the roaster, it is heated by a stream of hot air to about 590°C. The process takes place between solid and gaseous phases without the appearance of a liquid phase. The heat generated by the exothermic oxidation reaction of sulphur from cooper and iron minerals (chalcopyrite and pyrite is sufficient to carry out the entire process autogenously at temperature from 620 to 670°C. The temperature of sulphur firing which defines the start of roasting depends on physical traits, particle size of sulfides and characteristic product of oxidation. The obtained products of the roasting process are: calcine, ready for smelting in the furnace and gas-rich sulphure dioxide (SO2, well suited for the production of sulfuric acid. The relationship between the quantitative mineral composition of the charge and of the calcine directly points out to the efficiency of the roasting process in fluo-solid reactor. The amount of bornite and magnetite, resulting from the sulfide oxidation is the most important parameter. Hence, quantitative determination of mineral composition is of great interest. In this work, the results of the determination of quantitative mineral composition of the copper sulphide concentrate (charge and products of their roasting (calcine and overflow in fluo-solid reactor in the RTB Bor are presented. The aim was to compare the results of the iron, copper, sulfur and oxygen contents determined by two independent techniques, the chemical (HA and X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRPD that is based on the quantitative mineral

  14. Hydrochemical models of the sulphidic tailings dumps at Matchless (Namibia) and Selebi-Phikwe (Botswana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, M. O.; Schippers, A.; Hahn, L.

    2006-02-01

    The sulphidic tailings dumps at Matchless (Namibia) and Selebi-Phikwe (Botswana) are located in a similar semiarid environment but have a contrasting mineralogical composition. The Matchless tailings are pyrite-rich, whereas the Selebi-Phikwe tailings are dominated by pyrrhotite. Hydrochemical models are established with computer codes for water-balance, sulphide oxidation rate and hydrochemical equilibrium calculations. The data input is based on detailed mineralogical, chemical and kinetic investigations carried out on the core of boreholes drilled in 2000 and 2003. The oxidation of pyrrhotite proceeds at a much faster rate than the oxidation of pyrite. The PYROX code, which is used for kinetic calculations, can take these differences into account by applying different oxide-coating diffusion coefficients (D2) for pyrrhotite and pyrite. Humidity-cell testing is widely used to predict the post-mining composition of drainage water in humid climates. However, the semiarid conditions at Matchless and Selebi-Phikwe only allow a minimal water flux within the dump. Under such conditions, humidity-cell testing is likely to overestimate the seepage-water pH. This is suggested by the hydrochemical equilibrium calculations for the post-mining period at Selebi-Phikwe, which predict a seepage-water pH about one unit lower than the pH at the end of the 26-weeks humidity-cell testing period. The acidity of the seepage water can be reduced by about half a pH unit, if an oxygen barrier below the evaporation zone is installed. A clay layer 0.5 m thick covered by >1.5 m tailings represents the optimal design for a wet barrier. All three computer codes used for water-balance calculations (HELP3, UNSAT-H and HYDRUS-1D), predict >85% average water saturation for such a layer, which diminishes the diffusion of oxygen into the pile and production of SO{4/-2} and H+. The alternative design for a dry barrier consists of a vegetated silt layer 1 m thick on top of the tailings. This barrier

  15. New methodologies for volcanic-hosted copper sulphide mineralization on Cyprus: a GIS–prospectivity analysis-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Naden, J.; Herrington, R.J.; Jowitt, S.M.; McEvoy, F.M.; Williamson, J.P.; Monhemius, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the results of a three-year collaborative research project between the British Geological Survey (BGS), The Natural History Museum, London (NHM) and the Geological Survey Department, Cyprus (GSD). It was funded by the Ministry of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Environment, Cyprus. The objectives of the programme were to develop new methodologies for the exploration and exploitation of cupriferous sulphide ore and re-establish metalliferous mineral exploration resea...

  16. Long-term effects of sulphide on the enhanced biological removal of phosphorus: The symbiotic role of Thiothrix caldifontis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Rincón, F J; Welles, L; Lopez-Vazquez, C M; Nierychlo, M; Abbas, B; Geleijnse, M; Nielsen, P H; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Brdjanovic, D

    2017-06-01

    Thiothrix caldifontis was the dominant microorganism (with an estimated bio-volume of 65 ± 3%) in a lab-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) system containing 100 mg of sulphide per litre in the influent. After a gradual exposure to the presence of sulphide, the EBPR system initially dominated by Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis Clade I (98 ± 3% bio-volume) (a known polyphosphate accumulating organism, PAO) became enriched with T. caldifontis. Throughout the different operating conditions studied, practically 100% phosphate removal was always achieved. The gradual increase of the sulphide content in the medium (added to the anaerobic stage of the alternating anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor) and the adjustment of the aerobic hydraulic retention time played a major role in the enrichment of T. caldifontis. T. caldifontis exhibited a mixotrophic metabolism by storing carbon anaerobically as poly-β-hydroxy-alkanoates (PHA) and generating the required energy through the hydrolysis of polyphosphate. PHA was used in the aerobic period as carbon and energy source for growth, polyphosphate, and glycogen formation. Apparently, extra energy was obtained by the initial accumulation of sulphide as an intracellular sulphur, followed by its gradual oxidation to sulphate. The culture enriched with T. caldifontis was able to store approximately 100 mg P/g VSS. This research suggests that T. caldifontis could behave like PAO with a mixotrophic metabolism for phosphorus removal using an intracellular sulphur pool as energy source. These findings can be of major interest for the biological removal of phosphorus from wastewaters with low organic carbon concentrations containing reduced S-compounds like those (pre-)treated in anaerobic systems or from anaerobic sewers. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of lithogeochemistry in the assessment of nickel-sulphide potential in komatiite belts from northern Finland and Norway

    OpenAIRE

    G.J. Heggie; S.J. Barnes; M.L. Fiorentini

    2013-01-01

    This study tests the application of chalcophile elements such as nickel, copper and the platinum-group elements as indicators of nickel-sulphide prospectivity in komatiites from terranes of the Karelian Craton in northern Finland and Norway. Major element abundances reflect volcanic processes associated with the emplacement dynamics of ultramafic lavas, whereas the variable chalcophile element concentrations record the ore-forming process, mainly as an anomalous metal depletion and enrichm...

  18. Understanding the shrinkage of optical absorption edges of nanostructured Cd-Zn sulphide films for photothermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Md. Sohrab [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh); Kabir, Humayun [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh); School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Rahman, M. Mahbubur, E-mail: M.Rahman@Murdoch.edu.au [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh); Surface Analysis and Materials Engineering Research Group, School of Engineering & Information Technology, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia 6150 (Australia); Hasan, Kamrul [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, University of Sharjah, P.O. Box 27272, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Bashar, Muhammad Shahriar; Rahman, Mashudur [Institute of Fuel and Research Development, Bangladesh Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Dhanmondi, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Gafur, Md. Abdul [Pilot Plant and Process Development Center, Bangladesh Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Dhanmondi, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Islam, Shariful [Department of Physics, Comilla University, Comilla (Bangladesh); Amri, Amun [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitas Riau, Pekanbaru (Indonesia); Jiang, Zhong-Tao [Surface Analysis and Materials Engineering Research Group, School of Engineering & Information Technology, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia 6150 (Australia); Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z. [School of Engineering & Information Technology, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150 (Australia)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Cd-Zn sulphide films synthesized via chemical bath deposition technique. • Nanocrystalline phase of Cd-Zn sulphide films were seen in XRD studies. • Nanocrystalline structures of the films were also confirmed by the SEM. • The band gap of these films is a combination of composition and size. • E{sub U} and σ studies ascribed the shrinkage of absorption edges around the optical band-gaps. - Abstract: In this article Cd-Zn sulphide thin films deposited onto soda lime glass substrates via chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique were investigated for photovoltaic applications. The synthesized films were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and ultraviolet visible (UV–vis) spectroscopic methodologies. A higher degree of crystallinity of the films was attained with the increase of film thicknesses. SEM micrographs exhibited a partial crystalline structure with a particulate appearance surrounded by the amorphous grain boundaries. The optical absorbance and absorption coefficient of the films were also enhanced significantly with the increase in film thicknesses. Optical band-gap analysis indicated a monotonic decrease in direct and indirect band-gaps with the increase of thicknesses of the films. The presence of direct and indirect transitional energies due to the exponential falling edges of the absorption curves may either be due to the lack of long-range order or to the existence of defects in the films. The declination of the optical absorption edges was also confirmed via Urbach energy and steepness parameters studies.

  19. Effect of annealing on the properties of spray-pyrolysed lead sulphide thin films for solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veena, E.; Bangera, Kasturi V.; Shivakumar, G. K.

    2017-05-01

    Annealing is the most important processing parameter perhaps as it directly affects the properties of the thin films. In the present article, lead sulphide thin films composed of (2 0 0) plane-oriented nano-rods were successfully synthesized on glass substrates using spray pyrolysis technique at annealing temperature 350 °C. Films were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive analysis by X-ray (EDAX), UV-VIS-NIR spectrometry and two-probe experiments. The X-ray diffraction study confirmed that films exhibiting face-centred cubic structure with a preferred orientation along (2 0 0) plane were independent of annealing temperature. SEM photographs revealed the formation of nano-rods. The possible formation of nano-rods and its dependency on optical and electrical properties were discussed. Chemical composition in terms of atomic ratio of the constituents is determined from EDAX studies. The optical band gap of the lead sulphide thin films was found to decrease from 1.22 to 0.98 eV with an increase in annealing temperature. The electrical conductivity of the films at room temperature was of the order of 10-2 Ω-1 cm-1 with the low activation energy. Results prove that lead sulphide films grown by chemical method appeal its adoptability for potential solar cell applications.

  20. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulphidic marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Yu, DR. Hang [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Steele, Joshua [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Dawson, Katherine [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Sun, S [University of California, San Diego; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Orphan, V [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

    2013-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyse important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulphiderich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization because of decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulphide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulphidic (> 1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5 270 nM), cobalt (0.5 6 nM), molybdenum (10 5600 nM) and tungsten (0.3 8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalysing anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate-reducing bacteria. Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrophilic microorganisms. Overall, our data suggest that AOM consortia use specialized biochemical strategies to overcome the challenges of metal availability in sulphidic environments.

  1. The environmental context of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and its potential role as an ecosystem engineer in sulphidic mine waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebenaa, Gustav

    2001-06-01

    Microorganisms are the causative agent of the environmental problems since they catalyse the weathering of the (sulphidic) waste. The chemical oxidation alone is not fast enough to create any severe environmental problems. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is thought to be a key organism in weathering of sulphide minerals. A. ferrooxidans is affected by several more or less abiotic factors. The influence of temperature, pH and nutrient deficiency as potentially limiting factors for the activity of A. ferrooxidans has been investigated. It seems that temperature has less influence on its activity, but rather reflects the origin of the bacterial isolate. An alkaline pH seems enough to hinder growth and activity. The nutrients do not seem to be a limiting factor in the studied environment. The possible regulation of the activity of A. ferrooxidans is therefore a way to, at least partly, mitigate the environmental impact from mine waste. Waste from the mining industry is the largest waste problem in Sweden. With amounts over 600 million tonnes one could easily imagine the tremendous cost involved in the abatement. The MiMi-programme, with researchers from several relevant fields, has as its aim to evaluate present and to find alternative techniques to mitigate the environmental impact from mine waste. The understanding of A. ferrooxidans and its role as an ecosystem engineer is essential both in evaluating present techniques and even more so in finding alternative abatement techniques for sulphidic mine waste.

  2. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hydrogen on various metals and the use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage are discussed. The mechanisms of, and differences between, hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen attack of ferritic steels are compared, common sources...

  3. Formic Acid as a Hydrogen Energy Carrier

    KAUST Repository

    Eppinger, Jorg

    2016-12-15

    The high volumetric capacity (S3 g H-2/L) and its low toxicity and flammability under ambient conditions make formic acid a promising hydrogen energy carrier. Particularly, in the past decade, significant advancements have been achieved in catalyst development for selective hydrogen generation from formic acid. This Perspective highlights the advantages of this approach with discussions focused on potential applications in the transportation sector together with analysis of technical requirements, limitations, and costs.

  4. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  5. Optical and electrical properties of chemical bath deposited cobalt sulphide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindasamy, Geetha [R& D Centre, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore (India); Murugasen, Priya, E-mail: priyamurugasen15@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Saveetha Engineering, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Sagadevan, Suresh [Department of Physics, AMET University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2017-01-15

    Cobalt sulphide (CoS) thin films were synthesized using the Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was used to study the structure and the crystallite size of CoS thin film. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) studies reveal the surface morphology of these films. The optical properties of the CoS thin films were determined using UV-Visible absorption spectrum. The optical band gap of the thin films was found to be 1.6 eV. Optical constants such as the refractive index, the extinction coefficient and the electric susceptibility were determined. The dielectric studies were carried out at different frequencies and at different temperatures for the prepared CoS thin films. In addition, the plasma energy of the valence electron, Penn gap or average energy gap, the Fermi energy and electronic polarizability of the thin films were determined. The AC electrical conductivity measurement was also carried out for the thin films. The activation energy was determined by using DC electrical conductivity measurement. (author)

  6. Optical properties of silver sulphide thin films formed on evaporated Ag by a simple sulphurization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera-Calva, E., E-mail: ebc@xanum.uam.m [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Iztapalapa, Av. Purisima Esq. Michoacan, Col. Vicentina, Mexico, D.F., 09340 (Mexico); Ortega-Lopez, M.; Avila-Garcia, A.; Matsumoto-Kwabara, Y. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Mexico DF 07360 (Mexico)

    2010-01-31

    Silver sulphide (Ag{sub 2}S) thin films were grown on the surface of silver films (Ag) deposited on glass substrate by using a simple chemical sulphurization method. According to X-ray diffraction analysis, the Ag{sub 2}S thin films display low intensity peaks at 34.48{sup o}, 36.56{sup o}, and 44.28{sup o}, corresponding to diffraction from (100), (112) and (103) planes of the acanthite phase (monoclinic). A model of the type Ag{sub 2}S/Ag/glass was deduced from spectroscopic ellipsometric measurements. Also, the optical constants (n, k) of the system were determined. Furthermore, the optical properties as solar selective absorber for collector applications were assessed. The optical reflectance of the Ag{sub 2}S/Ag thin film systems exhibits the expected behavior for an ideal selective absorber, showing a low reflectance in the wavelength range below 2 {mu}m and a high reflectance for wavelengths higher than that value. An absorptance about 70% and an emittance about 3% or less were calculated for several samples.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Mercaptoacetic Acid Capped Cadmium Sulphide Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wageh, S; Maize, Mai; Donia, A M; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A; Umar, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the facile synthesis and detailed characterization of mercaptoacetic acid capped cadmium sulphide (CdS) quantum dots using various cadmium precursors. The mercaptoacetic acid capped CdS quantum dots were prepared by facile and simple wet chemical method and characterized by several techniques such as energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-vis. spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM) and thremogravimetric analysis. The EDS studies revealed that the prepared quantum dots possess higher atomic percentage of sulfur compared to cadmium due to the coordination of thiolate to the quantum dots surfaces. The X-ray and absorption analyses exhibited that the size of quantum dots prepared by cadmium acetate is larger than the quantum dots prepared by cadmium chloride and cadmium nitrate. The increase in size can be attributed to the low stability constant of cadmium acetate in comparison with cadmium chloride and cadmium nitrate. The FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis showed that the nature of capping molecule on the surface of quantum dots are different depending on the cadmium precursors which affect the emission from CdS quantum dots. Photoemission spectroscopy revealed that the emission of quantum dots prepared by cadmium acetate has high intensity band edge emission along with low intensity trapping state emission. However the CdS quantum dots prepared by cadmium chloride and cadmium nitrate produced only trapping state emissions.

  8. Characterization of Silver Sulphide Thin Films Prepared by Spray Pyrolysis Using a New Precursor Silver Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel SAHRAOUI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Silver sulphide is a semiconductor widely used as an infrared sensor and as an absorber material for solar cells. In this work, we report the preparation of Ag2S thin films from a new precursor using chemical spray pyrolysis technique. The thin films having various [CS(NH22]/[AgCl] were grown at different substrate temperatures and characterized using X-Ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, transmission T(λ and reflectivity R(λ measurements. The diffraction patterns showed that the sample having x =[CS(NH22]/[AgCl]=5 ratio at the substrate temperature Ts =200 °C has the best crystallinity and exhibits a monoclinic structure preferentially oriented in the direction of (- 112 lattice plan . The optical properties have been investigated using spectrophotometric measurements in the wavelength range 200-2500 nm. The obtained values of the band gap energy were in the order of 1 eV. The refractive index n and the extinction coefficient k were determined from the absolute values of the measured transmittance and reflectance. The conductivity at room temperature was 32´10 –3(W cm-1, and the films were n type.

  9. Interface and properties of inorganic fullerene tungsten sulphide nanoparticle reinforced poly (ether ether ketone) nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nannan; Yang, Zhuxian; Wang, Yuan; Thummavichai, Kunyapat; Xia, Yongde; Ghita, Oana; Zhu, Yanqiu

    We report a simple and effective method to fabricate PEEK (poly ether ether ketone)/IF-WS2 (Inorganic Fullerene Tungsten Sulphide) nanocomposites with IF-WS2 content up to 8 wt%. We have used electron microscopies to characterise the morphology and structural features of the nancomposites, and FTIR and XPS to show that some chemical interface bondings were formed between the PEEK and IF-WS2. We demonstrate that the resulting PEEK/IF-WS2 nanocomposites showed an extraordinary 190% increase in thermal conductivity, 50 °C higher in degradation temperature, and mild improvements in strength and hardness. The increased degradation activation energy from 64 to 76 kJ/mol for neat PEEK and PEEK/IF-WS2 nanocomposites, respectively, is attributed to the synergistic interface between the PEEK matrix and IF-WS2 nanoparticles. The enhancements in both the mechanical and thermal properties will significantly expand the capacities of PEEK-based nanocomposites towards applications where thermal conductivity and stability are important.

  10. Utilization of water-reducing admixtures in cemented paste backfill of sulphide-rich mill tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Cihangir, Ferdi; Kesimal, Ayhan; Deveci, Haci; Alp, Ibrahim

    2010-07-15

    This study presents the effect of three different water-reducing admixtures (WRAs) on the rheological and mechanical properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB) samples. A 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa and the maintenance of the stability (i.e. > or = 0.7 MPa) over 360 days of curing were desired as the design criteria. Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and Portland composite cement (PCC) were used as binders at 5 wt.% dose. WRAs were initially tested to determine the dosage of a WRA for a required consistency of 7'' for CPB mixtures. A total of 192 CPB samples were then prepared using WRAs. The utilization of WRAs enhanced the flow characteristics of the CPB mixture and allowed to achieve the same consistency at a lower water-to-cement ratio. For OPC, the addition of WRAs appeared to improve the both short- and long-term performance of CPB samples. However, only polycarboxylate-based superplasticiser produced the desired 28-day strength of > or = 0.7 MPa when PCC was used as the binder. These findings suggest that WRAs can be suitably exploited for CPB of sulphide-rich tailings to improve the strength and stability in short and long terms allowing to reduce binder costs in a CPB plant. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Microwave-assisted total digestion of sulphide ores for multi-element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Harahsheh, M., E-mail: al-harahsheh@ahu.edu.jo [College of Mining and Environmental Engineering, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University, P.O. Box 20, Ma' an 71111 (Jordan); Kingman, S.; Somerfield, C. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Ababneh, F. [Department of Chemistry, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University, P.O. Box 20, Ma' an (Jordan)

    2009-04-06

    A new two-stage microwave-assisted digestion procedure using concentrated HNO{sub 3}, HCl, HF and H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} has been developed for the chemical analysis of major and trace elements in sulphide ore samples prior to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis. In the first stage 0.2 g of the certified reference material (CRM) sample was digested with a combination of acids (HNO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) in a closed Teflon vessel and heated in the microwave to 200 deg. C for 30 min. After cooling, H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} was added and the vessel was reheated to 170 deg. C for 15 min. The precision of the method was checked by comparing the results against six certified reference materials. The analytical results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values, in most cases the recoveries were in the range 95-105%. Based on at least 17 replicates of sample preparation and analysis, the precision of the method was found to be {<=}5%.

  12. From lithotroph- to organotroph-dominant: directional shift of microbial community in sulphidic tailings during phytostabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofang; Bond, Philip L.; van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong; Huang, Longbin

    2015-08-01

    Engineering microbial diversity to enhance soil functions may improve the success of direct revegetation in sulphidic mine tailings. Therefore, it is essential to explore how remediation and initial plant establishment can alter microbial communities, and, which edaphic factors control these changes under field conditions. A long-term revegetation trial was established at a Pb-Zn-Cu tailings impoundment in northwest Queensland. The control and amended and/or revegetated treatments were sampled from the 3-year-old trial. In total, 24 samples were examined using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes and various chemical properties. The results showed that the microbial diversity was positively controlled by soil soluble Si and negatively controlled by soluble S, total Fe and total As, implying that pyrite weathering posed a substantial stress on microbial development in the tailings. All treatments were dominated by typical extremophiles and lithotrophs, typically Truepera, Thiobacillus, Rubrobacter; significant increases in microbial diversity, biomass and frequency of organotrophic genera (typically Nocardioides and Altererythrobacter) were detected in the revegetated and amended treatment. We concluded that appropriate phytostabilization options have the potential to drive the microbial diversity and community structure in the tailings toward those of natural soils, however, inherent environmental stressors may limit such changes.

  13. Inorganic Nanoparticle-Modified Poly(Phenylene Sulphide/ Carbon Fiber Laminates: Thermomechanical Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Díez-Pascual

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber (CF-reinforced high-temperature thermoplastics such as poly(phenylene sulphide (PPS are widely used in structural composites for aerospace and automotive applications. The porosity of CF-reinforced polymers is a very important topic for practical applications since there is a direct correlation between void content and mechanical properties. In this study, inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulphide (IF-WS2 lubricant nanoparticles were used to manufacture PPS/IF-WS2/CF laminates via melt-blending and hot-press processing, and the effect of IF-WS2 loading on the quality, thermal and mechanical behaviour of the hybrid composites was investigated. The addition of IF-WS2 improved fiber impregnation, resulting in lower degree of porosity and increased delamination resistance, compression and flexural properties; their reinforcement effect was greater at temperatures above the glass transition (Tg. IF-WS2 contents higher than 0.5 wt % increased Tg and the heat deflection temperature while reduced the coefficient of thermal expansion. The multiscale laminates exhibited higher ignition point and notably reduced peak heat release rate compared to PPS/CF. The coexistence of micro- and nano-scale fillers resulted in synergistic effects that enhanced the stiffness, strength, thermal conductivity and flame retardancy of the matrix. The results presented herein demonstrate that the IF-WS2 are very promising nanofillers to improve the thermomechanical properties of conventional thermoplastic/CF composites.

  14. Inorganic Nanoparticle-Modified Poly(Phenylene Sulphide)/Carbon Fiber Laminates: Thermomechanical Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M.; Naffakh, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Carbon fiber (CF)-reinforced high-temperature thermoplastics such as poly(phenylene sulphide) (PPS) are widely used in structural composites for aerospace and automotive applications. The porosity of CF-reinforced polymers is a very important topic for practical applications since there is a direct correlation between void content and mechanical properties. In this study, inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulphide (IF-WS2) lubricant nanoparticles were used to manufacture PPS/IF-WS2/CF laminates via melt-blending and hot-press processing, and the effect of IF-WS2 loading on the quality, thermal and mechanical behaviour of the hybrid composites was investigated. The addition of IF-WS2 improved fiber impregnation, resulting in lower degree of porosity and increased delamination resistance, compression and flexural properties; their reinforcement effect was greater at temperatures above the glass transition (Tg). IF-WS2 contents higher than 0.5 wt % increased Tg and the heat deflection temperature while reduced the coefficient of thermal expansion. The multiscale laminates exhibited higher ignition point and notably reduced peak heat release rate compared to PPS/CF. The coexistence of micro- and nano-scale fillers resulted in synergistic effects that enhanced the stiffness, strength, thermal conductivity and flame retardancy of the matrix. The results presented herein demonstrate that the IF-WS2 are very promising nanofillers to improve the thermomechanical properties of conventional thermoplastic/CF composites. PMID:28811429

  15. Determination of iron sulphides in roofing slates from the north west of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Guinea, J.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The most important production of roofing slates in the world is quarried from the Ordovician formations of the Truchas Syncline, which have the largest amount of working quarries. Roofing slates, sometimes, have crystallized iron sulphides such as pyrite, pyrrhotite and other minerals. These iron sulphides oxidise and stain the tiles when are exposed to atmospheric conditions, so much oxidized how much more inclined is the roof. Galician quarrymen distinguish between harmless pyrite (i.e., resistant cubes of pyrite and damaging pyrite (i.e., other alterable metallic minerals such as pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, marcasite and arsenopyirite. An improved identification method is proposed using both methods (a chemical element ratios of samples under electron microprobes and (b quantitative determination of the iron sulphides in the slate measuring the oxidized areas by digital camera. The analysed Fe/S ratios, in an XY plot, of seventy metallic samples, define three separated zones: pyrite, pyrrhotite and iron oxi-hydroxides. Quantitative determination of iron sulphides in the slate tile were performed by sinking the tile horizontally for six hours in oxygen peroxide (3% diluted and capturing the oxidation areas with a magnetic camera and analysing the bitmap images with Sigma-Scan 5 software. The proposed method is faster than the Spanish UNE norm (UNE-EN- 12326-2 Sept.2000, which requires thermal strike cycles for a month. The necessary use of heavy analytical equipment such as electron microprobes can be facilitated by installing it in the Slate Technological Centre of Sobradelo de Valdeorras (Orense or by using a simple optical stereoscopic zoom microscope to classify the iron minerals.

    Las formaciones ordovícicas del Sinclinal de Duchas concentran la mayor producción mundial de pizarra para cubiertas y el mayor número de canteras en producción. Las pizarras para cubiertas muchas veces contienen sulfuros de hierro cristalizados en forma

  16. [Toxic megacolon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppkes, M; Ganslmayer, M; Strauß, R; Neurath, M F

    2015-10-01

    Toxic megacolon constitutes a feared, life-threatening complication of severe intestinal inflammation and is a challenge for interdisciplinary medical care. Specific aspects of conservative treatment based on current scientific evidence derived from guidelines, qualified reviews, and scientific studies are presented, which provide a rational approach and maximize therapeutic success. This work is based on a selective literature review and the authors' experience of many years in gastroenterology and intensive care. Toxic megacolon requires a rapid interdisciplinary assessment. Depending on the underlying etiology, an individual treatment concept needs to be developed. If an infectious or inflammatory cause is probable, a conservative approach can reduce perioperative morbidity and mortality. A step-wise approach with controlled reevaluations of the response to therapy after 72 h and 7 days avoids uncontrolled delay of surgical options further ensuring patient safety. Despite a decreasing incidence of toxic megacolon, it remains an interdisciplinary therapeutic challenge.

  17. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  18. Potential protective role of hydrogen against cisplatininduced side ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced side effects during chemotherapy. Methods: We searched PubMed and SCOPUS using the following keywords and combinations in titles, keywords, abstracts and full texts: cisplatin; side effects; chemotherapy; tumor; toxicity; hydrogen; ...

  19. Process for the preparation of a sulphided catalyst and use of said catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinerman, J.J.L.; Schoonhoven, J.W.F.M.

    1990-12-13

    A process is provided for the preparation of a sulfided catalyst for the catalytic hydrotreatment of hydrocarbon-containing feeds. The process comprises the ex-situ presulfidization of a catalyst consisting of a carrier material having one or more catalytically active metals or compounds of metals deposited on it, and contacting the resulting material under sulfiding conditions with hydrogen to which a sulfiding agent has been added. Alternatively, the resulting material can be contacted with hydrogen combined with a hydrocarbon-containing feed containing an added sulfiding agent. The sulfiding agent is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen sulfide and compounds that under the prevailing conditions are decomposable into hydrogen sulfide. Experiments are described to illustrate the process of the invention. 2 tabs.

  20. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  1. Hydrogen sulfide intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, Tee L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a hazard primarily in the oil and gas industry, agriculture, sewage and animal waste handling, construction (asphalt operations and disturbing marshy terrain), and other settings where organic material decomposes under reducing conditions, and in geothermal operations. It is an insoluble gas, heavier than air, with a very low odor threshold and high toxicity, driven by concentration more than duration of exposure. Toxicity presents in a unique, reliable, and characteristic toxidrome consisting, in ascending order of exposure, of mucosal irritation, especially of the eye ("gas eye"), olfactory paralysis (not to be confused with olfactory fatigue), sudden but reversible loss of consciousness ("knockdown"), pulmonary edema (with an unusually favorable prognosis), and death (probably with apnea contributing). The risk of chronic neurcognitive changes is controversial, with the best evidence at high exposure levels and after knockdowns, which are frequently accompanied by head injury or oxygen deprivation. Treatment cannot be initiated promptly in the prehospital phase, and currently rests primarily on supportive care, hyperbaric oxygen, and nitrite administration. The mechanism of action for sublethal neurotoxicity and knockdown is clearly not inhibition of cytochrome oxidase c, as generally assumed, although this may play a role in overwhelming exposures. High levels of endogenous sulfide are found in the brain, presumably relating to the function of hydrogen sulfide as a gaseous neurotransmitter and immunomodulator. Prevention requires control of exposure and rigorous training to stop doomed rescue attempts attempted without self-contained breathing apparatus, especially in confined spaces, and in sudden release in the oil and gas sector, which result in multiple avoidable deaths. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pollution of the seas around India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Qasim, S.Z.; SenGupta, R.; Kureishy, T.W.

    associated with the generation of toxic hydrogen sulphide have been observed at several places. Heavy metal concentrations are largely within the acceptable limits in water and in biota excepting in a few areas. Organochlorine and pesticides residues have...

  3. Sulphide and sulphosalt mineralogy and paragenesis from the Sierra Almagrera veins, Betic Cordillera (SE Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Frías, J.

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sierra Almagrera vein-type mineralization contains base metal sulphides and Pb-Sb- Cu-Ag sulphosalts. The sulphides possess significant proportions of Ag, Sb (galena, Fe (sphalerite and Sb, Zn (chalcopyrite. Ore microscopy and electron microprobe have revealed a mineralogical and textural variation and confirmed the presence of bournonite, boulangerite and anomalous tetrahedrite. The average sulphosalt formulas are bournonite Cu0.98 Pb0. 96 Sb0.98 S3.04, boulangerite Pb4.8Sb3.8S11.34 and anomalous tetrahedrite Ag0.6Cu9.7 Zn3.6 Fe0. 44 Sb3.47 S13- The sequence of mineral deposition indicates the existance of four mineralizing stages and one supergene alteration: 1 Fe-(As; 2 Zn-Cu-Fe; 3 Pb-Sb-Cu-Ag; 4 Cu-Zn-Fe, and 5 carbonates, sulphates and supergene oxides. In broad terms, it is possible to establish the following conclusions: a there exist a mineralogical and textural variation with depth, the Pb-Sb-Cu-Ag stage reaching the maximum development; b a temperature decrease during the formation of sph. 1, linked to the progressive increase in Fe-content of the sphalerite has been detected; c the compositional homogeneity of the bournonite (and the fair lack of As in the tetrahedrite could indicate the existance of a possible tendancy to individually crystallise the Sb and As sulphosalts, according to the trend Bi → Sb → As.La mineralización filoniana de Sierra Almagrera presenta una interesante paragénesis caracterizada por la presencia de sulfuros de metales base y sulfosales de Pb-Sb-Cu-Ag. Se ha identificado una secuencialidad textural y química de las distintas fases minerales, según la cual los sulfuros poseen variaciones significativas de las proporciones de Ag, Sb (galena, Fe (esfalerita, y Sb, Zn (calcopirita, yen la que las sulfosales son fundamentalmente sulfoantimoniuros (bournonita: Cu0.98 Pb0. 96 Sb0.98 S3.04, boulangerita Pb4.8Sb3.8S11.34 y tetraedrita anómala Ag0.6Cu9.7 Zn3.6 Fe0. 44 Sb3.47 S13-. La secuencia de

  4. Leaching of a gold bearing partially roasted sulphide. Laboratory scale studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Almeida

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed at defining a route for recovering precious metals from a very heterogeneous gold bearing sulphide and arsenide concentrate that was partially roasted and dumped by the 1960s when Santo António mine closed. Gold occurs in this concentrate as free particles in the range of 10-100 mum, most of them still enclosed in the pyrite and arsenopyrite matrix. Its content varies from 20 to 150 g of Au/ton, being higher at the dump upper levels and in the finer concentrate fractions. Preliminary tests demonstrated the refractoriness of this product, since the leaching with conventional cyanide solutions and with other leaching solutions gave very low recoveries. However, high concentrated cyanide solutions recover more than 60% of Au, although with high NaCN and lime consumptions and poor settling characteristics. Iron was shown to be highly dissolved in these solutions. Some prior treatments clearly favoured the cyanidation process, in particular a roasting step. Thus, a large number of roasting experiments was carried out to define the most favourable conditions for recovering gold. However, no clear relationship between roasting conditions and gold dissolution was found due to the heterogeneity of the product and high variance of gold experimental recoveries. These recoveries were calculated considering gold contained in both the leaching residues and leachates, and uncertainties of these results are relatively high. Roasting the product at 450-700 °C for 1 h guarantees a high probability to dissolve at least 74% Au in a highly concentrated NaCN solution stirred for 24 h. The 600-700 °C roasting range is clearly preferable for consuming less cyanide and lime. Pre-washing the roasted product seems not to reduce the cyanide consumption. Regarding the silver recovery, the NaCN and lime consumption are higher while using the products roasted at the lowest tested temperatures. Products roasted at higher temperatures have better settling

  5. Geochemical processes in acidic water caused by the weathering of metal sulphides; Procesos geoquimicos en aguas acidas por meteorizacion de sulfuros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asta Andres, M. P.; Acero Salazar, P.; Auque Sanz, L. F.; Gimeno Serrano, M. J.; Gomez Jimenez, J. B.

    2011-07-01

    Acid generated by the oxidative dissolution of metal sulphides is one of the main sources of pollution in runoff water, groundwater, soils and sediments throughout the world. These types of water are very acidic and contain high concentrations of sulphate and other potentially contaminating elements such Fe, As, Cd, Sb, Zn and Cu. The acidity generated by sulphide oxidation processes is mainly controlled by the type, quantity and distribution of the sulphide-rich rocks, by the physical characteristics of the rocks (since they determine the accessibility of aqueous solutions and gases to the sulphides), by the presence of microorganisms able to catalyze the main chemical reactions involved in the formation of acid drainage, and by the existence of minerals capable of neutralizing acidity. As a result, the generation of acidic water is a very complex problem, the study of which must be undertaken via a multidisciplinary approach, taking into account geological, geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological aspects among others. The aim of our work is to provide a general overview of these processes and other factors that influence the generation and evolution of these systems, together with information concerning current scientific knowledge about each of these approaches. Thus we hope to provide a basic background to the understanding and study of acid-water systems associated with the weathering of metal sulphides and the processes involved in the generation, migration, evolution and natural attenuation of acidic waters in these environments. (Author) 65 refs.

  6. Sulfide Formation And Its Impacts On A Developing Country

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matias, Natércia; Mutuvúie, Raúl; Vollertsen, Jes

    2014-01-01

    consumption, such as Mozambique, these changes are particularly important due to the potential increase of sulphide formation and the consequent release of hydrogen sulphide and other malodorous or toxic gases to the atmosphere. A major expansion of the sewer systems in the main cities of Mozambique...

  7. Studies on the toxicity of industrial waste to Macrobrachium dayanum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, S.R.; Mathur, R.P.

    1974-01-01

    The toxic substances in industrial wastes, if discharged untreated into the stream can rapidly harm the aquatic life. It is, therefore, necessary to know the permissible concentration of various wastes. This paper presents data obtained from a series of static bioassay experiments conducted to establish the median tolerance limits (TL/sub m/). The distillery waste and the mixed pulp and paper waste were taken and the range of their toxicity was evaluated. Macrobrachium dayanum, a crustacean, was chosen as the test animal because of experimental convenience and suitability. The results on toxicity indicate that distillery waste is more toxic than the mixed pulp and paper factory waste. The toxicity of distillery waste is due to sulphides and H/sub 2/S. The mixed pulp and paper waste contain colloidal particles of cellulose and lignin which are lethal. The statistical analysis shows that both of the wastes are lethal to the animals separately in their natural form. The difference in survival rates is highly significant.

  8. Application of the SPA in the design of a hydrogen producer plant coupled to a nuclear reactor; Aplicacion del APS en el diseno de una planta productora de hidrogeno acoplada a un reactor nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz S, T.; Nelson, P. F.; Francois, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Cruz G, M. J., E-mail: truizsmx@yahoo.com.mx [UNAM, Facultad de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    At the present time, one of the processes that is broadly investigated and that, theoretically demonstrates to be one of the most efficient for the hydrogen production, is the thermal-chemistry cycle Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) coupled to a nuclear reactor of very high temperature (VHTR). Because this chemical process of hydrogen production requires of a great inventory of toxic materials (sulphide compounds, hydriodic acid and iodine), is necessary the design of emergency systems with the purpose of protecting the facilities and the equipment s, the environment, as well as the near population. Given the impact of an accidental liberation of the process materials, as well as the proximity with the nuclear plant, is necessary that these emergency systems are the most reliable possible. This way, the results of the consequences analysis are utilized for the optimal localization of the gas sensors that activate the emergency systems, and the flows of the substances that are used for the leakage control. For all this, the use of the Safety Probabilistic Analysis methodology, as well as some standards of the nuclear industry, can be applied to the chemical installation to determine the fault sequences that can take to final states of not controlled leakage. This way, the use of methodologies of Event Tree Analysis and Fault Trees show in their results the components that but contribute in fault of such systems. In this work, is presented the evaluation of the joined models of event and fault trees and like with the obtained results, some proposals to increase the safety of the facilities are exposed. Also, the results of the evaluations of these proposals, and their impact of the probability of the not controlled fault sequences in a plant that is still in design stage are showed. (Author)

  9. Human Toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Fantke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews the human toxicological impacts of chemicals and how to assess these impacts in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA), in order to identify key processes and pollutants. The complete cause-effect pathway – from emissions of toxic substances up to damages on human health...... on characterisation factors means that results should by default be reported and interpreted in log scales when comparing scenarios or substance contribution! We conclude by outlining future trends in human toxicity modelling for LCIA, with promising developments for (a) better estimates of degradation halflives, (b......) the inclusion of ionization of chemicals in human exposure including bioaccumulation, (c) metal speciation, (d) spatialised models to differentiate the variability associated with spatialisation from the uncertainty, and (e) the assessment of chemical exposure via consumer products and occupational settings...

  10. Studying toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkus, A.; LeBlanc, L.; Kim, C.; Van Beneden, R.; Mayer, G.

    2006-01-01

    With funding from the George Mitchell Center for the Environment at the University of Maine, a team of scientists used a simple laboratory-based sediment resuspension design, and two well-established aquatic toxicology models, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), to evaluate if resuspension of Penobscot river sediment significantly elevates the toxicity of river water and to provide preliminary information on the types of chemicals likely to desorb during resuspension. The group collected sediments from two sites with known chemical contamination downstream of the Great Works and Veazie dams. The sediments were examined to determine the dynamics of PAH desorption and degradation under different resuspension frequencies. The scientists used clarified water from resuspension experiments for toxicity tests with the water-flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and other aquatic test organisms to infer toxicity from sediments from northern California rivers. Data from the study will help ascertain whether metals and/or xenoestrogens are present in the desorption water and give insight into possible avenues of sediment remediation.

  11. Study on copper kinetics in processing sulphide ore mixed with copper and zinc with sulfuric acid leaching under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-bo, LUO; Ji-kun, WANG; Yin, GAN

    2018-01-01

    Sulphide ore mixed with copper and zinc is processed with pressure acid leaching. Research is conducted on the copper kinetic. The stirring rate is set at 600 rpm which could eliminate the influence of external diffusions. Research is conducted on the factors affecting the copper leaching kinetic are temperature, pressure, concentration of sulfuric acid, particle size. The result shows that the apparent activity energy is 50.7 KJ/mol. We could determine that the copper leaching process is shrinking core model of chemical reaction control and work out the leaching equation.

  12. Acid leaching of oxide-sulphide copper ore prior the flotation: A way for an increased metal recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić Miroslav D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper mine "Cerovo"- East Serbia as well as the other ore bodies in its vicinity contain a significant amount of oxide copper minerals in their uper layers (>40%. Processing of such mixed ores by the existing concentration technologies leads to a substantial copper losses (<60%. Reduction of "oxide copper", by acid leaching prior the flotation concentration, can increase the overall copper efficiency up to more than 70% in the single-stage leaching, achieving an efficiency in the flotation concentration stage higher than 75%. Based on the performed experimental results the flow sheet for processing of the mixed oxide-sulphide copper ore is proposed.

  13. An effective finite element model for the prediction of hydrogen induced cracking in steel pipelines

    KAUST Repository

    Traidia, Abderrazak

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive finite element model for the numerical simulation of Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC) in steel pipelines exposed to sulphurous compounds, such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S). The model is able to mimic the pressure build-up mechanism related to the recombination of atomic hydrogen into hydrogen gas within the crack cavity. In addition, the strong couplings between non-Fickian hydrogen diffusion, pressure build-up and crack extension are accounted for. In order to enhance the predictive capabilities of the proposed model, problem boundary conditions are based on actual in-field operating parameters, such as pH and partial pressure of H 2S. The computational results reported herein show that, during the extension phase, the propagating crack behaves like a trap attracting more hydrogen, and that the hydrostatic stress field at the crack tip speed-up HIC related crack initiation and growth. In addition, HIC is reduced when the pH increases and the partial pressure of H2S decreases. Furthermore, the relation between the crack growth rate and (i) the initial crack radius and position, (ii) the pipe wall thickness and (iii) the fracture toughness, is also evaluated. Numerical results agree well with experimental data retrieved from the literature. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of sulphide minerals on uranium oxidation state in in-situ leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastukhov, A. M.; Skripchenko, S. Yu.

    2017-09-01

    The thermodynamic model of uranium in-situ leaching process at the stages of acidification and active leaching were investigated. It was demonstrated that in the frontal zone of acid leaching solutions reduction of uranium(VI) up to uranium(IV) was possible due to the nature of redox processes involving hydrogen sulfide. At the same time uranium was precipitated as U(OH)4. In order to eliminate the negative influence of sulfide minerals and hydrogen sulfide, artificial oxidizers were proposed to be used at the both stages of in-situ leaching process, i.e. active leaching and acidification of new process cells.

  15. Mobility of toxic elements in carbonate sediments from a mining area in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Ospina-Alvarez, N.; et al

    2014-01-01

    The Bolesław–Bukowno mining area in Poland is highly polluted by elements such as Zn, Pb, Cd and As. The reactivity and mobility of toxic elements such as Tl are poorly known. Here, we studied by sequential extraction the mobility of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Pb, Tl and Zn in sediments from two water reservoirs near Bukowno. Results show that available As, Co, Mn, Pb and Zn are found in carbonate minerals. Available Cd, Cu and Tl are found in sulphides and organic matter. The extractability...

  16. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  17. Marine controlled-source electromagnetic sounding on submarine massive sulphides using 2.5-D simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, N.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.; Mikada, H.

    2010-12-01

    Recently, controlled-source electromagnetic (EM) method is widely used for shallow sub-seafloor explorations. In conventional marine CSEM methods, we need to connect a survey vehicle and an EM transmitter using a long cable, and also connect the EM transmitter and towed receiver using a cable. However, in practice, we must tow cables far from seafloor because of rough topography (e.g, chimneys) around submarine massive sulphides (SMS). Therefore, it is difficult to get information about shallow sub-seafloor structure. In this paper, we propose a new controlled-source electromagnetic method using two autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) for the exploration of SMS. We set an EM transmitter to one AUV, and also set an EM receiver to another AUV. Using this method, it is possible to keep a low height of diving AUVs from the seafloor, so we can carry out the exploration of SMS effectively. A numerical simulation code for 2.5 dimensional (2.5-D) electromagnetic fields in the frequency domain is developed in order to estimate electromagnetic responses on possible conductivity structures. In this research, we compared the behavior of electric fields as various functions such as the distance between source and receiver, and discussed the possibility of our CSEM method to be applied for the exploration of SMS. From the simulation results, we found that it is possible to detect the electric field for about 150~200m offsets even under the contamination of noise. Among various combination of source and receivers, we also found that the anomalous amplitude rate becomes greatest, in particular around the edge of SMS, when polarizing both the source and receiver in the horizontal direction. We next considered the sensitivity of electromagnetic field to the location of SMS using two model calculations. We found that the received electric field becomes steeply weaker as setting the receiver apart from the transmitter when the source was placed near SMS. Above all numerical

  18. Estimation of Wear Behavior of Polyphenylene Sulphide Composites Reinforced with Glass/Carbon Fibers, Graphite and Polytetrafluoroethylene, by Pin-on-disc Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.C. Besnea

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wear behavior of polyphenylene sulphide composites was investigated according to load and test speed. Two types of materials were studied: first, with 40 wt% glass fiber, and second, with 10 wt% carbon fiber, 10 wt% graphite and 10 wt%. Tribological tests were performed on the universal tribometer UMT-2, using a pin-on-disc device. The friction coefficient and wear rate for the composites were analyzed. As a result of experimental tests, it was established that polymer composite with polyphenylene sulphide matrix, carbon fibers, graphite and polytetrafluorethylene exhibit good wear behavior under operating conditions.

  19. Ammonia leaching of copper smelter dust and precipitation as copper sulphide; Lixiviacion amoniacal de polvos de fundicion de cobre y precipitacion como sulfuro de cobre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, A.; Hevia, J. F.; Cifuentes, G.

    2009-07-01

    The effect of ammonia on the leaching of copper smelter dust and copper precipitation from these solutions as sulphide using sulfur and sulfur dioxide was studied. The precipitation was done in ammoniacal media because this solution produced more satisfactory results at room temperature that a sulphuric media. A solid was precipitated containing 60 % of copper of the dust smelter. The other waste generated contained around 80 % of the arsenic of the original copper smelter dust. Based on the preliminary results obtained in this work it will propose a procedure for the recovery of copper as sulphide from copper smelter dust with parallel confinement of arsenic. (Author) 14 refs.

  20. The Lattice Compatibility Theory: Arguments for Recorded I-III-O2 Ternary Oxide Ceramics Instability at Low Temperatures beside Ternary Telluride and Sulphide Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Boubaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some recorded behaviours differences between chalcopyrite ternary oxide ceramics and telluride and sulphides are investigated in the framework of the recently proposed Lattice Compatibility Theory (LCT. Alterations have been evaluated in terms of Urbach tailing and atomic valence shell electrons orbital eigenvalues, which were calculated through several approximations. The aim of the study was mainly an attempt to explain the intriguing problem of difficulties of elaborating chalcopyrite ternary oxide ceramics (I-III-O2 at relatively low temperatures under conditions which allowed crystallization of ternary telluride and sulphides.

  1. Cross effect of temperature, pH and free ammonia on autotrophic denitrification process with sulphide as electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Carmen; Mora, Mabel; Fernández, Isaac; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, José Luis; Méndez, Ramón

    2014-02-01

    Autotrophic denitrification is a suitable technology to simultaneously remove oxidised nitrogen compounds and reduced sulphur compounds yielding nitrogen gas, sulphur and sulphate as the main products. In this work, several batch tests were conducted to investigate the cross effect of temperature, pH and free ammonia on the autotrophic denitrification. Denitrification efficiencies above 95% were achieved at 35°C and pH 7.5-8.0 with maximum specific autotrophic denitrifying activities up to 188mgN2g(-1)VSSd(-1). Free ammonia did not show any effect on denitrification at concentrations up to 53mg NH3-NL(-1). Different sulphide concentrations were also tested with stoichiometric nitrite and nitrate concentrations. Sulphide inhibited denitrification at concentrations higher than 200mgS(2-)L(-1). A 50% inhibition was also found at nitrite concentrations above 48mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The maximum specific activity decreased until a value of 25mgN2g(-1) VSSd(-1) at 232mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The Haldane model was used to describe denitrification inhibition caused by nitrite. Kinetic parameters determined from the fitting of experimental data were rmax=176mgN2g(-1)VSSd(-1), Ks=10.7mg NO2(-)-NL(-1) and Ki=34.7mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The obtained model allowed optimising an autotrophic denitrification process by avoiding situations of inhibition and thus obtaining higher denitrification efficiencies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy of scalp hair decontamination following exposure to vapours of sulphur mustard simulants 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide and methyl salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiandore, Marie; Piram, Anne; Lacoste, Alexandre; Prevost, Philippe; Maloni, Pascal; Torre, Franck; Asia, Laurence; Josse, Denis; Doumenq, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Chemical warfare agents are an actual threat and victims' decontamination is a main concern when mass exposure occurs. Skin decontamination with current protocols has been widely documented, as well as surface decontamination. However, considering hair ability to trap chemicals in vapour phase, we investigated hair decontamination after exposure to sulphur mustard simulants methyl salicylate and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide. Four decontamination protocols were tested on hair, combining showering and emergency decontamination (use of Fuller's earth or Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion RSDL ® ). Both simulants were recovered from hair after treatment, but contents were significantly reduced (42-85% content allowance). Showering alone was the least efficient protocol. Concerning 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide, protocols did not display significant differences in decontamination efficacy. For MeS, use of emergency decontaminants significantly increased showering efficacy (10-20% rise), underlining their usefulness before thorough decontamination. Our results highlighted the need to extensively decontaminate hair after chemical exposure. Residual amounts after decontamination are challenging, as their release from hair could lead to health issues. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Contaminated marine sediments: Water column and interstitial toxic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, R.M.; Schweitzer, K.A.; McKinney, R.A.; Phelps, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity that contaminated sediments may introduce into the water column has not been measured extensively. In order to quantify this potential toxicity, the seawater overlying two uncontaminated and three contaminated marine sediments was evaluated in the laboratory with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata fertilization test. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and copper, as representative contaminants, were also measured. To characterize sources of toxicity, samples were chemically manipulated using reversed-phase chromatography, cation exchange, and chelation. Water column toxicity and contaminant concentrations were higher in the suspended exposures than in bedded exposures. Interstitial water toxicity and contaminant concentrations were generally greater than either bedded or suspended exposures. Chemical manipulation indicated that the observed toxicity in water column exposures was probably caused by metallic and/or nonionic organic contaminants. Conversely, manipulation of interstitial waters did not result in significantly reduced toxicity, suggesting that other toxicants such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide may be active.

  4. Contaminated marine sediments: Water column and interstitial toxic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, R.M.; McKinney, R.A. (Science Applications International Corp., Narragansett, RI (United States)); Schweitzer, K.A. (Chemical Waste Management, Inc., Dartmouth, MA (United States)); Phelps, D.K. (Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett, RI (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The toxicity that contaminated sediments may introduce into the water column has not been measured extensively. In order to quantify this potential toxicity, the seawater overlying two uncontaminated and three contaminated marine sediments was evaluated in the laboratory with the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata fertilization test. Concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and copper, as representative contaminants, were also measured. To characterize sources of toxicity, samples were chemically manipulated using reversed-phase chromatography, cation exchange, and chelation. Water column toxicity and contaminant concentrations were higher in the suspended exposures than in bedded exposures. Interstitial water toxicity and contaminant concentrations were generally greater than either bedded or suspended exposures. Chemical manipulation indicated that the observed toxicity in water column exposures was probably caused by metallic and/or nonionic organic contaminants. Conversely, manipulation of interstitial water did not result in significantly reduced toxicity, suggesting that other toxicants such as ammonia and hydrogen sulfide may be active.

  5. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Schoonman, J.; Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept

  6. [Toxic methemoglobinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, P; Neuhaus, H

    2011-04-01

    A 19 year-old female patient suffered from severe hypoxemia after an ambulant surgery for splayfeet. Local anesthesia had been performed with prilocain and bupivacain. Methemoglobinemia was suspected and treated with ascorbine acid and methylene blue. The patient was then admitted to hospital. The patient was well orientated and awake. She complained of a mild headache and general illness. There was marked central cyanosis. A blood sample was dark-red to brownish. The periphere oxygen saturation was 85%. A cardiac ultrasound and a chest X ray were without pathological findings. Initial arterial blood gas analysis showed a concentration of methemoglobin of 24%. On intensive care clinical and laboratory findings quickly resolved and methemoglobin concentration normalized after one day. The patient had no symptoms anymore and was discharged the next day. In treatment-resistent hypoxemia after local anesthesia toxic methemoglobinaemia should be suspected. Therapy of choice is immediate administration of methylene blue. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Sulphide-sulphate stability and melting in subducted sediment and its role in arc mantle redox and chalcophile cycling in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canil, Dante; Fellows, Steven A.

    2017-07-01

    The redox budget during subduction is tied to the evolution of oxygen and biogeochemical cycles on Earth's surface over time. The sulphide-sulphate couple in subducted crust has significant potential for redox and control on extraction of chalcophile metals from the arc mantle. We derive oxygen buffers for sulphide-sulphate stability ('SSO buffers') using mineral assemblages in subducted crust within the eclogite facies, and examine their disposition relative to the fO2 in the arc mantle along various P-T trajectories for subduction. The fO2 required for sulphide stability in subducted crust passing beneath an arc is shifted by variations in the bulk Ca/(Ca + Mg + Fe) of the subducting crust alone. Hotter slabs and more Fe-rich sediments stabilize sulphide and favour chalcophile sequestration deep into the mantle, whereas colder slabs and calcic sediment will stabilize anhydrite, in some cases at depths of melt generation in the arc mantle (earth history. Oxidation of arc mantle and the proliferation of porphyry Cu deposits may be latter-day advents in earth history partly due to the rise of planktic calcifiers in the oceans in only the past 250 million years.

  8. The buffering capacity towards free sulphide in sediments of a coastal lagoon (Bassin d'Arcachon, France) - the relative importance of chemical and biological processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijs, SK; Jonkers, HM; van Gemerden, H; Schaub, BEM; Stal, LJ

    The Bassin d'Arcachon (south-west France) was chosen as a model ecosystem to study the chemical and microbiological buffering towards free sulphide. Data were collected on the vertical distribution of oxygen, sulphur and iron compounds and the vertical distribution of colourless sulphur bacteria and

  9. The buffering capacity towards free sulphide in sediments of a coastal lagoon (Bassin d'Arcachon, France) - the relative importance of chemical and biological processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijs, S.K.; Jonkers, H.M.; van Gemerden, H.; Schaub, B.; Stal, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Bassin d'Arcachon (south-west France) was chosen as a model ecosystem to study the chemical and microbiological buffering towards free sulphide. Data were collected on the vertical distribution of oxygen, sulphur and iron compounds and the vertical distribution of colourless sulphur bacteria and

  10. An application of lithogeochemistry to the evaluation of the Ni-sulphide ore potential of weathered serpentinites in the Fortaleza de Minas Greenstone Belt, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostindiër, J.; Taufen, P.M.; Vriend, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    A practical application of lithogeochemistry to the classification of weathered serpentinites as to whether or not serpentinites are host rocks to Ni-sulphide ore is presented. An effort is made to apply existing concepts used to distinguish between fertile and sterile unweathered ultramafics to

  11. Refractive index and dispersion control of ultrafast laser inscribed waveguides in gallium lanthanum sulphide for near and mid-infrared applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demetriou, Giorgos; Berube, Jean-Philippe; Vallee, Real

    2016-01-01

    The powerful ultrafast laser inscription technique is used to fabricate optical waveguides in gallium lanthanum sulphide substrates. For the first time the refractive index profile and the dispersion of such ultrafast laser inscribed waveguides are experimentally measured. In addition the Zero...

  12. Paradoxical co-existing base metal sulphides in the mantle: The multi-event record preserved in Loch Roag peridotite xenoliths, North Atlantic Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Hannah S. R.; McDonald, Iain; Loocke, Matthew; Butler, Ian B.; Upton, Brian G. J.; Faithfull, John W.

    2017-04-01

    The role of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle as a source of precious metals for mafic magmas is contentious and, given the chalcophile (and siderophile) character of metals such as the platinum-group elements (PGE), Se, Te, Re, Cu and Au, the mobility of these metals is intimately linked with that of sulphur. Hence the nature of the host phase(s), and their age and stability in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle may be of critical importance. We investigate the sulphide mineralogy and sulphide in situ trace element compositions in base metal sulphides (BMS) in a suite of spinel lherzolite mantle xenoliths from northwest Scotland (Loch Roag, Isle of Lewis). This area is situated on the margin of the North Atlantic Craton which has been overprinted by a Palaeoproterozoic orogenic belt, and occurs in a region which has undergone magmatic events from the Palaeoproterozoic to the Eocene. We identify two populations of co-existing BMS within a single spinel lherzolite xenolith (LR80) and which can also be recognised in the peridotite xenolith suite as a whole. Both populations consist of a mixture of Fe-Ni-Cu sulphide minerals, and we distinguished between these according to BMS texture, petrographic setting (i.e., location within the xenolith in terms of 'interstitial' or within feldspar-spinel symplectites, as demonstrated by X-ray Computed Microtomography) and in situ trace element composition. Group A BMS are coarse, metasomatic, have low concentrations of total PGE (enrichment was associated with a pre-Carboniferous carbonatite episode. This method of mantle xenolith base metal sulphide documentation may ultimately permit the temporal and spatial mapping of the chalcophile metallogenic budget of the lithospheric mantle, providing a blueprint for assessing regional metallogenic potential.

  13. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  14. Hydrogen nanobubble at normal hydrogen electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, S.; Shinozaki, R.; Senda, Y.; Yoshikawa, H. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Electrochemically formed hydrogen nanobubbles at a platinum rotating disk electrode (RDE) were detected by re-oxidation charge. The dissolution time course of the hydrogen nanobubbles was measured by AFM tapping topography under open-circuit conditions at stationary platinum and gold single-crystal electrodes. The bubble dissolution at platinum was much faster than that at gold because two types of diffusion, bulk and surface diffusion, proceeded at the platinum surface, whereas surface diffusion was prohibited at the gold electrode. These findings indicated that the electrochemical reaction of normal hydrogen electrode partly proceeded heterogeneously on the three-phase boundary around the hydrogen nanobubble.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation optimisation of zinc sulphide based fast-neutron detector for radiography using a {sup 252}Cf source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshkian, Mohsen, E-mail: mohsenm@ethz.ch

    2016-02-01

    Neutron radiography is rapidly extending as one of the methods for non-destructive screening of materials. There are various parameters to be studied for optimising imaging screens and image quality for different fast-neutron radiography systems. Herein, a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation is employed to evaluate the response of a fast-neutron radiography system using a {sup 252}Cf neutron source. The neutron radiography system is comprised of a moderator as the neutron-to-proton converter with suspended silver-activated zinc sulphide (ZnS(Ag)) as the phosphor material. The neutron-induced protons deposit energy in the phosphor which consequently emits scintillation light. Further, radiographs are obtained by simulating the overall radiography system including source and sample. Two different standard samples are used to evaluate the quality of the radiographs.

  16. Electron Microscopy and Optical Characterization of Cadmium Sulphide Nanocrystals Deposited on the Patterned Surface of Diatom Biosilica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Gutu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intricately patterned biosilica obtained from the shell of unicellular algae called diatoms serve as novel templates for fabrication of optoelectronic nanostructures. In this study, the surface of diatom frustules that possessed hierarchical architecture ordered at the micro and nanoscale was coated with a nanostructured polycrystalline cadmium sulphide (CdS thin film using a chemical bath deposition technique. The CdS thin film was composed of spherical nanoparticles with a diameter of about 75 nm. The CdS nanoparticle thin film imparted new photoluminescent properties to the intricately patterned diatom nanostructure. The imparted photoluminescent properties were dependent on the CdS coverage onto the frustules surface. The intrinsic photoluminescent properties of the frustules were strongly quenched by the deposited CdS. The origin of PL spectra was discussed on the basis of the band theory and native defects.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation optimisation of zinc sulphide based fast-neutron detector for radiography using a 252Cf source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkian, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    Neutron radiography is rapidly extending as one of the methods for non-destructive screening of materials. There are various parameters to be studied for optimising imaging screens and image quality for different fast-neutron radiography systems. Herein, a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation is employed to evaluate the response of a fast-neutron radiography system using a 252Cf neutron source. The neutron radiography system is comprised of a moderator as the neutron-to-proton converter with suspended silver-activated zinc sulphide (ZnS(Ag)) as the phosphor material. The neutron-induced protons deposit energy in the phosphor which consequently emits scintillation light. Further, radiographs are obtained by simulating the overall radiography system including source and sample. Two different standard samples are used to evaluate the quality of the radiographs.

  18. Microbial leaching of toxic metals and arsenic from a heap consisting of heavily polluted soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groudev, Stoyan; Georgiev, Plamen; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2014-05-01

    Soil heavily polluted with toxic heavy metals (mainly Cu, Zn, Cd) and arsenic was subjected to microbial cleanup in a heap specially constructed for this purpose. The heap was located on an impermeable geomembrane, had the shape of a truncated pyramid and contained about 240 tons of soil collected mainly from the horizon A. The soil was highly acidic (with an initial pH of about 3.2) and was preliminarily crushed to minus 2.5 cm particle size. The pollutants were present mainly as the relevant sulphide minerals and the soil was inhabited by different microorganisms, including some acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacteria able to oxidize sulphides and to solubilize the relevant toxic elements. The heap possessed systems for irrigation and aeration and was surrounded by ditches to collect the drainage heap effluents containing the dissolved pollutants. The treatment of the soil was carried out by means of interrupted irrigation with leach solutions containing diluted sulphuric acid (to maintain pH in the heap within the range of about 2.5 - 2.8) and ammonium and phosphate ions to maintain the microbial growth. The treatment was carried out for a period of about two years during different climatic seasons. After the end of leaching the soil was subjected to some conventional melioration procedures such as liming, grassing, moulching, addition of fertilizers and animal manure and periodic ploughing and irrigation to increase its quality to levels suitable for agricultural utilization.

  19. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  20. Laboratory testing results of kinetics and processing technology of the polymetallic sulphide concentrate Blagojev Kamen – Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milorad Ćirković

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the laboratory testing results of kinetics the oxidation process and sample processing of the sulphide polymetallic concentrate Blagojev Kamen. The aim of investigation is recovery of these types of raw material, present in large quantities in the peripheral parts of already used primary mineral deposits of copper, because of their high economic potential due to the content of a large number of metals and especially precious metals. Characterization of this raw material is based on the chemical analyses, XRD results, DTA analysis, etc. For these investigations, the sulphide concentrate with the following content was used in %: Cu – 2.3; Fe – 19.8; S – 27.19; Zn – 9.13; As – 0.167; Pb – 15.63; SiO2 – 17.93; CaO – 0.97; Al2O3 – 1.43; Ag – 480 g/t; Au – 659 g/t. Kinetic investigations of oxidation processes were carried out under the isothermal conditions within the temperature range of 400 to 625 oC. The Sharp's model was used for determination the kinetics parameters, and determined values of activation energy are 67 kJ/mole for the first period, and 47 kJ/mole for the second period. Pyrometallurgical treatment of this type of polymetallic concentrate, in the laboratory conditions, was carried out using the oxidative roasting and, then the reduction smelting was done in the Taman's furnace. Gold from 90.5 to 97.95% and silver from 77.28 to 93.37% are moved into the raw lead (smelting product. Gold from 1.1 to 3.92% and silver from 4.35 to 8.42% are moved into the polymetallic copper matte. Gold from 0.58 to 1.6% and silver from 2.45 to 6.82% are moved into the slag.

  1. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  2. Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Distributed Structure Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) online resource provides high quality chemical structures and annotations in association with toxicity data....

  3. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  4. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  5. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  6. Hydrogen transport membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  7. Solar hydrogen generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Sabol, A. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus, using solar energy to manufacture hydrogen by dissociating water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen molecules is described. Solar energy is concentrated on a globe containing water thereby heating the water to its dissociation temperature. The globe is pervious to hydrogen molecules permitting them to pass through the globe while being essentially impervious to oxygen molecules. The hydrogen molecules are collected after passing through the globe and the oxygen molecules are removed from the globe.

  8. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  9. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  10. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Y. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  11. HGMS: Glasses and Nanocomposites for Hydrogen Storage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinska, Kris [PI; Hemmers, Oliver

    2013-02-17

    The primary goal of this project is to fabricate and investigate different glass systems and glass-derived nanocrystalline composite materials. These glass-based, two-phased materials will contain nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen and be of potential interest as hydrogen storage media. The glass materials with intrinsic void spaces that are able to precipitate functional nanocrystals capable to attract hydrogen are of particular interest. Proposed previously, but never practically implemented, one of promising concepts for storing hydrogen are micro-containers built of glass and shaped into hollow microspheres. The project expanded this concept to the exploration of glass-derived nanocrystalline composites as potential hydrogen storage media. It is known that the most desirable materials for hydrogen storage do not interact chemically with hydrogen and possess a high surface area to host substantial amounts of hydrogen. Glasses are built of disordered networks with ample void spaces that make them permeable to hydrogen even at room temperature. Glass-derived nanocrystalline composites (two-phased materials), combination of glasses (networks with ample voids) and functional nanocrystals (capable to attract hydrogen), appear to be promising candidates for hydrogen storage media. Key advantages of glass materials include simplicity of preparation, flexibility of composition, chemical durability, non-toxicity and mechanical strength, as well as low production costs and environmental friendliness. This project encompasses a fundamental research into physics and chemistry of glasses and nanocrystalline composite materials, derived from glass. Studies are aimed to answer questions essential for considering glass-based materials and composites as potential hydrogen storage media. Of particular interest are two-phased materials that combine glasses with intrinsic voids spaces for physisorption of hydrogen and nanocrystals capable of chemisorption. This project does not

  12. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  13. Safe venting of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Health assessment document for hydrogen sulfide: review draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammann, H.M.; Bradow, F.; Fennell, D.; Griffin, R.; Kearney, B.

    1986-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a highly toxic gas which is immediately lethal in concentrations greater than 2000 ppm. The toxic end-point is due to anoxia to brain and heart tissues which results from its interaction with the celluar enzyme cytochrome oxidase. Inhibition of the enzyme halts oxidative metabolism which is the primary energy source for cells. A second toxic end-point is the irritative effect of hydrogen sulfide on mucous membranes, particularly edema at sublethal doses (250 to 500 ppm) in which sufficient exposure occurs before conciousness is lost. Recovered victims of exposure report neurologic symptoms such as headache, fatigue, irritability, vertigo, and loss of libido. Long-term effects are similar to those caused by anoxia due to other toxic agents like CO, and probably are not due to specific H/sub 2/S effects. H/sub 2/S is not a cumulative poison. No mutagenic, carcinogenic, reproductive, or teratogenic effects have been reported in the literature.

  15. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  16. Cyclooctanaminium hydrogen succinate monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Khorasani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title hydrated salt, C8H18N+·C4H5O4−·H2O, the cyclooctyl ring of the cation is disordered over two positions in a 0.833 (3:0.167 (3 ratio. The structure contains various O—H.·O and N—H...O interactions, forming a hydrogen-bonded layer of molecules perpendicular to the c axis. In each layer, the ammonium cation hydrogen bonds to two hydrogen succinate anions and one water molecule. Each hydrogen succinate anion hydrogen bonds to neighbouring anions, forming a chain of molecules along the b axis. In addition, each hydrogen succinate anion hydrogen bonds to two water molecules and the ammonium cation.

  17. Diamond growth beneath Letlhakane established by Re-Os and Sm-Nd systematics of individual eclogitic sulphide, garnet and clinopyroxene inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, Michael U.; Pearson, D. Graham; Timmerman, Suzette; Chinn, Ingrid L.; Koornneef, Janne M.; Davies, Gareth R.

    2017-04-01

    The diamondiferous Letlhakane kimberlites are part of the Orapa kimberlite cluster (˜ 93.1 Ma) in north-eastern Botswana, located on the edge of the Zimbabwe Craton, close to the Proterozoic Magondi Mobile Belt. Here we report the first Re-Os ages of six individual eclogitic sulphide inclusions (3.0 to 35.7μg) from Letlhakane diamonds along with their rhenium, osmium, iridium and platinum concentrations, and carbon isotope, nitrogen content and N-aggregation data from the corresponding growth zones of the host diamonds. For the first time, Re-Os data will be compared to Sm-Nd ages of individual eclogitic silicate inclusions recovered from the same diamonds using a Triton Plus equipped with four 1013Ω amplifiers. The analysed inclusion set currently encompasses pairs of individual sulphides from two diamonds (LK040 sf4 & 5, LK113 sf1 & 2) and two sulphide inclusions from separate diamonds (LK048, LK362). Ongoing work will determine the Sm-Nd ages and element composition of multiple individual eclogitic garnets (LK113/LK362, n=4) and an eclogitic clinopyroxene (LK040) inclusion. TMA ages of the six sulphides range from 1.06 to 2.38 Ga (± 0.1 to 0.54 Ga) with Re and Os contents between 7 and 68 ppb and 0.03 and 0.3 ppb, respectively. The host diamond growth zones have low nitrogen abundances (21 to 43 ppm N) and high N-aggregation (53 to 90% IaB). Carbon isotope data suggests the involvement of crustal carbon (δ13C between -19.3 to -22.7 ± 0.2 per mill) during diamond precipitation. Cathodoluminescence imaging of central plates from LK040 and LK113 displays homogenous internal structure with no distinct zonation. The two sulphide inclusions from LK040 define an 'isochron' of 0.92 ± 0.23 Ga (2SD) with initial 187Os/188Os = 1.31 ± 0.24. Sulphides from LK113 have clear imposed diamond morphology and indicate diamond formation at 0.93 ± 0.36 Ga (2SD) with initial 187Os/188Os = 0.69 ± 0.44. The variation in the initial 187Os/188Os does not justify including these

  18. Hydrogen storage methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at Tchemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m-3, approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen is 70.8 kg.m-3, and large volumes, where the thermal losses are small, can cause hydrogen to reach a

  19. Oxidation reduction potential as a parameter to regulate micro-oxygen injection into anaerobic digester for reducing hydrogen sulphide concentration in biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Long D; Manassa, Patrick; Dawson, Marcia; Fitzgerald, Shona K

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of oxidation reduction potential (ORP) to regulate the injection of a small amount of oxygen into an anaerobic digester for reducing H2S concentration in biogas. The results confirm that micro-oxygen injection can be effective for controlling H2S formation during anaerobic digestion without disturbing the performance of the digester. Biogas production, composition, and the removal of volatile solids (VS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were monitored to assessment the digester's performance. Six days after the start of the micro-oxygen injection, the ORP values increased to between -320 and -270 mV, from the natural baseline value of -485 mV. Over the same period the H2S concentration in the biogas decreased from over 6000 ppm to just 30 ppm. No discernible changes in the VS and COD removal rates, pH and alkalinity of the digestate or in the biogas production or composition were observed. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bonding configuration due to hydrogen migration have been proposed as a mechanism of defect generation in a-Si:H [6,7]. Thus hydrogen plays a dual role in a-Si:H: (1) acting as a .... the sphere of radius R0 and allows to express. ∆F as a function of localization radius R0. Using eqs (10) and (11), the volume integration.

  1. Product analysis and kinetics of Br-initiated gas-phase oxidation of dimethyl sulphide; Produktanalyse und Kinetik der Br-initiierten Gasphasenoxidation von Dimethylsulfid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, K.H.; Maurer, T.

    1996-07-01

    High Br concentrations in maritime environments may render the reaction between Br radicals and dimethyl sulphide an important process. According to the literature this system has as yet not been studied with a mind to clarifying the reaction mechanisms and performing a product analysis. Thus, for example, the decomposition of the DMS-Br adduct remains to be clarified. The purpose of the present study was therefore to examine the reaction between dimethyl sulphide and Br radicals and so gain information on the decomposition mechanism. This implied a determination of the velocity constant and a product analysis of the reaction between Br radicals and dimethyl sulphide. In addition the velocity constant of the reaction between Br radicals and dimethylsulphoxide (a consequent product of DMS oxidation) was to be determined. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hohe Br-Konzentrationen in maritimen Gebieten machen die Reaktion von Br-Radikalen mit Dimethylsulfid moeglicherweise zu einem wichtigen Prozess. In der Literatur fehlen eingehende Untersuchungen dieses Systems hinsichtlich der Aufklaerung der Reaktionsmechanismen und der Produktanalyse. So ist zum Beispiel der Zerfall des DMS-Br-Adduktes nicht aufgeklaert. Aus diesen Gruenden soll im Rahmen dieser Arbeit die Reaktion von Dimethylsulfid mit Br-Radikalen untersucht werden, um Informationen ueber den Abbaumechanismus zu erhalten. Darunter fallen die Bestimmung der Geschwindigkeitskonstanten und die Produktanalyse der Reaktion von Br-Radikalen mit Dimethylsulfid. Zusaetzlich soll die Geschwindigkeitskonstante der Reaktion vom Br-Radikalen mit Dimethylsulfoxid (einem Folgeprodukt der DMS-Oxidation) bestimmt werden. (orig.)

  2. A Conceptual Model for the Interaction between Carbon Content and Manganese Sulphide Inclusions in the Short-Term Seawater Corrosion of Low Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Melchers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The critical role of manganese sulphide (MnS inclusions for the initiation of the short-term growth of pitting or localized corrosion of low carbon steels has long been recognized. Classical results show that pitting probability and pitting severity increases with increased sulphide concentration for low carbon steels as a result of magnesium sulphides acting as local cathodes for initiating pitting corrosion. However, the iron carbides (cementite in steels can also act as local cathodes for initiation of pitting corrosion. Herein it is proposed that there is competition between pits for cathodic area and that this will determine the severity of pitting and general corrosion observed in extended exposures. Preliminary experimental data for immersion exposures of up to 56 days in natural seawater of three low carbon steels show, contrary to conventional wisdom, greater pit depths for the steels with lower S content. However, the pit depth results are consistent with lower C/S ratios. This is considered to support the concept of cathodic competition between C and S. It is proposed that this offers explanations for a number of other phenomena, including the thus far unexplained apparently higher reactivity of some MnS inclusions.

  3. Geochemical characterisation of seepage and drainage water quality from two sulphide mine tailings impoundments: Acid mine drainage versus neutral mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, P.M.; Raisanen, M.L.; Johnson, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    Seepage water and drainage water geochemistry (pH, EC, O2, redox, alkalinity, dissolved cations and trace metals, major anions, total element concentrations) were studied at two active sulphide mine tailings impoundments in Finland (the Hitura Ni mine and Luikonlahti Cu mine/talc processing plant). The data were used to assess the factors influencing tailings seepage quality and to identify constraints for water treatment. Changes in seepage water quality after equilibration with atmospheric conditions were evaluated based on geochemical modelling. At Luikonlahti, annual and seasonal changes were also studied. Seepage quality was largely influenced by the tailings mineralogy, and the serpentine-rich, low sulphide Hitura tailings produced neutral mine drainage with high Ni. In contrast, drainage from the high sulphide, multi-metal tailings of Luikonlahti represented typical acid mine drainage with elevated contents of Zn, Ni, Cu, and Co. Other factors affecting the seepage quality included weathering of the tailings along the seepage flow path, process water input, local hydrological settings, and structural changes in the tailings impoundment. Geochemical modelling showed that pH increased and some heavy metals were adsorbed to Fe precipitates after net alkaline waters equilibrated with the atmosphere. In the net acidic waters, pH decreased and no adsorption occurred. A combination of aerobic and anaerobic treatments is proposed for Hitura seepages to decrease the sulphate and metal loading. For Luikonlahti, prolonged monitoring of the seepage quality is suggested instead of treatment, since the water quality is still adjusting to recent modifications to the tailings impoundment.

  4. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  5. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  6. About the process improvement of adsorptive desulphurisation by adding hydrogen donators as additives in liquid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rheinberg, Oliver; Lucka, Klaus; Köhne, Heinrich

    For the use in fuel cell system commercial fuels, like diesel or domestic heating oil, have to be desulphurised to ultra deep sulphur levels of below 1 mg kg -1. To reach this goal the adsorptive desulphurisation using a nickel-based sorbent has been identified. The evaluation of the reaction mechanism reveals in principle the same route as that of the hydrodesulphurisation (HDS) whereas the sulphur is adsorbed by the sorbent instead of being converted to hydrogen sulphide. The required hydrogen for the process is provided out of the fuel itself and not by an external supply of hydrogen. This analysis leads to an easy applicable enhancement of the process by adding a hydrogen donator as an additive to the liquid fuel. In correlation to the mass fraction of the donator the reaction rates and sorbent capacities are improved significantly. Furthermore the influence of aromatic compounds has been investigated, which exhibit similar molecular structures and chemical properties than comparable high refractory sulphur species. This leads to side reactions especially of di- and tri-aromatics which influence the sulphur adsorption. A shift of the aromatic fraction from mono- to di- and tri-aromatic compounds has been observed as well as the alkylation of di- and tri-aromatics.

  7. High-capacity antimony sulphide nanoparticle-decorated graphene composite as anode for sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Denis Y. W.; Prikhodchenko, Petr V.; Mason, Chad W.; Batabyal, Sudip K.; Gun, Jenny; Sladkevich, Sergey; Medvedev, Alexander G.; Lev, Ovadia

    2013-12-01

    Sodium-ion batteries are an alternative to lithium-ion batteries for large-scale applications. However, low capacity and poor rate capability of existing anodes are the main bottlenecks to future developments. Here we report a uniform coating of antimony sulphide (stibnite) on graphene, fabricated by a solution-based synthesis technique, as the anode material for sodium-ion batteries. It gives a high capacity of 730 mAh g-1 at 50 mA g-1, an excellent rate capability up to 6C and a good cycle performance. The promising performance is attributed to fast sodium ion diffusion from the small nanoparticles, and good electrical transport from the intimate contact between the active material and graphene, which also provides a template for anchoring the nanoparticles. We also demonstrate a battery with the stibnite-graphene composite that is free from sodium metal, having energy density up to 80 Wh kg-1. The energy density could exceed that of some lithium-ion batteries with further optimization.

  8. Cadmium Sulphide-Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified Photoelectrode-Based Photoelectrochemical Sensing Platform for Copper(II) Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I; Lim, H N; Huang, N M; Pandikumar, A

    2016-01-01

    A photoelectrochemical (PEC) sensor with excellent sensitivity and detection toward copper (II) ions (Cu2+) was developed using a cadmium sulphide-reduced graphene oxide (CdS-rGO) nanocomposite on an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, with triethanolamine (TEA) used as the sacrificial electron donor. The CdS nanoparticles were initially synthesized via the aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method using cadmium acetate and thiourea as the precursors to Cd2+ and S2-, respectively. Graphene oxide (GO) was then dip-coated onto the CdS electrode and sintered under an argon gas flow (50 mL/min) for the reduction process. The nanostructured CdS was adhered securely to the ITO by a continuous network of rGO that also acted as an avenue to intensify the transfer of electrons from the conduction band of CdS. The photoelectrochemical results indicated that the ITO/CdS-rGO photoelectrode could facilitate broad UV-visible light absorption, which would lead to a higher and steady-state photocurrent response in the presence of TEA in 0.1 M KCl. The photocurrent decreased with an increase in the concentration of Cu2+ ions. The photoelectrode response for Cu2+ ion detection had a linear range of 0.5-120 μM, with a limit of detection (LoD) of 16 nM. The proposed PEC sensor displayed ultra-sensitivity and good selectivity toward Cu2+ ion detection.

  9. The headspace of microaerobic reactors: sulphide-oxidising population and the impact of cleaning on the efficiency of biogas desulphurisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, I; Pérez, R; Fdz-Polanco, M

    2014-04-01

    O2-limiting/microaerobic conditions were applied in order to control the H2S content of biogas. The S(0)-rich deposits found all over the headspace of two pilot reactors (R1 and R2) as a result of operating under such conditions for 7 and 15 months (respectively) were sampled and removed. After restarting micro-oxygenation, H2S-free biogas was rapidly obtained, and the O2 demand of R2 decreased. This highlighted the need for a cleaning interval of less than 14 months in order to minimise the micro-oxygenation cost. The H2S removed from R2 after approximately 1 month was recovered from its headspace as S(0), thus indicating that the biogas desulphurisation did not take place at the liquid interface. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis indicated that the composition, species richness and size of the sulphide-oxidising bacteria population depended on the location, and, more specifically, moisture availability, and indicated increasing species richness over time. Additionally, a possible succession was estimated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis of Tunable Band Gap Semiconductor Nickel Sulphide Nanoparticles: Rapid and Round the Clock Degradation of Organic Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Aniruddha; Sahu, Meenakshi; Hussain, Sahid

    2016-05-17

    Controlled shape and size with tuneable band gap (1.92-2.41 eV), nickel sulphide NPs was achieved in presence of thiourea or thioacetamide as sulphur sources with the variations of temperature and capping agents. Synthesized NPs were fully characterized by powder XRD, IR, UV-vis, DRS, FE-SEM, TEM, EDX, XPS, TGA and BET. Capping agent, temperature and sulphur sources have significant role in controlling the band gaps, morphology and surface area of NPs. The catalytic activities of NPs were tested for round the clock (light and dark) decomposition of crystal violet (CV), rhodamine B (RhB), methylene blue (MB), nile blue (NB) and eriochrome black T (EBT). Agitation speed, temperature, pH and ionic strength have significant role on its catalytic activities. The catalyst was found to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) both in presence and absence of light which is responsible for the decomposition of dyes into small fractions, identified with ESI-mass spectra.

  11. Highly luminescent nanostructures of CdS and ZnS prepared by microwaves heating: effect of sulphide concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Samuel; Gomez, Idalia; Elizondo, Perla [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Universidad s/n, C.P. 66450 San Nicolas de los Garza (Mexico); Cavazos, Jose [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Av. Universidad s/n, C.P. 66450 San Nicolas de los Garza (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    Nearly monodisperse and highly luminescent ZnS and CdS NPs were obtained by microwave irradiation. The ZnS and CdS NPs solutions were prepared by adding freshly prepared ZnSO{sub 4} or CdSO{sub 4} solution to a thioacetamide solution at pH 8 in the presence of sodium citrate in solution used as stabilizer. The precursors concentration were such that the sulphide ion concentrations were 3 x 10{sup -2} M, 6 x 10{sup -2} M and 8 x 10{sup -2} M, for each of these [S] concentrations the [Zn] or [Cd] content were fixed at 3 x 10{sup -2} M. NPs were prepared under microwave irradiation for 1 min at 905 W of power. The NPs samples were taken when the temperature descended to ambient temperature for further analysis. Effect of concentration of Cd and Zn ions were studied in the luminescence property. RXD, AFM, TEM and UV-Vis were used too as analytical equipment for characterization. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Facile synthesis and post-processing of eco-friendly, highly conductive copper zinc tin sulphide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rameez; Distaso, Monica; Azimi, Hamed; Brabec, Christoph J.; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanoparticles have shown promising properties to be used as an energy harvesting material. They are usually synthesised under inert atmosphere or vacuum, whereas the subsequent step of film formation is carried out under an atmosphere of sulphur and/or Sn in order to avoid the decomposition of CZTS nanoparticles into binary and ternary species as well as the formation of the corresponding oxides. In the present paper we show that both the synthesis of CZTS nanoparticles and the film formation from the corresponding suspension can be considerably simplified. Namely, the synthesis can be carried out without controlling the atmosphere, whereas during the film annealing a nitrogen atmosphere is sufficient to avoid the depletion of the CZTS kesterite phase. Furthermore, an integrated approach including in-depth Raman analysis is developed in order to deal with the challenges associated with the characterization of CZTS nanoparticles in comparison to bulk systems. The formation of competitive compounds during the synthesis such as binary and ternary sulphides as well as metal oxides nanoparticles is discussed in detail. Finally, the as-produced films have ten times higher conductivity than the state of the art.

  13. Evaporated copper sulphide layers for all-vacuum evaporated Cu sub x S/CdS solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aperathitis, E.; Bryant, F.J.; Scott, C.G. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Hull (UK))

    1990-01-01

    Copper sulphide layers have been prepared by vacuum evaporation from a single Cu{sub x}S source, as an alternative to the chemiplating technique for fabricating the upper Cu{sub x}S layer in Cu{sub x}S/CdS solar cells. Deposition rates of less that 150 A/min have been shown to produce Cu{sub x}S layers with chalcocite being the major phase. Higher deposition rates increase the copper content of the layer which dominates its optoelectrical properties. Layers free from excess copper have a chalcocite-related phase transition between 75 and 80degC, room temperature resistivity between 10{sup -2} and 10{sup -3} {Omega} cm and evidence of direct and indirect band gaps of 2.25 and 1.25 eV, respectively. With well controlled evaporation conditions the layers deposited on hot CdS thin film substrates are found to have highly reproducible characteristics, and are well suited for use as the absorber for the Cu{sub x}S/CdS solar cell. Open-circuit voltages up to 0.58 V have been produced in cells with efficiencies in excess of 7%. (orig.).

  14. Study of volumetric properties (PVT) of mixtures made of light hydrocarbons (C1-C4), carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide - Experimental measurements through a vibrating tube densimeter and modelling; Etude des proprietes volumetriques (PVT) d'hydrocarbures legers (C1-C4), du dioxyde de carbone et de l'hydrogene sulfure. Mesures par densimetrie a tube vibrant et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivollet, F.

    2005-12-15

    Various pollutant contents (i.e. carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide or other sulphur products) are found in produced oils. These latter must undergo a number of transformations and purifications. The design and dimensioning of the corresponding units can well be optimized only if one has reliable and accurate data about phase equilibria and volumetric properties and of course reliable and accurate modeling. This work was devoted partly to measurements of volumetric properties on three binary mixtures (ethane - hydrogen sulphide, ethane - propane and carbon dioxide - hydrogen sulphide). These measurements were carried out using equipment, comprising a vibrating tube densimeter (Paar, model DMA 512 P), which was especially designed and built for this work. The binary mixtures were studied in the 253 to 363 K temperature range from at pressures up to either 20 or 40 MPa. Two calibration methods of the vibrating tube were used: the FPMC method (Forced Path Mechanical Calibration) described in the literature and an original method containing neural network, developed herein. The study undertaken about the modeling of volumetric properties made it possible to highlight the inadequacy of the traditional use of cubic equations of state to represent simultaneously volumetric properties and phase equilibria. Among the equations of state investigated, a close attention however was paid to cubic equations of state because of their very great use in the oil field. A new tool was found to adapt cubic equations of state to the simultaneous and satisfactory representation of volumetric properties and phase equilibria. It concerns the coupling of the cubic Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state with volume correction through a neural network. This new model was tested successfully, it makes it possible to benefit from the existing work of representation of phase equilibria (mixing rules and interaction coefficients) while improving calculation of the volumetric data.

  15. Allylammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażej Dziuk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title hydrated molecular salt, C3H8N+·C2HO4−·0.5H2O, the water O atom lies on a crystallographic twofold axis. The C=C—C—N torsion angle in the cation is 2.8 (3° and the dihedral angle between the CO2 and CO2H planes in the anion is 1.0 (4°. In the crystal, the hydrogen oxalate ions are linked by O—H...O hydrogen bonds, generating [010] chains. The allylammonium cations bond to the chains through N—H...O and N—H...(O,O hydrogen bonds. The water molecule accepts two N—H...O hydrogen bonds and makes two O—H...O hydrogen bonds. Together, the hydrogen bonds generate (100 sheets.

  16. Hydrogen Fuelling Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard

    This thesis concerns hydrogen fuelling stations from an overall system perspective. The study investigates thermodynamics and energy consumption of hydrogen fuelling stations for fuelling vehicles for personal transportation. For the study a library concerning the components in a hydrogen fuelling...... station has been developed in Dymola. The models include the fuelling protocol (J2601) for hydrogen vehicles made by Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the thermodynamic property library CoolProp is used for retrieving state point. The components in the hydrogen fuelling library are building up....... A system consisting of one high pressure storage tank is used to investigate the thermodynamics of fuelling a hydrogen vehicle. The results show that the decisive parameter for how the fuelling proceeds is the pressure loss in the vehicle. The single tank fuelling system is compared to a cascade fuelling...

  17. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  18. Pathways to Metallic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Deemyad, Shanti

    2008-01-01

    The traditional pathway that researchers have used in the goal of producing atomic metallic hydrogen is to compress samples with megabar pressures at low temperature. A number of phases have been observed in solid hydrogen and its isotopes, but all are in the insulating phase. The results of experiment and theory for this pathway are reviewed. In recent years a new pathway has become the focus of this challenge of producing metallic hydrogen, namely a path along the melting line. It has bee...

  19. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  20. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen is an especially attractive transportation fuel. It is the least polluting fuel available, and can be produced anywhere there is water and a clean source of electricity. A fuel cycle in which hydrogen is produced by solar-electrolysis of water, or by gasification of renewably grown biomass, and then used in a fuel-cell powered electric-motor vehicle (FCEV), would produce little or no local, regional, or global pollution. Hydrogen FCEVs would combine the best features of bat...

  1. The addition of pure oxygen to reduce sulphide concentration; La adicion oxigeno puro para disminuir la concentracion de sulfuro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Castillo, M.C.; Ortiz Alemany, F. [EMARASA, aLICANTE (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    The effect of using oxygen in order to reducing problems caused by the presence of hydrogen sulfide in wastewater has been studied in the wastewater treatment plant of Alicante ``Monte Orgegia``. Oxygen was injected in the sewage system before the wastewater treatment plant. The effect of different doses of Oxygen over the values of electrode potential of wastewater was studied and so the concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the air of the pretreatment building. A decreasing in the hydrogen sulfide concentration due to the modification of the usual values of electrode potential in wastewater was observed. (Author) 7 refs.

  2. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  3. An effective low Pd-loading catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Xu, Junlei; Ma, Xin

    2017-01-01

    As an interesting hydrogen carrier, formic acid is bio-renewable, non-toxic and available in the liquid state at room temperature. The development of active and low-cost catalyst is of significance for hydrogen generation from formic acid. In this study, both a relatively cheap metal (Ag...

  4. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  5. Termination of a toxic Alexandrium bloom with hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burson, A.; Matthijs, H.C.P.; Bruijne, de W.; Talens, R.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Gerssen, A.; Visser, P.M.; Stomp, M.; Steur, K.; Scheppingen, van Y.; Huisman, J.

    2014-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii is a well-known harmful algal species that can potentially cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). Usually A. ostenfeldii occurs in low background concentrations only, but in August of 2012 an exceptionally dense bloom of more than 1 million cells L-1

  6. Toxic hemolytic anemias.

    OpenAIRE

    ZEMANOVÁ, Vendula

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with toxic hemolytic anemias which are often unheeded. There are described laboratory signs of hemolytic anemias, their dividing into the various groups and it focuses mainly to toxic and drug-related hemolytic anemias and their causations.

  7. Increasing oxygen radicals and water temperature select for toxic Microcystis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Dziallas

    Full Text Available Pronounced rises in frequency of toxic cyanobacterial blooms are recently observed worldwide, particularly when temperatures increase. Different strains of cyanobacterial species vary in their potential to produce toxins but driving forces are still obscure. Our study examines effects of hydrogen peroxide on toxic and non-toxic (including a non-toxic mutant strains of M. aeruginosa. Here we show that hydrogen peroxide diminishes chlorophyll a content and growth of cyanobacteria and that this reduction is significantly lower for toxic than for non-toxic strains. This indicates that microcystins protect from detrimental effects of oxygen radicals. Incubation of toxic and non-toxic strains of M. aeruginosa with other bacteria or without (axenic at three temperatures (20, 26 and 32°C reveals a shift toward toxic strains at higher temperatures. In parallel to increases in abundance of toxic (i.e. toxin gene possessing strains and their actual toxin expression, concentrations of microcystins rise with temperature, when amounts of radicals are expected to be enhanced. Field samples from three continents support the influence of radicals and temperature on toxic potential of M. aeruginosa. Our results imply that global warming will significantly increase toxic potential and toxicity of cyanobacterial blooms which has strong implications for socio-economical assessments of global change.

  8. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T [Ann Arbor, MI; Li, Yingwel [Ann Arbor, MI; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  9. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

    2013-02-12

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  10. Hydrogen Storage Tank

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This huge stainless steel reservoir,placed near an end of the East Hall, was part of the safety equipment connected to the 2 Metre liquid hydrogen Bubble Chamber. It could store all the hydrogen in case of an emergency. The picture shows the start of its demolition.

  11. Metastable ultracondensed hydrogenous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellis, W. J.

    2017-12-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to stimulate theoretical predictions of how to retain metastably hydrogenous materials made at high pressure P on release to ambient. Ultracondensed metallic hydrogen has been made at high pressures in the fluid and reported made probably in the solid. Because the long quest for metallic hydrogen is likely to be concluded in the relatively near future, a logical question is whether another research direction, comparable in scale to the quest for metallic H, will arise in high pressure research. One possibility is retention of metastable solid metallic hydrogen and other hydrogenous materials on release of dynamic and static high pressures P to ambient. If hydrogenous materials could be retained metastably on release, those materials would be a new class of materials for scientific investigations and technological applications. This paper is a review of the current situation with the synthesis of metallic hydrogen, potential technological applications of metastable metallic H and other hydrogenous materials at ambient, and general background of published experimental and theoretical work on what has been accomplished with metastable phases in the past and thus what might be accomplished in the future.

  12. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  13. Dark hydrogen fermentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrije, de G.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The production of hydrogen is a ubiquitous, natural phenomenon under anoxic or anaerobic conditions. A wide variety of bacteria, in swamps, sewage, hot springs, the rumen of cattle etc. is able to convert organic matter to hydrogen, CO2 and metabolites like acetic acid, lactate, ethanol and alanine.

  14. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipp, Ludwig [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Torrington, CT (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Conventional compressors have not been able to meet DOE targets for hydrogen refueling stations. They suffer from high capital cost, poor reliability and pose a risk of fuel contamination from lubricant oils. This project has significantly advanced the development of solid state hydrogen compressor technology for multiple applications. The project has achieved all of its major objectives. It has demonstrated capability of Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) technology to potentially meet the DOE targets for small compressors for refueling sites. It has quantified EHC cell performance and durability, including single stage hydrogen compression from near-atmospheric pressure to 12,800 psi and operation of EHC for more than 22,000 hours. Capital cost of EHC was reduced by 60%, enabling a path to meeting the DOE cost targets for hydrogen compression, storage and delivery ($2.00-2.15/gge by 2020).

  15. Chlorific efficiency of coal hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schappert, H.

    1942-10-20

    In studies on the calorific efficiency of coal hydrogenation, the efficiency for H/sub 2/ production was calculated to be 26%, the efficiency for hydrogenation was calculated to be 49%, and the efficiency of hydrogenation including H/sub 2/ production was 27.2%. The efficiency of hydrogenation plus hydrogen production was almost equal to the efficiency of hydrogen production alone, even though this was not expected because of the total energy calculated in the efficiency of hydrogenation proper. It was entirely possible, but did not affect computations, that the efficiency of one or the other components of hydrogenation process differed somewhat from 49%. The average efficiency for all cases was 49%. However, when hydrogen was not bought, but was produced--(efficiency of hydrogen production was 26%, not 100%-- then the total energy changed and the efficiency of hydrogen production and combination was not 26%, but 13%. This lower value explained the drop of hydrogenation efficiency to 27.2%.

  16. The role of carbonyl sulphide as a source of stratospheric sulphate aerosol and its impact on climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Brühl

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Globally, carbonyl sulphide (COS is the most abundant sulphur gas in the atmosphere. Our chemistry-climate model (CCM of the lower and middle atmosphere with aerosol module realistically simulates the background stratospheric sulphur cycle, as observed by satellites in volcanically quiescent periods. The model results indicate that upward transport of COS from the troposphere largely controls the sulphur budget and the aerosol loading of the background stratosphere. This differs from most previous studies which indicated that short-lived sulphur gases are also important. The model realistically simulates the modulation of the particulate and gaseous sulphur abundance in the stratosphere by the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO. In the lowermost stratosphere organic carbon aerosol contributes significantly to extinction. Further, using a chemical radiative convective model and recent spectra, we compute that the direct radiative forcing efficiency by 1 kg of COS is 724 times that of 1 kg CO2. Considering an anthropogenic fraction of 30% (derived from ice core data, this translates into an overall direct radiative forcing by COS of 0.003 W m−2. The direct global warming potentials of COS over time horizons of 20 and 100 yr are GWP(20 yr = 97 and GWP(100 yr = 27, respectively (by mass. Furthermore, stratospheric aerosol particles produced by the photolysis of COS (chemical feedback contribute to a negative direct solar radiative forcing, which in the CCM amounts to −0.007 W m−2 at the top of the atmosphere for the anthropogenic fraction, more than two times the direct warming forcing of COS. Considering that the lifetime of COS is twice that of stratospheric aerosols the warming and cooling tendencies approximately cancel.

  17. Cadmium Sulphide-Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified Photoelectrode-Based Photoelectrochemical Sensing Platform for Copper(II Ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ibrahim

    Full Text Available A photoelectrochemical (PEC sensor with excellent sensitivity and detection toward copper (II ions (Cu2+ was developed using a cadmium sulphide-reduced graphene oxide (CdS-rGO nanocomposite on an indium tin oxide (ITO surface, with triethanolamine (TEA used as the sacrificial electron donor. The CdS nanoparticles were initially synthesized via the aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD method using cadmium acetate and thiourea as the precursors to Cd2+ and S2-, respectively. Graphene oxide (GO was then dip-coated onto the CdS electrode and sintered under an argon gas flow (50 mL/min for the reduction process. The nanostructured CdS was adhered securely to the ITO by a continuous network of rGO that also acted as an avenue to intensify the transfer of electrons from the conduction band of CdS. The photoelectrochemical results indicated that the ITO/CdS-rGO photoelectrode could facilitate broad UV-visible light absorption, which would lead to a higher and steady-state photocurrent response in the presence of TEA in 0.1 M KCl. The photocurrent decreased with an increase in the concentration of Cu2+ ions. The photoelectrode response for Cu2+ ion detection had a linear range of 0.5-120 μM, with a limit of detection (LoD of 16 nM. The proposed PEC sensor displayed ultra-sensitivity and good selectivity toward Cu2+ ion detection.

  18. Cadmium Sulphide-Reduced Graphene Oxide-Modified Photoelectrode-Based Photoelectrochemical Sensing Platform for Copper(II) Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I; Lim, H. N; Huang, N. M; Pandikumar, A

    2016-01-01

    A photoelectrochemical (PEC) sensor with excellent sensitivity and detection toward copper (II) ions (Cu2+) was developed using a cadmium sulphide-reduced graphene oxide (CdS-rGO) nanocomposite on an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface, with triethanolamine (TEA) used as the sacrificial electron donor. The CdS nanoparticles were initially synthesized via the aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method using cadmium acetate and thiourea as the precursors to Cd2+ and S2-, respectively. Graphene oxide (GO) was then dip-coated onto the CdS electrode and sintered under an argon gas flow (50 mL/min) for the reduction process. The nanostructured CdS was adhered securely to the ITO by a continuous network of rGO that also acted as an avenue to intensify the transfer of electrons from the conduction band of CdS. The photoelectrochemical results indicated that the ITO/CdS-rGO photoelectrode could facilitate broad UV-visible light absorption, which would lead to a higher and steady-state photocurrent response in the presence of TEA in 0.1 M KCl. The photocurrent decreased with an increase in the concentration of Cu2+ ions. The photoelectrode response for Cu2+ ion detection had a linear range of 0.5–120 μM, with a limit of detection (LoD) of 16 nM. The proposed PEC sensor displayed ultra-sensitivity and good selectivity toward Cu2+ ion detection. PMID:27176635

  19. Magnetotelluric evidence for massive sulphide mineralization in intruded sediments of the outer Vøring Basin, mid-Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corseri, Romain; Senger, Kim; Selway, Kate; Abdelmalak, Mohamed Mansour; Planke, Sverre; Jerram, Dougal A.

    2017-06-01

    A highly conductive body (0.1-0.8 Ω·m) is identified at mid-crustal depth (8-13 km) in the north Gjallar Ridge from magnetotelluric (MT) data and further investigated in light of other remote-sensing geophysical data (seismic reflection, gravity, aeromagnetic). A commercial 3D controlled-source electromagnetic survey was conducted in the Vøring Basin in 2014 and, although primarily designed for hydrocarbon exploration, good quality MT data were extracted at periods ranging from 100 to 103 s. Dimensionality analysis indicates clear 1D to 2D characteristics in the MT data. 2D inversion was carried out on four profiles (totalling 94 km) oriented perpendicular to the electromagnetic strike and one profile along strike ( 45 km), using a 1D subset of the data. All inversions converged quickly to RMS values close to unity and display a very good agreement with borehole resistivity data from well 6705/10-1 located in the survey area. A striking feature on all profiles is a highly conductive (0.1-0.8 Ω·m) body at 8-13 km depth. To explain the prominent conductive anomaly, integration of geophysical data favours the hypothesis of electrical conduction across well-connected mineral network in pre-Cretaceous sediments. Seismic interpretation suggests a link between the conductor and intruded sedimentary successions below a detachment level and associated low-angle faults. In the Vøring Basin, low magnetic signal and temperature at the conductor's depth indicate that such thick mineral deposits could display non-magnetic behaviour while occurring well below the magnetite Curie isotherm ( 585 °C). Natural occurrences and magnetic properties of common iron-sulphide minerals favour a geological interpretation of mid-crustal conductivity as thick pyrrhotite deposits formed in intrusion's contact metamorphic aureoles.

  20. Flash-lamp annealing of ZnO-layers on copper–indium–gallium–sulphide layers: A spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reck, J., E-mail: reck@out-ev.de [OUT e.V., Köpenicker Str. 325, Haus 201, 12555 Berlin (Germany); Seeger, S.; Weise, M.; Mientus, R. [OUT e.V., Köpenicker Str. 325, Haus 201, 12555 Berlin (Germany); Schulte, J. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Ellmer, K., E-mail: ellmer@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-28

    Polycrystalline copper–indium–(gallium)–sulphide (CI(G)Su) absorbers were analysed by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) with special emphasis on the optical band gap energy. Rough CI(G)Su absorber films grown by reactive magnetron sputtering were peeled off from molybdenum coated glass substrates. The smooth back side of CI(G)Su absorbers was suited for the SE analysis. Furthermore, these samples were covered with a thin zinc oxide (ZnO) layer and heat-treated with a commercial xenon flash lamp annealing system (FLA) as well as by thermal annealing in an argon atmosphere. The effect of zinc on CI(G)Su absorber films was studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling as well as by SE analysis. The optical modelling of spectral Stokes parameters was performed by using a multilayer approach over a spectral range from 1.5 to 4.3 eV. Spectral absorption coefficients were calculated in every process stage, i.e. (i) peeled samples, (ii) ZnO deposition, (iii) FLA treatment and (iv) etching of the ZnO. Special emphasis was given to the shift of the optical band gap due to the various treatments. While the SE analysis was quite sensitive to the change of optical band gaps due to a varying gallium content in the CI(G)Su absorber layers, a significant shift of the optical band gap due to increasing zinc content was not detectable. - Highlights: • Optical functions of CuIn(Ga)S{sub 2} absorbers are studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry. • Flash lamp annealing realises shallow zinc-profiles in absorber layers. • The method is sensitive for optical band gap shifts regarding gallium or zinc doping. • A band gap shift due to doping with zinc additional to gallium was not detectable.

  1. The hydrogen highway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, A. [Fuel Cells Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  2. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.; Misra, A.; Miller, E. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A significant component of the US DOE Hydrogen Program is the development of a practical technology for the direct production of hydrogen using a renewable source of energy. High efficiency photoelectrochemical systems to produce hydrogen directly from water using sunlight as the energy source represent one of the technologies identified by DOE to meet this mission. Reactor modeling and experiments conducted at UH provide strong evidence that direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency greater than 10% can be expected using photoelectrodes fabricated from low-cost, multijunction (MJ) amorphous silicon solar cells. Solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8% have been achieved using a 10.3% efficient MJ amorphous silicon solar cell. Higher efficiency can be expected with the use of higher efficiency solar cells, further improvement of the thin film oxidation and reduction catalysts, and optimization of the solar cell for hydrogen production rather than electricity production. Hydrogen and oxygen catalysts developed under this project are very stable, exhibiting no measurable degradation in KOH after over 13,000 hours of operation. Additional research is needed to fully optimize the transparent, conducting coatings which will be needed for large area integrated arrays. To date, the best protection has been afforded by wide bandgap amorphous silicon carbide films.

  3. A green hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, W.W. II [Clark Communications, Beverly Hills, CA (United States). Green Hydrogen Scientific Advisory Committee; Rifkin, J. [The Foundation on Economic Trends (United States)

    2006-11-15

    This paper is the result of over a dozen scholars and practitioners who strongly felt that a hydrogen economy and hence the future is closer than some American politicians and bureaucrats state. Moreover, when seen internationally, there is strong evidence, the most recent and obvious ones are the proliferation of hybrid vehicles, that for any nation-state to be energy independent it must seek a renewable or green hydrogen future in the near term. The State of California has once again taken the lead in this effort for both an energy-independent future and one linked strongly to the hydrogen economy. Then why a hydrogen economy in the first instance? The fact is that hydrogen most likely will not be used for refueling of vehicles in the near term. The number of vehicles to make hydrogen commercially viable will not be in the mass market by almost all estimates until 2010. However, it is less than a decade away. The time frame is NOT 30-40 years as some argue. The hydrogen economy needs trained people, new ventures and public-private partnerships now. The paper points out how the concerns of today, including higher costs and technologies under development, can be turned into opportunities for both the public and private sectors. It was not too long ago that the size of a mobile phone was that of a briefcase, and then almost 10 years ago, the size of a shoe box. Today, they are not only the size of a man's wallet but also often given away free to consumers who subscribe or contract for wireless services. While hydrogen may not follow this technological commercialization exactly, it certainly will be on a parallel path. International events and local or regional security dictate that the time for a hydrogen must be close at hand. (author)

  4. Bismuth sulphides prepared by thermal and hydrothermal decomposition of a single source precursor: the effect of reaction parameters on morphology, microstructure and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Guilherme Oliveira; de Oliveira Porto, Arilza; Viana, Marcelo Machado; da Silva, Herculano Vieira; de Souza, Yara Gonçalves; da Silva, Hugo Wallison Alves; de Lima, Geraldo Magela; Matencio, Tulio

    2013-10-14

    Bismuth sulphides were prepared by thermal and hydrothermal decomposition of a precursor, bismuth tris-diethyldithiocarbamate, at different temperatures and times. The obtained results showed that the thermal decomposition of the precursor in a tube furnace was not very appropriate to control particle size and morphology. XRD results showed that at 310 °C the precursor was not fully decomposed but at 500 °C besides the orthorhombic bismuth sulphide, the metallic bismuth also started to be formed. At the highest temperature 1D crystals were formed with an apparent mean crystal size of 138 nm. However, hydrothermal decomposition was shown to be a very suitable method to control particle size and morphology just by varying some parameters such as temperature and time. For 6 hours reaction time, as temperature increased, the apparent mean crystal size decreased. The particle morphology was also very affected by this parameter, at 180 °C only 1D particles (nanorods) with lengths varying from 25 to 4700 nm were formed but at 200 °C not only 1D particles but also 2D particles were (nanosheets) obtained. Bismuth sulphide particles obtained at 180 °C and 24 hours reaction time were shown to be formed mostly by 2D particles compared to those obtained at 6 hours. It was clearly seen that the increase in reaction time and temperature led to the formation of bi-dimensional particles. The presence of 1D crystals in the samples obtained by hydrothermal decomposition at 180 °C/6 h and 180 °C/24 h is responsible for their high catalytic efficiency towards methylene blue dye degradation.

  5. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M; Lien, S; Weaver, P F

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  6. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M.; Lien, S.; Weaver, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  7. Biological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  8. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  9. Color Changing Hydrogen Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha; Captain, Janine E.; Mohajeri, Nahid; Raissi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Program, one of the most hazardous operation that occurred was the loading of liquid hydrogen (LH2) during fueling operations of the spacecraft. Due to hydrogen's low explosive limit, any amount leaked could lead to catastrophic event. Hydrogen's chemical properties make it ideal as a rocket fuel; however, the fuel is deemed unsafe for most commercial use because of the inability to easily detect the gas leaking. The increased use of hydrogen over traditional fossil fuels would reduce greenhouse gases and America's dependency on foreign oil. Therefore a technology that would improve safety at NASA and in the commercial sector while creating a new economic sector would have a huge impact to NASA's mission. The Chemochromic Detector for sensing hydrogen gas leakage is a color-changing detector that is useful in any application where it is important to know not only the presence but also the location of the hydrogen gas leak. This technology utilizes a chemochromicpigment and polymer matrix that can be molded or spun into rigid or pliable shapes useable in variable temperature environments including atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases. A change in color of the detector material indicates where gaseous hydrogen leaks are occurring. The irreversible sensor has a dramatic color change from beige to dark grey and remains dark grey after exposure. A reversible pigment changes from white to blue in the presence of hydrogen and reverts back to white in the presence of oxygen. Both versions of the sensor's pigments were comprised of a mixture of a metal oxide substrate and a hydro-chromic compound (i.e., the compound that changed color in the presence of hydrogen) and immediately notified the operator of the presence of low levels of hydrogen. The detector can be used in a variety of formats including paint, tape, caulking, injection molded parts, textiles and fabrics, composites, and films. This technology brings numerous

  10. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  11. Biomimetic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  12. Usage of a statistical method of designing factorial experiments in the mechanical activation of a complex CuPbZn sulphide concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BalហPeter

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical activation belongs to innovative procedures which intensify technological processes by creating new surfaces and making a defective structure of solid phase. Mechanical impact on the solid phase is a suitable procedure to ensure the mobility of its structure elements and to accumulate the mechanical energy that is later used in the processes of leaching.The aim of this study was to realize the mechanical activation of a complex CuPbZn sulphide concentrate (Slovak deposit in an attritor by using of statistical methods for the design of factorial experiments and to determine the conditions for preparing the optimum mechanically activated sample of studied concentrate.The following parameters of the attritor were studied as variables:the weight of sample/steel balls (degree of mill filling, the number of revolutions of the milling shaft and the time of mechanical activation. Interpretation of the chosen variables inducing the mechanical activation of the complex CuPbZn concentrate was also carried out by using statistical methods of factorial design experiments. The presented linear model (23 factorial experiment does not support directly the optimum search, therefore this model was extended to the nonlinear model by the utilization of second order ortogonal polynom. This nonlinear model does not describe adequately the process of new surface formation by the mechanical activation of the studied concentrate. It would be necessary to extend the presented nonlinear model to the nonlinear model of the third order or choose another model. In regard to the economy with the aspect of minimal energy input consumption, the sample with the value of 524 kWht-1 and with the maximum value of specific surface area 8.59 m2g-1 (as a response of the factorial experiment was chosen as the optimum mechanically activated sample of the studied concentrate. The optimum mechanically activated sample of the complex CuPbZn sulphide concentrate was prepared

  13. Pit lakes from sulphide ore mining, geochemical and limnological characterization before treatment, after liming and sewage sludge treatments:cases studies at Rävlidmyran and Udden, Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Ming

    2004-01-01

    Due to the increasing number of acidic mining-pit lakes and a growing awareness of the environmental risks associated with them, pit lakes have attracted more and more attention. This study started with a full-year- round investigation of two abandoned sulphide mine pit lakes, the Rävlidmyran and Udden pit lakes in northern Sweden, followed by studies of two full-scale remediation treatments, liming and sewage sludge treatment, respectively, in the Rävlidmyran pit lake. The aim of this study ...

  14. Mobility of toxic elements in carbonate sediments from a mining area in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina-Alvarez, Natalia; Głaz, Lukasz; Dmowski, Krzysztof; Krasnodębska-Ostręga, Beata

    2014-01-01

    The Bolesław-Bukowno mining area in Poland is highly polluted by elements such as Zn, Pb, Cd and As. The reactivity and mobility of toxic elements such as Tl are poorly known. Here, we studied by sequential extraction the mobility of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Pb, Tl and Zn in sediments from two water reservoirs near Bukowno. Results show that available As, Co, Mn, Pb and Zn are found in carbonate minerals. Available Cd, Cu and Tl are found in sulphides and organic matter. The extractability of As, Cr, Mo and Tl was rather poor. By contrast, 85 % of total Cd, Pb and Zn was mobile. We discuss Tl and Mo association in carbonate sediments from ore deposits.

  15. Pulmonary toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, Brian Christopher

    Manufactured nanomaterials have become ubiquitous in science, industry, and medicine. Although electron microscopy and surface probe techniques have improved understanding of the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, much less is known about what makes nanomaterials toxic. Particulate matter less than 2.5 mum in effective aerodynamic diameter is easily inhaled and taken deep into the lungs. The toxicity of inhaled particulate matter is related to its size and surface chemistry; for instance, the smaller the size of particles, the greater their specific surface area. The chemistry and toxicity of insoluble particles depends on their surface area, since chemical reactions may happen with the environment on the surface. Oxidation and reduction may occur on the surfaces of particles after they are produced. For instance, it is known that carbonaceous particles from vehicle exhaust and industrial emission may interact with reactive species like ozone in their ambient environment, altering the surface chemistry of the particles. Reaction with species in the environment may cause changes in the chemical functionality of the surface and change the toxic properties of the particles when they are inhaled. Furthermore, metals on the surface of inhalable particles can contribute to their toxicity. Much attention has been given to the presence of iron on the surfaces of inhalable particles in the environment. After particle inhalation, particles are endocytosed by alveolar macrophages in the immune response to foreign matter. They are exposed to hydrogen peroxide in the oxidative burst, which can cause the iron-mediated production of hydroxyl free radicals via the Fenton reaction, causing oxidative stress that leads to inflammation and cell death. The toxicity of particles that contain metals depends on the redox activity and bioavailability of the metals, the causes of thich have not yet been adequately explored. In this thesis, electron paramagnetic spectroscopy showed

  16. Females and Toxic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    than uplifting followers. Toxic leadership plummets productivity and applies brakes to organizational growth , causing progress to screech to a halt...uplifting followers. Toxic leadership plummets productivity and applies brakes to organizational growth , causing progress to screech to a halt.”5...FEMALES AND TOXIC LEADERSHIP A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in

  17. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  18. Hydrogen Recovery System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Liquid hydrogen is used extensively by NASA to support cryogenic rocket testing. In addition, there are many commercial applications in which delivery and use of...

  19. Hydrogen Recovery System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rocket test operations at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) result in substantial quantities of hydrogen gas that is flared from the facility and helium gas that is...

  20. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Misra, A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. One promising option to meet this goal is direct photoelectrolysis in which light absorbed by semiconductor-based photoelectrodes produces electrical power internally to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Under this program, direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8 % have been demonstrated using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Detailed loss analysis models indicate that solar-to-chemical conversion greater than 10% can be achieved with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, the authors describe the continuing progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, results of outdoor testing, and efforts to develop high efficiency, stable prototype systems.

  1. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperature...

  2. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauf, R.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Fleming, P.H.

    1994-11-22

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed. 6 figs.

  3. The hydrogen issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2011-01-17

    Hydrogen is often proposed as the fuel of the future, but the transformation from the present fossil fuel economy to a hydrogen economy will need the solution of numerous complex scientific and technological issues, which will require several decades to be accomplished. Hydrogen is not an alternative fuel, but an energy carrier that has to be produced by using energy, starting from hydrogen-rich compounds. Production from gasoline or natural gas does not offer any advantage over the direct use of such fuels. Production from coal by gasification techniques with capture and sequestration of CO₂ could be an interim solution. Water splitting by artificial photosynthesis, photobiological methods based on algae, and high temperatures obtained by nuclear or concentrated solar power plants are promising approaches, but still far from practical applications. In the next decades, the development of the hydrogen economy will most likely rely on water electrolysis by using enormous amounts of electric power, which in its turn has to be generated. Producing electricity by burning fossil fuels, of course, cannot be a rational solution. Hydroelectric power can give but a very modest contribution. Therefore, it will be necessary to generate large amounts of electric power by nuclear energy of by renewable energies. A hydrogen economy based on nuclear electricity would imply the construction of thousands of fission reactors, thereby magnifying all the problems related to the use of nuclear energy (e.g., safe disposal of radioactive waste, nuclear proliferation, plant decommissioning, uranium shortage). In principle, wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power have the potential to produce enormous amounts of electric power, but, except for wind, such technologies are too underdeveloped and expensive to tackle such a big task in a short period of time. A full development of a hydrogen economy needs also improvement in hydrogen storage, transportation and distribution

  4. CHEMICAL TOXICITY OF URANIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Cam

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Uranium, occurs naturally in the earth’s crust, is an alpha emitter radioactive element from the actinide group. For this reason, U-235 and U-238, are uranium isotopes with long half lives, have got radiological toxicity. But, for natural-isotopic-composition uranium (NatU, there is greater risk from chemical toxicity than radiological toxicity. When uranium is get into the body with anyway, also its chemical toxicity must be thought. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 215-220

  5. Cryogenic hydrogen release research.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this project was to devolop a plan for modifying the Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) with the necessary infrastructure to produce a cold (near liquid temperature) hydrogen jet. The necessary infrastructure has been specified and laboratory modifications are currently underway. Once complete, experiments from this platform will be used to develop and validate models that inform codes and standards which specify protection criteria for unintended releases from liquid hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery infrastructure.

  6. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  7. Cytosinium hydrogen selenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhwane Takouachet

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title salt, C4H6N3O+·HSeO3−, systematic name 6-amino-2-methylidene-2,3-dihydropyrimidin-1-ium hydrogen selenite, the hydrogenselenite anions and the cytosinium cations are linked via N—H...O, N—H...Se, O—H...O, O—H··Se and C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional framework.

  8. Ash removal by hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rank, V.; von Hartmann, G.B.

    1942-10-17

    This method for the production of high-quality electrode coke involved the hydrogenation of coal to a filterable bitumen product. The hydrogenation and splitting processes were carried out to end at high-molecular-weight bitumens with some lighter oils produced. Variations in temperature, pressure, and throughput determined the type and amount of bitumens. Proper conditions allowed sufficient middle oil for recirculation as pasting oil as well as for increasing filterability by dilution. This partial hydrogenation could be performed without the addition of hydrogen, if hydrogen-producing aromatic compounds, such as tetraline or cresol, were used as pasting oils. For 700-atm hydrogenation, it was found that the Upper Silesian coal was the best with respect to yield, filterability, and recovery of the recycle oils. The lower pressures gave a better filterability while sacrificing yield and recycle oil. The more severe the hydrogenating conditions, the lighter the bitumens and the lower the melting point. For the range of 300 to 600 atm, it was found that filterability improved with increased temperature and decreased with a pressure gain. Larger throughputs caused relatively moderate decreases in filterability. The use of iron catalysts decreased filterability while changing gas and pasting-oil content had little effect. The optimum conditions established a pasting-oil equilibrium with the best filterability. Greater degrees of hydrogenation or splitting produced more recycle middle oils but decreased filterability, thus only the necessary paste oil was produced. By selecting proper conditions, an ashfree bituminous binder could be produced, as used in the production of the Soederberg electrode. 2 tables, 2 graphs

  9. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  10. Hydrogen Sorption and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, C. J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen is unique among aqueous ions, both in its importance for geochemical reactions, and in its complex transport behavior through reactive media. The structure of hydrogen reaction fronts can be analyzed in the advective limit of the transport equation. At local chemical equilibrium, sorption of hydrogen onto the media surface (sorption isotherm) controls reaction front morphology. Transport modeling thus necessitates accurate knowledge of surface chemistry. Though motivated by transport, sorption models are often parameterized against batch titration experiments. The validity of these parameterizations, in a transport setting, are seldom tested. The analytic solution to the transport equation gives an algebraic relationship between concentration velocity and equilibrium sorption behavior. In this study, we conduct a suite of column flow experiments through quartz sand. Hydrogen concentration breakthrough curves at the column outlet are used to infer the "transport sorption isotherm." These results are compared to the batch titration derived sorption isotherm. We find excellent agreement between the datasets. Our findings suggest that, for aqueous hydrogen, local chemical equilibrium is a valid assumption. With the goal of a predictive transport model, we parameterize various sorption models against this dataset. Models which incorporate electrostatic effects at the surface predict transport well. Nonelectrostatic models such as the Kd, Langmuir, and Freundlich models fail. These results are particularly compelling as nonelectrostatic models are often employed to predict hydrogen transport in many reactive transport code.

  11. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  12. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  13. Hydrogen supplies for SPFC vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, D.; Bauen, A.; Fouquet, R.; Leach, M.; Pearson, P.; Anderson, D.

    2000-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a study investigating the potential of using hydrogen fuel for fuel cell-powered fleet vehicles based at a depot in a range of counties. An overview of current hydrogen supply and demand is presented, and research already carried out on potential hydrogen refuelling infrastructures, and the costs of producing hydrogen as a transportation fuel are examined. Hydrogen demand modelling, and supplying hydrogen to fleet vehicles, alternative hydrogen supply options, energy and emissions comparison with competing fuels, and health and safety standards are discussed.

  14. Tourmalines from the siderite-quartz-sulphide hydrothermal veins, Gemeric unit, western Carpathians, Slovakia: crystal chemistry and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bačík, P.; Uher, P.; Dikej, J.; Puškelová, Ľ.

    2017-03-01

    Tourmaline is an important gangue mineral in a large number of Cretaceous siderite-quartz-sulphide hydrothermal veins in the Gemeric Unit, Slovak Ore Mountains, Slovakia, such as Dobšiná, Vlachovo, Rožňavské Bystré, Hnilčík, Rakovnica, Novoveská Huta, Gretla, Rudňany, and Bindt. In this study we combine by electron microprobe analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer and optical emission spectroscopy to determine the range of tourmaline compositions in the deposits and constrain the mechanisms of its precipitation. Selected samples from the mentioned deposits belong mostly to the alkali group, schorl to dravite series, rarely dominant X-site vacant foititic tourmaline (Vlachovo and Bindt) and oxy-dravite compositions (Hnilčík) were detected. Rim zones of some schorlitic tourmalines show high concentrations of Ti (up to 2.35 wt.% TiO2, 0.30 apfu; Rožňavské Bystré). The chemical composition is mostly controlled by alkali-deficient X □AlNa-1(Mg,Fe2+)-1 and proton-deficient AlO(Mg,Fe2+)-1(OH)-1 substitutions. Titanium is incorporated into the structure by Y Ti Y (Mg,Fe) Y Al-2, Y Ti Z Mg Y Al-1 Z Al-1, Y TiO( Y AlOH), and X Ca Y Ti Z MgO2 X □-1 Y,Z Al-2(OH)-2 substitutions. Along trace elements, Sr and V attain concentrations of 80-450 and 70-320 ppm, respectively. The unit-cell parameter a varies between 15.960 and 15.985 Å; variations in c are larger, between 7.177 and 7.236 Å indicating the presence of Fe3+ and Mg2+ at Z site. Mössbauer spectroscopy has shown variable Fe3+ proportions (0.17-0.55 apfu) in all samples. The gathered dataset suggests some qualitative considerations on the mechanisms controlling tourmaline compositions at the regional scale. The highest Fe3+ concentrations occur in samples from Rudňany and Gretla in the external part of Gemeric unit, suggesting higher oxidation during longer transport of fluids. We propose that the determined XFe in the samples are correlated with the compositions of the host rocks, as

  15. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling

  16. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  17. Hydrogen as an energy vector

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela Ortega, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Study of the use of the Hydrogen to storage big amounts of energy. In this project there will be an study about the different energies that are profitable to use them to obtain hydrogen, the study of the different technologies to obtain hydrogen (electrolysis, gasification, etc.), the study of the technologies for storage the hydrogen and the study of the different ways to obtain final energy with the hydrogen. There will be also an overall analysis of the efficiency of the process a...

  18. Sulphide-mining impacts in the physical environment: Sierra de Cartagena-La Unión (SE Spain) case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Arenas, V. M.; Rodríguez, R.; García, C.; Manteca, J. I.; Candela, L.

    2006-10-01

    The environmental impact and potential-risk assessment of an abandoned sulphide-mining site in a semiarid climate is presented here, by the study case of Sierra de Cartagena-La Unión (SE Spain), a 2,500-year-old mining district extending over an area of 100 km2. The regional map illustrates the existence of 12 open-pits, 1,902 mining wells, 2,351 waste deposits, including 89 tailing dams and waste rock derived from mining processes. Mine wastes occupy an area of 9 km2 and have an approximate volume of 200 Mm3. Mineralogical, physical and chemical data distinguish nine different types of mine and metallurgical waste. According to the concentration of sulphate and heavy metals in sediment, soil, rainwater, surface water and groundwater samples, it is possible to conclude that the impact of mine activities occurs not only in the immediate mining area (100 km2), but also in the surrounding areas (an affected area of 1,000 km2 approximately). The hydrochemical data show that groundwater, runoff water and some rainwater samples exceed Spanish and European water quality guideline values for water supply. The main geochemical process recognised is sulphide-mineral oxidation and later-generated sulphate dissolution by groundwater and runoff. Runoff and wind are the major mechanisms of metals and sulphate transport in the study area and adjacent zones.

  19. Characterisation of sulphide-bearing waste-rock dumps using electrical resistivity imaging: the case study of the Rio Marina mining district (Elba Island, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Mauro; Servida, Diego; Lupis, Domenico

    2013-07-01

    Sulphide-bearing mine dumps are potential sources of pollution when acid mine drainage (AMD) occurs. Because the generation of AMD depends on the volume and composition of waste materials, their characterisation is crucial for the evaluation of geochemical hazards and for the design of remediation strategies to minimise their environmental impact. In this paper, a cost-effective strategy for the characterisation of an inactive mine dump in the Rio Marina mining district (Elba Island, Italy) using earth resistivity imaging (ERI) is presented. As no information regarding the nature of waste rocks is found in reports for the mine, five ERI profiles were acquired at the top of the waste pile. The results show that waste rocks are heterogeneous with a maximum thickness of 30 m. Due to the large amounts of dispersed sulphide minerals, the waste rocks are characterised by an electrically conductive geophysical signature in comparison to the surrounding resistive metamorphic bedrock. A geostatistical approach was adopted to estimate the elevation of the edges of the mine dump, and the net volume of the waste rocks was computed through a raster analysis of the elevations of the upper and lower boundaries of the mine dump. High-conductivity anomalies were detected within the core of the mine dump. The integration of the hydrogeological, geochemical and geological framework of the Rio Marina mining district suggests that these anomalies could be a geophysical signature of subsurface regions where AMD is currently generated or stored, thus representing sources of environmental pollution.

  20. Toxic proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Liuyi; Van Damme, Els J M

    2015-09-01

    Plants have evolved to synthesize a variety of noxious compounds to cope with unfavorable circumstances, among which a large group of toxic proteins that play a critical role in plant defense against predators and microbes. Up to now, a wide range of harmful proteins have been discovered in different plants, including lectins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, protease inhibitors, ureases, arcelins, antimicrobial peptides and pore-forming toxins. To fulfill their role in plant defense, these proteins exhibit various degrees of toxicity towards animals, insects, bacteria or fungi. Numerous studies have been carried out to investigate the toxic effects and mode of action of these plant proteins in order to explore their possible applications. Indeed, because of their biological activities, toxic plant proteins are also considered as potentially useful tools in crop protection and in biomedical applications, such as cancer treatment. Genes encoding toxic plant proteins have been introduced into crop genomes using genetic engineering technology in order to increase the plant's resistance against pathogens and diseases. Despite the availability of ample information on toxic plant proteins, very few publications have attempted to summarize the research progress made during the last decades. This review focuses on the diversity of toxic plant proteins in view of their toxicity as well as their mode of action. Furthermore, an outlook towards the biological role(s) of these proteins and their potential applications is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms of Phosphine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisa S. Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH3, the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N and arsenic (As, which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH3 and AsH3. The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity.

  2. Hydrogen Contractors Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, Tim [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering

    2006-05-16

    This volume highlights the scientific content of the 2006 Hydrogen Contractors Meeting sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (DMS&E) on behalf of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Hydrogen Contractors Meeting held from May 16-19, 2006 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott Hotel Arlington, Virginia. This meeting is the second in a series of research theme-based Contractors Meetings sponsored by DMS&E held in conjunction with our counterparts in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the first with the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The focus of this year’s meeting is BES funded fundamental research underpinning advancement of hydrogen storage. The major goals of these research efforts are the development of a fundamental scientific base in terms of new concepts, theories and computational tools; new characterization capabilities; and new materials that could be used or mimicked in advancing capabilities for hydrogen storage.

  3. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. David Swank

    2007-02-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant’s absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  4. The hydrogen laminar jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanz, M. [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidomecanica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rosales, M. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain); Instituto de Innovacion en Mineria y Metalurgia, Avenida del Valle 738, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, A.L. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Numerical and asymptotic methods are used to investigate the structure of the hydrogen jet discharging into a quiescent air atmosphere. The analysis accounts in particular for the variation of the density and transport properties with composition. The Reynolds number of the flow R{sub j}, based on the initial jet radius a, the density {rho}{sub j} and viscosity {mu}{sub j} of the jet and the characteristic jet velocity u{sub j}, is assumed to take moderately large values, so that the jet remains slender and stable, and can be correspondingly described by numerical integration of the continuity, momentum and species conservation equations written in the boundary-layer approximation. The solution for the velocity and composition in the jet development region of planar and round jets, corresponding to streamwise distances of order R{sub j}a, is computed numerically, along with the solutions that emerge both in the near field and in the far field. The small value of the hydrogen-to-air molecular weight ratio is used to simplify the solution by considering the asymptotic limit of vanishing jet density. The development provides at leading-order explicit analytical expressions for the far-field velocity and hydrogen mass fraction that describe accurately the hydrogen jet near the axis. The information provided can be useful in particular to characterize hydrogen discharge processes from holes and cracks. (author)

  5. Hydrogen in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.; Hervig, R.; Irving, T.

    2017-01-01

    Most volatile studies of Mars have targeted its surface via spacecraft and rover data, and have evidenced surficial water in polar caps and the atmosphere, in the presence of river channels, and in the detection of water bearing minerals. The other focus of Martian volatile studies has been on Martian meteorites which are all from its crust. Most of these studies are on hydrous phases like apatite, a late-stage phase, i.e. crystallizing near the end of the differentiation sequence of Martian basalts and cumulates. Moreover, calculating the water content of the magma a phosphate crystallized from is not always possible, and yet is an essential step to estimate how much water was present in a parent magma and its source. Water, however, is primarily dissolved in the interiors of differentiated planets as hydrogen in lattice defects of nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, feldspar) of the crust and mantle. This hydrogen has tremendous influence, even in trace quantities, on a planet's formation, geodynamics, cooling history and the origin of its volcanism and atmosphere as well as its potential for life. Studies of hydrogen in nominally anhydrous phases of Martian meteorites are rare. Measuring water contents and hydrogen isotopes in well-characterized nominally anhydrous minerals of Martian meteorites is the goal of our study. Our work aims at deciphering what influences the distribution and origin of hydrogen in Martian minerals, such as source, differentiation, degassing and shock.

  6. Microfabricated hydrogen sensitive membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddaf, A.; Kraetz, L. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern (Germany); Detemple, P.; Schmitt, S.; Hessel, V. [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, Mainz (Germany); Faqir, N. [University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Bart, H.J.

    2009-01-15

    Thin, defect-free palladium, palladium/copper and palladium/silver hydrogen absorbing membranes were microfabricated. A dual sputtering technique was used to deposit the palladium alloy membranes of only 1 {mu}m thickness on a nonporous silicon substrate. Advanced silicon etching (ASE) was applied on the backside to create a mechanically stable support structure for the thin films. Performance evaluation was carried out for different gases in a temperature range of 20 C to 298 C at a constant differential pressure of 110 kPa at the two sides of the membrane. The composite membranes show an excellent permeation rate of hydrogen, which appears to be 0.05 Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} and 0.01.10{sup -3} Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 20 C for the microfabricated 23 % silver and the 53 % copper composite membranes, respectively. The selectivity to hydrogen over a gas mixture containing, in addition to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen was measured. The mass spectrometer did not detect any CO{sub 2} or CO, showing that the membrane is completely hydrogen selective. The microfabricated membranes exhibit both high mechanical strength (they easily withstand pressures up to 4 bar) and high thermal stability (up to 650 C). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Tetramethylammonium hydrogen terephthalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Dolatyari

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C4H12N+·C8H5O4−, contains one half of a tetramethylammonium cation and one half of a hydrogen terephthalate monoanion. The N atom of the ammonium cation lies on a twofold rotation axis and the centre of mass of the terephthalate anion is on a centre of inversion. In the crystal, the centrosymmetric terephthalate ions are linked by a very short symmetric O—H...O hydrogen bond [O...O = 2.4610 (19 Å] into a one-dimensional polymeric chain along [1-12]. The tetramethylammonium cations and terephthalate anions are then connected through a pair of bifurcated acceptor C—H...O hydrogen bonds, generating a three-dimensional supramolecular network. The carboxylate groups at both ends of the terephthalate anion are charge-shared with an equal probability of 0.5.

  8. Hydrogen gas detector card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Sánchez Niño

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A small card used for detecting hydrogen gas in a crystal growth system by the liquid phase epitaxy technique was designed and built. The small size of the card enables its portability to other laboratories where leakage detection of hydrogen or other flammable gas is required. Card dimensions are approximately 10 cm long and 5 cm wide enabling easy transportation. The design is based on a microcontroller which reads the signal from the hydrogen sensor and internally compares the read value with preset values. Depending on the signal voltage a red, yellow or green LED will light to indicate the levels of concentration of the flammable gas. The card is powered by a 9 V battery.

  9. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Kjøller, John; Larsen, B.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast at tempe......A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast...... at temperatures around 600 K and above, but the reversed reaction showed somewhat slower kinetics around 600 K. At higher temperatures the opposite was found. The enthalpy and entropy change by the hydrogenation, derived from pressure-concentration isotherms, agree fairly well with those reported earlier....

  10. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  11. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.

  12. Hydrogen: Fueling the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leisch, Jennifer

    2007-02-27

    As our dependence on foreign oil increases and concerns about global climate change rise, the need to develop sustainable energy technologies is becoming increasingly significant. Worldwide energy consumption is expected to double by the year 2050, as will carbon emissions along with it. This increase in emissions is a product of an ever-increasing demand for energy, and a corresponding rise in the combustion of carbon containing fossil fuels such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Undisputable scientific evidence indicates significant changes in the global climate have occurred in recent years. Impacts of climate change and the resulting atmospheric warming are extensive, and know no political or geographic boundaries. These far-reaching effects will be manifested as environmental, economic, socioeconomic, and geopolitical issues. Offsetting the projected increase in fossil energy use with renewable energy production will require large increases in renewable energy systems, as well as the ability to store and transport clean domestic fuels. Storage and transport of electricity generated from intermittent resources such as wind and solar is central to the widespread use of renewable energy technologies. Hydrogen created from water electrolysis is an option for energy storage and transport, and represents a pollution-free source of fuel when generated using renewable electricity. The conversion of chemical to electrical energy using fuel cells provides a high efficiency, carbon-free power source. Hydrogen serves to blur the line between stationary and mobile power applications, as it can be used as both a transportation fuel and for stationary electricity generation, with the possibility of a distributed generation energy infrastructure. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies will be presented as possible pollution-free solutions to present and future energy concerns. Recent hydrogen-related research at SLAC in hydrogen production, fuel cell catalysis, and hydrogen

  13. Electronic Cigarette Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J Drew; Michaels, David; Orellana-Barrios, Menfil; Nugent, Kenneth

    2017-04-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are often advertised as a healthier product when compared with traditional cigarettes. Currently, there are limited data to support this and only a threat of federal regulation from the US Food and Drug Administration. Calls to poison control centers about e-cigarette toxicity, especially in children, and case reports of toxic exposures have increased over the past 3 years. This research letter reports the frequency of hazardous exposures to e-cigarettes and characterizes the reported adverse health effects associated with e-cigarette toxicity.

  14. Assessing Nanoparticle Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Sara A.; Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Thompson, John W.; Lin, Yu-Shen; Haynes, Christy L.

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticle toxicology, an emergent field, works toward establishing the hazard of nanoparticles, and therefore their potential risk, in light of the increased use and likelihood of exposure. Analytical chemists can provide an essential tool kit for the advancement of this field by exploiting expertise in sample complexity and preparation as well as method and technology development. Herein, we discuss experimental considerations for performing in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies, with a focus on nanoparticle characterization, relevant model cell systems, and toxicity assay choices. Additionally, we present three case studies (of silver, titanium dioxide, and carbon nanotube toxicity) to highlight the important toxicological considerations of these commonly used nanoparticles.

  15. Liquid Nicotine Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Won; Baum, Carl R

    2015-07-01

    E-cigarettes, also known as electronic nicotine delivery systems and electronic cigarettes, are advertised as a healthier alternative product to tobacco cigarettes despite limited data on the consequences of e-cigarette use. Currently, there are no US Food and Drug Administration or other federal regulations of e-cigarettes, and calls to poison control centers regarding liquid nicotine toxicity, especially in children, are on the rise. This article presents the background and mechanism of action of e-cigarettes as well as up-to-date details of the toxicity of liquid nicotine. We also present management strategies in the setting of liquid nicotine toxicity.

  16. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  17. Polyhydride complexes for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application in hydrogen storage. Efforts have focused on developing complexes with improved available hydrogen weight percentages. We have explored the possibility that complexes containing aromatic hydrocarbon ligands could store hydrogen at both the metal center and in the ligands. We have synthesized novel indenyl hydride complexes and explored their reactivity with hydrogen. The reversible hydrogenation of [IrH{sub 3}(PPh{sub 3})({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 10}H{sub 7})]{sup +} has been achieved. While attempting to prepare {eta}{sup 6}-tetrahydronaphthalene complexes, we discovered that certain polyhydride complexes catalyze both the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of tetrahydronaphthalene.

  18. Electrocatalysts for hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Losiewicz, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    This special topic volume deals with the development of novel solid state electrocatalysts of a high performance to enhance the rates of the hydrogen or oxygen evolution. It contains a description of various types of metals, alloys and composites which have been obtained using electrodeposition in aqueous solutions that has been identified to be a technologically feasible and economically superior technique for the production of the porous electrodes. The goal was to produce papers that would be useful to both the novice and the expert in hydrogen technologies. This volume is intended to be us

  19. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular materials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date text covering topics in utilizing hydrogen bonding for constructing functional architectures and supramolecular materials. The first chapter addresses the control of photo-induced electron and energy transfer. The second chapter summarizes the formation of nano-porous materials. The following two chapters introduce self-assembled gels, many of which exhibit unique functions. Other chapters cover the advances in supramolecular liquid crystals and the versatility of hydrogen bonding in tuning/improving the properties and performance of materials. This book is designed

  20. Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, A.B.; Varela Gasque, Ana Sofia; Dionigi, F.

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is growing in significance as society begins to rely more on renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. Thus, research on designing new, inexpensive, and abundant HER catalysts is important. Here, we describe how a simple experiment....... The curve visually shows students that the best HER catalysts are characterized by an optimal hydrogen binding energy (reactivity), as stated by the Sabatier principle. In addition, students may use this volcano curve to predict the activity of an untested catalyst solely from the catalyst reactivity...

  1. Hydrogen Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-27

    Schoeppei, R.J. and Gray, C.L., "The Hydrogen Engine in P^srectl^e", Proceedings 7th international Energy Conversion Encrineering C^ference.: San Dxego...Conversion Engineering Conference, San Diego, Sept. 19/^, pp. 1349-1354. 10. Hausz, W., Leeth, G., and Meyer, C., "Eco-Energy", ibid, pp. 1316-1322. II...75114, . 24. ^schütz, R.H., "Hydrogen Burning Engine Experience", presented at Symposium, see Ref. 8. 25. A. Presto filipo (Pnblio Service’Electric S

  2. The dual transcriptional regulator CysR in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 controls a subset of genes of the McbR regulon in response to the availability of sulphide acceptor molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Daniel J

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of sulphur metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 has been studied intensively in the last few years, due to its industrial as well as scientific importance. Previously, the gene cg0156 was shown to belong to the regulon of McbR, a global transcriptional repressor of sulphur metabolism in C. glutamicum. This gene encodes a putative ROK-type regulator, a paralogue of the activator of sulphonate utilisation, SsuR. Therefore, it is an interesting candidate for study to further the understanding of the regulation of sulphur metabolism in C. glutamicum. Results Deletion of cg0156, now designated cysR, results in the inability of the mutant to utilise sulphate and aliphatic sulphonates. DNA microarray hybridisations revealed 49 genes with significantly increased and 48 with decreased transcript levels in presence of the native CysR compared to a cysR deletion mutant. Among the genes positively controlled by CysR were the gene cluster involved in sulphate reduction, fpr2 cysIXHDNYZ, and ssuR. Gel retardation experiments demonstrated that binding of CysR to DNA depends in vitro on the presence of either O-acetyl-L-serine or O-acetyl-L-homoserine. Mapping of the transcription start points of five transcription units helped to identify a 10 bp inverted repeat as the possible CysR binding site. Subsequent in vivo tests proved this motif to be necessary for CysR-dependent transcriptional regulation. Conclusion CysR acts as the functional analogue of the unrelated LysR-type regulator CysB from Escherichia coli, controlling sulphide production in response to acceptor availability. In both bacteria, gene duplication events seem to have taken place which resulted in the evolution of dedicated regulators for the control of sulphonate utilisation. The striking convergent evolution of network topology indicates the strong selective pressure to control the metabolism of the essential but often toxic sulphur

  3. Sulphides balance in tanning leather district in Tuscany: evaluation of H{sub 2}S emissions and estimation of their impact on the air quality of the area; Bilancio dei solfuri nel comprensorio del cuoio: valutazione delle emissioni di dirogeno solforato e del loro impatto sulla qualita' dell'aria della zona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campi, B.; De Blasi, E.; Vanni, D.; Scali, C. [Pisa Univ., Pisa (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Chimica, Chimica Industriale e Scienza dei Materiali; Spinazzola, A. [ARPAT-Agenzia Regionale per la Protezione Ambientale della Toscana, Pisa (Italy). Dipt. di Protezione Ambientale, Sez. locale di San Romano

    2000-09-01

    The paper deals with an evaluation of hydrogen sulphide emissions from leather tanning industries and water purification plants in the leather district in Tuscany. The aim of the work is to correlate different sources emissions of the area with pollutant concentrations recorded by the monitoring network. Global quantities of treated substances, different plants typologies and operating mode, have been considered, following the indications of the ARPAT's archives. This analysis, updated to 1998, gives interesting information about the trend of emissions and their weight on air quality: the effect of tanning leather industries emissions during the 'pickel' operation results greater than the average purification plants contribution to air quality, even if, cause of the high quantity of treated sulphides, the weight of purification plants remains important. The trend of measured concentration of pollutant in air shows a clear improvement of air quality during last three years (1997-199). [Italian] L'articolo presenta una valutazione delle emissioni di idrogeno sulforato da aziende conciarie e da impianti di trattamento delle acque reflue industriali nel comprensorio del cuoio. in Toscano. Lo scopo dell'indagine e' quello di valutare la possibilita' di correlare le emissioni delle diverse sorgenti della zona con i valori di concentrazione di inquinante al suolo rilevati dlla rete di monitoraggio. La valutazione tiene conto delle quantita' complessive di sostanze lavorate, delle diverse tipologie degli impianti e del loro stato di funzionamento, secondo quanto risulta dai dati contenuti nell'archivio dell'ARPAT (Agenzia Regionale per la Protezione Ambientale della Toscana). L'analisi aggiornata al 1998, fornisce indicazioni circa l'andamento dei fenomeni emissivi ed il loro peso sulla qualita' dell'aria. In particolare si evidenzia come l'effetto delle emissioni dalle aziende conciarie durante l

  4. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  5. Toxicity Reference Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB) contains approximately 30 years and $2 billion worth of animal studies. ToxRefDB allows scientists and the interested...

  6. Local anaesthetic toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment strategies. Introduction ... depression and central nervous system and cardiovascular toxicity increased .... requiring analgesic therapy beyond that of surgery. ..... Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 2006;91:1 –82. 32.

  7. [Toxicity of hydroxyquinoline derivatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashov, D; Simeonov, S P; Drumev, D; Peĭnikova, Ts; Dzhurov, A

    1980-01-01

    We studied a 90 day toxicity in dogs of the compound broxyquinoline + broxaldine--5:1 (enteroquin), applied orally and daily in doses of 0.1 and 0.2/kg t/24 h. We established the toxic manifestations during the period after the 15th day of the treatment: leukopenia, neutropenia and lymphocytosis (by 0.2 kg t/24 h). After the second and fifth day we observed a decrease of appetite, depression of the CNS, paralyses, arrhythmia, progressing loss in weight, proteinorrhea (more pronounced with those receiving 0.2/kg t (24 h); lethal consequence with some part of the animals 25% (ba 0.1/kg t) and 50% (by 0.2 kg t). We found out pathohistologically necrobiotic changes in the medulla oblongata and the kidneys, toxic distrophy of the liver, blood-vessel injuries. The toxic changes observed can be interpreted in connection with the presence of a species specific reaction.

  8. Recurrent amiodarone pulmonary toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chendrasekhar, A; Barke, R A; Druck, P

    1996-01-01

    Amiodarone, a widely used antiarrhythmic drug, is associated with pulmonary toxicity, with an estimated mortality of 1% to 33%. Standard treatment for amiodarone pulmonary toxicity (APT) has been discontinuance of the drug and steroid therapy. We report a case of APT that recurred after withdrawal of steroids and failed to respond to reinstatement of steroid therapy. Recurrent APT is a rare clinical entity that has been reported only twice in recent literature.

  9. [Toxic alcohol poisonings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulicki, Paweł; Głogowski, Tomasz

    Accidental or intentional poisonings with ethylene glycol or methanol constitute a serious toxicological problem in many countries. Both alcohols are quickly metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase to toxic metabolites responsible for high anion gap severe metabolic acidosis and profound neurological, cardiopulmonary, renal disturbances and death. In the early period, the competing inhibition the alcohol dehydrogenase with ethanol or fomepizol may successfully prevent the formation of the toxic metabolites. Once severe acidosis develops an emergency hemodialysis is required.

  10. Advances in Hypergolic Propellants: Ignition, Hydrazine, and Hydrogen Peroxide Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Davis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature pertaining to hypergolic fuel systems, particularly using hydrazine or its derivatives and hydrogen peroxide, has been conducted. It has been shown that a large effort has been made towards minimizing the risks involved with the use of a toxic propellant such as the hydrazine. Substitution of hydrazines for nontoxic propellant formulations such as the use of high purity hydrogen peroxide with various types of fuels is one of the major areas of study for future hypergolic propellants. A series of criteria for future hypergolic propellants has been recommended, including low toxicity, wide temperature range applicability, short ignition delay, high specific impulse or density specific impulse, and storability at room temperature.

  11. Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers (LOHCs): Toward a Hydrogen-free Hydrogen Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuster, Patrick; Papp, Christian; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-17

    The need to drastically reduce CO 2 emissions will lead to the transformation of our current, carbon-based energy system to a more sustainable, renewable-based one. In this process, hydrogen will gain increasing importance as secondary energy vector. Energy storage requirements on the TWh scale (to bridge extended times of low wind and sun harvest) and global logistics of renewable energy equivalents will create additional driving forces toward a future hydrogen economy. However, the nature of hydrogen requires dedicated infrastructures, and this has prevented so far the introduction of elemental hydrogen into the energy sector to a large extent. Recent scientific and technological progress in handling hydrogen in chemically bound form as liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) supports the technological vision that a future hydrogen economy may work without handling large amounts of elemental hydrogen. LOHC systems are composed of pairs of hydrogen-lean and hydrogen-rich organic compounds that store hydrogen by repeated catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation cycles. While hydrogen handling in the form of LOHCs allows for using the existing infrastructure for fuels, it also builds on the existing public confidence in dealing with liquid energy carriers. In contrast to hydrogen storage by hydrogenation of gases, such as CO 2 or N 2 , hydrogen release from LOHC systems produces pure hydrogen after condensation of the high-boiling carrier compounds. This Account highlights the current state-of-the-art in hydrogen storage using LOHC systems. It first introduces fundamental aspects of a future hydrogen economy and derives therefrom requirements for suitable LOHC compounds. Molecular structures that have been successfully applied in the literature are presented, and their property profiles are discussed. Fundamental and applied aspects of the involved hydrogenation and dehydrogenation catalysis are discussed, characteristic differences for the catalytic conversion of

  12. Colonic hydrogen sulfide produces portal hypertension and systemic hypotension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huc, Tomasz; Jurkowska, Halina; Wróbel, Maria; Jaworska, Kinga; Onyszkiewicz, Maksymilian; Ufnal, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, a toxic gas, at low concentrations is also a biological mediator in animals. In the colon, hydrogen sulfide is produced by intestinal tissues and gut sulfur bacteria. Gut-derived molecules undergo liver metabolism. Portal hypertension is one of the most common complications contributing to the high mortality in liver cirrhosis. We hypothesized that the colon-derived hydrogen sulfide may affect portal blood pressure. Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained either on tap water (controls) or on water solution of thioacetamide to produce liver cirrhosis (CRH-R). Hemodynamics were measured after administration of either saline or Na2S, a hydrogen sulfide donor, into (1) the colon, (2) the portal vein, or (3) the femoral vein. Expression of enzymes involved in hydrogen sulfide metabolism was measured by RT-PCR. CRH-R showed a significantly higher portal blood pressure but a lower arterial blood pressure than controls. Saline did not affect hemodynamic parameters. In controls, intracolonic hydrogen sulfide decreased arterial blood pressure and portal blood flow but increased portal blood pressure. Similarly, hydrogen sulfide administered into the portal vein decreased arterial blood pressure but increased portal blood pressure. In contrast, hydrogen sulfide administered into the systemic vein decreased both arterial and portal blood pressures. CRH-R showed significantly greater responses to hydrogen sulfide than controls. CRH-R had a significantly higher liver concentration of hydrogen sulfide but lower expression of rhodanese, an enzyme converting hydrogen sulfide to sulfate. In conclusion, colon-administered hydrogen sulfide increases portal blood pressure while decreasing the systemic arterial blood pressure. The response to hydrogen sulfide is more pronounced in cirrhotic rats which show reduced hydrogen sulfide liver metabolism. Therefore, colon-derived hydrogen sulfide may be involved in the regulation of portal blood pressure, and may contribute to

  13. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    temperature T, by an equation analogous to the ideal gas law: π V=iRT. (1). R is the gas .... vehicular applications. Nanomaterials are a ... development of materials for hydrogen storage are the low rate of bulk hydride sorption and the high temperatures required for gas release. 3.0. Bulk material. <100 nm. Nanoparticles.

  14. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 5. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage - The van't Hoff Connection. C S Sunandana. General Article Volume 12 Issue 5 May 2007 pp 31-36. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  16. Hydrogen storage for automobiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, G.

    1979-01-01

    Results of an analysis of hydrogen-fueled automobiles are presented as a part of a continuing study conducted by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) on Energy Storage Systems for Automobile Propulsion. The hydrogen is stored either as a metal hydride at moderate pressure in TiFe/sub 0/ /sub 9/Mn/sub 0/ /sub 1/H/sub x/ and at low pressure in MgH/sub x/ catalyzed with 10 wt % Ni, or it is stored in hollow glass microspheres at pressures up to about 400 atm. Improved projections are given for the two hydrides, which are used in combination to take advantage of their complementary properties. In the dual-hydride case and in the microsphere case where Ti-based hydride is used for initial operation, hydrogen is consumed in an internal-combustion engine; whereas in the third case, hydrogen from Ti-based hydride is used with air in an alkaline fuel cell/Ni-Zn battery combination which powers an electric vehicle. Each system is briefly described; and the results of the vehicle analysis are compared with those for the conventional automobile and with electric vehicles powered by Pb-acid or Ni-Zn batteries. Comparisons are made on the basis of automobile weight, initial user cost, and life-cycle cost. In this report, the results are limited to those for the 5-passenger vehicle in the period 1985-1990, and are provided as probable and optimistic values.

  17. Economic data on hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-07-22

    General information is recorded about hydrogenation plants and their operation up to July 1943. For 12 German plants, there is a table indicating date of beginning construction, start of operation, and production capacity, including gas. Another chart gives the same data for foreign plants, in the United States, England, Italy, Iran and Holland. Domestic and foreign partners and agreements are also listed, as well as license returns from hydrogenation. Extent of I.G. Farben patent ownership is given in a short list. Development of production costs for liquid products is indicated for the years 1927-1941. Data on test costs are also given. Production figures for hydrogenation are shown, as well as the share of Farben synthetics in total German fuel production. The report gives a breakdown for requirements of raw materials, manpower, capital, and construction steels for production of four million metric tons of fuels from hydrogenation. Finally, the report lists the special areas in which Farben was carrying on work related to synthetic fuels. The data are given mostly in tabular form.

  18. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  19. Onboard hydrogen generation for automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Problems concerning the use of hydrogen as a fuel for motor vehicles are related to the storage of the hydrogen onboard a vehicle. The feasibility is investigated to use an approach based on onboard hydrogen generation as a means to avoid these storage difficulties. Two major chemical processes can be used to produce hydrogen from liquid hydrocarbons and methanol. In steam reforming, the fuel reacts with water on a catalytic surface to produce a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. In partial oxidation, the fuel reacts with air, either on a catalytic surface or in a flame front, to yield a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. There are many trade-offs in onboard hydrogen generation, both in the choice of fuels as well as in the choice of a chemical process. Attention is given to these alternatives, the results of some experimental work in this area, and the combustion of various hydrogen-rich gases in an internal combustion engine.

  20. Biomimetic Production of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Devens

    2004-03-01

    The basic reaction for hydrogen generation is formation of molecular hydrogen from two electrons and two protons. Although there are many possible sources for the protons and electrons, and a variety of mechanisms for providing the requisite energy for hydrogen synthesis, the most abundant and readily available source of protons and electrons is water, and the most attractive source of energy for powering the process is sunlight. Not surprisingly, living systems have evolved to take advantage of these sources for materials and energy. Thus, biology provides paradigms for carrying out the reactions necessary for hydrogen production. Photosynthesis in green plants uses sunlight as the source of energy for the oxidation of water to give molecular oxygen, protons, and reduction potential. Some photosynthetic organisms are capable of using this reduction potential, in the form of the reduced redox protein ferredoxin, to reduce protons and produce molecular hydrogen via the action of an hydrogenase enzyme. A variety of other organisms metabolize the reduced carbon compounds that are ultimately the major products of photosynthesis to produce molecular hydrogen. These facts suggest that it might be possible to use light energy to make molecular hydrogen via biomimetic constructs that employ principles similar to those used by natural organisms, or perhaps with hybrid "bionic" systems that combine biomimetic materials with natural enzymes. It is now possible to construct artificial photosynthetic systems that mimic some of the major steps in the natural process.(1) Artificial antennas based on porphyrins, carotenoids and other chromophores absorb light at various wavelengths in the solar spectrum and transfer the harvested excitation energy to artificial photosynthetic reaction centers.(2) In these centers, photoinduced electron transfer uses the energy from light to move an electron from a donor to an acceptor moiety, generating a high-energy charge-separated state

  1. Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

    2010-07-31

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with

  2. Photovoltaic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiser, H.W.; Memory, S.B.; Veziroglu, T.N.; Padin, J. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This is a new project, which started in June 1995, and involves photovoltaic hydrogen production as a fuel production method for the future. In order to increase the hydrogen yield, it was decided to use hybrid solar collectors to generate D.C. electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. In this way, some of the energy needed to dissociate the water is supplied in the form of heat (or low grade energy), to generate steam, which results in a reduction of electrical energy (or high grade energy) needed. As a result, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency is increased. In the above stated system, the collector location, the collector tracking sub-system (i.e., orientation/rotation), and the steam temperature have been taken as variables. Five locations selected - in order to consider a variety of latitudes, altitudes, cloud coverage and atmospheric conditions - are Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Phoenix and Salt Lake City. Plain PV and hybrid solar collectors for a stationary south facing system and five different collector rotation systems have been analyzed. Steam temperatures have been varied between 200{degrees}C and 1200{degrees}C. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The results show that higher steam temperatures, 2 dimensional tracking system, higher elevations and dryer climates causes higher conversion efficiencies. Cost effectiveness of the sub-systems and of the overall system will be analyzed during the second year. Also, initial studies will be made of an advanced high efficiency hybrid solar hydrogen production system.

  3. Task D: Hydrogen safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, M.R.; Sievert, B.G. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States); Swain, M.N. [Analytical Technologies, Inc., Miami, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This report covers two topics. The first is a review of codes, standards, regulations, recommendations, certifications, and pamphlets which address safety of gaseous fuels. The second is an experimental investigation of hydrogen flame impingement. Four areas of concern in the conversion of natural gas safety publications to hydrogen safety publications are delineated. Two suggested design criteria for hydrogen vehicle fuel systems are proposed. It is concluded from the experimental work that light weight, low cost, firewalls to resist hydrogen flame impingement are feasible.

  4. Hydrogen Fire Spectroscopy Issues Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    The detection of hydrogen fires is important to the aerospace community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has devoted significant effort to the development, testing, and installation of hydrogen fire detectors based on ultraviolet, near-infrared, mid-infrared, andor far-infrared flame emission bands. Yet, there is no intensity calibrated hydrogen-air flame spectrum over this range in the literature and consequently, it can be difficult to compare the merits of different radiation-based hydrogen fire detectors.

  5. Magnetic levitation of condensed hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, C. G.; Seidel, G. M.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid and solid molecular hydrogen has been levitated using a pair of small superconducting solenoids. The hydrogen samples, up to 3 mm in dimension, were trapped in a magnetic potential having either a discrete minimum or a minimum in the form of a ring 1 cm in diameter. The hydrogen could be moved about in the magnetic trap by applying an electric field.

  6. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN MOLYBDENUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abd El Keriem, M.S.; van der Werf, D.P.; Pleiter, F

    1993-01-01

    Vacancy-hydrogen interaction in molybdenum was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. The complex InV2 turned out to trap up to two hydrogen atoms: trapping of a single hydrogen atom gives rise to a decrease of the quadrupole

  7. Muonic processes in solid hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G.M.; Beveridge, J.L. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology, Chester (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Maier, M.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Porcelli, T.A. [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Mulhauser, F.; Schaller, L.A. [University of Fribourg, Fribourg (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National University, Jeonju City, S. (Korea); Kunselman, A.R. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming (United States); Petitjean, C. [PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Zmeskal, J. [IMEP, Vienna (Austria)

    1998-08-01

    Muonic hydrogen participates in many different interactions, including muon induced fusion of hydrogen nuclei. Conventional experimental techniques cannot always unravel and separate the processes of interest. Some of the most important measurements may be more reliably accomplished with the use of a unique and versatile target consisting of layers of different solid hydrogen isotope mixtures. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Realizing a hydrogen future: Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel recommendations (brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, G.

    1999-08-01

    When generated from renewable sources, hydrogen production and use is part of a clean, cyclic process. Hydrogen can be used to generate electricity, heat homes and businesses, fuel vehicles, and produce commodities used every day. The Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel's (HTAP) primary functions are to advise the Secretary of Energy on the implementation of the U.S.DOE programs in hydrogen RD and D and to review and make recommendations on the economic, technical, and environmental consequences of deploying safe hydrogen energy systems.

  9. Relation between Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrodesulfurization Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Šaric, Manuel; Moses, Poul Georg; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A relation between hydrogen evolution and hydrodesulfurization catalysis was found by density functional theory calculations. The hydrogen evolution reaction and the hydrogenation reaction in hydrodesulfurization share hydrogen as a surface intermediate and, thus, have a common elementary step...

  10. Transfer Hydrogenation: Employing a Simple, In Situ Prepared Catalytic System

    KAUST Repository

    Ang, Eleanor Pei Ling

    2017-04-01

    Transfer hydrogenation has been recognized to be an important synthetic method in both academic and industrial research to obtain valuable products including alcohols. Transition metal catalysts based on precious metals, such as Ru, Rh and Ir, are typically employed for this process. In recent years, iron-based catalysts have attracted considerable attention as a greener and more sustainable alternative since iron is earth abundant, inexpensive and non-toxic. In this work, a combination of iron disulfide with chelating bipyridine ligand was found to be effective for the transfer hydrogenation of a variety of ketones to the corresponding alcohols in the presence of a simple base. It provided a convenient and economical way to conduct transfer hydrogenation. A plausible role of sulfide next to the metal center in facilitating the catalytic reaction is demonstrated.

  11. Hydrogen attack - Influence of hydrogen sulfide. [on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliezer, D.; Nelson, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted on 12.5-mm-thick SAE 1020 steel (plain carbon steel) plate to assess hydrogen attack at room temperature after specimen exposure at 525 C to hydrogen and a blend of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen at a pressure of 3.5 MN/sq m for exposure times up to 240 hr. The results are discussed in terms of tensile properties, fissure formation, and surface scales. It is shown that hydrogen attack from a high-purity hydrogen environment is severe, with the formation of numerous methane fissures and bubbles along with a significant reduction in the room-temperature tensile yield and ultimate strengths. However, no hydrogen attack is observed in the hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide blend environment, i.e. no fissure or bubble formation occurred and the room-temperature tensile properties remained unchanged. It is suggested that the observed porous discontinuous scale of FeS acts as a barrier to hydrogen entry, thus reducing its effective equilibrium solubility in the iron lattice. Therefore, hydrogen attack should not occur in pressure-vessel steels used in many coal gasification processes.

  12. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  13. Polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide inhibit proteoglycan synthesis of human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhner, Eric; Hoff, Paula; Winkler, Tobias; von Roth, Philipp; Seeger, Jörn Bengt; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-03-01

    The use of local antiseptics is a common method in septic joint surgery. We tested polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide, two of the most frequently used antiseptics with high efficacy and low toxicity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of both antiseptics on the extracellular cartilaginous matrix synthesis of human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were isolated from donated human knee joints, embedded in alginate beads, and incubated for 10 and 30 minutes with polyhexanide (0.04%), hydrogen peroxide (3%), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for control. Cartilaginous matrix production was quantified through light microscopic analysis of Alcian blue staining. Cell number and morphology were detected by histological analysis. Chondrocytes showed a decreased intensity of blue colouring after antiseptic treatment versus PBS. In contrast to that, neither the cell number per view field nor the cell morphology differed between the groups. Polyhexanide has more toxic potential than hydrogen peroxide. Based on the fact that the cell number and morphology was not altered by the substances at the examined concentrations, the lower intensity of Alcian blue staining of treated chondrocytes indicates a decreased cartilage-specific matrix synthesis by polyhexanide more than by hydrogen peroxide and control.

  14. [Toxicity of puffer fish fins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Shunichi; Ichimaru, Shunichi; Arakawa, Osamu; Takatani, Tomohiro; Noguchi, Tamao; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji

    2007-10-01

    Puffer fish is prized as a Japanese traditional food and its fin is also used in the cuisine. However, whether the fin is edible or not is determined for convenience from the toxicity of skin, since little information is available about the toxicity of puffer fish fins. In the present study, we examined the toxicity of fins and skin of three toxic species, Takifugu vermicularis, T. snyderi, and T. porphyreus. The toxicity of T. vermicularis fins (puffer fish with toxic skin also have toxic fins.

  15. Hydrogen adsorption on rhodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, M.E.; Michri, A.A.; Kalish, T.V.; Pshenichnikov, A.G.; Kazarinov, V.E.

    1987-09-01

    Measurements of thermal desorption and electron work function were used to investigate the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption from the gas phase on rhodium single-crystal faces and on a polycrystalline rhodium sample at room temperatures over the pressure range from 1.3-10/sup -3/ to 1.3 x 10/sup -5/ Pa. It was found that dipoles oriented with their negative ends toward the gas phase (dipoles of type I) form more rapidly than dipoles having the opposite orientation (dipoles of type II). For formation of the latter, a mechanism is proposed according to which the rate-determining step of the overall process is the transition of reversibly adsorbed hydrogen to dipoles of type II (the spillover), which occurs at surface defects. It was shown that the kinetics of this process with respect to the individual defect obeys an equation which is zeroth order in theta/sub H/ and pressure.

  16. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, James A [Lexington, SC; Wang, Tao [Columbia, SC; Ebner, Armin D [Lexington, SC; Holland, Charles E [Cayce, SC

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  17. Offshore Facilities to Produce Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Blanco-Fernández

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As a result of international agreements on the reduction of CO2 emissions, new technologies using hydrogen are being developed. Hydrogen, despite being the most abundant element in Nature, cannot be found in its pure state. Water is one of the most abundant sources of hydrogen on the planet. The proposal here is to use energy from the sea in order to obtain hydrogen from water. If plants to obtain hydrogen were to be placed in the ocean, the impact of long submarines piping to the coast will be reduced. Further, this will open the way for the development of ships propelled by hydrogen. This paper discusses the feasibility of an offshore installation to obtain hydrogen from the sea, using ocean wave energy.

  18. Acute Toxicity of Vildagliptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Martin, Lori; Keselica, Michael; Gunson, Diane; Skuba, Elizabeth; Lapadula, Dan; Hayes, Michael; Bentley, Phil; Busch, Steve

    2017-01-01

    This article describes acute toxicity data in cynomolgus monkeys following oral treatment with vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor. Acute toxicity symptoms in cynomolgus monkeys include edema formation of the extremities, tails, and face associated with skeletal muscle necrosis, and elevations of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, alanine transaminase, and aspartate aminotransferase activities in the serum; hypothermia; hypotension; tachycardia; moribundity; and death in a few isolated instances. In surviving animals, symptoms were reversible even if treatment was continued. Cynomolgus monkeys from Mauritius appear more sensitive than monkeys of Asian origin. The underlying mechanism(s) of these symptoms in cynomolgus monkeys is currently not well understood, although a vascular mechanism including initial vasoconstriction and subsequent vascular leakage in distal extremities may play a role. The monkey data are reviewed and discussed in the context of other preclinical and clinical data, and it is concluded that acute toxicity following vildagliptin treatment is a monkey-specific phenomenon without relevance for humans.

  19. Molecular and Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    Livermore Laboratory, Dr. J. C. Raich of the Colorado State University, and Dr. R. H. Wentorf, Jr., of the General Electric Company for their reviews...investigated by Raich and Etters [8], who have made ground-state energy calculations for hydrogen molecules retaining the orientation dependence of the...consistent with work of Raich and Etters [8], who have made similar calculations during the course of their work on the rotational transition in solid

  20. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Harvey D.

    1985-01-01

    The coal liquefaction process disclosed uses three stages. The first stage is a liquefaction. The second and third stages are hydrogenation stages at different temperatures and in parallel or in series. One stage is within 650.degree.-795.degree. F. and optimizes solvent production. The other stage is within 800.degree.-840.degree. F. and optimizes the C.sub.5 -850.degree. F. product.

  1. Phosphorylation in hydrogen bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, L

    1967-05-01

    The electron-transport system of cell-free extracts obtained from Hydrogenomonas H-20 has been studied with particular reference to phosphorylation associated with the oxyhydrogen reaction. Cell-free preparations of this organism exhibit oxidative phosphorylation with hydrogen and succinate as electron donors. This activity could be uncoupled with a number of agents. Ratios of phosphorylative activity to oxidative activity observed varied from 0.2 to 0.7. Factors affecting the efficiency of phosphorylation were examined. Inhibitor and spectrophotometric studies indicated that phosphorylation with hydrogen as electron donor occurs exclusively at a site in an abbreviated electron transport chain between H(2) and cytochrome b. The possible occurrence of a cytochrome b oxidase and the requirement for a quinone are discussed, as well as the correlation between the abbreviated pathway and the energy generation by the cell. Evidence is presented which indicates that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide does not participate in the hydrogen oxidation path which is coupled to adenosine triphosphate formation.

  2. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Zhang, Z. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. Photoelectrochemical devices-direct photoconversion systems utilizing a photovoltaic-type structure coated with water-splitting catalysts-represent a promising option to meet this goal. Direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies greater than 7% and photoelectrode lifetimes of up to 30 hours in 1 molar KOH have been demonstrated in our laboratory using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Loss analysis models indicate that the DOE`s goal of 10% solar-to-chemical conversion can be met with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, we describe recent progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, improvements in photoelectrode efficiency and stability, and designs for higher efficiency and greater stability.

  3. Inhalation toxicology. IX., Times-to-incapacitation for rats exposed to carbon monoxide alone, to hydrogen cyanide alone, and to mixtures of carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory rats were exposed to experimental atmospheres that contained a) carbon monoxide in air, b) hydrogen cyanide in air, and c) mixtures of CO and HCN in air. The toxic potency of each of the three types of environments was evaluated toxico-kin...

  4. The toxicity of refrigerants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calm, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    This paper presents toxicity data and exposure limits for refrigerants. The data address both acute (short-term, single exposure) and chronic (long-term, repeated exposure) effects, with emphasis on the former. The refrigerants covered include those in common use for the last decade, those used as components in alternatives, and selected candidates for future replacements. The paper also reviews the toxicity indicators used in both safety standards and building, mechanical, and fire codes. It then outlines current classification methods for refrigerant safety and relates them to standard and code usage.

  5. Metal-organic frameworks for the storage and delivery of biologically active hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, Phoebe K; Wheatley, Paul S; Aldous, David; Mohideen, M Infas; Tang, Chiu; Hriljac, Joseph A; Megson, Ian L; Chapman, Karena W; De Weireld, Guy; Vaesen, Sebastian; Morris, Russell E [St Andrews

    2012-04-02

    Hydrogen sulfide is an extremely toxic gas that is also of great interest for biological applications when delivered in the correct amount and at the desired rate. Here we show that the highly porous metal-organic frameworks with the CPO-27 structure can bind the hydrogen sulfide relatively strongly, allowing the storage of the gas for at least several months. Delivered gas is biologically active in preliminary vasodilation studies of porcine arteries, and the structure of the hydrogen sulfide molecules inside the framework has been elucidated using a combination of powder X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function analysis.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIMURA, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  7. Chemical Foundations of Hydrogen Sulfide Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  8. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-07-14

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  9. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2017-06-06

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  10. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  11. Respiratory Toxicity Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The advancement in high throughput genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques have accelerated pace of lung biomarker discovery. A recent growth in the discovery of new lung toxicity/disease biomarkers have led to significant advances in our understanding of pathological proce...

  12. ANTIRETROVIRAl TOXICITY IN CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vertical transmission prophylaxis (VrP), and the other is treatment for symptomatic HIV infection. Fig. 7. Disease profile ofHN-positivechildren in the Italian. Collaborative Multicentric Study. Antiretroviral (ARV) toxicity is an important issue that must be fully appreciated by prescribing doctors. While the benefits of therapy are ...

  13. Monosodium Glutamate Toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    on the brain, it is used as a major taste enhancer in most eateries and cafeteria in Nigeria. However, information is scanty on the potential of Sida acuta leaf ethanolic extract. (SALEE) to mitigate MSG-induced effect on the brain. This study aimed to investigate the possible toxic effect of MSG, a natural constituent of many ...

  14. Handheld hydrogen - a new concept for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Tue; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink

    2005-01-01

    A method of hydrogen storage using metal ammine complexes in combination with an ammonia decomposition catalyst is presented. This dense hydrogen storage material has high degree of safety compared to all the other available alternatives. This technology reduces the safety hazards of using liquid...... ammonia and benefits from the properties of ammonia as a fuel. The system can be used as a safe, reversible, low-cost hydrogen carrier....

  15. [Toxicity study of realgar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Aihua; Li, Chunying; Wang, Jinhua; Xue, Baoyun; Li, Hua; Yang, Bing; Wang, Jingyu; Xie, Qing; Nilsen, Odd Georg

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the toxicity of realgar and provide the scientific basis for safety use of realgar in clinic. Acute toxicity was tested by single oral administration. Chronic toxicity of realgar was tested at different dose levels (5, 10, 20, 80, 160 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) which correspond to 1/2, 1, 2, 8, 16 times of human dose levels. The rats were treated with the test substances through oral administration once daily for successively 90 days. Urinary qualitative test, blood routine examination, serum chemistry measurement, and histomorphologic observation were conducted at day 30, 60 and 90. Toxic changes related to the treatment of realgar and no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) was evaluated. With the content of 90% total arsenic and 1.696 mg x g(-1) soluble asenic, LD50 of Realgar with oral administration was 20.5 g x kg(-1) (corresponding to 34.8 mg x kg(-1) soluble arsenic), equivalent to 12 812 times of clinical daily dose for an adult. Realgar can cause kidney toxicity or/and liver toxicity after administration for over 30, 60 or 90 days respectively. The kidney was more sensitive to realgar than liver. Based on repeated dose toxicity study, NOAELs were 160 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) for 30 day's administration, 20 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) for 60 day's administration, 10 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) for 90 day's administration respectively. Thus, for safety use of realgar, it is recommended that the daily doses of realgar (with soluble arsenic realgar can cause kidney and liver pathological change, so the doses and administration duration should be limited. The suggestion is as follows: realgar which contains soluble arsenic < or = 1.7 mg x g(-1) should be used less than 2 weeks at daily dose 160 mg, less than 4 weeks at the dose of 20 mg and less than 6 weeks at the dose of 10 mg.

  16. Toxic fluoride gas emissions from lithium-ion battery fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Petra; Blomqvist, Per; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2017-08-30

    Lithium-ion battery fires generate intense heat and considerable amounts of gas and smoke. Although the emission of toxic gases can be a larger threat than the heat, the knowledge of such emissions is limited. This paper presents quantitative measurements of heat release and fluoride gas emissions during battery fires for seven different types of commercial lithium-ion batteries. The results have been validated using two independent measurement techniques and show that large amounts of hydrogen fluoride (HF) may be generated, ranging between 20 and 200 mg/Wh of nominal battery energy capacity. In addition, 15-22 mg/Wh of another potentially toxic gas, phosphoryl fluoride (POF3), was measured in some of the fire tests. Gas emissions when using water mist as extinguishing agent were also investigated. Fluoride gas emission can pose a serious toxic threat and the results are crucial findings for risk assessment and management, especially for large Li-ion battery packs.

  17. Hydrogen application dynamics and networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E. [Air Liquide Large Industries, Champigny-sur-Marne (France)

    2010-12-30

    The Chemical Industry consumes large volumes of hydrogen as raw material for the manufacture of numerous products (e.g. polyamides and polyurethanes account for 60% of hydrogen demand). The hydrogen demand was in the recent past and will continue to be driven by the polyurethane family. China will host about 60% of new hydrogen needs over the period 2010-2015 becoming the first hydrogen market next year and reaching 25% of market share by 2015 (vs. only 4% in 2001). Air Liquide supplies large volumes of Hydrogen (and other Industrial Gases) to customers by on-site plants and through pipeline networks which offer significant benefits such as higher safety, reliability and flexibility of supply. Thanks to its long term strategy and heavy investment in large units and pipeline networks, Air Liquide is the Industrial Gas leader in most of the world class Petrochemical basins (Rotterdam, Antwerp, US Gulf Coast, Yosu, Caojing,..) (orig.)

  18. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  19. Preparation of slightly hydrogenated coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rank, V.

    1943-05-03

    Processes serving as producers of slightly hydrogenated coal are discussed. It was established that the working process of an extracting hydrogenation from coal alone did not present optimal conditions for production of slightly hydrogenated coal, and therefore led to unfavorably high costs. More favorable operating costs were expected with the use of larger amounts of gas or with simultaneous production of asphalt-free oils in larger quantity. The addition of coal into the hydrogenation of low temperature carbonization tars made it possible to produce additional briquetting material (slightly hydrogenated coal) in the same reaction space without impairment of the tar hydrogenation. This was to lower the cost still more. For reasons of heat exchange, the process with a cold separator was unfavorable, and consideration of the residue quality made it necessary to investigate how high the separator temperature could be raised. 3 tables.

  20. Hydrogen-enriched fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roser, R. [NRG Technologies, Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

    1998-08-01

    NRG Technologies, Inc. is attempting to develop hardware and infrastructure that will allow mixtures of hydrogen and conventional fuels to become viable alternatives to conventional fuels alone. This commercialization can be successful if the authors are able to achieve exhaust emission levels of less than 0.03 g/kw-hr NOx and CO; and 0.15 g/kw-hr NMHC at full engine power without the use of exhaust catalysts. The major barriers to achieving these goals are that the lean burn regimes required to meet exhaust emissions goals reduce engine output substantially and tend to exhibit higher-than-normal total hydrocarbon emissions. Also, hydrogen addition to conventional fuels increases fuel cost, and reduces both vehicle range and engine output power. Maintaining low emissions during transient driving cycles has not been demonstrated. A three year test plan has been developed to perform the investigations into the issues described above. During this initial year of funding research has progressed in the following areas: (a) a cost effective single-cylinder research platform was constructed; (b) exhaust gas speciation was performed to characterize the nature of hydrocarbon emissions from hydrogen-enriched natural gas fuels; (c) three H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} fuel compositions were analyzed using spark timing and equivalence ratio sweeping procedures and finally; (d) a full size pick-up truck platform was converted to run on HCNG fuels. The testing performed in year one of the three year plan represents a baseline from which to assess options for overcoming the stated barriers to success.