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Sample records for hydrogen rich gas

  1. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  2. Hydrogen-rich gas generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus are described for producing hydrogen-rich product gases. A spray of liquid hydrocarbon is mixed with a stream of air in a startup procedure and the mixture is ignited for partial oxidation. The stream of air is then heated by the resulting combustion to reach a temperature such that a signal is produced. The signal triggers a two way valve which directs liquid hydrocarbon from a spraying mechanism to a vaporizing mechanism with which a vaporized hydrocarbon is formed. The vaporized hydrocarbon is subsequently mixed with the heated air in the combustion chamber where partial oxidation takes place and hydrogen-rich product gases are produced.

  3. LOX vaporization in high-pressure, hydrogen-rich gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1990-01-01

    LOX droplet vaporization in high-pressure hydrogen-rich gas is analyzed, with special attention to thermodynamic effects which compel the surface to heat to the critical state and to supercritical vaporization processes on heating to criticality. Subcritical vaporization is modeled using a quasi-steady diffusion-controlled gas-phase transport formulation coupled to an effective-conductivity internal-energy-transport model accounting for circulation effects. It is demonstrated how the droplet surface might heat to the critical state, for ambient pressures slightly greater than the critical pressure of oxygen, such that the bulk of propellant within the droplet remains substantially below the critical mixing temperature.

  4. Generation of hydrogen rich gas through fluidized bed gasification of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, M K; Datta, A B

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the process of generating hydrogen rich syngas through thermo chemical fluidized bed gasification of biomass. The experiments were performed in a laboratory scale externally heated biomass gasifier. Rice husk had been taken as a representative biomass and, steam had been used as the fluidizing and gasifying media. A thermodynamic equilibrium model was used to predict the gasification process. The work included the parametric study of process parameters such as reactor temperature and steam biomass ratio which generally influence the percentage of hydrogen content in the product gas. Steam had been used here to generate nitrogen free product gas and also to increase the hydrogen concentration in syngas with a medium range heating value of around 12 MJ/Nm3. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fuel-rich hydrogen-air combustion for a gas-turbine system without CO{sub 2} emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Namo, Takamitsu; Arai, Norio [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Advanced Energy Conversion

    1997-02-01

    We propose a new and innovative gas-turbine system using fuel-rich hydrogen combustion, which we call a chemical gas-turbine system. It involves a fuel-rich hydrogen-air combustor as a major component. We have focused on a coaxial diffusion flame under normal pressure. The effects of equivalence ratio and swirl number have been investigated by measuring temperature profiles, gas composition, and flame structures using direct observations of OH radical emissions. The flames were shortened and NO{sub x} emission decreased with swirling under fuel-rich conditions. (author)

  6. Hydrogen-Rich Gas Production by Cogasification of Coal and Biomass in an Intermittent Fluidized Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Qun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental results of cogasification of coal and biomass in an intermittent fluidized bed reactor, aiming to investigate the influences of operation parameters such as gasification temperature (T, steam to biomass mass ratio (SBMR, and biomass to coal mass ratio (BCMR on hydrogen-rich (H2-rich gas production. The results show that H2-rich gas free of N2 dilution is produced and the H2 yield is in the range of 18.25~68.13 g/kg. The increases of T, SBMR, and BCMR are all favorable for promoting the H2 production. Higher temperature contributes to higher CO and H2 contents, as well as H2 yield. The BCMR has a weak influence on gas composition, but the yield and content of H2 increase with BCMR, reaching a peak at the BCMR of 4. The H2 content and yield in the product gas increase with SBMR, whilst the content of CO increases first and then decreases correspondingly. At a typical case, the relative linear sensitivity coefficients of H2 production efficiency to T, SBMR, and BCMR were calculated. The results reveal that the order of the influence of the operation parameters on H2 production efficiency is T > SBMR > BCMR.

  7. Experimental Evaluation of SI Engine Operation Supplemented by Hydrogen Rich Gas from a Compact Plasma Boosted Reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. B. Green, Jr.; N. Domingo; J. M. E. Storey; R.M. Wagner; J.S. Armfield; L. Bromberg; D. R. Cohn; A. Rabinovich; N. Alexeev

    2000-06-19

    It is well known that hydrogen addition to spark-ignited (SI) engines can reduce exhaust emissions and increase efficiency. Micro plasmatron fuel converters can be used for onboard generation of hydrogen-rich gas by partial oxidation of a wide range of fuels. These plasma-boosted microreformers are compact, rugged, and provide rapid response. With hydrogen supplement to the main fuel, SI engines can run very lean resulting in a large reduction in nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emissions relative to stoichiometric combustion without a catalytic converter. This paper presents experimental results from a microplasmatron fuel converter operating under variable oxygen to carbon ratios. Tests have also been carried out to evaluate the effect of the addition of a microplasmatron fuel converter generated gas in a 1995 2.3-L four-cylinder SI production engine. The tests were performed with and without hydrogen-rich gas produced by the plasma boosted fuel converter with gasoline. A one hundred fold reduction in NO x due to very lean operation was obtained under certain conditions. An advantage of onboard plasma-boosted generation of hydrogen-rich gas is that it is used only when required and can be readily turned on and off. Substantial NO x reduction should also be obtainable by heavy exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) facilitated by use of hydrogen-rich gas with stoichiometric operation.

  8. Hydrogen-rich gas as a product of two-stage co-gasification of lignite/waste mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Straka, Pavel; Bičáková, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 21 (2014), s. 10987-10995 ISSN 0360-3199 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : co- gasification * waste plastics * lignite * hydrogen-rich gas Subject RIV: DM - Solid Waste and Recycling Impact factor: 3.313, year: 2014 http://authors.elsevier.com/sd/article/S0360319914014025

  9. Catalytic steam gasification of pig compost for hydrogen-rich gas production in a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingbo; Xiao, Bo; Liu, Shiming; Hu, Zhiquan; He, Piwen; Guo, Dabin; Hu, Mian; Qi, Fangjie; Luo, Siyi

    2013-04-01

    The catalytic steam gasification of pig compost (PC) for hydrogen-rich gas production was experimentally investigated in a fixed bed reactor using the developed NiO on modified dolomite (NiO/MD) catalyst. A series of experiments have been performed to explore the effects of catalyst, catalytic temperature, steam to PC ratio and PC particle size on the gas quality and yield. The results indicate that the NiO/MD catalyst could significantly eliminate the tar in the gas production and increase the hydrogen yield, and the catalyst lives a long lifetime in the PC steam gasification. Moreover, the higher catalytic temperature and smaller PC particle size can contribute to more hydrogen production and gas yield. Meanwhile, the optimal ratio of steam to PC (S/P) is found to be 1.24. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Compressed hydrogen-rich fuel gas (CHFG) from wet biomass by reforming in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penninger, Johannes M.L.; Maass, Georg J.J. [SPARQLE International B.V., Hasebroekstraat 1, 7552 VX Hengelo (Netherlands); Rep, Marco [BTG Biomass Technology Group B.V., Pantheon 12, 7521 PR Enschede (Netherlands)

    2007-07-15

    Aqueous condensate produced from biomass by flash pyrolysis is a clean feedstock for gas production by reforming at supercritical water conditions of 600-650 {sup circle} C and 28-30 MPa. Low concentrations of soda ash in the condensate reduce the CO content of the reformer gas to about 2% and proportionally increase the hydrogen content. This lean-CO gas appears as a primary candidate for upgrading to CHFG quality. Desk studies, reported in this paper, concern the design of a conceptual gas conditioning process and reveal interesting potential for production of CHFG, free of CO and CO{sub 2}, a hydrogen content of 50% with a pressure of 30 MPa, without the need for gas compression. The high processing pressure provides for small equipment size and low energy consumption. (author)

  11. Hydrogen-rich fuel gas from rice straw via microwave-induced pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y F; Kuan, W H; Lo, S L; Lin, C F

    2010-03-01

    This study aimed to research the productivity of H(2)-rich fuel gas from rice straw using the microwave-induced pyrolysis. The formation constituents of gas product and the mechanism of its production were also discussed. The primary components of gas product were H(2), CO(2), CO, and CH(4), with average percentages of 50.67, 22.56, 16.09, and 7.42vol.%, respectively. According to the TA-MS analysis, it was suggested that focused heating by microwaves made the microwave-induced pyrolysis different from the traditional pyrolysis. A chemical equation could be nearly balanced to illustrate the gas composition generated from rice straw. From the viewpoint of energy consumption, close to 60% of the input energy could be derived and utilized as bioenergy. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biogas Upgrading to Hydrogen Rich Gas by Steam Reforming: Comparison and Optimization of Plant Configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashrafi, Mojdeh; Proell, Tobias; Hofbauer, Hermann [Vienna Univ. of Technology, Vienna (Austria). Institute for Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-15

    Two process configurations for the production of H{sub 2}-rich gas from biogas through steam reforming are investigated: The autothermic reformer and the externally heated reformer. A mathematical model of the reformer is developed and implemented in a steady state simulation environment. The model is based on thermodynamic equilibrium using the free energy minimisation method. Heat integration is taken into consideration for the overall process scheme and plant operation is analysed at different operating parameters such as steam to organic carbon ratio in the reformer, the reformer exit temperature, and the CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} ratio of the raw biogas. The performance is described by the CH{sub 4} conversion rate, H{sub 2} concentration in the reformed gas, and the energetic efficiency of the plant. Finally, it can be concluded that, depending on downstream technology, the autothermic reformer may suit because of higher energetic efficiency in the case of combined heat and power production and, on the other hand, the externally heated approach is advantageous if a nitrogen-free product gas is required for synthesis of upgraded fuels or products (e.g. H{sub 2})

  13. Production of CO-rich Hydrogen Gas from Methane Dry Reforming over Co/CeO2 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamidele V. Ayodele

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Production of CO-rich hydrogen gas from methane dry reforming was investigated over CeO2-supported Co catalyst. The catalyst was synthesized by wet impregnation and subsequently characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM, energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, liquid N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA for the structure, surface and thermal properties. The catalytic activity test of the Co/CeO2 was investigated between 923-1023 K under reaction conditions in a stainless steel fixed bed reactor. The composition of the products (CO2 and H2 from the methane dry reforming reaction was measured by gas chromatography (GC coupled with thermal conductivity detector (TCD. The effects of feed ratios and reaction temperatures were investigated on the catalytic activity toward product selectivity, yield, and syngas ratio. Significantly, the selectivity and yield of both H2 and CO increases with feed ratio and temperature. However, the catalyst shows higher activity towards CO selectivity. The highest H2 and CO selectivity of 19.56% and 20.95% respectively were obtained at 1023 K while the highest yield of 41.98% and 38.05% were recorded for H2 and CO under the same condition. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 21st January 2016; Revised: 23rd February 2016; Accepted: 23rd February 2016 How to Cite: Ayodele, B.V., Khan, M.R., Cheng, C. K. (2016. Production of CO-rich Hydrogen Gas from Methane Dry Reforming over Co/CeO2 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (2: 210-219 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.2.552.210-219 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.2.552.210-219

  14. Promotion of hydrogen-rich gas and phenolic-rich bio-oil production from green macroalgae Cladophora glomerata via pyrolysis over its bio-char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Omid; Jafarian, Sajedeh; Safari, Farid; Tavasoli, Ahmad; Nejati, Behnam

    2016-11-01

    Conversion of Cladophora glomerata (C. glomerata) as a Caspian Sea's green macroalgae into gaseous, liquid and solid products was carried out via pyrolysis at different temperatures to determine its potential for bio-oil and hydrogen-rich gas production for further industrial utilization. Non-catalytic tests were performed to determine the optimum condition for bio-oil production. The highest portion of bio-oil was retrieved at 500°C. The catalytic test was performed using the bio-char derived at 500°C as a catalyst. Effect of the addition of the algal bio-char on the composition of the bio-oil and also gaseous products was investigated. Pyrolysis derived bio-char was characterized by BET, FESEM and ICP method to show its surface area, porosity, and presence of inorganic metals on its surface, respectively. Phenols were increased from 8.5 to 20.76area% by the addition of bio-char. Moreover, the hydrogen concentration and hydrogen selectivity were also enhanced by the factors of 1.37, 1.59 respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a Low NOx Medium sized Industrial Gas Turbine Operating on Hydrogen-Rich Renewable and Opportunity Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Ram

    2013-07-31

    This report presents the accomplishments at the completion of the DOE sponsored project (Contract # DE-FC26-09NT05873) undertaken by Solar Turbines Incorporated. The objective of this 54-month project was to develop a low NOx combustion system for a medium sized industrial gas turbine engine operating on Hydrogen-rich renewable and opportunity Fuels. The work in this project was focused on development of a combustion system sized for 15MW Titan 130 gas turbine engine based on design analysis and rig test results. Although detailed engine evaluation of the complete system is required prior to commercial application, those tasks were beyond the scope of this DOE sponsored project. The project tasks were organized in three stages, Stages 2 through 4. In Stage 2 of this project, Solar Turbines Incorporated characterized the low emission capability of current Titan 130 SoLoNOx fuel injector while operating on a matrix of fuel blends with varying Hydrogen concentration. The mapping in this phase was performed on a fuel injector designed for natural gas operation. Favorable test results were obtained in this phase on emissions and operability. However, the resulting fuel supply pressure needed to operate the engine with the lower Wobbe Index opportunity fuels would require additional gas compression, resulting in parasitic load and reduced thermal efficiency. In Stage 3, Solar characterized the pressure loss in the fuel injector and developed modifications to the fuel injection system through detailed network analysis. In this modification, only the fuel delivery flowpath was modified and the air-side of the injector and the premixing passages were not altered. The modified injector was fabricated and tested and verified to produce similar operability and emissions as the Stage 2 results. In parallel, Solar also fabricated a dual fuel capable injector with the same air-side flowpath to improve commercialization potential. This injector was also test verified to produce 15

  16. Design, Optimization and Energetic Efficiency of Producing Hydrogen-Rich Gas from Biomass Steam Gasification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Chih Kuo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the conceptual design of biomass steam gasification (BSG processes using raw oil palm (ROP and torrefied oil palm (TOP are examined in an Aspen Plus simulator. Through thermodynamic analysis, it is verified that the BSG process with torrefied feedstock can effectively enhance the hydrogen yield. When the heat recovery design is added into the BSG process, the system energetic efficiency (SEE is significantly improved. Finally, an optimization algorithm with respect to SEE and hydrogen yield is solved, and the optimum operating conditions are validated by simulations.

  17. Large Eddy Simulation Modeling of Flashback and Flame Stabilization in Hydrogen-Rich Gas Turbines Using a Hierarchical Validation Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, Noel [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This project was a combined computational and experimental effort to improve predictive capability for boundary layer flashback of premixed swirl flames relevant to gas-turbine power plants operating with high-hydrogen-content fuels. During the course of this project, significant progress in modeling was made on four major fronts: 1) use of direct numerical simulation of turbulent flames to understand the coupling between the flame and the turbulent boundary layer; 2) improved modeling capability for flame propagation in stratified pre-mixtures; 3) improved portability of computer codes using the OpenFOAM platform to facilitate transfer to industry and other researchers; and 4) application of LES to flashback in swirl combustors, and a detailed assessment of its capabilities and limitations for predictive purposes. A major component of the project was an experimental program that focused on developing a rich experimental database of boundary layer flashback in swirl flames. Both methane and high-hydrogen fuels, including effects of elevated pressure (1 to 5 atm), were explored. For this project, a new model swirl combustor was developed. Kilohertz-rate stereoscopic PIV and chemiluminescence imaging were used to investigate the flame propagation dynamics. In addition to the planar measurements, a technique capable of detecting the instantaneous, time-resolved 3D flame front topography was developed and applied successfully to investigate the flow-flame interaction. The UT measurements and legacy data were used in a hierarchical validation approach where flows with increasingly complex physics were used for validation. First component models were validated with DNS and literature data in simplified configurations, and this was followed by validation with the UT 1-atm flashback cases, and then the UT high-pressure flashback cases. The new models and portable code represent a major improvement over what was available before this project was initiated.

  18. LHCB RICH gas system proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Bosteels, Michel; Haider, S

    2001-01-01

    Both LHCb RICH will be operated with fluorocarbon as gas radiator. RICH 1 will be filled with 4m^3 of C4F10 and RICH 2 with 100m^3 of CF4. The gas systems will run as a closed loop circulation and a gas recovery system within the closed loop is planned for RICH 1, where the recovery of the CF4 will only be realised during filling and emptying of the detector. Inline gas purification is foreseen for the gas systems in order to limit water and oxygen impurities.

  19. Two-step gasification of cattle manure for hydrogen-rich gas production: Effect of biochar preparation temperature and gasification temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ya; Cao, Hongliang; Yuan, Qiaoxia; Wang, Dianlong

    2017-10-01

    Two-step gasification process was proposed to dispose cattle manure for hydrogen rich gas production. The effect of temperature on product distribution and biochar properties were first studied in the pyrolysis-carbonization process. The steam gasification of biochar derived from different pyrolysis-carbonization temperatures was then performed at 750°C and 850°C. The biochar from the pyrolysis-carbonization temperatures of 500°C had high carbon content and low volatiles content. According to the results of gasification stage, the pyrolysis-carbonization temperature of 500°C and the gasification temperature of 850°C were identified as the suitable conditions for hydrogen production. We obtained 1.61m 3 /kg of syngas production, 0.93m 3 /kg of hydrogen yield and 57.58% of hydrogen concentration. This study shows that two-step gasification is an efficient waste-to-hydrogen energy process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrogen gas detector card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Sánchez Niño

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A small card used for detecting hydrogen gas in a crystal growth system by the liquid phase epitaxy technique was designed and built. The small size of the card enables its portability to other laboratories where leakage detection of hydrogen or other flammable gas is required. Card dimensions are approximately 10 cm long and 5 cm wide enabling easy transportation. The design is based on a microcontroller which reads the signal from the hydrogen sensor and internally compares the read value with preset values. Depending on the signal voltage a red, yellow or green LED will light to indicate the levels of concentration of the flammable gas. The card is powered by a 9 V battery.

  1. Ceres' hydrogen-rich regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Feldman, William C.; Lawrence, David J.; McSween, Harry Y.; Schorghofer, Norbert; Toplis, Michael J.; Forni, Olivier; Joy, Steven P.; Marchi, Simone; Platz, Thomas; Polanskey, Carol A.; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Rayman, Marc D.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    Low-altitude mapping of Ceres by Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) began in December of 2015. GRaND will continue to acquire data for at least six months in a circular-polar orbit, at an altitude of about 0.8 body radii. Close-proximity enables global mapping of the elemental composition of Ceres' regolith, with regional-scale spatial resolution, similar to that achieved at Vesta. An initial analysis of the data shows that Ceres' regolith is rich in H, consistent with the detection of ammoniated phyllosilicates by Dawn's Visible to InfraRed (VIR) spectrometer. Global maps of neutron and gamma ray counting data reveal a strong latitude variation, with suppressed counts at the poles. Lower bound estimates of the concentration of polar H exceed that found in carbonaceous chondrites, which are the best meteorite analogs for Ceres. Thermal modeling predicts that water ice is stable near the surface at high latitudes, and, given Ceres' low obliquity, water ice and other volatile species may be concentrated in permanently shadowed regions near the poles. Excess hydrogen at high latitudes is likely in the form of water ice within the decimeter depths sensed by GRaND. Changes in the hydration state of phyllosilicates and hydrated salt minerals with temperature could also contribute to observed spatial variations. Some GRaND signatures show evidence for layering of hydrogen, consistent with ice stability models. Differences in the gamma ray spectra of Ceres and Vesta indicate that Ceres' surface is primitive (closely related to carbonaceous chondrite-like compositions), in contrast to Vesta's fractionated igneous composition. Strong gamma rays are observed at 7.6 MeV (Fe), 6.1 MeV (O), and 2.2 MeV (H). With additional accumulation time, it may be possible to quantify or bound the concentration of other elements, such as Mg, Ni, and C. Elements diagnostic of hydrothermal activity (K, Cl, and S) may be detectable if they are present in high concentrations over

  2. Removing hydrogen sulphide from a gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baar, J.F. Van; Lith, W.J. Van.

    1990-05-08

    A process is provided for selectively removing hydrogen sulfide from a gas mixture containing hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide, such as natural gas or a reduced off-gas from the Claus process. The process comprises contacting the gas mixture with a liquid absorbent composition including an aminopyridine, such as 4-dimethylaminopyridine. The absorbent composition suitably contains between 1 and 2 moles of aminopyridine per liter of physical solvent (such as sulfolane). Contacting is carried out at 20-80{degree}C and at approximately atmospheric pressure, usually in countercurrent fashion in a gas/liquid contacting column. The rich absorbent composition laden with hydrogen sulfide is regenerated by heating the solution and/or stripping the composition with an inert gas such as steam. Experiments are described to illustrate the process of the invention. 2 tabs.

  3. Hydrothermal gasification of Cladophora glomerata macroalgae over its hydrochar as a catalyst for hydrogen-rich gas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Farid; Norouzi, Omid; Tavasoli, Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    A tubular batch micro-reactor system was used for hydrothermal gasification (HTG) of Cladophora glomerata (C. glomerata) as green macroalgae found in the southern coast of the Caspian Sea, Iran. Non-catalytic tests were performed to determine the optimum condition for hydrogen production. Hydrochar, as a solid residue of non-catalytic HTG was characterized by BET, FESEM, and ICP-OES methods to determine its physiochemical properties. Surface area and pore volume of C. glomerata increased drastically after HTG. Also, the aqueous products were identified and quantified by GC-MS and GC-FID methods. Hydrochar was loaded to the reactor to determine its catalytic effect on HTG. HTG was promoted by inorganic compounds in the hydrochar and its porosity. The maximum hydrogen yield of 9.63mmol/g was observed in the presence of algal hydrochar with the weight ratio of 0.4 to feedstock. Also, acids production was inhibited while phenol production was promoted in the presence of hydrochar. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Semi-pilot scale test for production of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from different wastes by means of a gasification and smelting process with oxygen multi-blowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, R. [Department of Basic Science and Environment CERNAS, ESAC-Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, Bencanta, 3040-316 Coimbra (Portugal); Sato, H.; Matsukura, Y.; Yamamoto, T. [Corporate Research and Development Laboratories, Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd., 16-1 Sunayama, Hasaki-machi 314-0255 (Japan)

    2005-08-25

    In Europe, most wastes are deposited in landfills, but a European Council directive has called for a 30% reduction of the landfill amount. Though the cement industry commonly burns waste as an alternative fuel together with fossil fuel (so-called waste co-incineration), it is necessary to reconsider this co-incineration from the viewpoints of sustainable development and cement quality. Gasification and smelting processes (GSPs) for waste can convert waste to slag and fuel gas, which can be used by the energy sector and industry, so these processes are desirable in that they provide wide social benefit. Considering its low environmental impact and good economic performance, a GSP that uses a one-process furnace and oxygen multi-blowing was tested on a semi-pilot scale (1.7 tons/day) to convert different wastes (municipal waste, plastic waste and refuse of polyvinyl chloride with a chlorine content of 48%) to slag and hydrogen-rich fuel gas. The results show that the techniques applied in this test increase the quality of the produced fuel gas, strictly control pollutants, and prolong the life of the plant. Furthermore, the tested GSP has the potential to be linked with a hydrogen-based system through its production of hydrogen-rich fuel gas.

  5. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist, Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  6. Hydrogen-Rich Gas Production by Sorption Enhanced Steam Reforming of Woodgas Containing TAR over a Commercial Ni Catalyst and Calcined Dolomite as CO2 Sorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Naso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the evaluation of the catalytic steam reforming of a gaseous fuel obtained by steam biomass gasification to convert topping atmosphere residue (TAR and CH4 and to produce pure H2 by means of a CO2 sorbent. This experimental work deals with the demonstration of the practical feasibility of such concepts, using a real woodgas obtained from fluidized bed steam gasification of hazelnut shells. This study evaluates the use of a commercial Ni catalyst and calcined dolomite (CaO/MgO. The bed material simultaneously acts as reforming catalyst and CO2 sorbent. The experimental investigations have been carried out in a fixed bed micro-reactor rig using a slipstream from the gasifier to evaluate gas cleaning and upgrading options. The reforming/sorption tests were carried out at 650 °C while regeneration of the sorbent was carried out at 850 °C in a nitrogen environment. Both combinations of catalyst and sorbent are very effective in TAR and CH4 removal, with conversions near 100%, while the simultaneous CO2 sorption effectively enhances the water gas shift reaction producing a gas with a hydrogen volume fraction of over 90%. Multicycle tests of reforming/CO2 capture and regeneration were performed to verify the stability of the catalysts and sorbents to remove TAR and capture CO2 during the duty cycle.

  7. Immersing lungs in hydrogen-rich saline attenuates lung ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mamoru; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Saito, Masao; Tanaka, Satona; Miyamoto, Ei; Ohata, Keiji; Kondo, Takeshi; Motoyama, Hideki; Hijiya, Kyoko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Anti-oxidant effects of hydrogen have been reported in studies examining ischaemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of immersing lungs in hydrogen-rich saline on lung IRI. Lewis rats were divided into three groups: (i) sham, (ii) normal saline and (iii) hydrogen-rich saline. In the first experiment, the left thoracic cavity was filled with either normal saline or hydrogen-rich saline for 1 h. Then, we measured the hydrogen concentration in the left lung using a sensor gas chromatograph ( N = 3 per group). In the second experiment, lung IRI was induced by occlusion of the left pulmonary hilum for 1 h, followed by reperfusion for 3 h. During the ischaemic period, the left thoracic cavity was filled with either normal saline or hydrogen-rich saline. After reperfusion, we assessed lung function, histological changes and cytokine production ( N = 5-7 per group). Immersing lungs in hydrogen-rich saline resulted in an elevated hydrogen concentration in the lung (6.9 ± 2.9 μmol/1 g lung). After IRI, pulmonary function (pulmonary compliance and oxygenation levels) was significantly higher in the hydrogen-rich saline group than in the normal saline group ( P  hydrogen-rich saline group than in the normal saline group ( P  hydrogen-rich saline delivered hydrogen into the lung and consequently attenuated lung IRI. Hydrogen-rich solution appears to be a promising approach to managing lung IRI.

  8. Catalytic steam reforming of volatiles released via pyrolysis of wood sawdust for hydrogen-rich gas production on Fe–Zn/Al2O3 nanocatalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, F; Wu, C; Dong, L; Jin, F; Williams, PT; Huang, J

    2015-01-01

    Thermo-chemical processing of biomass is a promising alternative to produce renewable hydrogen as a clean fuel or renewable syngas for a sustainable chemical industry. However, the fast deactivation of catalysts due to coke formation and sintering limits the application of catalytic thermo-chemical processing in the emerging bio-refining industry. In this research, Fe–Zn/Al2O3 nanocatalysts have been prepared for the production of hydrogen through pyrolysis catalytic reforming of wood sawdust...

  9. Removing hydrogen sulphide from a gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christy, J.G.

    1990-07-31

    This invention relates, in particular, to removing hydrogen sulfide from a gas mixture in which the molar ratio of carbon dioxide to hydrogen sulfide is very large, for example between 20 and 45. Examples of such mixtures include natural gas or gas produced by coal gasification. According to the invention, the gas mixture is contacted in a main absorber at an elevated temperature with lean and regenerable aqueous absorbent to obtain a purified gas mixture and a loaded absorbent. The loaded absorbent is introduced into a separation vessel at a reduced pressure, and flash-off gas and partially regenerated absorbent are removed from the vessel. Hydrogen sulfide is removed from the flash-off gas to obtain a lean gas, and the removed hydrogen sulfide is converted into elemental sulfur. The partially regenerated absorbent is introduced into a regenerator to obtain lean absorbent for use in the first step, and a regenerator off-gas including hydrogen sulfide. The regenerator off-gas is supplied to a sulfur recovery plant to obtain elemental sulfur and a SO{sub 2}-containing off-gas. This off-gas is treated in a converter to obtain a reduced off-gas. At least part of the lean gas obtained in a previous step is mixed with the reduced plant off-gas, and the remainder is mixed with the plant off-gas. Hydrogen sulfide is removed from the mixture of reduced off-gas and lean gas to obtain substantially hydrogen sulfide-free off-gas; the removed hydrogen sulfide is converted into elemental sulfur. The absorbent used in this process includes a chemical absorbent, such as an amine, and a physical absorbent, such as sulfolane. 1 fig.

  10. Recycling a hydrogen rich residual stream to the power and steam plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, P. [Instituto de Energia y Desarrollo Sustentable, CNEA, CONICET, Av. del Libertador 8250 Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Eliceche, A.M. [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidad Nacional del Sur, PLAPIQUI-CONICET, Camino La Carrindanga Km 7 (8000) Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The benefits of using a residual hydrogen rich stream as a clean combustion fuel in order to reduce Carbon dioxide emissions and cost is quantified. A residual stream containing 86% of hydrogen, coming from the top of the demethanizer column of the cryogenic separation sector of an ethylene plant, is recycled to be mixed with natural gas and burned in the boilers of the utility plant to generate high pressure steam and power. The main advantage is due to the fact that the hydrogen rich residual gas has a higher heating value and less CO{sub 2} combustion emissions than the natural gas. The residual gas flowrate to be recycled is selected optimally together with other continuous and binary operating variables. A Mixed Integer Non Linear Programming problem is formulated in GAMS to select the operating conditions to minimize life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions. (author)

  11. Radiolytic and thermolytic bubble gas hydrogen composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodham, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-12-11

    This report describes the development of a mathematical model for the estimation of the hydrogen composition of gas bubbles trapped in radioactive waste. The model described herein uses a material balance approach to accurately incorporate the rates of hydrogen generation by a number of physical phenomena and scale the aforementioned rates in a manner that allows calculation of the final hydrogen composition.

  12. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  13. The Stability of Hydrogen-Rich Atmospheres of Earth-Like Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding hydrogen escape is essential to understanding the limits to habitability, both for liquid water where the Sun is bright, but also to assess the true potential of H2 as a greenhouse gas where the Sun is faint. Hydrogen-rich primary atmospheres of Earth-like planets can result either from gravitational capture of solar nebular gases (with helium), or from impact shock processing of a wide variety of volatile-rich planetesimals (typically accompanied by H2O, CO2, and under the right circumstances, CH4). Most studies of hydrogen escape from planets focus on determining how fast the hydrogen escapes. In general this requires solving hydro- dynamic equations that take into account the acceleration of hydrogen through a critical transonic point and an energy budget that should include radiative heating and cooling, thermal conduction, the work done in lifting the hydrogen against gravity, and the residual heat carried by the hydrogen as it leaves. But for planets from which hydrogen escape is modest or insignificant, the atmosphere can be approximated as hydrostatic, which is much simpler, and for which a relatively full-featured treatment of radiative cooling by embedded molecules, atoms, and ions such as CO2 and H3+ is straightforward. Previous work has overlooked the fact that the H2 molecule is extremely efficient at exciting non-LTE CO2 15 micron emission, and thus that radiative cooling can be markedly more efficient when H2 is abundant. We map out the region of phase space in which terrestrial planets keep hydrogen-rich atmospheres, which is what we actually want to know for habitability. We will use this framework to reassess Tian et al's hypothesis that H2-rich atmospheres may have been rather long-lived on Earth itself. Finally, we will address the empirical observation that rocky planets with thin or negligible atmospheres are rarely or never bigger than 1.6 Earth radii.

  14. Experimental Study of Gas Explosions in Hydrogen Sulfide-Natural Gas-Air Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Vagner Gaathaug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of turbulent combustion of hydrogen sulfide (H2S and natural gas was performed to provide reference data for verification of CFD codes and direct comparison. Hydrogen sulfide is present in most crude oil sources, and the explosion behaviour of pure H2S and mixtures with natural gas is important to address. The explosion behaviour was studied in a four-meter-long square pipe. The first two meters of the pipe had obstacles while the rest was smooth. Pressure transducers were used to measure the combustion in the pipe. The pure H2S gave slightly lower explosion pressure than pure natural gas for lean-to-stoichiometric mixtures. The rich H2S gave higher pressure than natural gas. Mixtures of H2S and natural gas were also studied and pressure spikes were observed when 5% and 10% H2S were added to natural gas and also when 5% and 10% natural gas were added to H2S. The addition of 5% H2S to natural gas resulted in higher pressure than pure H2S and pure natural gas. The 5% mixture gave much faster combustion than pure natural gas under fuel rich conditions.

  15. Hydrogen-rich water ameliorates bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in newborn rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Yukako; Ito, Mikako; Oshima, Takahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-09-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is characterized by developmental arrest of the alveolar tissue. Oxidative stress is causally associated with development of BPD. The effects of hydrogen have been reported in a wide range of disease models and human diseases especially caused by oxidative stress. We made a rat model of BPD by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the amniotic fluid at E16.5. The mother started drinking hydrogen-rich water from E9.5 and also while feeding milk. Hydrogen normalized LPS-induced abnormal enlargement of alveoli at P7 and P14. LPS increased staining for nitrotyrosine and 8-OHdG of the lungs, and hydrogen attenuated the staining. At P1, LPS treatment decreased expressions of genes for FGFR4, VEGFR2, and HO-1 in the lungs, and hydrogen increased expressions of these genes. In contrast, LPS treatment and hydrogen treatment had no essential effect on the expression of SOD1. Inflammatory marker proteins of TNFα and IL-6 were increased by LPS treatment, and hydrogen suppressed them. Treatment of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells with 10% hydrogen gas for 24 hr decreased production of reactive oxygen species in both LPS-treated and untreated cells. Lack of any known adverse effects of hydrogen makes hydrogen a promising therapeutic modality for BPD. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016; 51:928-935. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Polygeneration-IGCC concepts for the production of hydrogen rich fuels based on lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Bernd; Ogriseck, Katrin

    2007-08-15

    This paper presents three IGCC-power plant concepts for central production of a hydrogen-rich fuel (methanol, hydrogen, synthetic natural gas SNG) from lignite. Each concept contains a CO{sub 2} separation, which produces a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} rich stream. Thus, CO{sub 2} emissions caused by use of lignite are considerably reduced. Furthermore, the produced low-carbon fuels are converted in decentralised Combined Heat and Power Plants (CHPP). CHPP leads to high efficiencies of fuel utilisation between 54 and 62%, which exceed the efficiencies of single power generation. Regarding to the CO{sub 2} emissions of a natural gas fired CHPP, heat and power can be generated by lignite as clean as by natural gas. The specific CO{sub 2} emissions are even much lower in the case of hydrogen production. Costs for the centrally produced methanol and hydrogen are with 29 and 19 EUR/MWh(LHV) already within an economic range. Synthetic natural gas can be produced for 23 EUR/MWh (LHV).

  17. Hydrogen-rich gas production by steam gasification of char from biomass fast pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor: influence of temperature and steam on hydrogen yield and syngas composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feng; Luo, Si-yi; Hu, Zhi-quan; Xiao, Bo; Cheng, Gong

    2010-07-01

    Steam gasification experiments of biomass char were carried out in a fixed-bed reactor. The experiments were completed at bed temperature of 600-850 degrees C, a steam flow rate of 0-0.357 g/min/g of biomass char, and a reaction time of 15min. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of bed temperature and steam flow rate on syngas yield and its compositions. The results showed that both high gasification temperature and introduction of proper steam led to higher yield of dry gas and higher carbon conversion efficiency. However, excessive steam reduced gas yield and carbon conversion efficiency. The maximum dry gas yield was obtained at the gasification temperature of 850 degrees C and steam flow rate of 0.165 g/min/g biomass char. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, N. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming and partial oxidation) are complex, multi-step processes that produce large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The main goal of this project is to develop a technologically simple process for hydrogen production from natural gas (NG) and other hydrocarbon fuels via single-step decomposition of hydrocarbons. This approach eliminates or significantly reduces CO{sub 2} emission. Carbon is a valuable by-product of this process, whereas conventional methods of hydrogen production from NG produce no useful by-products. This approach is based on the use of special catalysts that reduce the maximum temperature of the process from 1400-1500{degrees}C (thermal non-catalytic decomposition of methane) to 500-900{degrees}C. Transition metal based catalysts and various forms of carbon are among the candidate catalysts for the process. This approach can advantageously be used for the development of compact NG reformers for on-site production of hydrogen-methane blends at refueling stations and, also, for the production of hydrogen-rich gas for fuel cell applications. The author extended the search for active methane decomposition catalysts to various modifications of Ni-, Fe-, Mo- and Co-based catalysts. Variation in the operational parameters makes it possible to produce H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} blends with a wide range of hydrogen concentrations that vary from 15 to 98% by volume. The author found that Ni-based catalysts are more effective at temperatures below 750{degrees}C, whereas Fe-based catalysts are effective at temperatures above 800{degrees}C for the production of hydrogen with purity of 95% v. or higher. The catalytic pyrolysis of liquid hydrocarbons (pentane, gasoline) over Fe-based catalyst was conducted. The author observed the production of a hydrogen-rich gas (hydrogen concentration up to 97% by volume) at a rate of approximately 1L/min.mL of hydrocarbon fuel.

  19. Compressorless Gas Storage and Regenerative Hydrogen Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microwave regenerative sorption media gas storage/delivery techniques are proposed to address both compressed gas management and hydrogen purification requirements...

  20. Refuelling stations for hydrogen or reformate gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, Fredrik [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2006-02-15

    A prestudy concerning refuelling stations for reformate gas/hydrogen has been performed on the request of Swedish Gas Centre. The plan is to build a small-scale fuel processor for said application during 2006 as a continuation of the RandD programme in the fuel processing area. Catator has designed and evaluated small-scale fuel processors in a series of SGC-projects. The fuel processor system was abbreviated 'Stur-unit' and contained reactors for steam reforming, water-gas shift and preferential oxidation, tied together in a single train unit. The STUR-unit is operated at atmospheric conditions and will produce reformate gas of fuel cell quality (normally less than 20 ppm of CO). Catator has designed and delivered a number of Stur-units ranging from 1 nm{sup 3} to 50 nm{sup 3}/hr of hydrogen. Different fuels have been evaluated, both gases and liquids. Catator has also designed a pressurised system together with Intelligent Energy (abbreviated 'Hestia-unit'). This unit operates at 5-10 bar(a) and utilizes physical purification by means of fast-cycle PSA to provide essential pure hydrogen. Both units have been subjected to successful long-term testing. The hydrogen demand in Malmoe (the proposed location for the refuelling station) is presently low and irregular since only two buses utilize Hythane (a mixture between natural gas and hydrogen) at the moment. The interest for hydrogen and hydrogen containing fuels is, however, expected to increase in a near future. E.ON Gas (the owner of the existing refuelling station) has forwarded a number of specifications for the fuel processor system. The unit shall operate on natural gas and biogas. Bio-derived liquid fuels (bio ethanol and E85 - a mixture between ethanol and gasoline) could also be interesting alternatives. Depending on the low demand for hydrogen (average of about 1 nm{sup 3}/hr), the production capacity can be rather low - 5-10 nm{sup 3}/hr is probably more than enough for the time being

  1. Gas diffusion electrodes improve hydrogen gas mass transfer for a hydrogen oxidizing bioanode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenas, Pau; Zhu, Fangqi; Ter Heijne, Annemiek; Sleutels, Tom; Saakes, Michel; Buisman, Cees

    2017-12-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are capable of recovery of metals at a cathode through oxidation of organic substrate at an anode. Recently, also hydrogen gas was used as an electron donor for recovery of copper in BESs. Oxidation of hydrogen gas produced a current density of 0.8 A m-2 and combined with Cu2+ reduction at the cathode, produced 0.25 W m-2. The main factor limiting current production was the mass transfer of hydrogen to the biofilm due to the low solubility of hydrogen in the anolyte. Here, the mass transfer of hydrogen gas to the bioanode was improved by use of a gas diffusion electrode (GDE). With the GDE, hydrogen was oxidized to produce a current density of 2.9 A m-2 at an anode potential of -0.2 V. Addition of bicarbonate to the influent led to production of acetate, in addition to current. At a bicarbonate concentration of 50 mmol L-1, current density increased to 10.7 A m-2 at an anode potential of -0.2 V. This increase in current density could be due to oxidation of formed acetate in addition to oxidation of hydrogen, or enhanced growth of hydrogen oxidizing bacteria due to the availability of acetate as carbon source. The effect of mass transfer was further assessed through enhanced mixing and in combination with the addition of bicarbonate (50 mmol L-1) current density increased further to 17.1 A m-2. Hydrogen gas may offer opportunities as electron donor for bioanodes, with acetate as potential intermediate, at locations where excess hydrogen and no organics are available. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. UV-Vis Action Spectroscopy Reveals a Conformational Collapse in Hydrogen-Rich Dinucleotide Cation Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Joseph A; Urban, Jan; Dang, Andy; Nguyen, Huong T H; Tureček, František

    2017-09-07

    We report the generation of deoxyriboadenosine dinucleotide cation radicals by gas-phase electron transfer to dinucleotide dications and their noncovalent complexes with crown ether ligands. Stable dinucleotide cation radicals of a novel hydrogen-rich type were generated and characterized by tandem mass spectrometry and UV-vis photodissociation (UVPD) action spectroscopy. Electron structure theory analysis indicated that upon electron attachment the dinucleotide dications underwent a conformational collapse followed by intramolecular proton migrations between the nucleobases to give species whose calculated UV-vis absorption spectra matched the UVPD action spectra. Hydrogen-rich cation radicals generated from chimeric riboadenosine 5'-diesters gave UVPD action spectra that pointed to novel zwitterionic structures consisting of aromatic π-electron anion radicals intercalated between stacked positively charged adenine rings. Analogies with DNA ionization are discussed.

  3. Unusually gas-rich central galaxies in small groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowiecki, Steven; xGASS Team

    2017-01-01

    Observations of gas in galaxies have shown dramatic differences between rich clusters and isolated field environments. However, pre-processing in intermediate group environments is expected to be responsible for much of the transformation between gas-rich blue and gas-poor red galaxies. We investigate this by taking advantage of the deepest observations to date of atomic and molecular gas in local galaxies from the GASS and COLD GASS surveys and their extensions to low stellar masses. This sample is uniquely suited to quantify gas and star formation properties of galaxies across environments, reaching the gas-poor regime of groups and clusters. We find that central galaxies in small groups are unusually gas rich and star-forming, compared to isolated galaxies. Below log Mst/Msun = 10, gas-poor group central galaxies are rare. We suggest that these central galaxies are being fed by the filaments of the cosmic web.

  4. Study on Hydrogen Gas concentration to Voltage and Resistance using Semiconductor Hydrogen Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Arif Hasibuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Study on hydrogen gas concentration to changes in voltage and resistance using semiconductor hydrogen gas sensor has been done. The system which has been designed will measure any changes in the voltage and resistance of the sensor automatically when the sensor is given a variation of concentration on hydrogen gas. On the condition of gas with low concentration, the sensor output voltage obtained worth 0:08 Volt and the sensor resistance value of 180 KΩ. On the increase in gas concentration causes an increase in sensor output voltage and a decrease in the value of resistance Studi tentang pengaruh konsentrasi kadar gas hidrogen terhadap perubahan tegangan dan resistansi menggunakan sensor gas hidrogen berbasis semikonduktor telah berhasil dilakukan. Sistem yang telah dirancang akan mengukur setiap perubahan tegangan dan resistansi secara digital pada sensor saat diberikan variasi terhadap konsentrasi kadar gas hidrogen. Pada kondisi gas dengan konsentrasi rendah diperoleh tegangan output sensor senilai 0.08 Volt dan nilai resistansi sensor sebesar 180 KΩ. Pada peningkatan konsentrasi gas menyebabkan peningkatan tegangan output sensor dan sebaliknya terjadi penurunan pada nilai resistansi

  5. Extensive Atrophic Gastritis Increases Intraduodenal Hydrogen Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Urita

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Gastric acid plays an important part in the prevention of bacterial colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. If these bacteria have an ability of hydrogen (H2 fermentation, intraluminal H2 gas might be detected. We attempted to measure the intraluminal H2 concentrations to determine the bacterial overgrowth in the gastrointestinal tract. Patients and methods. Studies were performed in 647 consecutive patients undergoing upper endoscopy. At the time of endoscopic examination, we intubated the stomach and the descending part of the duodenum without inflation by air, and 20 mL of intraluminal gas samples of both sites was collected through the biopsy channel. Intraluminal H2 concentrations were measured by gas chromatography. Results. Intragastric and intraduodenal H2 gas was detected in 566 (87.5% and 524 (81.0% patients, respectively. The mean values of intragastric and intraduodenal H2 gas were 8.5±15.9 and 13.2±58.0 ppm, respectively. The intraduodenal H2 level was increased with the progression of atrophic gastritis, whereas the intragastric H2 level was the highest in patients without atrophic gastritis. Conclusions. The intraduodenal hydrogen levels were increased with the progression of atrophic gastritis. It is likely that the influence of hypochlorhydria on bacterial overgrowth in the proximal small intestine is more pronounced, compared to that in the stomach.

  6. Hydrogen gas storage in fluorinated ultramicroporous tunnel crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Katagiri, Toshimasa

    2012-08-21

    We report hydrogen storage at an ordinary pressure due to a bottle-neck effect of an ultramicroporous crystal. Stored hydrogen was kept at an ordinary pressure below -110 °C. The amounts of stored hydrogen gas linearly correlated with the initial pressures. These phenomena suggested the ultramicroporous tunnels worked as a molecular gas cylinder.

  7. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, William [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Hughes, Michael [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Berry, Jonathan [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Russell, Tamara [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Lau, Y. C. [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Liu, Shan [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Arnett, Michael [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Peck, Arthur [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Tralshawala, Nilesh [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Weber, Joseph [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Benjamin, Marc [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Iduate, Michelle [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Kittleson, Jacob [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Garcia-Crespo, Andres [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Delvaux, John [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Casanova, Fernando [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Lacy, Ben [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Brzek, Brian [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Wolfe, Chris [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Palafox, Pepe [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Ding, Ben [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Badding, Bruce [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); McDuffie, Dwayne [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Zemsky, Christine [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2015-07-30

    The objective of this program was to develop the technologies required for a fuel flexible (coal derived hydrogen or syngas) gas turbine for IGCC that met DOE turbine performance goals. The overall DOE Advanced Power System goal was to conduct the research and development (R&D) necessary to produce coal-based IGCC power systems with high efficiency, near-zero emissions, and competitive capital cost. To meet this goal, the DOE Fossil Energy Turbine Program had as an interim objective of 2 to 3 percentage points improvement in combined cycle (CC) efficiency. The final goal is 3 to 5 percentage points improvement in CC efficiency above the state of the art for CC turbines in IGCC applications at the time the program started. The efficiency goals were for NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm NOx (@15 % O2). As a result of the technologies developed under this program, the DOE goals were exceeded with a projected 8 point efficiency improvement. In addition, a new combustion technology was conceived of and developed to overcome the challenges of burning hydrogen and achieving the DOE’s NOx goal. This report also covers the developments under the ARRA-funded portion of the program that include gas turbine technology advancements for improvement in the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of gas turbines for industrial applications with carbon capture and sequestration. Example applications could be cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, steel and aluminum plants, manufacturing facilities, etc. The DOE’s goal for more than 5 percentage point improvement in efficiency was met with cycle analyses performed for representative IGCC Steel Mill and IGCC Refinery applications. Technologies were developed in this program under the following areas: combustion, larger latter stage buckets, CMC and EBC, advanced materials and coatings, advanced configurations to reduce cooling, sealing and rotor purge flows, turbine aerodynamics, advanced sensors, advancements in first

  8. Compact solid source of hydrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2004-06-08

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  9. Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

    2009-01-22

    The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

  10. Impact of hydrogen insertion on vehicular natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strangueto, Karina Maretti; Silva, Ennio Peres da [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. of Mechanical Engineering. Energy Dept.], Email: karinakms@fem.unicamp.br

    2010-07-01

    This article aims to analyze the possibility of insertion of hydrogen in the vehicular natural gas or even the insertion of the hydrogen in the compressed natural gas used in Brazil. For the production of this hydrogen, the spilled turbinable energy from Itaipu would be harnessed. The calculation of production can be extended to other power plants which are close to the natural gas pipelines, where the hydrogen would be introduced. Then, it was analyzed the consumption of natural gas in vehicles in Brazil, the regulation of transportation, the sales of compressed natural gas to fuelling station, the specifications that the piped gas should follow to be sold, and how much hydrogen could be accepted in the mix. (author)

  11. Generation of oxy-hydrogen gas and its effect on performance of spark ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, N. N.; Chavan, C. B.; More, A. S.; Baskar, P.

    2017-11-01

    Considering the current scenario of petroleum fuels, it has been observed that, they will last for few years from now. On the other hand, the ever increasing cost of a gasoline fuels and their related adverse effects on environment caught the attention of researchers to find a supplementary source. For commercial fuels, supplementary source is not about replacing the entire fuel, instead enhancing efficiency by simply making use of it in lesser amount. From the recent research that has been carried out, focus on the use of Hydrogen rich gas as a supplementary source of fuel has increased. But the problem related to the storage of hydrogen gas confines the application of pure hydrogen in petrol engine. Using oxy-hydrogen gas (HHO) generator the difficulties of storing the hydrogen have overcome up to a certain limit. The present study highlights on performance evaluation of conventional petrol engine by using HHO gas as a supplementary fuel. HHO gas was generated from the electrolysis of water. KOH solution of 3 Molar concentration was used which act as a catalyst and accelerates the rate of generation of HHO gas. Quantity of gas to be supplied to the engine was controlled by varying amount of current. It was observed that, engine performance was improved on the introduction of HHO gas.

  12. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates hippocampus endoplasmic reticulum stress after cardiac arrest in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Gui, Qinfang; Jin, Li; Yu, Pan; Wu, Lin; Cao, Liangbin; Wang, Qiang; Duan, Manlin

    2017-02-15

    Hydrogen-rich saline can selectively scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and protect brain against ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) has been implicated in the pathological process of cerebral ischemia. However, very little is known about the role of hydrogen-rich saline in mediating pathophysiological reactions to ERS after I/R injury caused by cardiac arrest. The rats were randomly divided into three groups, sham group (n=30), ischemia/reperfusion group (n=40) and hydrogen-rich saline group (n=40). The rats in experimental groups were subjected to 4min of cardiac arrest and followed by resuscitation. Then they were randomized to receive 5ml/kg of either hydrogen-rich saline or normal saline. Hydrogen-rich saline significantly improves survival rate and neurological function. The beneficial effects of hydrogen-rich saline were associated with decreased levels of oxidative products, as well as the increased levels of antioxidant enzymes. Furthermore, the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline were accompanied by the increased activity of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), the decreased activity of cysteinyl aspartate specific proteinase-12 (caspase-12) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates brain I/R injury may through inhibiting hippocampus ERS after cardiac arrest in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydrogen-rich PBS protects cultured human cells from ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Liren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl radicals play an important role in ionizing radiation-induced cellular damage, while hydrogen can selectively reduce hydroxyl radicals in vitro. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that hydrogen-rich PBS may be an effective radioprotective agent in vitro. Compared to cells pretreated without hydrogen, we demonstrated that treating cells with hydrogen-rich PBS before irradiation could significantly inhibit IR-induced apoptosis, increase viability of human intestinal crypt cells, significantly increase endogenous antioxidant, and decrease malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine concentrations of human lymphocyte AHH-1 cells. It is concluded that hydrogen has a potential as an effective and safe radioprotective agent.

  14. Recovery and purification of hydrogen from refinery and petrochemical off-gas streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehra, Y.R.

    1988-04-26

    A process of producing a hydrogen-rich gas product stream as an overhead stream and a rich solvent stream as a bottoms stream from an inlet stream of gas is described comprising hydrogen and hydrocarbon by contacting the inlet hydrogen-containing gas stream with a stream of lean preferential physical solvent in which the hydrocarbons are more soluble and less volatile than hydrogen. The solvent is: A. selected from the group consisting of dialkyl ethers of polyalkylene glycol, N-methyl pyrrolidone, dimethylformamide, propylene carbonate, sulfolane, glycol triacetate, and C/sub 8/ to C/sub 10/ aromatic compounds having methyl, ethyl, propyl, or butyl aliphatic groups specifically constituting a sub-group of mesitylene, n-propyl benzene, n-butyl benzene, cumene, o-xylene m-xylene, p-xylene and mixtures thereof and aromatic streams rich in mixed xylenes, and other C/sub 8/-C/sub 10/ aromatics; and B. selective for methane and heavier hydrocarbon components of the inlet gas stream.

  15. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mishra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review, recent works on the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen rich gases for fuel cell applications are summarized. H2 is used as a fuel for polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. It is produced by reforming of natural gas or liquid fuels followed by water gas shift reaction. The produced gas consists of H2, CO, and CO2. In which CO content is around 1%, which is highly poisonous for the Pt anode of the PEMFC so that further removal of CO is needed. Catalytic preferential oxidation of CO (CO-PROX is one of the most suitable methods of purification of H2 because of high CO conversion rate at low temperature range, which is preferable for PEMFC operating conditions. Catalysts used for COPROX are mainly noble metal based; gold based and base metal oxide catalysts among them Copper-Ceria based catalysts are the most appropriate due to its low cost, easy availability and result obtained by these catalysts are comparable with the conventional noble metal catalysts. Copyright © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 22nd October 2010, Revised: 12nd January 2011, Accepted: 19th January 2011[How to Cite: A. Mishra, R. Prasad. (2011. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (1: 1-14. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/191] | View in 

  16. Gas migration regimes and outgassing in particle-rich suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eOppenheimer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how gases escape from particle-rich suspensions has important applications in nature and industry. Motivated by applications such as outgassing of crystal-rich magmas, we map gas migration patterns in experiments where we vary (1 particle fractions and liquid viscosity (10 Pa s – 500 Pa s, (2 container shape (horizontal parallel plates and upright cylinders, and (3 methods of bubble generation (single bubble injections, and multiple bubble generation with chemical reactions. We identify two successive changes in gas migration behavior that are determined by the normalized particle fraction (relative to random close packing, and are insensitive to liquid viscosity, bubble growth rate or container shape within the explored ranges. The first occurs at the random loose packing, when gas bubbles begin to deform; the second occurs near the random close packing, and is characterized by gas migration in a fracture-like manner. We suggest that changes in gas migration behavior are caused by dilation of the granular network, which locally resists bubble growth. The resulting bubble deformation increases the likelihood of bubble coalescence, and promotes the development of permeable pathways at low porosities. This behavior may explain the efficient loss of volatiles from viscous slurries such as crystal-rich magmas.

  17. Development Of A Centrifugal Hydrogen Pipeline Gas Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Bella, Francis A. [Concepts NREC, White River Junction, VY (United States)

    2015-04-16

    Concepts NREC (CN) has completed a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project to analyze, design, and fabricate a pipeline capacity hydrogen compressor. The pipeline compressor is a critical component in the DOE strategy to provide sufficient quantities of hydrogen to support the expected shift in transportation fuels from liquid and natural gas to hydrogen. The hydrogen would be generated by renewable energy (solar, wind, and perhaps even tidal or ocean), and would be electrolyzed from water. The hydrogen would then be transported to the population centers in the U.S., where fuel-cell vehicles are expected to become popular and necessary to relieve dependency on fossil fuels. The specifications for the required pipeline hydrogen compressor indicates a need for a small package that is efficient, less costly, and more reliable than what is available in the form of a multi-cylinder, reciprocating (positive displacement) compressor for compressing hydrogen in the gas industry.

  18. On the nature of hydrogen-rich superluminous supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.; Gall, E. E. E.; Leloudas, G.; Chen, T.-W.; Schulze, S.; Jerkstrand, A.; Nicholl, M.; Anderson, J. P.; Arcavi, I.; Benetti, S.; Cartier, R. A.; Childress, M.; Della Valle, M.; Flewelling, H.; Fraser, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Howell, D. A.; Huber, M.; Kankare, E.; Krühler, T.; Magnier, E. A.; Maguire, K.; McCully, C.; Prajs, S.; Primak, N.; Scalzo, R.; Schmidt, B. P.; Smith, M.; Smith, K. W.; Tucker, B. E.; Valenti, S.; Wilman, M.; Young, D. R.; Yuan, F.

    2018-03-01

    We present two hydrogen-rich superluminous supernovae (SLSNe): SN2103hx and PS15br. These objects, together with SN2008es, are the only SLSNe showing a distinct, broad H α feature during the photospheric phase; also, they show no sign of strong interaction between fast moving ejecta and circumstellar shells in their early spectra. Despite the fact that the peak luminosity of PS15br is fainter than that of the other two objects, the spectrophotometric evolution is similar to SN2103hx and different from any other supernova in a similar luminosity space. We group all of them as SLSNe II and hence they are distinct from the known class of SLSN IIn. Both transients show a strong, multicomponent H α emission after 200 d past maximum, which we interpret as an indication of the interaction of the ejecta with an asymmetric, clumpy circumstellar material. The spectra and photometric evolution of the two objects are similar to Type II supernovae, although they have much higher luminosity and evolve on slower time-scales. This is qualitatively similar to how SLSNe I compare with normal type Ic, in that the former are brighter and evolve more slowly. We apply a magnetar and an interaction semi-analytical code to fit the light curves of our two objects and SN2008es. The overall observational data set would tend to favour the magnetar, or central engine, model as the source of the peak luminosity, although the clear signature of late-time interaction indicates that interaction can play a role in the luminosity evolution of SLSNe II at some phases.

  19. Estimation of hepatic blood flow by hydrogen gas clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouma, D. J.; Coelho, J. C.; Schlegel, J.; Fisher, J. D.; Li, Y. F.; Moody, F. G.

    1986-01-01

    The hydrogen gas clearance technique was evaluated to estimate regional hepatic blood flow. Initially, the H2 gas method was compared to the indocyanine green clearance in mini pigs. The blood flow measured by the H2 gas method (0.49 +/- 0.03 ml/min/gm) was only 39% of the calculated blood flow by

  20. Effects of hydrogen-rich water on depressive-like behavior in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Su, Wen-Jun; Chen, Ying; Wu, Teng-Yun; Gong, Hong; Shen, Xiao-Liang; Wang, Yun-Xia; Sun, Xue-Jun; Jiang, Chun-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that neuroinflammation and oxidative stress may be major contributors to major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients or animal models of depression show significant increase of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and oxidative stress biomarkers in the periphery or central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies show that hydrogen selectively reduces cytotoxic oxygen radicals, and hydrogen-rich saline potentially suppresses the production of several proinflammatory mediators. Since current depression medications are accompanied by a wide spectrum of side effects, novel preventative or therapeutic measures with fewer side effects might have a promising future. We investigated the effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on the depressive-like behavior in mice and its underlying mechanisms. Our study show that hydrogen-rich water treatment prevents chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) induced depressive-like behavior. CUMS induced elevation in IL-1β protein levels in the hippocampus, and the cortex was significantly attenuated after 4 weeks of feeding the mice hydrogen-rich water. Over-expression of caspase-1 (the IL-1β converting enzyme) and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) was successfully suppressed by hydrogen-rich water treatment. Our data suggest that the beneficial effects of hydrogen-rich water on depressive-like behavior may be mediated by suppression of the inflammasome activation resulting in attenuated protein IL-1β and ROS production. PMID:27026206

  1. Structure and stabilization of hydrogen-rich transverse.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyra, Sgouria [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilde, B [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kolla, Hemanth [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Seitzman, J. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lieuwen, T. C. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen, Jacqueline H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports the results of a joint experimental and numerical study of the ow characteristics and flame stabilization of a hydrogen rich jet injected normal to a turbulent, vitiated cross ow of lean methane combustion products. Simultaneous high-speed stereoscopic PIV and OH PLIF measurements were obtained and analyzed alongside three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of inert and reacting JICF with detailed H2/CO chemistry. Both the experiment and the simulation reveal that, contrary to most previous studies of reacting JICF stabilized in low-to-moderate temperature air cross ow, the present conditions lead to an autoigniting, burner-attached flame that initiates uniformly around the burner edge. Significant asymmetry is observed, however, between the reaction zones located on the windward and leeward sides of the jet, due to the substantially different scalar dissipation rates. The windward reaction zone is much thinner in the near field, while also exhibiting significantly higher local and global heat release than the much broader reaction zone found on the leeward side of the jet. The unsteady dynamics of the windward shear layer, which largely control the important jet/cross flow mixing processes in that region, are explored in order to elucidate the important flow stability implications arising in the reacting JICF. Vorticity spectra extracted from the windward shear layer reveal that the reacting jet is globally unstable and features two high frequency peaks, including a fundamental mode whose Strouhal number of ~0.7 agrees well with previous non-reacting JICF stability studies. The paper concludes with an analysis of the ignition, ame stabilization, and global structure of the burner-attached flame. Chemical explosive mode analysis (CEMA) shows that the entire windward shear layer, and a large region on the leeward side of the jet, are highly explosive prior to ignition and are dominated by non-premixed flame structures after

  2. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.W.; Bell, C.M.; Chow, P.; Louie, J.; Mohr, J.M.; Peinemann, K.V.; Pinnau, I.; Wijmans, J.G.; Gottschlich, D.E.; Roberts, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    The production of hydrogen from synthesis gas made by gasification of coal is expensive. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the total process. In this report we describe the results of a program aimed at the development of membranes and membrane modules for the separation and purification of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The performance properties of the developed membranes were used in an economic evaluation of membrane gas separation systems in the coal gasification process. Membranes tested were polyetherimide and a polyamide copolymer. The work began with an examination of the chemical separations required to produce hydrogen from synthesis gas, identification of three specific separations where membranes might be applicable. A range of membrane fabrication techniques and module configurations were investigated to optimize the separation properties of the membrane materials. Parametric data obtained were used to develop the economic comparison of processes incorporating membranes with a base-case system without membranes. The computer calculations for the economic analysis were designed and executed. Finally, we briefly investigated alternative methods of performing the three separations in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas. The three potential opportunities for membranes in the production of hydrogen from synthesis gas are: (1) separation of hydrogen from nitrogen as the final separation in a air-blown or oxygen-enriched air-blown gasification process, (2) separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide to reduce or eliminate the conventional ethanolamine acid gas removal unit, and (3) separation of hydrogen and/or carbon dioxide form carbon monoxide prior to the shift reactor to influence the shift reaction. 28 refs., 54 figs., 40 tabs.

  3. xGASS: gas-rich central galaxies in small groups and their connections to cosmic web gas feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowiecki, Steven; Catinella, Barbara; Cortese, Luca; Saintonge, Amélie; Brown, Toby; Wang, Jing

    2017-04-01

    We use deep H I observations obtained as part of the extended GALEX Arecibo SDSS survey (xGASS) to study the cold gas properties of central galaxies across environments. We find that below stellar masses of 1010.2 M⊙, central galaxies in groups have an average atomic hydrogen gas fraction ˜0.3 dex higher than those in isolation at the same stellar mass. At these stellar masses, group central galaxies are usually found in small groups of N = 2 members. The higher H I content in these low-mass group central galaxies is mirrored by their higher average star formation activity and molecular hydrogen content. At larger stellar masses, this difference disappears and central galaxies in groups have similar (or even smaller) gas reservoirs and star formation activity compared to those in isolation. We discuss possible scenarios able to explain our findings and suggest that the higher gas content in low-mass group central galaxies is likely due to the contributions from the cosmic web or H I-rich minor mergers, which also fuel their enhanced star formation activity.

  4. Gas-phase hydrogenation influence on defect behavior in titanium-based hydrogen-storage material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman S. Laptev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Titanium and its alloys are promising materials for hydrogen storage. However, hydrogen penetration accompanies the exploitation of hydrogen storage alloys. In particular, hydrogen penetration and accumulation in titanium alloys changes their mechanical properties. Therefore, the research works of such materials are mainly focused on improving the reversibility of hydrogen absorption-liberation processes, increasing the thermodynamic characteristics of the alloys, and augmenting their hydrogen storage capacity. In the process of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation, the formed defects both significantly reduce hydrogen storage capacity and can also be used to create effective traps for hydrogen. Therefore, the investigation of hydrogen interaction with structural defects in titanium and its alloys is very important. The present work, the hydrogen-induced formation of defects in the alloys of commercially pure titanium under temperature gas-phase hydrogenation (873 K has studied by positron lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler broadening spectroscopy. Based on the evolution of positron annihilation parameters τf, τd, their corresponding intensities If, Id and relative changes of parameters S/S0 and W/W0, the peculiarities of hydrogen interaction with titanium lattice defects were investigated in a wide range of hydrogen concentrations from 0.8at% to 32.0at%.

  5. Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline on Hepatectomy-Induced Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction in Old Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yue; Guo, Shanbin; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Ying; Zhao, Ping; Zhao, Xiaochun

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the protective effects and underlying mechanisms of hydrogen-rich saline on the cognitive functions of elder mice with partial hepatectomy-induced postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Ninety-six old male Kunming mice were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 24 each): control group (group C), hydrogen-rich saline group (group H), POCD group (group P), and POCD + hydrogen-rich saline group (group PH). Cognitive function was subsequently assessed using Morris water-maze (MWM) test. TNF-α and IL-1β levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry, along with NF-κB activity determined by ELISA. The morphology of hippocampal tissues were further observed by HE staining. Learning and memory abilities of mice were significantly impaired at day 10 and day 14 post-surgery, as partial hepatectomy significantly prolonged the escape latency, decreased time at the original platform quadrant and frequency of crossing in group P when compared to group C (p hydrogen-rich saline (group PH) partially rescued spatial memory and learning as it shortened escape latency and increased time and crossing frequency of original platform compared to group P (p hydrogen-rich saline. Hydrogen-rich saline can alleviate POCD via inhibiting NF-κB activity in the hippocampus and reducing inflammatory response.

  6. Thermo-Gas Dynamics of Hydrogen Combustion and Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfand, Boris E; Medvedev, Sergey P; Khomik, Sergey V

    2012-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen as an important future energy source has generated fresh interest in the study of hydrogenous gas mixtures. Indeed, both its high caloricity and reactivity are unique properties, the latter underscoring safety considerations when handling such mixtures.   The present monograph is devoted to the various aspects of hydrogen combustion and explosion processes. In addition to theoretical and phenomenological considerations, this work also collates the results of many experiments from less well known sources. The text reviews the literature in this respect, thereby providing valuable information about the thermo-gas-dynamical parameters of combustion processes for selected experimental settings in a range of scientific and industrial applications.

  7. Attenuation of cigarette smoke-induced airway mucus production by hydrogen-rich saline in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunye Ning

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over-production of mucus is an important pathophysiological feature in chronic airway disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma. Cigarette smoking (CS is the leading cause of COPD. Oxidative stress plays a key role in CS-induced airway abnormal mucus production. Hydrogen protected cells and tissues against oxidative damage by scavenging hydroxyl radicals. In the present study we investigated the effect of hydrogen on CS-induced mucus production in rats. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: sham control, CS group, hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment group and hydrogen-rich saline control group. Lung morphology and tissue biochemical changes were determined by immunohistochemistry, Alcian Blue/periodic acid-Schiff staining, TUNEL, western blot and realtime RT-PCR. RESULTS: Hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment attenuated CS-induced mucus accumulation in the bronchiolar lumen, goblet cell hyperplasia, muc5ac over-expression and abnormal cell apoptosis in the airway epithelium as well as malondialdehyde increase in the BALF. The phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1068 and Nrf2 up-regulation expression in the rat lungs challenged by CS exposure were also abrogated by hydrogen-rich saline. CONCLUSION: Hydrogen-rich saline pretreatment ameliorated CS-induced airway mucus production and airway epithelium damage in rats. The protective role of hydrogen on CS-exposed rat lungs was achieved at least partly by its free radical scavenging ability. This is the first report to demonstrate that intraperitoneal administration of hydrogen-rich saline protected rat airways against CS damage and it could be promising in treating abnormal airway mucus production in COPD.

  8. Alleviation of cadmium toxicity in Medicago sativa by hydrogen-rich water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weiti; Gao, Cunyi; Fang, Peng; Lin, Guoqing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2013-09-15

    Hydrogen gas (H₂) induces plant tolerance to several abiotic stresses, including salinity and paraquat exposure. However, the role of H₂ in cadmium (Cd)-induced stress amelioration is largely unknown. Here, pretreatment with hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of H₂ in the alleviation of Cd toxicity in alfalfa plants. Our results showed that the addition of HRW at 10% saturation significantly decreased contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) caused by Cd, and inhibited the appearance of Cd toxicity symptoms, including the improvement of root elongation and seedling growth. These responses were related to a significant increase in the total or isozymatic activities of representative antioxidant enzymes, or their corresponding transcripts. In vivo imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the detection of lipid peroxidation and the loss of plasma membrane integrity provided further evidence for the ability of HRW to improve Cd tolerance significantly, which was consistent with a significant enhancement of the ratio of reduced/oxidized (homo)glutathione ((h)GSH). Additionally, plants pretreated with HRW accumulated less amounts of Cd. Together, this study suggested that the usage of HRW could be an effective approach for Cd detoxification and could be explored in agricultural production systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based on Semiconductor Oxide Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Haoshuang; Wang, Zhao; Hu, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the hydrogen gas sensing properties of semiconductor oxide (SMO) nanostructures have been widely investigated. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the research progress in the last five years concerning hydrogen gas sensors based on SMO thin film and one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. The hydrogen sensing mechanism of SMO nanostructures and some critical issues are discussed. Doping, noble metal-decoration, heterojunctions and size reduction have been investigated and proved to be effective methods for improving the sensing performance of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures. The effect on the hydrogen response of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures of grain boundary and crystal orientation, as well as the sensor architecture, including electrode size and nanojunctions have also been studied. Finally, we also discuss some challenges for the future applications of SMO nanostructured hydrogen sensors. PMID:22778599

  10. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based on Semiconductor Oxide Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Hu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the hydrogen gas sensing properties of semiconductor oxide (SMO nanostructures have been widely investigated. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the research progress in the last five years concerning hydrogen gas sensors based on SMO thin film and one-dimensional (1D nanostructures. The hydrogen sensing mechanism of SMO nanostructures and some critical issues are discussed. Doping, noble metal-decoration, heterojunctions and size reduction have been investigated and proved to be effective methods for improving the sensing performance of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures. The effect on the hydrogen response of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures of grain boundary and crystal orientation, as well as the sensor architecture, including electrode size and nanojunctions have also been studied. Finally, we also discuss some challenges for the future applications of SMO nanostructured hydrogen sensors.

  11. Fabrication of mechano-optical sensors for hydrogen gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham Van So, P.V.S.; Kauppinen, L.J.; Dijkstra, Mindert; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; de Ridder, R.M.; Hoekstra, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    We present results related to the fabrication of a novel and highly sensitive mechano-optical sensor for hydrogen gas, based on microcantilevers, supplied with a selective gas absorbing layer (Pd), suspended above a Si3N4 grated waveguide (GWG). Integrated microcantilever-GWG devices have been

  12. The Fate of Gas-rich Satellites in Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher; Scannapieco, Evan

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the stellar mass-loss of gas-rich galaxies falling into clusters due to the change in the gravitational potential caused by the ram-pressure-stripping of their gas. We model the satellites with exponential stellar and gas disk profiles, assume rapid ram-pressure-stripping, and follow the stellar orbits in the shocked potential. Due to the change of the potential, the stars move from circular orbits to elliptical orbits with apocenters that are often outside the tidal radius, causing those stars to be stripped. We explore the impact of the redshift of infall, gas fraction, satellite halo mass, and cluster mass on this process. The puffing of the satellites makes them appear as ultra-diffuse galaxies, and the stripped stars contribute to the intracluster light. Our results show that these effects are most significant for less massive satellites, which have larger gas fractions when they are accreted into clusters. The preferential destruction of low-mass systems causes the red fraction of cluster galaxies to be smaller at lower masses, an observation that is otherwise difficult to explain.

  13. Adsorption of hydrogen gas and redox processes in clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Mathilde; Leone, Laura; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Giffaut, Eric; Charlet, Laurent

    2012-03-20

    In order to assess the adsorption properties of hydrogen gas and reactivity of adsorbed hydrogen, we measured H(2)(g) adsorption on Na synthetic montmorillonite-type clays and Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clayrock using gas chromatography. Synthetic montmorillonites with increasing structural Fe(III) substitution (0 wt %, 3.2 wt %, and 6.4 wt % Fe) were used. Fe in the synthetic montmorillonites is principally present as structural Fe(III) ions. We studied the concomitant reduction of structural Fe(III) in the clays using (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The COx, which mainly contains smectite/illite and calcite minerals, is also studied together with the pure clay fraction of this clayrock. Experiments were performed with dry clay samples which were reacted with hydrogen gas at 90 and 120 °C for 30 to 45 days at a hydrogen partial pressure close to 0.45 bar. Results indicate that up to 0.11 wt % of hydrogen is adsorbed on the clays at 90 °C under 0.45 bar of relative pressure. (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry shows that up to 6% of the total structural Fe(III) initially present in these synthetic clays is reduced upon adsorption of hydrogen gas. No reduction is observed with the COx sample in the present experimental conditions.

  14. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, N.Z. [Univ. of Central Florida, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    It is universally accepted that in the next few decades hydrogen production will continue to rely on fossil fuels (primarily, natural gas). On the other hand, the conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming) are complex multi-step processes. These processes also result in the emission of large quantities of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere that produce adverse ecological effects. One alternative is the one-step thermocatalytic cracking (TCC) (or decomposition) of natural gas into hydrogen and carbon. Preliminary analysis indicates that the cost of hydrogen produced by thermal decomposition of natural gas is somewhat lower than the conventional processes after by-product carbon credit is taken. In the short term, this process can be used for on-site production of hydrogen-methane mixtures in gas-filling stations and for CO{sub x}-free production of hydrogen for fuel cell driven prime movers. The experimental data on the thermocatalytic cracking of methane over various catalysts and supports in a wide range of temperatures (500-900{degrees}C) are presented in this paper. Two types of reactors were designed and built at FSEC: continuous flow and pulse fix bed catalytic reactors. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen production yield using oxide type catalysts was studied. Alumina-supported Ni- and Fe-catalysts demonstrated relatively high efficiency in the methane cracking reaction at moderate temperatures (600-800{degrees}C). Kinetic curves of hydrogen production over metal and metal oxide catalysts at different temperatures are presented in the paper. Fe-catalyst demonstrated good stability (for several hours), whereas alumina-supported Pt-catalyst rapidly lost its catalytic activity.

  15. Gas-driven hydrogen permeation through tungsten-coated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubeva, A.V., E-mail: anna-golubeva@yandex.ru [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Spitsyn, A.V., E-mail: spitsyn@nfi.kiae.ru [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Mayer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Cherkez, D.I. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Koch, F.; Lindig, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Skovoroda, A.A. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogen gas-driven permeation through graphite coated with different types of tungsten coatings with thicknesses up to 200 {mu}m has been investigated. The substrate material was fine-grain graphite R5710 and R6710, which properties with respect to hydrogen transport are well known . Magnetron-sputtered W coatings of thicknesses 1 and 3 {mu}m and two coatings of ASDEX Upgrade were investigated: A 3 {mu}m thick layer of tungsten deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD-W) and 200 {mu}m thick layers of tungsten deposited by plasma-spaying in vacuum (VPS-W). The gas-driven permeation was investigated at a pressure gradient of 10{sup -2}-150 Pa. The gas-driven permeation occurs through the carbon base-materials by hydrogen molecular gas flow through the internal porosity network rather than hydrogen atom diffusion through the graphite lattice. It was found that W coatings with thicknesses up to 3 {mu}m are transparent for hydrogen gas penetration and do not influence the permeability of coated fine-grain graphite, because the open porosity system of graphite remains open. Even a 200 {mu}m thick layer of VPS-W has an open system of connected pores, which connects the front and rear surfaces of the deposited layer.

  16. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

    2005-09-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. Carbon may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. In the presence of oxygen, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB has the needed binding rate and capacity for hydrogen that potentially could be generated in the TRUPACT II. Phases 1 and 2 of this project showed that uncoated DEB performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests. Based upon these results, Phase 3, the final project phase, included larger scale testing. Test vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were run with an atmosphere of air for 63.9 days at ambient temperature (15-27°C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60E-07 moles per second (0.35 cc/min). A second type of getter known as VEI, a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds, was also tested in Phase 3. Hydrogen was successfully “gettered” by both getter systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in

  17. NO2 gas sensor based on hydrogenated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungjin; Park, Minji; Kim, Sunghyun; Yi, Sum-Gyun; Kim, Myeongjin; Son, Jangyup; Cha, Jongin; Hong, Jongill; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the relationship between defects in graphene and NO2 gas sensitivity of graphene-based gas sensors. Defects were introduced by hydrogen plasma or ultraviolet (UV)/ozone treatment. As the defect concentration increased, the sensitivity was enhanced, and sub-ppb level detection limit was achieved. UV irradiation was used for recovery at room temperature. However, defects generated by ozone treatment, like graphene oxide, were reduced back to graphene by UV irradiation, so the ozone-treated graphene sensor was not stable over time. In contrast, the response of the hydrogenated graphene sensor was very repeatable because defects generated by hydrogenation was stable enough not to be dehydrogenated by UV irradiation. These results demonstrate that the hydrogenated graphene sensor is a highly sensitive and stable NO2 sensor at room temperature.

  18. Combustion gas properties. Part 3: Hydrogen gas fuel and dry air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, J. D.; Jones, R. E.; Mcbride, B. J.; Beyerle, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    A series of computations has been made to produce the equilibrium temperature and gas composition for hydrogen gas fuel and dry air. The computed tables and figures provide combustion gas property data for pressures from 0.5 to 50 atmospheres and equivalence ratios from 0 to 2.0. Only sample tables and figures are provided in this report.

  19. Superconductivity in hydrogen-rich materials at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    A room temperature superconductor is probably one of the most desired systems in solid state physics. The highest critical temperature (T{sub c}) that has been achieved so far is in the copper oxide system: 133 kelvin (K) at ambient pressure ([82]Schilling et al. 1993) and 160 K under pressure ([42]Gao et al. 1994). The nature of superconductivity in the cuprates and in the recently discovered iron-based superconductor family (T{sub c}=57 K) is still not fully understood. In contrast, there is a class of superconductors which is well-described by the Bardeen, Cooper, Schrieffer (BCS) theory - conventional superconductors. Great efforts were spent in searching for high-temperature (T{sub c} > 77 K) conventional superconductor but only T{sub c} = 39 K has been reached in MgB2 ([68]Nagamatsu et al. 2001). BCS theory puts no bounds for T{sub c} as follows from Eliashberg's formulation of BCS theory. T{sub c} can be high, if there is a favorable combination of high-frequency phonons, strong electron-phonon coupling, and a high density of states. It does not predict however in which materials all three parameters are large. At least it gives a clear indication that materials with light elements are favorable as light elements provide high frequencies in the phonon spectrum. The lightest element is hydrogen, and Ashcroft made a first prediction that metallic hydrogen will be a high-temperature superconductor ([6]Ashcroft 1968). As pressure of hydrogen metallization was too high (about 400-500 GPa) for experimental techniques then he proposed that compounds dominated by hydrogen (hydrides) also might be good high temperature superconductors ([6]Ashcroft 1968; [7]Ashcroft 2004). A lot of the followed calculations supported this idea. T{sub c} in the range of 50-235 kelvin was predicted for many hydrides. Unfortunately, only a moderate T{sub c} of 17 kelvin has been observed experimentally ([27]Eremets et al. 2008) so far. A goal of the present work is to find a

  20. Hydrogen Gas Production in a Stand-Alone Wind Farm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Naziry Kordkandy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is analyzing the operation of a stand-alone wind farm with variable speed turbines, permanent magnet synchronous generators (PMSG and a system for converting wind energy during wind speed variations. On this paper, the design and modeling of a wind system which uses PMSG’s to provide the required power of a hydrogen gas electrolyzer system, is discussed. This wind farm consists of three wind turbines, boost DC-DC converters, diode full bridge rectifiers, permanent magnet synchronous generators, MPPT control and a hydrogen gas electrolyzer system. The MPPT controller based on fuzzy logic is designed to adjust the duty ratio of the boost DC-DC converters to absorb maximum power. The proposed fuzzy logic controller assimilates, with (PSF MPPT algorithm which generally used to absorb maximum power from paralleled wind turbines and stores it in form of hydrogen gas. The system is modeled and its behavior is studied using the MATLAB software.

  1. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks. A Review of Key Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Antonia, O. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Penev, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines. Blending hydrogen into the existing natural gas pipeline network has also been proposed as a means of increasing the output of renewable energy systems such as large wind farms.

  2. Production of bioplastics and hydrogen gas by photosynthetic microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuo, Asada; Masato, Miyake; Jun, Miyake

    1998-03-01

    Our efforts have been aimed at the technological basis of photosynthetic-microbial production of materials and an energy carrier. We report here accumulation of poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), a raw material of biodegradable plastics and for production of hydrogen gas, and a renewable energy carrier by photosynthetic microorganisms (tentatively defined as cyanobacteria plus photosynthetic bateria, in this report). A thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. MA19 that accumulates PHB at more than 20% of cell dry wt under nitrogen-starved conditions was isolated and microbiologically identified. The mechanism of PHB accumulation was studied. A mesophilic Synechococcus PCC7942 was transformed with the genes encoding PHB-synthesizing enzymes from Alcaligenes eutrophus. The transformant accumulated PHB under nitrogen-starved conditions. The optimal conditions for PHB accumulation by a photosynthetic bacterium grown on acetate were studied. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms was studied. Cyanobacteria can produce hydrogen gas by nitrogenase or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenase in cyanobacteria was revealed to be in the dark anaerobic degradation of intracellular glycogen. A new system for light-dependent hydrogen production was targeted. In vitro and in vivo coupling of cyanobacterial ferredoxin with a heterologous hydrogenase was shown to produce hydrogen under light conditions. A trial for genetic trasformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum is going on. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Co-culture of Rhodobacter and Clostriumdium was applied to produce hydrogen from glucose. Conversely in the case of cyanobacteria, genetic regulation of photosynthetic proteins was intended to improve conversion efficiency in hydrogen production by the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV. A mutant acquired by

  3. Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator Cycle with a Reciprocating Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C

    2002-06-11

    A four-chamber piston pump is powered by decomposed 85% hydrogen peroxide. The performance envelope of the evolving 400 gram pump has been expanded to 172 cc/s water flow at discharge pressures near 5 MPa. A gas generator cycle system using the pump has been tested under similar conditions of pressure and flow. The powerhead gas is derived from a small fraction of the pumped hydrogen peroxide, and the system starts from tank pressures as low as 0.2 MPa. The effects of steam condensation on performance have been evaluated.

  4. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-01

    To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Relationship between the variations of hydrogen in HCNG fuel and the oxygen in exhausted gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preecha Yaom

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The variation of the mixing ratio between hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG in hydrogen enriched compressed natural gas fuel (HCNG gives different results in terms of engine performances, fuel consumption, and emission characteristics. Therefore, the engine performance using HCNG as fuel can be optimized if the mixing ratio between the two fuels in HCNG can be adjusted in real time while the engine is being operated. In this research, the relationship between the amount of oxygen in the exhausted gas and the mixing composition between the hydrogen and CNG in HCNG is investigated based on the equilibrium equation of combustion. It is found that the main factors affecting the amount of oxygen in exhausted gas when using HCNG as fuel include the error from the air-fuel-ratio (AFR control, the error from the HCNG composition control, and the intended change of the HCNG composition. Theoretically, the amount of the oxygen in the exhaust should increase by 0.78% for every 5% addition of H2 at stoichiometric condition. This value can be higher or lower for lean and rich engine operation, respectively. The experimental results found that at the equivalent ratio around 0.8 the amount of O2 in the exhaust gas increases about 1.23% for every 5% H2 addition, which inclines with the proposed calculations.

  6. Blending Hydrogen into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. W.; Antonia, O.; Penev, M.

    2013-03-01

    The United States has 11 distinct natural gas pipeline corridors: five originate in the Southwest, four deliver natural gas from Canada, and two extend from the Rocky Mountain region. This study assesses the potential to deliver hydrogen through the existing natural gas pipeline network as a hydrogen and natural gas mixture to defray the cost of building dedicated hydrogen pipelines.

  7. Hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schastlivtsev, A. I.; Nazarova, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    A hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine unit is considered that can be used in both nuclear and centralized power industries. However, it is the most promising when used for power-generating plants based on renewable energy sources (RES). The basic feature of the energy storage system in question is combination of storing the energy in compressed air and hydrogen and oxygen produced by the water electrolysis. Such a process makes the energy storage more flexible, in particular, when applied to RES-based power-generating plants whose generation of power may considerably vary during the course of a day, and also reduces the specific cost of the system by decreasing the required volume of the reservoir. This will allow construction of such systems in any areas independent of the local topography in contrast to the compressed-air energy storage gas-turbine plants, which require large-sized underground reservoirs. It should be noted that, during the energy recovery, the air that arrives from the reservoir is heated by combustion of hydrogen in oxygen, which results in the gas-turbine exhaust gases practically free of substances hazardous to the health and the environment. The results of analysis of a hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are presented. Its layout and the principle of its operation are described and the basic parameters are computed. The units of the system are analyzed and their costs are assessed; the recovery factor is estimated at more than 60%. According to the obtained results, almost all main components of the hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are well known at present; therefore, no considerable R&D costs are required. A new component of the system is the H2-O2 combustion chamber; a difficulty in manufacturing it is the necessity of ensuring the combustion of hydrogen in oxygen as complete as possible and preventing formation of nitric oxides.

  8. Field test of hydrogen in the natural gas grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskov, H.

    2010-08-15

    In order to prepare for a future use of hydrogen as a fuel gas it became evident that very little information existed regarding the compatibility between long-term exposure and transportation of hydrogen in natural gas pipelines. A program was therefore set to study the transportation in a small-scale pilot grid at the research centre in Hoersholm, Denmark. The test program included steel pipes from the Danish gas transmission grid and polymer pipes from the Danish and Swedish gas distribution grid. The test of polymer pipes was devised so that samples of all test pipes were cut out of the grid each year and analysis performed on these pipe samples; in this way any form of influence on the integrity of the polyethylene pipe would be detected. The analytical program for polymer was devised in order to detect any influence on the additivation of the polyethylene as this has an influence on oxidative resistance, as well as checking already encountered possible degradation caused by extrusion of the material. Further tools as rheology and melt flow rate were used for detecting any structural changes on the material. On the mechanical property side the tensile strength and modulus were followed as well as the most important property for the pipe line, namely slow crack growth. The results of the polymer pipe tests show no degradations of any kind related to the continuous hydrogen exposure for more than 4 years. This is a strong indication of the compatibility to hydrogen of the tested polymer materials PE 80 and PE 100. The object of the steel pipe test was to see the effect on fatigue life of existing natural gas transmission lines with hydrogen replacing the natural gas. Full-scale dynamic tests were performed using randomly selected cut-out API 5L X70 pipe sections with a diameter of 20 inches and a wall thickness of 7 millimetres from the Danish natural gas transmission system. The pipe sections contained field girth weld made during the installation of the pipe

  9. Alleviation of cadmium toxicity in Medicago sativa by hydrogen-rich water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Weiti; Gao, Cunyi; Fang, Peng [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Lin, Guoqing [Laboratory Center of Life Sciences, Co. Laboratory of Nanjing Agricultural University and Carl Zeiss Far East, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Shen, Wenbiao, E-mail: wbshenh@njau.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • HRW can alleviate Cd-induced alfalfa seedling growth inhibition and DNA laddering. • HRW alleviates Cd-induced oxidative stress by activating antioxidant enzymes. • Cd uptake in alfalfa seedling roots was decreased by HRW. • HRW can re-establish glutathione homeostasis under Cd stress. -- Abstract: Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) induces plant tolerance to several abiotic stresses, including salinity and paraquat exposure. However, the role of H{sub 2} in cadmium (Cd)-induced stress amelioration is largely unknown. Here, pretreatment with hydrogen-rich water (HRW) was used to characterize physiological roles and molecular mechanisms of H{sub 2} in the alleviation of Cd toxicity in alfalfa plants. Our results showed that the addition of HRW at 10% saturation significantly decreased contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) caused by Cd, and inhibited the appearance of Cd toxicity symptoms, including the improvement of root elongation and seedling growth. These responses were related to a significant increase in the total or isozymatic activities of representative antioxidant enzymes, or their corresponding transcripts. In vivo imaging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the detection of lipid peroxidation and the loss of plasma membrane integrity provided further evidence for the ability of HRW to improve Cd tolerance significantly, which was consistent with a significant enhancement of the ratio of reduced/oxidized (homo)glutathione ((h)GSH). Additionally, plants pretreated with HRW accumulated less amounts of Cd. Together, this study suggested that the usage of HRW could be an effective approach for Cd detoxification and could be explored in agricultural production systems.

  10. First detection of hydrogen in the β Pictoris gas disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P. A.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Bourrier, V.; Hébrard, G.; Kiefer, F.; Beust, H.; Ferlet, R.; Lagrange, A.-M.

    2017-03-01

    The young and nearby star β Pictoris (β Pic) is surrounded by a debris disk composed of dust and gas known to host a myriad evaporating exocomets, planetesimals and at least one planet. At an edge-on inclination, as seen from Earth, this system is ideal for debris disk studies providing an excellent opportunity to use absorption spectroscopy to study the planet forming environment. Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) we observe the most abundant element in the disk, hydrogen, through the H I Lyman α (Ly-α) line. We present a new technique to decrease the contamination of the Ly-α line by geocoronal airglow in COS spectra. This Airglow Virtual Motion (AVM) technique allows us to shift the Ly-α line of the astrophysical target away from the contaminating airglow emission revealing more of the astrophysical line profile. This new AVM technique, together with subtraction of an airglow emission map, allows us to analyse the shape of the β Pic Ly-α emission line profile and from it, calculate the column density of neutral hydrogen surrounding β Pic. The column density of hydrogen in the β Pic stable gas disk at the stellar radial velocity is measured to be log (NH/ 1 cm2) ≪ 18.5. The Ly-α emission line profile is found to be asymmetric and we propose that this is caused by H I falling in towards the star with a bulk radial velocity of 41 ± 6 km s-1 relative to β Pic and a column density of log (NH/ 1 cm2) = 18.6 ± 0.1. The high column density of hydrogen relative to the hydrogen content of CI chondrite meteorites indicates that the bulk of the hydrogen gas does not come from the dust in the disk. This column density reveals a hydrogen abundance much lower than solar, which excludes the possibility that the detected hydrogen could be a remnant of the protoplanetary disk or gas expelled by the star. We hypothesise that the hydrogen gas observed falling towards the star arises from the dissociation of

  11. Dynamic gas bearing turbine technology in hydrogen plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlig, Klaus; Bischoff, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines - although applied for helium refrigerators and liquefiers for decades - experienced limitations for hydrogen applications due to restrictions in axial bearing capacity. With a new design concept for gas bearing turbines developed in 2004, axial bearing capacity was significantly improved enabling the transfer of this technology to hydrogen liquefiers. Prior to roll-out of the technology to industrial plants, the turbine bearing technology passed numerous tests in R&D test benches and subsequently proved industrial scale demonstration at Linde Gas' hydrogen liquefier in Leuna, Germany. Since its installation, this turbine has gathered more than 16,000 successful operating hours and has outperformed its oil bearing brother in terms of performance, maintainability as well as reliability. The present paper is based on Linde Kryotechnik AG's paper published in the proceedings of the CEC 2009 concerning the application of Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbines in hydrogen applications. In contrast to the former paper, this publication focuses on the steps towards final market launch and more specifically on the financial benefits of this turbine technology, both in terms of capital investment as well as operating expenses.

  12. Utilization of hydrogen gas production for electricity generation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterobacter aerogenes ADH-43 is a hydrogen gas (H2) producing mutant bacterium and a facultative anaerobic microbe. This double mutant was obtained by classical mutagenetically treated in order to enhance H2 production. In addition, this mutant has ability to degrade molasses from sugar factory as well as other ...

  13. Utilization of hydrogen gas production for electricity generation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lecturer

    2012-05-03

    May 3, 2012 ... Enterobacter aerogenes ADH-43 is a hydrogen gas (H2) producing mutant bacterium and a facultative anaerobic microbe. This double mutant was obtained by classical mutagenetically treated in order to enhance H2 production. In addition, this mutant has ability to degrade molasses from sugar factory as.

  14. Characterizing the V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitude...

  15. Neutron imaging of hydrogen-rich fluids in geomaterials and engineered porous media: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, E.; Cheng, C.-L.; Kang, M.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Lamanna, J. M.; Gragg, M. J.; Wright, D. M.

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in visualization technologies are providing new discoveries as well as answering old questions with respect to the phase structure and flow of hydrogen-rich fluids, such as water and oil, within porous media. Magnetic resonance and x-ray imaging are sometimes employed in this context, but are subject to significant limitations. In contrast, neutrons are ideally suited for imaging hydrogen-rich fluids in abiotic non-hydrogenous porous media because they are strongly attenuated by hydrogen and can "see" through the solid matrix in a non-destructive fashion. This review paper provides an overview of the general principles behind the use of neutrons to image hydrogen-rich fluids in both 2-dimensions (radiography) and 3-dimensions (tomography). Engineering standards for the neutron imaging method are examined. The main body of the paper consists of a comprehensive review of the diverse scientific literature on neutron imaging of static and dynamic experiments involving variably-saturated geomaterials (rocks and soils) and engineered porous media (bricks and ceramics, concrete, fuel cells, heat pipes, and porous glass). Finally some emerging areas that offer promising opportunities for future research are discussed.

  16. Thermodynamic behavior of hydrogen/natural gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agahi, R.R.; Ershaghi, B.; Lin, M.C. [Atlas Copco Rotoflow, Gardena, CA (United States); Mansoori, A. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The process gas of ethylene plants and methyl tertiary butyl ether plants is normally a hydrogen/methane mixture. The molecular weight of the gas in such processes ranges from 3.5 to 14. Thermodynamic behavior of hydrogen/methane mixture has been and is being researched extensively. The gas dynamic design of turboexpanders which are extensively utilized in such plants depends on the equations of state of the process gas. Optimum performance of the turboexpanders and associated equipment demands accurate thermodynamic properties for a wide range of process gas conditions. The existing equations of state, i.e. Benedict-Webb-Rubin (BWR), Soave-Redlich, Kwange and Peng-Robinson have some practical limitations. The equations of state developed by the University of Illinois also have only a limited range of applications. By using the various equations of state, especially in the vapor-liquid equilibrium region, this paper shows that predictions by the various models are not the same and that they also differ from actual field results. The field data collected for hydrogen/methane mixtures are in the range of 100 F to {minus}200 F containing some polar components i.e. H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2}. In this paper, the authors compare performance of several equations of state with the field performance of many expander units.

  17. Neutral hydrogen (H I) gas content of galaxies at z ≈ 0.32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jonghwan; Lah, Philip; Briggs, Frank H.; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Colless, Matthew; Willner, Steven P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Le Fèvre, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    We use observations made with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to probe the neutral hydrogen (H I) gas content of field galaxies in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) 14h field at z ≈ 0.32. Because the H I emission from individual galaxies is too faint to detect at this redshift, we use an H I spectral stacking technique using the known optical positions and redshifts of the 165 galaxies in our sample to co-add their H I spectra and thus obtain the average H I mass of the galaxies. Stacked H I measurements of 165 galaxies show that ≳ 95 per cent of the neutral gas is found in blue, star-forming galaxies. Among these galaxies, those having lower stellar mass are more gas rich than more massive ones. We apply a volume correction to our H I measurement to evaluate the H I gas density at z ≈ 0.32 as Ω_{H I}=(0.50± 0.18)× 10^{-3} in units of the cosmic critical density. This value is in good agreement with previous results at z < 0.4, suggesting no evolution in the neutral hydrogen gas density over the last ∼4 Gyr. However the z ≈ 0.32 gas density is lower than that at z ∼ 5 by at least a factor of two.

  18. Biomass & Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Fuel For Gas Turbine (Power Generation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant progress has been made by major power generation equipment manufacturers in the development of market applications for hydrogen fuel use in gas turbines in recent years. Development of a new application using gas turbines for significant reduction of power plant CO2 e...

  19. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Liu, Wen Wu [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xiang, Hong Gang [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Fan, Lie Ying [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Shanghai East Hospital, Tong Ji University, Shanghai 200120 (China); Sun, Qiang [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xu, Xin Yun [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Cai, Jian Mei [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Sun, Xue Jun, E-mail: sunxjk@hotmail.com [Department of Diving Medicine, Faculty of Naval Medicine, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wang2929@hotmail.com [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Chang Zheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China)

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  20. Solid-phase microextraction may catalize hydrogenation when using hydrogen as carrier in gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, D; Boarelli, M C

    2016-07-01

    When hydrogen is used as carrier gas, carbon-carbon double bonds may be hydrogenated in the hot gas chromatograph (GC) injector if introduced by solid-phase microextraction (SPME). SPME fibers coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/carboxen/divinylbenzene (DVB), PDMS/carboxen, polyacrylate, PDMS/DVB and PDMS on fused silica, stableflex or metal alloy core have been tested with fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from olive oil. Using coatings containing DVB, hydrogenation took place with high conversion rates (82.0-92.9%) independently of the core material. With all fibers having a metal core, hydrogenation was observed to a certain extent (27.4-85.3%). PDMS, PDMS/carboxen and polyacrylate coated fibers with a fused silica or stableflex core resulted in negligible hydrogenation (0.2-2.5%). The occurrence of hydrogenation was confirmed also with other substances containing carbon-carbon double bonds (n-alkenes, alkenoic acids, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl and ethyl esters). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrogen and Hydrogen/Natural Gas Station and Vehicle Operations - 2006 Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort; Donald Karner; Roberta Brayer

    2006-09-01

    This report is a summary of the operations and testing of internal combustion engine vehicles that were fueled with 100% hydrogen and various blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (HCNG). It summarizes the operations of the Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which produces, compresses, and dispenses hydrogen fuel. Other testing activities, such as the destructive testing of a CNG storage cylinder that was used for HCNG storage, are also discussed. This report highlights some of the latest technology developments in the use of 100% hydrogen fuels in internal combustion engine vehicles. Reports are referenced and WWW locations noted as a guide for the reader that desires more detailed information. These activities are conducted by Arizona Public Service, Electric Transportation Applications, the Idaho National Laboratory, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  2. Hydrogen storage on high-surface-area carbon monoliths for Adsorb hydrogen Gas Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Pfeifer, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Carbon briquetting can increase hydrogen volumetric storage capacity by reducing the useless void volume resulting in a better packing density. It is a robust and efficient space-filling form for an adsorbed hydrogen gas vehicle storage tank. To optimize hydrogen storage capacity, we studied three fabrication process parameters: carbon-to-binder ratio, compaction temperature, and pyrolysis atmosphere. We found that carbon-to-binder ratio and pyrolysis atmosphere have influences on gravimetric excess adsorption. Compaction temperature has large influences on gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity. We have been able to optimize these parameters for high hydrogen storage. All monolith uptakes (up to 260 bar) were measured by a custom-built, volumetric, reservoir-type instrument.

  3. Preparation and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Mg-Rich Mg-Ni Ultrafine Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Zou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, Mg-rich Mg-Ni ultrafine powders were prepared through an arc plasma method. The phase components, microstructure, and hydrogen storage properties of the powders were carefully investigated. It is found that Mg2Ni and MgNi2 could be obtained directly from the vapor state reactions between Mg and Ni, depending on the local vapor content in the reaction chamber. A nanostructured MgH2 + Mg2NiH4 hydrogen storage composite could be generated after hydrogenation of the Mg-Ni ultrafine powders. After dehydrogenation, MgH2 and Mg2NiH4 decomposed into nanograined Mg and Mg2Ni, respectively. Thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry (TG/DSC analyses showed that Mg2NiH4 phase may play a catalytic role in the dehydriding process of the hydrogenated Mg ultrafine particles.

  4. Gas Phase Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid to gamma-Valerolactone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonrath, Werner; Castelijns, Anna Maria Cornelia Francisca; de Vries, Johannes Gerardus; Guit, Rudolf Philippus Maria; Schuetz, Jan; Sereinig, Natascha; Vaessen, Henricus Wilhelmus Leonardus Marie

    The gas phase hydrogenation of levulinic acid to gamma-valerolactone over copper and ruthenium based catalysts in a continuous fixed-bed reactor system was investigated. Among the catalysts a copper oxide based one [50-75 % CuO, 20-25 % SiO2, 1-5 % graphite, 0.1-1 % CuCO3/Cu(OH)(2)] gave

  5. Warm Pressurant Gas Effects on the Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen, John B.; Chato, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results for the liquid hydrogen bubble point tests using warm pressurant gases conducted at the Cryogenic Components Cell 7 facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the test series was to determine the effect of elevating the temperature of the pressurant gas on the performance of a liquid acquisition device. Three fine mesh screen samples (325 x 2300, 450 x 2750, 510 x 3600) were tested in liquid hydrogen using cold and warm noncondensible (gaseous helium) and condensable (gaseous hydrogen) pressurization schemes. Gases were conditioned from 0 to 90 K above the liquid temperature. Results clearly indicate a degradation in bubble point pressure using warm gas, with a greater reduction in performance using condensable over noncondensible pressurization. Degradation in the bubble point pressure is inversely proportional to screen porosity, as the coarsest mesh demonstrated the highest degradation. Results here have implication on both pressurization and LAD system design for all future cryogenic propulsion systems. A detailed review of historical heated gas tests is also presented for comparison to current results.

  6. Mesoporous germanium-rich chalcogenido frameworks with highly polarizable surfaces and relevance to gas separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armatas, Gerasimos S; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2009-03-01

    Mesoporous materials with tunable non-oxidic framework compositions can exhibit new kinds of functionality including internal surfaces with high polarizability. As the chemical and physical characteristics of the framework components can induce useful catalytic, absorption and optoelectronic features, the mesoporous structure can promote fast mass diffusion kinetics and size-selective transport of guest molecules. So far, synthetic efforts have resulted in mesoporous metal chalcogenides on using structure-directing moulds of soft or hard templates. These include ordered mesoporous II-VI semiconductors (such as CdS (refs 2,3), ZnS (ref. 4) and CdTe (ref. 5)). Recently, template-free synthetic routes for high-surface-area chalcogenide aerogels have been reported. Here, we describe a novel kind of porous materials based on germanium-rich chalcogenide networks and 'soft' highly polarizable surfaces. We demonstrate that these materials can exhibit excellent selectivity for separating hydrogen from carbon dioxide and methane. These highly polarizable mesoporous structures have important implications for membrane-based gas separation process technologies including hydrogen purification.

  7. Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Pratapas; Daniel Mather; Anton Kozlovsky

    2007-03-31

    analysis of test results indicates that hydrogen enhanced natural gas HCCI (versus neat natural gas HCCI at comparable stoichiometry) had the following characteristics: (1) Substantially lower intake temperature needed for stable HCCI combustion; (2) Inconclusive impact on engine BMEP and power produced; (3) Small reduction in the thermal efficiency of the engine; (4) Moderate reduction in the unburned hydrocarbons in the exhaust; (5) Slight increase in NOx emissions in the exhaust; (6) Slight reduction in CO2 in the exhaust; and (7) Increased knocking at rich stoichiometry. The major accomplishments and findings from the project can be summarized as follows: (1) A model was calibrated for accurately predicting heat release rate and peak pressures for HCCI combustion when operating on hydrogen and natural gas blends. (2) A single cylinder research engine was thoroughly mapped to compare performance and emissions for micro-pilot natural gas compression ignition, and HCCI combustion for neat natural gas versus blends of natural gas and hydrogen. (3) The benefits of using hydrogen to extend, up to a limit, the stable operating window for HCCI combustion of natural gas at higher intake pressures, leaner air to fuel ratios or lower inlet temperatures was documented.

  8. Hyperoxygenated hydrogen-rich solution suppresses shock- and resuscitation-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Yangjie; Liu, Ting; Mei, Xiaopeng; Meng, Xiangzhong; Gou, Xingchun; Deng, Bin; Xu, Hao; Xu, Lixian

    2017-12-01

    It is not known whether simultaneous delivery of hydrogen and oxygen can reduce injury caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HSR). This study investigated the therapeutic potential of hyperoxygenated hydrogen-rich solution (HHOS), a combined hydrogen/oxygen carrier, in a rat model of HSR-induced liver injury. Rats (n = 60) were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 6 per group at each time point). One group underwent sham operation, and the others were subjected to severe hemorrhagic shock and then treated with lactated Ringer's solution (LRS), hydrogen-rich solution, hyperoxygenated solution, or HHOS. At 2 and 6 h after resuscitation, blood samples (n = 6) were collected from the femoral artery and serum concentrations of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were measured. Rats were then sacrificed, and histopathological changes in the liver were evaluated by quantifying the percentage of apoptotic cells by caspase-3 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling. Inflammation was assessed by assessing malondialdehyde content and tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin (IL)-6 expression. Compared to lactated Ringer's solution, hydrogen-rich solution, or hyperoxygenated solution groups, serum AST and alanine aminotransferase levels and IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and malondialdehyde expression in liver tissue were decreased by HHOS treatment. The number of caspase-3- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells was decreased (P < 0.05) by HHOS treatment, 2 and 6 h after resuscitation. HHOS has protective effects against liver injury in a rat model of HSR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Integrated Micro-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensor. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank DiMeo, Jr.

    2000-10-02

    This report details our recent progress in developing novel MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) based hydrogen gas sensors. These sensors couple novel thin films as the active layer on a device structure known as a Micro-HotPlate. This coupling has resulted in a gas sensor that has several unique advantages in terms of speed, sensitivity, stability and amenability to large scale manufacture. This Phase-I research effort was focused on achieving the following three objectives: (1) Investigation of sensor fabrication parameters and their effects on sensor performance. (2) Hydrogen response testing of these sensors in wet/dry and oxygen-containing/oxygen-deficient atmospheres. (3) Investigation of the long-term stability of these thin film materials and identification of limiting factors. We have made substantial progress toward achieving each of these objectives, and highlights of our phase I results include the demonstration of signal responses with and without oxygen present, as well as in air with a high level of humidity. We have measured response times of <0.5 s to 1% H{sub 2} in air, and shown the ability to detect concentrations of <200 ppm. These results are extremely encouraging and suggest that this technology has substantial potential for meeting the needs of a hydrogen based economy. These achievements demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-hotplates structures in conjunction with palladium+coated metal-hydride films for sensing hydrogen in many of the environments required by a hydrogen based energy economy. Based on these findings, they propose to continue and expand the development of this technology in Phase II.

  10. Organic Richness and Gas Generation Potential of Permian Barren ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    29

    Whether the shale formation can produce oil or gas, depends on numbers ... Oil and Natural Gas. 23. Corporation Ltd of India, drilled Asia's first (shale gas pilot project) shale gas well (RNSG-1. 24 and RNSG-2) at Icchapur village near Durgapur in West Bengal, the eastern part of Raniganj ...... British Colombia; Am. Assoc.

  11. Protective effect of hydrogen rich saline solution on experimental ovarian ischemia reperfusion model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokalp, Nurcan; Basaklar, Abdullah Can; Sonmez, Kaan; Turkyilmaz, Zafer; Karabulut, Ramazan; Poyraz, Aylar; Gulbahar, Ozlem

    2017-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of hydrogen rich saline solution (HRSS) in a rat model of ovarian ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thirty-six female Wistar-albino rats were grouped randomly, into six groups of six rats. The groups were classified as: sham (S), hydrogen (H), torsion (T), torsion/detorsion (TD), hydrogen-torsion (HT), and hydrogen-torsion/detorsion (HTD). Bilateral adnexal torsion was performed for 3h in all torsion groups. HRSS was given 5ml/kg in hydrogen groups intraperitoneally. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) levels were measured in both the plasma and tissue samples. Tissue sections were evaluated histopathologically, and the apoptotic index was detected by TUNEL assay. The results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Pearson chi-square tests using computer software, SPSS Version 20.0 for Windows. The MDA levels were higher and GST levels were lower in the torsion and detorsion groups when compared to other groups, but the differences were insignificant (P>0.05). The MDA levels were lower and GST levels were higher in the HT and HTD groups compared with the T and TD groups (P>0.05). Follicular injury, edema, vascular congestion, loss of cohesion and apoptotic index were higher in the torsion groups but decreased in the groups that received HRSS. According to histopathological and biochemical examinations, HRSS is effective in attenuating ischemia-reperfusion induced ovary injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Early metal enrichment of gas-rich galaxies at z ˜ 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Suraj; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Morrison, Sean; Péroux, Céline; Som, Debopam; Rahmani, Hadi; Quiret, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    We present abundance measurements of elements O, C, Si and Fe for three gas-rich galaxies at z ∼ 5 using observations from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Keck telescope in order to better constrain the early chemical enrichment of gas-rich galaxies. These galaxies show strong Lyman α absorption in the spectra of background quasars, with neutral hydrogen column densities log N_{H I} (cm-2) = 20.10 ± 0.15, 20.10 ± 0.15 and 20.80 ± 0.15. Using the undepleted element O, we find the metallicities [O/H] to be in the range of -2.51 to -2.05 dex. Our study has doubled the existing sample of measurements of undepleted elements at z > 4.5. Combining our measurements with those from the literature, we find that the N_{H I}-weighted mean metallicity of z ∼ 5 absorbers is consistent with the prediction based on z metallicity at z > 4.7 as reported by some prior studies. We also determine the extent of dust depletion using a combination of both the volatile element O and the refractory elements Si and/or Fe. Some of the absorbers show evidence of depletion of elements on dust grains, e.g. low [Si/O] or [Fe/O]. The relative abundances of these absorbers along with other z ∼ 5 absorbers from the literature show some peculiarities, e.g. low [C/O] in several absorbers and high [Si/O] in one absorber. Finally, we find that the metallicity versus velocity dispersion relation of z ∼ 5 absorbers may be different from that of lower redshift absorbers.

  13. Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2007-12-11

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  14. Proteomic analysis provides insights into the molecular bases of hydrogen gas-induced cadmium resistance in Medicago sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chen; Cui, Weiti; Pan, Jincheng; Xie, Yanjie; Wang, Jin; Shen, Wenbiao

    2017-01-30

    Recently, molecular hydrogen (H2) has emerged as a bio-regulator both in animals and plants. Normally, functions of endogenous generated H2 could be mimicked by exogenously applied hydrogen-rich water (HRW) or hydrogen-rich saline (particularly in animals). Although alfalfa seedlings showed more cadmium (Cd) resistance after the administration with HRW, corresponding molecular mechanism is still elusive. To address this gap, iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used. The results showed that a total of 2377 proteins were identified with Medicago sativa is a widely used forage around the world. Recently, hydrogen gas (H2) was suggested as a candidate of signal molecule, and found to effectively attenuate Cd-induced damage in alfalfa seedlings. However, the underlying molecular mechanism still needs to be further elucidated. In the present work, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was firstly carried out, and the results revealed the main molecular targets and metabolic processes associated with Cd resistance conferred by H2. This study may expand our understanding of hydrogen gas-medicated heavy metal tolerance in plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Selective permeation of hydrogen gas using cellulose nanofibril film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Hayaka; Fujisawa, Shuji; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2013-05-13

    Biobased membranes that can selectively permeate hydrogen gas have been developed from aqueous dispersions of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCN) prepared from wood cellulose: TOCN-coated plastic films and self-standing TOCN films. Compared with TOCNs with sodium, lithium, potassium, and cesium carboxylate groups, TOCN with free carboxyl groups (TOCN-COOH) had much high and selective H2 gas permeation performance. Because permeabilities of H2, N2, O2, and CO2 gases through the membranes primarily depended on their kinetic diameters, the gas permeation behavior of the various TOCNs can be explained in terms of a diffusion mechanism. Thus, the selective H2 gas permeability for TOCN-COOH was probably due to a larger average size in free volume holes present between nanofibrils in the layer and film than those of other TOCNs with metal carboxylate groups. The obtained results indicate that TOCN-COOH membranes are applicable as biobased H2 gas separation membranes in fuel cell electric power generation systems.

  16. Catalysts for selective oxidation of ammonia in a gas containing hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The invention contributes to a cost effective way to solve the problem of trace ammonia removal from a hydrogen and nitrogen containing gas. The set of catalysts of the invention selectively oxidised ammonia in ppm concentration even in gas mixtures containing hydrogen gas in concentrations...

  17. Catalysts for selective oxidation of ammonia in a gas containing hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The invention contributes to a cost effective way to solve the problem of trace ammonia removal from hydrogen containing gas. The set of catalysts of the invention selectively oxidised ammonia in ppm concentration even in gas mixture containing hydrogen gas in concentration of three orders...

  18. Evaluation of Technical Feasibility of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine Fueled with Hydrogen, Natural Gas, and DME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratapas, John; Mather, Daniel; Kozlovsky, Anton

    2013-03-31

    analysis of test results indicates that hydrogen enhanced natural gas HCCI (versus neat natural gas HCCI at comparable stoichiometry) had the following characteristics: • Substantially lower intake temperature needed for stable HCCI combustion • Inconclusive impact on engine BMEP and power produced, • Small reduction in the thermal efficiency of the engine, • Moderate reduction in the unburned hydrocarbons in the exhaust, • Slight increase in NOx emissions in the exhaust, • Slight reduction in CO2 in the exhaust. • Increased knocking at rich stoichiometry The major accomplishments and findings from the project can be summarized as follows: 1. A model was calibrated for accurately predicting heat release rate and peak pressures for HCCI combustion when operating on hydrogen and natural gas blends. 2. A single cylinder research engine was thoroughly mapped to compare performance and emissions for micro-pilot natural gas compression ignition, and HCCI combustion for neat natural gas versus blends of natural gas and hydrogen.

  19. Hydrogen-rich saline injection into the subarachnoid cavity within 2 weeks promotes recovery after acute spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-long Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen can relieve tissue-damaging oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. Injection of hydrogen-rich saline is an effective method for transporting molecular hydrogen. We hypothesized that hydrogen-rich saline would promote the repair of spinal cord injury induced by Allen′s method in rats. At 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after injury, then once daily for 2 weeks, 0.25 mL/kg hydrogen-rich saline was infused into the subarachnoid space through a catheter. Results at 24 hours, 48 hours, 1 week and 2 weeks after injury showed that hydrogen-rich saline markedly reduced cell death, inflammatory cell infiltration, serum malondialdehyde content, and caspase-3 immunoreactivity, elevated serum superoxide dismutase activity and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity, and improved motor function in the hindlimb. The present study confirms that hydrogen-rich saline injected within 2 weeks of injury effectively contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury in the acute stage.

  20. Oral intake of hydrogen-rich water ameliorated chlorpyrifos-induced neurotoxicity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Ling; Liu, Mengyu; Xie, Fei; Ma, Xuemei, E-mail: xmma@bjut.edu.cn; Zhao, Pengxiang; Liu, Yunqi; Li, Jiala; Wang, Minglian; Yang, Zhaona; Zhang, Yutong

    2014-10-01

    Chronic exposure to low-levels of organophosphate (OP) compounds, such as chlorpyrifos (CPF), induces oxidative stress and could be related to neurological disorders. Hydrogen has been identified as a novel antioxidant which could selectively scavenge hydroxyl radicals. We explore whether intake of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) can protect Wistar rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity. Rats were gavaged daily with 6.75 mg/kg body weight (1/20 LD{sub 50}) of CPF and given HRW by oral intake. Nissl staining and electron microscopy results indicated that HRW intake had protective effects on the CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons and neuronal mitochondria. Immunostaining results showed that the increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes induced by CPF exposure can be ameliorated by HRW intake. Moreover, HRW intake also attenuated CPF-induced oxidative stress as evidenced by enhanced level of MDA, accompanied by an increase in GSH level and SOD and CAT activity. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity tests showed significant decrease in brain AChE activity after CPF exposure, and this effect can be ameliorated by HRW intake. An in vitro study demonstrated that AChE activity was more intense in HRW than in normal water with or without chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO), the metabolically-activated form of CPF. These observations suggest that HRW intake can protect rats from CPF-induced neurotoxicity, and the protective effects of hydrogen may be mediated by regulating the oxidant and antioxidant status of rats. Furthermore, this work defines a novel mechanism of biological activity of hydrogen by directly increasing the AChE activity. - Highlights: • Hydrogen molecules protect rats from CPF-induced damage of hippocampal neurons. • The increased GFAP expression induced by CPF can also be ameliorated by hydrogen. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated the increase in CPF-induced oxidative stress. • Hydrogen molecules attenuated AChE inhibition in vivo

  1. Organic richness and gas generation potential of Permian Barren ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of Damodar Basin were analysed to evaluate their gas generation potential using Rock–Eval pyrolysis techniques. Petrographic analysis ... are the important parameters of shale gas generation and retention (Curtis 2002; Law and ...... reappraisal of the application of Rock–Eval pyrolysis to source rock studies in the Niger ...

  2. Overview of Two Hydrogen Energy Storage Studies: Wind Hydrogen in California and Blending in Natural Gas Pipelines (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. W.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of two NREL energy storage studies: Wind Hydrogen in California: Case Study and Blending Hydrogen Into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues. The presentation summarizes key issues, major model input assumptions, and results.

  3. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates anxiety-like behaviors in morphine-withdrawn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Di; Zhao, Peng; Hui, Rongji; Wang, Jian; Shen, Qianchao; Gong, Miao; Guo, Hongyan; Cong, Bin; Ma, Chunling

    2017-05-15

    Hydrogen therapy is a new medical approach for a wide range of diseases. The effects of hydrogen on central nervous system-related diseases have recently become increasingly appreciated, but little is known about whether hydrogen affects the morphine withdrawal process. This study aims to investigate the potential effects of hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) administration on naloxone-precipitated withdrawal symptoms and morphine withdrawal-induced anxiety-like behaviors. Mice received gradually increasing doses (25-100 mg/kg, i.p.) of morphine over 3 days. In the naloxone-precipitated withdrawal procedure, the mice were treated with three HRS (20 μg/kg, i.p.) injections, and naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was given 30 min after HRS administration. Body weight, jumping behavior and wet-dog shakes were immediately assessed. In the spontaneous withdrawal procedure, the mice were treated with HRS (20 μg/kg, i.p.) every 8-h. Mice underwent naloxone-precipitated or spontaneous withdrawal were tested for anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and light/dark box (L/D box) paradigm, respectively. In addition, the levels of plasma corticosterone were measured. We found that HRS administration significantly reduced body weight loss, jumping behavior and wet-dog shakes in mice underwent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal, and attenuated anxiety-like behaviors in the EPM and L/D box tests after naloxone-precipitated withdrawal or a 2-day spontaneous withdrawal period. Hypo-activity or motor impairment after HRS administration was not observed in the locomotion tests. Furthermore, HRS administration significantly decreased the levels of corticosterone in morphine-withdrawn mice. These are the first findings to indicate that hydrogen might ameliorate withdrawal symptoms and exert an anxiolytic-like effect in morphine-withdrawal mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Beneficial effects of hydrogen-rich saline on early burn-wound progression in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Xue Guo

    Full Text Available Deep burn wounds undergo a dynamic process known as wound progression that results in a deepening and extension of the initial burn area. The zone of stasis is more likely to develop more severe during wound progression in the presence of hypoperfusion. Hydrogen has been reported to alleviate injury triggered by ischaemia/reperfusion and burns in various organs by selectively quenching oxygen free radicals. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of hydrogen against early burn-wound progression.Deep-burn models were established through contact with a boiled, rectangular, brass comb for 20 s. Fifty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham, burn plus saline, and burn plus hydrogen-rich saline (HS groups with sacrifice and analysis at various time windows (6 h, 24 h, 48 h post burn. Indexes of oxidative stress, apoptosis and autophagy were measured in each group. The zone of stasis was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining, ELISA, and Western blot to explore the underlying effects and mechanisms post burn.The burn-induced increase in malondialdehyde was markedly reduced with HS, while the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased. Moreover, HS treatment attenuated increases in apoptosis and autophagy postburn in wounds, according to the TUNEL staining results and the expression analysis of Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, Beclin-1 and Atg-5 proteins. Additionally, HS lowered the level of myeloperoxidase and expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the zone of stasis while augmenting IL-10. The elevated levels of Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB p65 expression post burn were also downregulated by HS management.Hydrogen can attenuate early wound progression following deep burn injury. The beneficial effect of hydrogen was mediated by attenuating oxidative stress, which inhibited apoptosis and inflammation, and the Akt/NF-κB signalling pathway may be involved in regulating the

  5. Relationship between hydrogen gas and butanol production by Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosseau, J.D.; Yan, J.Y.; Lo, K.V.

    1986-03-01

    Two simultaneous fermentations were performed at 26 degrees C with simultaneous inocula using Clostridium saccharoperbutylacetonicum. Fermentation 1 prevented the gas formed by the biomass from escaping the fermentor while 2 allowed the gas formed to escape. Fermentor 1 provided for the production of butanol, acetone, and ethanol, while when the H/sub 2/ formed was allowed to escape with fermentor 2, neither butanol nor acetone were produced. Ethanol was also formed in both fermentors and began along with the initial growth of biomass and continued until the fermentations were complete. Butanol and acetone production began after biomass growth had reached a maximum and began to subside. The butanol-acetone-ethanol millimolar yields and ratios were 38:1:14 respectively. The fermentor 2 results show that a yield of 2.1 l H/sub 2/, 93 or 370 mmol H/sub 2//mol glucose, was formed only during the growing stage of growth; neither butanol nor acetone were produced; ethanol was formed throughout the fermentation, reaching a yield of 15.2 mmolar. It appears that hydrogen gas is required for butanol production during the resting stage of growth. 16 references.

  6. Fuel-rich catalytic combustion: A soot-free technique for in situ hydrogen-like enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Olson, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental program on the catalytic oxidation of iso-octane demonstrated the feasibility of the two-stage combustion system for reducing particulate emissions. With a fuel-rich (phi = 4.8 to 7.8) catalytic combustion preburner as the first stage the combustion process was soot free at reactor outlet temperatures of 1200 K or less. Although soot was not measured directly, its absence was indicated. Reaction products collected at two positions downstream of the catalyst bed were analyzed on a gas chromatograph. Comparison of these products indicated that pyrolysis of the larger molecules continued along the drift tube and that benzene formation was a gas-phase reaction. The effective hydrogen-carbon ratio calculated from the reaction products increased by 20 to 68 percent over the range of equivalence ratios tested. The catalytic partial oxidation process also yielded a large number of smaller-containing molecules. The fraction of fuel carbon in compounds having two or fewer carbon atoms ranged from 30 percent at 1100 K to 80 percent at 1200 K.

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for systemic gas embolism after hydrogen peroxide ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Brendan; Sherwin, Robert; Courage, Cheryl; Baylor, Alfred; Dolcourt, Bram; Brudzewski, Jacek R; Mosteller, Jeffrey; Wilson, Robert F

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a commonly available product and its ingestion has been demonstrated to produce in vivo gas bubbles, which can embolize to devastating effect. We report two cases of hydrogen peroxide ingestion with resultant gas embolization, one to the portal system and one cerebral embolus, which were successfully treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO), and review the literature. Two individuals presented to our center after unintentional ingestion of concentrated hydrogen peroxide solutions. Symptoms were consistent with portal gas emboli (Patient A) and cerebral gas emboli (Patient B), which were demonstrated on imaging. They were successfully treated with HBO and recovered without event. As demonstrated by both our experience as well as the current literature, HBO has been used to successfully treat gas emboli associated with hydrogen peroxide ingestion. We recommend consideration of HBO in any cases of significant hydrogen peroxide ingestion with a clinical picture compatible with gas emboli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Micro cogeneration - rich-methane gasifier and micro gas turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Król Danuta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presents a concept of integration a gasifier system with distributed generation of electricity and heat cogeneration system based on a gas microturbine. The gas generator is supplied by the RDF fuel from waste and biomass fuel Bio-CONOx. In the scale considered, the cogeneration system is designed to produce 30kWe of electricity and approx. 50kW of heat. Important perspective directions of technology development are: (i the possibility of gas microturbine to cooperate with the gasifier (up to date, in such systems were used, and continue to apply only piston engines, (ii the production of syngas in the gasifier (for efficient cogeneration in the composition of which there is a high content of methane (CH4 = 18%-22%. In the first step of possible commercialization a mathematical model to simulate single shaft gas turbine cogeneration plant has been developed. In conceptual design is application of microturbine as the prime mover of Combined Heat and Power (CHP system but with especial emphasis on possible use of a low calorific gas attainable from presented in details a gasifier unit. To support the calculations for preliminary design analysis, a computer program is developed in EES software environment.

  9. Characterizing the V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Antezana, Roberto; De Jaeger, Thomas; Förster, Francisco; González, Luis [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Contreras, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Olivares E, Felipe [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Phillips, Mark M.; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Schulze, Steve [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifícia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Bolt, Luis [Argelander Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Folatelli, Gastón [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Freedman, Wendy L. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Krzemiński, Wojtek, E-mail: janderso@eso.org [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 mag, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SN II' with an 's {sub 2}' value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.

  10. Cerebral arterial gas embolism, ingestion of hydrogen peroxide and flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joob, Beuy; Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2017-03-01

    We read with interest the recent report by Smedley et al. on an interesting case of cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) after pre-flight ingestion of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). The authors discuss the safety of aero-medical transfer following H₂O₂ ingestion. We agree with the possible problems but the concern on the other side of the coin needs to be mentioned; can transfer be delayed is the big question? Indeed, as reported by others, ingestion of even a small amount of concentrated H₂O₂ can result in CAGE. Hence, whether aero-medical transfer proceeds or not, severe, life-threatening embolism can occur. Since it was reported that "complete neurologic recovery occurred quickly with hyperbaric therapy", this supports the contention that the fastest transfer of the patient for hyperbaric treatment should be the primary focus.

  11. A mathematical framework for modelling and evaluating natural gas pipeline networks under hydrogen injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabkhi, F.; Azzaro-Pantel, C.; Pibouleau, L.; Domenech, S. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, UMR5503 CNRS/INP/UPS, 5 rue Paulin Talabot F-BP1301, 31106 Toulouse Cedex 1 (France)

    2008-11-15

    This article presents the framework of a mathematical formulation for modelling and evaluating natural gas pipeline networks under hydrogen injection. The model development is based on gas transport through pipelines and compressors which compensate for the pressure drops by implying mainly the mass and energy balances on the basic elements of the network. The model was initially implemented for natural gas transport and the principle of extension for hydrogen-natural gas mixtures is presented. The objective is the treatment of the classical fuel minimizing problem in compressor stations. The optimization procedure has been formulated by means of a nonlinear technique within the General Algebraic Modelling System (GAMS) environment. This work deals with the adaptation of the current transmission networks of natural gas to the transport of hydrogen-natural gas mixtures. More precisely, the quantitative amount of hydrogen that can be added to natural gas can be determined. The studied pipeline network, initially proposed in [1] is revisited here for the case of hydrogen-natural gas mixtures. Typical quantitative results are presented, showing that the addition of hydrogen to natural gas decreases significantly the transmitted power: the maximum fraction of hydrogen that can be added to natural gas is around 6 mass% for this example. (author)

  12. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  13. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5-5 pA per μmol L(-1) H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8-10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1-2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats.

  14. Microsensor Measurements of Hydrogen Gas Dynamics in Cyanobacterial Microbial Mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eNielsen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria spp.. The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5-5 pA per µmol L-1 H2. Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8-10% H2 saturation within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1-2 hours in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct photobiolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g. sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats.

  15. Organic richness and gas generation potential of Permian Barren ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, a total of 32 core samples of Permian Barren Measures from four boreholes in Raniganj field of Damodar Basin were analysed to evaluate their gas generation potential using Rock–Eval pyrolysis techniques. Petrographic analysis brings out the lithofacies of Barren Measures as carbonaceous silty shale, iron ...

  16. a Study of Using Hydrogen Gas for Steam Boiler in CHOLOR- Alkali Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peantong, Sasitorn; Tangjitsitcharoen, Somkiat

    2017-06-01

    Main products of manufacturing of Cholor - Alkali, which commonly known as industrial chemical, are chlorine gas (Cl2), Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) and hydrogen gas (H2). Chorine gas and sodium hydroxide are two main products for commercial profit; where hydrogen gas is by product. Most industries release hydrogen gas to atmosphere as it is non-profitable and less commercial scale. This study aims to make the most use of hydrogen as a substitute energy of natural gas for steam boiler to save energy cost. The second target of this study is to reduce level of CO2 release to air as a consequence of boiler combustion. This study suggests to install boiler that bases on hydrogen as main power with a high turndown ratio of at least 1:6. However, this case study uses boiler with two mode such as natural gas (NG) mode and mixed mode as they need to be flexible for production. Never the less, the best boiler selection is to use single mode energy of hydrogen. The most concerned issue about hydrogen gas is explosion during combustion stage. Stabilization measures at emergency stop is introduced to control H2 pressure to protect the explosion. This study varies ratio of natural gas to hydrogen gas to find the optimal level of two energy sources for boiler and measure total consumption through costing model; where CO2 level is measured at the boiler stack. The result of this study shows that hydrogen gas can be a substitute energy with natural gas and can reduce cost. Natural gas cost saving is 248,846 baht per month and reduce level of NOx is 80 ppm 7% O2 and 2 % of CO2 release to air as a consequence of boiler combustion.

  17. Density functional theory (DFT) studies of hydrogen rich solids and boron carbide under extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamp, Andrew James

    Since the first prediction that compressed hydrogen would metallize in 1935 and the further prediction that the metallic allotrope would be a superconductor at high temperatures, metallic hydrogen has been termed the "holy grail" of high-pressure science. A tremendous amount of theoretical and experimental research has been carried out, with the ultimate goal of metallizing hydrogen via the application of external pressure. It has been previously proposed that doping hydrogen with another element can lower the pressure at which metallization occurs. A number of experimental and theoretical studies have investigated doping hydrogen by either a group XIII or XIV element. Experiments in diamond anvil cells have illustrated that it is indeed possible to synthesize hydrogen-rich phases under conditions of extreme pressures, and SiH4 (H2)2, GeH4(H2) n, and Xe(H2)n have been shown to behave as true compounds. The focus herein is on the theoretical exploration of hydrogen-rich phases with novel stoichiometries, which contain a dopant element up to pressures of 350 GPa. In particular, the alkali-metal and alkaline Earth metal polyhydrides (MHn where n > 1) have been considered. Within this thesis the XtalOpt evolutionary algorithm was employed in order to complete this work, and predict the most stable structures of cesium and beryllium polyhydrides under pressure. In addition, we explore the possibility of mixing excess hydrogen with an electronegative element, iodine and phosphorus. The phases found are examined via detailed first principles calculations. In addition, because of its outstanding hardness, thermodynamic stability, low density, electronic properties, thermal stability, and high melting point boron carbide has many uses: i.e. as a refractory material, in abrasive powders and ballistics, as a neutron radiation absorbent, and in electronic applications. However, little is known about the behavior of boron carbide when under the external stress of pressure. The

  18. Hydrodesulphurization of Light Gas Oil using hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdulaziz

    2009-12-01

    The production of clean fuel faces the challenges of high production cost and complying with stricter environmental regulations. In this research, the ability of using a novel technology of upgrading heavy oil to treat Light Gas Oil (LGO) will be investigated. The target of this project is to produce cleaner transportation fuel with much lower cost of production. Recently, a novel process for upgrading of heavy oil has been developed at University of Waterloo. It is combining the two essential processes in bitumen upgrading; emulsion breaking and hydroprocessing into one process. The water in the emulsion is used to generate in situ hydrogen from the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). This hydrogen can be used for the hydrogenation and hydrotreating reaction which includes sulfur removal instead of the expensive molecular hydrogen. This process can be carried out for the upgrading of the bitumen emulsion which would improve its quality. In this study, the hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of LGO was conducted using in situ hydrogen produced via the Water Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR). The main objective of this experimental study is to evaluate the possibility of producing clean LGO over dispersed molybdenum sulphide catalyst and to evaluate the effect of different promoters and syn-gas on the activity of the dispersed Mo catalyst. Experiments were carried out in a 300 ml Autoclave batch reactor under 600 psi (initially) at 391°C for 1 to 3 hours and different amounts of water. After the hydrotreating reaction, the gas samples were collected and the conversion of carbon monoxide to hydrogen via WGSR was determined using a refinery gas analyzer. The sulphur content in liquid sample was analyzed via X-Ray Fluorescence. Experimental results showed that using more water will enhance WGSR but at the same time inhibits the HDS reaction. It was also shown that the amount of sulfur removed depends on the reaction time. The plan is to investigate the effect of synthesis gas (syngas

  19. Laboratory Studies of Hydrogen Gas Generation Using the Cobalt Chloride Catalyzed Sodium Borohydride-Water Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    reaction to generate hydrogen gas to inflate lighter-than-air vehicles . RESULTS When using CoCl2 as a catalyst, we discovered that distilled or...driving prices up. Consequently, the use of hydrogen gas to inflate LTA vehicles is gaining greater acceptance; many countries (military and commercial...due to leakage, safety, and size concerns. Hydrogen is less flammable than gasoline. In summary, the demand to use LTA vehicles for military and

  20. Analytical model of neutral gas shielding for hydrogen pellet ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuteev, Boris V.; Tsendin, Lev D. [State Technical Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2001-11-01

    A kinetic gasdynamic scaling for hydrogen pellet ablation is obtained in terms of a neural gas shielding model using both numerical and analytical approaches. The scaling on plasma and pellet parameters proposed in the monoenergy approximation by Milora and Foster dR{sub pe}/dt{approx}S{sub n}{sup 2/3}R{sub p}{sup -2/3}q{sub eo}{sup 1/3}m{sub i}{sup -1/3} is confirmed. Here R{sub p} is the pellet radius, S{sub n} is the optical thickness of a cloud, q{sub eo} is the electron energy flux density and m{sub i} is the molecular mass. Only the numeral factor is approximately two times less than that for the monoenergy approach. Due to this effect, the pellet ablation rates, which were obtained by Kuteev on the basis of the Milora scaling, should be reduced by a factor of 1.7. Such a modification provides a reasonable agreement (even at high plasma parameters) between the two-dimensional kinetic model and the one-dimensional monoenergy approximation validated in contemporary tokamak experiments. As the could (in the kinetic approximation) is significantly thicker than that for the monoenergy case as well as the velocities of the gas flow are much slower, the relative effect of plasma and magnetic shielding on the ablation rate is strongly reduced. (author)

  1. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  2. Gas-phase hydrogenation influence on defect behavior in titanium-based hydrogen-storage material

    OpenAIRE

    Laptev, Roman S.; Viktor N. Kudiiarov; Bordulev, Yuri S.; Mikhaylov, Andrey A.; Andrey M. Lider

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are promising materials for hydrogen storage. However, hydrogen penetration accompanies the exploitation of hydrogen storage alloys. In particular, hydrogen penetration and accumulation in titanium alloys changes their mechanical properties. Therefore, the research works of such materials are mainly focused on improving the reversibility of hydrogen absorption-liberation processes, increasing the thermodynamic characteristics of the alloys, and augmenting their hydroge...

  3. Protective Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Alveolar Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Yun-Qian; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Mao, Yan-Fei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Liu, Yu-Jian; Jiang, Lai

    2017-05-19

    BACKGROUND Fibrotic change is one of the important reasons for the poor prognosis of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The present study investigated the effects of hydrogen-rich saline, a selective hydroxyl radical scavenger, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Male ICR mice were divided randomly into 5 groups: Control, LPS-treated plus vehicle treatment, and LPS-treated plus hydrogen-rich saline (2.5, 5, or 10 ml/kg) treatment. Twenty-eight days later, fibrosis was assessed by determination of collagen deposition, hydroxyproline, and type I collagen levels. Development of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was identified by examining protein expressions of E-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 content, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), malondialdehyde (MDA) content, catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were determined. RESULTS Mice exhibited increases in collagen deposition, hydroxyproline, type I collagen contents, and TGF-β1 production in lung tissues after LPS treatment. LPS-induced lung fibrosis was associated with increased expression of α-SMA, as well as decreased expression of E-cadherin. In addition, LPS treatment increased MDA levels but decreased T-AOC, CAT, and SOD activities in lung tissues, indicating that LPS induced pulmonary oxidative stress. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment at doses of 2.5, 5, or 10 ml/kg significantly attenuated LPS-induced pulmonary fibrosis. LPS-induced loss of E-cadherin in lung tissues was largely reversed, whereas the acquisition of α-SMA was dramatically decreased by hydrogen-rich saline treatment. In addition, hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated LPS-induced oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS Hydrogen-rich saline may protect against LPS-induced EMT and pulmonary fibrosis through suppressing oxidative stress.

  4. Combinatorial and conventional studies on new highly selective methanation catalysts for the removal of small amounts of CO from hydrogen-rich gas mixtures; Kombinatorische und konventionelle Untersuchungen zu neuen hochselektiven Methanisierungskatalysatoren zur Entfernung geringer Mengen an CO aus wasserstoffreichen Gasgemischen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Michael

    2008-04-15

    New tailor-made catalysts for the purification of hydrogen-rich reformates by the selective methanation of CO were developed using combinatorial methods. The optimization of the catalysts was achieved within 3 or 4 generations while Ni-based oxides generally proved most promising. Conventional validations confirmed the successive enhancement of the materials. All in all, a number of catalysts providing higher CO hydrogenation activities combined with a lower reactivity towards the undesired methanation of the excess CO{sub 2} in comparison to an industrial reference was discovered. The application of numerous characterization techniques to the optimization sequence Ni{sub 100} - Zr{sub 10}Ni{sub 90} - Re{sub 2}Zr{sub 10}Ni{sub 88} - Re{sub 0,6}Zr{sub 15}Ni{sub 84,4} resulted in the following model: The catalysts are present in their as-prepared state as mixed metal oxide, which is (partly) demixed during the reductive pretreatment. The resulting (Re)Ni-particles seem to represent the actual active component while ZrO{sub 2} could stabilize the dispersion. Alloying with Ni, Re seems to modify the surface of the catalyst in such a way that it only marginally interacts with CO{sub 2}. Solo methanation tests unambiguously reveal that the increase in selectivity is not connected to a competition between CO and CO{sub 2} for adsorption sites but is based on a loss of the intrinsic reactivity of the respective samples towards the methanation of CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  5. Estimating explosion properties of normal hydrogen-rich core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejcha, Ondrej

    2017-08-01

    Recent parameterized 1D explosion models of hundreds of core-collapse supernova progenitors suggest that success and failure are intertwined in a complex pattern that is not a simple function of the progenitor initial mass. This rugged landscape is present also in other explosion properties, allowing for quantitative tests of the neutrino mechanism from observations of hundreds of supernovae discovered every year. We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of normal hydrogen-rich core-collapse supernovae based on their photometric measurements and expansion velocities. We construct SED and bolometric light curves, determine explosion energies, ejecta and nickel masses while taking into account all uncertainties and covariances of the model. We describe the efforts to compare the inferences to the predictions of the neutrino mechanim. The model can be adapted to include more physical assumptions to utilize primarily photometric data coming from surveys such as LSST.

  6. Blending of hydrogen in natural gas distribution systems. Volume I. Gas blends flow in distribution system, mixing points, and regulatory standards. Final report, June 1, 1976--August 30, 1977. [10 and 20% hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-09-01

    This volume of the subject study ''Blending of Hydrogen in Natural Gas Distribution Systems'' describes studies on the determination of gas distribution system flows with hydrogen - natural gas blends, potential hydrogen admission points to gas distribution systems, and the impact of hydrogen - natural gas blends on regulatory standards for gas distribution systems. The studies resulted in the following principal findings: (1) Most existing natural gas distribution systems could adequately transport 20% blends of hydrogen by volume with little or no modification. (2) The best point of admission of the hydrogen into a natural gas distribution system would be at the meter and regulating stations supplying a particular distribution system. (3) The impact of hydrogen - natural gas blends on state regulatory standards appears to be minimal for PSE and G, but requires further study for various National Codes and for other states.

  7. Low cost hydrogen/novel membrane technology for hydrogen separation from synthesis gas. Task 1, Literature survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-01

    To make the coal-to-hydrogen route economically attractive, improvements are being sought in each step of the process: coal gasification, water-carbon monoxide shift reaction, and hydrogen separation. This report addresses the use of membranes in the hydrogen separation step. The separation of hydrogen from synthesis gas is a major cost element in the manufacture of hydrogen from coal. Separation by membranes is an attractive, new, and still largely unexplored approach to the problem. Membrane processes are inherently simple and efficient and often have lower capital and operating costs than conventional processes. In this report current ad future trends in hydrogen production and use are first summarized. Methods of producing hydrogen from coal are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the Texaco entrained flow gasifier and on current methods of separating hydrogen from this gas stream. The potential for membrane separations in the process is then examined. In particular, the use of membranes for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}/CO, and H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separations is discussed. 43 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Biomass to hydrogen-rich syngas via catalytic steam gasification of bio-oil/biochar slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanyi; Yao, Jingang; Liu, Jing; Yan, Beibei; Shan, Rui

    2015-12-01

    The catalytic steam gasification of bio-oil/biochar slurry (bioslurry) for hydrogen-rich syngas production was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor using LaXFeO3 (X=Ce, Mg, K) perovskite-type catalysts. The effects of elemental substitution in LaFeO3, temperature, water to carbon molar ratio (WCMR) and bioslurry weight hourly space velocity (WbHSV) were examined. The results showed that La0.8Ce0.2FeO3 gave the best performance among the prepared catalysts and had better catalytic activity and stability than the commercial 14 wt.% Ni/Al2O3. The deactivation caused by carbon deposition and sintering was significantly depressed in the case of La0.8Ce0.2FeO3 catalyst. Both higher temperature and lower WbHSV contributed to more H2 yield. The optimal WCMR was found to be 2, and excessive introducing of steam reduced hydrogen yield. The La0.8Ce0.2FeO3 catalyst gave a maximum H2 yield of 82.01% with carbon conversion of 65.57% under the optimum operating conditions (temperature=800°C, WCMR=2 and WbHSV=15.36h(-1)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Energetic eruptions leading to a peculiar hydrogen-rich explosion of a massive star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, Iair; Howell, D. Andrew; Kasen, Daniel; Bildsten, Lars; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; McCully, Curtis; Wong, Zheng Chuen; Katz, Sarah Rebekah; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Sollerman, Jesper; Taddia, Francesco; Leloudas, Giorgos; Fremling, Christoffer; Nugent, Peter E.; Horesh, Assaf; Mooley, Kunal; Rumsey, Clare; Cenko, S. Bradley; Graham, Melissa L.; Perley, Daniel A.; Nakar, Ehud; Shaviv, Nir J.; Bromberg, Omer; Shen, Ken J.; Ofek, Eran O.; Cao, Yi; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Fang; Rui, Liming; Zhang, Tianmeng; Li, Wenxiong; Li, Zhitong; Zhang, Jujia; Valenti, Stefano; Guevel, David; Shappee, Benjamin; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fender, Rob; Nyholm, Anders; Yaron, Ofer; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Sullivan, Mark; Blagorodnova, Nadja; Walters, Richard S.; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Khazov, Danny; Andreoni, Igor; Laher, Russ R.; Konidaris, Nick; Wozniak, Przemek; Bue, Brian

    2017-11-01

    Every supernova so far observed has been considered to be the terminal explosion of a star. Moreover, all supernovae with absorption lines in their spectra show those lines decreasing in velocity over time, as the ejecta expand and thin, revealing slower-moving material that was previously hidden. In addition, every supernova that exhibits the absorption lines of hydrogen has one main light-curve peak, or a plateau in luminosity, lasting approximately 100 days before declining. Here we report observations of iPTF14hls, an event that has spectra identical to a hydrogen-rich core-collapse supernova, but characteristics that differ extensively from those of known supernovae. The light curve has at least five peaks and remains bright for more than 600 days; the absorption lines show little to no decrease in velocity; and the radius of the line-forming region is more than an order of magnitude bigger than the radius of the photosphere derived from the continuum emission. These characteristics are consistent with a shell of several tens of solar masses ejected by the progenitor star at supernova-level energies a few hundred days before a terminal explosion. Another possible eruption was recorded at the same position in 1954. Multiple energetic pre-supernova eruptions are expected to occur in stars of 95 to 130 solar masses, which experience the pulsational pair instability. That model, however, does not account for the continued presence of hydrogen, or the energetics observed here. Another mechanism for the violent ejection of mass in massive stars may be required.

  10. New devices Si-rich and C-rich a-Si{sub 1−x}C{sub x} thin films gas sensors based

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouadfel, M.A. [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (C.R.T.S.E), 02 Bd., Frantz FANON, B.P. 140, Algiers (Algeria); U.S.T.H.B, Physics Faculty, Physics Materials Laboratory, Algiers (Algeria); Yaddaden, C. [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (C.R.T.S.E), 02 Bd., Frantz FANON, B.P. 140, Algiers (Algeria); Merazga, S. [Mentouri Ahmed University, Constantine (Algeria); Cheriet, A.; Talb, L.; Kaci, S.; Belkacem, Y.; Ouadah, Y.; Menous, I. [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (C.R.T.S.E), 02 Bd., Frantz FANON, B.P. 140, Algiers (Algeria); Kechouane, M. [U.S.T.H.B, Physics Faculty, Physics Materials Laboratory, Algiers (Algeria); Gabouze, N. [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (C.R.T.S.E), 02 Bd., Frantz FANON, B.P. 140, Algiers (Algeria); Keffous, A., E-mail: keffousa@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (C.R.T.S.E), 02 Bd., Frantz FANON, B.P. 140, Algiers (Algeria); Menari, H. [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (C.R.T.S.E), 02 Bd., Frantz FANON, B.P. 140, Algiers (Algeria)

    2013-12-05

    Highlights: •Elaboration of Si-rich and C-rich thin films of amorphous silicon carbide. •Using a co-sputtering d.c magnetron of Si target and different 32–86 of 6H–SiC sprigs. •Structural and optical properties has been performed with applications in environmental field. •Different devices structures based on thin films have been investigated as gas sensor. -- Abstract: In this paper, we present an experimental study on elaboration of Si-rich and C-rich thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si{sub 1−x}C{sub x}:H) using a DC magnetron co-sputtering of Si single crystal target on which are deposited different polycrystalline 6H–SiC sprigs varying from 32 to 86, with dimension of 10 × 5 mm{sup 2}. A comparative study of structural and optical properties has been performed and its applications in environmental field. The a-Si{sub 1−x}C{sub x}:H films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–visible-NIR spectrophotometry, infrared absorption spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and photoluminescence. The measured optical gap of a-Si{sub 1−x}C{sub x}:H thin films depend on the carbon concentration with x varying from 0.18 to 0.30. This can be probably explained by the changes of Sp{sup 3} (silicon or film with low carbon content) to sp{sup 2} (high carbon content) configuration. Finally, different devices structures based the thin films have been investigated as gas sensors as Pd/a-Si{sub 0.72}C{sub 0.28}:H with a good sensitivity of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} gases at low bias voltage ranging from 0.05 to 0.26 volt, respectively and a low response time of 29 s and 25 s was obtained at 165 ppm of the used gases, with a recovery time of 32 s and 23 s for CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} gases, respectively.

  11. Apparatus and method for treating pollutants in a gas using hydrogen peroxide and UV light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles David (Inventor); Clausen, Christian Anthony (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for treating pollutants in a gas may include a source of hydrogen peroxide, and a treatment injector for creating and injecting dissociated hydrogen peroxide into the flow of gas. The treatment injector may further include an injector housing having an inlet, an outlet, and a hollow interior extending therebetween. The inlet may be connected in fluid communication with the source of hydrogen peroxide so that hydrogen peroxide flows through the hollow interior and toward the outlet. At least one ultraviolet (UV) lamp may be positioned within the hollow interior of the injector housing. The at least one UV lamp may dissociate the hydrogen peroxide flowing through the tube. The dissociated hydrogen peroxide may be injected into the flow of gas from the outlet for treating pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides.

  12. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchoel Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5 layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  13. Silicon carbide-based hydrogen gas sensors for high-temperature applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-10-09

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  14. The thermodynamic properties of the high-pressure superconducting state in the hydrogen-rich compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szcz&şacute; niak, Radosław; Durajski, Artur P.

    2013-11-01

    The ab initio calculations suggest that the superconducting state in CaH6 under the pressure (p) at 150 GPa has the highest critical temperature among the examined hydrogen-rich compounds. For this reason, the relevant thermodynamic parameters of the superconducting state in CaH6 have been determined; a wide range of the Coulomb pseudopotential has been assumed: μ⋆∈. It has been found that: (i) The critical temperature (TC) changes in the range from 243 K to 180 K (ii) The values of the ratio of the energy gap to the critical temperature (RΔ ≡ 2Δ(0)/kBTC) can be found in the range from 5.42 to 5.02. (iii) The ratio of the specific heat jump (ΔC(TC)) to the value of the specific heat in the normal state (CN(TC)), which has been represented by the symbol RC, takes the values from 3.30 to 3.18. (iv) The ratio R≡TC(T)/HC2(0), where HC(0) denotes the critical thermodynamic field, changes from 0.122 to 0.125. The above results mean that even for the strong electron depairing correlations the superconducting state in CaH6 is characterized by a very high value of TC, and the remaining thermodynamic parameters significantly deviate from the predictions of the BCS theory. The study has brought out the expressions that correctly predict the values of the thermodynamic parameters for the superconducting state in CaH6 and for the compounds: SiH4(H2)2, Si2H6, B2H6, SiH4, GeH4, and PtH. Next, in the whole family of the hydrogen-rich compounds, the possible ranges of the values have been determined for TC, RΔ, RC, and RH. It has been found that the maximum value of the critical temperature can be equal to 764 K, which very well correlates with TC for metallic hydrogen (p = 2 TPa). Other parameters (RΔ, RC, and RH) should not deviate from the predictions of the BCS theory more than the analogous parameters for CaH6.

  15. A CO 2-rich gas trigger of explosive paroxysms at Stromboli basaltic volcano, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    In addition to rhythmic slug-driven Strombolian activity, Stromboli volcano occasionally produces discrete explosive paroxysms (2 per year on average for the most frequent ones) that constitute a major hazard and whose origin remains poorly elucidated. Partial extrusion of the volatile-rich feeding basalt as aphyric pumice during these events has led to consider their triggering by the fast ascent of primitive magma blobs from possibly great depth. Here I examine and discuss the alternative hypothesis that most of the paroxysms could be triggered and driven by the fast upraise of CO 2-rich gas pockets generated by bubble foam growth and collapse in the sub-volcano plumbing system. Data for the SO 2 and CO 2 crater plume emissions are used to show that Stromboli's feeding magma may originally contain as much as 2 wt.% of carbon dioxide and early coexists with an abundant CO 2-rich gas phase with high CO 2/SO 2 molar ratio (≥ 60 at 10 km depth below the vents, compared to ˜ 7 in time-averaged crater emissions). Pressure-related modelling indicates that the time-averaged crater gas composition and output are well accounted for by closed system decompression of the basalt-gas mixture until the volcano-crust interface (˜ 3 km depth), followed by open degassing and crystallization in the volcano conduits. However, both the low viscosity and high vesicularity of the basaltic magma permit bubble segregation and bubble foam growth at deep sill-like feeder discontinuities and at shallower physical boundaries (such as the volcano-crust interface) where the gas-rich aphyric basalt interacts with the unerupted crystal-rich and viscous magma drained back from the volcano conduits. Gas pressure build-up and bubble foam collapse at these boundaries will intermittently trigger the sudden upraise of CO 2-rich gas blobs that constitute the main driving force of the paroxysms. Deeper-sourced gas blobs, driving the most powerful explosions, will be the richest in CO 2 and have

  16. Space hardware compatibility tests with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Delphine; Aguila, Alexandre; Debus, Andre; Remaury, Stephanie; Nabarra, Pascale; Darbord, Jacques C.; Soufflet, Caroline; Destrez, Philippe; Coll, Patrice; Coscia, David

    The exploration of the Solar System shall comply with planetary protection requirements handled presently by the Committee of Space Research (COSPAR). The goal of planetary protection is to protect celestial bodies from terrestrial contamination and also to protect the Earth environment from an eventual contamination carried by return samples or by space systems. For project teams, avoiding the biological contamination of other Solar System bodies such as Mars imposes to perform unusual tasks at technical and operational constraints point of view. The main are the reduction of bioburden on space hardware, the sterile integration of landers, the control of the biological cleanliness and the limitation of crash probability. In order to reduce the bioburden on spacecraft, the use of qualified sterilization processes may be envisaged. Since 1992 now, with the Mars96 mission, one of the most often used is the Sterrad(R) process working with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma. In the view of future Mars exploration programs, after tests performed in the frame of previous missions, a new test campaign has been performed on thermal coatings and miscellaneous materials coming from an experiment in order to assess the compatibility of space hardware and material with this sterilization process.

  17. Gas-rich dwarf galaxies in dense and sparse environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, G. Lyle

    1993-01-01

    Dwarf irregular galaxies (generically labelled Im for the present purposes) pose an enigma to students of galaxy evolution. In nearby groups and the Virgo cluster, Im galaxies are at least as abundant as spiral galaxies, and their low surface brightnesses and high gas-to-stars ratios suggest that (at least in the stochastic self-propagating star formation scenario) there should be significant numbers of HI clouds with masses approaching 10(exp 8) solar mass which have undergone very little or no star formation. To date, however, no clouds with so little star formation that they would not be recognized as Im galaxies on high-quality photographic plates have been identified. There have been suggestions that such dwarfs may be tidally disrupted in regions of high galactic density, but may be prevalent in low density regions. We offer data from three parallel programs relevant to this issue. (1) A large number of Im galaxies throughout the Local Supercluster have been mapped in the HI spectral line using the Arecibo Radiotelescope, and we can establish the frequency with which HI disks much more extended than their optically visible portions are found. (2) Our extensive mapping of spiral and dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster allows us to set stringent limits on the density of star-free Hi clouds in that cluster. (3) We have conducted a sampling of the void in the distribution of galaxies toward the super galactic pole, optimized for finding low-mass HI clouds at redshifts out to approximately 2000 km/s.

  18. Zeolite Membrane Reactor for Water Gas Shift Reaction for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jerry Y.S. [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2013-01-29

    Gasification of biomass or heavy feedstock to produce hydrogen fuel gas using current technology is costly and energy-intensive. The technology includes water gas shift reaction in two or more reactor stages with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given catalyst volume. This project is focused on developing a membrane reactor for efficient conversion of water gas shift reaction to produce a hydrogen stream as a fuel and a carbon dioxide stream suitable for sequestration. The project was focused on synthesizing stable, hydrogen perm-selective MFI zeolite membranes for high temperature hydrogen separation; fabricating tubular MFI zeolite membrane reactor and stable water gas shift catalyst for membrane reactor applications, and identifying experimental conditions for water gas shift reaction in the zeolite membrane reactor that will produce a high purity hydrogen stream. The project has improved understanding of zeolite membrane synthesis, high temperature gas diffusion and separation mechanisms for zeolite membranes, synthesis and properties of sulfur resistant catalysts, fabrication and structure optimization of membrane supports, and fundamentals of coupling reaction with separation in zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction. Through the fundamental study, the research teams have developed MFI zeolite membranes with good perm-selectivity for hydrogen over carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water vapor, and high stability for operation in syngas mixture containing 500 part per million hydrogen sulfide at high temperatures around 500°C. The research teams also developed a sulfur resistant catalyst for water gas shift reaction. Modeling and experimental studies on the zeolite membrane reactor for water gas shift reaction have demonstrated the effective use of the zeolite membrane reactor for production of high purity hydrogen stream.

  19. First Operating Results of a Dynamic Gas Bearing Turbine in AN Industrial Hydrogen Liquefier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, S.; Decker, L.

    2010-04-01

    Hydrogen has been brought into focus of industry and public since fossil fuels are depleting and costs are increasing dramatically. Beside these issues new high-tech processes in the industry are in need for hydrogen at ultra pure quality. To achieve these requirements and for efficient transportation, hydrogen is liquefied in industrial plants. Linde Gas has commissioned a new 5.5 TPD Hydrogen liquefier in Leuna, Germany, which has been engineered and supplied by Linde Kryotechnik. One of the four expansion turbines installed in the liquefaction process is equipped with dynamic gas bearings. Several design features and operational characteristics of this application will be discussed. The presentation will include results of efficiency and operational reliability that have been determined from performance tests. The advantages of the Linde dynamic gas bearing turbine for future use in hydrogen liquefaction plants will be shown.

  20. Development of an Inexpensive RGB Color Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen Cyanide Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenawald, Lee A; Boss, Gerry R; Snyder, Jay L; Reeder, Aaron; Bell, Suzanne

    2017-10-27

    An inexpensive red, green, blue (RGB) color sensor was developed for detecting low ppm concentrations of hydrogen cyanide gas. A piece of glass fiber filter paper containing monocyanocobinamide [CN(H2O)Cbi] was placed directly above the RGB color sensor and an on chip LED. Light reflected from the paper was monitored for RGB color change upon exposure to hydrogen cyanide at concentrations of 1.0-10.0 ppm as a function of 25%, 50%, and 85% relative humidity. A rapid color change occurred within 10 s of exposure to 5.0 ppm hydrogen cyanide gas (near the NIOSH recommended exposure limit). A more rapid color change occurred at higher humidity, suggesting a more effective reaction between hydrogen cyanide and CN(H2O)Cbi. The sensor could provide the first real time respirator end-of-service-life alert for hydrogen cyanide gas.

  1. Modification and testing of an engine and fuel control system for a hydrogen fuelled gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, H. H.-W.; Börner, S.; Hendrick, P.; Recker, E.

    2011-10-01

    The control of pollutant emissions has become more and more important by the development of new gas turbines. The use of hydrogen produced by renewable energy sources could be an alternative. Besides the reduction of NOx emissions emerged during the combustion process, another major question is how a hydrogen fuelled gas turbine including the metering unit can be controlled and operated. This paper presents a first insight in modifications on an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) GTCP 36300 for using gaseous hydrogen as a gas turbine fuel. For safe operation with hydrogen, the metering of hydrogen has to be fast, precise, and secure. So, the quality of the metering unit's control loop has an important influence on this topic. The paper documents the empiric determination of the proportional integral derivative (PID) control parameters for the metering unit.

  2. Lean-rich axial stage combustion in a can-annular gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laster, Walter R.; Szedlacsek, Peter

    2016-06-14

    An apparatus and method for lean/rich combustion in a gas turbine engine (10), which includes a combustor (12), a transition (14) and a combustor extender (16) that is positioned between the combustor (12) and the transition (14) to connect the combustor (12) to the transition (14). Openings (18) are formed along an outer surface (20) of the combustor extender (16). The gas turbine (10) also includes a fuel manifold (28) to extend along the outer surface (20) of the combustor extender (16), with fuel nozzles (30) to align with the respective openings (18). A method (200) for axial stage combustion in the gas turbine engine (10) is also presented.

  3. SN 2017dio: A Type-Ic Supernova Exploding in a Hydrogen-rich Circumstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Maeda, Keiichi; Ashall, Christopher J.; Prentice, Simon J.; Mattila, Seppo; Kankare, Erkki; Fransson, Claes; Lundqvist, Peter; Pastorello, Andrea; Leloudas, Giorgos; Anderson, Joseph P.; Benetti, Stefano; Bersten, Melina C.; Cappellaro, Enrico; Cartier, Régis; Denneau, Larry; Della Valle, Massimo; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Folatelli, Gastón; Fraser, Morgan; Galbany, Lluís; Gall, Christa; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Hamanowicz, Aleksandra; Heinze, Ari; Inserra, Cosimo; Kangas, Tuomas; Mazzali, Paolo; Melandri, Andrea; Pignata, Giuliano; Rest, Armin; Reynolds, Thomas; Roy, Rupak; Smartt, Stephen J.; Smith, Ken W.; Sollerman, Jesper; Somero, Auni; Stalder, Brian; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Taddia, Francesco; Tomasella, Lina; Tonry, John; Weiland, Henry; Young, David R.

    2018-02-01

    SN 2017dio shows both spectral characteristics of a type-Ic supernova (SN) and signs of a hydrogen-rich circumstellar medium (CSM). Prominent, narrow emission lines of H and He are superposed on the continuum. Subsequent evolution revealed that the SN ejecta are interacting with the CSM. The initial SN Ic identification was confirmed by removing the CSM interaction component from the spectrum and comparing with known SNe Ic and, reversely, adding a CSM interaction component to the spectra of known SNe Ic and comparing them to SN 2017dio. Excellent agreement was obtained with both procedures, reinforcing the SN Ic classification. The light curve constrains the pre-interaction SN Ic peak absolute magnitude to be around {M}g=-17.6 mag. No evidence of significant extinction is found, ruling out a brighter luminosity required by an SN Ia classification. These pieces of evidence support the view that SN 2017dio is an SN Ic, and therefore the first firm case of an SN Ic with signatures of hydrogen-rich CSM in the early spectrum. The CSM is unlikely to have been shaped by steady-state stellar winds. The mass loss of the progenitor star must have been intense, \\dot{M}∼ 0.02{({ε }{{H}α }/0.01)}-1 ({v}{wind}/500 km s‑1) ({v}{shock}/10,000 km s‑1)‑3 M ⊙ yr‑1, peaking at a few decades before the SN. Such a high mass-loss rate might have been experienced by the progenitor through eruptions or binary stripping. Based on observations made with the NOT, operated by the Nordic Optical Telescope Scientific Association at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain, of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. This work is based (in part) on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile as part of PESSTO, (the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey for Transient Objects Survey) ESO program 188.D-3003, 191.D-0935, 197.D-1075. Based on observations made with the Liverpool Telescope operated on the

  4. Enzymatic production of hydrogen gas from glucose and cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, S.M.; Woodward, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    An enzymatic process has been used to convert glucose to molecular hydrogen with the ultimate goal of converting cellulose to hydrogen. Two enzymes from the Archae, Thermoplasma acidophilium glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase, were used to oxidize glucose and NADPH respectively, resulting in the formation of molecular hydrogen. The stoichiometric yield of hydrogen from glucose was close to the theoretical maximum expected. Further, the molar amount of hydrogen produced was greater than the molar equivalent of NADP{sup +} present in the reaction mixture indicating that this GDH cofactor was regenerated throughout the course of the reaction. Hydrogen was also shown to be produced from cellulose if cellulase was included in the reaction mixture.

  5. Using biomass of starch-rich transgenic Arabidopsis vacuolar as feedstock for fermentative hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Yung-Chung; Cheng, Chieh-Lun; Chen, Chun-Yen [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Huang, Li-Fen; Chang, Jo-Shu [Yuan Ze Univ., Tao-yuan, Taiwan (China). Graduate School of Biotechnology and Bioengineering

    2010-07-01

    Cellulose is the major constitute of plant biomass and highly available in agricultural wastes and industrial effluents, thereby being a cost-effective feedstock for bioenergy production. However, most hydrogen producing bacteria (HPB) could not directly convert cellulosic materials (such as rice husk and rice straw) into hydrogen whereas most HPB could utilize sugar and starch for hydrogen production. In this work, we used an indigenous bacterial isolate Clostridium butyricum CGS2 as HPB, which could directly convert soluble starch into H2 with a maximum H2 production rate and a H2 yield of 205.07 ml H2/h/l and 6.46 mmol H2/g starch, respectively. However, C. butyricum CGS2 could not ferment pure cellulosic materials such as carboxymethyl cellulose and xylan. Moreover, we found that C. butyricum CGS2 could utilize rich husk to produce H2 at a rate of 13.19 ml H2/h/l due to the starch content in rice husk (H2 yield = 1.49 mmol H2/g rice husk). In contrast, since lacking starch content, rice straw cannot be converted to H2 by C. butyricum CGS2. The foregoing results suggest that increasing the starch content in the natural agricultural wastes may make them better feedstock for fermentative H2 production. Hence, a genetically modified plant (Arabidopsis vacuolar) was constructed to enhance its starch concentration. The starch concentration of mutant plant S1 increased to 10.67 mg/fresh weight, which is four times higher than that of wild type plant. Using mutant plant S1 as carbon source, C. butyricum CGS2 was able to give a high cumulative H2 production and H2 production rate of 285.4 ml H2/l and 43.6 ml/h/l, respectively. The cumulative H2 production and H2 production rate both increased when the concentration of the transgenic plant was increased. Therefore, this study successful demonstrated the feasibility of expressing starch on genetically-modified plants to create a more effective feedstock for dark H2 fermentation. (orig.)

  6. Inspection of the hydrogen gas pressure with metal shield by cold neutron radiography at CMRR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hang; Cao, Chao; Huo, Heyong; Wang, Sheng; Wu, Yang; Yin, Wei; Sun, Yong; Liu, Bin; Tang, Bin [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China)

    2017-04-11

    The inspection of the process of gas pressure change is important for some applications (e.g. gas tank stockpile or two phase fluid model) which need quantitative and non-touchable measurement. Neutron radiography provides a suitable tool for such investigations with nice resolution. The quantitative cold neutron radiography (CNR) is developed at China Mianyang Research Reactor (CMRR) to measure the hydrogen gas pressure with metal shield. Because of the high sensitivity to hydrogen, even small change of the hydrogen pressure can be inspected by CNR. The dark background and scattering neutron effect are both corrected to promote measurement precision. The results show that CNR can measure the hydrogen gas pressure exactly and the pressure value average relative error between CNR and barometer is almost 1.9%.

  7. Inspection of the hydrogen gas pressure with metal shield by cold neutron radiography at CMRR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hang; Cao, Chao; Huo, Heyong; Wang, Sheng; Wu, Yang; Yin, Wei; Sun, Yong; Liu, Bin; Tang, Bin

    2017-04-01

    The inspection of the process of gas pressure change is important for some applications (e.g. gas tank stockpile or two phase fluid model) which need quantitative and non-touchable measurement. Neutron radiography provides a suitable tool for such investigations with nice resolution. The quantitative cold neutron radiography (CNR) is developed at China Mianyang Research Reactor (CMRR) to measure the hydrogen gas pressure with metal shield. Because of the high sensitivity to hydrogen, even small change of the hydrogen pressure can be inspected by CNR. The dark background and scattering neutron effect are both corrected to promote measurement precision. The results show that CNR can measure the hydrogen gas pressure exactly and the pressure value average relative error between CNR and barometer is almost 1.9%.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BIOQUELL, INC. CLARIS C HYDROGEN PEROXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Clarus C Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator, a biological decontamination device manufactured by BIOQUELL, Inc. The unit was tested by evaluating its ability to decontaminate seven types...

  9. Silicon carbide-based hydrogen gas sensors for high-temperature applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-01-01

    .... In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC...

  10. Performance of a hydrogen/deuterium polarized gas target in a storage ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buuren, L.D.; Szczerba, D.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bulten, H.J.; Klous, S.; Mul, F.A.; Poolman, H.R.; Simani, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a hydrogen/deuterium polarized gas target in a storage ring is presented. The target setup consisted of an atomic beam source, a cryogenic storage cell and a Breit-Rabi polarimeter. High frequency transition units were constructed to produce vector polarized hydrogen and

  11. Relationship between the variations of hydrogen in HCNG fuel and the oxygen in exhausted gas

    OpenAIRE

    Preecha Yaom; Sarawoot Watechagit

    2015-01-01

    The variation of the mixing ratio between hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) in hydrogen enriched compressed natural gas fuel (HCNG) gives different results in terms of engine performances, fuel consumption, and emission characteristics. Therefore, the engine performance using HCNG as fuel can be optimized if the mixing ratio between the two fuels in HCNG can be adjusted in real time while the engine is being operated. In this research, the relationship between the amount of oxygen in ...

  12. The chemical kinetics and thermodynamics of sodium species in oxygen-rich hydrogen flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, A. J.; Steinberg, M.; Schofield, K.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented which, it is claimed, lead to a correction of previous misconceptions over the relative importance and kinetics of NaO2. It is shown that its rapid conversion to NaO and NaOH is such that it can severely perturb the NaOH/Na ratio and produce significant concentration overshoots over that predicted from the balance of the reaction of Na with H2O. This becomes increasingly the case in flames of large O2 concentrations and temperatures below 2500 K; and the corresponding large rate constants for the termolecular formation of the other alkali peroxides imply that similar considerations will be necessary for them. Depending on the rate constants for the exothermic conversions of MO2 to MO or MOH, the steady-state concentrations of MO2 could be more or less significant than for sodium. Owing to numerous reactions that produce these conversions, the MOH species will probably be the dominant species in all cases in oxygen-rich hydrogen or hydrocarbon flames, with MO concentrations at not greater than 1 percent of the bound metal.

  13. Main reaction process simulation of hydrogen gas discharge in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... ... reactions of hydrogen discharge in small electric vacuum components at low pressure and weak ionization were confirmed. Among the 21 types of reactions in hydrogen discharge process, 11 of them play importnat roles under low pressure and weak ionization in cold cathode electric vacuum device.

  14. Upgrading of reformate gas for different applications with focus on small-scale hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannasch, Anna-Karin; Silversand, Fredrik [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen gas or hydrogen rich gas is today used in many different applications, i.e. as fuel in fuel cells or additive in vehicle fuel (i.e. hythane) and as reagent or reducing agent in different industrial product lines. The majority of the hydrogen is produced either via electrolysis or reformation, where this work has entirely been focused on the latter alternative. The overarching aims of this project have been to demonstrate the need for reformate purification for different applications, and then, to investigate different available methods that can be used in order to enable the requested gas clean-up. The different purification methods have been examined with respect to parameters such as operating conditions (temperature, pressure), impurity tolerance, size, weight and cost. Another goal of the project has been to investigate how the reformer fuel type used influences the reformate gas quality and hence, the need for gas purification before the reformate can be fed to e.g. a low temperature polymer membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). For this reason, some experimental work has been performed. First, analysis of the reformate gas composition when natural gas, LPG, gasoline, diesel, kerosene (low and high S-concentration (i.e. JP8)) and ethanol have been processed. The reformation tests were carried out in a small scale reformer unit ({approx} 1 kW H{sub 2}) including Catator's catalyst formulations developed for the steam reforming, the water gas shift and the preferential oxidation reaction, respectively. Verification tests, with synthetic gas blends, including different potential reformate impurities, and with real reformate gas were thereafter performed with a commercial 4-cell PEMFC stack (3-5 W). Finally, some examination and also to some extent further development of Catator's existing gas purification units were made, i.e. chemical (WGS, PROX) and physical (regenerative adsorption). The Pd-alloy membrane seems to be the obvious choice of purification

  15. Empirical Method to Estimate Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals as a Function of Hydrogen Gas Pressure at Constant Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    High pressure Hydrogen (H) gas has been known to have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties of certain metals, particularly, the notched tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility. The ratio of these properties in Hydrogen as compared to Helium or Air is called the Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) Index, which is a useful method to classify the severity of H embrittlement and to aid in the material screening and selection for safety usage H gas environment. A comprehensive world-wide database compilation, in the past 50 years, has shown that the HEE index is mostly collected at two conveniently high H pressure points of 5 ksi and 10 ksi near room temperature. Since H embrittlement is directly related to pressure, the lack of HEE index at other pressure points has posed a technical problem for the designers to select appropriate materials at a specific H pressure for various applications in aerospace, alternate and renewable energy sectors for an emerging hydrogen economy. Based on the Power-Law mathematical relationship, an empirical method to accurately predict the HEE index, as a function of H pressure at constant temperature, is presented with a brief review on Sievert's law for gas-metal absorption.

  16. Hydrogen gas filling into an actual tank at high pressure and optimization of its thermal characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md. Tawhidul Islam; Monde, Masanori; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2009-09-01

    Gas with high pressure is widely used at present as fuel storage mode for different hydrogen vehicles. Different types of materials are used for constructing these hydrogen pressure vessels. An aluminum lined vessel and typically carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials are commercially used in hydrogen vessels. An aluminum lined vessel is easy to construct and posses high thermal conductivity compared to other commercially available vessels. However, compared to CFRP lined vessel, it has low strength capacity and safety factors. Therefore, nowadays, CFRP lined vessels are becoming more popular in hydrogen vehicles. Moreover, CFRP lined vessel has an advantage of light weight. CFRP, although, has many desirable properties in reducing the weight and in increasing the strength, it is also necessary to keep the material temperature below 85 °C for maintaining stringent safety requirements. While filling process occurs, the temperature can be exceeded due to the compression works of the gas flow. Therefore, it is very important to optimize the hydrogen filling system to avoid the crossing of the critical limit of the temperature rise. Computer-aided simulation has been conducted to characterize the hydrogen filling to optimize the technique. Three types of hydrogen vessels with different volumes have been analyzed for optimizing the charging characteristics of hydrogen to test vessels. Gas temperatures are measured inside representative vessels in the supply reservoirs (H2 storages) and at the inlet to the test tank during filling.

  17. The Influence of Hydrogen Gas on the Measures of Efficiency of Diesel Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgis Latakas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research paper energy and ecological parameters of diesel engine which works under addition of hydrogen (10, 20, 30 l/ min are presented. A survey of research literature has shown that addition of hydrogen gases improve diesel combustion; increase indicated pressure; decrease concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2, hydrocarbons (HC, particles; decrease fuel consumptions. Results of the experiment revealed that hydrogen gas additive decreased pressure in cylinder in kinetic combustion phase. Concentration of CO2 and nitrous oxides (NOx decreased not significantly, HC – increased. Concentration of particles in engine exhaust gases significantly decreased. In case when hydrogen gas as additive was supplied, the fuel consumptions decreased a little. Using AVL BOOST software combustion process analysis was made. It was determined that in order to optimize engine work process under hydrogen additive usage, it is necessary to adjust diesel injection angle.

  18. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction stage. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. Because of the higher cost of chemicals and the restricted markets in Hawaii, the economic viability of this process in Hawaii is questionable.

  19. Direct chlorination process for geothermal power plant off-gas - hydrogen sulfide abatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, A.V.

    1983-06-01

    The Direct Chlorination Process removes hydrogen sulfide from geothermal off-gases by reacting hydrogen sulfide with chlorine in the gas phase. Hydrogen chloride and elemental sulfur are formed by this reaction. The Direct Chlorination Process has been successfully demonstrated by an on-site operation of a pilot plant at the 3 M We HPG-A geothermal power plant in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. Over 99.5 percent hydrogen sulfide removal was achieved in a single reaction state. Chlorine gas did not escape the pilot plant, even when 90 percent excess chlorine gas was used. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Direct Chlorination Process indicates that it is very competitive with the Stretford Process. Compared to the Stretford Process, the Direct Chlorination Process requires about one-third the initial capital investment and about one-fourth the net daily expenditure.

  20. Performance of a Small Gas Generator Using Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Loren W.; Fenn, David B.; Dietrich, Marshall W.

    1961-01-01

    The performance and operating problems of a small hot-gas generator burning liquid hydrogen with liquid oxygen are presented. Two methods of ignition are discussed. Injector and combustion chamber design details based on rocket design criteria are also given. A carefully fabricated showerhead injector of simple design provided a gas generator that yielded combustion efficiencies of 93 and 96 percent.

  1. Geochemical modelling of hydrogen gas migration in an unsaturated bentonite buffer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Thomas, H.R.; Al Masum, S.; Vardon, P.J.; Nicholson, D.; Chen, Q.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the transport and fate of hydrogen gas through compacted bentonite buffer. Various geochemical reactions that may occur in the multiphase and multicomponent system of the unsaturated bentonite buffer are considered. A reactive gas transport model, developed

  2. CHOOSING OF PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS OF LIGHT-DUTY ENGINE RUNNING ON NATURAL GAS AND HYDROGEN MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Dube

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigation of light-duty gas engine running on natural gas and hydrogen mixture has been given. The mathematical model of combustion process with variable Vibe combus-tion factor for this engine type has been specified.

  3. Development and industrial application of catalyzer for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis of Claus tail gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honggang Chang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of more strict national environmental protection laws, energy conservation, emission reduction and clean production will present higher requirements for sulfur recovery tail gas processing techniques and catalyzers. As for Claus tail gas, conventional hydrogenation catalyzers are gradually being replaced by low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers. This paper concentrates on the development of technologies for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis catalyzers, preparation of such catalyzers and their industrial application. In view of the specific features of SO2 hydrogenation and organic sulfur hydrolysis during low-temperature hydrogenation, a new technical process involving joint application of hydrogenation catalyzers and hydrolysis catalyzers was proposed. In addition, low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers and low-temperature hydrolysis catalyzers suitable for low-temperature conditions were developed. Joint application of these two kinds of catalyzers may reduce the inlet temperatures in the conventional hydrogenation reactors from 280 °C to 220 °C, at the same time, hydrogenation conversion rates of SO2 can be enhanced to over 99%. To further accelerate the hydrolysis rate of organic sulfur, the catalyzers for hydrolysis of low-temperature organic sulfur were developed. In lab tests, the volume ratio of the total sulfur content in tail gas can be as low as 131 × 10−6 when these two kinds of catalyzers were used in a proportion of 5:5 in volumes. Industrial application of these catalyzers was implemented in 17 sulfur recovery tail gas processing facilities of 15 companies. As a result, Sinopec Jinling Petrochemical Company had outstanding application performances with a tail gas discharging rate lower than 77.9 mg/m3 and a total sulfur recovery of 99.97%.

  4. Hydrogen gas reduces hyperoxic lung injury via the Nrf2 pathway in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Tomohiro; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Shigemura, Norihisa; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Masutani, Kosuke; Tanaka, Yugo; Noda, Kentaro; Peng, Ximei; Takahashi, Toru; Billiar, Timothy R.; Okumura, Meinoshin; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperoxic lung injury is a major concern in critically ill patients who receive high concentrations of oxygen to treat lung diseases. Successful abrogation of hyperoxic lung injury would have a huge impact on respiratory and critical care medicine. Hydrogen can be administered as a therapeutic medical gas. We recently demonstrated that inhaled hydrogen reduced transplant-induced lung injury and induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1. To determine whether hydrogen could reduce hyperoxic lung injury and investigate the underlying mechanisms, we randomly assigned rats to four experimental groups and administered the following gas mixtures for 60 h: 98% oxygen (hyperoxia), 2% nitrogen; 98% oxygen (hyperoxia), 2% hydrogen; 98% balanced air (normoxia), 2% nitrogen; and 98% balanced air (normoxia), 2% hydrogen. We examined lung function by blood gas analysis, extent of lung injury, and expression of HO-1. We also investigated the role of NF-E2-related factor (Nrf) 2, which regulates HO-1 expression, by examining the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes and the ability of hydrogen to reduce hyperoxic lung injury in Nrf2-deficient mice. Hydrogen treatment during exposure to hyperoxia significantly improved blood oxygenation, reduced inflammatory events, and induced HO-1 expression. Hydrogen did not mitigate hyperoxic lung injury or induce HO-1 in Nrf2-deficient mice. These findings indicate that hydrogen gas can ameliorate hyperoxic lung injury through induction of Nrf2-dependent genes, such as HO-1. The findings suggest a potentially novel and applicable solution to hyperoxic lung injury and provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms and actions of hydrogen. PMID:23475767

  5. Solar flare neon and solar cosmic ray fluxes in the past using gas-rich meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, C. M.; Rao, M. N.

    1986-01-01

    Methods were developed earlier to deduce the composition of solar flare neon and to determine the solar cosmic ray proton fluxes in the past using etched lunar samples and at present, these techniques are extended to gas rich meteorites. By considering high temperature Ne data points for Pantar, Fayetteville and other gas rich meteorites and by applying the three component Ne-decomposition methods, the solar cosmic ray and galactic cosmic ray produced spallation Ne components from the trapped SF-Ne was resolved. Using appropiate SCR and GCR production rates, in the case of Pantar, for example, a GCR exposure age of 2 m.y. was estimated for Pantar-Dark while Pantar-Light yielded a GCR age of approx. 3 m.y. However the SCR exposure age of Pantar-Dark is two orders of magnitude higher than the average surface exposure ages of lunar soils. The possibility of higher proton fluxes in the past is discussed.

  6. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  7. Optimization of simultaneous thermophilic fermentative hydrogen production and COD reduction from palm oil mill effluent by Thermoanaerobacterium-rich sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O-Thong, Sompong [Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai 90112, Songkhla (Thailand); Department of Biology, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7800, N-5020, Bergen (Norway); Prasertsan, Poonsuk [Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Prince of Songkla University, Hatyai 90112, Songkhla (Thailand); Intrasungkha, Nugul [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Thaksin University, Songkhla (Thailand); Dhamwichukorn, Srisuda [Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok (Thailand); Birkeland, Nils-KAare [Department of Biology, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7800, N-5020, Bergen (Norway); Centre for Geobiology, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7800, N-5020, Bergen (Norway)

    2008-02-15

    Thermoanaerobacterium-rich sludge acclimated with palm oil mill effluent (POME) in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor operating at 60 C was used as a seed in batch experiments to investigate the effects of C/N (carbon/nitrogen) ratio, C/P (carbon/phosphate) ratio and iron concentration in POME on fermentative hydrogen production. A central composite design was performed with the aim of optimizing the hydrogen yield together with POME degradation using response surface methodology (RSM). The RSM results indicated that the presence of 257 mg Fe{sup 2+}/l, a C/N ratio of 74 and a C/P ratio of 559 were optimal for simultaneous hydrogen production and COD (chemical oxygen demand) removal. C/N ratio, C/P ratio and iron concentration all had an individual effect on hydrogen production and COD removal, while iron concentration and C/N ratio had the greatest interactive effect on hydrogen production (P<0.05) while C/N and C/P ratio gave more profound interactive effect on COD removal (P<0.05). The predicted maximum simultaneous hydrogen production and COD removal were 6.5 l H{sub 2}/l-POME and 58%, respectively. In a confirmation experiment under optimized conditions highly reproducible results were obtained, with a hydrogen production and COD removal efficiency of 6.33{+-}0.142lH{sub 2}/l-POME and 44{+-}1.5%, respectively. The total carbohydrate conversion was 92{+-}2.7%. The hydrogen production rate reached 25.9mmolH{sub 2}/l/day and increased by 60% as compared with the use of raw POME. Thermoanaerobacterium spp. were found to be dominant and present at a higher population density under optimized conditions than in raw POME fermentation. Optimization of the culture cultivation conditions in POME resulted in a simultaneous increase in biohydrogen production and COD reduction. (author)

  8. Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

    1996-12-31

    General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

  9. Life cycle greenhouse emissions of compressed natural gas-hydrogen mixtures for transportation in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, P. [Instituto de Energia y Desarrollo Sustentable, CNEA, CONICET, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dawidowski, L.; Gomez, D. [Gerencia Quimica, CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (Argentina); Pasquevich, D. [Instituto de Energia y Desarrollo Sustentable, CNEA, CONICET, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Centro Atomico Bariloche, CNEA, Av. Bustillo 9500, S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    We have developed a model to assess the life cycle greenhouse emissions of compressed natural gas-hydrogen (CNG-H{sub 2}) mixtures used for transportation in Argentina. The overall fuel life cycle is assessed through a well-to-wheel (WTW) analysis for different hydrogen generation and distribution options. The combustion stage in road vehicles is modeled using the COPERT IV model. Hydrogen generation options include classical steam methane reforming (SMR) and water electrolysis (WE) in central plants and distributed facilities at the refueling stations. Centralized hydrogen generation by electrolysis in nuclear plants as well as the use of solar photovoltaic and wind electricity is also considered. Hydrogen distribution options include gas pipeline and refrigerated truck transportation for liquefied hydrogen. A total number of fifteen fuel pathways are studied; in all the cases the natural gas-hydrogen mixture is made at the refueling station. The use of WE using nuclear or wind electricity appears to be less contaminant that the use of pure CNG. (author)

  10. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Doped Tungsten Oxide Thin Films for Hydrogen Gas Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisorn Tuantranont

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have fabricated hydrogen gas sensors based on undoped and 1 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT-doped tungsten oxide (WO3 thin films by means of the powder mixing and electron beam (E-beam evaporation technique. Hydrogen sensing properties of the thin films have been investigated at different operating temperatures and gas concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 50,000 ppm. The results indicate that the MWCNT-doped WO3 thin film exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen. Thus, MWCNT doping based on E-beam co-evaporation was shown to be an effective means of preparing hydrogen gas sensors with enhanced sensing and reduced operating temperatures. Creation of nanochannels and formation of p-n heterojunctions were proposed as the sensing mechanism underlying the enhanced hydrogen sensitivity of this hybridized gas sensor. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on a MWCNT-doped WO3 hydrogen sensor prepared by the E-beam method.

  11. Cooperative catalysis: electron-rich Fe-H complexes and DMAP, a successful "joint venture" for ultrafast hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Susanne; Hettmanczyk, Lara; Klein, Johannes E M N; Plietker, Bernd

    2014-08-01

    A series of defined iron-hydrogen complexes was prepared in a straightforward one-pot approach. The structure and electronic properties of such complexes were investigated by means of quantum-chemical analysis. These new complexes were then applied in the dehydrogenative silylation of methanol. The complex (dppp)(CO)(NO)FeH showed a remarkable activity with a TOF of more than 600 000 h(-1) of pure hydrogen gas within seconds. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26798423

  13. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naofumi Tamaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  14. Gas-Rich Mergers in LCDM: Disk Survivability and the Baryonic Assembly of Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Maller, Ariyeh H.; /New York City Coll. Tech.

    2009-08-03

    We use N-body simulations and observationally-normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M > 0.3) experienced by Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshift. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed late-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Secondly, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is substantial. Approximately 30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas in major mergers. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers is even higher, {approx} 50%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass deposition is almost unavoidable, and provides a

  15. Experimental and numerical investigations of the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion chamber of an industrial gas turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Haj Ayed, A.; Kusterer, K; Funke, H.H.-W.; J. Keinz; Striegan, C.; Bohn, D

    2015-01-01

    Combined with the use of renewable energy sources for its production, hydrogen represents a possible alternative gas turbine fuel within future low emission power generation. Due to the large difference in the physical properties of hydrogen compared to other fuels such as natural gas, well established gas turbine combustion systems cannot be directly applied for dry-low-NOx (DLN) hydrogen combustion. Thus, the development of DLN combustion technologies is an essential and challenging task fo...

  16. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through December 1999.

  17. Informing hazardous zones for on-board maritime hydrogen liquid and gas systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, Myra L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Pratt, Joseph William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bran Anleu, Gabriela A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Proctor, Camron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The significantly higher buoyancy of hydrogen compared to natural gas means that hazardous zones defined in the IGF code may be inaccurate if applied to hydrogen. This could place undue burden on ship design or could lead to situations that are unknowingly unsafe. We present dispersion analyses to examine three vessel case studies: (1) abnormal external vents of full blowdown of a liquid hydrogen tank due to a failed relief device in still air and with crosswind; (2) vents due to naturally-occurring boil-off of liquid within the tank; and (3) a leak from the pipes leading into the fuel cell room. The size of the hydrogen plumes resulting from a blowdown of the tank depend greatly on the wind conditions. It was also found that for normal operations releasing a small amount of "boil- off" gas to regulate the pressure in the tank does not create flammable concentrations.

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the prevention of arterial gas embolism in food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Stephen M; Menth, Nicholas L; Westgard, Bjorn C; Cole, Jon B; Walter, Joseph W; Masters, Thomas C; Logue, Christopher J

    2017-05-01

    Food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion is a relatively rare presentation to the emergency department. There are no defined guidelines at this time regarding the treatment of such exposures, and providers may not be familiar with the potential complications associated with high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestions. In this case series, we describe four patients who consumed 35% hydrogen peroxide, presented to the emergency department, and were treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Two of the four patients were critically ill requiring intubation. All four patients had evidence on CT or ultrasound of venous gas emboli and intubated patients were treated as if they had an arterial gas embolism since an exam could not be followed. After hyperbaric oxygen therapy each patient was discharged from the hospital neurologically intact with no other associated organ injuries related to vascular gas emboli. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is an effective treatment for patients with vascular gas emboli after high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestion. It is the treatment of choice for any impending, suspected, or diagnosed arterial gas embolism. Further research is needed to determine which patients with portal venous gas emboli should be treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Treating landfill gas hydrogen sulphide with mineral wool waste (MWW) and rod mill waste (RMW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergersen, Ove; Haarstad, Ketil

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) gas is a major odorant at municipal landfills. The gas can be generated from different waste fractions, for example demolition waste containing gypsum based plaster board. The removal of H2S from landfill gas was investigated by filtering it through mineral wool waste products. The flow of gas varied from 0.3 l/min to 3.0 l/min. The gas was typical for landfill gas with a mean H2S concentration of ca. 4500 ppm. The results show that the sulphide gas can effectively be removed by mineral wool waste products. The ratios of the estimated potential for sulphide precipitation were 19:1 for rod mill waste (RMW) and mineral wool waste (MWW). A filter consisting of a mixture of MWW and RMW, with a vertical perforated gas tube through the center of filter material and with a downward gas flow, removed 98% of the sulfide gas over a period of 80 days. A downward gas flow was more efficient in contacting the filter materials. Mineral wool waste products are effective in removing hydrogen sulphide from landfill gas given an adequate contact time and water content in the filter material. Based on the estimated sulphide removal potential of mineral wool and rod mill waste of 14 g/kg and 261 g/kg, and assuming an average sulphide gas concentration of 4500 ppm, the removal capacity in the filter materials has been estimated to last between 11 and 308 days. At the studied location the experimental gas flow was 100 times less than the actual gas flow. We believe that the system described here can be upscaled in order to treat this gas flow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cerebral arterial gas embolism after pre-flight ingestion of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Ben L; Gault, Alan; Gawthrope, Ian C

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) is a feared complication of ambient depressurisation and can also be a complication of hydrogen peroxide ingestion. We present an unusual case of CAGE in a 57-year-old woman exposed to both of these risk factors. We describe her subsequent successful treatment with hyperbaric oxygen, despite a 72-hour delay in initial presentation and diagnosis, and discuss the safety of aero-medical transfer following hydrogen peroxide ingestions.

  1. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas : numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Alastuey, Angel; Ballenegger, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    8 pages; International audience; We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first five leading corrections to the ideal Saha equation ...

  2. Detection of hydrogen gas-producing anaerobes in refuse-derived fuel (RDF) pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Makiko; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ohmiya, Kunio; Sakka, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Recently, we reported that refuse-derived fuel (RDF) pellets contain a relatively high number of viable bacterial cells and that these bacteria generate heat and hydrogen gas during fermentation under wet conditions. In this study we analyzed bacterial cell numbers of RDF samples manufactured with different concentrations of calcium hydroxide, which is usually added to waste materials for the prevention of rotting of food wastes and the acceleration of drying of solid wastes, and determined the amount of hydrogen gas produced by them under wet conditions. Furthermore, we analyzed microflora of the RDF samples before and during fermentation by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA followed by sequencing. We found that the RDF samples contained various kinds of clostridia capable of producing hydrogen gas.

  3. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2008-12-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  4. Microbial electrolysis cells for high yield hydrogen gas production from organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Bruce E; Call, Douglas; Cheng, Shaoan; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Sleutels, Tom H J A; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W; Rozendal, René A

    2008-12-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (> 0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment.

  5. Hydrogen enriched compressed natural gas (HCNG: A futuristic fuel for internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanthagopal Kasianantham

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is fast becoming a serious global problem with increasing population and its subsequent demands. This has resulted in increased usage of hydrogen as fuel for internal combustion engines. Hydrogen resources are vast and it is considered as one of the most promising fuel for automotive sector. As the required hydrogen infrastructure and refueling stations are not meeting the demand, widespread introduction of hydrogen vehicles is not possible in the near future. One of the solutions for this hurdle is to blend hydrogen with methane. Such types of blends take benefit of the unique combustion properties of hydrogen and at the same time reduce the demand for pure hydrogen. Enriching natural gas with hydrogen could be a potential alternative to common hydrocarbon fuels for internal combustion engine applications. Many researchers are working on this for the last few years and work is now focused on how to use this kind of fuel to its maximum extent. This technical note is an assessment of HCNG usage in case of internal combustion engines. Several examples and their salient features have been discussed. Finally, overall effects of hydrogen addition on an engine fueled with HCNG under various conditions are illustrated. In addition, the scope and challenges being faced in this area of research are clearly described.

  6. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A. (CP Industries, McKeesport, PA)

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  7. Advances of zeolite based membrane for hydrogen production via water gas shift reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Zunita, M.; Rizki, Z.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a promising energy vector which can be obtained from various renewable sources. However, an efficient hydrogen production technology is still challenging. One technology to produce hydrogen with very high capacity with low cost is through water gas shift (WGS) reaction. Water gas shift reaction is an equilibrium reaction that produces hydrogen from syngas mixture by the introduction of steam. Conventional WGS reaction employs two or more reactors in series with inter-cooling to maximize conversion for a given volume of catalyst. Membrane reactor as new technology can cope several drawbacks of conventional reactor by removing reaction product and the reaction will favour towards product formation. Zeolite has properties namely high temperature, chemical resistant, and low price makes it suitable for membrane reactor applications. Moreover, it has been employed for years as hydrogen selective layer. This review paper is focusing on the development of membrane reactor for efficient water gas shift reaction to produce high purity hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Development of membrane reactor is discussed further related to its modification towards efficient reaction and separation from WGS reaction mixture. Moreover, zeolite framework suitable for WGS membrane reactor will be discussed more deeply.

  8. Commissioning of the cryogenic hydrogen system in J-PARC: Preliminary operation by helium gas

    CERN Document Server

    Aso, T; Hasegawa, S; Ohtsu, K; Uehara, T; Kawakami, Y; Sakurayama, H; Maekawa, F; Futakawa, M; Ushijima, I

    2009-01-01

    A cryogenic hydrogen circulation system to cool the moderators for the spallation neutron source in J-PARC has been constructed. This system provides supercritical hydrogen at the temperature of 20 K and the pressure of 1.5 MPa to three moderators and absorbs nuclear heating produced in the moderators. The cryogenic hydrogen system commissioning was started. In January 2008, for the first time, we carried out a cryogenic test of the whole system, in which helium gas was used in stead of hydrogen. The cryogenic hydrogen system can be cooled down to 18 K within 30 hours, and be kept to be the rated condition for 36 hours without any problems. We confirmed the soundness of each component such as circulation pump and operation control system.

  9. Development of the Raman lidar system for remote hydrogen gas detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, In Young; Baik, Sung Hoon; Park, Seung Kyu; Park, Nak Gyu; Choi, Young Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Detection of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas leakage is very important for safety of the nuclear power plant because H{sub 2} gas is very flammable and explosive. H{sub 2} gas is generated by oxidizing the nuclear fuel cladding during the critical accident and generated H{sub 2} gas leads to serious secondary damages in the containment building of nuclear power plant. Thus, various H{sub 2} gas detection techniques are used in the nuclear power plant such as catalytic combustion sensors, semiconducting oxide sensors, thermal conductivity sensors and electrochemical sensor. A Raman lidar (Light Detection And Ranging) system for remote detection of the H{sub 2} gas can cover the area in the containment building of a nuclear power plant. H{sub 2} gas has a very strong Raman Effect, and H{sub 2} Raman cells have been widely used for laser wavelength conversion. In this study, Raman lidar system was developed for H{sub 2} gas detection used in the containment building of nuclear power plant. In this study, remote hydrogen gas detection devices and measuring algorithm are developed by using the Raman lidar method. Through the experiment, we proved that our developed Raman lidar system was possible to measure the N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} gas scattering signal remotely.

  10. Low-Dimensional Palladium Nanostructures for Fast and Reliable Hydrogen Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooyoung Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium (Pd has received attention as an ideal hydrogen sensor material due to its properties such as high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen gas, fast response, and operability at room temperature. Interestingly, various Pd nanostructures that have been realized by recent developments in nanotechnologies are known to show better performance than bulk Pd. This review highlights the characteristic properties, issues, and their possible solutions of hydrogen sensors based on the low-dimensional Pd nanostructures with more emphasis on Pd thin films and Pd nanowires. The finite size effects, relative strengths and weaknesses of the respective Pd nanostructures are discussed in terms of performance, manufacturability, and practical applicability.

  11. Development of a new method for hydrogen isotope analysis of trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibin Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new method had been developed for the analysis of hydrogen isotopic composition of trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples by using solid phase microextraction (SPME combined with gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS. In this study, the SPME technique had been initially introduced to achieve the enrichment of trace content of hydrocarbons with low abundance and coupled to GC/IRMS for hydrogen isotopic analysis. The main parameters, including the equilibration time, extraction temperature, and the fiber type, were systematically optimized. The results not only demonstrated that high extraction yield was true but also shows that the hydrogen isotopic fractionation was not observed during the extraction process, when the SPME device fitted with polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene/carbon molecular sieve (PDMS/DVB/CAR fiber. The applications of SPME-GC/IRMS method were evaluated by using natural gas samples collected from different sedimentary basins; the standard deviation (SD was better than 4‰ for reproducible measurements; and also, the hydrogen isotope values from C1 to C9 can be obtained with satisfying repeatability. The SPME-GC/IRMS method fitted with PDMS/DVB/CAR fiber is well suited for the preconcentration of trace hydrocarbons, and provides a reliable hydrogen isotopic analysis for trace hydrocarbons in natural gas samples.

  12. In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

    2002-09-20

    The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

  13. Numerical estimation of ultrasonic production of hydrogen: Effect of ideal and real gas based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-01-01

    Based on two different assumptions regarding the equation describing the state of the gases within an acoustic cavitation bubble, this paper studies the sonochemical production of hydrogen, through two numerical models treating the evolution of a chemical mechanism within a single bubble saturated with oxygen during an oscillation cycle in water. The first approach is built on an ideal gas model, while the second one is founded on Van der Waals equation, and the main objective was to analyze the effect of the considered state equation on the ultrasonic hydrogen production retrieved by simulation under various operating conditions. The obtained results show that even when the second approach gives higher values of temperature, pressure and total free radicals production, yield of hydrogen does not follow the same trend. When comparing the results released by both models regarding hydrogen production, it was noticed that the ratio of the molar amount of hydrogen is frequency and acoustic amplitude dependent. The use of Van der Waals equation leads to higher quantities of hydrogen under low acoustic amplitude and high frequencies, while employing ideal gas law based model gains the upper hand regarding hydrogen production at low frequencies and high acoustic amplitudes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance of the CAPRICE98 balloon-borne gas-RICH detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bergström, D; Carlson, P J; Francke, T; Grinstein, S; Weber, N; Suffert, Martin; Hof, M; Kremer, J; Menn, W; Simon, M; Stephens, S A; Ambriola, M; Bellotti, R; Cafagna, F; Castellano, M G; Ciacio, F; Circella, M; De Marzo, C; Finetti, N; Papini, P; Piccardi, S; Spillantini, P; Bartalucci, S; Ricci, M; Bidoli, V; Casolino, M; De Pascale, M P; Morselli, A; Picozza, P; Sparvoli, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Schiavon, R P; Vacchi, A; Zampa, N; Mitchell, J W; Ormes, J F; Streitmatter, R E; Bravar, U; Stochaj, S J

    2001-01-01

    A RICH counter using a gas radiator of C/sub 4/F/sub 10/ and a photosensitive MWPC with pad readout has been developed, tested in particle beam at CERN and used in the CAPRICE98 balloon-borne experiment. The MWPC was operated with a TMAE and ethane mixture at atmospheric pressure and used a cathode pad plane to give an unambiguous image of the Cherenkov light. The induced signals in the pad plane were read our using the AMPLEX chip and CRAMS. The good efficiency of the Cherenkov light collection, the efficient detection of the weak signal from single UV photons together with a low noise level in the electronics of the RICH detector, resulted in a large number of detected photoelectrons per event. For beta approximately=1 charge one particles, an average of 12 photoelectrons per event were detected. The reconstructed Cherenkov angle of 50 mrad for a beta approximately=1 particle had a resolution of 1.2 mrad (rms). The RICH was flown with the CAPRICE98 magnetic spectrometer and was the first RICH counter ever u...

  15. Experimental and numerical investigations of the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion chamber of an industrial gas turbine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haj Ayed, A; Kusterer, K; Funke, H.H.-W; Keinz, J; Striegan, C; Bohn, D

    2015-01-01

    .... Due to the large difference in the physical properties of hydrogen compared to other fuels such as natural gas, well established gas turbine combustion systems cannot be directly applied for dry-low-NOx (DLN...

  16. Electrochemical gas chromatographic detection of hydrogen sulfide at PPM and PPB levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, J R; Sedlak, J M; Blurton, K F

    1977-01-01

    An electrochemical detector for gas chromatographic analysis of hydrogen sulfide is described and its operating characteristics are discussed. The detector operation is based upon the measurement of the current when hydrogen sulfide is electrochemically oxidized at a diffusion electrode. The lower detectable limit was 3 X 10(-12) grams H2S, the precision was 0.5% and analysis was achieved within 2 minutes. Accuracy was limited principally by the preparation of calibration samples and the availability of standard reference gas mixtures.

  17. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  18. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2000-01-01

    A method for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide within a reformer 10 is disclosed. According to the method, a stream including an oxygen-containing gas is directed adjacent to a first vessel 18 and the oxygen-containing gas is heated. A stream including unburned fuel is introduced into the oxygen-containing gas stream to form a mixture including oxygen-containing gas and fuel. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and unburned fuel is directed tangentially into a partial oxidation reaction zone 24 within the first vessel 18. The mixture of oxygen-containing gas and fuel is further directed through the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 to produce a heated reformate stream including hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide. Steam may also be mixed with the oxygen-containing gas and fuel, and the reformate stream from the partial oxidation reaction zone 24 directed into a steam reforming zone 26. High- and low-temperature shift reaction zones 64,76 may be employed for further fuel processing.

  20. Analysis of Energy Storage System with Distributed Hydrogen Production and Gas Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotowicz, Janusz; Bartela, Łukasz; Dubiel-Jurgaś, Klaudia

    2017-12-01

    Paper presents the concept of energy storage system based on power-to-gas-to-power (P2G2P) technology. The system consists of a gas turbine co-firing hydrogen, which is supplied from a distributed electrolysis installations, powered by the wind farms located a short distance from the potential construction site of the gas turbine. In the paper the location of this type of investment was selected. As part of the analyses, the area of wind farms covered by the storage system and the share of the electricity production which is subjected storage has been changed. The dependence of the changed quantities on the potential of the hydrogen production and the operating time of the gas turbine was analyzed. Additionally, preliminary economic analyses of the proposed energy storage system were carried out.

  1. Analysis of Energy Storage System with Distributed Hydrogen Production and Gas Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotowicz Janusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents the concept of energy storage system based on power-to-gas-to-power (P2G2P technology. The system consists of a gas turbine co-firing hydrogen, which is supplied from a distributed electrolysis installations, powered by the wind farms located a short distance from the potential construction site of the gas turbine. In the paper the location of this type of investment was selected. As part of the analyses, the area of wind farms covered by the storage system and the share of the electricity production which is subjected storage has been changed. The dependence of the changed quantities on the potential of the hydrogen production and the operating time of the gas turbine was analyzed. Additionally, preliminary economic analyses of the proposed energy storage system were carried out.

  2. Molecular Hydrogen as an Emerging Therapeutic Medical Gas for Neurodegenerative and Other Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Kinji; Ito, Mikako; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Ito, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    Effects of molecular hydrogen on various diseases have been documented for 63 disease models and human diseases in the past four and a half years. Most studies have been performed on rodents including two models of Parkinson's disease and three models of Alzheimer's disease. Prominent effects are observed especially in oxidative stress-mediated diseases including neonatal cerebral hypoxia; Parkinson's disease; ischemia/reperfusion of spinal cord, heart, lung, liver, kidney, and intestine; transplantation of lung, heart, kidney, and intestine. Six human diseases have been studied to date: diabetes mellitus type 2, metabolic syndrome, hemodialysis, inflammatory and mitochondrial myopathies, brain stem infarction, and radiation-induced adverse effects. Two enigmas, however, remain to be solved. First, no dose-response effect is observed. Rodents and humans are able to take a small amount of hydrogen by drinking hydrogen-rich water, but marked effects are observed. Second, intestinal bacteria in humans and rodents produce a large amount of hydrogen, but an addition of a small amount of hydrogen exhibits marked effects. Further studies are required to elucidate molecular bases of prominent hydrogen effects and to determine the optimal frequency, amount, and method of hydrogen administration for each human disease. PMID:22720117

  3. Molecular Hydrogen as an Emerging Therapeutic Medical Gas for Neurodegenerative and Other Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinji Ohno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of molecular hydrogen on various diseases have been documented for 63 disease models and human diseases in the past four and a half years. Most studies have been performed on rodents including two models of Parkinson's disease and three models of Alzheimer's disease. Prominent effects are observed especially in oxidative stress-mediated diseases including neonatal cerebral hypoxia; Parkinson's disease; ischemia/reperfusion of spinal cord, heart, lung, liver, kidney, and intestine; transplantation of lung, heart, kidney, and intestine. Six human diseases have been studied to date: diabetes mellitus type 2, metabolic syndrome, hemodialysis, inflammatory and mitochondrial myopathies, brain stem infarction, and radiation-induced adverse effects. Two enigmas, however, remain to be solved. First, no dose-response effect is observed. Rodents and humans are able to take a small amount of hydrogen by drinking hydrogen-rich water, but marked effects are observed. Second, intestinal bacteria in humans and rodents produce a large amount of hydrogen, but an addition of a small amount of hydrogen exhibits marked effects. Further studies are required to elucidate molecular bases of prominent hydrogen effects and to determine the optimal frequency, amount, and method of hydrogen administration for each human disease.

  4. Chlorine and hydrogen chloride gas emissions cleaning in vinylchloride production

    OpenAIRE

    Гармаш, Роман Вікторович

    2013-01-01

    The paper gives the data on mathematical modeling of simultaneous absorption of chlorine and hydrogen chloride by alkaline solutions. The mathematical model of the process includes the system of differential equations of component-wise material balance and the system of kinetic equations. The system of material balance equations describes the change in concentrations of components along the column height. For its solving it is necessary to know the numerical values of chemisorption accelerati...

  5. XUV-exposed, non-hydrostatic hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets. Part II: hydrogen coronae and ion escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislyakova, Kristina G; Lammer, Helmut; Holmström, Mats; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Odert, Petra; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Leitzinger, Martin; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Kulikov, Yuri N; Güdel, Manuel; Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2013-11-01

    We studied the interactions between the stellar wind plasma flow of a typical M star, such as GJ 436, and the hydrogen-rich upper atmosphere of an Earth-like planet and a "super-Earth" with a radius of 2 R(Earth) and a mass of 10 M(Earth), located within the habitable zone at ∼0.24 AU. We investigated the formation of extended atomic hydrogen coronae under the influences of the stellar XUV flux (soft X-rays and EUV), stellar wind density and velocity, shape of a planetary obstacle (e.g., magnetosphere, ionopause), and the loss of planetary pickup ions on the evolution of hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres. Stellar XUV fluxes that are 1, 10, 50, and 100 times higher compared to that of the present-day Sun were considered, and the formation of high-energy neutral hydrogen clouds around the planets due to the charge-exchange reaction under various stellar conditions was modeled. Charge-exchange between stellar wind protons with planetary hydrogen atoms, and photoionization, lead to the production of initially cold ions of planetary origin. We found that the ion production rates for the studied planets can vary over a wide range, from ∼1.0×10²⁵ s⁻¹ to ∼5.3×10³⁰ s⁻¹, depending on the stellar wind conditions and the assumed XUV exposure of the upper atmosphere. Our findings indicate that most likely the majority of these planetary ions are picked up by the stellar wind and lost from the planet. Finally, we estimated the long-time nonthermal ion pickup escape for the studied planets and compared them with the thermal escape. According to our estimates, nonthermal escape of picked-up ionized hydrogen atoms over a planet's lifetime within the habitable zone of an M dwarf varies between ∼0.4 Earth ocean equivalent amounts of hydrogen (EO(H)) to <3 EO(H) and usually is several times smaller in comparison to the thermal atmospheric escape rates.

  6. Biological Water-Gas Shift Conversion of Carbon Monoxide to Hydrogen: Milestone Completion Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, W. A.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of research and economic analysis on a biological water-gas shift process for the production of hydrogen. The organism Rubrivivax gelatinosus CBS is a photosynthetic bacteria which can perform the water-gas shift reaction under anaerobic conditions. The report describes some of the technical issues regarding the process, addresses some claimed benefits of the process and presents some results from economic studies of different process configurations.

  7. The use of the natural-gas pipeline infrastructure for hydrogen transport in a changing market structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeseldonckx, Dries; D' haeseleer, William [Division of Energy Conversion, University of Leuven (K.U. Leuven), Celestijnenlaan 300A, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2007-07-15

    In this paper, the transport and distribution aspects of hydrogen during the transition period towards a possible full-blown hydrogen economy are carefully looked at. Firstly, the energetic and material aspects of hydrogen transport through the existing natural-gas (NG) pipeline infrastructure is discussed. Hereby, only the use of centrifugal compressors and the short-term security of supply seem to constitute a problem for the NG to hydrogen transition. Subsequently, the possibility of percentwise mixing of hydrogen into the NG bulk is dealt with. Mixtures containing up to 17 vol% of hydrogen should not cause difficulties. As soon as more hydrogen is injected, replacement of end-use applications and some pipelines will be necessary. Finally, the transition towards full-blown hydrogen transport in (previously carrying) NG pipelines is treated. Some policy guidelines are offered, both in a regulated and a liberalised energy (gas) market. As a conclusion, it can be stated that the use of hydrogen-natural gas mixtures seems well suited for the transition from natural gas to hydrogen on a distribution (low pressure) level. However, getting the hydrogen gas to the distribution grid, by means of the transport grid, remains a major issue. In the end, the structure of the market, regulated or liberalised, turns out not to be important. (author)

  8. Ejection of the Massive Hydrogen-rich Envelope Timed with the Collapse of the Stripped SN 2014C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margutti, Raffaella; Kamble, A; Milisavljevic, D; Zapartas, E; de Mink, S E; Drout, M; Chornock, R; Risaliti, G; Zauderer, B A; Bietenholz, M; Cantiello, M; Chakraborti, S; Chomiuk, L; Fong, W; Grefenstette, B; Guidorzi, C; Kirshner, R; Parrent, J T; Patnaude, D; Soderberg, A M; Gehrels, N C; Harrison, F

    2017-02-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of SN 2014C during the first 500 days. These observations represent the first solid detection of a young extragalactic stripped-envelope SN out to high-energy X-rays ~40 keV. SN 2014C shows ordinary explosion parameters (Ek ~ 1.8 × 10(51) erg and Mej ~ 1.7 M⊙). However, over an ~1 year timescale, SN 2014C evolved from an ordinary hydrogen-poor supernova into a strongly interacting, hydrogen-rich supernova, violating the traditional classification scheme of type-I versus type-II SNe. Signatures of the SN shock interaction with a dense medium are observed across the spectrum, from radio to hard X-rays, and revealed the presence of a massive shell of ~1 M⊙of hydrogen-rich material at ~6 × 10(16) cm. The shell was ejected by the progenitor star in the decades to centuries before collapse. This result challenges current theories of massive star evolution, as it requires a physical mechanism responsible for the ejection of the deepest hydrogen layer of H-poor SN progenitors synchronized with the onset of stellar collapse. Theoretical investigations point at binary interactions and/or instabilities during the last nuclear burning stages as potential triggers of the highly time-dependent mass loss. We constrain these scenarios utilizing the sample of 183 SNe Ib/c with public radio observations. Our analysis identifies SN 2014C-like signatures in ~10% of SNe. This fraction is reasonably consistent with the expectation from the theory of recent envelope ejection due to binary evolution if the ejected material can survive in the close environment for 10(3)-10(4) years. Alternatively, nuclear burning instabilities extending to core C-burning might play a critical role.

  9. Ejection of the Massive Hydrogen-rich Envelope Timed with the Collapse of the Stripped SN 2014C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margutti, Raffaella; Kamble, A.; Milisavljevic, D.; Zapartas, E.; de Mink, S. E.; Drout, M.; Chornock, R.; Risaliti, G.; Zauderer, B. A.; Bietenholz, M.; Cantiello, M.; Chakraborti, S.; Chomiuk, L.; Fong, W.; Grefenstette, B.; Guidorzi, C.; Kirshner, R.; Parrent, J. T.; Patnaude, D.; Soderberg, A. M.; Gehrels, N. C.; Harrison, F.

    2017-02-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of SN 2014C during the first 500 days. These observations represent the first solid detection of a young extragalactic stripped-envelope SN out to high-energy X-rays ˜40 keV. SN 2014C shows ordinary explosion parameters (Ek ˜ 1.8 × 1051 erg and Mej ˜ 1.7 M⊙). However, over an ˜1 year timescale, SN 2014C evolved from an ordinary hydrogen-poor supernova into a strongly interacting, hydrogen-rich supernova, violating the traditional classification scheme of type-I versus type-II SNe. Signatures of the SN shock interaction with a dense medium are observed across the spectrum, from radio to hard X-rays, and revealed the presence of a massive shell of ˜1 M⊙ of hydrogen-rich material at ˜6 × 1016 cm. The shell was ejected by the progenitor star in the decades to centuries before collapse. This result challenges current theories of massive star evolution, as it requires a physical mechanism responsible for the ejection of the deepest hydrogen layer of H-poor SN progenitors synchronized with the onset of stellar collapse. Theoretical investigations point at binary interactions and/or instabilities during the last nuclear burning stages as potential triggers of the highly time-dependent mass loss. We constrain these scenarios utilizing the sample of 183 SNe Ib/c with public radio observations. Our analysis identifies SN 2014C-like signatures in ˜10% of SNe. This fraction is reasonably consistent with the expectation from the theory of recent envelope ejection due to binary evolution if the ejected material can survive in the close environment for 103-104 years. Alternatively, nuclear burning instabilities extending to core C-burning might play a critical role.

  10. Ejection of the Massive Hydrogen-rich Envelope Timed with the Collapse of the Stripped SN 2014C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margutti, Raffaella [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Kamble, A.; Milisavljevic, D.; Drout, M.; Chakraborti, S.; Kirshner, R.; Parrent, J. T.; Patnaude, D.; Soderberg, A. M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Zapartas, E.; De Mink, S. E. [Anton Pannenkoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Chornock, R. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 251B Clippinger Lab, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Risaliti, G. [INAF-Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Zauderer, B. A. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bietenholz, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3 (Canada); Cantiello, M. [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Chomiuk, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Fong, W. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Grefenstette, B. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, 1216 E. California Boulevard, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guidorzi, C. [University of Ferrara, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); and others

    2017-02-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of SN 2014C during the first 500 days. These observations represent the first solid detection of a young extragalactic stripped-envelope SN out to high-energy X-rays ∼40 keV. SN 2014C shows ordinary explosion parameters ( E {sub k} ∼ 1.8 × 10{sup 51} erg and M {sub ej} ∼ 1.7 M{sub ⊙}). However, over an ∼1 year timescale, SN 2014C evolved from an ordinary hydrogen-poor supernova into a strongly interacting, hydrogen-rich supernova, violating the traditional classification scheme of type-I versus type-II SNe. Signatures of the SN shock interaction with a dense medium are observed across the spectrum, from radio to hard X-rays, and revealed the presence of a massive shell of ∼1 M {sub ⊙} of hydrogen-rich material at ∼6 × 10{sup 16} cm. The shell was ejected by the progenitor star in the decades to centuries before collapse. This result challenges current theories of massive star evolution, as it requires a physical mechanism responsible for the ejection of the deepest hydrogen layer of H-poor SN progenitors synchronized with the onset of stellar collapse. Theoretical investigations point at binary interactions and/or instabilities during the last nuclear burning stages as potential triggers of the highly time-dependent mass loss. We constrain these scenarios utilizing the sample of 183 SNe Ib/c with public radio observations. Our analysis identifies SN 2014C-like signatures in ∼10% of SNe. This fraction is reasonably consistent with the expectation from the theory of recent envelope ejection due to binary evolution if the ejected material can survive in the close environment for 10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} years. Alternatively, nuclear burning instabilities extending to core C-burning might play a critical role.

  11. reaction process simulation of hydrogen gas discharge in a cold ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the cold cathode electric vacuum device, under low pressure and weak ionization, elastic collision reaction is encountered by most electrons, that is, e + H2 → H2 + e and e + H → H + e, but the inelastic collision is the key method for ionizing the working gas and constituting plasma [10]. The inelastic collision has four ...

  12. Hydrocarbon-Rich Groundwater above Shale-Gas Formations: A Karoo Basin Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eymold, William K; Swana, Kelley; Moore, Myles T; Whyte, Colin J; Harkness, Jennifer S; Talma, Siep; Murray, Ricky; Moortgat, Joachim B; Miller, Jodie; Vengosh, Avner; Darrah, Thomas H

    2018-02-06

    Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enhanced unconventional hydrocarbon recovery but raised environmental concerns related to water quality. Because most basins targeted for shale-gas development in the USA have histories of both active and legacy petroleum extraction, confusion about the hydrogeological context of naturally occurring methane in shallow aquifers overlying shales remains. The Karoo Basin, located in South Africa, provides a near-pristine setting to evaluate these processes, without a history of conventional or unconventional energy extraction. We conducted a comprehensive pre-industrial evaluation of water quality and gas geochemistry in 22 groundwater samples across the Karoo Basin, including dissolved ions, water isotopes, hydrocarbon molecular and isotopic composition, and noble gases. Methane-rich samples were associated with high-salinity, NaCl-type groundwater and elevated levels of ethane, 4 He, and other noble gases produced by radioactive decay. This endmember displayed less negative δ 13 C-CH 4 and evidence of mixing between thermogenic natural gases and hydrogenotrophic methane. Atmospheric noble gases in the methane-rich samples record a history of fractionation during gas-phase migration from source rocks to shallow aquifers. Conversely, methane-poor samples have a paucity of ethane and 4 He, near saturation levels of atmospheric noble gases, and more negative δ 13 C-CH 4 ; methane in these samples is biogenic and produced by a mixture of hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic sources. These geochemical observations are consistent with other basins targeted for unconventional energy extraction in the USA and contribute to a growing data base of naturally occurring methane in shallow aquifers globally, which provide a framework for evaluating environmental concerns related to unconventional energy development (e.g., stray gas). © 2018, National Ground Water Association.

  13. Investigations of charge-changing processes for light proton-rich nuclei on carbon and solid-hydrogen targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawahata, K. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ozawa, A., E-mail: ozawa@tac.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Saito, Y.; Abe, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Inaba, N.; Ishibashi, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Matsunaga, S. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Okada, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Sato, S. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Suzuki, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Zenihiro, J. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    We investigated charge-changing processes (total charge-changing cross sections and partial charge-changing cross sections) for light proton-rich nuclei ({sup 34–36}Ar, {sup 33}Cl, {sup 25–28}Si) at around 300A MeV on carbon and solid-hydrogen targets. We estimated the nuclear proton point radii of {sup 33}Cl and {sup 25,26,27}Si from the observed total charge-changing cross sections by using Glauber-model calculations with a phenomenological correction factor. Furthermore, we estimated the proton skin thickness for {sup 33}Cl coupled with its previously observed matter radius. From investigations of the partial charge-changing cross sections, clear zigzag pattern was observed for all isotopes. The present studies suggest that the pattern may be common in the proton-rich side, and depends on the odd–even nature of the fragment charge.

  14. Hydrogen Separation by Natural Zeolite Composite Membranes: Single and Multicomponent Gas Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjoo, Afrooz; Kuznicki, Steve M; Sadrzadeh, Mohtada

    2017-10-06

    Single and multicomponent gas permeation tests were used to evaluate the performance of metal-supported clinoptilolite membranes. The efficiency of hydrogen separation from lower hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, and ethylene) was studied within the temperature and pressure ranges of 25-600 °C and 110-160 kPa, respectively. The hydrogen separation factor was found to reduce noticeably in the gas mixture compared with single gas experiments at 25 °C. The difference between the single and multicomponent gas results decreased as the temperature increased to higher than 300 °C, which is when the competitive adsorption-diffusion mechanism was replaced by Knudsen diffusion or activated diffusion mechanisms. To evaluate the effect of gas adsorption, the zeolite surface isotherms of each gas in the mixture were obtained from 25 °C to 600 °C. The results indicated negligible adsorption of individual gases at temperatures higher than 300 °C. Increasing the feed pressure resulted in a higher separation efficiency for the individual gases compared with the multicomponent mixture, due to the governing effect of the adsorptive mechanism. This study provides valuable insight into the application of natural zeolites for the separation of hydrogen from a mixture of hydrocarbons.

  15. Hydrogen Separation by Natural Zeolite Composite Membranes: Single and Multicomponent Gas Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrooz Farjoo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Single and multicomponent gas permeation tests were used to evaluate the performance of metal-supported clinoptilolite membranes. The efficiency of hydrogen separation from lower hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, and ethylene was studied within the temperature and pressure ranges of 25–600 °C and 110–160 kPa, respectively. The hydrogen separation factor was found to reduce noticeably in the gas mixture compared with single gas experiments at 25 °C. The difference between the single and multicomponent gas results decreased as the temperature increased to higher than 300 °C, which is when the competitive adsorption–diffusion mechanism was replaced by Knudsen diffusion or activated diffusion mechanisms. To evaluate the effect of gas adsorption, the zeolite surface isotherms of each gas in the mixture were obtained from 25 °C to 600 °C. The results indicated negligible adsorption of individual gases at temperatures higher than 300 °C. Increasing the feed pressure resulted in a higher separation efficiency for the individual gases compared with the multicomponent mixture, due to the governing effect of the adsorptive mechanism. This study provides valuable insight into the application of natural zeolites for the separation of hydrogen from a mixture of hydrocarbons.

  16. Hydrogen-rich saline inhibits tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by alleviating airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zibing; Geng, Wenye; Jiang, Chuanwei; Zhao, Shujun; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Ying; Qin, Shucun; Li, Chenxu; Zhang, Xinfang; Si, Yanhong

    2017-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease induced by tobacco smoke has been regarded as a great health problem worldwide. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline, a novel antioxidant, on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and explore the underlying mechanism. Sprague-Dawley rats were made chronic obstructive pulmonary disease models via tobacco smoke exposure for 12 weeks and the rats were treated with 10 ml/kg hydrogen-rich saline intraperitoneally during the last 4 weeks. Lung function testing indicated hydrogen-rich saline decreased lung airway resistance and increased lung compliance and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 0.1 s/forced vital capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. Histological analysis revealed that hydrogen-rich saline alleviated morphological impairments of lung in tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. ELISA assay showed hydrogen-rich saline lowered the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-8 and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. The content of malondialdehyde in lung tissue and serum was also determined and the data indicated hydrogen-rich saline suppressed oxidative stress reaction. The protein expressions of mucin MUC5C and aquaporin 5 involved in mucus hypersecretion were analyzed by Western blot and ELISA and the data revealed that hydrogen-rich saline down-regulated MUC5AC level in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue and up-regulated aquaporin 5 level in lung tissue of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that administration of hydrogen-rich saline exhibits significant protective effect on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease through alleviating inflammation, reducing oxidative stress and lessening mucus hypersecretion in tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats

  17. 40 CFR 266.107 - Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. 266.107 Section 266.107 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Industrial Furnaces § 266.107 Standards to control hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine gas (Cl2) emissions. (a) General. The owner or operator must comply with the hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine (Cl2...

  18. First Scattered-light Images of the Gas-rich Debris Disk around 49 Ceti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquet, Élodie [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Milli, Julien; Wahhaj, Zahed [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Còrdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Soummer, Rémi; Chen, Christine H.; Debes, John H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Roberge, Aki [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Augereau, Jean-Charles [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Booth, Mark [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitätssternwarte, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Schillergäßchen 2-3, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Absil, Olivier [Space sciences, Technologies and Astrophysics Research (STAR) Institute, Université de Liège, 19 Allée du Six Août, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Boccaletti, Anthony [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Burgo, Carlos del, E-mail: echoquet@jpl.nasa.gov [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Luis Enrique Erro 1, Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); and others

    2017-01-10

    We present the first scattered-light images of the debris disk around 49 Ceti, a ∼40 Myr A1 main-sequence star at 59 pc, famous for hosting two massive dust belts as well as large quantities of atomic and molecular gas. The outer disk is revealed in reprocessed archival Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS-F110W images, as well as new coronagraphic H-band images from the Very Large Telescope SPHERE instrument. The disk extends from 1.″1 (65 au) to 4.″6 (250 au) and is seen at an inclination of 73°, which refines previous measurements at lower angular resolution. We also report no companion detection larger than 3 M {sub Jup} at projected separations beyond 20 au from the star (0.″34). Comparison between the F110W and H-band images is consistent with a gray color of 49 Ceti’s dust, indicating grains larger than ≳2 μ m. Our photometric measurements indicate a scattering efficiency/infrared excess ratio of 0.2–0.4, relatively low compared to other characterized debris disks. We find that 49 Ceti presents morphological and scattering properties very similar to the gas-rich HD 131835 system. From our constraint on the disk inclination we find that the atomic gas previously detected in absorption must extend to the inner disk, and that the latter must be depleted of CO gas. Building on previous studies, we propose a schematic view of the system describing the dust and gas structure around 49 Ceti and hypothetical scenarios for the gas nature and origin.

  19. Effect of biologically produced sulfur on gas absorption in a biotechnological hydrogen sulfide removal process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, W.E.; Lammers, J.N.J.J.; Keizer, de A.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Absorption of hydrogen sulfide in aqueous suspensions of biologically produced sulfur particles was studied in a batch stirred cell reactor, and in a continuous set-up, consisting of a lab-scale gas absorber column and a bioreactor. Presence of biosulfur particles was found to enhance the absorption

  20. The HERMES polarized hydrogen and deuterium gas target in the HERA electron storage ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Airapetian, A.; Blok, H.P.; Chen, T.; Hesselink, W.H.A.; Laziev, A.; Volmer, J.; Wang, S.; Smit, G.P.

    2005-01-01

    The HERMES hydrogen and deuterium nuclear-polarized gas targets have been in use since 1996 with the polarized electron beam of HERA at DESY to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Polarized atoms from a Stern-Gerlach Atomic Beam Source are injected into a storage cell internal to the HERA

  1. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logan, B.E.; Call, D.; Cheng, S.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Jeremiasse, A.W.; Rozendal, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few

  2. ASU nitrogen sweep gas in hydrogen separation membrane for production of HRSG duct burner fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuccio, Gregory J.; Raybold, Troy M.; Jamal, Agil; Drnevich, Raymond Francis

    2013-04-02

    The present invention relates to the use of low pressure N2 from an air separation unit (ASU) for use as a sweep gas in a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to increase syngas H2 recovery and make a near-atmospheric pressure (less than or equal to about 25 psia) fuel for supplemental firing in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) duct burner.

  3. Testing of a Hydrogen Diffusion Flame Array Injector at Gas Turbine Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiland, Nathan T.; Sidwell, Todd G.; Strakey, Peter A.

    2013-07-03

    High-hydrogen gas turbines enable integration of carbon sequestration into coal-gasifying power plants, though NO{sub x} emissions are often high. This work explores nitrogen dilution of hydrogen diffusion flames to reduce thermal NO{sub x} emissions and avoid problems with premixing hydrogen at gas turbine pressures and temperatures. The burner design includes an array of high-velocity coaxial fuel and air injectors, which balances stability and ignition performance, combustor pressure drop, and flame residence time. Testing of this array injector at representative gas turbine conditions (16 atm and 1750 K firing temperature) yields 4.4 ppmv NO{sub x} at 15% O{sub 2} equivalent. NO{sub x} emissions are proportional to flame residence times, though these deviate from expected scaling due to active combustor cooling and merged flame behavior. The results demonstrate that nitrogen dilution in combination with high velocities can provide low NO{sub x} hydrogen combustion at gas turbine conditions, with significant potential for further NO{sub x} reductions via suggested design changes.

  4. Integration of biohydrogen fermentation and gas separation processes to recover and enrich hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bélafi-Bakó, K.; Búcsú, D.; Pientka, Z.; Bálint, B.; Herbel, Z.; Kovács, K.I.; Wessling, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    An integrated system for biohydrogen production and separation was designed, constructed and operated where biohydrogen was fermented by Thermococcus litoralis, a heterotrophic archaebacterium, and a two-step gas separation process was coupled to recover and concentrate hydrogen. A special liquid

  5. Development of a fermentation-based process for biomass conversion to hydrogen gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, P.A.M.; Vrije, de G.J.; Urbaniec, K.; Grabarczyk, R.

    2010-01-01

    The production of hydrogen gas from biomass to meet the foreseen demand arising from the expected introduction of fuel cells is envisaged. Apart from the well-known gasification method, fermentative conversion can also be applied for this purpose. Two options of the latter method, that is,

  6. Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.

    2000-09-28

    A life cycle assessment of hydrogen production via natural gas steam reforming was performed to examine the net emissions of greenhouse gases as well as other major environmental consequences. LCA is a systematic analytical method that helps identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of a specific process or competing processes.

  7. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  8. Carbon dioxide emission in hydrogen production technology from coke oven gas with life cycle approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burmistrz Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of Carbon Footprint (CF for technology of hydrogen production from cleaned coke oven gas was performed. On the basis of real data and simulation calculations of the production process of hydrogen from coke gas, emission indicators of carbon dioxide (CF were calculated. These indicators are associated with net production of electricity and thermal energy and direct emission of carbon dioxide throughout a whole product life cycle. Product life cycle includes: coal extraction and its transportation to a coking plant, the process of coking coal, purification and reforming of coke oven gas, carbon capture and storage. The values were related to 1 Mg of coking blend and to 1 Mg of the hydrogen produced. The calculation is based on the configuration of hydrogen production from coke oven gas for coking technology available on a commercial scale that uses a technology of coke dry quenching (CDQ. The calculations were made using ChemCAD v.6.0.2 simulator for a steady state of technological process. The analysis of carbon footprint was conducted in accordance with the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA.

  9. Transient flow in pipelines of high-pressure hydrogen-natural gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elaoud, Sami; Hadj-Taieb, Ezzeddine [Unit of Applied Fluid Mechanics and Modeling, ENIS, Sokra Road Km 4, P.O. Box W, Sfax 3038 (Tunisia)

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study is the numerical modeling of high-pressure transient flow of hydrogen-natural gas mixtures in rigid pipelines. The governing equations for such flows are two coupled, non-linear, hyperbolic, partial differential equations. The fluid pressure and velocity are considered as two principal dependent variables. The fluid is a homogeneous hydrogen-natural gas mixture for which the density is defined by an expression averaging the two gas densities where a polytropic process is admitted for the two components. The hydrogen-mixture mass ratio (or quality), assumed to be constant, is used in the mathematical formulation, instead of the void fraction which varies with pressure. The problem has been solved by the non-linear method of characteristics and the finite difference conservative method. To verify their validity, the computed results of the two numerical methods are compared for different values of the quality. The occurrence of pressure oscillations in hydrogen-natural gas mixture pipelines was studied as a result of the compression wave created by a rapid closure of downstream shut-off valve. (author)

  10. Photoluminescence and hydrogen gas-sensing properties of titanium dioxide nanostructures synthesized by hydrothermal treatments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sikhwivhilu, LM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available -1 ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces 2012, 4, 1656-1665 dx.doi.org/10.1021/am2018089 Photoluminescence and Hydrogen Gas-Sensing Properties of Titanium Dioxide Nanostructures Synthesized by Hydrothermal Treatments Lucky M. Sikhwivhilu, Siyasanga Mpelane...

  11. Impact of pH on hydrogen oxidizing redox processes in aquifers due to gas intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzgen, Adrian; Berta, Marton; Dethlefsen, Frank; Ebert, Markus; Dahmke, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen production from excess energy and its storage can help increasing the efficiency of solar and wind in the energy mix. Therefore, hydrogen needs large-scale intermediate storage independent of the intended later use as hydrogen gas or as reactant to produce methane in the Sabatier process. A possible storage solution is using the geological subsurface such as caverns built in salt deposits or aquifers that are not used for drinking water production. However, underground storage of hydrogen gas potentially leads to accidental gas leakages into near-surface potable aquifers triggering subsequent geochemical processes. These leakages pose potential risks that are currently not sufficiently understood. To close this gap in knowledge, a high-pressure laboratory column system was used to simulate a hydrogen gas intrusion into a shallow aquifer. Water and sediment were gained from a sandy Pleistocene aquifer near Neumünster, Germany. In the first stage of the experiment, 100% hydrogen gas was used to simulate dissolved hydrogen concentrations between 800 and 4000 µM by varying pH2 between 2 and 15 bars. pH values rose to between 7.9 and 10.4, partly due to stripping CO2 from the groundwater used during H2 gas addition. In a second stage, the pH was regulated in a range of 6.7 to 7.9 by using a gas mixture of 99% H2 and 1% CO2 at 5 bars of total gas pressure. Observed processes included hydrogen oxidation, sulfate reduction, acetogenesis, formate production, and methanogenesis, which were independent of the hydrogen concentration. Hydrogen oxidation and sulfate reduction showed zeroth order reaction rates and rate constants (106 to 412 µM/h and 12 to 33 µM/h, respectively) in the pH range between 8 and 10. At pH levels between 7 and 8, both reactions started out faster near the column's inflow but then seemed limited towards the columns outflow, suggesting the dependence of sulfate reduction on the pH-value. Acetogenesis dominated the pH range between 8 and 10

  12. Heat and mass transfer rates during flow of dissociated hydrogen gas over graphite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, V. K.; Sharma, O. P.

    1986-01-01

    To improve upon the performance of chemical rockets, the nuclear reactor has been applied to a rocket propulsion system using hydrogen gas as working fluid and a graphite-composite forming a part of the structure. Under the boundary layer approximation, theoretical predictions of skin friction coefficient, surface heat transfer rate and surface regression rate have been made for laminar/turbulent dissociated hydrogen gas flowing over a flat graphite surface. The external stream is assumed to be frozen. The analysis is restricted to Mach numbers low enough to deal with the situation of only surface-reaction between hydrogen and graphite. Empirical correlations of displacement thickness, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local non-dimensional heat transfer rate have been obtained. The magnitude of the surface regression rate is found low enough to ensure the use of graphite as a linear or a component of the system over an extended period without loss of performance.

  13. Rapid analysis of urinary opiates using fast gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and hydrogen as a carrier gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumandeep Rana

    2014-09-01

    Gas chromatographic–mass spectrometric analysis was performed in electron ionization mode by selective ion monitoring, using hydrogen as a carrier gas, a short narrow bore GC capillary column, and fast temperature program, allowing for a rapid analytical cycle to maximize the instrument time for high throughput laboratories. While maintaining specificity for these drugs, concentrations in human urine ranging from 50 to 5,000 ng/mL can be measured with intraday and interday imprecision, expressed as variation coefficients, of less than 2.3% for all analytes within a run time of less than 3.5 minutes.

  14. The hydrogen gas clearance method for liver blood flow examination: inhalation or local application of hydrogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, H P

    1989-01-01

    The combined method of hydrogen inhalation and local hydrogen production enable the determination of hepatic blood flow (HBF) and local hepatic blood flow (LHBF). LHBF was registered within a small superficial tissue volume of 0.5 mm in diameter by means of a multi-wire electrode having 200 microns producing and 100 microns measuring wires arranged within less than 300 microns distance between the measuring wires. The feeding current for hydrogen production was 1 microA, the potential less than 10 V. The clearance in response to inhalation was registered by means of the same measuring electrodes within the same tissue volume. Spontaneously breathing rats (Wistar-Frömter strain, 180-230 g bw, N = 19, ketamin-xylazine anesthesia, artificial respiration) showed the following flow values: HBF +/- SD = 0.50 +/- 0.26 ml/g.min, n = 48 registrations; LHBF +/- SD = 4.66 +/- 2.13 ml/g.min, n = 43. The validity of the combined method is demonstrated in the LHBF/HBF graph which summarizes the data of hemorrhagic and control animals, m = 0.1 and yo = 0.001. The correlation coefficient of r = 0.685 shows a reasonable correlation of the combined data despite the wide scattering of the individual values.

  15. Gas phase detection of the NH-P hydrogen bond and importance of secondary interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kristian Holten; Hansen, Anne Schou; Kjærgaard, Henrik Grum

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the NH···P hydrogen bond in a gas phase complex. The bond is identified in the dimethylamine-trimethylphosphine complex by a red shift of the fundamental NH-stretching frequency observed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). On the basis of the measured NH......-stretching frequency red shifts, we find that P is a hydrogen bond acceptor atom similar in strength to S. Both are stronger acceptors than O and significantly weaker acceptors than N. The hydrogen bond angle, ∠NHP, is found to be very sensitive to the functional employed in density functional theory (DFT......) optimizations of the complex and is a possible parameter to assess the quality of DFT functionals. Natural bonding orbital (NBO) energies and results from the topological methods atoms in molecules (AIM) and noncovalent interactions (NCI) indicate that the sensitivity is caused by the weakness of the hydrogen...

  16. Tank designs for combined high pressure gas and solid state hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea

    Many challenges have still to be overcome in order to establish a solid ground for significant market penetration of fuel cell hydrogen vehicles. The development of an effective solution for on-board hydrogen storage is one of the main technical tasks that need to be tackled. The present thesis...... for each storage solution investigated in this work. Attention is given to solutions that involve high-pressure solid-state and gas hydrogen storage with an integrated passive cooling system. A set of libraries is implemented in the modeling platform to select among different material compositions, kinetic...... compressed-hydrogen vessel respectively. For the former, these models are used to quantify the main design parameter, being the critical metal hydride thickness, for the tank/heat-exchanger system. For the metal hydride tank, the tubular layout in a shell and tube configuration with 2 mm inner diameter tubes...

  17. Stability of MOF-5 in a hydrogen gas environment containing fueling station impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ming, Yang; Purewal, Justin; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an emerging class of porous, crystalline materials with potential application as hydrogen storage media in fuel cell vehicles. Unlike lower capacity adsorbents such as zeolites and carbons, some MOFs are expected to degrade due to attack by impurities present...... in the hydrogen fuel stream. Hydrogen intended for use in fuel cell vehicles should satisfy purity standards, such as those outlined in SAE J2719. This standard limits the concentration of certain species in the fuel stream based primarily on their deleterious effects on PEM fuel cells. However, the impact...... of these contaminants on MOFs is mostly unknown. In the present study MOF-5 is adopted as a prototypical moisture-sensitive hydrogen storage material. Five “impure” gas mixtures were prepared by introducing low-to-moderate levels (i.e., up to ∼200 times greater than the J2719 limit) of selected contaminants (NH3, H2S...

  18. Gas chromatography flow rates for determining deuterium/hydrogen ratios of natural gas by gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wanglu; Peng, Ping'an; Liu, Jinzhong

    2008-08-01

    The effects of the gas chromatography flow rate on the determination of the deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios of natural gas utilising gas chromatography/high-temperature conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/TC/IRMS) have been evaluated. In general, the measured deltaD values of methane, ethane and propane decrease with increase in column flow rate. When the column flow rate is 1 mL/min or higher, which is commonly used for the determination of D/H ratios of natural gas, the organic H in gas compounds may not be completely converted into hydrogen gas. Based on the results of experiments conducted on a GC column with an i.d. of 0.32 mm, a GC flow rate of 0.6 mL/min is proposed for determining the D/H ratios of natural gas by GC/TC/IRMS. Although this value may be dependent on the instrument conditions used in this work, we believe that correct deltaD values of organic compounds with a few carbon atoms are obtained only when relatively low GC flow rates are used for D/H analysis by GC/TC/IRMS. Moreover, as the presence of trace water could significantly affect the determination of D/H ratios, a newly designed inlet liner was used to remove trace water contained in some gas samples. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Exergy and thermoeconomic evaluation of hydrogen production from natural gas; Avaliacao exergetica e termo-economica da producao de hidrogenio a partir do gas natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Flavio Eduardo da [PROMON Engenharia Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira Junior, Silvio de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica

    2008-07-01

    Some specific processes are required to obtain pure hydrogen and the most usual one is the natural gas reforming, where natural gas reacts with superheated steam producing H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. This paper presents exergy and thermoeconomic analysis of a complete hydrogen production unit of a petroleum refinery. The hydrogen production unit analysed in this paper has to supply 550,000 Nm{sup 3} of hydrogen per day to purify diesel oil. Based on a synthesis plant of the hydrogen production unit, the exergy efficiency of each component and of the overall plant are calculated. The hydrogen production cost is determined by means of a thermoeconomic analysis in which the equality cost partition method is employed, including capital and operational costs, in order to determine the production cost of hydrogen and other products of the plant.(author)

  20. Low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newson, E.; Roth, F. von; Hottinger, P.; Truong, T.B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - air mixtures would allow the development of no-NO{sub x} burners for heating and power applications. Using commercially available catalysts, the room temperature ignition of methane-propane-air mixtures has been shown in laboratory reactors with combustion efficiencies over 95% and maximum temperatures less than 700{sup o}C. After a 500 hour stability test, severe deactivation of both methane and propane oxidation functions was observed. In cooperation with industrial partners, scaleup to 3 kW is being investigated together with startup dynamics and catalyst stability. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  1. Selective Hydrogen Sulphide Removal from Acid Gas by Alkali Chemisorption in a Jet Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobek Janka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas is a primary energy source that contains a number of light paraffins. It also contains several undesirable components, such as water, ammonia, hydrogen sulphide, etc. In our study, a selective hydrogen sulphide removal process was achieved by alkali chemisorption in a custom-designed jet reactor. Several model gas compositions (CO2-H2S-N2 were evaluated to find parameters that enable H2S absorption instead of CO2. The negative effect of the presence of CO2 in the raw gas on the efficiency of H2S removal was observed. The beneficial effect of the low residence time (less than 1 s on the efficiency of H2S removal was recognized. Optimal operational parameters were defined to reach at least a 50% efficiency of H2S removal and minimal alkali consumption.

  2. Integration of phase change materials in compressed hydrogen gas systems: Modelling and parametric analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rothuizen, Erasmus; Jørgensen, Jens-Erik

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic fueling model is built to simulate the fueling process of a hydrogen tank with an integrated passive cooling system. The study investigates the possibility of absorbing a part of the heat of compression in the high latent-heat material during melting, with the aim of saving the monetary...... and energy resources spent at the refueling station to cool the gas prior to tank filling. This is done while respecting the technical constraint of keeping the walls below the critical temperature of 85 C to ensure the mechanical stability of the storage system even when the gas is fueled at ambient...... temperature. Results show that a 10-mm-thick layer of paraffin wax can absorb enough heat to reduce the adiabatic temperature by 20 K when compared to a standard Type IV tank, but its influence on the hydrogen peak temperature that occurs at the end of refueling is modest. The heat transfer from the gas...

  3. Measurements of Gasification Characteristics of Coal and Char in CO2-Rich Gas Flow by TG-DTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis, combustion, and gasification properties of pulverized coal and char in CO2-rich gas flow were investigated by using gravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA with changing O2%, heating temperature gradient, and flow rate of CO2-rich gases provided. Together with TG-DTA, flue gas generated from the heated coal, such as CO, CO2, and hydrocarbons (HCs, was analyzed simultaneously on the heating process. The optimum O2% in CO2-rich gas for combustion and gasification of coal or char was discussed by analyzing flue gas with changing O2 from 0 to 5%. The experimental results indicate that O2% has an especially large effect on carbon oxidation at temperature less than 1100°C, and lower O2 concentration promotes gasification reaction by producing CO gas over 1100°C in temperature. The TG-DTA results with gas analyses have presented basic reference data that show the effects of O2 concentration and heating rate on coal physical and chemical behaviors for the expected technologies on coal gasification in CO2-rich gas and oxygen combustion and underground coal gasification.

  4. Subseafloor microbial communities in hydrogen-rich vent fluids from hydrothermal systems along the Mid-Cayman Rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveillaud, Julie; Reddington, Emily; McDermott, Jill; Algar, Christopher; Meyer, Julie L; Sylva, Sean; Seewald, Jeffrey; German, Christopher R; Huber, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Warm fluids emanating from hydrothermal vents can be used as windows into the rocky subseafloor habitat and its resident microbial community. Two new vent systems on the Mid-Cayman Rise each exhibits novel geologic settings and distinctively hydrogen-rich vent fluid compositions. We have determined and compared the chemistry, potential energy yielding reactions, abundance, community composition, diversity, and function of microbes in venting fluids from both sites: Piccard, the world's deepest vent site, hosted in mafic rocks; and Von Damm, an adjacent, ultramafic-influenced system. Von Damm hosted a wider diversity of lineages and metabolisms in comparison to Piccard, consistent with thermodynamic models that predict more numerous energy sources at ultramafic systems. There was little overlap in the phylotypes found at each site, although similar and dominant hydrogen-utilizing genera were present at both. Despite the differences in community structure, depth, geology, and fluid chemistry, energetic modelling and metagenomic analysis indicate near functional equivalence between Von Damm and Piccard, likely driven by the high hydrogen concentrations and elevated temperatures at both sites. Results are compared with hydrothermal sites worldwide to provide a global perspective on the distinctiveness of these newly discovered sites and the interplay among rocks, fluid composition and life in the subseafloor. © 2015 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Pilot study: Effects of drinking hydrogen-rich water on muscle fatigue caused by acute exercise in elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoki Kosuke

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle contraction during short intervals of intense exercise causes oxidative stress, which can play a role in the development of overtraining symptoms, including increased fatigue, resulting in muscle microinjury or inflammation. Recently it has been said that hydrogen can function as antioxidant, so we investigated the effect of hydrogen-rich water (HW on oxidative stress and muscle fatigue in response to acute exercise. Methods Ten male soccer players aged 20.9 ± 1.3 years old were subjected to exercise tests and blood sampling. Each subject was examined twice in a crossover double-blind manner; they were given either HW or placebo water (PW for one week intervals. Subjects were requested to use a cycle ergometer at a 75 % maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 for 30 min, followed by measurement of peak torque and muscle activity throughout 100 repetitions of maximal isokinetic knee extension. Oxidative stress markers and creatine kinase in the peripheral blood were sequentially measured. Results Although acute exercise resulted in an increase in blood lactate levels in the subjects given PW, oral intake of HW prevented an elevation of blood lactate during heavy exercise. Peak torque of PW significantly decreased during maximal isokinetic knee extension, suggesting muscle fatigue, but peak torque of HW didn’t decrease at early phase. There was no significant change in blood oxidative injury markers (d-ROMs and BAP or creatine kinease after exercise. Conclusion Adequate hydration with hydrogen-rich water pre-exercise reduced blood lactate levels and improved exercise-induced decline of muscle function. Although further studies to elucidate the exact mechanisms and the benefits are needed to be confirmed in larger series of studies, these preliminary results may suggest that HW may be suitable hydration for athletes.

  6. Gas-phase hydrogenation/hydrogenolysis of phenol over supported nickel catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, E.J.; Keane, M.A.

    2000-04-01

    The gas-phase hydrogenation/hydrogenolysis of alcoholic solutions of phenol between 423 and 573 K has been studied using a Y zeolite-supported nickel catalyst (2.2% w/w Ni) and Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts (1.5--20.3% w/w Ni). This is a viable means of treating concentrated phenol streams to generate recyclable raw material. Phenol hydrogenation proceeded in a stepwise fashion with cyclohexanone as a reactive intermediate while a combination of hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation yielded cyclohexane. Hydrogenolysis to benzene is favored by high nickel loadings and elevated temperatures. A catalytic hydrogen treatment of cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol helped to establish the overall reaction network/mechanism. The possible role of thermodynamic limitations is considered and structure sensitivity is addressed; reaction data are subjected to a pseudo-first-order kinetic treatment. Hydrogen temperature-programmed desorption (H{sub 2}-TPD) has revealed the existence of different forms of surface hydrogen. Selectivity is interpreted on the basis of the H{sub 2}-TPD profiles and the possible phenol/catalyst interactions. The zeolite sample only catalyzed (via the surface Bronsted acidity) anisole formation in the presence of methanol, but this was suppressed when hexanol was used; the zeolite then promoted hydrogenolysis. The zeolite, however, deactivated and this was not reversed by heating in hydrogen. The results of the hydrogen treatment of aqueous rather than alcoholic phenol solutions are presented, where a switch from methanol to water was accompanied by a move from highly selective hydrogenolysis to highly selective hydrogenation.

  7. Hydrogen Gas Ameliorates Hepatic Reperfusion Injury After Prolonged Cold Preservation in Isolated Perfused Rat Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Shingo; Wakayama, Kenji; Fukai, Moto; Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Takahisa; Fukumori, Daisuke; Shibata, Maki; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Kimura, Taichi; Todo, Satoru; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen gas reduces ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) in the liver and other organs. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive. We investigated whether hydrogen gas ameliorated hepatic I/R injury after cold preservation. Rat liver was subjected to 48-h cold storage in University of Wisconsin solution. The graft was reperfused with oxygenated buffer with or without hydrogen at 37° for 90 min on an isolated perfusion apparatus, comprising the H2 (+) and H2 (-) groups, respectively. In the control group (CT), grafts were reperfused immediately without preservation. Graft function, injury, and circulatory status were assessed throughout the perfusion. Tissue samples at the end of perfusion were collected to determine histopathology, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. In the H2 (-) group, IRI was indicated by a higher aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) leakage, portal resistance, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine-positive cell rate, apoptotic index, and endothelial endothelin-1 expression, together with reduced bile production, oxygen consumption, and GSH/GSSG ratio (vs. CT). In the H2 (+) group, these harmful changes were significantly suppressed [vs. H2 (-)]. Hydrogen gas reduced hepatic reperfusion injury after prolonged cold preservation via the maintenance of portal flow, by protecting mitochondrial function during the early phase of reperfusion, and via the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammatory cascades thereafter. Copyright © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Controlling residual hydrogen gas in mass spectra during pulsed laser atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, R Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Residual hydrogen (H2) gas in the analysis chamber of an atom probe instrument limits the ability to measure H concentration in metals and alloys. Measuring H concentration would permit quantification of important physical phenomena, such as hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, hydrogen trapping, and grain boundary segregation. Increased insight into the behavior of residual H2 gas on the specimen tip surface in atom probe instruments could help reduce these limitations. The influence of user-selected experimental parameters on the field adsorption and desorption of residual H2 gas on nominally pure copper (Cu) was studied during ultraviolet pulsed laser atom probe tomography. The results indicate that the total residual hydrogen concentration, HTOT, in the mass spectra exhibits a generally decreasing trend with increasing laser pulse energy and increasing laser pulse frequency. Second-order interaction effects are also important. The pulse energy has the greatest influence on the quantity HTOT, which is consistently less than 0.1 at.% at a value of 80 pJ.

  9. Hydrogen gas inhalation inhibits progression to the "irreversible" stage of shock after severe hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaru; Sano, Motoaki; Hayashida, Kei; Tamura, Tomoyoshi; Homma, Koichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi; Sasaki, Junichi

    2017-09-01

    Mortality of hemorrhagic shock primarily depends on whether or not the patients can endure the loss of circulating volume until radical treatment is applied. We investigated whether hydrogen (H2) gas inhalation would influence the tolerance to hemorrhagic shock and improve survival. Hemorrhagic shock was achieved by withdrawing blood until the mean arterial blood pressure reached 30-35 mm Hg. After 60 minutes of shock, the rats were resuscitated with a volume of normal saline equal to four times the volume of shed blood. The rats were assigned to either the H2 gas (1.3% H2, 26% O2, 72.7% N2)-treated group or the control gas (26% O2, 74% N2)-treated group. Inhalation of the specified gas mixture began at the initiation of blood withdrawal and continued for 2 hours after fluid resuscitation. The survival rate at 6 hours after fluid resuscitation was 80% in H2 gas-treated rats and 30% in control gas-treated rats (p gas-treated rats than in the control rats. Despite losing more blood, the increase in serum potassium levels was suppressed in the H2 gas-treated rats after 60 minutes of shock. Fluid resuscitation completely restored blood pressure in the H2 gas-treated rats, whereas it failed to fully restore the blood pressure in the control gas-treated rats. At 2 hours after fluid resuscitation, blood pressure remained in the normal range and metabolic acidosis was well compensated in the H2 gas-treated rats, whereas we observed decreased blood pressure and uncompensated metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia in the surviving control gas-treated rats. H2 gas inhalation delays the progression to irreversible shock. Clinically, H2 gas inhalation is expected to stabilize the subject until curative treatment can be performed, thereby increasing the probability of survival after hemorrhagic shock.

  10. Preventive Effects of Drinking Hydrogen-Rich Water on Gingival Oxidative Stress and Alveolar Bone Resorption in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Toshiki; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Ekuni, Daisuke; Irie, Koichiro; Azuma, Tetsuji; Machida, Tatsuya; Miyai, Hisataka; Fujimori, Kouhei; Morita, Manabu

    2017-01-13

    Obesity induces gingival oxidative stress, which is involved in the progression of alveolar bone resorption. The antioxidant effect of hydrogen-rich water may attenuate gingival oxidative stress and prevent alveolar bone resorption in cases of obesity. We examined whether hydrogen-rich water could suppress gingival oxidative stress and alveolar bone resorption in obese rats fed a high-fat diet. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 18) were divided into three groups of six rats each: a control group (fed a regular diet and drinking distilled water) and two experimental groups (fed a high-fat diet and drinking distilled water or hydrogen-rich water). The level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was determined to evaluate oxidative stress. The bone mineral density of the alveolar bone was analyzed by micro-computerized tomography. Obese rats, induced by a high-fat diet, showed a higher gingival level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and a lower level of alveolar bone density compared to the control group. Drinking hydrogen-rich water suppressed body weight gain, lowered gingival level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, and reduced alveolar bone resorption in rats on a high-fat diet. The results indicate that hydrogen-rich water could suppress gingival oxidative stress and alveolar bone resorption by limiting obesity.

  11. Preventive Effects of Drinking Hydrogen-Rich Water on Gingival Oxidative Stress and Alveolar Bone Resorption in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Yoneda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity induces gingival oxidative stress, which is involved in the progression of alveolar bone resorption. The antioxidant effect of hydrogen-rich water may attenuate gingival oxidative stress and prevent alveolar bone resorption in cases of obesity. We examined whether hydrogen-rich water could suppress gingival oxidative stress and alveolar bone resorption in obese rats fed a high-fat diet. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 18 were divided into three groups of six rats each: a control group (fed a regular diet and drinking distilled water and two experimental groups (fed a high-fat diet and drinking distilled water or hydrogen-rich water. The level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine was determined to evaluate oxidative stress. The bone mineral density of the alveolar bone was analyzed by micro-computerized tomography. Obese rats, induced by a high-fat diet, showed a higher gingival level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and a lower level of alveolar bone density compared to the control group. Drinking hydrogen-rich water suppressed body weight gain, lowered gingival level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, and reduced alveolar bone resorption in rats on a high-fat diet. The results indicate that hydrogen-rich water could suppress gingival oxidative stress and alveolar bone resorption by limiting obesity.

  12. Metallic Cobalt Encapsulated in Bamboo-Like and Nitrogen-Rich Carbonitride Nanotubes for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaoping; Li, Zhanzhao; Ma, Yangde; Liu, Mengzhao; Du, Kangli; Su, Haixia; Zhuo, Hongying; Yu, Lei; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Despite being technically possible, the hydrogen production by means of electrocatalytic water splitting is still practically unreachable mainly because of the lack of inexpensive and high active catalysts. Herein, a novel and facile approach by melamine polymerization, exfoliation and Co(2+)-assisted thermal annealing is developed to fabricate Co nanoparticles embedded in bamboo-like and nitrogen-rich carbonitride nanotubes (Co@NCN). The electronic interaction between the embedded Co nanoparticles and N-rich carbonitride nanotubes could strongly promote the HER performance. The optimized Co@NCN-800 exhibits outstanding HER activity with an onset potential of -89 mV (vs RHE), a large exchange current density of 62.2 μA cm(-2), and small Tafel slope of 82 mV dec(-1), as well as excellent stability (5000 cycles) in acid media, demonstrating the potential for the replacement of Pt-based catalysts. Control experiments reveal that the superior performance should be ascribed to the synergistic effects between embedded Co nanoparticles and N-rich carbonitride nanotubes, which originate from the high pyridinic N content, fast charge transfer rate from Co particles to electrodes via electronic coupling, and porous and bamboo-like carbonitride nanotubes for more active sites in HER.

  13. Integration of phase change materials in compressed hydrogen gas systems: Modelling and parametric analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rothuizen, Erasmus; Jørgensen, Jens-Erik

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic fueling model is built to simulate the fueling process of a hydrogen tank with an integrated passive cooling system. The study investigates the possibility of absorbing a part of the heat of compression in the high latent-heat material during melting, with the aim of saving the monetary...... temperature. Results show that a 10-mm-thick layer of paraffin wax can absorb enough heat to reduce the adiabatic temperature by 20 K when compared to a standard Type IV tank, but its influence on the hydrogen peak temperature that occurs at the end of refueling is modest. The heat transfer from the gas...

  14. A compressed hydrogen gas storage system with an integrated phase change material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Jørgensen, Jens Erik

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic fueling model is built to simulate the fueling process of a hydrogen tank with an integrated passive cooling system. The study investigates the possibility of absorbing a part of the heat of compression in the high latent-heat material during melting, with the aim of keeping the walls...... below the critical temperature of 85 °C, while filling the hydrogen at ambient temperature. Results show that a 10-mm-thick layer of paraffin wax can absorb enough heat to reduce the adiabatic temperature by 20 K when compared to a standard Type IV tank. The heat transfer from the gas to the phase...

  15. Robust, Reliable Low Emission Gas Turbine Combustion of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, Margaret Stacy [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Im, Hong Geum [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-12-16

    The effects of high hydrogen content fuels were studied using experimental, computational and theoretical approaches to understand the effects of mixture and state conditions on the ignition behavior of the fuels. A rapid compression facility (RCF) was used to measure the ignition delay time of hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures. The data were combined with results of previous studies to develop ignition regime criteria. Analytical theory and direct numerical simulation were used to validate and interpret the RCF ignition data. Based on the integrated information the ignition regime criteria were extended to non-dimensional metrics which enable application of the results to practical gas turbine combustion systems.

  16. First principle investigations of the physical properties of hydrogen-rich MgH2

    KAUST Repository

    Zarshenas, Mohammed

    2013-11-28

    Hydrogen being a cleaner energy carrier has increased the importance of hydrogen-containing light metal hydrides, in particular those with large gravimetric hydrogen density like magnesium hydride (MgH2). In this study, density functional and density functional perturbation theories are combined to investigate the structural, elastic, thermodynamic, electronic and optical properties of MgH2. Our structural parameters calculated with those proposed by Perdew, Burke and Ernzerof generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA) and Wu-Cohen GGA (WC-GGA) are in agreement with experimental measurements, however the underestimated band gap values calculated using PBE-GGA and WC-GGA were greatly improved with the GGA suggested by Engle and Vosko and the modified Becke-Johnson exchange correlation potential by Trans and Blaha. As for the thermodynamic properties the specific heat values at low temperatures were found to obey the T3 rule and at higher temperatures Dulong and Petit\\'s law. Our analysis of the optical properties of MgH2 also points to its potential application in optoelectronics. © 2013 The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

  17. Hydrogen gas sensor based on metal oxide nanoparticles decorated graphene transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhangyuan; Zou, Xuming; Xu, Lei; Liao, Lei; Liu, Wei; Ho, Johnny; Xiao, Xiangheng; Jiang, Changzhong; Li, Jinchai

    2015-06-14

    In this work, in order to enhance the performance of graphene gas sensors, graphene and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are combined to be utilized for high selectivity and fast response gas detection. Whether at the relatively optimal temperature or even room temperature, our gas sensors based on graphene transistors, decorated with SnO2 NPs, exhibit fast response and short recovery times (∼1 seconds) at 50 °C when the hydrogen concentration is 100 ppm. Specifically, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy are employed to explore the interface properties between graphene and SnO2 NPs. Through the complimentary characterization, a mechanism based on charge transfer and band alignment is elucidated to explain the physical originality of these graphene gas sensors: high carrier mobility of graphene and small energy barrier between graphene and SnO2 NPs have ensured a fast response and a high sensitivity and selectivity of the devices. Generally, these gas sensors will facilitate the rapid development of next-generation hydrogen gas detection.

  18. Inactivation of animal and human prions by hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez-Kreuz, C; Yousfi, R; Soufflet, C; Quadrio, I; Yan, Z-X; Huyot, V; Aubenque, C; Destrez, P; Roth, K; Roberts, C; Favero, M; Clayette, P

    2009-08-01

    Prions cause various transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. They are highly resistant to the chemical and physical decontamination and sterilization procedures routinely used in healthcare facilities. The decontamination procedures recommended for the inactivation of prions are often incompatible with the materials used in medical devices. In this study, we evaluated the use of low-temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization systems and other instrument-processing procedures for inactivating human and animal prions. We provide new data concerning the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide against prions from in vitro or in vivo tests, focusing on the following: the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide sterilization and possible interactions with enzymatic or alkaline detergents, differences in the efficiency of this treatment against different prion strains, and the influence of contaminating lipids. We found that gaseous hydrogen peroxide decreased the infectivity of prions and/or the level of the protease-resistant form of the prion protein on different surface materials. However, the efficiency of this treatment depended strongly on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the delivery system used in medical devices, because these effects were more pronounced for the new generation of Sterrad technology. The Sterrad NX sterilizer is 100% efficient (0% transmission and no protease-resistant form of the prion protein signal detected on the surface of the material for the mouse-adapted bovine spongiform encephalopathy 6PB1 strain and a variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease strain). Thus, gaseous or vaporized hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivates prions on the surfaces of medical devices.

  19. Monte Carlo methods: Application to hydrogen gas and hard spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewing, Mark Douglas

    2001-08-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are among the most accurate for computing ground state properties of quantum systems. The two major types of QMC we use are Variational Monte Carlo (VMC), which evaluates integrals arising from the variational principle, and Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC), which stochastically projects to the ground state from a trial wave function. These methods are applied to a system of boson hard spheres to get exact, infinite system size results for the ground state at several densities. The kinds of problems that can be simulated with Monte Carlo methods are expanded through the development of new algorithms for combining a QMC simulation with a classical Monte Carlo simulation, which we call Coupled Electronic-Ionic Monte Carlo (CEIMC). The new CEIMC method is applied to a system of molecular hydrogen at temperatures ranging from 2800K to 4500K and densities from 0.25 to 0.46 g/cm3. VMC requires optimizing a parameterized wave function to find the minimum energy. We examine several techniques for optimizing VMC wave functions, focusing on the ability to optimize parameters appearing in the Slater determinant. Classical Monte Carlo simulations use an empirical interatomic potential to compute equilibrium properties of various states of matter. The CEIMC method replaces the empirical potential with a QMC calculation of the electronic energy. This is similar in spirit to the Car-Parrinello technique, which uses Density Functional Theory for the electrons and molecular dynamics for the nuclei. The challenges in constructing an efficient CEIMC simulation center mostly around the noisy results generated from the QMC computations of the electronic energy. We introduce two complementary techniques, one for tolerating the noise and the other for reducing it. The penalty method modifies the Metropolis acceptance ratio to tolerate noise without introducing a bias in the simulation of the nuclei. For reducing the noise, we introduce the two-sided energy

  20. VHMPID RICH prototype using pressurized C4F8O radiator gas and VUV photon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, T. V.; Agócs, A. G.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Bellwied, R.; Bencédi, G.; Bencze, G.; Berényi, D.; Boldizsár, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cindolo, F.; Cossyleon, K.; Das, D.; Das, K.; Das-Bose, L.; Dash, A. K.; D`Ambrosio, S.; De Cataldo, G.; De Pasquale, S.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Futó, E.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Hamar, G.; Harton, A.; Iannone, G.; Jimenez, R. T.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. S.; Knospe, A.; Kovács, L.; Lévai, P.; Markert, C.; Martinengo, P.; Molnár, L.; Nappi, E.; Oláh, L.; Paić, G.; Pastore, C.; Patimo, G.; Patino, M. E.; Peskov, V.; Pinsky, L.; Piuz, F.; Pochybová, S.; Sgura, I.; Sinha, T.; Song, J.; Takahashi, J.; Timmins, A.; Van Beelen, J. B.; Varga, D.; Volpe, G.; Weber, M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Yi, J.; Yoo, I.-K.

    2014-12-01

    A small-size prototype of a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector using for the first time pressurized C4F8O radiator gas and a photon detector consisting of MWPC equipped with a CsI photocathode has been built and tested at the PS accelerator at CERN. It contained all the functional elements of the detector proposed as Very High Momentum Particle Identification (VHMPID) upgrade for the ALICE experiment at LHC to provide charged hadron track-by-track identification in the momentum range starting from 5 potentially up to 25 GeV/c. In the paper the equipment and its elements are described and some characteristic test results are shown.

  1. Hydrogen Gas Inhalation Attenuates Seawater Instillation-Induced Acute Lung Injury via the Nrf2 Pathway in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Mengyuan; Zhang, Sheng; Wu, Lifeng; Huan, Le; Huang, Fenglou; Cui, Yunliang; Lin, Zhaofen

    2016-12-01

    Seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury involves oxidative stress and apoptosis. Although hydrogen gas inhalation is reportedly protective in multiple types of lung injury, the effect of hydrogen gas inhalation on seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of hydrogen gas on seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury and explored the mechanisms involved. Rabbits were randomly assigned to control, hydrogen (2 % hydrogen gas inhalation), seawater (3 mL/kg seawater instillation), and seawater + hydrogen (3 mL/kg seawater instillation + 2 % hydrogen gas inhalation) groups. Arterial partial oxygen pressure and lung wet/dry weight ratio were detected. Protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels were determined. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to monitor changes in lung specimens, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assayed. In addition, NF-E2-related factor (Nrf) 2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression were measured, and apoptosis was assessed by measuring caspase-3 expression and using terminal deoxy-nucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining. Hydrogen gas inhalation markedly improved lung endothelial permeability and decreased both MDA content and MPO activity in lung tissue; these changes were associated with decreases in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in BALF. Hydrogen gas also alleviated histopathological changes and cell apoptosis. Moreover, Nrf2 and HO-1 expressions were significantly activated and caspase-3 expression was inhibited. These results demonstrate that hydrogen gas inhalation attenuates seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury in rabbits and that the protective effects observed may be related to the activation of the Nrf2 pathway.

  2. Hydrogen production by absorption enhanced water gas shift (AEWGS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo Bretado, Miguel A. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Juarez del Estado de Durango, Ave. Veterinaria s/n, Circuito Universitario, Durango 34120 (Mexico); Departamento de Quimica de Materiales, Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Chihuahua, Chih. 31109 (Mexico); Delgado Vigil, Manuel D.; Gutierrez, Jesus Salinas; Lopez Ortiz, Alejandro; Collins-Martinez, Virginia [Departamento de Quimica de Materiales, Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Chihuahua, Chih. 31109 (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    AEWGS is a reaction that combines the WGS reaction and CO{sub 2} capture by a solid absorbent to produce high purity H{sub 2} from synthesis gas in one single step at 600-800 C. This reactor system, if homogeneous, would not require a catalyst. However, previous research on this concept was not conclusive, since a steel reactor was used and reactor walls were suspected to act as catalyst. Therefore, there is a need to address this issue and to select and evaluate suitable CO{sub 2} absorbents for this concept. AEWGS was studied using a quartz-made fixed-bed reactor at; SV = 3000 h{sup -1}, feed; 5% CO, 15% H{sub 2}O, balance He-N{sub 2} at 600 C, 1 atm. CO{sub 2} absorbents tested were CaO*MgO, and Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Empty quartz-reactor tests leaded to conclude that a catalyst is needed for the WGS at temperatures of interest. A 97% H{sub 2} product was obtained with calcined dolomite suggesting this last to act as a WGS catalyst. (author)

  3. Effectiveness of oxygen enriched hydrogen-HHO gas addition on DI diesel engine performance, emission and combustion characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premkartikkumar S.R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, more researches focus on protecting the environment. Present investigation concern with the effectiveness of Oxygen Enriched hydrogen- HHO gas addition on performance, emission and combustion characteristics of a DI diesel engine. Here the Oxygen Enriched hydrogen-HHO gas was produced by the process of water electrolysis. When potential difference is applied across the anode and cathode electrodes of the electrolyzer, water is transmuted into Oxygen Enriched hydrogen-HHO gas. The produced gas was aspirated into the cylinder along with intake air at the flow rates of 1 lpm and 3.3 lpm. The results show that when Oxygen Enriched hydrogen-HHO gas was inducted, the brake thermal efficiency of the engine increased by 11.06%, Carbon monoxide decreased by 15.38%, Unburned hydrocarbon decreased by 18.18%, Carbon dioxide increased by 6.06%, however, the NOX emission increased by 11.19%.

  4. Determining air quality and greenhouse gas impacts of hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens-Romero, Shane; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jacob; Dabdub, Donald; Samuelsen, Scott

    2009-12-01

    Adoption of hydrogen infrastructure and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) to replace gasoline internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has been proposed as a strategy to reduce criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector and transition to fuel independence. However, it is uncertain (1) to what degree the reduction in criteria pollutants will impact urban air quality, and (2) how the reductions in pollutant emissions and concomitant urban air quality impacts compare to ultralow emission gasoline-powered vehicles projected for a future year (e.g., 2060). To address these questions, the present study introduces a "spatially and temporally resolved energy and environment tool" (STREET) to characterize the pollutant and GHG emissions associated with a comprehensive hydrogen supply infrastructure and HFCVs at a high level of geographic and temporal resolution. To demonstrate the utility of STREET, two spatially and temporally resolved scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure are evaluated in a prototypical urban airshed (the South Coast Air Basin of California) using geographic information systems (GIS) data. The well-to-wheels (WTW) GHG emissions are quantified and the air quality is established using a detailed atmospheric chemistry and transport model followed by a comparison to a future gasoline scenario comprised of advanced ICE vehicles. One hydrogen scenario includes more renewable primary energy sources for hydrogen generation and the other includes more fossil fuel sources. The two scenarios encompass a variety of hydrogen generation, distribution, and fueling strategies. GHG emissions reductions range from 61 to 68% for both hydrogen scenarios in parallel with substantial improvements in urban air quality (e.g., reductions of 10 ppb in peak 8-h-averaged ozone and 6 mug/m(3) in 24-h-averaged particulate matter concentrations, particularly in regions of the airshed where concentrations are highest for the gasoline scenario).

  5. On physical nanoscale aspects of compatibility of steels with hydrogen and natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaev, Yu S; Ochsner, A

    2010-02-01

    The possibilities of effective solutions of relevant technological problems are considered based on the analysis of fundamental physical aspects, elucidation of the nano-structural mechanisms and interrelations of aging and hydrogen embrittlement of materials (steels) in the hydrogen industry and gas-main industries. The adverse effects which these mechanisms and processes have on the service properties and technological lifetime of materials are analyzed. The concomitant fundamental process of formation of carbohydride-like and other segregation nanostructures at dislocations (with the segregation capacity 1 to 1.5 orders of magnitude greater than in the widely used Cottrell 'atmosphere' model) and grain boundaries is discussed in the context of how these nanostructures affect technological processes (aging, hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion damage, and failure) and the physicomechanical properties of the metallic materials (including the technological lifetimes of pipeline steels).

  6. Hydrogen storage materials discovery via high throughput ball milling and gas sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Kaye, Steven S; Riley, Conor; Greenberg, Doron; Galang, Daniel; Bailey, Mark S

    2012-06-11

    The lack of a high capacity hydrogen storage material is a major barrier to the implementation of the hydrogen economy. To accelerate discovery of such materials, we have developed a high-throughput workflow for screening of hydrogen storage materials in which candidate materials are synthesized and characterized via highly parallel ball mills and volumetric gas sorption instruments, respectively. The workflow was used to identify mixed imides with significantly enhanced absorption rates relative to Li2Mg(NH)2. The most promising material, 2LiNH2:MgH2 + 5 atom % LiBH4 + 0.5 atom % La, exhibits the best balance of absorption rate, capacity, and cycle-life, absorbing >4 wt % H2 in 1 h at 120 °C after 11 absorption-desorption cycles.

  7. The HIX galaxy survey I: Study of the most gas rich galaxies from HIPASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, K. A.; Kilborn, V. A.; Catinella, B.; Koribalski, B. S.; Brown, T. H.; Cortese, L.; Dénes, H.; Józsa, G. I. G.; Wong, O. I.

    2017-05-01

    We present the H I eXtreme (HIX) galaxy survey targeting some of the most H I rich galaxies in the Southern hemisphere. The 13 HIX galaxies have been selected to host the most massive H I discs at a given stellar luminosity. We compare these galaxies to a control sample of average galaxies detected in the H I Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS). As the control sample is matched in stellar luminosity, we find that the stellar properties of HIX galaxies are similar to the control sample. Furthermore, the specific star formation rate and optical morphology do not differ between HIX and control galaxies. We find, however, the HIX galaxies to be less efficient in forming stars. For the most H I massive galaxy in our sample (ESO075-G006, log M_{H I} [M⊙] = (10.8 ± 0.1)), the kinematic properties are the reason for inefficient star formation and H I excess. Examining the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) H I imaging and Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) optical spectra of ESO075-G006 reveals an undisturbed galaxy without evidence for recent major, violent accretion events. A tilted ring fitted to the H I disc together with the gas-phase oxygen abundance distribution supports the scenario that gas has been constantly accreted on to ESO075-G006 but the high specific angular momentum makes ESO075-G006 very inefficient in forming stars. Thus, a massive H I disc has been built up.

  8. Chromatographic measurement of hydrogen isotopic and permanent gas impurities in tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, D.K.; Kinard, C.; Bohl, D.C.

    1976-06-04

    This paper describes a gas chromatograph that was designed for dedicated analysis of hydrogen isotopic and permanent gas impurities in tritium and tritium-deuterium mixtures. The instrument that was developed substantially improved the accuracy and precision of hydrogen isotopic analysis in the 20 ppM to one mole percent range as compared with other analytical methods. Several unique design features of the instrument were required due to the radiation and isotopic exchange properties of the tritium in the samples; descriptions of these features are presented along with details of the complete chromatographic system. The experimental procedures used to calibrate the detector and statistically evaluate its performance are given, and the sources of analytical error are cited. The limitations of the present system are also discussed.

  9. Nitrogen-Rich Polyacrylonitrile-Based Graphitic Carbons for Hydrogen Peroxide Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Pollack

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic substrate, which is devoid of expensive noble metals and enzymes for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, reduction reactions can be obtained via nitrogen doping of graphite. Here, we report a facile fabrication method for obtaining such nitrogen doped graphitized carbon using polyacrylonitrile (PAN mats and its use in H2O2 sensing. A high degree of graphitization was obtained with a mechanical treatment of the PAN fibers embedded with carbon nanotubes (CNT prior to the pyrolysis step. The electrochemical testing showed a limit of detection (LOD 0.609 µM and sensitivity of 2.54 µA cm−2 mM−1. The promising sensing performance of the developed carbon electrodes can be attributed to the presence of high content of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogens in the pyrolytic carbons, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The reported results suggest that, despite their simple fabrication, the hydrogen peroxide sensors developed from pyrolytic carbon nanofibers are comparable with their sophisticated nitrogen-doped graphene counterparts.

  10. Effects of hydrogen sulfide in fuel gas on SOFC stack performance with nickel containing anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavurucu Schubert, Sena

    2012-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) can use wide varieties of fuels such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, alcohols as well as synthesis gases from natural gas, biogas and petroleum. Using such a wide range of fuels introduces the risk of unwanted impurities, which can affect the function of the SOFC. One of the known impurities is sulfur which is a well known catalyst poison. This work deals with the effect of H{sub 2}S containing fuel gas on SOFC stack performance as well as regeneration processes and their underlying mechanisms.

  11. Characteristics of Carbon Monoxide Oxidization in Rich Hydrogen by Mesoporous Silica with TiO2 Photocatalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Nishimura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen (H2 is normally used as the fuel to power polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC. However, the power generation performance of PEFC is harmed by the carbon monoxide (CO in the H2 that is often produced frommethane (CH4. The purpose of this study is to investigate the experimental conditions in order to improve the CO oxidization performance of mesoporous silica loaded with TiO2. The impact of loading ratio of TiO2 and initial concentration ratio of O2 to CO on CO oxidization performance is investigated. As a result, the optimum loading ratio of TiO2 and initial concentration ratio of O2 to CO were 20 wt% and 4 vol%, respectively, under the experimental conditions. Under this optimumexperimental condition, the CO in rich H2 in the reactor can be completely eliminated from initial 12000 ppmV after UV light illumination of 72 hours.

  12. Liquefaction of Elbitsan and Yatagan lignites in carbon monoxide/hydrogen gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolat, E.; Oner, M.; Yalin, G.; Dincer, S. (Yildiz Univ., Chemical Engineering Dept., Istanbul (TR))

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects of experimental parameters on the liquefaction yields of Elbistan and Yatagan lignites that were investigated by using different solvents, gases and catalysts. In hydroliquefaction of Elbistan lignite with anthracene and creosote oils, higher oil yields were obtained with anthracene oil. Based on this result, anthracene oil was chosen as solvent for further work done with Elbistan lignite. First, the effect of moisture in lignite samples was observed with synthesis gas as medium gas; then, the effect of carbon monoxide/hydrogen ratio in liquefaction gas mixture was determined using moist lignite samples. The highest oil yield was obtained with most lignite sample in 3CO/1H{sub 2} gas moisture and it was 57.3% (daf.) The hydroliquefaction oil yields of Yatagan lignite obtained with creosote oil were higher than those obtained in anthracene oil. On further work done with Yatagan lignite, creosote oil was chosen as solvent. First, the effects of CoMo and red mud catalysts, then in catalyzed medium, the effects of moisture in lignite samples and at last, using most lignite samples and red mud catalyst, the effects of carbon monoxide/hydrogen ratio in gas moisture, were investigated.

  13. Aqueous process for recovering sulfur from hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Arunabha

    2015-05-05

    A process for recovering sulfur from a hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas utilizes an aqueous reaction medium, a temperature of about 110-150.degree. C., and a high enough pressure to maintain the aqueous reaction medium in a liquid state. The process reduces material and equipment costs and addresses the environmental disadvantages associated with known processes that rely on high boiling point organic solvents.

  14. Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooteghem Van, Suellen

    2005-09-13

    A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

  15. Observations of hydrogen-rich supernovae in the first days after explosion and new instruments to study them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Adam; PTF

    2018-01-01

    I will discuss our results studying light curves of hydrogen-rich supernovae during the first few days after explosion. The first days of emission encode important information about the physical system, and it is possible to relate the early-time light curve to the radius of the progenitor star by using shock-cooling models. I will show the first systematic application of these models to data from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We found that R-band data alone at PTF cadence cannot constrain the radius but can constrain the energy per unit mass of the explosion, uncovering new correlations with other supernova observables. We constrained the radii for events with multi-wavelength observations, and for two events observed with the Kepler mission at 30 min cadence. I will discuss improved observing strategies to obtain more constraining results in the future. Some tensions have arisen between our results and the expected radii from identified progenitors of hydrogen-rich supernovae. The resolution of these tensions may be related to the effect of circumstellar material on the light curves, motivating future systematic spectroscopic sequencing of these events. To this end, we have designed a new medium resolution UV-VIS spectrograph. The Multi-Imaging Transient Spectrograph (MITS) is the R~4500 UV-VIS arm of the Son Of X-Shooter (SOXS) spectrograph proposed for ESO’s 3.6 m New Technology Telescope. Our design divides the spectrum into several sub-bands, allowing optimization for each narrow part of the spectrum. We estimate a 50-100% improvement in throughput relative to a classical 4-C echelle design. Our design has passed a preliminary design review and is expected on the telescope in early 2021.

  16. Utilizing acid-rich effluents of fermentative hydrogen production process as substrate for harnessing bioelectricity: An integrative approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanakrishna, G.; Venkata Mohan, S.; Sarma, P.N. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre (BEEC), Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 607 (India)

    2010-04-15

    Lower substrate degradation is one of the limiting factors associated with fermentative hydrogen production process. To overcome this, an attempt was made to integrate microbial fuel cell (MFC) as a secondary energy generating process with the fermentative hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production. The acid-rich effluents generated from the acidogenic sequential batch biofilm reactor (AcSBBR) producing H{sub 2} by fermenting vegetable waste was subsequently used as substrate for bioelectricity generation in single chambered MFC (air cathode; non-catalyzed electrodes). AcSBBR was operated at 70.4 kg COD/m{sup 3}-day and the outlet was fed to the MFC at three variable organic loading rates. The final outlet from AcSBBR was composed of fermentative soluble acid intermediates along with residual carbon source. Experimental data illustrated the feasibility of utilizing acid-rich effluents by MFC for both additional energy generation and wastewater treatment. Higher power output (111.76 mW/m{sup 2}) was observed at lower substrate loading condition. MFC also illustrated its function as wastewater treatment unit by removing COD (80%), volatile fatty acids (79%), carbohydrates (78%) and turbidity (65.38%) effectively. Fermented form of vegetable wastewater exhibited higher improvement (94%) in power compared to unfermented wastewater. The performance of MFC was characterized with respect to polarization behavior, cell potentials, cyclic voltammetry and sustainable power. This integration approach enhanced wastewater treatment efficiency (COD removal, 84.6%) along with additional energy generation demonstrating both environmental and economic sustainability of the process. (author)

  17. Gas-Phase Reaction Pathways and Rate Coefficients for the Dichlorosilane-Hydrogen and Trichlorosilane-Hydrogen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Walch, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    As part of NASA Ames Research Center's Integrated Process Team on Device/Process Modeling and Nanotechnology our goal is to create/contribute to a gas-phase chemical database for use in modeling microelectronics devices. In particular, we use ab initio methods to determine chemical reaction pathways and to evaluate reaction rate coefficients. Our initial studies concern reactions involved in the dichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H2--H2) and trichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H-H2) systems. Reactant, saddle point (transition state), and product geometries and their vibrational harmonic frequencies are determined using the complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure method with the correlation consistent polarized valence double-zeta basis set (cc-pVDZ). Reaction pathways are constructed by following the imaginary frequency mode of the saddle point to both the reactant and product. Accurate energetics are determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations (CCSD(T)) extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Using the data from the electronic structure calculations, reaction rate coefficients are obtained using conventional and variational transition state and RRKM theories.

  18. Improvement of saturation magnetization of Fe nanoparticles by post-annealing in a hydrogen gas atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kin, Masane, E-mail: masane-kin@denso.co.jp; Tanaka, Masaaki; Hayashi, Yasushi; Hasaegawa, Jun [Research Laboratories, DENSO CORPORATION, 500-1, Minamiyama, Komenoki-cho, Nisshin, Aichi 470-0111 (Japan); Kura, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Tomoyuki [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    Fe nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5} and then post-annealing in a hydrogen gas atmosphere to produce highly monodisperse Fe NPs with high saturation magnetization (M{sub s}). The as-synthesized pre-anneal Fe NPs had an expanded α-Fe structure and M{sub s} was only 39% of that for bulk Fe because of the low crystallinity and the inclusion of a surfactant. Post-annealing of the Fe NPs in a hydrogen gas atmosphere at 200 °C improved the crystallinity of the Fe NPs from an amorphous-like structure to a body centered cubic (bcc) structure without any lattice expansion. This result indicates that hydrogen gas plays a significant role in improvement of the crystallinity of Fe NPs. Accompanying the improvement in crystallinity, M{sub s} for the Fe NPs increased from 86 to 190 emu/g{sub net} at 300 K, the values of which include the weight of surfactant. This enhanced M{sub s} is almost the same as that of bulk Fe (218 emu/{sub Fe}). It was concluded that the crystallinity has a significant influence on the M{sub s} of the Fe NPs because long-range ordering of the lattice can maintain strong direct exchange interactions between Fe atoms.

  19. Hydrogen from biomass gas steam reforming for low temperature fuel cell: energy and exergy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sordi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a method to analyze hydrogen production by biomass gasification, as well as electric power generation in small scale fuel cells. The proposed methodology is the thermodynamic modeling of a reaction system for the conversion of methane and carbon monoxide (steam reforming, as well as the energy balance of gaseous flow purification in PSA (Pressure Swing Adsorption is used with eight types of gasification gases in this study. The electric power is generated by electrochemical hydrogen conversion in fuel cell type PEMFC (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell. Energy and exergy analyses are applied to evaluate the performance of the system model. The simulation demonstrates that hydrogen production varies with the operation temperature of the reforming reactor and with the composition of the gas mixture. The maximum H2 mole fraction (0.6-0.64 mol.mol-1 and exergetic efficiency of 91- 92.5% for the reforming reactor are achieved when gas mixtures of higher quality such as: GGAS2, GGAS4 and GGAS5 are used. The use of those gas mixtures for electric power generation results in lower irreversibility and higher exergetic efficiency of 30-30.5%.

  20. Gas-Liquid Precipitation of water dissolved heavy metal ions using hydrogen sulfide gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Tarazi, M.Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation of solids promoted by gas-liquid reactions is applied in many industrial processes such as the production of ammonium phosphate, ammonium sulphate, barium carbonate, calcium carbonate, calcium fluoride, ypsum (calcium sulphate), goethite, sodium bicarbonate, strontium carbonate and

  1. Integration of Wind Energy, Hydrogen and Natural Gas Pipeline Systems to Meet Community and Transportation Energy Needs: A Parametric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahryar Garmsiri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The potential benefits are examined of the “Power-to-Gas” (P2G scheme to utilize excess wind power capacity by generating hydrogen (or potentially methane for use in the natural gas distribution grid. A parametric analysis is used to determine the feasibility and size of systems producing hydrogen that would be injected into the natural gas grid. Specifically, wind farms located in southwestern Ontario, Canada are considered. Infrastructure requirements, wind farm size, pipeline capacity, geographical dispersion, hydrogen production rate, capital and operating costs are used as performance measures. The model takes into account the potential production rate of hydrogen and the rate that it can be injected into the local gas grid. “Straw man” systems are examined, centered on a wind farm size of 100 MW integrating a 16-MW capacity electrolysis system typically producing 4700 kg of hydrogen per day.

  2. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. During Year I, we have successfully fabricated SiC macro porous membranes via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder, which were then deposited with thin, micro-porous (6 to 40{angstrom} in pore size) films via sol-gel technique as intermediate layers. Finally, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was deposited on this substrate via our CVD/I technique. The composite membrane thus prepared demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers. Building upon the positive progress made in the Year I preliminary study, we will conduct an optimization study in Year II to develop an optimized H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment.

  3. Hydrogen gas permeation through amorphous and partially crystallized Fe40Ni38Mo4B18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaella Martins Ribeiro

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Samples of amorphous and partially crystallized Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 alloy were submitted to hydrogen gas permeation from 523 to 643 K. The hydrogen permeation curves exhibited a single sigmoidal shape, typical of tests where no hydride formation occurs. It was observed that the hydrogen diffusivity increases for the amorphous samples and partially crystallized alloy with the temperature increase. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature was found to be D = 5.1 ± 0.5 × 10-12 exp (-11.0 ± 3.5/RT (m².s-1 for amorphous condition and D = 3.6 ± 0.5 × 10-11 exp (-19.8 ± 3.3/RT (m².s-1 for the partially crystallized condition. This suggests that the annihilation of defects in the amorphous structure and the crystalline phase precipitate contributes to the increase of the hydrogen diffusion.

  4. Gas Phase Detection of the NH-P Hydrogen Bond and Importance of Secondary Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Kristian H; Hansen, Anne S; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2015-11-05

    We have observed the NH···P hydrogen bond in a gas phase complex. The bond is identified in the dimethylamine-trimethylphosphine complex by a red shift of the fundamental NH-stretching frequency observed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). On the basis of the measured NH-stretching frequency red shifts, we find that P is a hydrogen bond acceptor atom similar in strength to S. Both are stronger acceptors than O and significantly weaker acceptors than N. The hydrogen bond angle, ∠NHP, is found to be very sensitive to the functional employed in density functional theory (DFT) optimizations of the complex and is a possible parameter to assess the quality of DFT functionals. Natural bonding orbital (NBO) energies and results from the topological methods atoms in molecules (AIM) and noncovalent interactions (NCI) indicate that the sensitivity is caused by the weakness of the hydrogen bond compared to secondary interactions. We find that B3LYP favors the hydrogen bond and M06-2X favors the secondary interactions leading to under- and overestimation, respectively, of the hydrogen bond angle relative to a DF-LCCSD(T)-F12a calculated angle. The remaining functionals tested, B3LYP-D3, B3LYP-D3BJ, CAM-B3LYP, and ωB97X-D, as well as MP2, show comparable contributions from the hydrogen bond and the secondary interactions and are close to DF-LCCSD(T)-F12a results.

  5. Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Air Products and Chemicals

    2008-09-30

    An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

  6. A comparative study of ethylene oxide gas, hydrogen peroxide gas plasma, and low-temperature steam formaldehyde sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemitsu, Keiji; Imasaka, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Shiho; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Ueno, Kumi; Takemura, Hiromu; Hirayama, Yoshihiro; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2005-05-01

    To compare the efficacies of ethylene oxide gas (EOG), hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (PLASMA), and low-temperature steam formaldehyde (LTSF) sterilization methods. The efficacies of EOG, PLASMA, and LTSF sterilization were tested using metal and plastic plates, common medical instruments, and three process challenge devices with narrow lumens. All items were contaminated with Bacillus stearothermophilus spores or used a standard biological indicator. EOG and LTSF demonstrated effective killing of B. stearothermophilus spores, with or without serum, on plates, on instruments, and in process challenge devices. PLASMA failed to adequately sterilize materials on multiple trials in several experiments, including two of three plates, two of three instruments, and all process challenge devices. Our results suggest that PLASMA sterilization may be unsuccessful under certain conditions, particularly when used for items with complex shapes and narrow lumens. Alternatively, LTSF sterilization demonstrates excellent efficacy and is comparable to EOG sterilization. LTSF could potentially act as a substitute if EOG becomes unavailable due to environmental concerns.

  7. Pathways to Earth-like atmospheres. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV)-powered escape of hydrogen-rich protoatmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammer, Helmut; Kislyakova, K G; Odert, P; Leitzinger, M; Schwarz, R; Pilat-Lohinger, E; Kulikov, Yu N; Khodachenko, M L; Güdel, M; Hanslmeier, M

    2011-12-01

    We discuss the evolution of the atmosphere of early Earth and of terrestrial exoplanets which may be capable of sustaining liquid water oceans and continents where life may originate. The formation age of a terrestrial planet, its mass and size, as well as the lifetime in the EUV-saturated early phase of its host star play a significant role in its atmosphere evolution. We show that planets even in orbits within the habitable zone of their host stars might not lose nebular- or catastrophically outgassed initial protoatmospheres completely and could end up as water worlds with CO2 and hydrogen- or oxygen-rich upper atmospheres. If an atmosphere of a terrestrial planet evolves to an N2-rich atmosphere too early in its lifetime, the atmosphere may be lost. We show that the initial conditions set up by the formation of a terrestrial planet and by the evolution of the host star's EUV and plasma environment are very important factors owing to which a planet may evolve to a habitable world. Finally we present a method for studying the discussed atmosphere evolution hypotheses by future UV transit observations of terrestrial exoplanets.

  8. Hydrogen-rich pure water prevents cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in SMP30 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yohei; Sato, Tadashi; Sugimoto, Masataka; Baskoro, Hario; Karasutani, Keiko; Mitsui, Aki; Nurwidya, Fariz; Arano, Naoko; Kodama, Yuzo; Hirano, Shin-Ichi; Ishigami, Akihito; Seyama, Kuniaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-10-07

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is predominantly a cigarette smoke (CS)-triggered disease with features of chronic systemic inflammation. Oxidants derived from CS can induce DNA damage and stress-induced premature cellular senescence in the respiratory system, which play significant roles in COPD. Therefore, antioxidants should provide benefits for the treatment of COPD; however, their therapeutic potential remains limited owing to the complexity of this disease. Recently, molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) has been reported as a preventive and therapeutic antioxidant. Molecular H 2 can selectively reduce hydroxyl radical accumulation with no known side effects, showing potential applications in managing oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and lipid metabolism. However, there have been no reports on the efficacy of molecular H 2 in COPD patients. In the present study, we used a mouse model of COPD to investigate whether CS-induced histological damage in the lungs could be attenuated by administration of molecular H 2 . We administered H 2 -rich pure water to senescence marker protein 30 knockout (SMP30-KO) mice exposed to CS for 8 weeks. Administration of H 2 -rich water attenuated the CS-induced lung damage in the SMP30-KO mice and reduced the mean linear intercept and destructive index of the lungs. Moreover, H 2 -rich water significantly restored the static lung compliance in the CS-exposed mice compared with that in the CS-exposed H 2 -untreated mice. Moreover, treatment with H 2 -rich water decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage markers such as phosphorylated histone H2AX and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, and senescence markers such as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1, and β-galactosidase in the CS-exposed mice. These results demonstrated that H 2 -rich pure water attenuated CS-induced emphysema in SMP30-KO mice by reducing CS-induced oxidative DNA damage and premature cell senescence in the lungs. Our

  9. Hydrogen gas sensing feature of polyaniline/titania (rutile) nanocomposite at environmental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milani Moghaddam, Hossain, E-mail: hossainmilani@yahoo.com [Solid State Physics Department, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nasirian, Shahruz [Solid State Physics Department, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Basic Sciences Department, Mazandaran University of Science and Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polyaniline/titania (rutile) nanocomposite (TPNC) was synthesized by a chemical oxidative polymerization method. • Surface morphology and titania (rutile) wt% in TPNC sensors were significant factors for H{sub 2} gas sensing. • TPNC sensors could be used for H{sub 2} gas sensing at different R.H. humidity. • TPNC Sensors exhibited considerable sensitive, reversible and repeatable response to H{sub 2} gas at environmental conditions. - Abstract: The resistance-based sensors of polyaniline/titania (rutile) nanocomposite (TPNC) were prepared by spin coating technique onto an epoxy glass substrate with Cu-interdigited electrodes to study their hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas sensing features. Our findings are that the change of the surface morphology, porosity and wt% of titania in TPNCs have a significant effect on H{sub 2} gas sensing of sensors. All of the sensors had a reproducibility response toward 0.8 vol% H{sub 2} gas at room temperature, air pressure and 50% relative humidity. A sensor with 40 wt% of titania nanoparticles had better response/recovery time and the response than other sensors. Moreover, H{sub 2} gas sensing mechanism of TPNC sensors based contact areas and the correlation of energy levels between PANI chains and the titania grains were studied.

  10. Analysis of Water Hammer with Different Closing Valve Laws on Transient Flow of Hydrogen-Natural Gas Mixture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Subani, Norazlina; Amin, Norsarahaida

    2015-01-01

      Water hammer on transient flow of hydrogen-natural gas mixture in a horizontal pipeline is analysed to determine the relationship between pressure waves and different modes of closing and opening of valves...

  11. Hydrogen sulfide monitoring and the effects of oil and gas activities on migratory birds in southeastern New Mexico [draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study examined the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), emitted by oil and gas activities, by focusing on migratory birds in southeastern New Mexico. Study sites...

  12. Effectiveness of oxygen enriched hydrogen-HHO gas addition on DI diesel engine performance, emission and combustion characteristics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Premkartikkumar S.R; Annamalai K; Pradeepkumar A.R

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, more researches focus on protecting the environment. Present investigation concern with the effectiveness of Oxygen Enriched hydrogen- HHO gas addition on performance, emission and combustion characteristics of a DI diesel engine...

  13. DECONTAMINATION ASSESSMENT OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS, AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACTS USING A HYDROGEN PERIOXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: To evaluate the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials using hydrogen peroxide gas. Methods and Results: B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. Stearothermophilus spores were dried on seven...

  14. A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Based Study on Urine Metabolomics in Rats Chronically Poisoned with Hydrogen Sulfide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deng, Mingjie; Zhang, Meiling; Sun, Fa; Ma, Jianshe; Hu, Lufeng; Yang, Xuezhi; Lin, Guanyang; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-01

      Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GS-MS) in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was applied to explore the metabolic variability in urine of chronically hydrogen sulfide- (H2S...

  15. A Two‐Fluid model study of hydrogen production via water gas shift in fluidized bed membrane reactors

    OpenAIRE

    J.W. Voncken, Ramon; Roghair, Ivo; Van Sint Annaland, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Fluidized bed membrane reactors have been proposed as a promising reactor concept for the production of ultra-pure hydrogen via Water Gas Shift (WGS). High-flux thin-film dense palladium-based membranes are used to selectively extract hydrogen from the reaction medium, which shifts the thermodynamic equilibrium towards the products’ side, increasing the conversion. A Two-Fluid Model (TFM) has been used to investigate the effect of hydrogen extraction via perm-selective membranes on the WGS re...

  16. Hydrogen Oxidation on Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells in the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, Xiao; Li, Qingfeng; Hjuler, Hans Aage

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen oxidation has been studied on a carbon-supported platinum gas diffusion electrode in a phosphoric acidelectrolyte in the presence of carbon monoxide and oxygen in the feed gas. The poisoning effect of carbon monoxide presentin the feed gas was measured in the temperature range from 80...... to 150°C. It was found that throughout the temperaturerange, the potential loss due to the CO poisoning can be reduced to a great extent by the injection of small amounts ofgaseous oxygen into the hydrogen gas containing carbon monoxide. By adding 5 volume percent (v/o) oxygen, an almost...

  17. SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2003-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. SiC macro-porous membranes have been successfully fabricated via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder. Also, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was prepared via our CVD/I technique. This composite membrane demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers and sol-gel techniques. Building upon the positive progress made in the membrane development study, we conducted an optimization study to develop an H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment. In addition, mathematical simulation has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed reactor for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the

  18. Overview of geologic storage of natural gas with an emphasis on assessing the feasibility of storing hydrogen.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, Anna Snider

    2009-09-01

    In many regions across the nation geologic formations are currently being used to store natural gas underground. Storage options are dictated by the regional geology and the operational need. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in understanding theses various geologic storage options, the advantages and disadvantages, in the hopes of developing an underground facility for the storage of hydrogen as a low cost storage option, as part of the hydrogen delivery infrastructure. Currently, depleted gas/oil reservoirs, aquifers, and salt caverns are the three main types of underground natural gas storage in use today. The other storage options available currently and in the near future, such as abandoned coal mines, lined hard rock caverns, and refrigerated mined caverns, will become more popular as the demand for natural gas storage grows, especially in regions were depleted reservoirs, aquifers, and salt deposits are not available. The storage of hydrogen within the same type of facilities, currently used for natural gas, may add new operational challenges to the existing cavern storage industry, such as the loss of hydrogen through chemical reactions and the occurrence of hydrogen embrittlement. Currently there are only three locations worldwide, two of which are in the United States, which store hydrogen. All three sites store hydrogen within salt caverns.

  19. Reduced-order modellin for high-pressure transient flow of hydrogen-natural gas mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaie, Baba G.; Khan, Ilyas; Alshomrani, Ali Saleh; Alqahtani, Aisha M.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper the transient flow of hydrogen compressed-natural gas (HCNG) mixture which is also referred to as hydrogen-natural gas mixture in a pipeline is numerically computed using the reduced-order modelling technique. The study on transient conditions is important because the pipeline flows are normally in the unsteady state due to the sudden opening and closure of control valves, but most of the existing studies only analyse the flow in the steady-state conditions. The mathematical model consists in a set of non-linear conservation forms of partial differential equations. The objective of this paper is to improve the accuracy in the prediction of the HCNG transient flow parameters using the Reduced-Order Modelling (ROM). The ROM technique has been successfully used in single-gas and aerodynamic flow problems, the gas mixture has not been done using the ROM. The study is based on the velocity change created by the operation of the valves upstream and downstream the pipeline. Results on the flow characteristics, namely the pressure, density, celerity and mass flux are based on variations of the mixing ratio and valve reaction and actuation time; the ROM computational time cost advantage are also presented.

  20. Hydrogen Gas Retention and Release from WTP Vessels: Summary of Preliminary Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bontha, Jagannadha R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Daniel, Richard C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mahoney, Lenna A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rassat, Scot D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wells, Beric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bao, Jie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boeringa, Gregory K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buchmiller, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burns, Carolyn A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Karri, Naveen K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Li, Huidong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tran, Diana N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently being designed and constructed to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in the 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. A number of technical issues related to the design of the pretreatment facility (PTF) of the WTP have been identified. These issues must be resolved prior to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) reaching a decision to proceed with engineering, procurement, and construction activities for the PTF. One of the issues is Technical Issue T1 - Hydrogen Gas Release from Vessels (hereafter referred to as T1). The focus of T1 is identifying controls for hydrogen release and completing any testing required to close the technical issue. In advance of selecting specific controls for hydrogen gas safety, a number of preliminary technical studies were initiated to support anticipated future testing and to improve the understanding of hydrogen gas generation, retention, and release within PTF vessels. These activities supported the development of a plan defining an overall strategy and approach for addressing T1 and achieving technical endpoints identified for T1. Preliminary studies also supported the development of a test plan for conducting testing and analysis to support closing T1. Both of these plans were developed in advance of selecting specific controls, and in the course of working on T1 it was decided that the testing and analysis identified in the test plan were not immediately needed. However, planning activities and preliminary studies led to significant technical progress in a number of areas. This report summarizes the progress to date from the preliminary technical studies. The technical results in this report should not be used for WTP design or safety and hazards analyses and technical results are marked with the following statement: “Preliminary Technical Results for Planning – Not to be used for WTP Design

  1. Polymer pipes for distributing mixtures of hydrogen and natural gas. Evolution of their transport and mechanical properties after an ageing under an hydrogen environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klopffer, Marie-Helene [IFP (France); Berne, Philippe [CEA (France); Castagnet, Sylvie [ENSMA (France); Weber, Mathilde [Air Liquide (Canada); Hochstetter, Gilles [Arkema (France); Espuche, Eliane [INSA Lyon (France)

    2010-07-01

    With the development of hydrogen as an energy vector, its delivery and transport from the production site to the end user remains an issue. Indeed, the key challenge to overcome is the high hydrogen permeation through existing polymer infrastructures used for natural gas distribution (Polyethylene pipes, components as connecting parts). This high flow rate of hydrogen through polymer has to be taken into account for safety and economical requirements. This 3-year project investigates pure hydrogen gas and mixtures (20% CH4 - 80% H2) in pipelines made of engineering polymers to develop and assess material solutions to cope with today problems for H2 distribution. Materials such as polyethylene (PE100) and polyamide 11 (PA11) have been studied. PE100 is considered as a reference material as it is used today in natural gas distribution pipes. PA11 should allow a higher operating pressure combined with better gas-barrier performances. Test benches and protocols for testing materials in terms of mechanical and barrier properties were first developed. The materials have then been studied in terms of barrier, mechanical properties and on a microstructural point of view. The properties of the raw material and samples after ageing in presence of hydrogen in various conditions were compared to assess the long term behaviour in service. These results as well as the comparison between PA11 and PE are presented. (orig.)

  2. The effects of the hydrogen addition on the HCN profiles in fuel-rich-premixed, burner-stabilized C1-C3 alkane flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepman, A. V.; Mokhov, A. V.; Levinsky, H. B.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen addition on HCN formation and consumption in fuel-rich, burnerstabilized methane, ethane and propane flames are reported. The HCN mole fraction was measured using quartz-microprobe sampling followed by direct absorption spectroscopy. Experiments were performed at equivalence

  3. The effects of hydrogen addition on Fenimore NO formation in low-pressure, fuel-rich-premixed, burner-stabilized CH4/O-2/N-2 flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepman, A. V.; van Essen, V. M.; Mokhov, A. V.; Levinsky, H. B.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effects of hydrogen addition on Fenimore NO formation in fuel-rich, low-pressure burner-stabilized CH4/O-2/N-2 flames. Towards this end, axial profiles of temperature and mole fractions of CH and NO are measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The experiments are performed

  4. The effects of hydrogen addition on NO formation in atmospheric-pressure, fuel-rich-premixed, burner-stabilized methane, ethane and propane flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepman, A. V.; Mokhov, A. V.; Levinsky, H. B.

    The effects of hydrogen addition on NO formation in fuel-rich, burner-stabilized methane, ethane and propane flames are reported. Profiles of temperature and NO mole fraction were obtained using spontaneous Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), respectively. Experiments were

  5. Microbial Electrodialysis Cell for Simultaneous Water Desalination and Hydrogen Gas Production

    KAUST Repository

    Mehanna, Maha

    2010-12-15

    A new approach to water desalination is to use exoelectrogenic bacteria to generate electrical power from the biodegradation of organic matter, moving charged ions from a middle chamber between two membranes in a type of microbial fuel cell called a microbial desalination cell. Desalination efficiency using this approach is limited by the voltage produced by the bacteria. Here we examine an alternative strategy based on boosting the voltage produced by the bacteria to achieve hydrogen gas evolution from the cathode using a three-chambered system we refer to as a microbial electrodialysis cell (MEDC). We examined the use of the MEDC process using two different initial NaCl concentrations of 5 g/L and 20 g/L. Conductivity in the desalination chamber was reduced by up to 68 ± 3% in a single fed-batch cycle, with electrical energy efficiencies reaching 231 ± 59%, and maximum hydrogen production rates of 0.16 ± 0.05 m3 H2/m3 d obtained at an applied voltage of 0.55 V. The advantage of this system compared to a microbial fuel cell approach is that the potentials between the electrodes can be better controlled, and the hydrogen gas that is produced can be used to recover energy to make the desalination process self-sustaining with respect to electrical power requirements. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  6. The impact of hydrogen-bearing gas to change indexes of car engine in operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korpach A.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to lower oil and petroleum products there is a constant problem of the growing use of alternative fuels. One of the most promising is hydrogen, but its use as a self-fuel is rather difficult, but using as the form of supplements has prospects for widespread use in road transport. In order to establish the effectiveness of its use as a hydrogen-containing gas as a product of the electrolysis of the alkaline solution, a series of tests conducted. Tests were carried out on the car ZAZ–1102 "Tavria", which is equipped with an engine MeMZ–245 with carburetor feed system and electrolyser SuperKit 10, which is powered by the vehicle electrical system. At the same time also used electrolytic League–02. The effect on fuel economy additives hydrogen-containing gas to the air charge is determined when the engine is idling. When using additives 1,34 % interest, from the weight of the fuel, fuel efficiency has increased by 1,9 %.

  7. Plasma-neutral gas interaction in a tokamak divertor: effects of hydrogen molecules and plasma recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, S.I. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center]|[I.V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, 1 Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); Pigarov, A.Yu. [Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory, James Forrestal Campus, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)]|[I.V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, 1 Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); Soboleva, T.K. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]|[I.V. Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy, 1 Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); Sigmar, D.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Fusion Center

    1997-02-01

    We investigate the influence of hydrogen molecules on plasma recombination using a collisional-radiative model for multispecies hydrogen plasmas and tokamak detached divertor parameters. The rate constant found for molecular activated recombination of a plasma can be as high as 2 x 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}/s, confirming our pervious estimates. We investigate the effects of hydrogen molecules and plasma recombination on self-consistent plasma-neutral gas interactions in the recycling region of a tokamak divertor. We treat the plasma flow in a fluid approximation retaining the effects of plasma recombination and employing a Knudsen neutral transport model for a `gas box` divertor geometry. For the model of plasma-neutral interactions we employ we find: (a) molecular activated recombination is a dominant channel of divertor plasma recombination; and (b) plasma recombination is a key element leading to a decrease in the plasma flux onto the target and substantial plasma pressure drop which are the main features of detached divertor regimes. (orig.).

  8. Sulfur Isotopes in Gas-rich Impact-Melt Glasses in Shergottites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. N.; Hoppe, P.; Sutton, S. R.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Huth, J.

    2010-01-01

    Large impact melt glasses in some shergottites contain huge amounts of Martian atmospheric gases and they are known as gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses. By studying the neutron-induced isotopic deficits and excesses in Sm-149 and Sm-150 isotopes resulting from Sm-149 (n,gamma) 150Sm reaction and 80Kr excesses produced by Br-79 (n,gamma) Kr-80 reaction in the GRIM glasses using mass-spectrometric techniques, it was shown that these glasses in shergottites EET79001 and Shergotty contain regolith materials irradiated by a thermal neutron fluence of approx.10(exp 15) n/sq cm near Martian surface. Also, it was shown that these glasses contain varying amounts of sulfates and sulfides based on the release patterns of SO2 (sulfate) and H2S (sulfide) using stepwise-heating mass-spectrometric techniques. Furthermore, EMPA and FE-SEM studies in basaltic-shergottite GRIM glasses EET79001, LithB (,507& ,69), Shergotty (DBS I &II), Zagami (,992 & ,994) showed positive correlation between FeO and "SO3" (sulfide + sulfate), whereas those belonging to olivine-phyric shergottites EET79001, LithA (,506, & ,77) showed positive correlation between CaO/Al2O3 and "SO3".

  9. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of Ni-rich NiTi plates: functional behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J. P.; Barbosa, D.; Braz Fernandes, F. M.; Miranda, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    It is often reported that, to successfully join NiTi shape memory alloys, fusion-based processes with reduced thermal affected regions (as in laser welding) are required. This paper describes an experimental study performed on the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of 1.5 mm thick plates of Ni-rich NiTi. The functional behavior of the joints was assessed. The superelasticity was analyzed by cycling tests at maximum imposed strains of 4, 8 and 12% and for a total of 600 cycles, without rupture. The superelastic plateau was observed, in the stress-strain curves, 30 MPa below that of the base material. Shape-memory effect was evidenced by bending tests with full recovery of the initial shape of the welded joints. In parallel, uniaxial tensile tests of the joints showed a tensile strength of 700 MPa and an elongation to rupture of 20%. The elongation is the highest reported for fusion-welding of NiTi, including laser welding. These results can be of great interest for the wide-spread inclusion of NiTi in complex shaped components requiring welding, since TIG is not an expensive process and is simple to operate and implement in industrial environments.

  10. Development of gas temperature probes for 1700 degrees C hydrogen-combustion turbine combustors; 1700 degrees C suiso nensho turbine yo nenshokino gas ondo keisoku probe no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Nishida, H.; Kasai, Y.; Fukahori, O. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Murayama, M. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Dodo, S. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-05-20

    In the development of the Hydrogen-oxygen combustor for 1700 degrees C Hydrogen-combustion turbines, it is important to measure gas temperature distribution at combustor outlet where local temperatures are estimated over 1800 degrees C in order to evaluate the performance of combustors. Multi point gas temperature probes consisting of Pt/Rh 40% Pt/Rh 20% thermocouples are developed to measure gas temperature distribution in the combustion tests of the Hydrogen-Oxygen combustors. Two types of probes no cooled and water-cooled, are designed and tested on the high pressure combustion tests. The test results demonstrate that the water-cooled type probes enable us to measure local gas temperatures up to 1850 degrees C in 2.5 Mpa, 130 m/s steam flow, and are applicable to the combustion tests of the combustor. (author)

  11. Human health cost of hydrogen sulfide air pollution from an oil and gas Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenessary, Dinara; Kenessary, Almas; Kenessariyev, Ussen Ismailovich; Juszkiewicz, Konrad; Amrin, Meiram Kazievich; Erzhanova, Aya Eralovna

    2017-06-08

    Introduction and objective. The Karachaganak oil and gas condensate field (KOGCF), one of the largest in the world, located in the Republic of Kazakhstan (RoK) in Central Asia, is surrounded by 10 settlements with a total population of 9,000 people. Approximately73% of this population constantly mention a specific odour of rotten eggs in the air, typical for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions, and the occurrence of low-level concentrations of hydrogen sulfide around certain industrial installations (esp. oil refineries) is a well known fact. Therefore, this study aimed at determining the impact on human health and the economic damage to the country due to H2S emissions. Materials and method. Dose-response dependency between H2S concentrations in the air and cardiovascular morbidity using multiple regression analysis was applied. Economic damage from morbidity was derived with a newly-developed method, with Kazakhstani peculiarities taken into account. Results.Hydrogen sulfide air pollution due to the KOGCF activity costs the state almost $60,000 per year. Moreover, this is the reason for a more than 40% rise incardiovascular morbidity in the region. Conclusion. The reduction of hydrogen sulfide emissions into the air is recommended, as well as successive constant ambient air monitoring in future. Economic damage evaluation should be made mandatory, on a legal basis, whenever an industrial facility operation results in associated air pollution.

  12. Portal venous gas emboli after accidental ingestion of concentrated hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Rebekah A; Schmidt, Suzanne M

    2013-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a common household product. It is clear and odorless making it easy to confuse with water, especially when improperly stored. Concentrated formulations are also available for consumer purchase. We report a case of hydrogen peroxide ingestion in a child and discuss the potential consequences and treatment of such an exposure. A 12-year-old boy accidentally ingested a sip of concentrated hydrogen peroxide. He rapidly developed hematemesis and presented to the Emergency Department. His initial work-up was unremarkable, and his symptoms resolved quickly. However, diffuse gas emboli were found within the portal system on abdominal computed tomography. The child was treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy and later found to have gastric irritation as well as an ulcer on endoscopy. He recovered fully from the incident. We present this case to increase awareness of the dangers of hydrogen peroxide ingestion in children. Fortunately, the child in this case recovered fully, but emergency physicians should be aware of the potential consequences and therapeutic options. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Catalytic Steam Reforming of Bio-Oil to Hydrogen Rich Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trane-Restrup, Rasmus

    , was observed and the yield of these compounds decreased with increasing temperature. A large formation of aromatic compounds, benzenediols and phenol, was observed in the SR of guaiacol even at 600 ‰ and temperatures as high as 780 ‰ were needed to eliminate the formation of these compounds. Temperatures...... the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. In the SR of bio-oil or biooil model compounds high degrees of conversion and high yields of H2 can be achieved, but stability with time-on-stream is rarely achieved. The deactivation is mainly due to carbon deposition and is one of the major hurdles in the SR of bio...... precursor to carbon deposition. CeO2, ZrO2, K, or mixtures hereof were added to Ni/MgAl2O4, and all of them lowered the carbon deposition and increased the activity. The addition of CeO2 gave the lowest carbon deposition probably due to an increased oxidation of carbon by CeO2. Stability tests over 24 h...

  14. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  15. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area - Phase 2 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Mark Lee

    2002-04-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB. It has the needed binding rate and capacity, but some of the chemical species that might be present in the containers could interfere with its ability to remove hydrogen. This project is focused upon developing a protective polymeric membrane coating for the DEB getter material, which comes in the form of small, irregularly shaped particles. This report summarizes the experimental results of the second phase of the development of the materials.

  16. Assessment of the efficacy of a low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyi, M S; Holton, J; Ridgway, G L

    1995-12-01

    The STERRAD 100 sterilization system (Johnson & Johnson Medical Ltd) uses low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma for sterilization of heat labile equipment. The efficacy of the machine was tested by contaminating a standard set of instruments with different organisms and using a filtration method to assess recovery of organisms from the wash fluids of instruments post-sterilization. Experiments were performed under clean (the organism only) and dirty (organism mixed with egg protein) conditions. A parallel study conducted using a 3M STERIVAC ethylene oxide sterilizer could not be completed owing to closure of the ethylene oxide plant. For sterilization of instruments with long and narrow lumens, hydrogen peroxide adaptors are necessary. The STERRAD 100 sterilizer can achieve effective sterilization of heat labile instruments with a reduction of 6 log10 cfu/mL of organisms tested. This method has the advantages over ethylene oxide sterilization of safety, ease of maintenance and no requirement for aeration time.

  17. Evaluation of the plasma hydrogen isotope content by residual gas analysis at JET and AUG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenik, A.; Alegre, D.; Brezinsek, S.; De Castro, A.; Kruezi, U.; Oberkofler, M.; Panjan, M.; Primc, G.; Reichbauer, T.; Resnik, M.; Rohde, V.; Seibt, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Wauters, T.; Zaplotnik, R.; ASDEX-Upgrade, the; EUROfusion MST1 Teams; contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    The isotope content of the plasma reflects on the dynamics of isotope changeover experiments, efficiency of wall conditioning and the performance of a fusion device in the active phase of operation. The assessment of the isotope ratio of hydrogen and methane molecules is used as a novel method of assessing the plasma isotope ratios at JET and ASDEX-Upgrade (AUG). The isotope ratios of both molecules in general shows similar trends as the isotope ratio detected by other diagnostics. At JET, the absolute values of RGA signals are in relatively good agreement with each other and with spectroscopy data, while at AUG the deviation from neutral particle analyser data are larger, and the results show a consistent spatial distribution of the isotope ratio. It is further shown that the isotope ratio of the hydrogen molecule can be used to study the degree of dissociation of the injected gas during changeover experiments.

  18. Reversible Storage of Hydrogen and Natural Gas in Nanospace-Engineered Activated Carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Beckner, Matt; Rash, Tyler; Yu, Ping; Suppes, Galen; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    An overview is given of the development of advanced nanoporous carbons as storage materials for natural gas (methane) and molecular hydrogen in on-board fuel tanks for next-generation clean automobiles. High specific surface areas, porosities, and sub-nm/supra-nm pore volumes are quantitatively selected by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process. Tunable bimodal pore-size distributions of sub-nm and supra-nm pores are established by subcritical nitrogen adsorption. Optimal pore structures for gravimetric and volumetric gas storage, respectively, are presented. Methane and hydrogen adsorption isotherms up to 250 bar on monolithic and powdered activated carbons are reported and validated, using several gravimetric and volumetric instruments. Current best gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are: 256 g CH4/kg carbon and 132 g CH4/liter carbon at 293 K and 35 bar; 26, 44, and 107 g H2/kg carbon at 303, 194, and 77 K respectively and 100 bar. Adsorbed film density, specific surface area, and binding energy are analyzed separately using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation, Langmuir model, and lattice gas models.

  19. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a

  20. Discovery of an extremely gas rich dwarf triplet near the centre of the Lynx-Cancer void

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengalur, J. N.; Pustilnik, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) H i observations, done as part of an ongoing study of dwarf galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void, resulted in the discovery of a triplet of extremely gas rich galaxies located near the centre of the void. The triplet members SDSS J0723+3621, SDSS J0723+3622 and SDSS J0723+3624 have absolute magnitudes MB of -14.2, -11.9 and -9.7 and M(H i)/LB of ˜2.9, ˜10 and ˜25, respectively. The gas mass fractions, as derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry and the GMRT data, are 0.93, 0.997 and 0.997, respectively. The faintest member of this triplet, SDSS J0723+3624, is one of the most gas rich galaxies known. We find that all three galaxies deviate significantly from the Tully-Fisher relation, but follow the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. All three galaxies also have a baryon fraction that is significantly smaller than the cosmic baryon fraction. For the largest galaxy in the triplet, this is in contradiction to numerical simulations. The discovery of this very unique dwarf triplet lends further support to the idea that the void environment is conducive to the formation of galaxies with unusual properties. These observations provide further motivation to do deep searches of voids for a `hidden' very gas rich galaxy population with MB ≳ -11.

  1. Pilot Scale Water Gas Shift - Membrane Device for Hydrogen from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Tom [Western Research Inst. (WRI), Laramie, WY (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The objectives of the project were to build pilot scale hydrogen separation systems for use in a gasification product stream. This device would demonstrate fabrication and manufacturing techniques for producing commercially ready facilities. The design was a 2 lb/day hydrogen device which included composite hydrogen separation membranes, a water gas shift monolith catalyst, and stainless steel structural components. Synkera Technologies was to prepare hydrogen separation membranes with metallic rims, and to adjust the alloy composition in their membranes to a palladium-gold composition which is sulfur resistant. Chart was to confirm their brazing technology for bonding the metallic rims of the composite membranes to their structural components and design and build the 2 lbs/day device incorporating membranes and catalysts. WRI prepared the catalysts and completed the testing of the membranes and devices on coal derived syngas. The reactor incorporated eighteen 2'' by 7'' composite palladium alloy membranes. These membranes were assembled with three stacks of three paired membranes. Initial vacuum testing and visual inspection indicated that some membranes were cracked, either in transportation or in testing. During replacement of the failed membranes, while pulling a vacuum on the back side of the membranes, folds were formed in the flexible composite membranes. In some instances these folds led to cracks, primarily at the interface between the alumina and the aluminum rim. The design of the 2 lb/day device was compromised by the lack of any membrane isolation. A leak in any membrane failed the entire device. A large number of tests were undertaken to bring the full 2 lb per day hydrogen capacity on line, but no single test lasted more than 48 hours. Subsequent tests to replace the mechanical seals with brazing have been promising, but the technology remains promising but not proven.

  2. UGC 3672: an unusual merging triplet of gas-rich galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengalur, J. N.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Egorova, E. S.

    2017-02-01

    We present H I 21 cm and optical observations of UGC 3672 which is located near the centre of the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. We find that UGC 3672 consists of an approximately linearly aligned triplet of gas-rich dwarfs with large-scale velocity continuity along the triplet axis. The faintest component of the triplet is extremely gas-rich M_{H I}/L_B ˜ 17) and also extremely metal deficient (12 + log (O/H) ˜ 7.0). The metallicity of this dwarf is close to the 'floor' observed in star-forming galaxies. Low-resolution H I images show that the galaxy triplet is located inside a common H I envelope, with fairly regular, disc-like kinematics. At high angular resolution however, the gas is found to be confined to several filamentary tidal tails and bridges. The linear alignment of the galaxies, along with the velocity continuity that we observe, is consistent with the galaxies lying along a filament. We argue that the location of this highly unusual system in an extremely low-density environment is not a coincidence, but is a consequence of structure formation proceeding more slowly and also probing smaller scales than in regions with average density. Our observations also indicate that wet mergers of galaxies flowing along filaments is a possible pathway for the formation of gas-rich discs. The UGC 3672 system provides an interesting opportunity to study the kind of interactions typical between high-redshift extremely gas-rich unevolved small systems that lie at base of the hierarchical galaxy formation model.

  3. Hyperfine frequency shift of atomic hydrogen in the presence of helium buffer gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochemsen, R.; Berlinsky, A.J. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Physics)

    1982-02-01

    A quantum mechanical thermal average is performed to obtain the temperature dependence of the hyperfine frequency shift (HFS) of hydrogen atoms in the presence of He buffer gas. The calculations are based on existing ab initio calculations of the hyperfine frequency shift as a function of internuclear separation and of the interatomic potential. We find that the HFS changes sign at fairly low temperature and has a small negative value at T = 1 K in agreement with recent measurements. The overall temperature dependence is shown to be quite sensitive to the interatomic potential.

  4. Observation of nuclear spin waves in spin-polarized atomic hydrogen gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johson, B.R.; Denker, J.S.; Bigelow, N.; Levy, L.P.; Freed, J.H.; Lee, D.M.

    1984-04-23

    We have observed narrow, distinct resonances in the NMR spectrum of dilute spin-polarized atomic hydrogen gas (nroughly-equal10/sup 16/ atoms/cm/sup 3/). The dependence of the observed spectra on temperature, density, polarization, and magnetic field gradient is consistent with theoretical predictions for spin-wave excitations damped by diffusion. We have measured the parameter ..mu.., which is a measure of the importance of exchange effects in spin transport processes, and the diffusion coefficient D/sub 0/, both of which are in reasonable agreement with theory.

  5. Intermediate energy proton stopping power for hydrogen molecules and monoatomic helium gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Stopping power in the intermediate energy region (100 keV to 1 MeV) was investigated, based on the work of Lindhard and Winther, and on the local plasma model. The theory is applied to calculate stopping power of hydrogen molecules and helium gas for protons of energy ranging from 100 keV to 2.5 MeV. Agreement with the experimental data is found to be within 10 percent. Previously announced in STAR as N84-16955

  6. Detection of Hydrogen Sulphide Gas Sensor Based Nanostructured Ba2CrMoO6 Thick Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Kadu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline pure and doped Ba2CrMoO6, having an average crystallite size of 40 nm were synthesized by the sol-gel citrate method. Structural and gas-sensing characteristics were performed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD and sensitivity measurements. The gas sensing properties to reducing gases like Hydrogen sulphide (H2S, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG, carbon monoxide (CO and hydrogen gas (H2 were also discussed. The maximum sensitivity was obtained for 5 wt % Ni doped Ba2CrMoO6 at an operating temperature 250oC for H2S gas. Pd incorporation over 5 wt% Ni doped Ba2CrMoO6 improved the sensitivity, selectivity, response time, and reduced the operating temperature from 250 to 200oC of the sensor for H2S gas. This sensor also shows good satiability.

  7. Effects of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on Performance and Emission Characteristic of SI Engine using Hydrogen and CNG Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitnaware, Pravin Tukaram; Suryawanshi, Jiwak G.

    2018-01-01

    This paper shows exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) effects on multi-cylinder bi-fuel SI engine using blends of 0, 5, 10 and 15% hydrogen by energy with CNG. All trials are performed at a speed of 3000, 3500 and 4000 rpm with EGR rate of 0, 5, 10 and 15%, with equal spark timing and injection pressure of 2.6 bar. At specific hydrogen percentage with increase in EGR rate NOx emission reduces drastically and increases with increase in hydrogen addition. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission decreases with increase in speed and hydrogen addition. There is considerable improvement in brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and brake specific energy consumption (BSEC) at 15% EGR rate. At 3000 rpm, 5% EGR rate with 5% hydrogen had shown maximum cylinder pressure. Brake specific fuel consumption (b.s.f.c) increased with increase in EGR rate and decreased with increase in hydrogen addition for all speeds.

  8. Drinking Hydrogen-Rich Water Has Additive Effects on Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment of Improving Periodontitis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuji Azuma

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. A reduction of oxidative stress by drinking hydrogen-rich water (HW might be beneficial to periodontal health. In this pilot study, we compared the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment with or without drinking HW on periodontitis. Thirteen patients (3 women, 10 men with periodontitis were divided into two groups: The control group (n = 6 or the HW group (n = 7. In the HW group, participants consumed HW 4–5 times/day for eight weeks. At two to four weeks, all participants received non-surgical periodontal treatment. Oral examinations were performed at baseline, two, four and eight weeks, and serum was obtained at these time points to evaluate oxidative stress. At baseline, there were no significant differences in periodontal status between the control and HW groups. The HW group showed greater improvements in probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level than the control group at two, four and eight weeks (p < 0.05. The HW group also exhibited an increased serum level of total antioxidant capacity at four weeks, compared to baseline (p < 0.05. Drinking HW enhanced the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment, thus improving periodontitis.

  9. Applied potentials regulate recovery of residual hydrogen from acid-rich effluents: Influence of biocathodic buffer capacity over process performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikhil, G N; Venkata Mohan, S; Swamy, Y V

    2015-01-01

    An absolute biological microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was operated for a prolonged period under different applied potentials (Eapp, -0.2V to -1.0V) and hydrogen (H2) production was observed using acid-rich effluent. Among these potentials, an optimal voltage of -0.6 V influenced the biocathode by which maximum H2 production of 120 ± 9 ml was noticed. This finding was corroborated with dehydrogenase activity (1.8 ± 0.1 μg/ml) which is the key enzyme for H2 production. The in situ biocathode regulated buffer overpotentials which was remarkably observed by the change in peak heights of dissociation value (pKa) from the titration curve. Substrate degradation analysis gave an estimate of coulombic efficiency of about 72 ± 5% when operated at optimal voltage. Evidently, the electron transfer from solid carbon electrode to biocathode was analyzed by cyclic voltammetry and its derivatives showed the involvement of redox mediators. Despite, the MEC endures certain activation overpotentials which were estimated from the Tafel slope analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydrogen-Rich Syngas Production from Gasification and Pyrolysis of Solar Dried Sewage Sludge: Experimental and Modeling Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrib, Amina; Friaa, Athar; Ouerghi, Aymen; Naoui, Slim; Belayouni, Habib

    2017-01-01

    Solar dried sewage sludge (SS) conversion by pyrolysis and gasification processes has been performed, separately, using two laboratory-scale reactors, a fixed-bed pyrolyzer and a downdraft gasifier, to produce mainly hydrogen-rich syngas. Prior to SS conversion, solar drying has been conducted in order to reduce moisture content (up to 10%). SS characterization reveals that these biosolids could be appropriate materials for gaseous products production. The released gases from SS pyrolysis and gasification present relatively high heating values (up to 9.96 MJ/kg for pyrolysis and 8.02  9.96 MJ/kg for gasification) due to their high contents of H2 (up to 11 and 7 wt%, resp.) and CH4 (up to 17 and 5 wt%, resp.). The yields of combustible gases (H2 and CH4) show further increase with pyrolysis. Stoichiometric models of both pyrolysis and gasification reactions were determined based on the global biomass formula, CαHβOγNδSε, in order to assist in the products yields optimization. PMID:28856162

  11. Carbon Dioxide-Free Hydrogen Production with Integrated Hydrogen Separation and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Stefan; Müller, Michael; Jorschick, Holger; Helmin, Marta; Bösmann, Andreas; Palkovits, Regina; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-10

    An integration of CO2 -free hydrogen generation through methane decomposition coupled with hydrogen/methane separation and chemical hydrogen storage through liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems is demonstrated. A potential, very interesting application is the upgrading of stranded gas, for example, gas from a remote gas field or associated gas from off-shore oil drilling. Stranded gas can be effectively converted in a catalytic process by methane decomposition into solid carbon and a hydrogen/methane mixture that can be directly fed to a hydrogenation unit to load a LOHC with hydrogen. This allows for a straight-forward separation of hydrogen from CH4 and conversion of hydrogen to a hydrogen-rich LOHC material. Both, the hydrogen-rich LOHC material and the generated carbon on metal can easily be transported to destinations of further industrial use by established transport systems, like ships or trucks. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H. J.

    2001-01-01

    A hydrocarbon fuel reformer (200) is disclosed suitable for producing synthesis hydrogen gas from reactions with hydrocarbons fuels, oxygen, and steam. The reformer (200) comprises first and second tubes (208,218). The first tube (208) includes a first catalyst (214) and receives a first mixture of steam and a first fuel. The second tube (218) is annularly disposed about the first tube (208) and receives a second mixture of an oxygen-containing gas and a second fuel. In one embodiment, a third tube (224) is annularly disposed about the second tube (218) and receives a first reaction reformate from the first tube (208) and a second reaction reformate from the second tube (218). A catalyst reforming zone (260) annularly disposed about the third tube (224) may be provided to subject reformate constituents to a shift reaction. In another embodiment, a fractionator is provided to distill first and second fuels from a fuel supply source.

  13. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  14. Conversion rate of para-hydrogen to ortho-hydrogen by oxygen: implications for PHIP gas storage and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Shawn

    2014-06-01

    To determine the storability of para-hydrogen before reestablishment of the room temperature thermal equilibrium mixture. Para-hydrogen was produced at near 100% purity and mixed with different oxygen quantities to determine the rate of conversion to the thermal equilibrium mixture of 75: 25% (ortho: para) by detecting the ortho-hydrogen (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance using a 9.4 T imager. The para-hydrogen to ortho-hydrogen velocity constant, k, near room temperature (292 K) was determined to be 8.27 ± 1.30 L/mol · min(-1). This value was calculated utilizing four different oxygen fractions. Para-hydrogen conversion to ortho-hydrogen by oxygen can be minimized for long term storage with judicious removal of oxygen contamination. Prior calculated velocity rates were confirmed demonstrating a dependence on only the oxygen concentration.

  15. Biomass Steam Gasification with In-Situ CO2 Capture for Enriched Hydrogen Gas Production: A Reaction Kinetics Modelling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ibrahim Abdul Mutalib

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to energy and environmental issues, hydrogen has become a more attractive clean fuel. Furthermore, there is high interest in producing hydrogen from biomass with a view to sustainability. The thermochemical process for hydrogen production, i.e. gasification, is the focus of this work. This paper discusses the mathematical modeling of hydrogen production process via biomass steam gasification with calcium oxide as sorbent in a gasifier. A modelling framework consisting of kinetics models for char gasification, methanation, Boudouard, methane reforming, water gas shift and carbonation reactions to represent the gasification and CO2 adsorption in the gasifier, is developed and implemented in MATLAB. The scope of the work includes an investigation of the influence of the temperature, steam/biomass ratio and sorbent/biomass ratio on the amount of hydrogen produced, product gas compositions and carbon conversion. The importance of different reactions involved in the process is also discussed. It is observed that hydrogen production and carbon conversion increase with increasing temperature and steam/biomass ratio. The model predicts a maximum hydrogen mole fraction in the product gas of 0.81 occurring at 950 K, steam/biomass ratio of 3.0 and sorbent/biomass ratio of 1.0. In addition, at sorbent/biomass ratio of 1.52, purity of H2 can be increased to 0.98 mole fraction with all CO2 present in the system adsorbed.

  16. Decontamination assessment of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surfaces using a hydrogen peroxide gas generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J V; Sabourin, C L K; Choi, Y W; Richter, W R; Rudnicki, D C; Riggs, K B; Taylor, M L; Chang, J

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials using hydrogen peroxide gas. Bacillus anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. stearothermophilus spores were dried on seven types of indoor surfaces and exposed to > or =1000 ppm hydrogen peroxide gas for 20 min. Hydrogen peroxide exposure significantly decreased viable B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. stearothermophilus spores on all test materials except G. stearothermophilus on industrial carpet. Significant differences were observed when comparing the reduction in viable spores of B. anthracis with both surrogates. The effectiveness of gaseous hydrogen peroxide on the growth of biological indicators and spore strips was evaluated in parallel as a qualitative assessment of decontamination. At 1 and 7 days postexposure, decontaminated biological indicators and spore strips exhibited no growth, while the nondecontaminated samples displayed growth. Significant differences in decontamination efficacy of hydrogen peroxide gas on porous and nonporous surfaces were observed when comparing the mean log reduction in B. anthracis spores with B. subtilis and G. stearothermophilus spores. These results provide comparative information for the decontamination of B. anthracis spores with surrogates on indoor surfaces using hydrogen peroxide gas.

  17. Conceptual design for a kerosene fuel-rich gas-generator of a turbopump-fed liquid rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Min; Koo, Jaye; Cho, Won Kook; Lee, Eun Seok

    2012-10-01

    A design method for a kerosene fuel-rich gas-generator of a liquid rocket engine using turbopumps to supply propellant was performed at a conceptual level. The gas-generator creates hot gases, enabling the turbine to operate the turbopumps. A chemical non-equilibrium analysis and a droplet vaporization model were used for the estimation of the burnt gas properties and characteristic chamber length. A premixed counter-flow flame analysis was performed for the prediction of the burnt gas properties, namely the temperature, the specific heat ratio and heat capacity, and the chemical reaction time. To predict the vaporization time, the Spalding model, using a single droplet in convective condition, was used. The minimum residence time in the chamber and the characteristic length were calculated by adding the reaction time and the vaporization time. Using the characteristic length, the design methods for the fuel-rich gas-generator were established. Finally, a parametric study was achieved for the effects of the O/F ratio, mass flow rate, chamber pressure, initial droplet temperature, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet velocity.

  18. Wax: A benign hydrogen-storage material that rapidly releases H2-rich gases through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cortes, S; Slocombe, D R; Xiao, T; Aldawsari, A; Yao, B; Kuznetsov, V L; Liberti, E; Kirkland, A I; Alkinani, M S; Al-Megren, H A; Thomas, J M; Edwards, P P

    2016-10-19

    Hydrogen is often described as the fuel of the future, especially for application in hydrogen powered fuel-cell vehicles (HFCV's). However, its widespread implementation in this role has been thwarted by the lack of a lightweight, safe, on-board hydrogen storage material. Here we show that benign, readily-available hydrocarbon wax is capable of rapidly releasing large amounts of hydrogen through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition. This discovery offers a new material and system for safe and efficient hydrogen storage and could facilitate its application in a HFCV. Importantly, hydrogen storage materials made of wax can be manufactured through completely sustainable processes utilizing biomass or other renewable feedstocks.

  19. Hydrogen selective membrane for the natural gas system. Development of CO{sub 2}-selective biogas membrane. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestboe, A.P.

    2012-02-15

    The project started as a literature study and technology development project for a hydrogen selective membrane for the natural gas system. The introduction of hydrogen (for example produced from wind turbines by surplus electricity) in the gas system makes it possible to store energy which can be selectively used with high energy conversion in fuel cells directly located at the end users. In order to make this possible, it is necessary to have a separating unit that can selectively remove hydrogen from the gas mixture and deliver it as fuel to the electrical generator (a fuel cell). In the project, several existing technologies were evaluated with regard to the application in view. It was concluded that while other technologies are ripe, they are costly in energy and unsuitable for the relatively low capacity application that are in question close to the end users. Membrane technology was evaluated to be the most suitable, although the technology is still under development in many cases. In the project it was found that metallic membranes in the form of palladium coated stainless discs would answer the needs for the high purity needed. Laboratory development yielded discs that could separate hydrogen from natural gas, however, the flux was low compared to the needs of the application. It was found that at least 2 bar pressure difference of hydrogen would be needed to get a high enough flux. The way to achieve this pressure would necessitate a compressor which would consume an energy amount high enough to invalidate the concept. When concluding on the results and the study it was found that the direction of the project could be changed towards developing CO{sub 2}-selective membranes with the goal of developing membrane technology that could upgrade biogas by removing CO{sub 2}. The laboratory equipment and setup that were developed in the first part of the project could be used directly in this second part of the project. In this second part of the project it was

  20. Development of hydrogen sensors based on fiber Bragg grating with a palladium foil for online dissolved gas analysis in transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisser, Maximilian; Badcock, Rodney A.; Teal, Paul D.; Swanson, Adam; Hunze, Arvid

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen evolution, identified by dissolved gas analysis (DGA), is commonly used for fault detection in oil immersed electrical power equipment. Palladium (Pd) is often used as a sensing material due to its high hydrogen absorption capacity and related change in physical properties. Hydrogen is absorbed by Pd causing an expansion of the lattice. The solubility, and therefore lattice expansion, increases with increasing partial pressure of hydrogen and decreasing temperature. As long as a phase change is avoided the expansion is reversible and can be utilized to transfer strain into a sensing element. Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) are a well-established optical fiber sensor (OFS), mainly used for temperature and strain sensing. A safe, inexpensive, reliable and precise hydrogen sensor can be constructed using an FBG strain sensor to transduce the volumetric expansion of Pd due to hydrogen absorption. This paper reports on the development, and evaluation, of an FBG gas sensing OFS and long term measurements of dissolved hydrogen in transformer mineral oil. We investigate the effects of Pd foil cross-section and strain transfer between foil and fiber on the sensitivity of the OFS. Two types of Pd metal sensors were manufactured using modified Pd foil with 20 and 100 μm thickness. The sensors were tested in transformer oil at 90°C and a hydrogen concentration range from 20- 3200 ppm.

  1. Hydrogen gas alleviates oxygen toxicity by reducing hydroxyl radical levels in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Yu

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy through breathing oxygen at the pressure of above 1 atmosphere absolute (ATA is useful for varieties of clinical conditions, especially hypoxic-ischemic diseases. Because of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, breathing oxygen gas at high pressures can cause oxygen toxicity in the central nervous system, leading to multiple neurological dysfunction, which limits the use of HBO therapy. Studies have shown that Hydrogen gas (H2 can diminish oxidative stress and effectively reduce active ROS associated with diseases. However, the effect of H2 on ROS generated from HBO therapy remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of H2 on ROS during HBO therapy using PC12 cells. PC12 cells cultured in medium were exposed to oxygen gas or mixed oxygen gas and H2 at 1 ATA or 5 ATA. Cells viability and oxidation products and ROS were determined. The data showed that H2 promoted the cell viability and inhibited the damage in the cell and mitochondria membrane, reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and selectively decreased the levels of •OH but not disturbing the levels of O2•-, H2O2, or NO• in PC12 cells during HBO therapy. These results indicated that H2 effectively reduced •OH, protected cells against oxygen toxicity resulting from HBO therapy, and had no effect on other ROS. Our data supported that H2 could be potentially used as an antioxidant during HBO therapy.

  2. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  3. Contortionist bubbles in andesitic enclaves: implications for gas migration and phase segregation in crystal-rich magmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, J. C.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.; Dobson, K. J.; Bacon, C. R.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    In order to constrain gas migration behaviors in crystal-rich magmas, we compare results of analogue experiments to frozen structures in andesitic enclaves. In the analogue experiments air was injected into mixtures of syrup and particles sandwiched between glass plates. We observed a significant increase in bubble deformation and coalescence when particle fractions increased beyond a critical value (the random loose packing). At high particle fractions, bubble growth re-organized (compacted) the particles adjacent to the bubble walls. This caused liquid segregation into patches within the particle suspension and into large void spaces near the outer edge of experiments. We compare these experiments to void morphologies in a 58 x 70 x 73 cm andesitic enclave from silicic-andesite lava flows of Mt Mazama, Oregon (Bacon, 1986). This enclave is zoned, with a vesicle-rich center and a glass-rich rim, suggesting gas-driven melt segregation from the center to the rim. We use both 2D (optical microscopy and SEM) and 3D (X-ray tomography) techniques to image crystal textures and bubble shapes. The center of the enclave bears scattered patches of groundmass in the main phenocryst framework. These patches are similar to those observed in experiments, and thus melt segregation in the enclave may have occurred both toward the rim and toward these patches. Bubble morphologies reveal two main types of bubbles. (1) Lobate and finger-like bubbles, similar to the deformed bubbles in experiments, are found exclusively in the groundmass patches. They are also often associated with compacted crystal structures at the bubble walls. (2) Diktytaxitic textures - angular bubbles flattened against phenocrysts - are abundant in the crystal networks. These voids are entirely connected in 3D and formed the gas-rich center of the enclave. They likely represent a gas migration regime where the expanding gas front cannot deform the crystal structure but instead invades the pore-space between

  4. Bismuth-Based, Disposable Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen Sulfide Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosolina, Samuel M; Carpenter, Thomas S; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2016-02-02

    A new sensor for the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas has been developed to replace commercial lead(II) acetate-based test papers. The new sensor is a wet, porous, paper-like substrate coated with Bi(OH)3 or its alkaline derivatives at pH 11. In contrast to the neurotoxic lead(II) acetate, bismuth is used due to its nontoxic properties, as Bi(III) has been a reagent in medications such as Pepto-Bismol. The reaction between H2S gas and the current sensor produces a visible color change from white to yellow/brown, and the sensor responds to ≥ 30 ppb H2S in a total volume of 1.35 L of gas, a typical volume of human breath. The alkaline, wet coating helps the trapping of acidic H2S gas and its reaction with Bi(III) species, forming colored Bi2S3. The sensor is suitable for testing human bad breath and is at least 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive than a commercial H2S test paper based on Pb(II)(acetate)2. The small volume of 1.35-L H2S is important, as the commercial Pb(II)(acetate)2-based paper requires large volumes of 5 ppm H2S gas. The new sensor reported here is inexpensive, disposable, safe, and user-friendly. A simple, laboratory setup for generating small volumes of ppb-ppm of H2S gas is also reported.

  5. Application of Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation to Natural Gas-Fueled Reciprocating Engines (HALO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad Smutzer

    2006-01-01

    Two key challenges facing Natural Gas Engines used for cogeneration purposes are spark plug life and high NOx emissions. Using Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation (HALO), these two keys issues are simultaneously addressed. HALO operation, as demonstrated in this project, allows stable engine operation to be achieved at ultra-lean (relative air/fuel ratios of 2) conditions, which virtually eliminates NOx production. NOx values of 10 ppm (0.07 g/bhp-hr NO) for 8% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) supplementation at an exhaust O2 level of 10% were demonstrated, which is a 98% NOx emissions reduction compared to the leanest unsupplemented operating condition. Spark ignition energy reduction (which will increase ignition system life) was carried out at an oxygen level of 9%, leading to a NOx emission level of 28 ppm (0.13 g/bhp-hr NO). The spark ignition energy reduction testing found that spark energy could be reduced 22% (from 151 mJ supplied to the coil) with 13% (LHV H2/LHV CH4) hydrogen supplementation, and even further reduced 27% with 17% hydrogen supplementation, with no reportable effect on NOx emissions for these conditions and with stable engine torque output. Another important result is that the combustion duration was shown to be only a function of hydrogen supplementation, not a function of ignition energy (until the ignitability limit was reached). The next logical step leading from these promising results is to see how much the spark energy reduction translates into increase in spark plug life, which may be accomplished by durability testing.

  6. Use of hydrogen as a carrier gas for the analysis of steroids with anabolic activity by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Guerra, J A; Prado, P; García-Tenorio, S Vargas

    2011-10-14

    Due to the impact in the media and the requirements of sensitivity and robustness, the detection of the misuse of forbidden substances in sports is a really challenging area for analytical chemistry, where any study focused on enhancing the performance of the analytical methods will be of great interest. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of using hydrogen instead of helium as a carrier gas for the analysis of anabolic steroids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron ionization. There are several drawbacks related with the use of helium as a carrier gas: it is expensive, is a non-renewable resource, and has limited availability in many parts of the world. In contrast, hydrogen is readily available using a hydrogen generator or high-pressure bottled gas, and allows a faster analysis without loss of efficiency; nevertheless it should not be forgotten that due to its explosiveness hydrogen must be handled with caution. Throughout the study the impact of the change of the carrier gas will be evaluated in terms of: performance of the chromatographic system, saving of time and money, impact on the high vacuum in the analyzer, changes in the fragmentation behaviour of the analytes, and finally consequences for the limits of detection achieved with the method. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Numerical modeling of gas mixing and bio-chemical transformations during underground hydrogen storage within the project H2STORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, B.; Feldmann, F.; Panfilov, M.; Ganzer, L.

    2015-12-01

    The change from fossil to renewable energy sources is demanding an increasing amount of storage capacities for electrical energy. A promising technological solution is the storage of hydrogen in the subsurface. Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis using excessive electrical energy and subsequently converted back into electricity by fuel cells or engine generators. The development of this technology starts with adding small amounts of hydrogen to the high pressure natural gas grid and continues with the creation of pure underground hydrogen storages. The feasibility of hydrogen storage in depleted gas reservoirs is investigated in the lighthouse project H2STORE financed by the German Ministry for Education and Research. The joint research project has project members from the University of Jena, the Clausthal University of Technology, the GFZ Potsdam and the French National Center for Scientic Research in Nancy. The six sub projects are based on laboratory experiments, numerical simulations and analytical work which cover the investigation of mineralogical, geochemical, physio-chemical, sedimentological, microbiological and gas mixing processes in reservoir and cap rocks. The focus in this presentation is on the numerical modeling of underground hydrogen storage. A mathematical model was developed which describes the involved coupled hydrodynamic and microbiological effects. Thereby, the bio-chemical reaction rates depend on the kinetics of microbial growth which is induced by the injection of hydrogen. The model has been numerically implemented on the basis of the open source code DuMuX. A field case study based on a real German gas reservoir was performed to investigate the mixing of hydrogen with residual gases and to discover the consequences of bio-chemical reactions.

  8. A comprehensive review of microbial electrolysis cells (MEC reactor designs and configurations for sustainable hydrogen gas production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abudukeremu Kadier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen gas has tremendous potential as an environmentally acceptable energy carrier for vehicles. A cutting edge technology called a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC can achieve sustainable and clean hydrogen production from a wide range of renewable biomass and wastewaters. Enhancing the hydrogen production rate and lowering the energy input are the main challenges of MEC technology. MEC reactor design is one of the crucial factors which directly influence on hydrogen and current production rate in MECs. The rector design is also a key factor to up-scaling. Traditional MEC designs incorporated membranes, but it was recently shown that membrane-free designs can lead to both high hydrogen recoveries and production rates. Since then multiple studies have developed reactors that operate without membranes. This review provides a brief overview of recent advances in research on scalable MEC reactor design and configurations.

  9. Flow design and simulation of a gas compression system for hydrogen fusion energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avital, E. J.; Salvatore, E.; Munjiza, A.; Suponitsky, V.; Plant, D.; Laberge, M.

    2017-08-01

    An innovative gas compression system is proposed and computationally researched to achieve a short time response as needed in engineering applications such as hydrogen fusion energy reactors and high speed hammers. The system consists of a reservoir containing high pressure gas connected to a straight tube which in turn is connected to a spherical duct, where at the sphere’s centre plasma resides in the case of a fusion reactor. Diaphragm located inside the straight tube separates the reservoir’s high pressure gas from the rest of the plenum. Once the diaphragm is breached the high pressure gas enters the plenum to drive pistons located on the inner wall of the spherical duct that will eventually end compressing the plasma. Quasi-1D and axisymmetric flow formulations are used to design and analyse the flow dynamics. A spike is designed for the interface between the straight tube and the spherical duct to provide a smooth geometry transition for the flow. Flow simulations show high supersonic flow hitting the end of the spherical duct, generating a return shock wave propagating upstream and raising the pressure above the reservoir pressure as in the hammer wave problem, potentially giving temporary pressure boost to the pistons. Good agreement is revealed between the two flow formulations pointing to the usefulness of the quasi-1D formulation as a rapid solver. Nevertheless, a mild time delay in the axisymmetric flow simulation occurred due to moderate two-dimensionality effects. The compression system is settled down in a few milliseconds for a spherical duct of 0.8 m diameter using Helium gas and a uniform duct cross-section area. Various system geometries are analysed using instantaneous and time history flow plots.

  10. Blending of hydrogen in natural gas distribution systems. Volume II. Combustion tests of blends in burners and appliances. Final report, June 1, 1976--August 30, 1977. [8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31% hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-10-01

    The emerging ''hydrogen economy'' is a strong contender as one method to supplement or extend the domestic natural gas supply. This volume of the subject study ''Blending Hydrogen in Natural Gas Distribution Systems'' describes combustion studies to determine the maximum amount of hydrogen that can be blended in natural gas and utilized satisfactorily in typical appliances with no adjustment or conversion. Eleven pilot burners and twenty-three main burners typical of those in current use were operated on hydrogen-natural gas mixtures containing approximately 8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31 percent, by volume, hydrogen. The eleven pilot burners and thirteen main burners were tested outside the appliance they were a part of. Ten main burners were tested in their respective appliances. Performance of the various burners tested are as follows: (1) Gas blends containing more than 6 to 11% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for target type pilot burners. (2) Gas blends containing more than 20 to 22% hyrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners operating in the open. (3) Gas blends containing more than 22 to 25% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners tested in appliances. (4) Modification of the orifice in target pilots or increasing the supply pressure to a minimum of 7 inches water column will permit the use of gas blends with 20% hydrogen.

  11. An experimental approach aiming the production of a gas mixture composed of hydrogen and methane from biomass as natural gas substitute in industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraussler, Michael; Schindler, Philipp; Hofbauer, Hermann

    2017-08-01

    This work presents an experimental approach aiming the production of a gas mixture composed of H 2 and CH 4 , which should serve as natural gas substitute in industrial applications. Therefore, a lab-scale process chain employing a water gas shift unit, scrubbing units, and a pressure swing adsorption unit was operated with tar-rich product gas extracted from a commercial dual fluidized bed biomass steam gasification plant. A gas mixture with a volumetric fraction of about 80% H 2 and 19% CH 4 and with minor fractions of CO and CO 2 was produced by employing carbon molecular sieve as adsorbent. Moreover, the produced gas mixture had a lower heating value of about 15.5MJ·m -3 and a lower Wobbe index of about 43.4MJ·m -3 , which is similar to the typical Wobbe index of natural gas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide gas poisoning in fish garbage room: A report of a fisherman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Sadaf; Baig, Muhammad Akbar; Ali, Noman; Khan, NadeemUllah

    2017-07-01

    We report the case of a fisherman who was exposed to high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas from the fish garbage room. The patient survived and was discharged with full recovery from the hospital. H2S is a colourless, foul smelling and highly toxic gas next to carbon monoxide, which causes inhalation death. It is a by-product of various industrial processes particularly involves exposure from agriculture, petrochemical industry and organic matter decomposition from sewage processing. It is a by-product of H2S has been referred as the "knock down gas" because inhalation of high concentrations can cause immediate loss of consciousness and death. Although early use of amyl nitrate and hyperbaric oxygen shows some benefit in literature, supportive care remains the mainstay of treatment. Emergency physicians and pre-hospital care personnel are not very familiar with such exposure due to its rarity. This becomes more relevant in the developing world settings where there are rising concerns about the unsafe exposure to hazardous chemicals and its impact on human health. Emergency physicians working in Pakistan should be aware of this entity especially in regard to fishermen presenting to the Emergency Department with such a clinical presentation and its toxic manifestations. This incident also illustrates the need of enforcement of health and safety regulations in the fishing industry.

  13. Hydrogen from reformer gas a novel fuel and bridging technology: A combustion perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, P.; Checkel, M.D.; Fleck, B.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    2007-07-15

    Constant-volume combustion experiments measuring laminar burning velocity are presented for combinations of methane, inert diluent and H{sub 2}/CO mixtures that would result from steam reforming of methane. The experiments illustrate the very attractive prospects of on-board steam reforming in natural gas powered vehicles that would employ exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to improve combustion performance and reduce NO{sub x} emissions. Laminar burning velocity in the partially reformed fuel stream can be maintained at levels similar to that of air/natural gas mixtures by increasing the prereforming of the fuel at increasing concentrations of EGR. Up to 40% dilution was tested, requiring that 53% of the methane fuel be reformed to maintain burning velocity. Calculations indicate NO{sub x} levels are similar to scenarios with unreformed fuel. The knowledge base from this and similar experiments is required to allow for the future adoption of on-board fuel reforming in IC engines. This is a critical intermediate step in introducing hydrogen as a fuel to the currently fossil-hydrocarbon oriented economy and fuel delivery infrastructure. (author)

  14. Hydrogen-rich medium protects mouse embryonic fibroblasts from oxidative stress by activating LKB1-AMPK-FoxO1 signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihyun; Yang, Goowon; Kim, Young-Joo; Tran, Quynh Hoa; Choe, Wonchae; Kang, Insug; Kim, Sung Soo; Ha, Joohun

    2017-09-23

    Persistent oxidative stress is recognized as a major cause of many pathological conditions as well as ageing. However, most clinical trials of dietary antioxidants have failed to produce successful outcomes in treating oxidative stress-induced diseases. Molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) has recently received considerable attention as a therapeutic agent owing to its novel antioxidant properties, a selective scavenger of hydroxyl and peroxynitrite radicals. Beyond this, numerous reports support that H 2 can modulate the activity of various cellular signal pathways. However, its effect on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signal pathway, a central regulator of energy hemostasis, has remained almost elusive. Here, we report that hydrogen-rich medium activated LKB1-AMPK signal pathway without ATP depletion, which in turn induced FoxO1-dependent transcription of manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Moreover, hydrogen-rich media effectively reduced the level of reactive oxygen species in cells treated with hydrogen peroxide and protected these cells from apoptosis in an AMPK-dependent manner. These results suggest that the LKB1-AMPK-FoxO1 signaling pathway is a critical mediator of the antioxidant properties of H 2 , further supporting the idea that H 2 acts as a signaling molecule to serve various physiological functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Post Flame Oxidation on the UHC Emission for Combustion of Natural Gas and Hydrogen Containing fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Kvist; Schramm, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    In-cylinder post flame oxidation of unburned hydro-carbons from crevices in a lean burn spark ignition engine has been examined for natural gas and mixtures of natural gas and a hydrogen containing producer gas. For this purpose a model was developed to describe the mixing of cold unburned...... during in-cylinder post oxidation. The Arrhenius parameters were determined using the reaction mechanism, which gave the prediction of the results from the combustion reactor experiments. The investigation showed that addition of producer gas to natural gas promotes the in-cylinder post oxidation...... significantly. Furthermore it was found that the cyclic variation in the post oxidation is reduced by addition of producer gas to natural gas....

  16. Evidence for a Gas-rich Major Merger in a Proto-cluster at z = 2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Kodama, Tadayuki; Tamura, Yoichi; Hayashi, Masao; Koyama, Yusei; Shimakawa, Rhythm; Tanaka, Ichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Suzuki, Kenta

    2014-06-01

    Gas-rich major mergers in high-redshift proto-clusters are important events, perhaps leading to the creation of the slowly rotating remnants seen in the cores of clusters in the present day. Here, we present a deep Jansky Very Large Array observation of CO J = 1-0 emission line in a proto-cluster at z = 2.5, USS1558-003. The target field is an extremely dense region, where 20 Hα emitters (HAEs) are clustering. We have successfully detected the CO emission line from three HAEs and discovered a close pair of red and blue CO-emitting HAEs. Given their close proximity (~30 kpc), small velocity offset (~300 km s-1), and similar stellar masses, they could be in the early phase of a gas-rich major merger. For the red HAE, we derive a total infrared luminosity of L IR = 5.1 × 1012 L ⊙ using MIPS 24 μm and radio continuum images. The LIR/L\\prime CO ratio is significantly enhanced compared to local spirals and high-redshift disks with a similar CO luminosity, which is indicative of a starburst mode. We find the gas depletion timescale is shorter than that of normal star-forming galaxies regardless of adopted CO-H2 conversion factors. The identification of such a rare event suggests that gas-rich major mergers frequently take place in proto-clusters at z > 2 and may involve the formation processes of slow rotators seen in local massive clusters.

  17. Effect of organic matter properties, clay mineral type and thermal maturity on gas adsorption in organic-rich shale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongwei; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Milliken, Kitty; Lewan, Mike; Sun, Xun; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    A series of CH4 adsorption experiments on natural organic-rich shales, isolated kerogen, clay-rich rocks, and artificially matured Woodford Shale samples were conducted under dry conditions. Our results indicate that physisorption is a dominant process for CH4 sorption, both on organic-rich shales and clay minerals. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of the investigated samples is linearly correlated with the CH4 sorption capacity in both organic-rich shales and clay-rich rocks. The presence of organic matter is a primary control on gas adsorption in shale-gas systems, and the gas-sorption capacity is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) content, organic-matter type, and thermal maturity. A large number of nanopores, in the 2–50 nm size range, were created during organic-matter thermal decomposition, and they significantly contributed to the surface area. Consequently, methane-sorption capacity increases with increasing thermal maturity due to the presence of nanopores produced during organic-matter decomposition. Furthermore, CH4 sorption on clay minerals is mainly controlled by the type of clay mineral present. In terms of relative CH4 sorption capacity: montmorillonite ≫ illite – smectite mixed layer > kaolinite > chlorite > illite. The effect of rock properties (organic matter content, type, maturity, and clay minerals) on CH4 adsorption can be quantified with the heat of adsorption and the standard entropy, which are determined from adsorption isotherms at different temperatures. For clay-mineral rich rocks, the heat of adsorption (q) ranges from 9.4 to 16.6 kJ/mol. These values are considerably smaller than those for CH4 adsorption on kerogen (21.9–28 kJ/mol) and organic-rich shales (15.1–18.4 kJ/mol). The standard entropy (Δs°) ranges from -64.8 to -79.5 J/mol/K for clay minerals, -68.1 to -111.3 J/mol/K for kerogen, and -76.0 to -84.6 J/mol/K for organic-rich shales. The affinity of CH4 molecules for sorption on organic matter

  18. Miniaturized Metal (Metal Alloy)/PdO(x)/SiC Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO(x)). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600 C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sided sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  19. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Hydrogen Gas Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Burt W.; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were performed in earth-gravity to determine how buoyancy affected transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. The jet exit Froude number characterizing buoyancy in the flame was varied from 1.65 x 10(exp 5) to 1.14 x 10(exp 8) by varying the operating pressure and/or burner inside diameter. Laminar fuel jet was discharged vertically into ambient air flowing through a combustion chamber. Flame characteristics were observed using rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a line-of-site optical diagnostic technique. Results show that the breakpoint length for a given jet exit Reynolds number increased with increasing Froude number. Data suggest that buoyant transitional flames might become laminar in the absence of gravity. The schlieren technique was shown as effective in quantifying the flame characteristics.

  20. Miniaturized metal (metal alloy)/ PdO.sub.x/SiC hydrogen and hydrocarbon gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO.sub.x ). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600.degree. C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sized sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  1. Mobile measurement of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production site fence lines in the Texas Barnett Shale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapi, Gautam R; Sabnis, Madhu S; Sattler, Melanie L

    2014-08-01

    Production of natural gas from shale formations is bringing drilling and production operations to regions of the United States that have seen little or no similar activity in the past, which has generated considerable interest in potential environmental impacts. This study focused on the Barnett Shale Fort Worth Basin in Texas, which saw the number of gas-producing wells grow from 726 in 2001 to 15,870 in 2011. This study aimed to measure fence line concentrations of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production sites (wells, liquid storage tanks, and associated equipment) in the four core counties of the Barnett Shale (Denton, Johnson, Tarrant, and Wise). A mobile measurement survey was conducted in the vicinity of 4788 wells near 401 lease sites, representing 35% of gas production volume, 31% of wells, and 38% of condensate production volume in the four-county core area. Methane and hydrogen sulfide concentrations were measured using a Picarro G2204 cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). Since the research team did not have access to lease site interiors, measurements were made by driving on roads on the exterior of the lease sites. Over 150 hr of data were collected from March to July 2012. During two sets of drive-by measurements, it was found that 66 sites (16.5%) had methane concentrations > 3 parts per million (ppm) just beyond the fence line. Thirty-two lease sites (8.0%) had hydrogen sulfide concentrations > 4.7 parts per billion (ppb) (odor recognition threshold) just beyond the fence line. Measured concentrations generally did not correlate well with site characteristics (natural gas production volume, number of wells, or condensate production). t tests showed that for two counties, methane concentrations for dry sites were higher than those for wet sites. Follow-up study is recommended to provide more information at sites identified with high levels of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Implications: Information regarding air emissions from shale gas

  2. Hydrogen and Carbon Black Production from Thermal Decomposition of Sub-Quality Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Javadi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is computational investigation of the hydrogen and carbon black production through thermal decomposition of waste gases containing CH4 and H2S, without requiring a H2S separation process. The chemical reaction model, which involves solid carbon, sulfur compounds and precursor species for the formation of carbon black, is based on an assumed Probability Density Function (PDF parameterized by the mean and variance of mixture fraction and β-PDF shape. The effects of feedstock mass flow rate and reactor temperature on hydrogen, carbon black, S2, SO2, COS and CS2 formation are investigated. The results show that the major factor influencing CH4 and H2S conversions is reactor temperature. For temperatures higher than 1100° K, the reactor CH4 conversion reaches 100%, whilst H2S conversion increases in temperatures higher than 1300° K. The results reveal that at any temperature, H2S conversion is less than that of CH4. The results also show that in the production of carbon black from sub-quality natural gas, the formation of carbon monoxide, which is occurring in parallel, play a very significant role. For lower values of feedstock flow rate, CH4 mostly burns to CO and consequently, the production of carbon black is low. The results show that the yield of hydrogen increases with increasing feedstock mass flow rate until the yield reaches a maximum value, and then drops with further increase in the feedstock mass flow rate.

  3. Thermodynamic Analysis and Reduction of MnO2 by Methane-Hydrogen Gas Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingbing; Zhang, Yuanbo; Su, Zijian; Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2017-09-01

    Methane and hydrogen reduction has emerged as promising technology for clean and efficient metallurgy. To understand the reduction process of MnO2 by CH4-H2 gas mixture, the effects of various CH4/(CH4 + H2) molar ratios (0-1) and temperatures (1100°C-1250°C) on the reduction of pure MnO2 were researched. Characterization of the solid carbon derived from the decomposition of CH4 gas was also determined. Thermodynamic analysis indicated that the MnO2 was first reduced to MnO by CH4-H2 gas mixture, and then MnO was reduced to Mn7C3 according to this reaction, 7MnO(s) + 10CH4(g) = Mn7C3(s) + 7CO(g) + 20H2(g). Experimental results showed that under the CH4/(CH4 + H2) molar ratio of 0.2, the reduction extent of MnO2 increased with the rising of temperatures. Nevertheless, the deep reduction of MnO to Mn7C3 was retarded even by increasing the temperature and prolonging the time, which was a result of the formation of deposited solid carbon. The free carbon contents in the reduced samples increased with the increasing of the CH4/(CH4 + H2) molar ratio and reduction time. The reduction of MnO2 and formation of carbon can be regulated by adjusting the CH4/(CH4 + H2) molar ratio in a gas mixture. For example, when MnO2 was reduced by 50 vol.%CH4-50%N2, large amounts of MnO and Mn7C3 particles were wrapped by the platelike and rodlike carbon with nanoscale. Yet, the wrapping phenomenon cannot be observed under 10 vol.%CH4-40 vol.%H2-50 vol.%N2.

  4. Microbial aspects of synthesis gas fed bioreactors treating sulfate and metal rich wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, van B.H.G.W.

    2006-01-01

    The use of synthesis gas fed sulfate-reducing bioreactors to simultaneously remove both oxidized sulfur compounds and metals shows great potential to treat wastewaters generated as a result of flue gas scrubbing, mining activities and galvanic processes. Detailed information about the phylogenetic

  5. Nanocomposite thin films for high temperature optical gas sensing of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohodnicki, Jr., Paul R.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2013-04-02

    The disclosure relates to a plasmon resonance-based method for H.sub.2 sensing in a gas stream at temperatures greater than about 500.degree. C. utilizing a hydrogen sensing material. The hydrogen sensing material is comprised of gold nanoparticles having an average nanoparticle diameter of less than about 100 nanometers dispersed in an inert matrix having a bandgap greater than or equal to 5 eV, and an oxygen ion conductivity less than approximately 10.sup.-7 S/cm at a temperature of 700.degree. C. Exemplary inert matrix materials include SiO.sub.2, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3N.sub.4 as well as modifications to modify the effective refractive indices through combinations and/or doping of such materials. At high temperatures, blue shift of the plasmon resonance optical absorption peak indicates the presence of H.sub.2. The method disclosed offers significant advantage over active and reducible matrix materials typically utilized, such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) or TiO.sub.2.

  6. Measuring deuterium enrichment of glucose hydrogen atoms by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniewicz, Maciek R; Kelleher, Joanne K; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2011-04-15

    We developed a simple and accurate method for determining deuterium enrichment of glucose hydrogen atoms by electron impact gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). First, we prepared 18 derivatives of glucose and screened over 200 glucose fragments to evaluate the accuracy and precision of mass isotopomer data for each fragment. We identified three glucose derivatives that gave six analytically useful ions: (1) glucose aldonitrile pentapropionate (m/z 173 derived from C4-C5 bond cleavage; m/z 259 from C3-C4 cleavage; m/z 284 from C4-C5 cleavage; and m/z 370 from C5-C6 cleavage); (2) glucose 1,2,5,6-di-isopropylidene propionate (m/z 301, no cleavage of glucose carbon atoms); and (3) glucose methyloxime pentapropionate (m/z 145 from C2-C3 cleavage). Deuterium enrichment at each carbon position of glucose was determined by least-squares regression of mass isotopomer distributions. The validity of the approach was tested using labeled glucose standards and carefully prepared mixtures of standards. Our method determines deuterium enrichment of glucose hydrogen atoms with an accuracy of 0.3 mol %, or better, without the use of any calibration curves or correction factors. The analysis requires only 20 μL of plasma, which makes the method applicable for studying gluconeogenesis using deuterated water in cell culture and animal experiments. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. Hydrogen gas treatment prolongs replicative lifespan of bone marrow multipotential stromal cells in vitro while preserving differentiation and paracrine potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Haruhisa [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Guan, Jianjun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Tamama, Kenichi, E-mail: kenichi.tamama@osumc.edu [Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2010-07-02

    Cell therapy with bone marrow multipotential stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents a promising approach in the field of regenerative medicine. Low frequency of MSCs in adult bone marrow necessitates ex vivo expansion of MSCs after harvest; however, such a manipulation causes cellular senescence with loss of differentiation, proliferative, and therapeutic potentials of MSCs. Hydrogen molecules have been shown to exert organ protective effects through selective reduction of hydroxyl radicals. As oxidative stress is one of the key insults promoting cell senescence in vivo as well as in vitro, we hypothesized that hydrogen molecules prevent senescent process during MSC expansion. Addition of 3% hydrogen gas enhanced preservation of colony forming early progenitor cells within MSC preparation and prolonged the in vitro replicative lifespan of MSCs without losing differentiation potentials and paracrine capabilities. Interestingly, 3% hydrogen gas treatment did not decrease hydroxyl radical, protein carbonyl, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting that scavenging hydroxyl radical might not be responsible for these effects of hydrogen gas in this study.

  8. Treatment of portal venous gas embolism with hyperbaric oxygen after accidental ingestion of hydrogen peroxide: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papafragkou, Sotirios; Gasparyan, Anna; Batista, Richard; Scott, Paul

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that hydrogen peroxide ingestion can cause gas embolism. To report a case illustrating that the definitive, most effective treatment for gas embolism is hyperbaric oxygen therapy. We present a case of a woman who presented to the Emergency Department with acute abdominal pain after an accidental ingestion of concentrated hydrogen peroxide. Complete recovery from her symptoms occurred quickly with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This is a case report of the successful use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to treat portal venous gas embolism caused by hydrogen peroxide ingestion. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy can be considered for the treatment of symptomatic hydrogen peroxide ingestion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An Overview of Natural Gas Conversion Technologies for Co-Production of Hydrogen and Value-Added Solid Carbon Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, Robert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dagle, Vanessa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bearden, Mark D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, Jamelyn D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krause, Theodore R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ahmed, Shabbir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-11-16

    This report was prepared in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Congressional Appropriation language to support research on carbon-free production of hydrogen using new chemical processes that utilize natural gas to produce solid carbon and hydrogen. The U.S. produces 9-10 million tons of hydrogen annually with more than 95% of the hydrogen produced by steam-methane reforming (SMR) of natural gas. SMR is attractive because of its high hydrogen yield; but it also converts the carbon to carbon dioxide. Non-oxidative thermal decomposition of methane to carbon and hydrogen is an alternative to SMR and produces CO2-free hydrogen. The produced carbon can be sold as a co-product, thus providing economic credit that reduces the delivered net cost of hydrogen. The combination of producing hydrogen with potentially valuable carbon byproducts has market value in that this allows greater flexibility to match the market prices of hydrogen and carbon. That is, the higher value product can subsidize the other in pricing decisions. In this report we highlight the relevant technologies reported in the literature—primarily thermochemical and plasma conversion processes—and recent research progress and commercial activities. Longstanding technical challenges include the high energetic requirements (e.g., high temperatures and/or electricity requirements) necessary for methane activation and, for some catalytic processes, the separation of solid carbon product from the spent catalyst. We assess current and new carbon product markets that could be served given technological advances, and we discuss technical barriers and potential areas of research to address these needs. We provide preliminary economic analysis for these processes and compare to other emerging (e.g., electrolysis) and conventional (e.g., SMR) processes for hydrogen production. The overarching conclusion of this study is that the cost of hydrogen can be potentially

  10. Alfalfa discovery of the nearby gas-rich dwarf galaxy LEO P. V. Neutral gas dynamics and kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z.; Pardy, Stephen A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cannon, John M., E-mail: ezbc@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: spardy@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); and others

    2014-08-01

    We present new H I spectral line imaging of the extremely metal-poor, star-forming dwarf irregular galaxy Leo P. Our H I images probe the global neutral gas properties and the local conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM). The H I morphology is slightly elongated along the optical major axis. We do not find obvious signatures of interaction or infalling gas at large spatial scales. The neutral gas disk shows obvious rotation, although the velocity dispersion is comparable to the rotation velocity. The rotation amplitude is estimated to be V {sub c} =15 ± 5 km s{sup –1}. Within the H I radius probed by these observations, the mass ratio of gas to stars is roughly 2:1, while the ratio of the total mass to the baryonic mass is ≳15:1. We use this information to place Leo P on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, testing the baryonic content of cosmic structures in a sparsely populated portion of parameter space that has hitherto been occupied primarily by dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We detect the signature of two temperature components in the neutral ISM of Leo P; the cold and warm components have characteristic velocity widths of 4.2 ± 0.9 km s{sup –1} and 10.1 ± 1.2 km s{sup –1}, corresponding to kinetic temperature upper limits of ∼1100 K and ∼6200 K, respectively. The cold H I component is unresolved at a physical resolution of 200 pc. The highest H I surface densities are observed in close physical proximity to the single H II region. A comparison of the neutral gas properties of Leo P with other extremely metal-deficient (XMD) galaxies reveals that Leo P has the lowest neutral gas mass of any known XMD, and that the dynamical mass of Leo P is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than any known XMD with comparable metallicity.

  11. The production of hydrogen through the use of a 77 wt% Pd 23 wt% Ag membrane water gas shift reactor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, Liberty N

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available stainless steel (PSS) is evaluated for the production of hydrogen and the potential replacement of the current two-stage Water-Gas Shift (WGS) reaction by a single stage reaction. The permeability of a 20 µm Pd–Ag membrane reactor was examined at 320 °C, 380...

  12. Effect of Sulfide Removal on Sulfate Reduction at pH 5 in a Hydrogen fed Gas-Lift Bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmans, M.F.M.; Dopson, M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2008-01-01

    UNCORRECTED PROOF J. Microbiol. Biotechnol. (2007), 17(4), ¿ Effect of Sulfide Removal on Sulfate Reduction at pH 5 in a Hydrogen fed Gas-Lift Bioreactor Bijmans, Martijn F. M.1*, Mark Dopson2, Frederick Ennin1, Piet N. L. Lens1, and Cees J. N. Buisman1 1Sub Department of Environmental Technology,

  13. Inactivation of duck hepatitis B virus by a hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization system: laboratory and 'in use' testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, K; Deva, A K; Zou, J; Kumaradeva, P; Bissett, L; Cossart, Y E

    1999-04-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important cause of nosocomial infections and can be transmitted by contaminated instruments. However, tests of the efficacy of sterilization of materials and equipment contaminated by HBV are difficult to perform because the virus cannot be cultured in the laboratory. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the capability of a low temperature, hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilizer (Sterrad, Advanced Sterilization Products, Irvine California,) to inactivate duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). In laboratory efficacy studies using DHBV dried on to glass filter carriers and exposed to one-half of the hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization process, there was a 10(7) or greater decrease in the viral titer, with no infectivity detected on the carriers after treatment. In-use studies were performed using a laparoscope that was experimentally contaminated with DHBV to mimic the possible transmission of infection between successive patients. Following exposure to the hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization process no transmission of DHBV infection from the laparoscope occurred despite obvious visual soiling with blood (N = 8) while the transmission rate for the unprocessed laparoscope (positive control) was 100% (26/26), and that for instruments after a water wash was 63% (7/11). In conclusion the hydrogen gas plasma sterilization process completely inactivates DHBV a representative of the hepadna group of viruses.

  14. Filtration of chlorine and hydrogen chloride gas by engineered UiO-66-NH2metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browe, Matthew A; Napolitano, Amedeo; DeCoste, Jared B; Peterson, Gregory W

    2017-06-15

    Chlorine (Cl 2 ) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) are heavily utilized industrial chemicals that present significant respiratory health risks. The metal-organic framework UiO-66-NH 2 has shown an unprecedented ability in powder form to remove chlorine gas. Here, we engineered UiO-66-NH 2 into 20×40 mesh granules and evaluated their ability to remove chlorine and hydrogen chloride gas challenges. The exposed materials were characterized with nitrogen isotherms, powder X-ray diffraction, and attenuated total reflectance - Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Breakthrough results revealed that UiO-66-NH 2 sorption of chlorine and hydrogen chloride met or exceeded sorption of state-of-the-art metal-impregnated activated carbon materials on a mass and volume basis in engineered form. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Advanced gasifier and water gas shift technologies for low cost coal conversion to high hydrogen syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Andrew Kramer [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and team members RTI International (RTI), Coanda Research and Development, and Nexant, are developing and maturing a portfolio of technologies to meet the United States Department of Energy (DOE) goals for lowering the cost of producing high hydrogen syngas from coal for use in carbon capture power and coal-to-liquids/chemicals. This project matured an advanced pilot-scale gasifier, with scalable and commercially traceable components, to readiness for use in a first-of-a-kind commercially-relevant demonstration plant on the scale of 500-1,000 tons per day (TPD). This was accomplished through cold flow simulation of the gasifier quench zone transition region at Coanda and through an extensive hotfire gasifier test program on highly reactive coal and high ash/high ash fusion temperature coals at GTI. RTI matured an advanced water gas shift process and catalyst to readiness for testing at pilot plant scale through catalyst development and testing, and development of a preliminary design basis for a pilot scale reactor demonstrating the catalyst. A techno-economic analysis was performed by Nexant to assess the potential benefits of the gasifier and catalyst technologies in the context of power production and methanol production. This analysis showed an 18%reduction in cost of power and a 19%reduction in cost of methanol relative to DOE reference baseline cases.

  16. Method and apparatus for converting hydrocarbon fuel into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Thijssen, Johannes H.J.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for converting hydrocarbon fuel or an alcohol into hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide. The apparatus includes a first vessel having a partial oxidation reaction zone and a separate steam reforming reaction zone that is distinct from the partial oxidation reaction zone. The first vessel has a first vessel inlet at the partial oxidation reaction zone and a first vessel outlet at the steam reforming zone. The reformer also includes a helical tube extending about the first vessel. The helical tube has a first end connected to an oxygen-containing source and a second end connected to the first vessel at the partial oxidation reaction zone. Oxygen gas from an oxygen-containing source can be directed through the helical tube to the first vessel. A second vessel having a second vessel inlet and second vessel outlet is annularly disposed about the first vessel. The helical tube is disposed between the first vessel and the second vessel and gases from the first vessel can be directed through second vessel.

  17. Absolute standard hydrogen electrode potential measured by reduction of aqueous nanodrops in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, William A; Leib, Ryan D; O'Brien, Jeremy T; Bush, Matthew F; Williams, Evan R

    2008-03-19

    In solution, half-cell potentials are measured relative to those of other half cells, thereby establishing a ladder of thermochemical values that are referenced to the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE), which is arbitrarily assigned a value of exactly 0 V. Although there has been considerable interest in, and efforts toward, establishing an absolute electrochemical half-cell potential in solution, there is no general consensus regarding the best approach to obtain this value. Here, ion-electron recombination energies resulting from electron capture by gas-phase nanodrops containing individual [M(NH3)6]3+, M = Ru, Co, Os, Cr, and Ir, and Cu2+ ions are obtained from the number of water molecules that are lost from the reduced precursors. These experimental data combined with nanodrop solvation energies estimated from Born theory and solution-phase entropies estimated from limited experimental data provide absolute reduction energies for these redox couples in bulk aqueous solution. A key advantage of this approach is that solvent effects well past two solvent shells, that are difficult to model accurately, are included in these experimental measurements. By evaluating these data relative to known solution-phase reduction potentials, an absolute value for the SHE of 4.2 +/- 0.4 V versus a free electron is obtained. Although not achieved here, the uncertainty of this method could potentially be reduced to below 0.1 V, making this an attractive method for establishing an absolute electrochemical scale that bridges solution and gas-phase redox chemistry.

  18. Gas phase recovery of hydrogen sulfide contaminated polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakati, Biraj Kumar; Kucernak, Anthony R. J.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the anode of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and the gas phase recovery of the contaminated PEMFC using ozone (O3) were studied. Experiments were performed on fuel cell electrodes both in an aqueous electrolyte and within an operating fuel cell. The ex-situ analyses of a fresh electrode; a H2S contaminated electrode (23 μmolH2S cm-2); and the contaminated electrode cleaned with O3 shows that all sulfide can be removed within 900 s at room temperature. Online gas analysis of the recovery process confirms the recovery time required as around 720 s. Similarly, performance studies of an H2S contaminated PEMFC shows that complete rejuvenation occurs following 600-900 s O3 treatment at room temperature. The cleaning process involves both electrochemical oxidation (facilitated by the high equilibrium potential of the O3 reduction process) and direct chemical oxidation of the contaminant. The O3 cleaning process is more efficient than the external polarization of the single cell at 1.6 V. Application of O3 at room temperature limits the amount of carbon corrosion. Room temperature O3 treatment of poisoned fuel cell stacks may offer an efficient and quick remediation method to recover otherwise inoperable systems.

  19. CO{sub 2} capture by means of dolomite in hydrogen production from syn gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallucci, Katia; Stendardo, Stefano; Foscolo, Pier Ugo [Chemical Engineering Department, University of L' Aquila, Monteluco di Roio 67040 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2008-06-15

    The production of pure hydrogen from renewable or fossil energy sources can be achieved by purifying the syn gas obtained as a result of a steam gasification process. Depleting of the syn gas carbon-containing compounds by means of CO{sub 2} capture on calcined dolomite has been carried out. The dolomite behavior as CO{sub 2} sorbent and its regeneration has been investigated by means of Linseis (TG-DTA) coupled with FT-IR spectrometer. Original and heat-treated dolomite has been characterized by XRF and SEM in order to detect the composition and the morphology. A simple modeling approach has been applied to the investigation of the CO{sub 2} sorption kinetic. The results of this work show good agreement between model predictions and experimental data obtained either by SEM micrographs of dolomite particles at different stages of the calcination/carbonation cycle, and by TG curves of CaO recarbonation as a function of time. (author)

  20. Calorimetric Thermoelectric Gas Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen, Methane and Mixed Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Hee Park

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel miniaturized calorimeter-type sensor device with a dual-catalyst structure was fabricated by integrating different catalysts on the hot (Pd/θ-Al2O3 and cold (Pt/α-Al2O3 ends of the device. The device comprises a calorimeter with a thermoelectric gas sensor (calorimetric-TGS, combining catalytic combustion and thermoelectric technologies. Its response for a model fuel gas of hydrogen and methane was investigated with various combustor catalyst compositions. The calorimetric-TGS devices detected H2, CH4, and a mixture of the two with concentrations ranging between 200 and 2000 ppm at temperatures of 100–400 °C, in terms of the calorie content of the gases. It was necessary to reduce the much higher response voltage of the TGS to H2 compared to CH4. We enhanced the H2 combustion on the cold side so that the temperature differences and response voltages to H2 were reduced. The device response to H2 combustion was reduced by 50% by controlling the Pt concentration in the Pt/α-Al2O3 catalyst on the cold side to 3 wt%.

  1. 75 FR 17397 - Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kern County, CA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kern County, CA--Notice of... by Hydrogen Energy California LLC (HECA). DOE selected this project for an award of financial... produce synthesis gas (syngas), which would then be processed and purified to produce a hydrogen-rich fuel...

  2. Water–gas shift catalyst development for energy efficient applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hakeem, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    The water–gas shift (WGS) is a reversible, moderately exothermic reaction (1) and is used for the production of hydrogen from CO rich gas streams (synthesis gas). CO + H2O ? CO2 + H2 ?H°= –41 kJ mol?1 (1) This research has focused on the catalyst development of water–gas shift (WGS) reaction and

  3. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-08

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal

  4. Effect of Hydrogen and Hydrogen Enriched Compressed Natural Gas Induction on the Performance of Rubber Seed Oil Methy Ester Fuelled Common Rail Direct Injection (CRDi Dual Fuel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjun Bhovi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Renewable fuels are in biodegradable nature and they tender good energy security and foreign exchange savings. In addition they address environmental concerns and socio-economic issues. The present work presents the experimental investigations carried out on the utilization of such renewable fuel combinations for diesel engine applications. For this a single-cylinder four-stroke water cooled direct injection (DI compression ignition (CI engine provided with CMFIS (Conventional Mechanical Fuel Injection System was rightfully converted to operate with CRDi injection systems enabling high pressure injection of Rubber seed oil methyl ester (RuOME in the dual fuel mode with induction of varied gas flow rates of hydrogen and hydrogen enriched CNG (HCNG gas combinations. Experimental investigations showed a considerable improvement in dual fuel engine performance with acceptable brake thermal efficiency and reduced emissions of smoke, hydrocarbon (HC, carbon monoxide (CO and slightly increased nitric oxide (NOx emission levels for increased hydrogen and HCNG flow rates. Further CRDi facilitated dual fuel engine showed improved engine performance compared to CMFIS as the former enabled high pressure (900 bar injection of the RuOME and closer to TDC (Top Dead Centre as well. Combustion parameters such as ignition delay, combustion duration, pressure-crank angle and heat release rates were analyzed and compared with baseline data generated. Combustion analysis showed that the rapid rate of burning of hydrogen and HCNG along with air mixtures increased due to presence of hydrogen in total and in partial combination with CNG which further resulted into higher cylinder pressures and energy release rates. However, sustained research that can provide feasible engine technology operating on such fuels in dual fuel operation can pave the way for continued fossil fuel usage.

  5. Low-cost fiber optic hydrogen gas detector using guided-wave surface-plasmon resonance in chemochromic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Ed; Hishmeh, Gary A.; Ciszek, Paul E.; Lee, Se-Hee; Haberman, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    Low-cost, hydrogen-gas-leak detectors are needed for many hydrogen applications, such as hydrogen-fueled vehicles where several detectors may be required in different locations on each vehicle. A fiber-optic leak detector could be inherently safer than conventional detectors, because it would remove all detector electronics from the vicinity of potential leaks. It would also provide freedom from electromagnetic interference, a serious problem in fuel- cell-powered electric vehicles. This paper describes the design of a fiber-optic, surface-plasmon-resonance hydrogen detector, and efforts to make it more sensitive, selective, and durable. Chemochromic materials, such as tungsten oxide and certain Lanthanide hydrides, can reversibly react with hydrogen in air while exhibiting significant changes in their optical properties. Thin films of these materials applied to a sensor at the nd of an optical fiber have been used to detect low concentrations of hydrogen gas in air. The coatings include a thin silver layer in which the surface plasmon is generated, a thin film of the chemochromic materials, and a catalytic layer of palladium that facilitates the reaction with hydrogen. The film thickness is chosen to produce a guided-surface plasmon wave along the interface between the silver and the chemichromic material. A dichroic beam-splitter separates the reflected spectrum into a portion near the resonance and a portion away from the resonance, and directs these two portions to two separate photodiodes. The electronic ratio of these two signals cancels most of the fiber transmission noise and provides a stable hydrogen signal.

  6. Detection of exhaled hydrogen sulphide gas in rats exposed to intravenous sodium sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insko, Michael A; Deckwerth, Thomas L; Hill, Paul; Toombs, Christopher F; Szabo, Csaba

    2009-07-01

    Sodium sulphide (Na(2)S) disassociates to sodium (Na(+)) hydrosulphide, anion (HS(-)) and hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) in aqueous solutions. Here we have established and characterized a method to detect H(2)S gas in the exhaled breath of rats. Male rats were anaesthetized with ketamine and xylazine, instrumented with intravenous (i.v.) jugular vein catheters, and a tube inserted into the trachea was connected to a pneumotach connected to a H(2)S gas detector. Sodium sulphide, cysteine or the natural polysulphide compound diallyl disulphide were infused intravenously while the airway was monitored for exhaled H(2)S real time. Exhaled sulphide concentration was calculated to be in the range of 0.4-11 ppm in response to i.v. infusion rates ranging between 0.3 and 1.1 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1). When nitric oxide synthesis was inhibited with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester the amount of H(2)S exhaled during i.v. infusions of sodium sulphide was significantly increased compared with that obtained with the vehicle control. An increase in circulating nitric oxide using DETA NONOate [3,3-bis(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene] did not alter the levels of exhaled H(2)S during an i.v. infusion of sodium sulphide. An i.v. bolus of L-cysteine, 1 g.kg(-1), and an i.v. infusion of the garlic derived natural compound diallyl disulphide, 1.8 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1), also caused exhalation of H(2)S gas. This method has shown that significant amounts of H(2)S are exhaled in rats during sodium sulphide infusions, and the amount exhaled can be modulated by various pharmacological interventions.

  7. Capture and storage of hydrogen gas by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Eric J

    2014-02-01

    Granular Fe(o), used to reductively degrade a variety of contaminants in groundwater, corrodes in water to produce H2(g). A portion enters the Fe(o) lattice where it is stored in trapping sites such as lattice defects and microcracks. The balance is dissolved by the groundwater where it may exsolve as a gas if its solubility is exceeded. Gas exsolution can reduce the effectiveness of the Fe(o) treatment zone by reducing contact of the contaminant with iron surfaces or by diverting groundwater flow. It also represents a lost electron resource that otherwise could be involved in reductive degradation of contaminants. It is advantageous to select an iron for remediation purposes that captures a large proportion of the H2(g) it generates. This study examines various aspects of the H2(g) uptake process and has found 1) H2(g) does not have to be generated at the water/iron interface to enter the lattice. It can enter directly from the gas/water phases, 2) exposure of granular sponge iron to H2(g) reduces the dormant period for the onset of iron corrosion, 3) the large quantities of H2(g) generated by nano-Fe(o) injected into a reactive barrier of an appropriate granular iron can be captured in the lattice of that iron, and 4) lattice-bound hydrogen represents an additional electron resource to Fe(o) for remediation purposes and may be accessible using physical or chemical means. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions Characterization of Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Fueled with Hydrogen/Natural Gas Blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby S. Chapman; Amar Patil

    2007-06-30

    Hydrogen is an attractive fuel source not only because it is abundant and renewable but also because it produces almost zero regulated emissions. Internal combustion engines fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) are operated throughout a variety of industries in a number of mobile and stationary applications. While CNG engines offer many advantages over conventional gasoline and diesel combustion engines, CNG engine performance can be substantially improved in the lean operating region. Lean operation has a number of benefits, the most notable of which is reduced emissions. However, the extremely low flame propagation velocities of CNG greatly restrict the lean operating limits of CNG engines. Hydrogen, however, has a high flame speed and a wide operating limit that extends into the lean region. The addition of hydrogen to a CNG engine makes it a viable and economical method to significantly extend the lean operating limit and thereby improve performance and reduce emissions. Drawbacks of hydrogen as a fuel source, however, include lower power density due to a lower heating value per unit volume as compared to CNG, and susceptibility to pre-ignition and engine knock due to wide flammability limits and low minimum ignition energy. Combining hydrogen with CNG, however, overcomes the drawbacks inherent in each fuel type. Objectives of the current study were to evaluate the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas as a fuel for conventional natural gas engines. The experiment and data analysis included evaluation of engine performance, efficiency, and emissions along with detailed in-cylinder measurements of key physical parameters. This provided a detailed knowledge base of the impact of using hydrogen/natural gas blends. A four-stroke, 4.2 L, V-6 naturally aspirated natural gas engine coupled to an eddy current dynamometer was used to measure the impact of hydrogen/natural gas blends on performance, thermodynamic efficiency and exhaust gas emissions

  9. Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Pressure Hydrogen Production. A comprehensive project report (FY2010 - FY2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaehn, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Peterson, Eric [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Orme, Christopher [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bhandari, Dhaval [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Miller, Scott [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Ku, Anthony [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Polishchuk, Kimberly [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Narang, Kristi [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Singh, Surinder [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Wei, Wei [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Shisler, Roger [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Wickersham, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); McEvoy, Kevin [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Alberts, William [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Howson, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Barton, Thomas [Western Research inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Sethi, Vijay [Western Research inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL), GE Global Research (GEGR), and Western Research Institute (WRI) have successfully produced hydrogen-selective membranes for water-gas-shift (WGS) modules that enable high-pressure hydrogen product streams. Several high performance (HP) polymer membranes were investigated for their gas separation performance under simulated (mixed gas) and actual syngas conditions. To enable optimal module performance, membranes with high hydrogen (H2) selectivity, permeance, and stability under WGS conditions are required. The team determined that the VTEC PI 80-051 and VTEC PI 1388 (polyimide from Richard Blaine International, Inc.) are prime candidates for the H2 gas separations at operating temperatures (~200°C). VTEC PI 80-051 was thoroughly analyzed for its H2 separations under syngas processing conditions using more-complex membrane configurations, such as tube modules and hollow fibers. These membrane formats have demonstrated that the selected VTEC membrane is capable of providing highly selective H2/CO2 separation (α = 7-9) and H2/CO separation (α = 40-80) in humidified syngas streams. In addition, the VTEC polymer membranes are resilient within the syngas environment (WRI coal gasification) at 200°C for over 1000 hours. The information within this report conveys current developments of VTEC PI 80-051 as an effective H2 gas separations membrane for high-temperature syngas streams.

  10. A novel study of methane-rich gas reforming to syngas and its kinetics over semicoke catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojie; Su, Aiting; Qu, Jiangwen; Du, Yannian

    2014-01-01

    A small-size gasification unit is improved through process optimization to simulate industrial United Gas Improvement Company gasification. It finds that the reaction temperature has important impacts on semicoke catalyzed methane gas mixture. The addition of water vapor can enhance the catalytic activity of reforming, which is due to the fact that addition of water vapor not only removes carbon deposit produced in the reforming and gasification reaction processes, but also participates in gasification reaction with semicoke to generate some active oxygen-containing functional groups. The active oxygen-containing functional groups provide active sites for carbon dioxide reforming of methane, promoting the reforming reaction. It also finds that the addition of different proportions of methane-rich gas can yield synthesis gas with different H2/CO ratio. The kinetics study shows that the semicoke can reduce the activation energy of the reforming reaction and promote the occurrence of the reforming reaction. The kinetics model of methane reforming under the conditions of steam gasification over semicoke is as follows: [Formula in text].

  11. Nitrogen-Rich Conjugated Microporous Polymers: Facile Synthesis, Efficient Gas Storage, and Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yaozu; Cheng, Zhonghua; Zuo, Weiwei; Thomas, Arne; Faul, Charl F J

    2017-11-08

    Nitrogen-rich conjugated microporous polymers (NCMPs) have attracted great attention in recent years owing to their polarity, basicity, and ability to coordinate metal ions. Herein, three NCMPs, structurally close to polyaniline, were facilely synthesized via chemical oxidative polymerization between multiconnected aniline precursors. The NCMPs with high N content (11.84 wt %), intrinsic ultramicroporosity (94% activity in Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions after six continuous runs.

  12. Corrosion Resistance of Nanosized Silicon Carbide-Rich Composite Coatings Produced by Noble Gas Ion Mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racz, A S; Kerner, Z; Nemeth, A; Panjan, P; Peter, L; Sulyok, A; Vertesy, G; Zolnai, Z; Menyhard, M

    2017-12-27

    Ion beam mixing has been used to produce a silicon carbide (SiC)-rich nanolayer for protective coating. Different C/Si/C/Si/C/Si(substrate) multilayer structures (with individual layer thicknesses falling in the range of 10-20 nm) have been irradiated by Ar+ and Xe+ ions at room temperature in the energy and fluence ranges of 40-120 keV and 1-6 × 1016 ion/cm2, respectively. The effects of ion irradiation, including the in-depth distribution of the SiC produced, was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling. The thickness of the SiC-rich region was only some nanometers, and it could be tailored by changing the layer structure and the ion irradiation conditions. The corrosion resistance of the layers was investigated by potentiodynamic electrochemical test in 4 M KOH solution. The measured corrosion resistance of the SiC-rich layers was orders of magnitude better than that of pure silicon, and a correlation was found between the corrosion current density and the effective areal density of the SiC.

  13. Hydrogen Selective Inorganic membranes for Gas Separations under High Pressure Intermediate Temperature Hydrocarbonic Envrionment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich Ciora; Paul KT Liu

    2012-06-27

    In this project, we have successfully developed a full scale commercially ready carbon molecular sieve (CMS) based membrane for applications in H{sub 2} recovery from refinery waste and other aggressive gas streams. Field tests at a refinery pilot plant and a coal gasification facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to recovery hydrogen from hydrotreating and raw syngas respectively. High purity H{sub 2} and excellent stability of the membrane permeance and selectivity were obtained in testing conducted over >500 hours at each site. The results from these field tests as well as laboratory testing conclude that the membranes can be operated at high pressures (up to 1,000 psig) and temperatures (up to 300 C) in presence of aggressive contaminants, such as sulfur and nitrogen containing species (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, etc), condensable hydrocarbons, tar-like species, heavy metals, etc. with no observable effect on membrane performance. By comparison, similar operating conditions and/or environments would rapidly destroy competing membranes, such as polymeric, palladium, zeolitic, etc. Significant cost savings can be achieved through recovering H{sub 2} from refinery waste gas using this newly developed CMS membrane. Annual savings of $2 to 4MM/year (per 20,000 scfd of waste gas) can be realized by recovering the H{sub 2} for reuse (versus fuel). Projecting these values over the entire US market, potential H{sub 2} savings from refinery waste gases on the order of 750 to 1,000MM scfd and $750 to $1,000MM per year are possible. In addition to the cost savings, potential energy savings are projected to be ca. 150 to 220 tBTU/yr and CO{sub 2} gas emission reductions are projected to be ca. 5,000 to 6,500MMtons/year. The full scale membrane bundle developed as part of this project, i.e., 85 x 30 inch ceramic membrane tubes packaged into a full ceramic potting, is an important accomplishment. No comparable commercial scale product exists in the

  14. Estimation of the hydrogen concentration in rat tissue using an airtight tube following the administration of hydrogen via various routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi; Kurokawa, Ryosuke; Fujino, Masayuki; Hirano, Shinichi; Sato, Bunpei; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen exerts beneficial effects in disease animal models of ischemia-reperfusion injury as well as inflammatory and neurological disease. Additionally, molecular hydrogen is useful for various novel medical and therapeutic applications in the clinical setting. In the present study, the hydrogen concentration in rat blood and tissue was estimated. Wistar rats were orally administered hydrogen super-rich water (HSRW), intraperitoneal and intravenous administration of hydrogen super-rich saline (HSRS), and inhalation of hydrogen gas. A new method for determining the hydrogen concentration was then applied using high-quality sensor gas chromatography, after which the specimen was prepared via tissue homogenization in airtight tubes. This method allowed for the sensitive and stable determination of the hydrogen concentration. The hydrogen concentration reached a peak at 5 minutes after oral and intraperitoneal administration, compared to 1 minute after intravenous administration. Following inhalation of hydrogen gas, the hydrogen concentration was found to be significantly increased at 30 minutes and maintained the same level thereafter. These results demonstrate that accurately determining the hydrogen concentration in rat blood and organ tissue is very useful and important for the application of various novel medical and therapeutic therapies using molecular hydrogen. PMID:24975958

  15. Maximum Potential Hydrogen Gas Retention in the sRF Resin Ion Exchange Column for the LAWPS Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Bottenus, Courtney LH; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2018-01-22

    The Low-Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) is being developed to provide treated supernatant liquid from the Hanford tank farms directly to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The design and development of the LAWPS is being conducted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC. A key process in LAWPS is the removal of radioactive Cs in ion exchange (IX) columns filled with spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. One accident scenario being evaluated is the loss of liquid flow through the sRF resin bed after it has been loaded with radioactive Cs and hydrogen gas is being generated by radiolysis. In normal operations, the generated hydrogen is expected to remain dissolved in the liquid and be continuously removed by liquid flow. For an accident scenario with a loss of flow, hydrogen gas can be retained within the IX column both in the sRF resin and below the bottom screen that supports the resin within the column. The purpose of this report is to summarize calculations that estimate the upper-bound volume of hydrogen gas that can be retained in the column and potentially be released to the headspace of the IX column or to process equipment connected to the IX column and, thus, pose a flammability hazard.

  16. The role of OH in the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks. II. Gas-rich environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaparro Molano, G.; Kamp, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. We present a method for including gas extinction of cosmic-ray-generated UV photons in chemical models of the midplane of protoplanetary disks, focusing on its implications on ice formation and chemical evolution. Aims: Our goal is to improve on chemical models by treating cosmic rays, the

  17. The role of OH in the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks : II. Gas-rich environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaparro-Molano, German; Kamp, I.

    2012-01-01

    Context. We present a method for including gas extinction of cosmic-ray-generated UV photons in chemical models of the midplane of protoplanetary disks, focusing on its implications on ice formation and chemical evolution. Aims. Our goal is to improve on chemical models by treating cosmic rays, the

  18. Volatile-rich Circumstellar Gas in the Unusual 49 Ceti Debris Disk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roberge, Aki; Welsh, Barry Y.; Kamp, Inga; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Grady, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph far-UV spectra of the edge-on disk around 49 Ceti, one of the very few debris disks showing submillimeter CO emission. Many atomic absorption lines are present in the spectra, most of which arise from circumstellar gas lying

  19. System efficiency for two-step metal oxide solar thermochemical hydrogen production – Part 2: Impact of gas heat recuperation and separation temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Ehrhart, Brian D.

    2016-09-22

    The solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiency is calculated for various operating conditions for a two-step metal oxide solar thermochemical hydrogen production cycle using cerium(IV) oxide. An inert sweep gas was considered as the O2 removal method. Gas and solid heat recuperation effectiveness values were varied between 0 and 100% in order to determine the limits of the effect of these parameters. The temperature at which the inert gas is separated from oxygen for an open-loop and recycled system is varied. The hydrogen and water separation temperature was also varied and the effect on STH efficiency quantified. This study shows that gas heat recuperation is critical for high efficiency cycles, especially at conditions that require high steam and inert gas flowrates. A key area for future study is identified to be the development of ceramic heat exchangers for high temperature gas-gas heat exchange. Solid heat recuperation is more important at lower oxidation temperatures that favor temperature-swing redox processing, and the relative impact of this heat recuperation is muted if the heat can be used elsewhere in the system. A high separation temperature for the recycled inert gas has been shown to be beneficial, especially for cases of lower gas heat recuperation and increased inert gas flowrates. A higher water/hydrogen separation temperature is beneficial for most gas heat recuperation effectiveness values, though the overall impact on optimal system efficiency is relatively small for the values considered. © 2016 Hydrogen Energy Publications LLC.

  20. Alfalfa discovery of the nearby gas-rich dwarf galaxy Leo P. IV. Distance measurement from LBT optical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Salzer, John J.; Rhode, Katherine L. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: berg@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: rhode@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: betsey@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Leo P is a low-luminosity dwarf galaxy discovered through the blind H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. The H I and follow-up optical observations have shown that Leo P is a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with both active star formation and an underlying older population, as well as an extremely low oxygen abundance. Here, we measure the distance to Leo P by applying the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) distance method to photometry of the resolved stellar population from new Large Binocular Telescope V and I band imaging. We measure a distance modulus of 26.19{sub −0.50}{sup +0.17} mag corresponding to a distance of 1.72{sub −0.40}{sup +0.14} Mpc. Although our photometry reaches 3 mag below the TRGB, the sparseness of the red giant branch yields higher uncertainties on the lower limit of the distance. Leo P is outside the Local Group with a distance and velocity consistent with the local Hubble flow. While located in a very low-density environment, Leo P lies within ∼0.5 Mpc of a loose association of dwarf galaxies which include NGC 3109, Antlia, Sextans A, and Sextans B, and 1.1 Mpc away from its next nearest neighbor, Leo A. Leo P is one of the lowest metallicity star-forming galaxies known in the nearby universe, comparable in metallicity to I Zw 18 and DDO 68, but with stellar characteristics similar to dwarf spheriodals (dSphs) in the Local Volume such as Carina, Sextans, and Leo II. Given its physical properties and isolation, Leo P may provide an evolutionary link between gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies and dSphs that have fallen into a Local Group environment and been stripped of their gas.

  1. The effect of hydrogen peroxide solution on SO2 removal in the semidry flue gas desulfurization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuegui; Zhu, Xian; Peng, Jun; Liu, Yaobin; Zhang, Dingwang; Zhang, Mingchuan

    2009-10-15

    The present study attempts to use hydrogen peroxide solution to humidify Ca(OH)(2) particles to enhance the absorption of SO(2) to achieve higher removal efficiency and to solve the valuable reuse of the reaction product in the semidry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process. Experiments were carried out to examine the effect of various operating parameters including hydrogen peroxide solution concentration, Ca/S molar ratio and approach to adiabatic saturation temperature on SO(2) removal efficiency in a laboratory scale spray reactor. The product samples were analyzed to obtain semi-quantitative measures of mineralogical composition by X-ray diffraction (XRD) with reference intensity ratio (RIR) method and the morphology of the samples was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Compared with spraying water to humidify Ca(OH)(2), SO(2) removal efficiency was improved significantly by spraying hydrogen peroxide solution of 1-3 wt.% to humidify Ca(OH)(2) because hydrogen peroxide solution enhanced the dissolution and absorption rate of SO(2). Moreover, XRD and SEM analyses show that the desulfurization products contain less amount of unreacted Ca(OH)(2) and more amount of stable calcium sulfate with increasing hydrogen peroxide solution concentration. Thus, the process mechanism of the enhanced absorption of SO(2) by spraying hydrogen peroxide solution to humidify Ca(OH)(2) was elucidated on the basis of the experimental results.

  2. Detection of exhaled hydrogen sulphide gas in healthy human volunteers during intravenous administration of sodium sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toombs, Christopher F; Insko, Michael A; Wintner, Edward A; Deckwerth, Thomas L; Usansky, Helen; Jamil, Khurram; Goldstein, Brahm; Cooreman, Michael; Szabo, Csaba

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule and potential therapeutic agent. Emerging studies indicate its therapeutic potential in a variety of cardiovascular diseases and in critical illness. Augmentation of endogenous sulphide concentrations by intravenous administration of sodium sulphide can be used for the delivery of H(2)S to the tissues. In the current study, we have measured H(2)S concentrations in the exhaled breath of healthy human volunteers subjected to increasing doses sodium sulphide in a human phase I safety and tolerability study. We have measured reactive sulphide in the blood via ex vivo derivatization of sulphide with monobromobimane to form sulphide-dibimane and blood concentrations of thiosulfate (major oxidative metabolite of sulphide) via ion chromatography. We have measured exhaled H(2)S concentrations using a custom-made device based on a sulphide gas detector (Interscan). Administration of IK-1001, a parenteral formulation of Na(2)S (0.005-0.20 mg kg(-1), i.v., infused over 1 min) induced an elevation of blood sulphide and thiosulfate concentrations over baseline, which was observed within the first 1-5 min following administration of IK-1001 at 0.10 mg kg(-1) dose and higher. In all subjects, basal exhaled H(2)S was observed to be higher than the ambient concentration of H(2)S gas in room air, indicative of on-going endogenous H(2)S production in human subjects. Upon intravenous administration of Na(2)S, a rapid elevation of exhaled H(2)S concentrations was observed. The amount of exhaled H(2)S rapidly decreased after discontinuation of the infusion of Na(2)S. Exhaled H(2)S represents a detectable route of elimination after parenteral administration of Na(2)S.

  3. Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas: Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmann, H.G.; Paisley, M.A.; Appelbaum, H.R.

    1986-03-01

    A process is being developed that produces a fuel gas with a heating value of 500 Btu/SCF from diverse forms of biomass, including shredded bark, wood chips, and sawdust. The system uses a high throughput, non-oxygen gasifier that employs sand circulation to supply process heat. Results obtained with a 10-inch I.D. gasifier are presented and compared with those in a 6-inch I.D. reactor. Feed rates up to 12 tons/day (dry) have been achieved corresponding to a specific wood throughput of 2000 lbs/ft/sup 2/-hr. Gas compositions in the two reactors are in excellent agreement and performance in the larger reactor, as measured by carbon conversion, is significantly improved. Cost projections comparing this process with direct combustion are presented that indicate gasification technology should have very significant cost advantages for both generation of plant steam and cogeneration of electricity. 5 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. COSMIC RAYS CAN DRIVE STRONG OUTFLOWS FROM GAS-RICH HIGH-REDSHIFT DISK GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanasz, M.; Kowalik, K.; Wóltański, D. [Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Grudziadzka 5, PL-87100 Toruń (Poland); Lesch, H. [Universitäts-Sternwarte München, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 München (Germany); Naab, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching bei München (Germany); Gawryszczak, A., E-mail: mhanasz@astri.uni.torun.pl [Poznań Supercomputing and Networking Centre, ul. Noskowskiego 10, PL-61-704 Poznań (Poland)

    2013-11-10

    We present simulations of the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) in models of massive star-forming (40 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) disk galaxies with high gas surface densities (Σ{sub gas} ∼ 100 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}) similar to observed star-forming high-redshift disks. We assume that type II supernovae deposit 10% of their energy into the ISM as cosmic rays (CRs) and neglect the additional deposition of thermal energy or momentum. With a typical Galactic diffusion coefficient for CRs (3 × 10{sup 28} cm{sup 2} s{sup –1}), we demonstrate that this process alone can trigger the local formation of a strong low-density galactic wind maintaining vertically open field lines. Driven by the additional pressure gradient of the relativistic fluid, the wind speed can exceed 10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}, much higher than the escape velocity of the galaxy. The global mass loading, i.e., the ratio of the gas mass leaving the galactic disk in a wind to the star formation rate, becomes of order unity once the system has settled into an equilibrium. We conclude that relativistic particles accelerated in supernova remnants alone provide a natural and efficient mechanism to trigger winds similar to observed mass-loaded galactic winds in high-redshift galaxies. These winds also help in explaining the low efficiencies for the conversion of gas into stars in galaxies, as well as the early enrichment of the intergalactic medium with metals. This mechanism may be at least of similar importance to the traditionally considered momentum feedback from massive stars and thermal and kinetic feedback from supernova explosions.

  5. Hydridation of hyperquenched Ti-Ni by electrolytic hydrogen at 25{sup o}C then by thermally active hydrogen gas. Relation between TiNiH{sub x} structure and hydrogen storage capacity; Hyduration de Ti-Ni hypertrempe par l`hydrogene electrolytique a 25{sup o}C puis par l`hydrogene gaz active thermiquement: relation entre la structure de TiNiH{sub x} et sa capacite de stockage d`hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basile, F. [Centre d`Etudes de Chimie Metallurgique, 94 - Vitry-sur-Seine (France)

    1997-05-01

    TiNi alloys are potentially able to include in their structure a significant quantity of hydrogen which allows them to be used as electrodes in hydrogen batteries providing their electrical characteristics are suitable. TiNi alloys were produced in hyperquenched tape shape. These tapes were then electrolytically hydrided. X-ray analysis of hydrided and nonhydrided samples was performed. In the hyperquenched tape the B2 and the ``R``(H) phases, the presence of which is linked to the hyperquenched constraints, coexist. The hydrided electrolytically hyperquenched tape has the TiNiH{sub x} (x 0.3) formula and contains the two hydrided forms corresponding to those that are unhydrided. At around 100{sup o}C, under hydrogen gas, the quadratic hydride parent of B2 remains alone. The TiNiH{sub 0.3} sample has been analysed using differential calorimetry under argon and hydrogen gas. In the cubic structure only two octahedral sites are occupied by hydrogen. In TiNiH{sub 0.3} only the smaller octahedral sites are occupied by electrolytic hydrogen. If TiNiH{sub 0.3} is then charged with hydrogen gas, this gas occupies the other larger octahedral site. The hydride has the formula TiNiH{sub 0.85}. (Author)

  6. Sunlight-promoted photocatalytic hydrogen gas evolution from water-suspended cellulose: a systematic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speltini, Andrea; Sturini, Michela; Dondi, Daniele; Annovazzi, Enrico; Maraschi, Federica; Caratto, Valentina; Profumo, Antonella; Buttafava, Armando

    2014-10-01

    This work presents a systematic study of cellulose (CLS) as a sacrificial biomass for photocatalytic H2 evolution from water. The idea is indeed to couple a largely available and not expensive biomass, and water, with a renewable energy like solar radiation. An aqueous CLS suspension irradiated either at 366 nm (UV-A) or under sunlight in the presence of Pt/TiO2 behaves as a H2 evolving system. The effects of irradiation time, catalyst and CLS concentrations, pH and water salinity are studied. Addition of CLS to the sample significantly improved H2 evolution from water splitting, with yields up to ten fold higher than those observed in neat water. The mechanism of the photocatalytic process relies on the TiO2-mediated CLS hydrolysis, under irradiation. The polysaccharide depolymerisation generates water-soluble species and intermediates, among them 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was identified. These intermediates are readily oxidized following the glucose photoreforming, thus enhancing water hydrogen ion reduction to give gas-phase H2. The formation of "colored" by-products from HMF self-polymerization involves a sort of "in situ dye sensitization" that allows an effective photoreaction even under solar light. The procedure is evaluated and successfully extended on cellulosic biomasses, i.e. rice husk and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) stems, not previously investigated for this application.

  7. Catalytic dry reforming of natural gas for the production of chemicals and hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verykios Xenophon E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide reforming of methane to synthesis gas was studied over Ni-based catalysts. It is shown that, in contrast to other Ni-based catalysts which exhibit continuous deactivation with time-on-stream, the rate over the Ni/La2O3 catalyst increases during the initial 2-3 h of reaction and then tends to be essentially invariable, displaying very good stability. X-ray diffraction, hydrogen and CO uptake studies, as well as high resolution TEM indicate that, under reaction conditions, the Ni particles are partially covered by La2O2CO3 species which are formed by interaction of La2O2 with CO2. Catalytic activity occurs at the Ni- La2O2CO3 interface, while the oxycarbonate species participate directly by reacting with deposited carbon, thus restoring the activity of the Ni sites at the interface. XPS and FTIR studies provide evidence in support of this mechanistic scheme. It was also found that methane cracking on Ni sites and surface reaction between deposited carbon and oxycarbonate species are the rate determining steps in the reaction sequence. A kinetic model is developed based on this mechanistic scheme, which is found to predict satisfactorily the kinetic measurements.

  8. Mathematical modelling and simulation on the adsorption of Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkefli, N. N.; Masdar, M. S.; Isahak, W. R. W.; Jahim, J.; Majlan, E. H.; Rejab, S. A. M.; Lye, C. C.

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, H2S, a pollutant in biofuel gas, i.e., biohydrogen and biomethane, is produced at concentrations ranging from 100 ppm to 10,000 ppm and is recommended to be removed at the early stage of gas purification because it is known as a problematic compound. In this study, adsorption technologies show a promising technique to remove H2S from biofuel gas, which mainly depends on the operating parameters and adsorbent ability. In this study, the development of the models is important to investigate the fundamentals of H2S adsorption mechanism. The fitted mathematics model was performed by considering several assumptions made for fixed-bed adsorption, leading to the determination of the breakthrough curve by solving a set of partial differential equations (PDEs). The operating parameters were as follows: varied inlet concentration at 1000 ppm to 10,000 ppm, flow rate at 0.2 L/min to 0.6 L/min, length bed used at 10 cm to 30 cm, and pressure at 1.5 atm to 5 atm. The adsorption performance was also studied by using commercial activated carbon such as palm kernel shell (PKS-AC), coconut shell activated carbon (coconut shell-AC), and zeolite ZSM-5. To support the effectiveness of the mathematical models, the adsorption test was performed by loading the adsorbent into the fixed-bed adsorption column at an overall diameter of 6 cm and height of 30 cm. The system operated under room temperature, H2S inlet concentration of 1000 ppm, and varying flow rate as in the modelling for PKS-AC. As a result, in the modelling study, the inlet concentration effect was highest in adsorption capacity, breakthrough time, and exhaustion time. However, the increase of flow rate and length bed used only affected the breakthrough and exhaustion times but not adsorption capacity. The total pressure used did not affect adsorption performance. Coconut shell-AC shows longer exhaustion time compared with other adsorbents due to the less frequent changes of adsorbent. In the experimental

  9. Performance Change of Hydrogen Fueled Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Internally Humidified at the Cathode by Gas Flow Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Akio; Tanaka, Kazuhisa; Aoki, Tsutomu; Ogami, Yasuji; Saso, Hidetoshi; Abe, Satoshi; Hariyama, Suguru; Nishikawa, Hisao

    With high hydrogen utilization operation, a minor imbalance in the distributed flow of the stack causes a shortage of hydrogen gas. In order to achieve high hydrogen utilization operation, we investigated the flow pattern for cells internally humidified at the cathode side. We fabricated both counter flow and co flow type cells for humidification of the cells inside the cathode and carried out electricity generation tests on single cells and cell stacks. Also we measured the distribution of relative humidity at the anode electrode for counter flow and co flow humidification of the cell inside the cathode. From these test results we concluded that the counter flow method is superior as a humidification cell inside a cathode when using the stack division method.

  10. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of By-product Hydrogen from Chlor-Alkali Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong-Yeon [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Systems Assessment Group, Energy Systems Division; Elgowainy, Amgad A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Systems Assessment Group, Energy Systems Division; Dai, Qiang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Systems Assessment Group, Energy Systems Division

    2017-12-01

    Current hydrogen production capacity in the U.S. is about 15.8 million tonne (or metric ton) per year (Brown 2016). Some of the hydrogen (2 million tonne) is combusted for its heating energy value, which makes total annual net production 13.8 million tonne (Table 1). If captive by-product hydrogen (3.3 million tonne) from catalytic reforming at oil refineries is excluded (Brown 2016; EIA 2008), approximately 11 million tonne is available from the conventional captive and merchant hydrogen market (DOE 2013). Captive hydrogen (owned by the refiner) is produced and consumed on site (e.g., process input at refineries), whereas merchant hydrogen is produced and sold as a commodity to external consumers. Whether it is merchant or captive, most hydrogen produced in the U.S. is on-purpose (not by-product)— around 10 million tonne/year.

  11. Concept for premixed combustion of hydrogen-containing fuels in gas turbines; Konzept zur vorgemischten Verbrennung wasserstoffhaltiger Brennstoffe in Gasturbinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Christoph

    2012-07-19

    One of the main challenges for future gas turbines and their combustion systems is to provide fuel flexibility. The fuel range is expected to reach from the lowly reactive natural gas to highly reactive hydrogen-containing syngases. The objective of the project in which this work was pursued is to develop such a combustion system. The burner has to ensure premixed operation with an aerodynamically stabilized flame. The focus of this work is on characterizing and optimizing the operational safety of the system, but also on ensuring sufficientmixing and lowemissions. A burner and fuel injection design is achieved that leads not only to emissions far below the permissible values, but also to flashback safety for hydrogen combustion that comes close to the theoretically achievable maximum at atmospheric pressure conditions. In this design flashback due to combustion-induced vortex breakdown and wall boundary layer flashback is avoided. Flashback only takes place when the flow velocity reaches the flame velocity.

  12. Modes of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion of hydrogen/air mixtures in a closed chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Xian

    2017-01-05

    Modes of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion of hydrogen/air mixtures in a closed chamber are numerically investigated using an 1-D unsteady, shock-capturing, compressible and reacting flow solver. Different combinations of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion modes are observed, i.e., 1) deflagration without end-gas combustion, 2) deflagration to end-gas autoignition, 3) deflagration to end-gas detonation, 4) developing or developed detonation, occurring in the sequence of increasing initial temperatures. Effects of ignition location and chamber size are evaluated: the asymmetric ignition is found to promote the reactivity of unburnt mixture compared to ignitions at center/wall, due to additional heating from asymmetric pressure waves. End-gas combustion occurs earlier in smaller chambers, where end-gas temperature rise due to compression heating from the deflagration is faster. According to the ξ−ε regime diagram based on Zeldovich theory, modes of reaction front propagation are primarily determined by reactivity gradients introduced by initial ignition, while modes of end-gas combustion are influenced by the total amount of unburnt mixture at the time when autoignition occurs. A transient reactivity gradient method is provided and able to capture the occurrence of detonation.

  13. The effect of a micro bubble dispersed gas phase on hydrogen isotope transport in liquid metals under nuclear irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fradera, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The present work intend to be a first step towards the understanding and quantification of the hydrogen isotope complex phenomena in liquid metals for nuclear technology. Liquid metals under nuclear irradiation in,e.g., breeding blankets of a nuclear fusion reactor would generate tritium which is to be extracted and recirculated as fuel. At the same time that tritium is bred, helium is also generated and may precipitate in the form of nano bubbles. Other liquid metal systems of a nuclear reactor involve hydrogen isotope absorption processes, e.g., tritium extraction system. Hence, hydrogen isotope absorption into gas bubbles modelling and control may have a capital importance regarding design, operation and safety. Here general models for hydrogen isotopes transport in liquid metal and absorption into gas phase, that do not depend on the mass transfer limiting regime, are exposed and implemented in OpenFOAMR CFD tool for 0D to 3D simulations. Results for a 0D case show the impact of a He dispersed phase of na...

  14. VHMPID RICH prototype using pressurized C{sub 4}F{sub 8}O radiator gas and VUV photon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acconcia, T.V. [UNICAMP, University of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); Agócs, A.G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Barile, F. [INFN Sezione di Bari and Universitá degli Studi di Bari, Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Bari (Italy); Barnaföldi, G.G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Bellwied, R. [University of Houston, Houston (United States); Bencédi, G. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Bencze, G., E-mail: Gyorgy.Bencze@cern.ch [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Berényi, D.; Boldizsár, L. [Wigner RCP of the HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Chattopadhyay, S. [Saha Institute, Kolkata (India); Chinellato, D.D. [University of Houston, Houston (United States); Cindolo, F. [University of Salerno, Salerno (Italy); Cossyleon, K. [Chicago State University, Chicago, IL (United States); Das, D.; Das, K.; Das-Bose, L. [Saha Institute, Kolkata (India); Dash, A.K. [UNICAMP, University of Campinas, Campinas (Brazil); D' Ambrosio, S. [University of Salerno, Salerno (Italy); De Cataldo, G. [INFN Sezione di Bari and Universitá degli Studi di Bari, Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Bari (Italy); De Pasquale, S. [University of Salerno, Salerno (Italy); and others

    2014-12-11

    A small-size prototype of a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector using for the first time pressurized C4F8O radiator gas and a photon detector consisting of MWPC equipped with a CsI photocathode has been built and tested at the PS accelerator at CERN. It contained all the functional elements of the detector proposed as Very High Momentum Particle Identification (VHMPID) upgrade for the ALICE experiment at LHC to provide charged hadron track-by-track identification in the momentum range starting from 5 potentially up to 25 GeV/c. In the paper the equipment and its elements are described and some characteristic test results are shown.

  15. XUV-exposed, non-hydrostatic hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets. Part I: atmospheric expansion and thermal escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkaev, Nikolai V; Lammer, Helmut; Odert, Petra; Kulikov, Yuri N; Kislyakova, Kristina G; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Güdel, Manuel; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Biernat, Helfried

    2013-11-01

    The recently discovered low-density "super-Earths" Kepler-11b, Kepler-11f, Kepler-11d, Kepler-11e, and planets such as GJ 1214b represent the most likely known planets that are surrounded by dense H/He envelopes or contain deep H₂O oceans also surrounded by dense hydrogen envelopes. Although these super-Earths are orbiting relatively close to their host stars, they have not lost their captured nebula-based hydrogen-rich or degassed volatile-rich steam protoatmospheres. Thus, it is interesting to estimate the maximum possible amount of atmospheric hydrogen loss from a terrestrial planet orbiting within the habitable zone of late main sequence host stars. For studying the thermosphere structure and escape, we apply a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model that solves the equations of mass, momentum, and energy conservation for a planet with the mass and size of Earth and for a super-Earth with a size of 2 R(Earth) and a mass of 10 M(Earth). We calculate volume heating rates by the stellar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) and expansion of the upper atmosphere, its temperature, density, and velocity structure and related thermal escape rates during the planet's lifetime. Moreover, we investigate under which conditions both planets enter the blow-off escape regime and may therefore experience loss rates that are close to the energy-limited escape. Finally, we discuss the results in the context of atmospheric evolution and implications for habitability of terrestrial planets in general.

  16. Sulfur and Iron Speciation in Gas-rich Impact-melt Glasses from Basaltic Shergottites Determined by Microxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Mossbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO4 is deduced from MgO - SO3 correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/ S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/ sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. To understand the implications of these observations for the formation of the Gas-rich Impact-melt (GRIM) glasses, we determined the oxidation state of Fe in the GRIM glasses using Fe K micro-XANES techniques.

  17. Development of fuel-rich combustor of methane-air under high pressure for chemical gas turbine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Arai, Norio [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    A new turbine system, called Chemical gas turbine system, is based on promising developments in fuel-rich combustor with a carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) being used as the turbine blades. It would improve the thermal efficiency of more than 10% compared to conventional ones. As one of fundamental researches to develop this system, we designed a 4MPa-scale combustor with methane-air. Flammability limit and components of combustion gases were measured between 1.1 and 4.1 MPa in pressure. Temperature distributions of combustion gases were also measured by the thermocouple. Furthermore, simultaneous measurements of the intensity of OH fluorescence and the combustion temperature were made to clarify instant planar-distributions of these quantities under high pressure by a Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) system. Results from these measurements were as follows: (1) Stable combustion could attain between the equivalence ratio 0=0.7 and 1.3 at 4MPa in pressure, (2) Flammability limit extended with increasing the pressure in the fuel-rich region while it was almost constant in the fuel-lean one, (3) There was little effect of the pressure on the components of combustion gases, and (4 )Simultaneous measurements of the instant of OH fluorescence and the combustion temperature could be successfully made by a PLIF system. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Performance evaluation of an advanced air-fuel ratio controller on a stationary, rich-burn natural gas engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochuparampil, Roshan Joseph

    The advent of an era of abundant natural gas is making it an increasingly economical fuel source against incumbents such as crude oil and coal, in end-use sectors such as power generation, transportation and industrial chemical production, while also offering significant environmental benefits over these incumbents. Equipment manufacturers, in turn, are responding to widespread demand for power plants optimized for operation with natural gas. In several applications such as distributed power generation, gas transmission, and water pumping, stationary, spark-ignited, natural gas fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) are the power plant of choice (over turbines) owing to their lower equipment and operational costs, higher thermal efficiencies across a wide load range, and the flexibility afforded to end-users when building fine-resolution horsepower topologies: modular size increments ranging from 100 kW -- 2 MW per ICE power plant compared to 2 -- 5 MW per turbine power plant. Under the U.S. Environment Protection Agency's (EPA) New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (RICE NESHAP) air quality regulations, these natural gas power plants are required to comply with stringent emission limits, with several states mandating even stricter emissions norms. In the case of rich-burn or stoichiometric natural gas ICEs, very high levels of sustained emissions reduction can be achieved through exhaust after-treatment that utilizes Non Selective Catalyst Reduction (NSCR) systems. The primary operational constraint with these systems is the tight air-fuel ratio (AFR) window of operation that needs to be maintained if the NSCR system is to achieve simultaneous reduction of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), total hydrocarbons (THC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and formaldehyde (CH 2O). Most commercially available AFR controllers utilizing lambda (oxygen

  19. ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE NEARBY GAS-RICH DWARF GALAXY LEO P. II. OPTICAL IMAGING OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Haurberg, Nathalie C.; Van Sistine, Angela; Young, Michael D. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Adams, Elizabeth A. K. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cannon, John M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W., E-mail: rhode@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: betsey@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    We present results from ground-based optical imaging of a low-mass dwarf galaxy discovered by the ALFALFA 21 cm H I survey. Broadband (BVR) data obtained with the WIYN 3.5 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) are used to construct color-magnitude diagrams of the galaxy's stellar population down to V{sub o} {approx} 25. We also use narrowband H{alpha} imaging from the KPNO 2.1 m telescope to identify a H II region in the galaxy. We use these data to constrain the distance to the galaxy to be between 1.5 and 2.0 Mpc. This places Leo P within the Local Volume but beyond the Local Group. Its properties are extreme: it is the lowest-mass system known that contains significant amounts of gas and is currently forming stars.

  20. DISCOVERY OF A GAS-RICH COMPANION TO THE EXTREMELY METAL-POOR GALAXY DDO 68

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, John M.; Alfvin, Erik D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Johnson, Megan; Koribalski, Baerbel [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, NSW 1710, Epping (Australia); McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Bailin, Jeremy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama, P.O. Box 870324, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0324 (United States); Ford, H. Alyson [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Girardi, Léo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Hirschauer, Alec S.; Janowiecki, Steven; Salzer, John J.; Van Sistine, Angela [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Elson, E. C. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Marigo, Paola; Rosenfield, Philip [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Galileo Galilei, Universitá degli Studi di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Rosenberg, Jessica L. [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Venkatesan, Aparna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of San Francisco, 2130 Fulton Street, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Warren, Steven R., E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, CSS Bldg., Rm. 1024, Stadium Drive, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We present H I spectral-line imaging of the extremely metal-poor galaxy DDO 68. This system has a nebular oxygen abundance of only ∼3% Z {sub ☉}, making it one of the most metal-deficient galaxies known in the local volume. Surprisingly, DDO 68 is a relatively massive and luminous galaxy for its metal content, making it a significant outlier in the mass-metallicity and luminosity-metallicity relationships. The origin of such a low oxygen abundance in DDO 68 presents a challenge for models of the chemical evolution of galaxies. One possible solution to this problem is the infall of pristine neutral gas, potentially initiated during a gravitational interaction. Using archival H I spectral-line imaging obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we have discovered a previously unknown companion of DDO 68. This low-mass (M{sub H} {sub I} = 2.8 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}), recently star-forming (SFR{sub FUV} = 1.4 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, SFR{sub Hα} < 7 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) companion has the same systemic velocity as DDO 68 (V {sub sys} = 506 km s{sup –1}; D = 12.74 ± 0.27 Mpc) and is located at a projected distance of ∼42 kpc. New H I maps obtained with the 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope provide evidence that DDO 68 and this companion are gravitationally interacting at the present time. Low surface brightness H I gas forms a bridge between these objects.

  1. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from S-I thermochemical process coupled to a high temperature gas reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraldi, M. R.; Francois, J. L.; Castro-Uriegas, D. [Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Paseo Cuauhnahuac No. 8532, Col. Progreso, C.P. 62550, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated to the hydrogen produced by the sulfur-iodine thermochemical process, coupled to a high temperature nuclear reactor, and to compare the results with other life cycle analysis (LCA) studies on hydrogen production technologies, both conventional and emerging. The LCA tool was used to quantify the impacts associated with climate change. The product system was defined by the following steps: (i) extraction and manufacturing of raw materials (upstream flows), (U) external energy supplied to the system, (iii) nuclear power plant, and (iv) hydrogen production plant. Particular attention was focused to those processes where there was limited information from literature about inventory data, as the TRISO fuel manufacture, and the production of iodine. The results show that the electric power, supplied to the hydrogen plant, is a sensitive parameter for GHG emissions. When the nuclear power plant supplied the electrical power, low GHG emissions were obtained. These results improve those reported by conventional hydrogen production methods, such as steam reforming. (authors)

  2. Simulation study to determine the feasibility of injecting hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen gas injection to improve gas and oil recovery oil-rim reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mohamed El Gohary

    This study is combining two important and complicated processes; Enhanced Oil Recovery, EOR, from the oil rim and Enhanced Gas Recovery, EGR from the gas cap using nonhydrocarbon injection gases. EOR is proven technology that is continuously evolving to meet increased demand and oil production and desire to augment oil reserves. On the other hand, the rapid growth of the industrial and urban development has generated an unprecedented power demand, particularly during summer months. The required gas supplies to meet this demand are being stretched. To free up gas supply, alternative injectants to hydrocarbon gas are being reviewed to support reservoir pressure and maximize oil and gas recovery in oil rim reservoirs. In this study, a multi layered heterogeneous gas reservoir with an oil rim was selected to identify the most optimized development plan for maximum oil and gas recovery. The integrated reservoir characterization model and the pertinent transformed reservoir simulation history matched model were quality assured and quality checked. The development scheme is identified, in which the pattern and completion of the wells are optimized to best adapt to the heterogeneity of the reservoir. Lateral and maximum block contact holes will be investigated. The non-hydrocarbon gases considered for this study are hydrogen sulphide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen, utilized to investigate miscible and immiscible EOR processes. In November 2010, re-vaporization study, was completed successfully, the first in the UAE, with an ultimate objective is to examine the gas and condensate production in gas reservoir using non hydrocarbon gases. Field development options and proces schemes as well as reservoir management and long term business plans including phases of implementation will be identified and assured. The development option that maximizes the ultimate recovery factor will be evaluated and selected. The study achieved satisfactory results in integrating gas and oil

  3. A review of experimental studies of hydrogen as a new therapeutic agent in emergency and critical care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Meihua; Zhang, Hongying; Yu, Congjun; Wang, Fan; Sun, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant chemical element in the Universe, but is seldom regarded as a therapeutic agent. Recent evidence has shown that hydrogen is a potent antioxidative, antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory agent and so may have potential medical applications in cells, tissues and organs. There are several methods to administer hydrogen, such as inhalation of hydrogen gas, aerosol inhalation of a hydrogen-rich solution, drinking hydrogen dissolved in water, injecting hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) and taking a hydrogen bath. Drinking hydrogen solution (saline/pure water/other solutions saturated with hydrogen) may be more practical in daily life and more suitable for daily consumption. This review summarizes the findings of recent studies on the use of hydrogen in emergency and critical care medicine using different disease models.

  4. Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2005-01-01

    Proceedings of the National Hydrogen Association Annual Hydrogen Conference (NHA 2005), Washington, DC, March 29 - April 1, 2005 Hydrogen offers a wide range of future environmental and social benefits, when used as a fuel for applications such as light duty vehicles and stationary power. These potential benefits include significant or complete reductions in point-of-use criteria emissions, lower life-cycle CO2 emissions, higher end-use and life-cycle efficiency, and a shift (with re...

  5. Biotransformation of Furanic and Phenolic Compounds with Hydrogen Gas Production in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2015-11-17

    Furanic and phenolic compounds are problematic byproducts resulting from the breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass during biofuel production. The capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to produce hydrogen gas (H2) using a mixture of two furanic (furfural, FF; 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, HMF) and three phenolic (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA) compounds as the substrate in the bioanode was assessed. The rate and extent of biotransformation of the five compounds and efficiency of H2 production, as well as the structure of the anode microbial community, were investigated. The five compounds were completely transformed within 7-day batch runs and their biotransformation rate increased with increasing initial concentration. At an initial concentration of 1200 mg/L (8.7 mM) of the mixture of the five compounds, their biotransformation rate ranged from 0.85 to 2.34 mM/d. The anode Coulombic efficiency was 44-69%, which is comparable to that of wastewater-fed MECs. The H2 yield varied from 0.26 to 0.42 g H2-COD/g COD removed in the anode, and the bioanode volume-normalized H2 production rate was 0.07-0.1 L/L-d. The biotransformation of the five compounds took place via fermentation followed by exoelectrogenesis. The major identified fermentation products that did not transform further were catechol and phenol. Acetate was the direct substrate for exoelectrogenesis. Current and H2 production were inhibited at an initial substrate concentration of 1200 mg/L, resulting in acetate accumulation at a much higher level than that measured in other batch runs conducted with a lower initial concentration of the five compounds. The anode microbial community consisted of exoelectrogens, putative degraders of the five compounds, and syntrophic partners of exoelectrogens. The MEC H2 production demonstrated in this study is an alternative to the currently used process of reforming natural gas to supply H2 needed to upgrade bio-oils to stable

  6. Investigation of Hydrogen Sulfide Gas as a Treatment against P. falciparum, Murine Cerebral Malaria, and the Importance of Thiolation State in the Development of Cerebral Malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellavalle, Brian; Staalsoe, Trine; Kurtzhals, Jørgen Anders

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a potentially fatal cerebrovascular disease of complex pathogenesis caused by Plasmodium falciparum. Hydrogen sulfide (HS) is a physiological gas, similar to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, involved in cellular metabolism, vascular tension, inflammation, and cell death...

  7. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide towards synthetic natural gas. A route to effective future energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoder, M. [Hochschule Lausitz, Cottbus (Germany); Armbruster, U.; Martin, A. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Leibniz Institute for Catalysis

    2012-07-01

    Ni- and Ru-based catalysts are best suited for the so-called Sabatier reaction, i.e., the hydrogenation of CO{sub 2} to synthetic natural gas (SNG). Besides using commercial materials, catalyst syntheses (5 wt% Ru or Ni) were carried out by incipient wetness impregnation of four carriers (TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Some pre-tests revealed that catalysts supported on TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} mostly produced CO, and therefore, they were not studied in detail. The catalyst tests were carried out in a continuously operated tube reactor at 623-723 K and 1-20 bar. Ru/ZrO{sub 2} and Ni/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} revealed best catalytic performance at ambient pressure. Methane selectivities of 99.9% at 81.2% CO{sub 2} conversion for Ru/ZrO{sub 2} (623 K) and of 98.9% at 73.8% CO{sub 2} conversion for Ni/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (673 K) were obtained. The conversion increased significantly with raising reaction pressure above 10 bar to reach more than 93% for the Ni-containing catalyst and more than 96% for the Zr catalysts. Methane as the target product was formed with a selectivity of 100%. In addition, the catalysts were characterized by various solid-state techniques such as BET, TPR, ICP-OES, XRD, XPS and TEM. (orig.)

  8. Application of computational chemistry methods to obtain thermodynamic data for hydrogen production from liquefied petroleum gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Sousa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate thermodynamic data, such as standard enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy changes of reaction and, consequently, chemical equilibrium constants, for a reaction system describing the hydrogen production from Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG. The acquisition of those properties was made using computational chemistry methods and the results were compared with experimental data reported in the literature. The reaction system of steam reforming of LPG was reported as a set of seven independent reactions involving the chemical species n-C4H10, C3H8, C2H6, C2H4, CH4, CO2, CO, H2O, H2 and solid carbon. Six computational approaches were used: Density Functional Theory (DFT employing Becke's three parameter hybrid exchange functional, and the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional (B3LYP using the 6-31G++(d,p basis set and the composite methods CBS-QB3, Gaussian-1 (G1, Gaussian-2 (G2, Gaussian-3 (G3 and Gaussian-4 (G4. Mole fractions of the system components were also determined between 873.15 and 1173.15 K, at 1 atm and a feed with a stoichiometric amount of water. Results showed that the hybrid functional B3LYP/6-31G++(d,p, G3 and G4 theories were the most appropriated methods to predict the properties of interest. Gaussian-3 and Gaussian-4 theories are expected to be good thermodynamic data predictors and the known efficient prediction of vibrational frequencies by B3LYP is probably the source of the good agreement found in this study. This last methodology is of special interest since it presents low computational cost, which is important when more complex molecular systems are considered.

  9. The Use of Liquid Isopropyl Alcohol and Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Plasma to Biologically Decontaminate Spacecraft Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, J. K.; Tudryn, Carissa D.; Choi, Sun J.; Eulogio, Sebastian E.; Roberts, Timothy J.; Tudryn, Carissa D.

    2006-01-01

    Legitimate concern exists regarding sending spacecraft and their associated hardware to solar system bodies where they could possibly contaminate the body's surface with terrestrial microorganisms. The NASA approved guidelines for sterilization as set forth in NPG 8020.12C, which is consistent with the biological contamination control objectives of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR), recommends subjecting the spacecraft and its associated hardware to dry heat-a dry heat regimen that could potentially employ a temperature of 110(deg)C for up to 200 hours. Such a temperature exposure could prove detrimental to the spacecraft electronics. The stimulated growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in metallic interconnects and/or thermal degradation of organic materials composing much of the hardware could take place over a prolonged temperature regimen. Such detrimental phenomena would almost certainly compromise the integrity and reliability of the electronics. Investigation of sterilization procedures in the medical field suggests that hydrogen peroxide (H202) gas plasma (HPGP) technology can effectively function as an alternative to heat sterilization, especially for heat-sensitive items. Treatment with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) in liquid form prior to exposure of the hardware to HPGP should also prove beneficial. Although IPA is not a sterilant, it is frequently used as a disinfectant because of its bactericidal properties. The use of IPA in electronics cleaning is widely recognized and has been utilized for many years with no adverse affects reported. In addition, IPA is the principal ingredient of the test fluid used in ionic contamination testers to assess the amount of ionic contamination found on the surfaces of printed wiring assemblies. This paper will set forth experimental data confirming the feasibility of the IPA/H202 approach to reach acceptable microbial reduction (MR) levels of spacecraft electronic hardware. In addition, a proposed process flow in

  10. Ethylene Oxide and Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Plasma Sterilization: Precautionary Practices in U.S. Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L

    Evaluate precautionary practices and extent of use of ethylene oxide (EtO) and hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (HPGP) sterilization systems, including use of single chamber EtO units. Modular, web-based survey. Members of professional practice organizations who reported using EtO or HPGP in the past week to sterilize medical instruments and supplies. Participating organizations invited members via email which included a hyperlink to the survey. Descriptive analyses were conducted including simple frequencies and prevalences. A total of 428 respondents completed the module on chemical sterilants. Because most respondents worked in hospitals (87%, n=373) analysis focused on these workers. Most used HPGP sterilizers (84%, n=373), 38% used EtO sterilizers, with 22% using both. Nearly all respondents using EtO operated single chamber units (94%, n=120); most of them reported that the units employed single use cartridges (83%, n=115). Examples of where engineering and administrative controls were lacking for EtO include: operational local exhaust ventilation (7%; n=114); continuous air monitoring (6%; n=113); safe handling training (6%; n=142); and standard operating procedures (4%; n=142). Examples of practices which may increase HPGP exposure risk included lack of standard operating procedures (9%; n=311) and safe handling training (8%; n=312). Use of precautionary practices was good but not universal. EtO use appears to have diminished in favor of HPGP which affords higher throughput and minimal regulatory constraints. Separate EtO sterilization and aeration units were still being used nearly one year after U.S. EPA prohibited their use.

  11. Dynamical Friction of Black Hole Pairs at Gas-Rich Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosun; Kim, W.; Sánchez-Salcedo, F. J.

    2008-05-01

    When galaxies merge, their host black holes are believed to coalesce quickly, through gas-dynamical friction, to the point at which gravitational radiation becomes important. A black hole in a binary system certainly experiences dynamical friction due to its own wake as well as due to the wake induced by its companion, but to date little is known about the role of the companion in the coevolution of black hole binaries. We use a semi-analytic approach to study the composite wake due to, and the resulting drag forces on, a point-mass black hole binary orbiting at the opposite sides of the system center in a uniform gaseous medium. Due to the circular orbit, the wake of each black hole becomes asymmetric with a trailing spiral shape, which not only drags the black hole backward but also exerts a positive torque on the companion. The ratio of the positive torque from the companion to the negative torque due to its own wake is 0.4-0.5 and becomes larger for subsonic cases. This suggests that the orbital decay of black holes in a binary system can take considerably longer than in isolation, especially in the subsonic regime. This work was supported by KICOS through the grant K20702020016-07E0200-01610 provided by MOST, and partly for H. Kim by the BK21 project of the Korean Government.

  12. Fission track astrology of three Apollo 14 gas-rich breccias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, H.; Shirck, J.; Sun, S.; Walker, R.

    1973-01-01

    The three Apollo 14 breccias 14301, 14313, and 14318 all show fission xenon due to the decay of Pu-244. To investigate possible in situ production of the fission gas, an analysis was made of the U-distribution in these three breccias. The major amount of the U lies in glass clasts and in matrix material and no more than 25% occurs in distinct high-U minerals. The U-distribution of each breccia is discussed in detail. Whitlockite grains in breccias 14301 and 14318 found with the U-mapping were etched and analyzed for fission tracks. The excess track densities are much smaller than indicated by the Xe-excess. Because of a preirradiation history documented by very high track densities in feldspar grains, however, it is impossible to attribute the excess tracks to the decay of Pu-244. A modified track method has been developed for measuring average U-concentrations in samples containing a heterogeneous distribution of U in the form of small high-U minerals. The method is briefly discussed, and results for the rocks 14301, 14313, 14318, 68815, 15595, and the soil 64421 are given.

  13. The long lives of giant clumps and the birth of outflows in gas-rich galaxies at high redshift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bournaud, Frédéric; Renaud, Florent; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kraljic, Katarina; Le Floch' , Emeric [CEA, IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Perret, Valentin; Amram, Philippe; Epinat, Benoit [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille), F-13388 Marseille (France); Dekel, Avishai [Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Elmegreen, Debra M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Teyssier, Romain [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01

    Star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift are often subject to violent disk instability, characterized by giant clumps whose fate is yet to be understood. The main question is whether the clumps disrupt within their dynamical timescale (≤50 Myr), like the molecular clouds in today's galaxies, or whether they survive stellar feedback for more than a disk orbital time (≈300 Myr) in which case they can migrate inward and help building the central bulge. We present 3.5-7 pc resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift disks including photoionization, radiation pressure, and supernovae feedback. Our modeling of radiation pressure determines the mass loading and initial velocity of winds from basic physical principles. We find that the giant clumps produce steady outflow rates comparable to and sometimes somewhat larger than their star formation rate, with velocities largely sufficient to escape the galaxy. The clumps also lose mass, especially old stars, by tidal stripping, and the stellar populations contained in the clumps hence remain relatively young (≤200 Myr), as observed. The clumps survive gaseous outflows and stellar loss, because they are wandering in gas-rich turbulent disks from which they can reaccrete gas at high rates compensating for outflows and tidal stripping, overall keeping realistic and self-regulated gaseous and stellar masses. The outflow and accretion rates have specific timescales of a few 10{sup 8} yr, as opposed to rapid and repeated dispersion and reformation of clumps. Our simulations produce gaseous outflows with velocities, densities, and mass loading consistent with observations, and at the same time suggest that the giant clumps survive for hundreds of Myr and complete their migration to the center of high-redshift galaxies. These long-lived clumps are gas-dominated and contain a moderate mass fraction of stars; they drive inside-out disk evolution, thickening, spheroid growth, and fueling of the central

  14. Thin, High-Flux, Self-Standing, Graphene Oxide Membranes for Efficient Hydrogen Separation from Gas Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouša, Daniel; Friess, Karel; Pilnáček, Kryštof; Vopička, Ondřej; Lanč, Marek; Fónod, Kristián; Pumera, Martin; Sedmidubský, David; Luxa, Jan; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2017-08-22

    The preparation and gas-separation performance of self-standing, high-flux, graphene oxide (GO) membranes is reported. Defect-free, 15-20 μm thick, mechanically stable, unsupported GO membranes exhibited outstanding gas-separation performance towards H2 /CO2 that far exceeded the corresponding 2008 Robeson upper bound. Remarkable separation efficiency of GO membranes for H2 and bulky C3 or C4 hydrocarbons was achieved with high flux and good selectivity at the same time. On the contrary, N2 and CH4 molecules, with larger kinetic diameter and simultaneously lower molecular weight, relative to that of CO2 , remained far from the corresponding H2 /N2 or H2 /CH4 upper bounds. Pore size distribution analysis revealed that the most abundant pores in GO material were those with an effective pore diameter of 4 nm; therefore, gas transport is not exclusively governed by size sieving and/or Knudsen diffusion, but in the case of CO2 was supplemented by specific interactions through 1) hydrogen bonding with carboxyl or hydroxyl functional groups and 2) the quadrupole moment. The self-standing GO membranes presented herein demonstrate a promising route towards the large-scale fabrication of high-flux, hydrogen-selective gas membranes intended for the separation of H2 /CO2 or H2 /alkanes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Inverted Fuel Cell: Room-Temperature Hydrogen Separation from an Exhaust Gas by Using a Commercial Short-Circuited PEM Fuel Cell without Applying any Electrical Voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friebe, Sebastian; Geppert, Benjamin; Caro, Jürgen

    2015-06-26

    A short-circuited PEM fuel cell with a Nafion membrane has been evaluated in the room-temperature separation of hydrogen from exhaust gas streams. The separated hydrogen can be recovered or consumed in an in situ olefin hydrogenation when the fuel cell is operated as catalytic membrane reactor. Without applying an outer electrical voltage, there is a continuous hydrogen flux from the higher to the lower hydrogen partial pressure side through the Nafion membrane. On the feed side of the Nafion membrane, hydrogen is catalytically split into protons and electrons by the Pt/C electrocatalyst. The protons diffuse through the Nafion membrane, the electrons follow the short-circuit between the two brass current collectors. On the cathode side, protons and electrons recombine, and hydrogen is released. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Residual gas entering high density hydrogen plasma: rarefaction due to rapid heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. den Harder,; D.C. Schram,; W. J. Goedheer,; de Blank, H. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; van Rooij, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of background molecular hydrogen with magnetized (0.4 T) high density (1–5 × 10 20  m −3 ) low temperature (∼3 eV) hydrogen plasma was inferred from the Fulcher band emission in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI. In the plasma center,

  17. A Room-temperature Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using Palladium-decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Si Heterojunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Gang DU

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a room-temperature (RT hydrogen gas (H2 sensor based on palladium-decorated single-walled carbon nanotube/Si (Pd-SWNTs/Si heterojunction. The current-voltage (I-V curves of the Pd-SWNTs/Si heterojunction in different concentrations of H2 were measured. The experimental results reveal that the Pd-SWNTs/Si heterojunction exhibits high H2 response. After exposure to 0.02 %, 0.05 %, and 0.1 % H2 for 10 min, the resistance of the heterojunction increases dramatically. The response is 122 %, 269 % and 457 %, respectively. A simple interfacial theory is used to understand the gas sensitivity results. This approach is a step toward future CNTs-based gas sensors for practical application.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12925

  18. Gas hydrate identified in sand-rich inferred sedimentary section using downhole logging and seismic data in Shenhu area, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujuan; Lee, Myung W.; Collett, Timothy S.; Yang, Shengxiong; Guo, Yiqun; Wu, Shiguo

    2014-01-01

    Downhole wireline log (DWL) data was acquired from eight drill sites during China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition (GMGS-1) in 2007. Initial analyses of the acquired well log data suggested that there were no significant gas hydrate occurrences at Site SH4. However, the re-examination of the DWL data from Site SH4 indicated that there are two intervals of high resistivity, which could be indicative of gas hydrate. One interval of high resistivity at depth of 171–175 m below seafloor (mbsf) is associated with a high compressional- wave (P-wave) velocities and low gamma ray log values, which suggests the presence of gas hydrate in a potentially sand-rich (low clay content) sedimentary section. The second high resistivity interval at depth of 175–180 mbsf is associated with low P-wave velocities and low gamma values, which suggests the presence of free gas in a potentially sand-rich (low clay content) sedimentary section. Because the occurrence of free gas is much shallower than the expected from the regional depth of the bottom simulating reflector (BSR), the free gas could be from the dissociation of gas hydrate during drilling or there may be a local anomaly in the depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. In order to determine whether the low P-wave velocity with high resistivity is caused by in-situ free gas or dissociated free gas from the gas hydrate, the surface seismic data were also used in this analysis. The log analysis incorporating the surface seismic data through the construction of synthetic seismograms using various models indicated the presence of free gas directly in contact with an overlying gas hydrate-bearing section. The occurrence of the anomalous base of gas hydrate stability at Site SH4 could be caused by a local heat flow conditions. This paper documents the first observation of gas hydrate in what is believed to be a sand-rich sediment in Shenhu area of the South China Sea.

  19. Measurement of the Rate of Muon Capture in Hydrogen Gas and Determination of the Proton's Pseudoscalar Coupling $g_P$

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V A; Case, T A; Chitwood, D B; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K L; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Özben, C S; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2007-01-01

    The rate of nuclear muon capture by the proton has been measured using a new experimental technique based on a time projection chamber operating in ultra-clean, deuterium-depleted hydrogen gas at 1 MPa pressure. The capture rate was obtained from the difference between the measured $\\mu^-$ disappearance rate in hydrogen and the world average for the $\\mu^+$ decay rate. The target's low gas density of 1% compared to liquid hydrogen is key to avoiding uncertainties that arise from the formation of muonic molecules. The capture rate from the hyperfine singlet ground state of the $\\mu p$ atom is measured to be $\\Lambda_S=725.0 \\pm 17.4 s^{-1}$, from which the induced pseudoscalar coupling of the nucleon, $g_P(q^2=-0.88 m_\\mu^2)=7.3 \\pm 1.1$, is extracted. This result is consistent with theoretical predictions for $g_P$ that are based on the approximate chiral symmetry of QCD.

  20. [Effects of hydrogen rich water on the expression of Nrf 2 and the oxidative stress in rats with traumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jia; Wang, Difen; Liu, Ying; Chen, Xianjun; Zhang, Hailin

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effects of hydrogen rich water on the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and oxidative stress in rats with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Ninety healthy male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into sham operation group, TBI group and hydrogen rich water treatment group (HW group), with 30 rats in each group. TBI model was reproduced by the modified Feeney weight dropping method. The skulls of rats in sham operation group underwent only craniotomy without direct hit. The rats in HW group received brain injury by hitting after craniotomy, followed by injection of hydrogen rich water (5 mL/kg) intraperitoneally once a day for 5 days after successful reproduction of the model. The rats in sham operation group and TBI group were given an equal amount of normal saline in same manner. Six rats from each group were sacrificed at 6, 12, 24, 48 hours and 5 days after evaluating neurological severity scores (NSS). The brain tissue in injured ipsilateral cortex was harvested. The activity of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and content of malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined by spectrophotometry. The expressions of mRNA and nucleoprotein of Nrf2 were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and Western Blot. The pathological changes were observed with microscopy after hematoxylin and cosin (HE) staining. (1) NSS score: compared with TBI group, NSS in HW group at 12, 24, 48 hours and 5 days were significantly decreased (12 hours: 9.83 ± 2.32 vs. 13.17 ± 2.71, 24 hours: 9.83 ± 2.79 vs. 13.50 ± 2.43, 48 hours: 7.50 ± 2.07 vs. 11.83 ± 2.14, 5 days: 5.50 ± 1.87 vs. 10.50 ± 2.43, all P operation group, the activity of GSH-Px and CAT in TBI group were markedly declined after operation, while the MDA content was elevated significantly, especially at 24 hours [CAT (kU/g): 1.080 ± 0.312 vs. 3.571 ± 0.758, GSH-Px (kU/g): 9.195 ± 3.173 vs. 32.385 ± 10.619; MDA (µmol

  1. Development of the on-demand fuel injection system for a light truck using the hydrogen enriched compressed natural gas (HCNG) fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Sarawoot Watechagit; Ruangdet Panduang; Natthaporn Prommakorn; Peeraya Siriput; Yaowateera Achawangkul; Bunyongvut Chullabodhi

    2014-01-01

    The use of hydrogen as a fuel by mixing with a commercial fuel has recently been investigated continuously in order to solve the energy crisis and global warming. This article presents the results of the design and experimentation for the use of the hydrogen enriched compressed natural gas or HCNG as a fuel. The prototype vehicle a light truck equipped with a 1809 cc. gasoline engine. The proposed system is a mixing system where the compressed natural gas and the hydrogen are stored on-board ...

  2. Hydrogen transfer on USY zeolites during gas oil cracking: Influence of the adsorption characteristics of the zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corma, A.; Faraldos, M.; Martinez, A.; Mifsud, A. (CSIC, Madrid (Spain))

    1990-04-01

    In this work, the hydrogen transfer activity of two series of HY zeolites dealuminated by steam and by SiCl{sub 4} (24.47-24.24 {angstrom} unit cell) has been measured from the butene/butane ratio in the products obtained during the cracking of a vacuum gas oil at 756 K. With the steam-dealuminated zeolites, a sharp decrease in the ratio of hydrogen transfer to cracking is observed when the number of Al atoms per unit cell falls below 10. On the other hand, in samples dealuminated by SiCl{sub 4}, this ratio changes very little with dealumination. These results cannot be explained assuming the need for adjacent acid sites for the hydrogen transfer. The authors have found, by adsorption measurements of n-butane and 1-butene, that the changes in the relative rates of bimolecular (hydrogen transfer) to monomolecular (cracking) reactions, observed with dealuminated HY zeolites, can be explained by the changes in the adsorption capacity and adsorption selectivity which occur on zeolites dealuminated at different levels by different dealumination procedures, and which are due to changes in the electric fields inside the pores.

  3. California-Specific Power-to-Hydrogen and Power-to-Gas Business Case Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichman, Joshua D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-12

    Flexible operation of electrolysis systems represents an opportunity to reduce the cost of hydrogen for a variety of end-uses while also supporting grid operations and thereby enabling greater renewable penetration. California is an ideal location to realize that value on account of growing renewable capacity and markets for hydrogen as a fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) fuel, refineries, and other end-uses. Shifting the production of hydrogen to avoid high cost electricity and participation in utility and system operator markets along with installing renewable generation to avoid utility charges and increase revenue from the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) program can result in around $2.5/kg (21%) reduction in the production and delivery cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. This reduction can be achieved without impacting the consumers of hydrogen. Additionally, future strategies for reducing hydrogen cost were explored and include lower cost of capital, participation in the Renewable Fuel Standard program, capital cost reduction, and increased LCFS value. Each must be achieved independently and could each contribute to further reductions. Using the assumptions in this study found a 29% reduction in cost if all future strategies are realized. Flexible hydrogen production can simultaneously improve the performance and decarbonize multiple energy sectors. The lessons learned from this study should be used to understand near-term cost drivers and to support longer-term research activities to further improve cost effectiveness of grid integrated electrolysis systems.

  4. California Power-to-Gas and Power-to-Hydrogen Near-Term Business Case Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichman, Josh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Flexible operation of electrolysis systems represents an opportunity to reduce the cost of hydrogen for a variety of end-uses while also supporting grid operations and thereby enabling greater renewable penetration. California is an ideal location to realize that value on account of growing renewable capacity and markets for hydrogen as a fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) fuel, refineries, and other end-uses. Shifting the production of hydrogen to avoid high cost electricity and participation in utility and system operator markets along with installing renewable generation to avoid utility charges and increase revenue from the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) program can result in around $2.5/kg (21%) reduction in the production and delivery cost of hydrogen from electrolysis. This reduction can be achieved without impacting the consumers of hydrogen. Additionally, future strategies for reducing hydrogen cost were explored and include lower cost of capital, participation in the Renewable Fuel Standard program, capital cost reduction, and increased LCFS value. Each must be achieved independently and could each contribute to further reductions. Using the assumptions in this study found a 29% reduction in cost if all future strategies are realized. Flexible hydrogen production can simultaneously improve the performance and decarbonize multiple energy sectors. The lessons learned from this study should be used to understand near-term cost drivers and to support longer-term research activities to further improve cost effectiveness of grid integrated electrolysis systems.

  5. Gas and hydrogen isotopic analyses of volcanic eruption clouds in Guatemala sampled by aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W.I.; Cadle, R.D.; Heidt, L.E.; Friedman, I.; Lazrus, A.L.; Huebert, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Gas samples were collected by aircraft entering volcanic eruption clouds of three Guatemalan volcanoes. Gas chromatographic analyses show higher H2 and S gas contents in ash eruption clouds and lower H2 and S gases in vaporous gas plumes. H isotopic data demonstrate lighter isotopic distribution of water vapor in ash eruption clouds than in vaporous gas plumes. Most of the H2O in the vaporous plumes is probably meteoric. The data are the first direct gas analyses of explosive eruptive clouds, and demonstrate that, in spite of atmospheric admixture, useful compositional information on eruptive gases can be obtained using aircraft. ?? 1980.

  6. A study on the fire response of compressed hydrogen gas vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Yohsuke; Tomioka, Junichi; Suzuki, Jinji [Japan Automobile Research Institute (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the events that could arise when fighting fires in vehicles with compressed hydrogen CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) composite cylinders, we conducted experiments to examine whether a hydrogen jet flame caused by the activation of the pressure relief device (PRD) can extinguished and how spraying water influences the cylinder and PRD. The experiments clarified that the hydrogen jet flame cannot be extinguished easily with water or dry powder extinguishers and that spraying water during activation of the PRD may result in closure of the PRD, but is useful for maintaining the strength of CFRP composite cylinders for vehicles. (orig.)

  7. A gas chromatographic instrument for measurement of hydrogen cyanide in the lower atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Ambrose

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A gas-chromatographic (GC instrument was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN in the lower atmosphere. The main features of the instrument are (1 a cryogen-free cooler for sample dehumidification and enrichment, (2 a porous polymer PLOT column for analyte separation, (3 a flame thermionic detector (FTD for sensitive and selective detection, and (4 a dynamic dilution system for calibration. We deployed the instrument for a ∼4 month period from January–June, 2010 at the AIRMAP atmospheric monitoring station Thompson Farm 2 (THF2 in rural Durham, NH. A subset of measurements made during 3–31 March is presented here with a detailed description of the instrument features and performance characteristics. The temporal resolution of the measurements was ~20 min, with a 75 s sample capture time. The 1σ measurement precision was <10% and the instrument response linearity was excellent on a calibration scale of 0.10–0.75 ppbv (±5%. The estimated method detection limit (MDL and accuracy were 0.021 ppbv and 15%, respectively. From 3–31 March 2010, ambient HCN mixing ratios ranged from 0.15–1.0 ppbv (±15%, with a mean value of 0.36 ± 0.16 ppbv (1σ. The approximate mean background HCN mixing ratio of 0.20 ± 0.04 ppbv appeared to agree well with tropospheric column measurements reported previously. The GC-FTD HCN measurements were strongly correlated with acetonitrile (CH3CN measured concurrently with a proton transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, as anticipated given our understanding that the nitriles share a common primary biomass burning source to the global atmosphere. The nitriles were overall only weakly correlated with carbon monoxide (CO, which is reasonable considering the greater diversity of sources for CO. However, strong correlations with CO were observed on several nights under stable atmospheric conditions and suggest regional combustion-based sources for the nitriles. These results demonstrate that

  8. System Study of Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL) Catalytic Combustion for Natural Gas and Coal-Derived Syngas Combustion Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahrokh Etemad; Lance Smith; Kevin Burns

    2004-12-01

    Rich Catalytic/Lean burn (RCL{reg_sign}) technology has been successfully developed to provide improvement in Dry Low Emission gas turbine technology for coal derived syngas and natural gas delivering near zero NOx emissions, improved efficiency, extending component lifetime and the ability to have fuel flexibility. The present report shows substantial net cost saving using RCL{reg_sign} technology as compared to other technologies both for new and retrofit applications, thus eliminating the need for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) in combined or simple cycle for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and natural gas fired combustion turbines.

  9. Hydrogen engines based on liquid fuels, a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J.; Voecks, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of storing hydrogen as part of a liquid fuel, such as gasoline or methanol, and subsequent onboard generation of the hydrogen from such liquids, is reviewed. Hydrogen generation processes, such as steam reforming, partial oxidation, and thermal decomposition are evaluated in terms of theoretical potential and practical limitations, and a summary is presented on the major experimental work on conversion of gasoline and methanol. Results of experiments indicate that onboard hydrogen generation from methanol is technically feasible and will yield substantial improvements in fuel economy and emissions, especially if methanol decomposition is brought about by the use of engine exhaust heat; e.g., a methanol decomposition reactor of 3.8 provides hydrogen-rich gas for a 4 cylinder engine (1.952), and 80% of the methanol is converted, engine exhaust gas being the only heat supply. A preliminary outline of the development of a methanol-based hydrogen engine and a straight hydrogen engine is presented.

  10. The Synthesis and Structural Properties of Crystalline Silicon Quantum Dots upon Thermal Annealing of Hydrogenated Amorphous Si-Rich Silicon Carbide Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guozhi; Zeng, Xiangbin; Li, Xianghu

    2016-08-01

    Silicon quantum dots (QDs) embedded in non-stoichiometric hydrogenated silicon carbide (SiC:H) thin films have been successfully synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and post-annealing. The chemical composition analyses have been carried out by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The bonding configurations have been deduced from Fourier transform infrared absorption measurements (FTIR). The evolution of microstructure with temperature has been characterized by glancing incident x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman diffraction spectroscopy. XPS and FTIR show that it is in Si-rich feature and there are a few hydrogenated silicon clusters in the as-grown sample. XRD and Raman diffraction spectroscopy show that it is in amorphous for the as-grown sample, while crystalline silicon QDs have been synthesized in the 900°C annealed sample. Silicon atoms precipitation from the SiC matrix or silicon phase transition from amorphous SiC is enhanced with annealing temperature increase. The average sizes of silicon QDs are about 5.1 nm and 5.6 nm, the number densities are as high as 1.7 × 1012 cm-2 and 3.2 × 1012 cm-2, and the crystalline volume fractions are about 58.3% and 61.3% for the 900°C and 1050°C annealed samples, respectively. These structural properties analyses provide an understanding about the synthesis of silicon QDs upon thermal annealing for applications in next generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  11. Full Annulus Numerical Study of Hot Streaks Propagation in a Hydrogen-rich Syngas-Fired Heavy Duty Axial Turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannou, E.; Sayma, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of fuel composition on hot streaks propagation in a high-pressure turbine using a full annulus unsteady computational fluid dynamics analysis of the first two stages. Hot streaks result from the inherent non-uniformities of temperature profiles at the exit of the combustion chamber. Variations in composition arise from current challenges requiring gas turbines to adapt to fuel variations driven by the need to reduce CO2 emissions through the use of sy...

  12. Kinetic Models Study of Hydrogenation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Vacuum Gas Oil and Basrah Crude Oil Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzher M. Ibraheem

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available             The aim of this research is to study the kinetic reaction models for catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic content for Basrah crude oil (BCO and vacuum gas oil (VGO derived from Kirkuk crude oil which has the boiling point rang of (611-833K.            This work is performed using a hydrodesulphurization (HDS pilot plant unit located in AL-Basil Company. A commercial (HDS catalyst cobalt-molybdenum (Co-Mo supported in alumina (γ-Al2O3 is used in this work. The feed is supplied by North Refinery Company in Baiji. The reaction temperatures range is (600-675 K over liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV range of (0.7-2hr-1 and hydrogen pressure is 3 MPa with H2/oil ratio of 300 of Basrah Crude oil (BCO, while the corresponding conditions for vacuum gas oil (VGO are (583-643 K, (1.5-3.75 hr-1, 3.5 MPa and 250  respectively .            The results showed that the reaction kinetics is of second order for both types of feed. Activation energies are found to be 30.396, 38.479 kJ/mole for Basrah Crude Oil (BCO and Vacuum Gas Oil (VGO respectively.

  13. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Metabolomics Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hossein; Karanji, Ahmad K.; Majuta, Sandra; Maurer, Megan M.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2017-09-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) in combination with gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) is evaluated as an analytical method for small-molecule standard and mixture characterization. Experiments show that compound ions exhibit unique HDX reactivities that can be used to distinguish different species. Additionally, it is shown that gas-phase HDX kinetics can be exploited to provide even further distinguishing capabilities by using different partial pressures of reagent gas. The relative HDX reactivity of a wide variety of molecules is discussed in light of the various molecular structures. Additionally, hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS) and HDX kinetics modeling of candidate (in silico) ion structures is utilized to estimate the relative ion conformer populations giving rise to specific HDX behavior. These data interpretation methods are discussed with a focus on developing predictive tools for HDX behavior. Finally, an example is provided in which ion mobility information is supplemented with HDX reactivity data to aid identification efforts of compounds in a metabolite extract. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Evidence for distributed gas sources of hydrogen halides in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyser, Johan; Dhooghe, Frederik; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Briois, Christelle; Calmonte, Ursina; Cessateur, Gaël; Combi, Michael R.; Equeter, Eddy; Fiethe, Björn; Fuselier, Stephen; Gasc, Sébastien; Gibbons, Andrew; Gombosi, Tamas; Gunell, Herbert; Hässig, Myrtha; Le Roy, Léna; Maggiolo, Romain; Mall, Urs; Marty, Bernard; Neefs, Eddy; Rème, Henri; Rubin, Martin; Sémon, Thierry; Tzou, Chia-Yu; Wurz, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Rosetta has detected the presence of the hydrogen halides HF, HCl, and HBr in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. These species are known to freeze out on icy grains in molecular clouds. Analysis of the abundances of HF and HCl as a function of cometocentric distance suggests that these hydrogen halides are released both from the nucleus surface and off dust particles in the inner coma. We present three lines of evidence. First, the abundances of HF and HCl relative to the overall neutral gas in the coma appear to increase with distance, indicating that a net source must be present; since there is no hint at any possible parent species with sufficient abundances that could explain the observed levels of HF or HCl, dust particles are the likely origin. Second, the amplitude of the daily modulation of the halide-to-water density due to the rotation and geometry of 67P's nucleus and the corresponding surface illumination is observed to progressively diminish with distance and comet dust activity; this can be understood from the range of dust particle speeds well below the neutral gas expansion speed, which tends to smooth the coma density profiles. Third, strong halogen abundance changes detected locally in the coma cannot be easily explained from composition changes at the surface, while they can be understood from differences in local gas production from the dust particles.

  15. Human health cost of hydrogen sulfide air pollution from an oil and gas Field

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dinara Kenessary; Almas Kenessary; Ussen Ismailovich Kenessariyev; Konrad Juszkiewicz; Meiram Kazievich Amrin; Aya Eralovna Erzhanova

    2017-01-01

    ...) in Central Asia, is surrounded by 10 settlements with a total population of 9,000 people. Approximately73% of this population constantly mention a specific odour of rotten eggs in the air, typical for hydrogen sulfide...

  16. A Detailed Assessment for the Potential use of Waste Hydrogen Gas at Stennis Space Center Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this study was to identify and estimate the cost of one or more approaches of utilizing waste hydrogen for power generation. To simplify the scope...

  17. The effect of pH on thiosulfate formation in a biotechnological process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, van den P.L.F.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2008-01-01

    In a biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) removal from gas streams, operating at natronophilic conditions, formation of thiosulfate (S2O32¿) is unfavorable, as it leads to a reduced sulfur production. Thiosulfate formation was studied in gas-lift bioreactors, using natronophilic

  18. Delayed addition of nitrogen-rich substrates during composting of municipal waste: Effects on nitrogen loss, greenhouse gas emissions and compost stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigussie, Abebe; Bruun, Sander; Kuyper, Thomas W; de Neergaard, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Municipal waste is usually composted with an N-rich substrate, such as manure, to increase the N content of the product. This means that a significant amount of nitrogen can be lost during composting. The objectives of this study were (i) to investigate the effect of split addition of a nitrogen-rich substrate (poultry manure) on nitrogen losses and greenhouse gas emissions during composting and to link this effect to different bulking agents (coffee husks and sawdust), and (ii) to assess the effect of split addition of a nitrogen-rich substrate on compost stability and sanitisation. The results showed