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Sample records for hydrogen photoproduction activities

  1. Algal Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghirardi, Maria L [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-08

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under the guidance of Drs. Michael Seibert (retired, Fellow Emeritus) and Maria Ghirardi (Fellow), led 15 years of research addressing the issue of algal H2 photoproduction. This project resulted in greatly increased rates and yields of algal hydrogen production; increased understanding of the H2 metabolism in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; expanded our knowledge of other physiological aspects relevant to sustained algal photosynthetic H2 production; led to the genetic identification, cloning and manipulation of algal hydrogenase genes; and contributed to a broader, fundamental understanding of the technical and scientific challenges to improving the conversion efficiencies in order to reach the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office’s targets. Some of the tangible results are: (i) 64 publications and 6 patents, (ii) international visibility to NREL, (iii) reinvigoration of national and international biohydrogen research, and (iv) research progress that helped stimulate new funding from other DOE and non-DOE programs, including the AFOSR and the DOE Office of Science.

  2. Hydrogen photoproduction by photoelectrochemical conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The water-splitting reaction by photoelectrochemical processes has gained much more attention than any of many reactions proposed for solar generation of energy-rich molecules (fuels). The conversion efficiency of the photosystem is the key factor. The higher the efficiency, the more economically feasible will be the conversion scheme. The conversion efficiency is a function of the semiconductor properties, light intensity, spectral quality, properties of the electrolyte, counterelectrode, cell configuration, etc. The semiconductor parameters include band gap, absorption coefficient and diffusion length. The area and material used for a counterelectrode are important when considering polarization losses in a two-electrode system. Besides, the stability problem is also a very important one to meet the requirement for practical applications. This paper reviews some important issues on photoelectrochemical generation of hydrogen by water splitting. It includes energy conversion efficiency, market assessment and cost goal, state of the technology, and future directions for research

  3. Photoproduction of hydrogen - A potential system of solar energy bioconversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, V S.R.

    1979-10-01

    The photoproduction of hydrogen from water utilizing the photosynthetic capacity of green plants is discussed as a possible means of solar energy conversion. Advantages of the biological production of H/sub 2/ over various physical and chemical processes are pointed out, and the system used for the production of hydrogen by biological agents, which comprises the photosynthetic electron transport chain, ferredoxin and hydrogenase, is examined in detail. The various types of biological hydrogen production systems in bacteria, algae, symbiotic systems and isolated chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase systems are reviewed. The limitations and the scope for further improvement of the promising symbiotic Azolli-Anabena azollae and chloroplast-ferredoxin-hydrogenase are discussed, and it is concluded that future research should concern itself with the identification of the environmental conditions that would maximize solar energy conversion efficiency, the elimination of the oxygen inhibition of biological hydrogen production, and the definition of the metabolic state for the maximal production of hydrogen.

  4. ϕ-meson photoproduction on hydrogen in the neutral decay mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraydaryan, H.; Amaryan, M. J.; Gavalian, G.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Weinstein, L.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Anderson, M. D.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; Fassi, L. El; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Fleming, J. A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lewis, S.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We report the first measurement of the photoproduction cross section of the ϕ meson in its neutral decay mode in the reaction γp →pϕ(KSKL). The experiment was performed with a tagged photon beam of energy 1.6≤Eγ≤3.6 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target of the CLAS spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The pϕ final state is identified via reconstruction of KS in the invariant mass of two oppositely charged pions and by requiring the missing particle in the reaction γp →pKSX to be KL. The presented results significantly enlarge the existing data on ϕ photoproduction. These data, combined with the data from the charged decay mode, will help to constrain different mechanisms of ϕ photoproduction.

  5. Photoproduction of hydrogen by membranes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, J D; Olson, J M

    1980-01-01

    Photoproduction of H/sub 2/ from ascorbate by unit-membrane vesicles from Chlorobium limicola f. thiosulfatophilum was achieved with a system containing gramicidin D, tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, methyl viologen, dithioerythritol, Clostridium hydrogenase, and an oxygen-scavenging mixture of glucose, glucose oxidase, ethanol, and catalase. Maximum quantum yield was less than one percent. Half maximum rate of H/sub 2/ production occurred at a white-light intensity of approximately 0.15 cm/sup -2/. The reaction was inhibited completely by 0.3% sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, 1% Triton X-100, or preheating the vesicles at 100/sup 0/C for 5 minutes. Low concentrations (0.01 and 0.05%) of Triton X-100 about doubled the reaction rate.

  6. The involvement of carbohydrate reserves in hydrogen photoproduction by the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chochois, V.

    2009-09-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen, using water as an electron donor, and sunlight as an energy source. Although this property offers interesting biotechnological perspectives, a major limitation is related to the sensitivity of hydrogenase to oxygen which is produced by photosynthesis. It had been previously shown that in conditions of sulfur deprivation, C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen during several days (Melis et an. 2000). During this process, two pathways, one direct depending on photosystem II (PSII) activity and the other involving only the PSI, are involved, starch reserves being supposed to play a role in both of these pathways. The purpose of this phD thesis was to elucidate the mechanisms linking starch catabolism to the hydrogen photoproduction process. Firstly, the analysis of mutants affected in starch biosynthesis (sta6 and sta7) showed that if starch reserves are essential to the functioning of the indirect pathway, they are not involved in the direct one. Secondly, in order to identify metabolic steps and regulatory processes involved in starch breakdown, we developed a genetic approach based on the search of mutants affected in starch reserves mobilization. Eight mutant (std1 to std8) diversely affected in their ability to degrade starch after an accumulation phase have been isolated from an insertional mutant library of 15,000 clones. One of these mutants, std1, is affected in a kinase related to the DYRK family (dual-specificity tyrosine regulated serine threonine kinase). Although the targets of this putative kinase remain to be identified, the analysis of the granule bound proteome displayed profound alterations in the expression profile of starch phosphorylases, potentially involved in starch breakdown. STD1 represents the first starch catabolism regulator identified to date in plants. (author)

  7. Transverse polarization of Σ+(1189) in photoproduction on a hydrogen target in CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepali, C. S.; Amaryan, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Fleming, J. A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Torayev, B.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental results on the Σ+(1189) hyperon transverse polarization in photoproduction on a hydrogen target using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory are presented. The Σ+(1189) was reconstructed in the exclusive reaction γ+p→KS0+Σ+(1189) via the Σ+→pπ0 decay mode. The KS0 was reconstructed in the invariant mass of two oppositely charged pions with the π0 identified in the missing mass of the detected pπ+π- final state. Experimental data were collected in the photon energy range Eγ=1.0-3.5 GeV (s range 1.66-2.73 GeV). We observe a large negative polarization of up to 95%. As the mechanism of transverse polarization of hyperons produced in unpolarized photoproduction experiments is still not well understood, these results will help to distinguish between different theoretical models on hyperon production and provide valuable information for the searches of missing baryon resonances.

  8. Photoproduction of Hydrogen by Decamethylruthenocene Combined with Electrochemical Recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivier, Lucie; Peljo, Pekka; Vannay, Laurent A C; Gschwend, Grégoire C; Méndez, Manuel A; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Scanlon, Micheál D; Girault, Hubert H

    2017-02-20

    The photoinduced hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) by decamethylruthenocene, Cp 2 *Ru II (Cp*=C 5 Me 5 ), is reported. The use of a metallocene to photoproduce hydrogen is presented as an alternative strategy to reduce protons without involving an additional photosensitizer. The mechanism was investigated by (spectro)electrochemical and spectroscopic (UV/Vis and 1 H NMR) measurements. The photoactivated hydride involved was characterized spectroscopically and the resulting [Cp 2 *Ru III ] + species was electrochemically regenerated in situ on a fluorinated tin oxide electrode surface. A promising internal quantum yield of 25 % was obtained. Optimal experimental conditions- especially the use of weakly coordinating solvent and counterions-are discussed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Antibacterial activity of oxytetracycline photoproducts in marine aquaculture's water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, J F; Henriques, I S; Correia, A; Santos, E B H; Esteves, V I

    2017-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is one of the most used antibiotics in aquaculture. The main concern related to its use is the bacterial resistance, when ineffective treatments are applied for its removal or inactivation. OTC photo-degradation has been suggested as an efficient complementary process to conventional methods used in intensive fish production (e.g.: ozonation). Despite this, and knowing that the complete mineralization of OTC is difficult, few studies have examined the antibacterial activity of OTC photoproducts. Thus, the main aim of this work is to assess whether the OTC photoproducts retain the antibacterial activity of its parent compound (OTC) after its irradiation, using simulated sunlight. For that, three Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Vibrio sp. and Aeromonas sp.) and different synthetic and natural aqueous matrices (phosphate buffered solutions at different salinities, 0 and 21‰, and three different samples from marine aquaculture industries) were tested. The microbiological assays were made using the well-diffusion method before and after OTC has been exposed to sunlight. The results revealed a clear effect of simulated sunlight, resulting on the decrease or elimination of the antibacterial activity for all strains and in all aqueous matrices due to OTC photo-degradation. For E. coli, it was also observed that the antibacterial activity of OTC is lower in the presence of sea-salts, as demonstrated by comparison of halos in aqueous matrices containing or not sea-salts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. In vitro residual anti-bacterial activity of difloxacin, sarafloxacin and their photoproducts after photolysis in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusari, Souvik; Prabhakaran, Deivasigamani; Lamshoeft, Marc; Spiteller, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones like difloxacin (DIF) and sarafloxacin (SARA) are adsorbed in soil and enter the aquatic environment wherein they are subjected to photolytic degradation. To evaluate the fate of DIF and SARA, their photolysis was performed in water under stimulated natural sunlight conditions. DIF primarily degrades to SARA. On prolonged photodegradation, seven photoproducts were elucidated by HR-LC-MS/MS, three of which were entirely novel. The residual anti-bacterial activities of DIF, SARA and their photoproducts were studied against a group of pathogenic strains. DIF and SARA revealed potency against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. The photoproducts also exhibited varying degrees of efficacies against the tested bacteria. Even without isolating the individual photoproducts, their impact on the aquatic environment could be assessed. Therefore, the present results call for prudence in estimating the fate of these compounds in water and in avoiding emergence of resistance in bacteria caused by the photoproducts of DIF and SARA. - Assessment of the residual anti-bacterial efficacies of difloxacin, sarafloxacin and their photoproducts in water, and estimating their impact on the aquatic environment in inducing resistance to microorganisms.

  11. Photoproduction of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution from model compounds for chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Catherine D.; Bruyn, Warren de; Jones, Joshua G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • CDOM produces hydrogen peroxide in sunlit surface waters. • Quinone moieties have been proposed as the photo-active chromophore in CDOM. • Hydrogen peroxide is produced in irradiated aqueous quinone solutions. • Concentrations and production rates are comparable to humic and fulvic acids. • Optical properties post-irradiation were similar to CDOM. - Abstract: To explore whether quinone moieties are important in chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) photochemistry in natural waters, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) production and associated optical property changes were measured in aqueous solutions irradiated with a Xenon lamp for CDOM model compounds (dihydroquinone, benzoquinone, anthraquinone, napthoquinone, ubiquinone, humic acid HA, fulvic acid FA). All compounds produced H 2 O 2 with concentrations ranging from 15 to 500 μM. Production rates were higher for HA vs. FA (1.32 vs. 0.176 mM h −1 ); values ranged from 6.99 to 0.137 mM h −1 for quinones. Apparent quantum yields (Θ app ; measure of photochemical production efficiency) were higher for HA vs. FA (0.113 vs. 0.016) and ranged from 0.0018 to 0.083 for quinones. Dihydroquinone, the reduced form of benzoquinone, had a higher production rate and efficiency than its oxidized form. Post-irradiation, quinone compounds had absorption spectra similar to HA and FA and 3D-excitation–emission matrix fluorescence spectra (EEMs) with fluorescent peaks in regions associated with CDOM

  12. Dijet photoproduction

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, J M

    2001-01-01

    Recent jet photoproduction measurements are presented, including measurements of jet substructure which are sensitive to parton types. The implications for real and virtual photon structure are discussed. (11 refs).

  13. Photoproduction of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution from model compounds for chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Catherine D; de Bruyn, Warren; Jones, Joshua G

    2014-02-15

    To explore whether quinone moieties are important in chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) photochemistry in natural waters, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and associated optical property changes were measured in aqueous solutions irradiated with a Xenon lamp for CDOM model compounds (dihydroquinone, benzoquinone, anthraquinone, napthoquinone, ubiquinone, humic acid HA, fulvic acid FA). All compounds produced H2O2 with concentrations ranging from 15 to 500 μM. Production rates were higher for HA vs. FA (1.32 vs. 0.176 mM h(-1)); values ranged from 6.99 to 0.137 mM h(-1) for quinones. Apparent quantum yields (Θ app; measure of photochemical production efficiency) were higher for HA vs. FA (0.113 vs. 0.016) and ranged from 0.0018 to 0.083 for quinones. Dihydroquinone, the reduced form of benzoquinone, had a higher production rate and efficiency than its oxidized form. Post-irradiation, quinone compounds had absorption spectra similar to HA and FA and 3D-excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectra (EEMs) with fluorescent peaks in regions associated with CDOM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CW-15 as a solar cell for hydrogen peroxide photoproduction. Comparison between free and immobilized cells and thylakoids for energy conversion efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, W.; Galvan, F.; Rosa, F.F. de la [Instituto de Bioquimica Vegetal y Fotosintesis, Universidad de Sevilla y CSIC, Sevilla (Spain)

    1995-11-28

    Immobilized cells and thylakoid vesicles of the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CW-15 have been developed as a solar cell because of their capabilities of producing hydrogen peroxide. This compound is an efficient and clean fuel used for rocket propulsion, motors and for heating. Hydrogen peroxide is produced by the photosystem in a catalyst cycle in which a redox mediator (methyl viologen) is reduced by electrons obtained from water by the photosynthetic apparatus of the microalga and it is re-oxidized by the oxygen dissolved in the solution. The photoproduction has been investigated using a discontinuous system with whole cells, or thylakoid vesicles, free or immobilized on alginate. The stimulation by azide as an inhibitor of catalase has also been analyzed. Under determined optimum conditions, the photoproduction by Ca-alginate entrapped cells, with a rate of 33 {mu}mol H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/mg Chl.h, was maintained for several hours with an energy conversion efficiency of 0.25%

  15. Strangeness photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthot, J.; Saghai, B.

    1989-01-01

    A non exhaustive review, about the strangeness photo-production is presented here in relation with the new electrons machines. Accent is put on the elementary reaction γp → K + Λ. The experiments on electroproduction and the study of hypernuclei with the electromagnetic probe are also discussed [fr

  16. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, L.E.; Luo, Yao-Hua; Tsuzuki, T. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The authors maintain a culture collection of over 2,500 cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacteria and 2,000 eukaryotic algae for research on H{sub 2} biophotoproduction as well as other projects. A high H{sub 2}-producing strain Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511 from the collection has been used to examine H{sub 2} production in relation to water photolysis and substance degradation, high O{sub 2}-tolerance characterization of nitrogenase, and interactive effects of light intensity and cell density on H{sub 2} production and its stable isotope fractionation. When cellular carbohydrate is depleted, no H{sub 2} production occurs. However, when pyruvate or glucose is added, H{sub 2} production begins. On the other hand, when glucose and DCMU are added to cellular carbohydrate-depleted cells from synchronous cultures, H{sub 2} production is inhibited compared with that with glucose addition alone. These results indicate that water photolysis alone cannot directly induce H{sub 2} production, but it acts together with cellular glucose degradation to enhance H{sub 2} production. The cyanobacteria strain, unlike unicellular green algae, shows no significant difference in H{sub 2} evolution with or without O{sub 2} removal reagent (Fieser`s solution: sodium dithionite/sodium anthraquinon-{beta}-sulfonate/KOH water solution) treated. When 10-hr cells are incubated in the dark with injected O{sub 2}, H{sub 2} evolution is induced, accompanied by O{sub 2} consumption. When zero-hr cells of synchronous cultures are incubated with 5% CO{sub 2}, the carbon is assimilated under light and O{sub 2} accumulates. Even when cells are under aerobic conditions with 25 {mu}mol O{sub 2}/Mg dry wt., H{sub 2} production is still induced, comparable with that under anaerobic conditions. The H{sub 2}-light curve has a pattern similar to CO{sub 2}-light curves, the light saturation point increasing, and the magnitude of H{sub 2} accumulation decreasing, with increasing cell density.

  17. Photoproduction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattenberg, A.

    1977-01-01

    Results of some experimental collaborations to search for new particles through photoproduction are briefly surveyed. The J/psi photoproduction on protons has been observed to rise slowly till above 12 GeV and then very steeply up to 55 GeV, exhibiting a pseudo-threshold behaviour. The psi production on Be and Ta is obtained to be sigmasub(psiN)=3.5+-0.8 mb at 20 GeV, which is somewhat higher than the vector dominance photoproduction value. A mass spectrum is shown for the γ+Be → μμ reaction at 90-200 GeV exhibiting a psi-like peak. Another mass spectrum for the γ+p → e + e - +p reaction shows very prominent rho/ω and phi peaks on top of Bethe-Heitler background. More data is needed to determine whether these events are due to very improbable statistical fluctuations or due to new narrow resonances

  18. Beauty Photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcato, M.

    2002-01-01

    Beauty photoproduction in ep collisions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA, at a center-of-mass energy of 300 GeV. Beauty quarks are tagged via their semi-leptonic decay into a muon or an electron. Events are selected by requiring the presence of two high-transverse energy jets and one high - p T lepton in the final state. The discrimination between beauty and background events is done by a fit to the p rel T variable, the transverse momentum of the lepton with respect to the jet axis. Total and differential cross sections are presented and compared to leading order Monte Carlo simulations and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. (author)

  19. Photoproduction of hydrogen by a non-sulphur bacterium isolated from root zones of water fern Azolla pinnata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Pandey, K.D. (Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (IN). Centre of Advanced Study in Botany)

    1990-01-01

    A photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. BHU strain 1 was isolated from the root zone of water fern Azolla pinnata. The bacterium was found to produce hydrogen with potato starch under phototrophic conditions. The immobilized bacterial cells showed sustained hydrogen production with a more than 4-fold difference over free cell suspensions. The data have been discussed in the light of possible utilization of relatively cheaper raw materials by non-sulphur bacteria to evolve hydrogen. (author).

  20. Photoproduction of proton-antiproton Paris on hydrogen in the energy region 4.74 - 6.55 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markou, A.

    1979-12-01

    The photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs on hydrogen has been investigated in the elastic reaction γp → p anti p p. In an experiment at the Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron DESY this reaction has been identified. The distribution of the p anti p invariant mass has been measured and the basic features of the dynamics by which the reaction proceeds have been identified. The kinematic region for the experiment was: 4.74 2 . The experiment used a tagged photon beam, a magnetic spectrometer with proportional- and spark-chambers, a time of flight system, and a Cerenkov counter. From a total number of 1.5 x 10 6 triggers about 65 events of the reaction γp → p anti p p have been identified by using the following criteria: The mass of at least the negative outgoing particle, computed from the time of flight information, was about the proton mass and the kinematic analysis of the event yielded the largest probability for the hypothesis γp → p anti p p in comparison with the competing reactions. The basic features of the dynamics by which the reaction proceeds have been identified through a comparison of the experimental momentum- and four momentum transfer distributions with the corresponding distributions of simulated events. The simulated events have been generated by Monte Carlo methods according of forward or backward p anti p photoproduction. The result of the comparison was that in the investigated reaction a proton-antiproton pair is produced in backward direction in the c.m. system and the angular distribution of the anti p in the p anti p rest system is nearly isotropic. The identification of the basic reaction dynamics, allowed us to determine which of the two outgoing protons has been produced together with the antiproton by the photon. Therefore it was possible to calculate the invariant mass of the proton-anti-proton pair unambiguously. The resulting p anti p mass distribution shows within our statistics no significant structures which would

  1. Electrochemical studies of a reconstituted photosynthetic electron-transfer chain or towards a biomimetic photoproduction of hydrogen; Etudes electrochimiques de chaines de transfert d'electrons photosynthetiques ou vers une photoproduction biomimetique d'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourmond, V

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this work is to find an efficient process to convert solar energy into hydrogen. The electrons transfers in reconstituted photosynthetic chains have been particularly studied with the aims 1)in one hand, to better understand the interactions of the different molecules of the photosynthetic chain in order to optimize the changes of the entire organisms for hydrogen production 2)in another hand, to insert the hydrogenases in a photosynthetic chain and then to photo reduce them in order to obtain kinetic data to better understand how it works. (O.M.)

  2. Electrochemical studies of a reconstituted photosynthetic electron-transfer chain or towards a biomimetic photoproduction of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourmond, V.

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this work is to find an efficient process to convert solar energy into hydrogen. The electrons transfers in reconstituted photosynthetic chains have been particularly studied with the aims 1)in one hand, to better understand the interactions of the different molecules of the photosynthetic chain in order to optimize the changes of the entire organisms for hydrogen production 2)in another hand, to insert the hydrogenases in a photosynthetic chain and then to photo reduce them in order to obtain kinetic data to better understand how it works. (O.M.)

  3. Eta meson photoproduction on hydrogen from threshold up to 1100 MeV: Measurement of the {Sigma} beam asymmetry; Photoproduction du meson eta sur l`hydrogene du seuil jusqu`a 1100 MeV: Mesure de l`asymetrie faisceau {Sigma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajaka, Jassem [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1997-12-12

    The photoproduction of {eta} meson on hydrogen has been measured from threshold to 1100 MeV in GRAAL experiment performed in 1996 - 1997 at the ESRF in Grenoble by a collaboration of Italian, French and Russian groups. A tagged and linearly polarized photon beam has been produced by back-scattering a laser beam on the 6 GeV electron beam of the ESRF ring. The target was a liquid hydrogen target of 3 cm. A 4{pi} detection system was used. It is composed of three layers of detectors: wire chambers, scintillator counters and calorimeters. We had in charge to install and calibrate a double wall of scintillator bars (3 x 3 m) designed to detect at forward angles (1 deg. - 25 deg.) the charged particles and to measure their loss of energy and their time of flight. We analyzed the results of the reaction {gamma}p {yields} {eta}p by identifying the {eta} in the lateral calorimeter which is a BGO ball and by detecting the proton in the scintillation counters. The {Sigma} beam asymmetry was extracted from {phi} distribution of {eta} meson and was plotted against {theta}{sub CM} of {eta} for 6 intervals of energy between the threshold and 1100 MeV. The interpretation of {Sigma} beam asymmetry was performed in the frame of the isobaric model. The use of two resonances S11(1535) and D13(1520) to explain our results was not sufficient. We had to take into account in addition the excitation of the resonances P13(1720), D15(1675) and P13(1880). The last being missing in the table of resonances and recently revealed by quark models. (author) 94 refs., 56 figs., 20 tabs.

  4. Novel developments in hydrogen storage, hydrogen activation and ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroodian, Amir

    2010-12-03

    This dissertation is divided into three chapters. Recently, metal-free hydrogen activation using phosphorous compounds has been reported in science magazine. We have investigated the interaction between hydrogen and phosphorous compounds in presence of strong Lewis acids (chapter one). A new generation of metal-free hydrogen activation, using amines and strong Lewis acids with sterically demanding nature, was already developed in our group. Shortage of high storage capacity using large substitution to improve sterical effect led us to explore the amine borane derivatives, which are explained in chapter two. Due to the high storage capacity of hydrogen in aminoborane derivatives, we have explored these materials to extend hydrogen release. These compounds store hydrogen as proton and hydride on adjacent atoms or ions. These investigations resulted in developing hydrogen storage based on ionic liquids containing methyl guanidinium cation. Then we have continued to develop ionic liquids based on methyl guanidinium cation with different anions, such as tetrafluoro borate (chapter three). We have replaced these anions with transition metal anions to investigate hydrogen bonding and catalytic activity of ionic liquids. This chapter illustrates the world of ionic liquid as a green solvent for organic, inorganic and catalytic reactions and combines the concept of catalysts and solvents based on ionic liquids. The catalytic activity is investigated particularly with respect to the interaction with CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  5. Photoproduction of π+π-π0 on hydrogen with linearly polarized photons of energy 20-70 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasalle, J.C.; Patrick, G.N.; Storr, K.M.; Atkinson, M.; Axon, T.J.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Brookes, G.R.; Bunn, J.J.; Bussey, P.J.; Clegg, A.B.; Dainton, J.B.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Dieckmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Ellison, R.J.; Flower, P.; Flynn, P.J.; Galbraith, W.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hughes-Jones, R.E.; Hutton, J.S.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H.P.; Jung, M.; Kemp, M.A.R.; Kumar, B.R.; Laberrigue, J.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lane, J.B.; Levy, J.M.; Liebenau, V.; McClatchey, R.H.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J.A.G.; Morris, J.V.; Newton, D.; Paterson, C.; Paul, E.; Raine, C.; Reidenbach, M.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schloesser, A.; Sharp, P.H.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Thompson, R.J.; Vaissiere, C. de la; Waite, A.P.; Worsell, M.F.; Yiou, T.P.

    1984-01-01

    Results on photoproduction of π + π - π 0 in the photon energy range 20-70 GeV are presented. For the ω meson, the production cross-section is found to be 1010 +- 15 (statistical) +- 290 (systematic) nb and is constant over the incident photon energy range. Spin-density matrix elements are evaluated for ω meson production. The PHI meson is observed with a total photoproduction cross section (corrected for branching ratio to π + π - π 0 ) of 610 +- 35 +- 170 nb. A third resonance, at 1.67 GeV, is seen in the mass spectrum and its interpretation is discussed. The production of a braod π + π - π 0 continuum, mainly via rhoπ, and peaking at 1.2 GeV, contributes with a cross section of about 2.5 μb. The spin-parity content is analysed by the moments of the π + π - π 0 decay angular distribution in the helicity frame and by maximum likelihood fits to the π + π - π 0 Dalitz plot. It is found that production of Jsup(P) = 1 - states accounts for less than half of the total mass spectrum above 900 MeV. There is a broad enhancement in the 1 + wave around 1.15 GeV indicating photoproduction of the H(1190) meson. (orig.)

  6. Heavy quarks photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, M.

    1996-08-01

    The state of the art of the theoretical calculations for heavy quarks photoproduction is reviewed. The full next-to-leading order calculation and two possible resummations, the high energy one for total cross sections and the large p T one for differential cross sections, are described. (orig.)

  7. Meson photoproduction (CLAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen Strauch

    2009-10-01

    This is a brief and selective discussion of meson photoproduction measurements with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. Meson photo- production is being used as a tool for various investigations, including the spectroscopy of baryons and mesons and the search for vector-meson medium modifications.

  8. Activation of erbium films for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Snow, Clark S.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Hydriding of metals can be routinely performed at high temperature in a rich hydrogen atmosphere. Prior to the hydrogen loading process, a thermal activation procedure is required to promote facile hydrogen sorption into the metal. Despite the wide spread utilization of this activation procedure, little is known about the chemical and electronic changes that occur during activation and how this thermal pretreatment leads to increased rates of hydrogen uptake. This study utilized variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to interrogate the changes during in situ thermal annealing of erbium films, with results confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and low energy ion scattering. Activation can be identified by a large increase in photoemission between the valence band edge and the Fermi level and appears to occur over a two stage process. The first stage involves desorption of contaminants and recrystallization of the oxide, initially impeding hydrogen loading. Further heating overcomes the first stage and leads to degradation of the passive surface oxide leading to a bulk film more accessible for hydrogen loading.

  9. Backward pion photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibirtsev, A; Haidenbauer, J; Huang, F; Krewald, S; Meissner, U -G

    2009-04-01

    We present a systematic analysis of backward pion photoproduction for the reactions $ \\gamma$ p $ \\rightarrow$ $ \\pi^{0}_{}$ p and $ \\gamma$ p $ \\rightarrow$ $ \\pi^{+}_{}$ n . Regge phenomenology is applied at invariant collision energies above 3GeV in order to fix the reaction amplitude. A comparision with older data on $ \\pi^{0}_{}$ - and $ \\pi^{+}_{}$ -photoproduction at $ \\vartheta$ = 180° indicates that the high-energy limit as given by the Regge calculation could be reached possibly at energies of around $ \\sqrt{{s}}$ ≃ 3 GeV. In the energy region of $ \\sqrt{{s}}$ $ \\le$2.5 GeV, covered by the new measurements of $ \\gamma$ p $ \\rightarrow$ $ \\pi^{0}_{}$ p differential cross-sections at large angles at ELSA, JLab, and LEPS, we see no clear signal for a convergence towards the Regge results. The baryon trajectories obtained in our analysis are in good agreement with those given by the spectrum of excited baryons.

  10. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  11. Inelastic J/ψphotoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.; Steegborn, J.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-11-01

    Inelastic photoproduction of J/ψ particles at high energies is one of the processes to determine the gluon distribution in the nucleon. We have calculated the QCD radiative corrections to the color-singlet model of this reaction. They are large at moderate photon energies, but decrease with increasing energies. The cross section and the J/ψ energy spectrum are compared with the available fixed-target photoproduction data and predictions are given for the HERA energy range. (orig.)

  12. Jet photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frixione, S.

    1997-01-01

    We compute various kinematical distributions for one-jet and two-jet inclusive photoproduction at HERA. Our results are accurate to next-to-leading order in QCD. We use the subtraction method for the cancellation of infrared singularities. We perform a thorough study of the reliability of QCD predictions; in particular, we consider the scale dependence of our results and discuss the cases when the perturbative expansion might break down. We also deal with the problem of the experimental definition of the pointlike and hadronic components of the incident photon, and briefly discuss the sensitivity of QCD predictions upon the input parameters of the calculation, like α S and the parton densities. (orig.)

  13. Photoproduction of charmed baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a search for the photoproduction of charmed baryons in the broad-band neutral beam at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are reported. The lowest lying charmed baryon (Λ/sub c/ + ) is observed through its decay to p-anti K 0 . The cross section times branching ratio of γ + C → Λ/sub c/ + + X, γ + C → p + anti K 0 is measured to be sigma B = 3 nanobarns/nucleon. The total error on this measurement is estimated to be -20% to +40%. The mass of the Λ/sub c/ + is found to be 2.284 +- 0.001 GeV/c 2 , in good agreement with the Mark II result from SPEAR. Upper limits (90% confidence level) are set on sigma B for the modes Λ 0 π, Λ 0 πππ, pKπ

  14. Photoproduction of the D*+-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Using the broad band beam at FNAL, the photoproduction of the D* + (and D* - ) meson was observed, where D* + → D 0 π + and D 0 → K - π + (143 +- 20 events) or D 0 → K/sub s/π + π - (35 +- 11 events). The observation exploited the small D* + - D 0 mass difference to reduce the combinatoric background by 3 orders of magnitude. A variety of analysis techniques are presented to demonstrate that the D* + is created by a diffractive pair production mechanism, with a cross section given by sigma(γ + N → D 0 ) = 160 +- 70 nb/nucleon. Finally the data is discussed in terms of a QCD production mechanism, photon gluon fusion, and certain parameters are fixed in the theory by using the D* P/sub t/ distribution

  15. IEA Agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 1996 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Carolyn C. (National Renewable Energy Lab, Golden, CO (US)) (ed.)

    1997-01-31

    The annual report includes an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including a brief summary of hydrogen in general. The Chairman's report provides highlights for the year. Sections are included on hydrogen energy activities in the IEA Hydrogen Agreement member countries, including Canada, European Commission, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the US. Lastly, Annex reports are given for the following tasks: Task 10, Photoproduction of Hydrogen, Task 11, Integrated Systems, and Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage.

  16. High-energy photoproduction of neutral mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Charity, Tim

    1987-01-01

    This thesis presents results from the first full period of data-taking of the experiment WA69 at the Omega^'^ectrometer, CERN, Geneva. The experiment used a tagged photon beam of energy 60-180 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target to study photoproduction of hadronic states. The various components of the experiment are described, with particular emphasis on the electromagnetic calorimeters, and the associated offline software for event reconstruction and acceptance calculation. The performance of the outer calorimeter is discussed, and the pi^0 detection and reconstruction efficiency is examined by comparison with pi^{+/- } production. Searches for photoproduction of neutral meson states reveal a clear signal for the pi^0, eta^0 , and omega^0 mesons. The cross-section for elastic omega^0 production is estimated, and found to be consistent with the established value of 1 mub. The cross-section for inclusive pi^0 and eta^0 production is studied using the variable Feynman-x (x_{F }), and pi^0 production as a ...

  17. Quarkonia Photoproduction at Nucleus Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Enterria, David

    2008-01-01

    Exclusive photoproduction of heavy quarkonia in high-energy ultraperipheral ion-ion interactions (γ A →V A, where V = J/ψ, Y and the nucleus A remains intact) offers a useful means to constrain the small-x nuclear gluon density. We discuss preliminary results on J/ψ photoproduction in Au-Au collisions at RHIC [D. d'Enterria [PHENIX Collaboration], Proceeds. Quark Matter'05, (arXiv:nucl-ex/0601001)], as well as full simulation-reconstruction studies of photo-produced Y in Pb-Pb interactions at the LHC [D. d'Enterria (ed.) et al. [CMS Collaboration], J. Phys. G. 34 2307 (2007)

  18. Inelastic J/ψphotoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.

    1995-04-01

    Inelastic photoproduction of J/ψ particles at high energies is one of the processes to determine the gluon distribution in the nucleon. The QCD radiative corrections to the color-singlet model of this reaction have recently been calculated. They are large at moderate photon energies, but decrease with increasing energies. I compare the cross section and the J/ψ energy spectrum with the available fixed-target photoproduction data. Predictions for the HERA energy range are given which demonstrate the sensitivity of the result to the parametrization of the gluon distribution in the small-x region. (orig.)

  19. Deletion of Proton Gradient Regulation 5 (PGR5) and PGR5-Like 1 (PGRL1) proteins promote sustainable light-driven hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii due to increased PSII activity under sulfur deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Janina; Nikolova, Denitsa; Weingarten, Robert; Johnson, Xenie; Richaud, Pierre; Peltier, Gilles; Hermann, Marita; Magneschi, Leonardo; Hippler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Continuous hydrogen photo-production under sulfur deprivation was studied in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii pgr5 pgrl1 double mutant and respective single mutants. Under medium light conditions, the pgr5 exhibited the highest performance and produced about eight times more hydrogen than the wild type, making pgr5 one of the most efficient hydrogen producer reported so far. The pgr5 pgrl1 double mutant showed an increased hydrogen burst at the beginning of sulfur deprivation under high light conditions, but in this case the overall amount of hydrogen produced by pgr5 pgrl1 as well as pgr5 was diminished due to photo-inhibition and increased degradation of PSI. In contrast, the pgrl1 was effective in hydrogen production in both high and low light. Blocking photosynthetic electron transfer by DCMU stopped hydrogen production almost completely in the mutant strains, indicating that the main pathway of electrons toward enhanced hydrogen production is via linear electron transport. Indeed, PSII remained more active and stable in the pgr mutant strains as compared to the wild type. Since transition to anaerobiosis was faster and could be maintained due to an increased oxygen consumption capacity, this likely preserves PSII from photo-oxidative damage in the pgr mutants. Hence, we conclude that increased hydrogen production under sulfur deprivation in the pgr5 and pgrl1 mutants is caused by an increased stability of PSII permitting sustainable light-driven hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  20. Hadron photoproduction at medium energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dainton, J.B.

    1985-04-01

    Results from measurements of multibody photoproduction at medium incident photon energy (2.8 to 4.8 GeV) are presented and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on topics which are not well understood and which therefore motivate experiments with the upgraded electron accelerator and storage ring ELSA at the University of Bonn, FR Germany. (author)

  1. Inelastic photoproduction of ω and rho+-mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, C.A. Jr.; May, E.N.; Abramson, J.; Andrews, D.E.; Harvey, J.; Lobkowicz, F.; Singer, M.N.; Thorndike, E.H.; Nordberg, M.E. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    We report measurements of inelastic photoproduction of ω and rho +- mesons from hydrogen and deuterium at incident photon energies in the range 7.5-10.5 GeV. For ωΔ and rho - Δ ++ production differential cross sections dsigma/dt' and spin density matrices are presented. For higher missing masses the cross sections dsigma/dM/sub X/ 2 and invariant structure functions F(x) are also given. The data are compared to a one-pion-exchange model. We conclude that pion exchange is dominant for inelastic ω photoproduction, but unimportant for rho +- during annealing, even though the resistively determined transport scattering time increased by a factor of 7.8 during annealing. Orbital depairing was found to follow a relation zeta = zeta 0 + αH 2 and to increase with annealing in a manner expected from the change in mean free path determined from measurements of H/sub cnu/

  2. Hydrogen storage capacity of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoda, Ai; Oshima, Shinji; Iki, Hideshi; Akiba, Etsuo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The hydrogen adsorption of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons has been studied. • Lithium doping improves their hydrogen adsorption affinity. • Lithium doping is more effective for materials with micropores of 0.8 nm or smaller. • Lithium reagent can alter the pore structure, depending on the raw material. • Optimizing the pore size and functional group is needed for better hydrogen uptake. - Abstract: The authors have studied the hydrogen adsorption performance of several types of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons. In the case of activated cokes, lithium doping improves their hydrogen adsorption affinity from 5.02 kg/m 3 to 5.86 kg/m 3 at 303 K. Hydrogen adsorption density increases by around 17% after lithium doping, likely due to the fact that lithium doping is more effective for materials with micropores of 0.8 nm or smaller. The effects of lithium on hydrogen storage capacity vary depending on the raw material, because the lithium reagent can react with the material and alter the pore structure, indicating that lithium doping has the effect of plugging or filling the micropores and changing the structures of functional groups, resulting in the formation of mesopores. Despite an observed decrease in hydrogen uptake, lithium doping was found to improve hydrogen adsorption affinity. Lithium doping increases hydrogen uptake by optimizing the pore size and functional group composition

  3. Charm photoproduction and quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.A.; Shifman, M.A.; Vainshtein, A.I.; Zakharov, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that charm photoproduction can be consistently described within asymptotically free field theory. Quantum chromodynamics is used to derive sum rules for the total cross section sigmasub(c)sup(γ) which includes both production of mesons with hidden charm (J/PIS, PIS' and so on) and of charmed particles (pairs DantiD, FantiF and so on). An estimate of sigmasub(c)sup(γ) as a function of energy is given and fast growth is discovered up to energies approximately 1000 GeV. In this energy range sigmasub(c)sup(γ) turns out to be equal to several microbarns. It is argued that measurements of charm photoproduction would give the most direct information on the gluon distribution within a nucleon. All the results are generalized to production of heavier particles containing new quarks. In particular, a simple rescaling law is derived connecting the cross sections for charm and beauty

  4. Hydrogen activities in the European Union work-programme. Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahbout, A.; Tartaglia, G.P.; Buenger, U.

    2000-07-01

    Looking at some of the national and international developments in hydrogen technology it becomes clear which important contributions the hydrogen technology oriented activities of the EU have helped to prepare and trigger: (a) Transport Energy Strategy (TES): This initiative of 7 major German automobile and mineral oilcompanies is aimed at an industrial consensus on one or two gasoline alternative fuels, which are to be presented to the German Ministry of Transport. An intermediate trend is that hydrogen may become the fuel of choice. (b) BMW: The Bayerischen Motorenwerke have already very early exposed themselves to the vehicle and component development of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, focussing on a strategy from CNG to LNG and LH{sub 2}. (c) Opel and GM: Opel has recently announced they have chosen hydrogen as the primary long term fuel for their fuel cell vehicles to be commercialized starting in 2004. (d) CFCP: The California Fuel Cell Partnership with partners from industry and politics has announced they are preparing the installation of hydrogen fuel stations aas well as 20-25 fuel cell buses and 30 passenger cars, mainly operated with hydrogen. (e) NEDO: The New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan has announced they are going to build hydrogen pilot refueling stations 18 months ahead of the original schedule to reduce the first-to-market-time. (f) Norway: A study group of Norwegian industry and institutes has carried out a comprehensive study for the Research Ministry on further R and D areas which should be intensified in a national strategy to be prepared for an international hydrogen energy system [SINTEF, 00]. (g) German Greens: The German ecologist party ''Greens'' has announced last week a shift from an anti-car lobbying to fostering greener cars, focussing on renewable hydrogen as a clean fuel. (h) Linde: The largest European Technical Gas Company has announced recently they will strategically

  5. Controlling hydrogenation activity and selectivity of bimetallic surfaces and catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Luis E.

    Studies of bimetallic systems are of great interest in catalysis due to the novel properties that they often show in comparison with the parent metals. The goals of this dissertation are: (1) to expand the studies of self-hydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions on bimetallic surfaces under ultra high vacuum conditions (UHV) using different hydrocarbon as probe molecules; (2) to attempt to correlate the surface science findings with supported catalyst studies under more realistic conditions; and (3) to investigate the competitive hydrogenation of C=C versus C=O bonds on Pt(111) modified by different 3d transition metals. Hydrogenation studies using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) on Ni/Pt(111) bimetallic surfaces have demonstrated an enhancement in the low temperature hydrogenation activity relative to that of clean Pt(111). This novel hydrogenation pathway can be achieved under UHV conditions by controlling the structures of the bimetallic surfaces. A low temperature hydrogenation activity of 1-hexene and 1-butene has been observed on a Pt-Ni-Pt(111) subsurface structure, where Ni atoms are mainly present on the second layer of the Pt(111) single crystal. These results are in agreement with previous studies of self-hydrogenation and hydrogenation of cyclohexene. However, a much higher dehydrogenation activity is observed in the reaction of cyclohexene to produce benzene, demonstrating that the hydrocarbon structure has an effect on the reaction pathways. On the other hand, self-hydrogenation of 1-butene is not observed on the Pt-Ni-Pt(111) surface, indicating that the chain length (or molecular weight) has a significant effect on the selfhydrogenation activity. The gas phase reaction of cyclohexene on Ni/Pt supported on alumina catalysts has also shown a higher self-hydrogenation activity in comparison with the same reaction performed on supported monometallic catalysts. The effects of metal loading and impregnation sequence of the metal precursors are

  6. Hydrogen Activation by Biomimetic Diiron Dithiolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Matthew T.; Barton, Bryan E.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Using the thermally stable salts of [Fe2(SR)2(CO)3(PMe3)(dppv)]BArF4, we found that the azadithiolates [Fe2(adtR)(CO)3(PMe3)(dppv)]+ react with high pressures of H2 to give the hydride [(μ-H)Fe2(adt)(CO)3(PMe3)(dppv)]BArF4. The related oxadithiolate and propanedithiolate complexes are unreactive toward H2. Molecular hydrogen is proposed to undergo heterolysis assisted by the amine followed by isomerization of an initially formed terminal hydride. Use of H2 and D2O gave the deuteride as well as the hydride, implicating protic intermediates. PMID:19603776

  7. Strangeness photoproduction and hadronic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the kaon photoproduction off a proton (γp → K + Λ,γp → K + Σ 0 , γp → K 0 Σ + ), with a photon energy between 0.9 and 2.1 GeV. We use an isobaric model where the amplitudes are computed with Feynman diagrams. The insertion of nucleonic resonances with spin 3/2 and 5/2 is necessary to improve the existing models beyond 1.5 GeV. This step is also necessary to extend the elementary process of photoproduction to electroproduction where the data have been taken with photon energies above 2.0 GeV. The parameters of our models are the coupling constants which appear at each Feynman diagram vertex. They are determined by fitting our models to the experimental data (cross sections, polarization asymmetries). Before performing the minimization we drew some informations about coupling constants from mesonic and electromagnetic decays, and from SU(3) and SU(6) symmetries. In conclusion, the models developed here reproduce the experimental data (E γ ≤ 2.0 GeV) and the two main coupling constants are in good agreement with broken SU(3)-symmetry predictions. (author)

  8. psi and excess leptons in photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritson, D.M.

    1976-03-01

    The A-dependence of psi photoproduction was measured on beryllium and tantalum. From this it is found sigma/sub psi N/ = 2.75 +- 0.90 mb. A study was made of excess leptons relative to pion production in photoproduction. A μ/π ratio of 1.40 +- 0.25 x 10 -4 was found at 20 GeV incident photon energy. The energy dependence of psi photoproduction was determined and appeared to have a ''pseudo-threshold'' at 12 GeV

  9. Single meson photoproduction and IR renormalons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agaev, S.S.

    1996-10-01

    Single pseudoscalar and vector mesons inclusive photoproduction γh → MX via higher twist mechanism is calculated using the QCD running coupling constant method. It is proved that in the context of this method a higher twist contribution to the photoproduction cross section cannot be normalized in terms of the meson electromagnetic form factor. The structure of infrared renormalon singularities of the higher twist subprocess cross section and the resumed expression (the Borel sum) for it are found. Comparisons are made with earlier results, as well as with leading twist cross section. Phenomenological effects of studied contributions for π, K, ρ-meson photoproduction are discussed. (author). 21 refs, 8 figs

  10. High-energy photoproduction and electroproduction of π+ on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'menko, V.S.; Mitrofanova, A.V.; Noga, V.I.; Ranyuk, Y.N.; Sorokin, P.V.; Telegin, Y.N.; Blomqvist, I.; Jonsson, G.G.; Freed, N.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for photoproduction and electroproduction of π + on 27 Al and 51 V leading to bound states in the daughter nuclei have been measured at Kharkov in the energy range 600--1200 MeV by use of the activation method. Careful comparison is made to other recent results obtained at intermediate and high energies. Agreement is found between the present data and results of earlier work carried out at Lund and DESY. Discrepancies between photoproduction data taken at different laboratories are attributed to differences between methods of background subtraction. Relative bremsstrahlung-induced to electron-induced yield ratios are compared with predictions based on the Dalitz-Yennie formalism for virtual-photon spectra

  11. Measurement of the Photoproduction of Vector and Scalar Bosons

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The original programme of the experiment consisted of a detailed study of projectile fragmentation on nucleons and nuclei with particular attention to diffractive excitation. This programme of research was then specified as the measurement of coherent photoproduction on nuclei up to $\\simeq$180 GeV with the following aims: \\item a) photoproduction of charmed particle pairs and measurement of charmed particle lifetimes by means of an active target; \\item b) study of the spectroscopy of the new massive particles with particular attention to the hadronic decay channels, containing charged particles and photons, and to radiative decays. \\end{enumerate}\\\\ \\\\ The apparatus consists of a forward spectrometer for charged particles and photons and of a large angle detector which provides the topology of individual events. The spectrometer subtends a solid angle of $\\simeq$ 40 msr and consists of four bending magnets interspaced by sets of drift chambers, counter hodoscopes and photon detectors. The momentum resolution...

  12. Reaction mechanisms in coherent nuclear photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazard, C.

    Nuclear coherent pion photoproduction is studied. Pion rescattering and propagation effects inside nucleus and mesic exchange current effects are discussed. Influence of nuclear wave functions and Fermi motion is presented [fr

  13. Pion photoproduction on the nucleon at threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, I.T.; Jeong, M.T.

    1989-08-01

    Electric dipole amplitudes of pion photoproduction on the nucleon at threshold have been calculated in the framework of the chiral bag model. Our results are in good agreement with the existing experimental data

  14. Hydrogen and fuel cell activity report, France 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This report gathers the main highlights of 2009 in the field of hydrogen and fuel cells in France. It presents the political context (priority to a sustainable development and to renewable energies) and the main initiatives (official commitment, projects and programmes launched by different public bodies and organizations). It briefly presents the projects and programmes concerning the hydrogen: ANR programmes, national structures dedicated to hydrogen and fuel cells, fundamental research, demonstrator project (the H2E project), applications in transport (a project by Peugeot, the Althytude project coordinated by GDF, the Hychain European project, and other airborne or maritime projects), stationary applications (MYRTE). It also briefly describes the activities of some small companies (CETH, McPHY, RAIGI, PRAGMA Industries, N-GHY, SAGIM), and regional initiatives. Colloquiums, congresses and meetings are mentioned

  15. High Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Activity of an Anomalous Ruthenium Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yao; Jiao, Yan; Zhu, Yihan; Li, Lu Hua; Han, Yu; Chen, Ying; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a critical process due to its fundamental role in electrocatalysis. Practically, the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for HER in alkaline media is of great importance for the conversion of renewable energy to hydrogen fuel via photoelectrochemical water splitting. However, both mechanistic exploration and materials development for HER under alkaline conditions are very limited. Precious Pt metal, which still serves as the state-of-the-art catalyst for HER, is unable to guarantee a sustainable hydrogen supply. Here we report an anomalously structured Ru catalyst that shows 2.5 times higher hydrogen generation rate than Pt and is among the most active HER electrocatalysts yet reported in alkaline solutions. The identification of new face-centered cubic crystallographic structure of Ru nanoparticles was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging, and its formation mechanism was revealed by spectroscopic characterization and theoretical analysis. For the first time, it is found that the Ru nanocatalyst showed a pronounced effect of the crystal structure on the electrocatalytic activity tested under different conditions. The combination of electrochemical reaction rate measurements and density functional theory computation shows that the high activity of anomalous Ru catalyst in alkaline solution originates from its suitable adsorption energies to some key reaction intermediates and reaction kinetics in the HER process.

  16. High Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Activity of an Anomalous Ruthenium Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yao; Jiao, Yan; Zhu, Yihan; Li, Lu Hua; Han, Yu; Chen, Ying; Jaroniec, Mietek; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-12-14

    Hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a critical process due to its fundamental role in electrocatalysis. Practically, the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for HER in alkaline media is of great importance for the conversion of renewable energy to hydrogen fuel via photoelectrochemical water splitting. However, both mechanistic exploration and materials development for HER under alkaline conditions are very limited. Precious Pt metal, which still serves as the state-of-the-art catalyst for HER, is unable to guarantee a sustainable hydrogen supply. Here we report an anomalously structured Ru catalyst that shows 2.5 times higher hydrogen generation rate than Pt and is among the most active HER electrocatalysts yet reported in alkaline solutions. The identification of new face-centered cubic crystallographic structure of Ru nanoparticles was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging, and its formation mechanism was revealed by spectroscopic characterization and theoretical analysis. For the first time, it is found that the Ru nanocatalyst showed a pronounced effect of the crystal structure on the electrocatalytic activity tested under different conditions. The combination of electrochemical reaction rate measurements and density functional theory computation shows that the high activity of anomalous Ru catalyst in alkaline solution originates from its suitable adsorption energies to some key reaction intermediates and reaction kinetics in the HER process.

  17. High Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Activity of an Anomalous Ruthenium Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yao

    2016-11-28

    Hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a critical process due to its fundamental role in electrocatalysis. Practically, the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for HER in alkaline media is of great importance for the conversion of renewable energy to hydrogen fuel via photoelectrochemical water splitting. However, both mechanistic exploration and materials development for HER under alkaline conditions are very limited. Precious Pt metal, which still serves as the state-of-the-art catalyst for HER, is unable to guarantee a sustainable hydrogen supply. Here we report an anomalously structured Ru catalyst that shows 2.5 times higher hydrogen generation rate than Pt and is among the most active HER electrocatalysts yet reported in alkaline solutions. The identification of new face-centered cubic crystallographic structure of Ru nanoparticles was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging, and its formation mechanism was revealed by spectroscopic characterization and theoretical analysis. For the first time, it is found that the Ru nanocatalyst showed a pronounced effect of the crystal structure on the electrocatalytic activity tested under different conditions. The combination of electrochemical reaction rate measurements and density functional theory computation shows that the high activity of anomalous Ru catalyst in alkaline solution originates from its suitable adsorption energies to some key reaction intermediates and reaction kinetics in the HER process.

  18. Quasi-free π0 photoproduction from the bound nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossert, K.; Camen, M.; Wissmann, F.; Schumacher, M.; Seitz, B.; Ahrens, J.; Arends, H.J.; Beck, R.; Caselotti, G.; Jahn, O.; Jennewein, P.; Leon, V.Olmos de; Annand, J.R.M.; McGeorge, J.C.; Rosner, G.; Grabmayr, P.; Natter, A.; Levchuk, M.I.; L'vov, A.I.; Petrun'kin, V.A.; Smend, F.; Thomas, A.; Weihofen, W.; Zapadtka, F.

    2004-01-01

    Differential cross-sections for quasi-free π 0 photoproduction from the proton and neutron bound in the deuteron have been measured for E γ =200-400 MeV at θγ lab =136.2 using the Glasgow photon tagger at MAMI, the Mainz 48 cm diameter x 64 cm NaI(Tl) photon detector and the Goettingen SENECA recoil detector. For the proton measurements made with both liquid-deuterium and liquid-hydrogen targets allow direct comparison of ''free'' π 0 photoproduction cross-sections as extracted from the bound-proton data with experimental free cross-sections which are found to be in reasonable agreement below 320 MeV. At higher energies the ''free'' cross-sections extracted from quasi-free data are significantly smaller than the experimental free cross-sections and theoretical predictions based on multipole analysis. For the first time, ''free'' neutron cross-section have been extracted in the Δ-region. They are also in agreement with the predictions from multipole analysis up to 320 MeV and significantly smaller at higher photon energies. (orig.)

  19. Multijets in photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krastev, Kaloyan

    2008-11-15

    In the analysis jets in photoproduction are studied with data collected by the H1 detector in 2006. Events with at least two jets with transverse energy greater than 9 GeV and pseudorapidity in the range of -0.5 to 1.5 in the laboratory frame are selected for the dijet sample. For the trijet and fourjet scenarios, one and two additional jets with transverse energy greater than 6 GeV and pseudorapidity in the range of -0.5 to 2.4 are required. The aim of the analysis is to study the dynamics of multijet events (events with more than two jets). In the perturbative picture the jet rate increases due to additional parton emissions. The jet rate can also be affected by multiple parton interactions when several pairs of partons within the incoming particles interact. Differential cross sections as a function of various variables for the dijet, trijet and fourjet scenario are measured. In addition, the applicability of two currently established multiple interaction models is tested. The results show that current models are not correctly describing the properties of multijet events in the analyzed phase space. (orig.)

  20. Hydrogen desorption reactions of Li-N-H hydrogen storage system: Estimation of activation free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuru; Haga, Tetsuya; Kawai, Yasuaki; Kojima, Yoshitsugu

    2007-01-01

    The dehydrogenation reactions of the mixtures of lithium amide (LiNH 2 ) and lithium hydride (LiH) were studied under an Ar atmosphere by means of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The dehydrogenation reaction of the LiNH 2 /LiH mixture was accelerated by addition of 1 mol% Ti(III) species (k = 3.1 x 10 -4 s -1 at 493 K), and prolonged ball-milling time (16 h) further enhanced reaction rate (k = 1.1 x 10 -3 s -1 at 493 K). For the hydrogen desorption reaction of Ti(III) doped samples, the activation energies estimated by Kissinger plot (95 kJ mol -1 ) and Arrhenius plot (110 kJ mol -1 ) were in reasonable agreement. The LiNH 2 /LiH mixture without Ti(III) species, exhibited slower hydrogen desorption process and the kinetic traces deviated from single exponential behavior. The results indicated the Ti(III) additives change the hydrogen desorption reaction mechanism of the LiNH 2 /LiH mixture

  1. Energy storage applications of activated carbons: supercapacitors and hydrogen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilla Solís, Marta; Mokaya, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Porous carbons have several advantageous properties with respect to their use in energy applications that require constrained space such as in electrode materials for supercapacitors and as solid state hydrogen stores. The attractive properties of porous carbons include, ready abundance, chemical and thermal stability, ease of processability and low framework density. Activated carbons, which are perhaps the most explored class of porous carbons, have been traditionally employed as catalyst s...

  2. Photoproduction of the φ(1020) near threshold in CLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedeschi, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    The differential cross section for the photoproduction of the φ (1020) near threshold (E γ = 1.57GeV) is predicted to be sensitive to production mechanisms other than diffraction. However, the existing low energy data is of limited statistics and kinematical coverage. Complete measurements of φ meson production on the proton have been performed at The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using a liquid hydrogen target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The φ was identified by missing mass using a proton and positive kaon detected by CLAS in coincidence with an electron in the photon tagger. The energy of the tagged, bremsstrahlung photons ranged from φ-threshold to 2.4 GeV. A description of the data set and the differential cross section for (E γ = 2.0 GeV) will be presented and compared with present theoretical calculations. (author)

  3. The FOREST detector for meson photoproduction experiments at ELPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, T., E-mail: ishikawa@lns.tohoku.ac.jp [Research Center for Electron Photon Science (ELPH), Tohoku University, Sendai 982–0826 (Japan); Fujimura, H.; Fukasawa, H.; Hashimoto, R.; Ishida, T.; Kaida, S.; Kasagi, J. [Research Center for Electron Photon Science (ELPH), Tohoku University, Sendai 982–0826 (Japan); Kawano, A. [Department of Information Science, Tohoku Gakuin University, Sendai 981–3193 (Japan); Kuwasaki, S. [Research Center for Electron Photon Science (ELPH), Tohoku University, Sendai 982–0826 (Japan); Maeda, K. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980–8578 (Japan); Miyahara, F.; Mochizuki, K.; Nakabayashi, T.; Nakamura, A.; Nawa, K.; Ogushi, S.; Okada, Y.; Okamura, K.; Onodera, Y.; Saito, Y. [Research Center for Electron Photon Science (ELPH), Tohoku University, Sendai 982–0826 (Japan); and others

    2016-10-01

    An electromagnetic calorimeter complex, FOREST, has been constructed for meson photoproduction experiments at the Research Center for Electron Photon Science, Tohoku University. It consists of three types of calorimeters, which are made of pure cesium-iodide crystals, lead scintillating-fiber modules, and lead glass Cherenkov counters. Each calorimeter is equipped with a plastic scintillator hodoscope to identify charged particles. The design and performance of FOREST are described. The energy responses of test calorimeters have been investigated by using 100–800 MeV positron beams. The energy resolutions of the three calorimeters are found to be approximately 3%, 7%, and 5% for 1-GeV photons, respectively. A cryogenic hydrogen/deuterium target system fitted to the FOREST experiments and a newly developed data acquisition system are also presented.

  4. Studies in deep inelastic scattering and vector meson photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busenitz, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    The first part of this thesis is devoted to a space-time analysis of deep inelastic scattering from protons at rest. Techniques are developed for identifying important space-time regions. These are then applied to obtain a space-time picture of deep inelastic scattering in the leading logarithmic approximation of QCD, Physical mechanisms responsible for the space-time picture are discussed. In the second part of this thesis he reports on the observations of elastic omega photoproduction from hydrogen by Fermilab Experiment-401. The omega was detected via its decay into the π + π - π 0 channel. Measurements of the energy, momentum transfer, and angular dependence of the cross section have been made for photon energies between 60 and 225 GeV

  5. Probing hydrogen bonding interactions and proton transfer in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Beining

    intermediate states of proteins. Our MD simulations on the structures of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) and its photoproducts provide deep insight into the much-debated structural nature of chromophore photo-isomerization. Our simulation data of three plausible photoproducts provide a specific guide on how to use time-resolved infrared spectroscopy to identify which photoproduct is formed after photo-isomerization. Our data also indicate that hydrogen bond with Tyr42 may be crucial to increase the proton affinity of the chromophore and trigger the intra-protein proton transfer during PYP photoreceptor activation.

  6. Hydrogen and fuel cell activity report - France 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The report gathers the main outstanding facts which occurred in France in the field of hydrogen and fuel cells in 2010. After having noticed some initiatives (the Grenelle II law, an investment package, the new role of the CEA, the new role of the IFP), the report presents several projects and programs regarding hydrogen: ANR programs, creation of a national structure (the HyPaC platform), regional initiatives and local actions, colloquiums and meetings in France and in the world, research projects (photo-synthesis as a new electric energy source), a technical-economic investigation (HyFrance3), demonstrator projects (the Althytude project by GDF and Suez, the Plathee hybrid locomotive by the SNCF, the H2E project, the Zero CO 2 sailing boat, and the Myrte project), educational applications, activity in small and medium-sized enterprises (CETH, SAGIM, HYCAN, McPhy, N-GHY).

  7. Hydrogen and fuel cell activity report - France 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The report gathers the main outstanding facts which occurred in France in the field of hydrogen and fuel cells in 2009. After having noticed some initiatives (French commitment in renewable energy production, new role for the CEA, cooperation between different research and industrial bodies, development of electric vehicles, research programs), the report presents several projects and programs regarding hydrogen: ANR programs, creation of a national structure, basic research by the CEA and CNRS, demonstration projects (H2E), transport applications (a hybrid 307 by Peugeot, the Althytude project by GDF and Suez, the Hychain European project by Air Liquide, a dirigible airship, an ultra-light aviation project, a submarine), some stationary applications (the Myrte project, a wind energy project), activity in small and medium-sized enterprises, regional initiatives, colloquiums and meetings.

  8. Transverse polarization of lambda(anti) hyperons from quasireal photoproduction on nuclei at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayrapetyan, Avetik; Brodski, Irina; Etzelmueller, Erik; Dueren, Michael; Zagrebalny, Vitaly [II. Physikalisches Inst., JLU Giessen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The transverse polarization of Λ(anti Λ) hyperons was measured in inclusive quasireal photoproduction for various target nuclei ranging from hydrogen to xenon. These data were taken at the HERMES Experiment at HERA/DESY using the 27.6 GeV lepton beam. They are compared to results from previous measurements of the HERMES experiment on hydrogen (H) and deuteron (D) targets. In comparison with earlier measurement a new improved track-fitting algorithm has been used leading to better vertex and momentum resolution. The HERMES data complement extensive transverse polarization studies of hyperons, using hadron beams.

  9. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed

  10. Strangeness photoproduction on the deuterium target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shende, Sugat Vyankatesh

    2007-01-01

    More information on the nucleon excitation function can be gained by studying the photoproduction experiments. In these experiments, the nucleon inside the nucleous is excited by shooting a high energy photon beam. The excited spectrum of the nucleon is then studied by measuring the energy and

  11. Photoproduction of neutral pions off protons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crede, V.; Sparks, N.; Wilson, A.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, R.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Castelijns, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Chr; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, P.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammer, S.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V. A.; Novinski, D.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Sokhoyan, V.; Suele, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch

    2011-01-01

    Photoproduction of neutral pions has been studied with the CBELSA/TAPS detector in the reaction gamma p -> p pi(0) for photon energies between 0.85 and 2.50 GeV. The pi(0) mesons are observed in their dominant neutral decay mode: pi(0) -> gamma gamma. For the first time, the differential cross

  12. Pion photoproduction in nucleons at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F.A.B.R. de.

    1983-01-01

    A new semiphenomenological analysis of the multipoles for pion photoproduction from nucleons, in the region of the first π-N resonance is presented. Through an energy dependent model, multipoles with isospin 1/2 and 3/2 and total angular momentum J [pt

  13. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  14. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  15. An unusual diphosphatase from the PhnP family cleaves reactive FAD photoproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Li, Qiang; Bruner, Steven D; Hanson, Andrew D

    2018-01-11

    Flavins are notoriously photolabile, but while the photoproducts derived from the iso -alloxazine ring are well known the other photoproducts are not. In the case of FAD, typically the main cellular flavin, the other photoproducts are predicted to include four- and five-carbon sugars linked to ADP. These FAD photoproducts were shown to be potent glycating agents, more so than ADP-ribose. Such toxic compounds would require disposal via an ADP-sugar diphosphatase or other route. Comparative analysis of bacterial genomes uncovered a candidate disposal gene that is chromosomally clustered with genes for FAD synthesis or transport and is predicted to encode a protein of the PhnP cyclic phosphodiesterase family. The representative PhnP family enzyme from Koribacter versatilis (here named Fpd, F AD p hotoproduct d iphosphatase) was found to have high, Mn 2+ -dependent diphosphatase activity against FAD photoproducts, FAD, and ADP-ribose, but almost no phosphodiesterase activity against riboflavin 4',5'-cyclic phosphate, a chemical breakdown product of FAD. To provide a structural basis of the unique Fpd activity, the crystal structure of K. versatilis Fpd was determined. The results place Fpd in the broad metallo-β-lactamase-like family of hydrolases, a diverse family commonly using two metals for hydrolytic catalysis. The active site of Fpd contains two Mn 2+ ions and a bound phosphate, consistent with a diphosphatase mechanism. Our results characterize the first PhnP family member that is a diphosphatase rather than a cyclic phosphodiesterase and suggest its involvement in a cellular damage-control system that efficiently hydrolyzes the reactive, ADP-ribose-like products of FAD photodegradation. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  16. Hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syukurilla, L., E-mail: tmart@fisika.ui.ac.id; Mart, T., E-mail: tmart@fisika.ui.ac.id [Department Fisika, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, 164242 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    We have revisited the effect of hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction process by utilizing an isobaric model developed for kaon photoproduction off the proton. The model is able to reproduce the available experimental data nicely as well as to reveal the origin of the second peak in the total cross section, which was the main source of confusion for decades. Different from our previous study, in the present work we explore the possibility of using different hadronic form factors in each of the KΛN vertices. The use of different hadronic form factors, e.g. dipole, Gaussian, and generalized dipole, has been found to produce a more flexible isobar model, which can provide a significant improvement in the model.

  17. Measurement of elastic φ photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1996-01-01

    The production of φ mesons in the reaction e + p→e + φp(φ→K + K - ) at a median Q 2 of 10 -4 GeV 2 has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The differential φ photoproduction cross section dσ/dt has an exponential shape and has been determined in the kinematic range 0.1 2 and 60 γp→φp 0.96±0.19 -0.18 +0.21 μb has been obtained by extrapolating to t=0. When compared to lower energy data, the results show a weak energy dependence of both σ γp→φp and the slope of the t distribution. The φ decay angular distributions are consistent with s-channel helicity conservation. From lower energies to HERA energies, the features of φ photoproduction are compatible with those of a soft diffractive process. (orig.)

  18. Drell-Yan lepton pair photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badalyan, R.G.; Grabskij, V.O.; Matinyan, S.G.

    1989-01-01

    The study of photon structure functions by spectra of massive lepton pairs (M l + l - ≥ 2 GeV) in photon fragmentation region in γp-interactions at high energies is suggested. In calculations of Drell-Yan lepton pair inclusive spectra in γp-interactions for photon structure functions there are used results obtained within QCD, data on γγ-interactions in e + e - → e + e - X on colliders as well as results from the analysis of vector meson non-diffractive photoproduction at high energies. It is shown that there exists a sufficienly wide kinematic region over variables X l + l - and M l + l - , wherein photon structure functions can be studied by spectra of Grell-Yan lepton pairs in the processes of their photoproduction. 31 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab

  19. Strangeness photoproduction with the SAPHIR-detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkel, H.

    1993-12-01

    At the ELSA facility at Bonn a photon beam with a high duty cycle up to energies of 3.3 GeV is available. In this energy range the large solid angle detector SAPHIR enables us to investigate the strangeness photoproduction starting from threshold. SAPHIR has already achieved results for the reactions γ+p→K + +Λ and γ+p→K + +Σ 0 . This work investigates the possibilities to measure the related reactions γ+n→K 0 +Λ and γ+n→K 0 +Σ 0 at a deuteron target and to measure the reaction γ+p→K 0 +Σ + at a proton target. For the first time the Σ + polarisation has been measured. With an cross section 10 times smaller compared to the kaon hyperon reactions, the photoproduction of the Φ(1020) meson can be investigated with the SAPHIR detector too. First reconstructed events are shown. (orig.)

  20. The Λ(1520) photoproduction from proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Λ(1520) photoproduction from proton target is investigated within the effective Lagrangian method and well compared with the experimental data. The D 13 state N(2120) plays the most important role among the nucleon resonances. Besides N(2120), a nucleon resonance [5/2 - ] 2 (2080) predicted by the constituent quark model is found also important to reproduce the experimental data. Other nucleon resonances give negligible contributions in the channel considered in this work. (author)

  1. Exclusive photoproduction of Υ mesons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2009-03-01

    The exclusive photoproduction reaction γ p → Υ p has been studied with the ZEUS experiment in ep collisions at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 468 pb -1 . The measurement covers the kinematic range 60 2 2 , where W is the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy and Q 2 is the photon virtuality. These results, which represent the analysis of the full ZEUS data sample for this channel, are compared to predictions based on perturbative QCD. (orig.)

  2. THE ETA-MESON PHOTOPRODUCTION ON PROTON

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Donoval, Jan; Bydžovský, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, 3-4 (2011), s. 645-646 ISSN 0217-751X. [11th International Workshop on Meson Production , Properties and Interaction. Krakow, 10.06.2010-15.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0984 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Eta-meson photoproduction * form factors * nucleon resonances Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.053, year: 2011

  3. NEUTRAL KAON PHOTOPRODUCTION AT LNS, TOHOKU UNIVERSITY

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaneta, M.; Chiga, N.; Beckford, B.; Ejima, M.; Fujii, T.; Fujii, Y.; Fujibayashi, T.; Gogami, T.; Futatsukawa, K.; Hashimoto, O.; Hosomi, K.; Hirose, K.; Iguchi, A.; Kameoka, S.; Kanda, H.; Kato, H.; Kawama, D.; Kawasaki, T.; Kimura, C.; Kiyokawa, S.; Koike, T.; Kon, T.; Ma, Y.; Maeda, K.; Maruyama, N.; Matsumura, A.; Miyagi, Y.; Miura, Y.; Miwa, K.; Nakamura, S. N.; Nomura, H.; Okuyama, A.; Ohtani, A.; Otani, T.; Sato, M.; Shichijo, A.; Shirotori, K.; Takahashi, T.; Tamura, H.; Taniya, N.; Tsubota, H.; Tsukada, K.; Terada, N.; Ukai, M.; Uchida, D.; Watanabe, T.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamauchi, H.; Yokota, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Kinoshita, T.; Miyahara, H.; Nakabayashi, T.; Shimizu, H.; Suzuki, K.; Tamae, T.; Terasawa, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Han, Y. C.; Wang, T. S.; Sasaki, A.; Konno, O.; Bydžovský, Petr; Sotona, Miloslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2010), s. 2355-2362 ISSN 0218-3013. [Sendai International Conference on Strangeness in Nuclear and Hadronic Systems. Sendai, 15.12.2008-18.12.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2142; GA ČR GA202/08/0984 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Strangeness * photoproduction Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.695, year: 2010

  4. Photoproduction of Neutral Kaons on Deuterons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckford, Brian

    2006-11-01

    Experimentation to greater understand the strangeness production mechanism can be performed by observing the electromagnetic interaction that leads to Kaon photoproduction. The n (γ, K^0) λ reaction may assist in answering questions about the strangeness photo-production process. An experiment into the elementary Kaon photoproduction process was investigated in an experiment conducted at the Laboratory of Nuclear Science of Tohoku University (LNS) using the Neutral Kaon Spectrometer. (NKS). The experiment was conducted by the d (γ, K^0) reaction. K^0 will be measured in the K^0->π^+π^- decay chain by the NKS. The NKS implements many detectors working in coincidence: These ranging from the Tagged Photon Beam generated by the 1.2 GeV Electron beam via bremsstrahlung, an Inner Plastic Scintillator Hodoscope (IH), a Straw Drift Chamber (SDC), a Cylindrical Drift Chamber (CDC), and an Outer Plastic Scintillator Hodoscope. Due to the background produced through the γ-> e+e- process, electron veto counters (EV) were placed in the middle of the OH to reject charged particles in the horizontal plane of the beam line. Preliminary analysis of the data indicates the need for pulse height correction. This was achieved by analysis of the Inner and Outer hodoscopes, and determining the energy deposit in the scintillators.

  5. Measurement of elastic ω photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1996-08-01

    The reaction γp→ωp (ω→π + π - π 0 and π 0 →γγ) has been studied in ep interactions using the ZEUS detector at photon-proton centre-of-mass energies between 70 and 90 GeV and vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 , where t is the squared four momentum transferred at the proton vertex. The elastic ω photoproduction cross section has been measured to be σ γp→ωp =1.21±0.12±0.23 μb. The differential cross section dσ γp→ωp /d vertical stroke t vertical stroke has an exponential shape e -b vertical stroke t vertical stroke with a slope b=10.0±1.2±1.3 GeV -2 . The angular distributions of the decay pions are consistent with s-channel helicity conservation. When compared to low energy data, the features of ω photoproduction as measured at HERA energies are in agreement with those of a soft diffractive process. Previous measurements of the ρ 0 and φ photoproduction cross sections at HERA show a similar behaviour. (orig.)

  6. Redox modulation of thimet oligopeptidase activity by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icimoto, Marcelo Y; Ferreira, Juliana C; Yokomizo, César H; Bim, Larissa V; Marem, Alyne; Gilio, Joyce M; Oliveira, Vitor; Nantes, Iseli L

    2017-07-01

    Thimet oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.15, TOP) is a cytosolic mammalian zinc protease that can process a diversity of bioactive peptides. TOP has been pointed out as one of the main postproteasomal enzymes that process peptide antigens in the MHC class I presentation route. In the present study, we describe a fine regulation of TOP activity by hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). Cells from a human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293) underwent an ischemia/reoxygenation-like condition known to increase H 2 O 2 production. Immediately after reoxygenation, HEK293 cells exhibited a 32% increase in TOP activity, but no TOP activity was observed 2 h after reoxygenation. In another model, recombinant rat TOP (rTOP) was challenged by H 2 O 2 produced by rat liver mitoplasts (RLMt) alone, and in combination with antimycin A, succinate, and antimycin A plus succinate. In these conditions, rTOP activity increased 17, 30, 32 and 38%, respectively. Determination of H 2 O 2 concentration generated in reoxygenated cells and mitoplasts suggested a possible modulation of rTOP activity dependent on the concentration of H 2 O 2 . The measure of pure rTOP activity as a function of H 2 O 2 concentration corroborated this hypothesis. The data fitted to an asymmetrical bell-shaped curve in which the optimal activating H 2 O 2 concentration was 1.2 nM, and the maximal inhibition (75% about the control) was 1 μm. Contrary to the oxidation produced by aging associated with enzyme oligomerization and inhibition, H 2 O 2 oxidation produced sulfenic acid and maintained rTOP in the monomeric form. Consistent with the involvement of rTOP in a signaling redox cascade, the H 2 O 2 -oxidized rTOP reacted with dimeric thioredoxin-1 (TRx-1) and remained covalently bound to one subunit of TRx-1.

  7. Photon beam asymmetry Σ for η and η′ photoproduction from the proton

    OpenAIRE

    P. Collins; B.G. Ritchie; M. Dugger; A.V. Anisovich; M. Döring; E. Klempt; V.A. Nikonov; D. Rönchen; D. Sadasivan; A. Sarantsev; K.P. Adhikari; Z. Akbar; M.J. Amaryan; S. Anefalos Pereira; H. Avakian

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the linearly-polarized photon beam asymmetry $\\Sigma$ for photoproduction from the proton of $\\eta$ and $\\eta^\\prime$ mesons are reported. A linearly-polarized tagged photon beam produced by coherent bremsstrahlung was incident on a cryogenic hydrogen target within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Results are presented for the $\\gamma p \\to \\eta p$ reaction for incident photon energies from 1.070 to 1.876 GeV, and from 1.516 to 1.836 GeV for the $\\gamma p \\to \\eta^\\pri...

  8. Low-energy photoproduction of PHI-mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, J; Glander, K H; Hannappel, J; Jöpen, N; Klein, F J; Klein, F; Lawall, R; Menze, D; Neuerburg, W; Ostrick, M; Paul, E; Schulday, I; Schwille, W J; Wiegers, B; Ernst, J; Kalinowsky, H; Klempt, E; Link, J; Pee, H V; Wieland, F W; Wisskirchen, J; Wu, C

    2003-01-01

    Photoproduction of PHI-vector-mesons has been studied from reaction threshold up to W=2.4 GeV with the SAPHIR spectrometer at the Bonn electron stretcher ring ELSA. Total cross-sections, differential cross-sections and decay angular distributions were measured. We find evidence for strong non-diffractive contributions to PHI photoproduction. (orig.)

  9. Relating inclusive and exclusive meson photoproduction at large transverse momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.M.

    1975-01-01

    Inclusive and exclusive meson photoproduction at large transverse momentum are related by a local application of the correspondence principle of Bjorken and Kogut. The recent predictions for the inclusive process by Escobar are thus compared with wide angle exclusive data. The inclusive photoproduction of (rho 0 +ω) at large transverse momentum is discussed. (Auth.)

  10. Coupled-channel analysis for phi photoproduction with Lambda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozaki, S.; Hosaka, A.; Nagahiro, H.; Scholten, O.

    We investigate photoproduction of phi mesons off protons within a coupled-channel effective-Lagrangian method which is based on the K-matrix approach. Since the threshold energy of the K Lambda(1520) channel is close to that of phi N, the contribution of this channel to f photoproduction near the

  11. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-06-10

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system.

  12. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system.

  13. Acclimation of green algae to sulfur deficiency: underlying mechanisms and application for hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Taras K; Krendeleva, Tatyana E; Rubin, Andrew B

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen is definitely one of the most acceptable fuels in the future. Some photosynthetic microorganisms, such as green algae and cyanobacteria, can produce hydrogen gas from water by using solar energy. In green algae, hydrogen evolution is coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport in thylakoid membranes via reaction catalyzed by the specific enzyme, (FeFe)-hydrogenase. However, this enzyme is highly sensitive to oxygen and can be quickly inhibited when water splitting is active. A problem of incompatibility between the water splitting and hydrogenase reaction can be overcome by depletion of algal cells of sulfur which is essential element for life. In this review the mechanisms underlying sustained hydrogen photoproduction in sulfur deprived C. reinhardtii and the recent achievements in studying of this process are discussed. The attention is focused on the biophysical and physiological aspects of photosynthetic response to sulfur deficiency in green algae.

  14. Baryon Spectroscopy Through Partial-Wave Analysis and Meson Photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, D. Mark

    2016-01-01

    The principal goal of this project is the experimental and phenomenological study of baryon spectroscopy. The PI's group consists of himself and three graduate students. This final report summarizes research activities by the PI's group during the period 03/01/2015 to 08/14/2016. During this period, the PI co-authored 11 published journal papers and one proceedings article and presented three invited talks. The PI's general interest is the investigation of the baryon resonance spectrum up to masses of ~ 2 GeV. More detail is given on two research projects: Neutral Kaon Photoproduction and Partial-Wave Analyses of γp → η p, γn → η n, and γp → K"+ Λ.

  15. Baryon Spectroscopy Through Partial-Wave Analysis and Meson Photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manley, D. Mark [Kent State Univ., Kent, OH (United States)

    2016-09-08

    The principal goal of this project is the experimental and phenomenological study of baryon spectroscopy. The PI's group consists of himself and three graduate students. This final report summarizes research activities by the PI's group during the period 03/01/2015 to 08/14/2016. During this period, the PI co-authored 11 published journal papers and one proceedings article and presented three invited talks. The PI's general interest is the investigation of the baryon resonance spectrum up to masses of ~ 2 GeV. More detail is given on two research projects: Neutral Kaon Photoproduction and Partial-Wave Analyses of γp → η p, γn → η n, and γp → K⁺ Λ.

  16. Learning about nucleon resonances with pion photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    This chapter charts the discovery of nucleon resonances from pion-nucleon interactions. It was not until after the Albuquerque meeting in 1953 the experimentalists were able to persuade physicists about the existence of this phenomenon with the discovery of the P 33 resonance. The second and third resonances to be discovered, D 13 and F 15 , were seen as peaks in the total cross section for pion plus photoproduction, from 1956 onwards. Knowledge of pion-nucleon scattering has played an important role in the development of quark models. (UK)

  17. High pT charm photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbiendi, G.; Butterworth, J.M.

    1996-09-01

    The expected rates for charm-tagged jet photoproduction are evaluated for a number of tagging procedures, and some of the physics potential is discussed. Charm in jets is tagged using D * 's, μ's, or tracks from secondary vertices which might be identified in a microvertex detector. We find high expected event rates, leading to the possibility of placing strong constraints on the kinematics of charm production and on the gluon content of the proton and the charm content of the photon. (orig.)

  18. Status of Meson Photoproduction Experiments with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasyuk, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    A large part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to baryon spectroscopy. Meson photoproduction experiments are essential part of this program. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and availability of circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beams in combination with longitudinally and transversely polarized frozen spin targets provide unique conditions for this type of experiments. For the first time, a complete or nearly complete measurement became possible and will allow model independent extraction of the reaction amplitude. The measurements were complete with both proton and deuteron targets. An overview of the collected experimental data will be presented.

  19. Photoproduction of ω mesons off the proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wilson

    2015-10-01

    These data were included in the Bonn–Gatchina partial wave analysis (PWA. The dominant contribution to ω photoproduction near threshold was found to be the 3/2+ partial wave, which is primarily due to the sub-threshold N(17203/2+ resonance. At higher energies, pomeron-exchange was found to dominate whereas π-exchange remained small. These t-channel contributions as well as further contributions from nucleon resonances were necessary to describe the entire dataset: the 1/2−, 3/2−, and 5/2+ partial waves were also found to contribute significantly.

  20. Exclusive photoproduction of {upsilon} mesons at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-03-15

    The exclusive photoproduction reaction {gamma} p {yields} {upsilon} p has been studied with the ZEUS experiment in ep collisions at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 468 pb{sup -1}. The measurement covers the kinematic range 60

  1. Prompt photons in photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Zus, R.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Antunovic, B.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Boer, Y. de; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grell, B.R.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Marti, Ll.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nozicka, M.; Olsson, J.E.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Radescu, V.; Rurikova, Z.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Driesch, M. von den; Wissing, C.; Wuensch, E.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Volchinski, V.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Li, G.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Brinkmann, M.; Habib, S.; List, B.; Pokorny, B.; Toll, T.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Murin, P.; Tomasz, F.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Liptaj, A.; Olivier, B.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Petrukhin, A.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cerny, K.; Pejchal, O.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cozzika, G.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Rahmat, A.J.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Del Degan, M.; Grab, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Sauter, M.; Zimmermann, T.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Trinh, T.N.; Vallee, C.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Glushkov, I.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Piec, S.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Tchoulakov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Schoening, A.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Stella, B.; Tsakov, I.

    2010-01-01

    The production of prompt photons is measured in the photoproduction regime of electron-proton scattering at HERA. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 340 pb -1 collected by the H1 experiment. Cross sections are measured for photons with transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in the range 6 T γ γ γ and x p carried by the partons entering the hard scattering process. The correlation between the photon and the jet is also studied. The results are compared with QCD predictions based on the collinear and on the k T factorization approaches. (orig.) 7

  2. UV-visible degradation of boscalid--structural characterization of photoproducts and potential toxicity using in silico tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassalle, Yannick; Kinani, Aziz; Rifai, Ahmad; Souissi, Yasmine; Clavaguera, Carine; Bourcier, Sophie; Jaber, Farouk; Bouchonnet, Stéphane

    2014-05-30

    Boscalid is a carboximide fungicide mainly used for vineyard protection as well as for tomato, apple, blueberry and various ornamental cultivations. The structural elucidation of by-products arising from the UV-visible photodegradation of boscalid has been investigated by gas chromatography/multi-stage mass spectrometry (GC/MS(n) ) and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) couplings. The potential toxicities of transformation products were estimated by in silico calculations. Aqueous solutions of boscalid were irradiated up to 150 min in a self-made reactor equipped with a mercury lamp. Analyses were carried out using a gas chromatograph coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer operated in both electron ionization (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) modes and a liquid chromatograph coupled with a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer operated in electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. Multiple-stage collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments were performed to establish dissociation pathways of ions. The QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) T.E.S.T. program allowed the estimation of the toxicities of the by-products. Eight photoproducts were investigated. Chemical structures were proposed not only on the interpretation of multi-stage CID experiments, but also on kinetics data. These structures led us to suggest photodegradation pathways. Three photoproducts were finally detected in Lebanon in a real sample of grape leaves for which routine analysis had led to the detection of boscalid at 4 mg kg(-1). With one exception, the structures proposed for the photoproducts on the basis of mass spectra interpretation have not been reported in previous studies. In silico toxicity predictions showed that two photoproducts are potentially more toxic than the parent compound considering oral rat LD50 while five photoproducts may induce mutagenic toxicity. With the exception of one compound, all photoproducts may

  3. UV-visible degradation of boscalid- structural characterization of photoproducts and potential toxicity using in silico tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rifai, A.; Jaber, F.; Lassalle, Y.; Kinani, A.; Souissi, Y.; Clavaguera, C.; Bourcier, S.; Bouchonnet, St.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Boscalid is a carboximide fungicide mainly used for vineyard protection as well as for tomato, apple, blueberry and various ornamental cultivations. The structural elucidation of by-products arising from the UV-visible photodegradation of boscalid has been investigated by gas chromatography/multi-stage mass spectrometry (GC/MSn) and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) couplings. The potential toxicities of transformation products were estimated by in silico calculations. METHODS: Aqueous solutions of boscalid were irradiated up to 150 min in a self-made reactor equipped with a mercury lamp. Analyses were carried out using a gas chromatograph coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer operated in both electron ionization (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) modes and a liquid chromatograph coupled with a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer operated in electrospray ionization (ESI) mode. Multiple-stage collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments were performed to establish dissociation pathways of ions. The QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) T.E.S.T. program allowed the estimation of the toxicities of the by-products. RESULTS: Eight photoproducts were investigated. Chemical structures were proposed not only on the interpretation of multi-stage CID experiments, but also on kinetics data. These structures led us to suggest photodegradation pathways. Three photoproducts were finally detected in Lebanon in a real sample of grape leaves for which routine analysis had led to the detection of boscalid at 4 mg kg1. CONCLUSIONS: With one exception, the structures proposed for the photoproducts on the basis of mass spectra interpretation have not been reported in previous studies. In silico toxicity predictions showed that two photoproducts are potentially more toxic than the parent compound considering oral rat LD50 while five photoproducts may induce mutagenic toxicity. With the exception of one compound

  4. From meson-baryon scattering to meson photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mai, Maxim

    2013-09-01

    In the present work we investigate the properties of the lowest baryon resonances. The starting point of our analyses is the low-energy effective theory of quantum chromodynamics, called chiral perturbation theory. As such it describes the long-range observables in terms of the low-energy effects, while the high-energy effects are subsumed in the so-called low-energy constants. In the region of the aforesaid lowest baryon resonances any strict perturbative expansion fails and some resummation scheme is required. For this we employ the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) which guarantees the exact unitarity of the S-matrix and allows to generate resonances dynamically, however, abandoning some other basic principles of quantum field theory as described in chapter 2. Restricting the driving term of this equation to local terms of the second chiral order, we derive an exact solution of the BSE for meson-baryon scattering in chapter 2. Without putting the interaction kernel on shell we preserve the exact correspondence of this solution to an infinite chain of Feynman diagrams. In chapter 4 we apply this ansatz for antikaon-nucleon scattering, trying to get a new insight into the nature of the subthreshold resonance, i.e. {Lambda}(1405). The properties of this resonance have been debated for decades and in recent years it has again attracted a lot of attention by theoreticians since this resonance can be dynamically generated from the so-called chiral unitary approaches. Moreover, the recent measurement of the energy shift and width of kaonic hydrogen in the SIDDHARTA experiment at DA{Phi}NE has provided a very tight constraint on K{sup -}p scattering length. Typically, these approaches predict a two pole structure of {Lambda}(1405), but the question is how precise one can determine the position of these poles relying on data at and above the anti KN threshold. Moreover, we apply our framework for the analysis of pion-nucleon scattering in chapter 3. There we show that the

  5. Determination of activation energy of hydrogen diffusion in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Komal; Kulkarni, A.S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Yadav, C.S.; Saxena, M.K.; Tomar, B.S.; Ramakumar, K.L.; Sunil, Sourav; Singh, R.N.

    2013-01-01

    The present paper describes the study on the determination of diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in Zr-2.5%Nb alloy. Hydrogen was charged on Zr-2.5% Nb alloy electrolytically. After annealing at required temperature, hydrogen concentration at various depths from the charged end was determined employing hot vacuum extraction-quadrupole mass spectrometer (HVE-QMS). The depth profile was used to obtain the diffusion coefficient employing Fick's second law of diffusion. From the Arrhenius relation between diffusion coefficient and temperature, activation energy of hydrogen diffusion was calculated. (author)

  6. Associated photoproduction of charmed particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scribano, Angelo

    1982-01-01

    Charmed meson pairs have been photoproduced coherently on an active multilayer silicon target in the energy range 80-150 GeV. D antiD and F antiF state have been identified and an estimate of the lifetimes is given

  7. IAEA Activities on Application of Nuclear Techniques in Development and Characterization of Materials for Hydrogen Economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salame, P.; Zeman, A.; Mulhauser, F.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen and fuel cells can greatly contribute to a more sustainable less carbon-dependent global energy system. An effective and safe method for storage of hydrogen in solid materials is one of the greatest technologically challenging barriers of widespread introduction of hydrogen in global energy systems. However, aspects related to the development of effective materials for hydrogen storage and fuel cells are facing considerable technological challenges. To reach these goals, research efforts using a combination of advanced modeling, synthesis methods and characterization tools are required. Nuclear methods can play an effective role in the development and characterization of materials for hydrogen storage. Therefore, the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project to promote the application of nuclear techniques for investigation and characterization of new/improved materials relevant to hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. This paper gives an overview of the IAEA activities in this subject. (author)

  8. Photoproduction of Mesons off Light Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshelashvili, Irakli

    2011-01-01

    During the last few years, a series of experiments has been done at the ELSA accelerator in Bonn with the Crystal Barrel/TAPS setup and at the MAMI accelerator in Mainz with the Crystal Ball/TAPS setup. Photoproduction of light mesons off the deuteron and 3 He-nuclei has been studied in detail. We will report some of the most interesting results.A completely unexpected finding, is the pronounced structure in the excitation function of the γn → nη reaction around 1 GeV, which has no counterpart for the proton. Recent measurements at GRAAL, Sendai, ELSA [1] and MAMI estimate it's width below 50 MeV, which would be extremely narrow for a nucleon resonance at this excitation energy. In the experiment with the 3 He target, special attention was given to the threshold behavior of the γHe 3 reactions in view of possible indications for the formation of (quasi-)bound η-nucleus states, so-called η-mesic nuclei. A very strong threshold enhancement of coherent η-photoproduction off 3 He was found. In a new experiment, this reaction was measured with much better statistical accuracy compared to an earlier experiment at MAMI-B using the TAPS detector [2].

  9. Mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge for hydrogen production: Focusing on homoacetogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Jingjing; Jing, Yuhang; Zhang, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for hydrogen production with focus on homoacetogenesis, which mediated the consumption of H2 and CO2 for acetate production. Batch experiments showed that hydrogen yield of WAS increased...

  10. Hydrogen storage material, electrochemically active material, electrochemical cell and electronic equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a hydrogen storage material comprising an alloy of magnesium. The invention further relates to an electrochemically active material and an electrochemical cell provided with at least one electrode comprising such a hydrogen storage material. Also, the invention relates to

  11. Gold Supported on Graphene Oxide: An Active and Selective Catalyst for Phenylacetylene Hydrogenations at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shao, Lidong; Huang, Xing; Teschner, Detre

    2014-01-01

    A constraint to industrial implementation of gold-catalyzed alkyne hydrogenation is that the catalytic activity was always inferior to those of other noble metals. In this work, gold was supported on graphene oxide (Au/GO) and used in a hydrogenation application. A 99% selectivity toward styrene...

  12. Catalytic activation of molecular hydrogen in alkyne hydrogenation reactions by lanthanide metal vapor reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, W.J.; Bloom, I.; Engerer, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    A rotary metal vapor was used in the synthesis of Lu, Er, Nd, Sm, Yb, and La alkyne, diene, and phosphine complexes. A typical catalytic hydrogenation experiment is described. The lanthanide metal vapor product is dissolved in tetrahydrofuran or toluene and placed in a pressure reaction vessel 3-hexyne (or another substrate) is added, the chamber attached to a high vacuum line, cooled to -196 0 C, evacuated, warmed to ambient temperature and hydrogen is added. The solution is stirred magnetically while the pressure in monitored. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography. Rates and products of various systems are listed. This preliminary survey indicates that catalytic reaction chemistry is available to these metals in a wide range of coordination environments. Attempts to characterize these compounds are hampered by their paramagnetic nature and their tendency to polymerize

  13. Photoproduction in the Energy Range 70-200 GeV

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment continues the photoproduction studies of WA4 and WA57 up to the higher energies made available by the upgrading of the West Hall. An electron beam of energy 200 GeV is used to produce tagged photons in the range 65-180 GeV; The photon beam is incident on a 60 cm liquid hydrogen target in the Omega Spectrometer. A Ring Image Cherenkov detector provides pion/kaon separation up to 150 GeV/c. The Transition Radiation Detector extends the charged pion identification to the momentum range from about 80 GeV/c upwards. The large lead/liquid scintillator calorimeter built by the WA70 collaboration and the new lead/scintillating fibre det (Plug) are used for the detection of the $\\gamma$ rays produced by the interactions of the primary photons in the hydrogen target. \\\\ \\\\ The aim is to make a survey of photoproduction reactions up to photon energies of 200 GeV. The large aperture of the Omega Spectrometer will particularly enable study of fragmentation of the photon to states of high mass, up to @C 9 G...

  14. Two step novel hydrogen system using additives to enhance hydrogen release from the hydrolysis of alane and activated aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Motyka, Theodore

    2015-12-01

    A system for the generation of hydrogen for use in portable power systems is set forth utilizing a two-step process that involves the thermal decomposition of AlH.sub.3 (10 wt % H.sub.2) followed by the hydrolysis of the activated aluminum (Al*) byproduct to release additional H.sub.2. Additionally, a process in which water is added directly without prior history to the AlH.sub.3:PA composite is also disclosed.

  15. Analysis of near-term production and market opportunities for hydrogen and related activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, R.; Leach, S. [National Hydrogen Association, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper summarizes current and planned activities in the areas of hydrogen production and use, near-term venture opportunities, and codes and standards. The rationale for these efforts is to assess industry interest and engage in activities that move hydrogen technologies down the path to commercialization. Some of the work presented in this document is a condensed, preliminary version of reports being prepared under the DOE/NREL contract. In addition, the NHA work funded by Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation (WSRC) to explore the opportunities and industry interest in a Hydrogen Research Center is briefly described. Finally, the planned support of and industry input to the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel (HTAP) on hydrogen demonstration projects is discussed.

  16. Activities of UNIDO-ICHET: On a Mission to Convert the World to Hydrogen Economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbir, Frano; Veziroglu, T. Nejat; Ture, Engin; Dziedzic, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    United Nations Industrial Development Organization - International Centre for Hydrogen Energy Technologies (UNIDO-ICHET) is an autonomous technological institution within the auspices of UNIDO, located in Istanbul Turkey. UNIDO-ICHET''s mission is to act as a bridge between developed and developing countries in spanning the gap between research and development organizations, innovative enterprises and the market-place, by stimulating appropriate applications of hydrogen energy technologies and the hydrogen energy related industrial development throughout the world in general, and in the developing countries in particular. The activities of UNIDO-ICHET include initiation of demonstration and pilot projects worldwide, establishment of a database on hydrogen energy technology and R and D activities, applied research and development, testing services, and education and training. UNIDO-ICHET is also assisting developing countries in adopting their Hydrogen Road-maps, by working with local governments, universities and industries, with other international organizations having similar mission, and with the leading technology and energy companies. (authors)

  17. Activity of bimetallic catalysts (Pt + Me)/A12030 in butane hydrogenolysis and benzene hydrogenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharkov, B.B.; Rubinov, A.Z.

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluate the decomposing and hydrogenating activity of some Me/Al 2 0 3 0 and (Pt + Me)/Al 203 catalysis for the reactions of butane hydrogenolysis and conversion of benzene to cyclohexane. The temperature was 180-300 C for butane transformation and 150 C for benzene hydrogenation. During both reactions some initial decrease of catalytic activity which stabilized over 2-3 h was observed. The results show that roasting Re-containing reforming catalysts at fairly high temperatures (500-550 C) balances maximum hydrogenating and average splitting activities, thus guaranteeing high resistance to coke deposition while preserving the necessary selectivity. The decreased hydrogenating capacity of Ir/A1 2 0 3 0 and (Pt + Ir)/A1 23 0 catalysts after roasting at 500 C indicates insufficient thermal stability, which can be why renewing the initial activity of iridium containing forming catalysts by oxidating regeneration is difficult

  18. Modeling and control design of hydrogen production process for an active hydrogen/wind hybrid power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Tao; Francois, Bruno [L2EP, Ecole Centrale de Lille, Cite Scientifique, BP48, 59651, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2009-01-15

    This paper gives a control oriented modeling of an electrolyzer, as well as the ancillary system for the hydrogen production process. A Causal Ordering Graph of all necessary equations has been used to illustrate the global scheme for an easy understanding. The model is capable of characterizing the relations among the different physical quantities and can be used to determine the control system ensuring efficient and reliable operation of the electrolyzer. The proposed control method can manage the power flow and the hydrogen flow. The simulation results have highlighted the variation domains and the relations among the different physical quantities. The model has also been experimentally tested in real time with a Hardware-In-the-Loop Simulation before being integrated in the test bench of the active wind energy conversion system. (author)

  19. Hydrogen and fuel cell activity report - France 2010; Rapport d'activites Hydrogene et Piles a combustible - France 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The report gathers the main outstanding facts which occurred in France in the field of hydrogen and fuel cells in 2010. After having noticed some initiatives (the Grenelle II law, an investment package, the new role of the CEA, the new role of the IFP), the report presents several projects and programs regarding hydrogen: ANR programs, creation of a national structure (the HyPaC platform), regional initiatives and local actions, colloquiums and meetings in France and in the world, research projects (photo-synthesis as a new electric energy source), a technical-economic investigation (HyFrance3), demonstrator projects (the Althytude project by GDF and Suez, the Plathee hybrid locomotive by the SNCF, the H2E project, the Zero CO{sub 2} sailing boat, and the Myrte project), educational applications, activity in small and medium-sized enterprises (CETH, SAGIM, HYCAN, McPhy, N-GHY).

  20. Vector meson photoproduction with a linearly polarized beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, V.; Nys, J.; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Jackura, A.; Pilloni, A.; Sherrill, N.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Fox, G.; Joint Physics Analysis Center

    2018-05-01

    We propose a model based on Regge theory to describe photoproduction of light vector mesons. We fit the SLAC data and make predictions for the energy and momentum-transfer dependence of the spin-density matrix elements in photoproduction of ω , ρ0 and ϕ mesons at Eγ˜8.5 GeV , which are soon to be measured at Jefferson Lab.

  1. RAYPHOTON version 2. 0 - an interface for HERA photoproduction physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, N.H.; Doyle, A.T. (Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); DeRoeck, A. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany). Werner-Heisenberg Inst.)

    1992-04-01

    RAYPHOTON allows photoproduction of both light and heavy quarks for the direct and resolved photon. It is a convolution of the Weiszaecker-Williams approximation with the cross section for the hard interaction. The hard interaction cross sections and colour flows are set up using the generators for real photoproduction LUCIFER, for the direct photon, and TWISTER, for the resolved photon. It includes QCD cascades in the colour dipole formalism, via an interface, RADIATE, to the ARIADNE package. (orig.).

  2. Engineering Synechocystis PCC6803 for hydrogen production: influence on the tolerance to oxidative and sugar stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Ortega-Ramos

    Full Text Available In the prospect of engineering cyanobacteria for the biological photoproduction of hydrogen, we have studied the hydrogen production machine in the model unicellular strain Synechocystis PCC6803 through gene deletion, and overexpression (constitutive or controlled by the growth temperature. We demonstrate that the hydrogenase-encoding hoxEFUYH operon is dispensable to standard photoautotrophic growth in absence of stress, and it operates in cell defense against oxidative (H₂O₂ and sugar (glucose and glycerol stresses. Furthermore, we showed that the simultaneous over-production of the proteins HoxEFUYH and HypABCDE (assembly of hydrogenase, combined to an increase in nickel availability, led to an approximately 20-fold increase in the level of active hydrogenase. These novel results and mutants have major implications for those interested in hydrogenase, hydrogen production and redox metabolism, and their connections with environmental conditions.

  3. Isolation of non-sulphur photosynthetic bacterial strains efficient in hydrogen production at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.P.; Srivastava, S.C. (Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (IN). Centre of Advanced Study in Botany)

    1991-01-01

    Four strains of non-sulphur photosynthetic bacteria were isolated from root zone associations of aquatic plants like Azolla, Salvinia and Eichhornia, as well as the deep-water rice. Based on the gross cell morphology and pigmentation, the isolates resembled Rhodopseudomonas sp. and have been designated as BHU strains 1 to 4, respectively. When subjected to elevated temperature (from 33-45{sup o}C), substantial growth/hydrogen production could be observed only in strains 1 and 4. Strains 2 and 3 on the other hand, showed diminished growth and negligible hydrogen photoproduction. The BHU strains 1 and 4 have been selected as the most active (thermostable) hydrogen producing strains of local origin as far as the Indian tropical climate is concerned. (author).

  4. Exclusive Meson Photoproduction off Bound Nucleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strakovsky, Igor; Briscoe, William

    2017-09-01

    An overview of the GW SAID group effort to analyze pion photoproduction on the neutron-target will be given. The disentangling of the isoscalar and isovector EM couplings of N * and Δ * resonances does require compatible data on both proton and neutron targets. The final-state interactions play a critical role in the state-of-the-art analysis in extraction of the γn -> π N data from the deuteron target experiments. Then resonance couplings determined by the SAID PWA technique are compared to previous findings. The neutron program is an important component of the current JLab, MAMI-C, SPring-8, ELSA, and ELPH studies. DOE Research Grant DE``SC0016583.

  5. Putative Enzymes of UV Photoproduct Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J. Sakofsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the biological relevance of two S. acidocaldarius proteins to the repair of UV photoproducts, the corresponding genes (Saci_1227 and Saci_1096 were disrupted, and the phenotypes of the resulting mutants were examined by various genetic assays. The disruption used integration by homologous recombination of a functional but heterologous pyrE gene, promoted by short sequences attached to both ends via PCR. The phenotypic analyses of the disruptants confirmed that ORF Saci_1227 encodes a DNA photolyase which functions in vivo, but they could not implicate ORF Saci_1096 in repair of UV- or other externally induced DNA damage despite its similarity to genes encoding UV damage endonucleases. The success of the gene-disruption strategy, which used 5′ extensions of PCR primers to target cassette integration, suggests potential advantages for routine construction of Sulfolobus strains.

  6. Deuteron Compton scattering below pion photoproduction threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchuk, M. I.; L'vov, A. I.

    2000-07-01

    Deuteron Compton scattering below pion photoproduction threshold is considered in the framework of the nonrelativistic diagrammatic approach with the Bonn OBE potential. A complete gauge-invariant set of diagrams is taken into account which includes resonance diagrams without and with NN-rescattering and diagrams with one- and two-body seagulls. The seagull operators are analyzed in detail, and their relations with free- and bound-nucleon polarizabilities are discussed. It is found that both dipole and higher-order polarizabilities of the nucleon are required for a quantitative description of recent experimental data. An estimate of the isospin-averaged dipole electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon and the polarizabilities of the neutron is obtained from the data.

  7. Deuteron Compton scattering below pion photoproduction threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levchuk, M.I.; L'vov, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    Deuteron Compton scattering below pion photoproduction threshold is considered in the framework of the nonrelativistic diagrammatic approach with the Bonn OBE potential. A complete gauge-invariant set of diagrams is taken into account which includes resonance diagrams without and with NN-rescattering and diagrams with one- and two-body seagulls. The seagull operators are analyzed in detail, and their relations with free- and bound-nucleon polarizabilities are discussed. It is found that both dipole and higher-order polarizabilities of the nucleon are required for a quantitative description of recent experimental data. An estimate of the isospin-averaged dipole electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon and the polarizabilities of the neutron is obtained from the data

  8. Deuteron Compton scattering below pion photoproduction threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levchuk, M.I. E-mail: levchuk@dragon.bas-net.by; L' vov, A.I. E-mail: lvov@x4u.lebedev.ru

    2000-07-17

    Deuteron Compton scattering below pion photoproduction threshold is considered in the framework of the nonrelativistic diagrammatic approach with the Bonn OBE potential. A complete gauge-invariant set of diagrams is taken into account which includes resonance diagrams without and with NN-rescattering and diagrams with one- and two-body seagulls. The seagull operators are analyzed in detail, and their relations with free- and bound-nucleon polarizabilities are discussed. It is found that both dipole and higher-order polarizabilities of the nucleon are required for a quantitative description of recent experimental data. An estimate of the isospin-averaged dipole electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon and the polarizabilities of the neutron is obtained from the data.

  9. Photoproduction of rhorho and rhof systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.; Axon, T.J.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Brookes, G.R.; Bunn, J.J.; Bussey, P.J.; Clegg, A.B.; Dainton, J.B.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Ellison, R.L.; Flower, P.; Flynn, P.J.; Galbraith, W.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hughes-Jones, R.E.; Hutton, J.S.; Ibbotson, M.; Jakob, H.P.; Jung, M.; Kemp, M.A.R.; Kumar, B.R.; Laberrigue, J.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lane, J.B.; Levy, J.M.; Liebenau, V.; McClatchey, R.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J.A.G.; Morris, J.V.; Newton, D.; Paterson, C.; Paul, E.; Raine, C.; Reidenbach, M.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schloesser, A.; Sharp, P.H.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Thompson, R.J.; La Vaissiere, D. de; Waite, A.P.; Worsell, M.F.; Yiou, T.P.

    1984-01-01

    A study is made of photoproduction of rhorho, rhof, rhoω and ωω systems, produced with masses > 1.8 GeV at high Feynman chisub(F) by photons of energy 20-70 GeV. There is evidence for a peak at a mass of approx.= 2.3 GeV with a width of approx.= 0.25 GeV in rho 0 f 0 and rhosup(+-)f 0 combinations. Angular distributions, in the 4π CM system, are found to be isotropic for these states, in sharp contrast to the strongly peaked angular distribution found for rho 0 rho 0 combinations at the same mass. (orig.)

  10. Suppression factors in diffractive photoproduction of dijets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasen, Michael; Kramer, Gustav

    2010-06-01

    After new publications of H1 data for the diffractive photoproduction of dijets, which overlap with the earlier published H1 data and the recently published data of the ZEUS collaboration, have appeared, we have recalculated the cross sections for this process in next-to-leading order (NLO) of perturbative QCD to see whether they can be interpreted consistently. The results of these calculations are compared to the data of both collaborations. We find that the NLO cross sections disagree with the data, showing that factorization breaking occurs at that order. If direct and resolved contributions are both suppressed by the same amount, the global suppression factor depends on the transverse-energy cut. However, by suppressing only the resolved contribution, also reasonably good agreement with all the data is found with a suppression factor independent of the transverse-energy cut. (orig.)

  11. Prompt Photons in Photoproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2010-01-01

    The production of prompt photons is measured in the photoproduction regime of electron-proton scattering at HERA. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 340 pb^-1 collected by the H1 experiment. Cross sections are measured for photons with transverse momentum and pseudorapidity in the range 6 < Et < 15 GeV and -1.0 < eta < 2.4, respectively. Cross sections for events with an additional jet are measured as a function of the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the jet, and as a function of the fractional momenta x_gamma and x_p carried by the partons entering the hard scattering process. The correlation between the photon and the jet is also studied. The results are compared with QCD predictions based on the collinear and on the k_T factorisation approaches.

  12. High-ET dijet photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2007-06-01

    The cross section for high-E T dijet production in photoproduction has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 81.8 pb -1 . The events were required to have a virtuality of the incoming pho- ton, Q 2 , of less than 1 GeV 2 and a photon-proton centre-of-mass energy in the range 142 γp T jet1 >20 GeV and E T jet2 >15 GeV and pseudorapidity requirements of -1 jet1,2 jet <2.5. The measurements show sensitivity to the parton distributions in the photon and proton and effects beyond next-to-leading order in QCD. Hence these data can be used to constrain further the parton densities in the proton and photon. (orig.)

  13. Photoproduction at high energy and high intensity

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The photon beam used for this programme is tagged and provides a large flux up to very high energies (150-200 GeV). It is also hadron-free, since it is obtained by a two-step conversion method. A spectrometer is designed to exploit this beam and to perform a programme of photoproduction with a high level of sensitivity (5-50 events/picobarn).\\\\ \\\\ Priority will be given to the study of processes exhibiting the point-like behaviour of the photon, especially deep inelastic Compton scattering. The spectrometer has two magnets. Charged tracks are measured by MWPC's located only in field-free regions. Three calorimeters provide a large coverage for identifying and measuring electrons and photons. An iron filter downstream identifies muons. Most of the equipment is existing and recuperated from previous experiments.

  14. Hard photoproduction of multiparticle hadronic final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, E.

    1992-02-01

    Recent results from fixed-target experiments on the photoproduction of hadrons have shown that pointlike photon interaction processes of lowest order in QCD can be studied. These are the flavour-dependent γg-fusion process which is the keyprocess to explore the gluon structure function of the nucleon at small x g and the QCD-Compton process which is a tool to study gluon fragmentation. The status of experimental results and comparison to QCD prediction is reviewed. The γg-fusion process will be measured in ep scatterings with almost real photons at HERA photon energies (equivalent to up to 50 TeV in the rest frame of the proton) down to x g > or approx. 10 -4 . Resolved (partonlike) photon interactions are predicted to be measurable at these high energies, too. (orig.)

  15. Photoproduction of scalar mesons at CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandavar, Shloka; Hicks, Kenneth; Weygand, Dennis; CLAS Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A single gluon, which carries color charge, cannot exist independently outside a hadron. Lattice QCD calculations in pure SU(3), however, predict the existence of glueballs which are bound states of two or more gluons. In the real world, the challenge to identify glueballs experimentally is the fact they mix with meson states. The f0 (1500) is one of several candidates for the lightest glueball, with JPC =0++ . We investigate the presence of this particle in photoproduction by analyzing the reaction γp -->fJ p -->KS0KS0 p --> 2 (π+π-) p . This reaction was studied using data from the g12 experiment performed using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. A preliminary partial wave analysis, performed on the KS0KS0 invariant mass spectrum, will be presented. These results update those presented for this reaction channel at previous conferences. This work is supported by grant from NSF.

  16. Photoproduction of scalar mesons at medium energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva, M. L. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-090, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Machado, M. V. [High Energy Physics Phenomenology Group, GFPAE IF-UFRGS, Caixa Postal 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    In this work we will focus on photoproduction of mesons states a{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(1500) and f{sub 0}(1710). The f{sub 0}(1500) and f{sub 0}(1710) mesons will be considered in distinct mixing possibilities and assuming that a{sub 0}(980) is member of the ground-state nonet. The theoretical formalism is the Regge approach with reggeized {rho} and {omega} exchange. The differential and integrated total cross section are computed for the cases of the mesons a{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(1500) and f{sub 0}(1710) focusing the GlueX energy regime with photon energy E = 9 GeV.

  17. Near-threshold charged pion photoproduction from 13C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeRose, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    Differential cross sections to discrete final states have been measured for both positive and negative pion photo-production on 13 C at 90 0 in the lab at pion energies of 18, 29, and 41 MeV. Measurements were made using a fixed angle magnetic spectrometer located in the 14 0 area of the MIT Bates linear accelerator. Pions were detected using a 90 channel multi-wire proportional counter in the focal plane along with a backup array consisting of three 1/16'' thick plastic scintillator detectors and a 1/2'' thick Cerenkov detector. Positive pion photo-production cross sections were obtained for the excitation of the 3/2 - ground state and for the 3.45 MeV first excited state of 13 B. Negative pion photo-production cross sections were obtained for the excitation of the 1/2 - ground state, and the 3/2 to 3.51 MeV and 5/2 to 7.39 MeV excited states of 13 N. The measured positive pion photo-production ground state cross sections are in reasonable agreement wth theoretical calculations. However, there is a large discrepancy between the measured negative pion photoproduction ground state cross sections and the theoretical values. There are no theoretical calculations available for comparison with the excited state measurements in either positive or negative pion photoproduction on 13 C

  18. First time measurements of polarization observables for the charged cascade hyperon in photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bono, Jason [Florida Intl Univ., Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-08-31

    The parity violating weak decay of hyperons offers a valuable means of measuring their polarization, providing insight into the production of strange quarks and the matter they compose. Jefferson Lab's CLAS collaboration has utilized this property of hyperons, publishing the most precise polarization measurements for the Lambda and Sigma in both photoproduction and electroproduction to date. In contrast, cascades, which contain two strange quarks, can only be produced through indirect processes and as a result, exhibit low cross sections thus remaining experimentally elusive.

    At present, there are two aspects in cascade physics where progress has been minimal: characterizing their production mechanism, which lacks theoretical and experimental developments, and observation of the numerous excited cascade resonances that are required to exist by flavor SU(3)F symmetry. However, CLAS data were collected in 2008 with a luminosity of 68 pb^-1 using a circularly polarized photon beam with energies up to 5.45 GeV, incident on a liquid hydrogen target. This dataset is, at present, the world's largest for meson photoproduction in its energy range and provides a unique opportunity to study cascade physics with polarization measurements.

    The current analysis explores hyperon production through the yp -> K^+ K^+ Xi^- reaction by providing the first ever determination of spin observables P, Cx and Cz for the cascade. Three of our primary goals are to test the only cascade photoproduction model in existence, examine the underlying processes that give rise to hyperon polarization, and to stimulate future theoretical developments while providing constraints for their parameters. Our research is part of a broader program to understand the production of strange quarks and hadrons with strangeness. The remainder of this document discusses the motivation behind such research, the method of data collection, details of their analysis, and the significance of

  19. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand.

  20. Ford/BASF/UM Activities in Support of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veenstra, Mike [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Purewal, Justin [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Xu, Chunchuan [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Yang, Jun [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Blaser, Rachel [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Sudik, Andrea [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Siegel, Don [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ming, Yang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Liu, Dong' an [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chi, Hang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gaab, Manuela [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Arnold, Lena [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Muller, Ulrich [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2015-06-30

    revealed cost gaps and opportunities that identified a storage system that was lower cost than a 700 bar compressed system. Finally, we led the HSECoE efforts devoted to characterizing and enhancing metal organic framework (MOF) storage materials. This report serves as a final documentation of the Ford-UM-BASF project contributions to the HSECoE during the 6-year timeframe of the Center. The activities of the HSECoE have impacted the broader goals of the DOE-EERE and USDRIVE, leading to improved understanding in the engineering of materials-based hydrogen storage systems. This knowledge is a prerequisite to the development of a commercially-viable hydrogen storage system.

  1. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor ePuerto-Galán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs, thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen- and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  2. [Hydrogen production and enzyme activity of acidophilic strain X-29 at different C/N ratio].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu-bo; Xing, De-feng; Ren, Nan-qi; Zhao, Li-hua; Song, Ye-ying

    2006-04-01

    Some fermentative bacteria can produce hydrogen by utilizing carbohydrate and other kinds of organic compounds as substrates. Hydrogen production was also determined by both the limiting of growth and related enzyme activity in energy metabolism. Carbon and nitrogen are needed for the growth and metabolism of microorganisms. In addition, the carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio can influence the material metabolized and the energy produced. In order to improve the hydrogen production efficiency of the bacteria, we analyzed the effect of different C/N ratios on hydrogen production and the related enzyme activities in the acidophilic strain X-29 using batch test. The results indicate that the differences in the metabolism level and enzyme activity are obvious at different C/N ratios. Although the difference in liquid fermentative products produced per unit of biomass is not obvious, hydrogen production is enhanced at a specifically determined ratio. At a C/N ratio of 14 the accumulative hydrogen yield of strain X-29 reaches the maximum, 2210.9 mL/g. At different C/N ratios, the expression of hydrogenase activity vary; the activity of hydrogenase decrease quickly after reaching a maximum along with the fermentation process, but the time of expression is short. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) tend to stabilize after reaching a peak along with the fermentation process, the difference in expression activity is little, and the expression period is long at different C/N ratios. At a C/N ratio of 14 hydrogenase and ADH reach the maximum 2.88 micromol x (min x mg)(-1) and 33.2 micromol x (min x mg)(-1), respectively. It is shown that the C/N ratio has an important effect on enhancing hydrogen production and enzyme activity.

  3. Hydrogen behaviour in the aged low activation martensitic steel F82H for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamati, G.

    1997-10-01

    A time dependent permeation method is used to measure the permeability, diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen in the low activation martensitic steel F82H aged for 2000 h under vacuum at 773 K. The measurements cover the temperature range from 373 to 723 K which includes the onset of hydrogen trapping effects on diffusivity and solubility. The results are interpreted using a trapping model. The number of trap sites and their average energies for hydrogen in the aged F82H steel are determined. These data are compared with those obtained for deuterium in F82H steel

  4. Multifaceted catalytic hydrogenation of amides via diverse activation of a sterically confined bipyridine-ruthenium framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takashi; Naruto, Masayuki; Toda, Katsuaki; Shimomura, Taiki; Saito, Susumu

    2017-05-16

    Amides are ubiquitous and abundant in nature and our society, but are very stable and reluctant to salt-free, catalytic chemical transformations. Through the activation of a "sterically confined bipyridine-ruthenium (Ru) framework (molecularly well-designed site to confine adsorbed H 2 in)" of a precatalyst, catalytic hydrogenation of formamides through polyamide is achieved under a wide range of reaction conditions. Both C=O bond and C-N bond cleavage of a lactam became also possible using a single precatalyst. That is, catalyst diversity is induced by activation and stepwise multiple hydrogenation of a single precatalyst when the conditions are varied. The versatile catalysts have different structures and different resting states for multifaceted amide hydrogenation, but the common structure produced upon reaction with H 2 , which catalyzes hydrogenation, seems to be "H-Ru-N-H."

  5. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  6. Photoproduction of the K= K0-(1750)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Ryan Edward

    2003-01-01

    While photoproduction has often been advertised as an important environment in which to study light meson spectroscopy, solid experimental results are sparse. In fact, beyond the relatively straightforward photoproduction of the ρ, ω, and ψ mesons, the few results of exclusive photoproduction that do exist are poorly understood, and several, perhaps, have even been misinterpreted. After extensively reviewing the sometimes tenuous history of the exclusive photoproduction of the ''p'(1600),'' the ''ωπ 0 (1250),'' the ''ω(1650),'' and the ''K + K - (1750),'' new results from the E831/FOCUS photoproduction experiment at Fermilab are presented which address the interpretation of the K + K - (1750). This enhancement in low-p T K + K - pairs at a mass near 1750 MeV/c 2 has been observed by several previous photoproduction experiments, but, despite several apparent inconsistencies, it has always been interpreted as the J PC = 1 -- ψ(1680) meson. With nearly two orders of magnitude more events than any previous observation of the K + K - (1750), and based on precise measurements of its mass and width, and its absence from the K*K final state, the FOCUS data can finally render this interpretation implausible. In addition, several steps have been taken towards establishing a new interpretation. Based on limited angular analyses of its decay and the beam energy dependence of its production, they argue that, in the absence of any wild interference scenarios, the K + K - (1750) has J PC ≠ 1 -- , and, in fact, the most likely assignment appears to be 2 ++ . It is hoped that this work can help set the stage for future reevaluations and new insights in photoproduction

  7. Photoproduction and Radiative Decay of eta' Meson in CLAS at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbianda Njencheu, Georgie [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    In this work the η' meson photoproduction cross sections as well as the distribution of the di-pion invariant mass, m(π+π-), in the radiative decay mode n' -> π+π-γ have been measured using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility using tagged incident photons in the center-of-mass energy range 1.96 GeV - 2.72 GeV. The measurements are performed on a liquid hydrogen target in the reaction γ π -> π η'(η'-> π+π-γ). The analysis is based on the highest statistics collected in this decay channel in comparison to other experiments reported so far. The n' photoproduction cross sections measured with radiative decay are in a good agreement with results of previous publication from the same data set in CLAS obtained through η' -> π+π-γ decay mode. Two free parameters, α and Β, are extracted from a model-independent fit to the m(π+π-) distribution and their values are found to agree well with recent theoretical expectations. The results of both parameters confirm the existence of the box anomaly, ρ-ω mixing and effects of the a2(1320) tensor meson in the radiative decay of η'.

  8. Photon beam asymmetry Σ for η and η′ photoproduction from the proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Collins

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the linearly-polarized photon beam asymmetry Σ for photoproduction from the proton of η and η′ mesons are reported. A linearly-polarized tagged photon beam produced by coherent bremsstrahlung was incident on a cryogenic hydrogen target within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Results are presented for the γp→ηp reaction for incident photon energies from 1.070 to 1.876 GeV, and from 1.516 to 1.836 GeV for the γp→η′p reaction. For γp→ηp, the data reported here considerably extend the range of measurements to higher energies, and are consistent with the few previously published measurements for this observable near threshold. For γp→η′p, the results obtained are consistent with the few previously published measurements for this observable near threshold, but also greatly expand the incident photon energy coverage for that reaction. Initial analysis of the data reported here with the Bonn–Gatchina model strengthens the evidence for four nucleon resonances – the N(18951/2−, N(19003/2+, N(21001/2+ and N(21203/2− resonances – which presently lack the “four-star” status in the current Particle Data Group compilation, providing examples of how these new measurements help refine models of the photoproduction process.

  9. Photon beam asymmetry Σ for η and η‧ photoproduction from the proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, P.; Ritchie, B. G.; Dugger, M.; Anisovich, A. V.; Döring, M.; Klempt, E.; Nikonov, V. A.; Rönchen, D.; Sadasivan, D.; Sarantsev, A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Balossino, I.; Bashkanov, M.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, Frank Thanh; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Gleason, C.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khachatryan, M.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wei, X.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.

    2017-08-01

    Measurements of the linearly-polarized photon beam asymmetry Σ for photoproduction from the proton of η and η‧ mesons are reported. A linearly-polarized tagged photon beam produced by coherent bremsstrahlung was incident on a cryogenic hydrogen target within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Results are presented for the γp → ηp reaction for incident photon energies from 1.070 to 1.876 GeV, and from 1.516 to 1.836 GeV for the γp →η‧ p reaction. For γp → ηp, the data reported here considerably extend the range of measurements to higher energies, and are consistent with the few previously published measurements for this observable near threshold. For γp →η‧ p, the results obtained are consistent with the few previously published measurements for this observable near threshold, but also greatly expand the incident photon energy coverage for that reaction. Initial analysis of the data reported here with the Bonn-Gatchina model strengthens the evidence for four nucleon resonances - the N (1895) 1 /2-, N (1900) 3 /2+, N (2100) 1 /2+ and N (2120) 3 /2- resonances - which presently lack the ;four-star; status in the current Particle Data Group compilation, providing examples of how these new measurements help refine models of the photoproduction process.

  10. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  11. Slow positron studies of hydrogen activation/passivation on SiO2/Si(100) interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, K.G.; Asoka-Kumar, P.

    1991-01-01

    The hydrogen atoms are one of the most common impurity species found in semiconductor systems owing to its large diffusivity, and are easily incorporated either in a controlled process like in ion implantation or in an uncontrolled process like the one at the fabrication stage. Hydrogen can passivate dangling bonds and dislocations in these systems and hence can be used to enhance the electrical properties. In a SiO 2 /Si system, hydrogen can passivate electronic states at the interface and can alter the fixed or mobile charges in the oxide layer. Since hydrogen is present in almost all of the environments of SiO 2 /Si wafer fabrication, the activation energy of hydrogen atoms is of paramount importance to a proper understanding of SiO 2 /Si based devices and has not been measured on the technologically most important Si(100) face. There are no direct, nondestructive methods available to observe hydrogen injection into the oxide layer and subsequent diffusion. This study uses the positrons as a ''sensitive'', nondestructive probe to observe hydrogen interaction in the oxide layer and the interface region. We also describe a new way of characterizing the changes in the density of the interface states under a low-temperature annealing using positrons. 9 refs., 6 figs

  12. Slow positron studies of hydrogen activation/passivation on SiO2/Si(100) interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, K. G.; Asoka-Kumar, P.

    The hydrogen atoms are one of the most common impurity species found in semiconductor systems owing to its large diffusivity, and are easily incorporated either in a controlled process like in ion implantation or in an uncontrolled process like the one at the fabrication stage. Hydrogen can passivate dangling bonds and dislocations in these systems and hence can be used to enhance the electrical properties. In a SiO2/Si system, hydrogen can passivate electronic states at the interface and can alter the fixed or mobile charges in the oxide layer. Since hydrogen is present in almost all of the environments of SiO2/Si wafer fabrication, the activation energy of hydrogen atoms is of paramount importance to a proper understanding of SiO2/Si based devices and has not been measured on the technologically most important Si(100) face. There are no direct, nondestructive methods available to observe hydrogen injection into the oxide layer and subsequent diffusion. The positrons are used as a 'sensitive', nondestructive probe to observe hydrogen interaction in the oxide layer and the interface region. A new way is described of characterizing the changes in the density of the interface states under a low temperature annealing using positrons.

  13. Realizing nanographene activated by a vacancy to solve hydrogen storage problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnardianto, Gagus Ketut; Maruyama, Isao; Kusakabe, Koichi

    We found a triply hydrogenated vacancy (V111) in nanographene reduces an activation barrier of adsorption-desorption process in both ways in an equal manner from the known values for pristine graphene as well as those of other hydrogenated vacancies of graphene. This finding may give a key to overcome existing problems in the hydrogen uptake and release processes in known hydrogen storage materials, e.g. graphene and organic hydrides (OHs) in near ambient operation temperature. In this study, we used DFT-NEB simulation to estimate the barrier height, which is supported by realized real experiments. We consider a nanographene molecule (VANG) which contains V111 with armchair structure at the periphery. We found interesting feature in comparable values of energy barriers for both hydrogen uptake and release, where hydrogenation process is even a little bit endothermic and dehydrogenation is a little but exothermic nature. Thus, this material structure acts as ``self-catalytic properties'', which has an important role in reducing an energy barrier and as a trapping site for hydrogen serving a new material prevailing other hopeful candidates. The work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI in Science of Atomic Layers\\x9D.

  14. Hydrogen atom scrambling in selectively labeled anionic peptides upon collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Nicolai; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg; Roepstorff, Peter

    2008-01-01

    have now measured the level of hydrogen scrambling in a deprotonated, selectively labeled peptide using MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results conclusively show that hydrogen scrambling is prevalent in the deprotonated peptide upon collisional activation. The amide hydrogens ((1)H....../(2)H) have migrated extensively in the anionic peptide, thereby erasing the original regioselective deuteration pattern obtained in solution....

  15. Study of peculiarities of hydrogen isotopes mixture permeation through low activated steel F82H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenzhin, Ye.A.; Tazhibayeva, I.L; Kulsartov, T.V.; Shestakov, V.P.; Chikhray, Ye.V.; Afanasev, S.E.; Zheldak, Yu.L.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The problem of diffusion tritium leakage through blanket materials of future fusion device makes some constructive difficulties concerned with protection of personnel and environment and also with losses of tritium, which is planned to be used in the same device. One of the little-studied problems in the tritium leakage process in Fusion Power Plant is that in fact tritium will penetrate through materials while other hydrogen isotopes are present. These are deuterium and hydrogen which always are present in metals. Therefore, for evaluation of tritium leakage in future Fusion Power Plant under such conditions it is necessary to have experimental data about permeation of these hydrogen isotopes through the structure materials.One of proposed structure materials of fusion reactor blanket is low activated steel F82H. The experiment results on evaluation of .hydrogen, deuterium and its mixture interaction parameters with steel F82H are shown in this work. The tests were carried out within temperature range 273-973 K under inlet hydrogen pressure of 100-2000 Pa. Diffusivity, deuterium and hydrogen permeation constants for low activated steel F82H was determined from experiment results. Those experimental results were used for created phenomenology model which describes hydrogen isotope penetration through tube sample from hydrogen isotopes mixture. That model was used so determining the ratios of desorption rates (D-D, D-H, H-H) on outlet side of sample. Using of so obtained results, we can correctly evaluate, the titanium leakage from blanket of fusion machine which will be constructed using low activated steel F82H

  16. Influence of activated carbon amended ASBR on anaerobic fermentative hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Li; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Qi

    2013-01-01

    The effect of activated carbon amended ASBR on fermentative bio-hydgrogen production from glucose was evaluated at hydraulic retention time (HRTs) ranging from 48 h to 12 h with initial pH of 6.0 at the system temperature of 60°C. Experimental results showed that the performance of activated carbon...... amended anazrobic seguencs batch reactor (ASBRs) was more stable than that of ASBRs without activated carbon addition regarding on hydrogen production and pH. Higher hydrogen yield(HY) and hydrogen producing rate(HPR) were observed in the activated carbon amended ASBRs, with 65%, 63%, 54%, 56% enhancement...... of hydrogen yield in smaller size activated carbon amended reactor under the tested HRT ranges, and the maximum HPR of (7.09±0.31)L·(L·d)-1 and HY of (1.42±0.03) mol·mol-1 was obtained at HRT of 12h. The major soluble products form hydrogen fermentation were n-butyric acid and acetic acid, accounting for 46...

  17. Hydrogenation active sites of unsupported molybdenum sulfide catalysts for hydroprocessing heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Y.; Araki, Y.; Honna, K. [Tsukuba-branch, Advanced Catalyst Research Laboratory, Petroleum Energy Center, 1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, 305-8565 Ibaraki (Japan); Miki, Y.; Sato, K.; Shimada, H. [National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, 1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, 305-8565 Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-02-20

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the nature of the hydrogenation active sites on unsupported molybdenum sulfide catalysts, aimed at the improvement of the catalysts for the slurry processes. The number of hydrogenation active sites was found to relate to the 'inflection' on the basal plane of the catalyst particles. The comparison of the catalytic activity to that of an oil-soluble catalyst in the hydroprocessing of heavy oils suggests that the performance of the oil-soluble catalyst was near the maximum, unless another component such as Ni or Co was incorporated.

  18. Methodologies for hydrogen determination in metal oxides by prompt gamma activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, E.; Biegalski, S.R.; Landsberger, S.

    2007-01-01

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA), available at University of Texas at Austin (UT), has been employed for the direct determination of hydrogen content in a series of metal oxide materials typically used as cathodes in lithium ion battery systems. Special attention was given to the experimental setup including potential sources of error and system calibration for the detection of hydrogen. Spectral interference with hydrogen arising from cobalt was identified and corrected for. Limits of detection as a function of cobalt mass present in a given sample are also discussed. PGAA has proven to be a novel and precise technique for the determination of hydrogen in metal oxides. This type of investigation could provide valuable insight regarding the factors that limit the practical capacities of lithium ion oxide cathodes

  19. Role of hydrogen ions in standard and activation heap leaching of gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsov, YuI

    2017-02-01

    The role of hydrogen ions in activation heap leaching of gold from rebellious ore has been studied, which has allowed enhancing gold recovery. The author puts forward a gold leaching circuit with the use of activated oxygen-saturated solutions acidified to pH = 6-9.

  20. Organosulphide profile and hydrogen sulphide-releasing activity of garlic fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tocmo, Restituto; Lai, Abigail Nianci; Wu, Yuchen; Liang, Dong; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Huang, Dejian

    2017-01-01

    Blanched and unblanched garlic were fermented using L. plantarum for investigation of organosulphide profiles, hydrogen sulphide-releasing activity, pH, titratable activity and microbial growth. Both raw and blanched garlic preparations allowed growth of L. plantarum with corresponding lowering of

  1. Gamma irradiation induced disintegration of waste activated sludge for biological hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, gamma irradiation was applied for the disintegration and dissolution of waste activated sludge produced during the biological wastewater treatment, and the solubilized sludge was used as substrate for bio-hydrogen production. The experimental results showed that the solubilization of waste activated sludge was 53.7% at 20 kGy and pH=12, and the SCOD, polysaccharides, protein, TN and TP contents in the irradiated sludge solutions was 3789.6 mg/L, 268.3 mg/L, 1881.5 mg/L, 132.3 mg/L and 80.4 mg/L, respectively. The irradiated sludge was used for fermentative hydrogen production, and the hydrogen yield was 10.5±0.7 mL/g SCOD consumed . It can be concluded that the irradiated waste activated sludge could be used as a low-cost substrate for fermentative hydrogen production. - Highlights: • The waste activated sludge could be disintegrated by gamma irradiation. • The disintegrated sludge could be used for biohydrogen production. • The hydrogen yield was 10.5±0.7 mL/g SCOD consumed .

  2. Prompt photon production in photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Krzysztof

    2010-03-01

    This thesis presents measurement of the production of prompt photons in photoproduction with the H1 experiment at HERA. The analysis is based on the data taken in the years 2004-2007, with a total integrated luminosity of 340 pb -1 . The main difficulty of the measurement comes from the high background of neutral mesons decaying into photons. It is accounted for with the help of multivariate analysis. Prompt photon cross sections are measured with the low negative four-momentum transfer squared Q 2 2 and in the inelasticity range 0.1 T γ γ γ and x p of the incident photon and proton carried by the constituents participating in the hard scattering process. Additionally, the transverse correlation between the photon and the jet is studied. The results are compared with predictions of a next-to-leading order calculation and a calculation based on the k T factorisation approach. Neither of calculations is able to describe all the aspects of the measurement. (orig.)

  3. Photoproduction with a Leading Proton at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; Zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    The total cross section for the photoproduction process with a leading proton in the final state has been measured at gamma p centre-of-mass energies W of 91, 181 and 231 GeV. The measured cross sections apply to the kinematic range with the transverse momentum of the scattered proton restricted to p_Tproton Xp'}(W,z)/dz is observed to be independent of W and z within the measurement errors and amounts to (8.05 +- 0.06 stat +- 0.89 syst) mub on average. The data are well described by a Triple Regge model in which the process is mediated by a mixture of exchanges with an effective Regge trajectory of intercept alpha_i(0)=0.33 +- 0.04 stat +- 0.04 syst. The total cross section for the interaction of the photon with this mixture (gamma alpha_i -> X) can be described by an effective trajectory of intercept alpha_k(0)=0.99 +- 0.01 stat +- 0.05 syst. The measured cross sections are compared with deep inelastic scattering leading proton data in the same region of z and p_Tproton for photon virtuality Q^2 > 2.5 GeV^...

  4. Rapidity gaps between jets in Photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-10-01

    Photoproduction events which have two or more jets have been studied in the W γp range 135 GeV γp <280 GeV with the ZEUS detector at HERA. A class of events is observed with little hadronic activity between the jets. The jets are separated by pseudorapidity intervals (Δη) of up to four units and have transverse energies greater than 6 GeV. A gap is defined as the absence between the jets of particles with transverse energy greater than 300 MeV. The fraction of events containing a gap is measured as a function of Δη. It decreases exponentially as expected for processes in which colour is exchanged between the jets, up to a value of Δη∼3, then reaches a constant value of about 0.1. The excess above the exponential fall-off can be interpreted as evidence for hard diffractive scattering via a strongly interacting colour singlet object. (orig.)

  5. Strangeness photoproduction and hadronic resonances; Photoproduction d`etrangete et resonances hadroniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, J C

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the kaon photoproduction off a proton ({gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Lambda},{gamma}p {yields} K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup 0}, {gamma}p {yields} K{sup 0}{Sigma}{sup +}), with a photon energy between 0.9 and 2.1 GeV. We use an isobaric model where the amplitudes are computed with Feynman diagrams. The insertion of nucleonic resonances with spin 3/2 and 5/2 is necessary to improve the existing models beyond 1.5 GeV. This step is also necessary to extend the elementary process of photoproduction to electroproduction where the data have been taken with photon energies above 2.0 GeV. The parameters of our models are the coupling constants which appear at each Feynman diagram vertex. They are determined by fitting our models to the experimental data (cross sections, polarization asymmetries). Before performing the minimization we drew some informations about coupling constants from mesonic and electromagnetic decays, and from SU(3) and SU(6) symmetries. In conclusion, the models developed here reproduce the experimental data (E{sub {gamma}} {<=} 2.0 GeV) and the two main coupling constants are in good agreement with broken SU(3)-symmetry predictions. (author). 47 refs.

  6. Hydrogen activities in the European Union work-programme; Activites liees a l'hydrogene dans le programme de travail de l'Union Europeenne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahbout, A.; Tartaglia, G.P. [Joint Research Centre, IHCP, Ispra (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    Growing concern over urban air pollution, global climatic change allegedly caused by rising levels of greenhouse gases and future energy security requirements demand a solution: a clean and sustainable energy supply. Hydrogen is seen as a promising clean fuel when integrated into a wide and long-term vision in which it provides, in parallel with electricity, a secondary energy carrier, ultimately derived from renewable energy sources. Europe has been a pioneer in promoting the wider use of hydrogen. Already in 1991, various demonstration projects were started with funds under the Euro-Quebec Hydro-Hydrogen Pilot Project (EQHPP). The European Commission, the European Industry, the Government of Quebec and the Canadian Industry made resources available so that hydrogen, from surplus in Canada, could be applied in various end-use technologies. Under this project, about thirty European industry/research centres/universities have been involved, working on a comprehensive set of hydrogen applications/uses. Innovative public transportation means (city buses, boats) equipped with internal combustion engines (ICE) or fuel cells and using either liquid or compressed hydrogen were put into demonstration service. Cogeneration (CHP) projects based on the use of phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC) were realised. In joint programs, aviation combustor test activities were carried out by Daimler Benz Aerospace, Airbus Industries and Pratt and Whitney. Investigation of hydrogen storage in zeolites, carbon and nano-tubes were started. Tests on compressed hydrogen gas storage tanks were also conducted. All these projects are now terminated. As intended, the initial momentum set by the EQHPP project has now been replaced by many private initiatives, especially in Germany. Only one specific project funded by the European Commission, the European Integrated Hydrogen Project (EIHP) remains. In the EIHP project, several companies which designed and constructed prototypes and demonstration

  7. Adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate on granular activated carbon from date pits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzougui, Z.; Nedjah, S.; Azoudj, Y.; Addoun, F. [Laboratoire d' etude physic-chimique des materiaux et application a l' environnement, Faculte de Chimie, USTHB (Algeria)], E-mail: zmerzougi@yahoo.fr

    2011-07-01

    Activated carbons, thanks to their versatility, are being used in the water treatment sector to absorb pollutants. Several factors influence the adsorption capacity of activated carbon and the aim of this study was to assess the effects of the porous texture and chemical nature of activated carbons on the adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate. Activated carbons used in this study were prepared from date pits with ZnCl2, KOH and H3PO4 by carbonization without adjuvant and adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate was conducted at 298K. Results showed that activated carbons prepared from date pits have a great potential for removing organic and inorganic pollutants from water and that the adsorption potential depends on the degree of activation of the activated carbons and on the compounds to absorb. This study highlighted that an increase of the carbon surface area and porosity results in a better adsorption capacity.

  8. Separation of minimum and higher twist in the photoproduction of mesons with large transverse momenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeger, K.C.

    1990-10-01

    Higher-twist effects in point-like photon interactions on hydrogen have been studied in xF-distributions of charged particles for -0.2 2.0 GeV/c. Data were taken with a tagged photon beam with energies between 70 and 170 GeV and a pion/kaon beam at fixed energies of 80 and 140 GeV using the same setup of detectors at the CERN-Ω-spectrometer (WA69 experiment). The pion and kaon interactions were used to obtain an estimate of the hadron-like photon component. A first estimation of Higher-Twist cross sections in photoproduction of mesons at high pT has been obtained that is consistent with QCD-expectations. (orig.) [de

  9. In situ hydrogen consumption kinetics as an indicator of subsurface microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S.H.; Smith, R.L.; Suflita, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are few methods available for broadly assessing microbial community metabolism directly within a groundwater environment. In this study, hydrogen consumption rates were estimated from in situ injection/withdrawal tests conducted in two geochemically varying, contaminated aquifers as an approach towards developing such a method. The hydrogen consumption first-order rates varied from 0.002 nM h-1 for an uncontaminated, aerobic site to 2.5 nM h-1 for a contaminated site where sulfate reduction was a predominant process. The method could accommodate the over three orders of magnitude range in rates that existed between subsurface sites. In a denitrifying zone, the hydrogen consumption rate (0.02 nM h-1) was immediately abolished in the presence of air or an antibiotic mixture, suggesting that such measurements may also be sensitive to the effects of environmental perturbations on field microbial activities. Comparable laboratory determinations with sediment slurries exhibited hydrogen consumption kinetics that differed substantially from the field estimates. Because anaerobic degradation of organic matter relies on the rapid consumption of hydrogen and subsequent maintenance at low levels, such in situ measures of hydrogen turnover can serve as a key indicator of the functioning of microbial food webs and may be more reliable than laboratory determinations. ?? 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  10. Quantum effects and colour transparency in charmonium photoproduction on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeliovich, B.Z.; Zakharov, B.G.

    1991-01-01

    A rigorous quantum-mechanical treatment of colour transparency effects in diffractive photoproduction of c-barc-pairs on nuclei was developed. The evolution of the c-barc wave function during propagating through a nucleus is rather a considerable distortion of its form, than a trivial attenuation. One of the manifestations of the quantum effects is a nuclear antishadowing of Ψ' yield, i.e. transparency above one. On the contrary, a considerable nuclear shadowing is predicted for the photoproduction of J/Ψ, which has a much smaller absorption cross section than Ψ'. 26 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Features of πΔ photoproduction at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nys, J.; Mathieu, V.; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Jackura, A.; Mikhasenko, M.; Pilloni, A.; Sherrill, N.; Ryckebusch, J.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Fox, G.; Joint Physics Analysis Center

    2018-04-01

    Hybrid/exotic meson spectroscopy searches at Jefferson Lab require the accurate theoretical description of the production mechanism in peripheral photoproduction. We develop a model for πΔ photoproduction at high energies (5 ≤Elab ≤ 16 GeV) that incorporates both the absorbed pion and natural-parity cut contributions. We fit the available observables, providing a good description of the energy and angular dependencies of the experimental data. We also provide predictions for the photon beam asymmetry of charged pions at Elab = 9 GeV which is expected to be measured by GlueX and CLAS12 experiments in the near future.

  12. Quasi-free K+ photo-production in 12C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, K.; Yamazaki, H.; Asano, S.; Emura, T.; Endo, I.; Endo, S.; Ito, S.; Itoh, H.; Ifuku, K.; Konno, O.; Koike, M.; Maruyama, K.; Niki, K.; Niwa, K.; Okuno, H.; Sakaguchi, A.; Sasaki, T.; Suda, T.; Sumi, Y.; Takeya, M.; Terasawa, T.; Uchida, H.; Yamashita, H.; Yoshida, K.

    1994-01-01

    Quasi-free K + photo-production in the 12 C(γ,K + ) reaction has been investigated in a photon energy range of 0.7-1.1GeV. Differential cross sections for the quasi-free process of the 12 C(γ,K + ) reaction have been obtained and they are compared with a calculation of a quasi-free K + photo-production. The effective proton number Z eff =4.2±0.6 obtained from the experiment was in good agreement with a calculation of a semi-classical attenuation model. ((orig.))

  13. Nanoconfinement in activated mesoporous carbon of calcium borohydride for improved reversible hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comănescu, Cezar; Capurso, Giovanni; Maddalena, Amedeo

    2012-09-28

    Mesoporous carbon frameworks were synthesized using the soft-template method. Ca(BH(4))(2) was incorporated into activated mesoporous carbon by the incipient wetness method. The activation of mesoporous carbon was necessary to optimize the surface area and pore size. Thermal programmed absorption measurements showed that the confinement of this borohydride into carbon nanoscaffolds improved its reversible capacity (relative to the reactive portion) and performance of hydrogen storage compared to unsupported borohydride. Hydrogen release from the supported hydride started at a temperature as low as 100 °C and the dehydrogenation rate was fast compared to the bulk borohydride. In addition, the hydrogen pressure necessary to regenerate the borohydride from the dehydrogenation products was reduced.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  15. Perturbation of formate pathway for hydrogen production by expressions of formate hydrogen lyase and its transcriptional activator in wild Enterobacter aerogenes and its mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yuan; Zhao, Hongxin; Zhang, Chong; Lai, Qiheng; Xing, Xin-Hui [Institute of Biochemical Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-06-15

    To examine perturbation effects of formate pathway on hydrogen productivity in Enterobacter aerogenes (Ea), formate dehydrogenase FDH-H gene (fdhF) and formate hydrogen lyase activator protein FHLA gene (fhlA) originated from Escherichia coli, were overexpressed in the wild strain Ea, its hycA-deleted mutant (A) by knockout the formate hydrogen lyase repressor and hybO-deleted mutant (O) by knockout of the uptake hydrogenase, respectively. Overexpression of fdhF and fhlA promoted cell growth and volumetric hydrogen production rates of all the strains, and the hydrogen production per gram cell dry weight (CDW) for Ea, A and O was increased by 38.5%, 21.8% and 5.25%, respectively. The fdhF and fhlA overexpression improved the hydrogen yield per mol glucose of strains Ea and A, but declined that of strain O. The increase of hydrogen yield of the strain Ea with fdhF and fhlA expression was mainly attributed to the increase of formate pathway, while for the mutant A, the improved hydrogen yield with fdhF and fhlA expression was mainly due to the increase of NADH pathway. Analysis of the metabolites and ratio of ethanol-to-acetate showed that the cellular redox state balance and energy level were also changed for these strains by fdhF and fhlA expression. These findings demonstrated that the hydrogen production was not only dependent on the hydrogenase genes, but was also affected by the regulation of the whole metabolism. Therefore, fdhF and fhlA expression in different strains of E. aerogenes could exhibit different perturbation effects on the metabolism and the hydrogen productivity. (author)

  16. Metal Hydride Nanoparticles with Ultrahigh Structural Stability and Hydrogen Storage Activity Derived from Microencapsulated Nanoconfinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiguang; Zhu, Yunfeng; Lin, Huaijun; Liu, Yana; Zhang, Yao; Li, Shenyang; Ma, Zhongliang; Li, Liquan

    2017-06-01

    Metal hydrides (MHs) have recently been designed for hydrogen sensors, switchable mirrors, rechargeable batteries, and other energy-storage and conversion-related applications. The demands of MHs, particular fast hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics, have brought their sizes to nanoscale. However, the nanostructured MHs generally suffer from surface passivation and low aggregation-resisting structural stability upon absorption/desorption. This study reports a novel strategy named microencapsulated nanoconfinement to realize local synthesis of nano-MHs, which possess ultrahigh structural stability and superior desorption kinetics. Monodispersed Mg 2 NiH 4 single crystal nanoparticles (NPs) are in situ encapsulated on the surface of graphene sheets (GS) through facile gas-solid reactions. This well-defined MgO coating layer with a thickness of ≈3 nm efficiently separates the NPs from each other to prevent aggregation during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles, leading to excellent thermal and mechanical stability. More interestingly, the MgO layer shows superior gas-selective permeability to prevent further oxidation of Mg 2 NiH 4 meanwhile accessible for hydrogen absorption/desorption. As a result, an extremely low activation energy (31.2 kJ mol -1 ) for the dehydrogenation reaction is achieved. This study provides alternative insights into designing nanosized MHs with both excellent hydrogen storage activity and thermal/mechanical stability exempting surface modification by agents. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Photoproduction with a leading proton at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, C.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Ch.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broeker, H.-B.; Brown, D.P.; Brueckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Buerger, J.; Buesser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, J.; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Fluegge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Graessler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoeting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Joensson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kaestli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, C.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Krueger, K.; Kuepper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, S.; Lueke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.-O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mueller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Nellen, G.; Newman, P.R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poeschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Raedel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoerner, T.; Schroeder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsuri n, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wuensch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; Nedden, M. zur

    2001-01-01

    The total cross section for the photoproduction process with a leading proton in the final state has been measured at γp centre-of-mass energies W of 91, 181 and 231 GeV. The measured cross sections apply to the kinematic range with the transverse momentum of the scattered proton restricted to p T ≤0.2 GeV and 0.68≤z≤0.88, where z=E p '/E p is the scattered proton energy normalised to the beam energy. The cross section dσ γp→Xp' (W,z)/dz is observed to be independent of W and z within the measurement errors and amounts to (8.05±0.06 (stat)±0.89 (syst)) μb on average. The data are well described by a Triple Regge model in which the process is mediated by a mixture of exchanges with an effective Regge trajectory of intercept α i (0)=0.33±0.04 (stat)±0.04 (syst). The total cross section for the interaction of the photon with this mixture (γα i →X) can be described by an effective trajectory of intercept α k (0)=0.99±0.01 (stat)±0.05 (syst). Predictions based on previous triple Regge analyses of pp→pX data assuming vertex factorisation are broadly consistent with the γp data. The measured cross sections are compared with deep inelastic scattering leading proton data in the same region of z and p T for photon virtuality Q 2 >2.5 GeV 2 . The ratio of the cross section for leading proton production to the total cross section is found to rise with Q 2

  18. Prompt photon production in photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Krzysztof

    2010-03-15

    This thesis presents measurement of the production of prompt photons in photoproduction with the H1 experiment at HERA. The analysis is based on the data taken in the years 2004-2007, with a total integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}. The main difficulty of the measurement comes from the high background of neutral mesons decaying into photons. It is accounted for with the help of multivariate analysis. Prompt photon cross sections are measured with the low negative four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} < 1GeV{sup 2} and in the inelasticity range 0.1 < y < 0.7 for photons with a transverse energy 6 < E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} < 15GeV and in the pseudorapidity range.1.0 < {eta}{sup {gamma}} < 2.4 as a function of photons transverse energy and its pseudorapidity. Cross sections for prompt photon events with an additional hadronic jet are measured as a function of the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the jet and of the momentum fractions x{sub {gamma}} and x{sub p} of the incident photon and proton carried by the constituents participating in the hard scattering process. Additionally, the transverse correlation between the photon and the jet is studied. The results are compared with predictions of a next-to-leading order calculation and a calculation based on the k{sub T} factorisation approach. Neither of calculations is able to describe all the aspects of the measurement. (orig.)

  19. Development of a national center for hydrogen technology. A summary report of activities completed at the national center hydrogen technology from 2005 to 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Michael J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT project's 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  20. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology. A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Michael [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology (NCHT) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program's nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  1. Cathodic electrochemical activation of Co3O4 nanoarrays: a smart strategy to significantly boost the hydrogen evolution activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Zhou, Huang; Qin, Xin; Guo, Xiaodong; Cui, Guanwei; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2018-02-22

    Co(hydro)oxides show unsatisfactory catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline media, and it is thus highly desirable but still remains a challenge to design and develop Co(hydro)oxide derived materials as superb hydrogen-evolving catalysts using a facile, rapid and less energy-intensive method. Here, we propose a cathodic electrochemical activation strategy toward greatly boosted HER activity of a Co 3 O 4 nanoarray via room-temperature cathodic polarization in sodium hypophosphite solution. After activation, the overpotential significantly decreases from 260 to 73 mV to drive a geometrical catalytic current density of 10 mA cm -2 in 1.0 M KOH. Notably, this activated electrode also shows strong long-term electrochemical durability with the retention of its catalytic activity at 100 mA cm -2 for at least 40 h.

  2. Activity of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubovich, I A; Mikhaylov, V A; Migulina, N N [Yaroslavskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR)

    1976-06-01

    Experimental data for the activities of iridium-ruthenium and iridium-rhodium adsorption catalysts in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide are considered and the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements are presented. It is concluded that surface structures (complexes) may be formed and that micro-electronic feaures play a role in heterogeneous catalysis.

  3. Biological Activity Predictions and Hydrogen Bonding Analysis in Quinolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Palvi; Kamni

    The paper has been designed to make a comprehensive review of a particular series of organic molecular assembly in the form of compendium. An overview of general description of fifteen quinoline derivatives has been given. The biological activity spectra of quinoline derivatives have been correlated on structure activity relationships base which provides the different Pa (possibility of activity) and Pi (possibility of inactivity) values. Expositions of the role of intermolecular interactions in the identified derivatives have been discussed with the standard distance and angle cut-off criteria criteria as proposed by Desiraju and Steiner (1999) in an International monogram on crystallography. Distance-angle scatter plots for intermolecular interactions are presented for a better understanding of the packing interactions which exist in quinoline derivatives.

  4. Acoustic emission monitoring of activation behavior of LaNi5 hydrogen storage alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Maria De Rosa, Alessandro Dell'Era, Mauro Pasquali, Carlo Santulli and Fabrizio Sarasini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The acoustic emission technique is proposed for assessing the irreversible phenomena occurring during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling in LaNi5. In particular, we have studied, through a parametric analysis of in situ detected signals, the correlation between acoustic emission (AE parameters and the processes occurring during the activation of an intermetallic compound. Decreases in the number and amplitude of AE signals suggest that pulverization due to hydrogen loading involves progressively smaller volumes of material as the number of cycles increases. This conclusion is confirmed by electron microscopy observations and particle size distribution measurements.

  5. A trap activation model for hydrogen retention and isotope exchange in some refractory materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, D.K.; Doyle, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    Our recently-developed Local Mixing Model (LMM) has been successful in describing and predicting the properties of hydrogen retention and isotope exchange for a variety of refractory materials. For some materials, however, the detailed predictions of the LMM are not observed. A Trap Activation Model (TAM) is proposed here to account for the observed departures from the LMM. Comparison of experimental room temperature saturation depth profiles for H + →Si with the predictions of TAM suggests that the hydrogen traps are multiple-vacancy complexes in this system. The observed profiles result from a beam-induced competition between trap creation/annihilation and H-trapping/detrapping. (orig.)

  6. radiation-accompanied π0 photoproduction on the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, S.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes an experiment for the radiation-accompanied π 0 photoproduction on the proton int the energy range of the Δ resonance. With the detector system from Crystal Ball (672 NaI(Tl) crystals) and the TAPS forward wall (510 BaF 2 modules) and the space-angle covering of this arrangement of nearly 4π the reaction γp→pπ 0 γ' could be studied with high statistics; furthermore the use of a both linearly and circularly polarized photon beam allowed beside the study of unpolarized cross sections also the consideration of polarization observables like the photon asymmetry of the π 0 meson or the single-spin asymmetry of the photon γ'. The experiment described hera was performed with a real photon beam, which was produced via the bremsstrahlung of the MAMI electron beam with energies of E 0 =883 MeV respectively E 0 =570 MeV on a diamond respectively iron radiator. By the momentum determination in a magnetic spectrometer (Glasgow-Mainz-Tagger) and a coincidence analysis with the product detectors Crystal Ball and TAPS this photon beam was energy-marked and allowed by this together with the liquid-hydrogen target a precise knowledge of the incident side of the photoinduced reactions. For the study of the reaction γp→pπ 0 γ' all final-state particle were detected in the detector systems with their complete energy and momentum informations. With the data analysis described in this thesis about 27,000 events of the radiation-accompanied π 0 production could be reconstructed, from which in connection with a simulation of the detector and analysis efficiency energy and angular differential cross sections of the photon γ', the π 0 meson, as well as the proton were determined in each three intervals of the beam energy (ω=325..375 MeV, ω=375..425 MeV, and ω=425..475 MeV). In the energy range between 325 MeV and 475 MeV for the total cross section values of about 60 nb to 80 nb result. Additionally the photon asymmetry (linearly polarized photons

  7. Effect of pre-strain on susceptibility of Indian Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel to hydrogen embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonak, Sagar; Tiwari, Abhishek; Jain, Uttam; Keskar, Nachiket; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, Ram N.; Dey, Gautam K.

    2015-01-01

    The role of pre-strain on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of Indian Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel was investigated using constant nominal strain-rate tension test. The samples were pre-strained to different levels of plastic strain and their mechanical behavior and mode of fracture under the influence of hydrogen was studied. The effect of plastic pre-strain in the range of 0.5–2% on the ductility of the samples was prominent. Compared to samples without any pre-straining, effect of hydrogen was more pronounced on pre-strained samples. Prior deformation reduced the material ductility under the influence of hydrogen. Up to 35% reduction in the total strain was observed under the influence of hydrogen in pre-strained samples. Hydrogen charging resulted in increased occurrence of brittle zones on the fracture surface. Hydrogen Enhanced Decohesion (HEDE) was found to be the dominant mechanism of fracture.

  8. Intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides upon collisional activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Gårdsvoll, H.; Ploug, M.

    2005-01-01

    Presently different opinions exist as to the degree of scrambling of amide hydrogens in gaseous protonated peptides and proteins upon collisional activation in tandem mass spectrometry experiments. This unsettled controversy is not trivial, since only a very low degree of scrambling is tolerable...... if collision-induced dissociation (CID) should provide reliable site-specific information from (1)H/(2)H exchange experiments. We have explored a series of unique, regioselectively deuterium-labeled peptides as model systems to probe for intramolecular amide hydrogen migration under low-energy collisional...... are protected against exchange with the solvent, while the amide hydrogens of the nonbinding sequences exchange rapidly with the solvent. We have utilized such long-lived complexes to generate peptides labeled with deuterium in either the binding or nonbinding region, and the expected regioselectivity...

  9. Modeling of the thermal effects of hydrogen adsorption on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, M.-A.; Chahine, R.

    2006-01-01

    'Full text:' Heat management is one of the most critical issues for the design of efficient adsorption-based storage of hydrogen. We present simulations of mass and energy balance for hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption on activated carbon over wide temperature and pressure ranges. First, the Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) model is adapted to model excess hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption isotherms at high pressures and supercritical temperatures assuming a constant microporous adsorption volume. The five parameter modified D-A adsorption model is shown to fit the experimental data over the temperature range (35 K-293 K) for hydrogen and (93 K-298 K) for nitrogen and pressure range (0-6 MPa) within the experimental uncertainties of the measurement system. We derive the thermodynamic properties of the adsorbed phase from this analytical expression of the measured data. The mass and energy rate balance equations in a microporous adsorbent/adsorbate system are then presented and validated with nitrogen desorption experiments. Finally, simulations of adiabatic and isothermal filling of adsorption-based hydrogen storage are presented and discussed. (author)

  10. Low-energy photoproduction of omega-mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, J; Glander, K H; Hannappel, J; Jöpen, N; Klein, F; Lawall, R; Menze, D; Neuerburg, W; Ostrick, M; Paul, E; Schulday, I; Schwille, W J; Wiegers, B; Ernst, J; Kalinowsky, H; Klempt, E; Link, J; Pee, H V; Klein, F J; Wieland, F W; Wisskirchen, J; Wu, C

    2003-01-01

    The photoproduction of the vector meson omega has been studied between threshold and W=2.4 GeV with the SAPHIR detector at the Bonn electron stretcher ring ELSA. Besides, the total cross-sections angular distributions in the CMS and decay angular distributions in the helicity and Gottfried-Jackson systems have been measured.

  11. The role of screening corrections in high energy photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotsman, E.; Maor, U.

    1994-07-01

    The role of screening corrections, calculated using the eikonal model, is discussed in the context of soft photoproduction. A comprehensive calculation is presented considering the total, elastic and diffractive cross sections jointly. The differences between our results and those obtained from the supercritical Pomeron-Reggeon model with no unitary corrections is examined. (author). 16 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  12. Phi Photoproduction in a Coupled-Channel Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozaki, S.; Nagahiro, H.; Hosaka, A.; Scholten, O.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate photoproduction of phi-mesons off protons within a coupled-channel effective-Lagrangian method which is based on the K-matrix approach. We take into account pi N, rho N, eta N, K Lambda, K Sigma, K Lambda (1520) and phi N channels. Especially we focus on K Lambda(1520) channel. We

  13. Effect of menadione and hydrogen peroxide on catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeast strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda EFREMOVA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been studied the possibility of utilization of two important oxidant factors as regulators of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts. In this paper results of the screening of some Saccharomyces yeast strains for potential producers of catalase are presented. Results of the screening for potential catalase producer have revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-11 strain possesses the highest catalase activity (2900 U/mg protein compared with other samples. Maximum increase of catalase activity with 50-60% compared to the reference sample was established in the case of hydrogen peroxide and menadione utilization in optimal concentrations of 15 and 10 mM. This research has been demonstrated the potential benefits of application of hydrogen peroxide and menadione as stimulatory factors of catalase activity in Saccharomyces yeasts.

  14. Active Edge Sites Engineering in Nickel Cobalt Selenide Solid Solutions for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2017-01-06

    An effective multifaceted strategy is demonstrated to increase active edge site concentration in NiCoSe solid solutions prepared by in situ selenization process of nickel cobalt precursor. The simultaneous control of surface, phase, and morphology result in as-prepared ternary solid solution with extremely high electrochemically active surface area (C = 197 mF cm), suggesting significant exposure of active sites in this ternary compound. Coupled with metallic-like electrical conductivity and lower free energy for atomic hydrogen adsorption in NiCoSe, identified by temperature-dependent conductivities and density functional theory calculations, the authors have achieved unprecedented fast hydrogen evolution kinetics, approaching that of Pt. Specifically, the NiCoSe solid solutions show a low overpotential of 65 mV at -10 mV cm, with onset potential of mere 18 mV, an impressive small Tafel slope of 35 mV dec, and a large exchange current density of 184 μA cm in acidic electrolyte. Further, it is shown that the as-prepared NiCoSe solid solution not only works very well in acidic electrolyte but also delivers exceptional hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) performance in alkaline media. The outstanding HER performance makes this solid solution a promising candidate for mass hydrogen production.

  15. Hydrogen storage of catalyst-containing activated carbon fibers and effect of surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikpyo Hong; Seong Young Lee; Kyung Hee Lee; Sei Min Park

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The hydrogen storage capacities of many kind of carbon nano materials have been reported with possibility and improbability. It is reported that specific surface area of carbon nano material has not a close relation to hydrogen storage capacity. This result shows that there is difference between specific surface area measured by isothermal nitrogen adsorption and direct measurement of adsorption with hydrogen and suggests that the carbon material with relatively low specific surface area can have high hydrogen storage capacity when they have effective nano pore. In this study, petroleum based isotropic pitch was hybridized with several kinds of transitional metal base organometallic compound solved with organic solvent and spun by electro-spinning method. The catalyst-dispersed ACFs were prepared and characterized and hydrogen storage capacity was measured. The effect of surface modification of ACFs by physical and chemical treatment was also investigated. Experimental: The isotropic precursor pitch prepared by nitrogen blowing from naphtha cracking bottom oil was hybridized with transitional metal based acetyl acetonates and spun by solvent electro-spinning. Tetrahydrofuran and quinoline were used as solvent with various mixing ratio. High voltage DC power generator which could adjust in the range of 0-60000 V and 2 mA maximum current was used to supply electrostatic force. At the solvent electro-spinning, solvent mixing ratio and pitch concentration, voltage and spinning distance were varied and their influences were investigated. The catalyst-dispersed electro-spun pitch fibers were thermal stabilized, carbonized and activated by conventional heat treatment for activated carbon fiber. Prepared fibers were observed by high resolution SEM and pore properties were characterized by Micromeritics ASAP2020 model physi-sorption analyzer. Hydrogen storage capacities were measured by equipment modified from Thermo Cahn TherMax 500 model high pressure

  16. Cleavage of hydrogen by activation at a single non-metal centre - towards new hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Sławomir J

    2015-05-28

    Molecular surfaces of non-metal species are often characterized by both positive and negative regions of electrostatic potential (EP) at a non-metal centre. This centre may activate molecular hydrogen which further leads to the addition reaction. The positive EP regions at the non-metal centres correspond to σ-holes; the latter sites are enhanced by electronegative substituents. This is why the following simple moieties; PFH2, SFH, AsFH2, SeFH, BrF3, PF(CH3)2 and AsF(CH3)2, were chosen here to analyze the H2 activation and its subsequent splitting at the P, As, S, Se and Br centres. Also the reverse H-H bond reforming process is analyzed. MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations were performed for systems corresponding to different stages of these processes. The sulphur centre in the SFH moiety is analyzed in detail since the potential barrier height for the addition reaction for this species is the lowest of the moieties analyzed here. The results of calculations show that the SFH + H2 → SFH3 reaction in the gas phase is endothermic but it is exothermic in polar solvents.

  17. PROCESS OPTIMIZATION OF TETRA ACETYL ETHYLENE DIAMINE ACTIVATED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF POPULUS NIGRA CTMP

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Zhao; Junwen Pu; Shulei Mao; Guibo Qi

    2010-01-01

    To enhance the bleaching efficiency, the activator of tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED) was used in conventional H2O2 bleaching. The H2O2/TAED bleaching system can accelerate the reaction rate and shorten bleaching time at relative low temperature, which can reduce the production cost. In this research, the process with hydrogen peroxide activated by TAED bleaching of Populus nigra chemi-thermo mechanical pulp was optimized. Suitable bleaching conditions were confirmed as follows: pulp con...

  18. Sulfite oxidase activity of cytochrome c: Role of hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murugesan Velayutham

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In humans, sulfite is generated endogenously by the metabolism of sulfur containing amino acids such as methionine and cysteine. Sulfite is also formed from exposure to sulfur dioxide, one of the major environmental pollutants. Sulfite is used as an antioxidant and preservative in dried fruits, vegetables, and beverages such as wine. Sulfite is also used as a stabilizer in many drugs. Sulfite toxicity has been associated with allergic reactions characterized by sulfite sensitivity, asthma, and anaphylactic shock. Sulfite is also toxic to neurons and cardiovascular cells. Recent studies suggest that the cytotoxicity of sulfite is mediated by free radicals; however, molecular mechanisms involved in sulfite toxicity are not fully understood. Cytochrome c (cyt c is known to participate in mitochondrial respiration and has antioxidant and peroxidase activities. Studies were performed to understand the related mechanism of oxidation of sulfite and radical generation by ferric cytochrome c (Fe3+cyt c in the absence and presence of H2O2. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spin trapping studies using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO were performed with sulfite, Fe3+cyt c, and H2O2. An EPR spectrum corresponding to the sulfite radical adducts of DMPO (DMPO-SO3- was obtained. The amount of DMPO-SO3- formed from the oxidation of sulfite by the Fe3+cyt c increased with sulfite concentration. In addition, the amount of DMPO-SO3- formed by the peroxidase activity of Fe3+cyt c also increased with sulfite and H2O2 concentration. From these results, we propose a mechanism in which the Fe3+cyt c and its peroxidase activity oxidizes sulfite to sulfite radical. Our results suggest that Fe3+cyt c could have a novel role in the deleterious effects of sulfite in biological systems due to increased production of sulfite radical. It also shows that the increased production of sulfite radical may be responsible for neurotoxicity and some of the injuries which

  19. Mechanochemical activation and synthesis of nanomaterials for hydrogen storage and conversion in electrochemical power sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronski, Zbigniew S; Varin, Robert A; Czujko, Tom

    2009-07-01

    In this study we discuss a process of mechanical activation employed in place of chemical or thermal activation to improve the mobility and reactivity of hydrogen atoms and ions in nanomaterials for energy applications: rechargeable batteries and hydrogen storage for fuel cell systems. Two materials are discussed. Both are used or intended for use in power sources. One is nickel hydroxide, Ni(OH)2, which converts to oxyhydroxide in the positive Ni electrode of rechargeable metal hydride batteries. The other is a complex hydride, Mg(AIH4)2, intended for use in reversible, solid-state hydrogen storage for fuel cells. The feature shared by these unlikely materials (hydroxide and hydride) is a sheet-like hexagonal crystal structure. The mechanical activation was conducted in high-energy ball mills. We discuss and demonstrate that the mechanical excitation of atoms and ions imparted on these powders stems from the same class of phenomena. These are (i) proliferation of structural defects, in particular stacking faults in a sheet-like structure of hexagonal crystals, and (ii) possible fragmentation of a faulted structure into a mosaic of layered nanocrystals. The hydrogen atoms bonded in such nanocrystals may be inserted and abstracted more easily from OH- hydroxyl group in Ni(OH)2 and AlH4- hydride complex in Mg(AlH4)2 during hydrogen charge and discharge reactions. However, the effects of mechanical excitation imparted on these powders are different. While the Ni(OH)2 powder is greatly activated for cycling in batteries, the Mg(AlH4)2 complex hydride phase is greatly destabilized for use in reversible hydrogen storage. Such a "synchronic" view of the structure-property relationship in respect to materials involved in hydrogen energy storage and conversion is supported in experiments employing X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and direct imaging of the structure with a high-resolution transmission-electron microscope (HREM), as well as in

  20. Activities of Nuclear Research Institute Rez in the area of hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucek, A.; Janik, L.; Misak, J.

    2010-01-01

    NRI is a research institution established in 1955. Nowadays, the Institute provides wide range of expertise and services for operators of the nuclear power plants in the Czech Republic and abroad, supports Czech central state institutions in the domains of strategic energy planning and development, management of radioactive waste (for the Ministry of Trade and Industry), provides independent expertise for the State Office of Nuclear Safety, performs activities in the area of exploitation of ionising radiation and irradiation services for basic and applied research, health service and industry, performs research and provides services for radioactive waste disposal, production of radiopharmaceuticals, education and training of experts and scientific specialists and performs many other activities. With the gradual changes in energy policy, hydrogen economy becomes one of the important topics related to nuclear energy. NRI is participating in the research and development in this area and as a member of the Czech Hydrogen Technology Platform is currently the leader in this area in the country. To promote hydrogen economy, NRI prepared and participated in several demonstration projects. Studies on production of hydrogen in current and future nuclear power plants are performed as well. (authors)

  1. Molecular hydrogen: An abundant energy source for bacterial activity in nuclear waste repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libert, M.; Bildstein, O.; Esnault, L.; Jullien, M.; Sellier, R.

    A thorough understanding of the energy sources used by microbial systems in the deep terrestrial subsurface is essential since the extreme conditions for life in deep biospheres may serve as a model for possible life in a nuclear waste repository. In this respect, H 2 is known as one of the most energetic substrates for deep terrestrial subsurface environments. This hydrogen is produced from abiotic and biotic processes but its concentration in natural systems is usually maintained at very low levels due to hydrogen-consuming bacteria. A significant amount of H 2 gas will be produced within deep nuclear waste repositories, essentially from the corrosion of metallic components. This will consequently improve the conditions for microbial activity in this specific environment. This paper discusses different study cases with experimental results to illustrate the fact that microorganisms are able to use hydrogen for redox processes (reduction of O 2, NO3-, Fe III) in several waste disposal conditions. Consequences of microbial activity include: alteration of groundwater chemistry and shift in geochemical equilibria, gas production or consumption, biocorrosion, and potential modifications of confinement properties. In order to quantify the impact of hydrogen bacteria, the next step will be to determine the kinetic rate of the reactions in realistic conditions.

  2. Molecular hydrogen: An abundant energy source for bacterial activity in nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libert, M.; Bildstein, O.; Esnault, L.; Jullien, M.; Sellier, R.

    2011-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the energy sources used by microbial systems in the deep terrestrial subsurface is essential since the extreme conditions for life in deep biospheres may serve as a model for possible life in a nuclear waste repository. In this respect, H 2 is known as one of the most energetic substrates for deep terrestrial subsurface environments. This hydrogen is produced from abiotic and biotic processes but its concentration in natural systems is usually maintained at very low levels due to hydrogen-consuming bacteria. A significant amount of H 2 gas will be produced within deep nuclear waste repositories, essentially from the corrosion of metallic components. This will consequently improve the conditions for microbial activity in this specific environment. This paper discusses different study cases with experimental results to illustrate the fact that microorganisms are able to use hydrogen for redox processes (reduction of O 2 , NO 3- , Fe III) in several waste disposal conditions. Consequences of microbial activity include: alteration of groundwater chemistry and shift in geochemical equilibria, gas production or consumption, bio-corrosion, and potential modifications of confinement properties. In order to quantify the impact of hydrogen bacteria, the next step will be to determine the kinetic rate of the reactions in realistic conditions. (authors)

  3. Thermal reorientation of hydrogenic Pr3+ centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sets of five multi-hydrogenic centers of both CaF 2 :Pr 3+ and SrF 2 :Pr 3 + show bleaching under selective polarized-light irradiation. Two forms of bleaching behaviour are observed. In reversible polarized bleaching, irradiation creates re-oriented equivalent centers, which can be restored to the original orientation by switching the laser polarization by 90 deg. Indefinite sequences of bleaching and recovery can be established. In photoproduct bleaching, inequivalent centers are produced, which can be reverted by subsequently selectively exciting their absorption lines. Thermal recovery of the bleached centers on warming the crystals occurs abruptly over a 5 K range around 100 K and is noteworthy in occurring at essentially identical temperatures for H - , D - and T - centers. The simplest model for this thermal recovery is thermal activation of the mobile hydrogenic ions over a double well potential barrier. An alternative model proposed by Universitaet Regensburg requires the involvement of high frequency excitations in scattering processes for surmounting the barrier

  4. Catalytic Activities of Noble Metal Phosphides for Hydrogenation and Hydrodesulfurization Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuharu Kanda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of a highly active noble metal phosphide (NMXPY-based hydrodesulfurization (HDS catalyst with a high hydrogenating ability for heavy oils was studied. NMXPY catalysts were obtained by reduction of P-added noble metals (NM-P, NM: Rh, Pd, Ru supported on SiO2. The order of activities for the hydrogenation of biphenyl was Rh-P > NiMoS > Pd-P > Ru-P. This order was almost the same as that of the catalytic activities for the HDS of dibenzothiophene. In the HDS of 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT, the HDS activity of the Rh-P catalyst increased with increasing reaction temperature, but the maximum HDS activity for the NiMoS catalyst was observed at 270 °C. The Rh-P catalyst yielded fully hydrogenated products with high selectivity compared with the NiMoS catalyst. Furthermore, XRD analysis of the spent Rh-P catalysts revealed that the Rh2P phase possessed high sulfur tolerance and resistance to sintering.

  5. Hydrogen adsorption on activated carbon nanotubes with an atomic-sized vanadium catalyst investigated by electrical resistance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Ji Sun; Yun, Jumi; Kang, Seok Chang; Lee, Sung Kyu; Lee, Young-Seak

    2012-01-01

    Activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes were prepared with appended vanadium as a hydrogen storage medium. The pore structure was significantly improved by an activation process that was studied using Raman spectroscopy, field emission transmission electron microscopy and pore analysis techniques. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results reveal that the vanadium catalyst was introduced into the carbon nanotubes in controlled proportions, forming V 8 C 7 . The improved pore structure functioned as a path through the carbon nanotubes that encouraged hydrogen molecule adsorption, and the introduced vanadium catalyst led to high levels of hydrogen storage through the dissociation of hydrogen molecules via the spill-over phenomenon. The hydrogen storage behavior was investigated by electrical resistance measurements for the hydrogen adsorbed on a prepared sample. The proposed mechanism of hydrogen storage suggests that the vanadium catalyst increases not only the amount of hydrogen that is stored but also the speed at which it is stored. A hydrogen storage capacity of 2.26 wt.% was achieved with the activation effects and the vanadium catalyst at 30 °C and 10 MPa.

  6. A micro-fabricated hydrogen storage module with sub-atmospheric activation and durability in air exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Xi; Payer, Joe H. [Corrosion and Reliability Engineering, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Akron, 302 Buchtel Common, Akron, OH 44325 (United States); Wainright, Jesse S.; Dudik, Laurie [Department of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    The objective of this work was to develop a hydrogen storage module for onboard electrical power sources suitable for use in micro-power systems and micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Hydrogen storage materials were developed as thin-film inks to be compatible with an integrated manufacturing process. Important design aspects were (a) ready activation at sub-atmospheric hydrogen pressure and room temperature and (b) durability, i.e. capable of hundreds of absorption/desorption cycles and resistance to deactivation on exposure to air. Inks with palladium-treated intermetallic hydrogen storage alloys were developed and are shown here to be compatible with a thin-film micro-fabrication process. These hydrogen storage modules absorb hydrogen readily at atmospheric pressure, and the absorption/desorption rates remained fast even after the ink was exposed to air for 47 weeks. (author)

  7. Novel alternating polymer adsorption/surface activation self-assembled film based on hydrogen bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yongjun; Yang Shuguang; Guan Ying; Miao Xiaopeng; Cao Weixiao; Xu Jian

    2003-08-01

    By combining hydrogen bonding layer-by-layer self-assembly and the stepwise chemisorption method, a new alternating polymer adsorption/surface activation self-assembly method was developed. First a layer of diphenylamine-4-diazonium-formaldehyde resin (diazo resin or DR) is deposited on a substrate. In the following surface activation step, the diazonium groups on the surface couple with resorcin in the outside solution. The deposition of another layer of DR is feasible due to the formation of hydrogen bond between the diazonium group of DR and the hydroxy group of the resorcin moieties. The resulting film is photosensitive. After UV irradiation, the film becomes very stable towards polar organic solvents.

  8. Electronic interactions decreasing the activation barrier for the hydrogen electro-oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Elizabeth; Schmickler, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    A unified model for electrochemical electron transfer reactions which explicitly accounts for the electronic structure of the electrode recently proposed by us is applied to the hydrogen oxidation reaction at different metal electrocatalysts. We focus on the changes produced in the transition state (saddle point) as a consequence of the interactions with d-bands. We discuss different empirical correlations between properties of the metal and catalytic activity proposed in the past. We show which role is played by the band structure of the different metals and its interaction with the molecule for decreasing the activation barrier. Finally, we demonstrate why some metals are better electrocatalysts for the hydrogen electro-oxidation reaction than others

  9. Improvement of silicon direct bonding using surfaces activated by hydrogen plasma treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, W B; Lee Jae Sik; Sung, M Y

    2000-01-01

    The plasma surface treatment, using hydrogen gas, of silicon wafers was studied as a pretreatment for silicon direct bonding. Chemical reactions of the hydrogen plasma with the surfaces were used for both surface activation and removal of surface contaminants. Exposure of the silicon wafers to the plasma formed an active oxide layer on the surface. This layer was hydrophilic. The surface roughness and morphology were examined as functions of the plasma exposure time and power. The surface became smoother with shorter plasma exposure time and lower power. In addition, the plasma surface treatment was very efficient in removing the carbon contaminants on the silicon surface. The value of the initial surface energy, as estimated by using the crack propagation method, was 506 mJ/M sup 2 , which was up to about three times higher than the value for the conventional direct bonding method using wet chemical treatments.

  10. Passivation of electrically active centers by Hydrogen and Lithium in Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The hyperfine technique of Perturbed Angular Correlation Spectroscopy (PAC) has proven to be excellently suited for the microscopic investigation of impurity complexes in semiconductors. But this method is seriously limited by the small number of chemically different isotopes which are suitable for PAC measurements and represent electrically active centers in semiconductors. This bottleneck can be widely overcome by the ISOLDE facility which provides a great variety of shortliving PAC isotopes. The probe atom $^{111m}$Cd, provided by ISOLDE opened the first successful access to PAC investigations of III-V compounds and enabled also the first PAC experiments on double acceptors in silicon and germamum. \\\\ \\\\ At the new ISOLDE facility our experiments were concentrated on the passivation of electrically active centres by hydrogen and lithium in Si, Ge and III-V compounds. Experiments on $^{111m}$Cd in Ge revealed the formation of two different acceptor hydrogen and two different acceptor lithium complexes respe...

  11. Efficient Method for the Determination of the Activation Energy of the Iodide-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, William; Lee, James; Abid, Nauman; DeMeo, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    An experiment is described that determines the activation energy (E[subscript a]) of the iodide-catalyzed decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide in a much more efficient manner than previously reported in the literature. Hydrogen peroxide, spontaneously or with a catalyst, decomposes to oxygen and water. Because the decomposition reaction is…

  12. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    phosphoric acid were investigated in a temperature range from 80 to 170°C. A significant dependence of the activities on temperature was observed for all five carbide samples. Through the entire temperature range Group 6 metal carbides showed higher activity than that of the Group 5 metal carbides......Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated...

  13. Factors responsible for activity of catalysts of different chemical types in the reaction of hydrogen oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'chenko, N.I.; Dolgikh, L.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Reasons of differences in the kinetics and mechanism of the H 2 oxidation on optimum metallic (Pt), carbide (WC) and oxide (Co 3 O 4 ) catalysts are discussed. These differences lead to unequal specific activity. It is shown that the catalytic activity of the catalysts in question increases with respect to reactions of isotopic exchange and hydrogen oxidation with an increasing electron-donating ability of anat of the transition metal M on which H 2 is adsorbed. The possibility is considered of increasing the transition metal activity by introduction of additions to increase the electron-donating ability of M

  14. Energy recovery during advanced wastewater treatment: simultaneous estrogenic activity removal and hydrogen production through solar photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenlong; Li, Yi; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Qing

    2013-03-01

    Simultaneous estrogenic activity removal and hydrogen production from secondary effluent were successfully achieved using TiO(2) microspheres modified with both platinum nanoparticles and phosphates (P-TiO(2)/Pt) for the first time. The coexistence of platinum and phosphate on the surface of TiO(2) microspheres was confirmed by transmission electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. P-TiO(2)/Pt microspheres showed a significantly higher photocatalytic activity than TiO(2) microspheres and TiO(2) powders (P25) for the removal of estrogenic activity from secondary effluent with the removal ratio of 100%, 58.2% and 48.5% in 200 min, respectively. Moreover, the marked production of hydrogen (photonic efficiency: 3.23 × 10(-3)) was accompanied by the removal of estrogenic activity only with P-TiO(2)/Pt as photocatalysts. The hydrogen production rate was increasing with decreased DO concentration in secondary effluent. Results of reactive oxygen species (ROS) evaluation during P-TiO(2)/Pt photocatalytic process showed that O(2)(-)and OH were dominant ROS in aerobic phase, while OH was the most abundant ROS in anoxic phase. Changes of effluent organic matter (EfOM) during photocatalysis revealed that aromatic, hydrophobic, and high molecular weight fractions of EfOM were preferentially transformed into non-humic, hydrophilic, and low MW fractions (e.g. aldehydes and carboxylic acids), which were continuously utilized as electron donors in hydrogen production process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Prediction of activation energies for hydrogen abstraction by cytochrome p450

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars; Rydberg, Patrik; Rod, Thomas Holm

    2006-01-01

    We have estimated the activation energy for hydrogen abstraction by compound I in cytochrome P450 for a diverse set of 24 small organic substrates using state-of-the-art density functional theory (B3LYP). We then show that these results can be reproduced by computationally less demanding methods,...... of the less demanding methods are applied to study the CYP3A4 metabolism of progesterone and dextromethorphan....

  16. Comment on "Active sites for CO2 hydrogenation to methanol on Cu/ZnO catalysts"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakamura, Junji; Fujitani, Tadahiro; Kuld, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Kattel et al (Reports, 24 March 2017, p. 1296) report that a zinc on copper (Zn/Cu) surface undergoes oxidation to zinc oxide/copper (ZnO/Cu) during carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrogenation to methanol and conclude that the Cu-ZnO interface is the active site for methanol synthesis. Similar experiments...... conducted two decades ago by Fujitani and Nakamura et al demonstrated that Zn is attached to formate rather than being fully oxidized....

  17. Far-UV-induced dimeric photoproducts in short oligonucleotides: sequence effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douki, T.; Zalizniak, T.; Cadet, J.

    1997-01-01

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine (6-4)pyrimidone adducts represent the two major classes of far-UV-induced DNA photoproducts. Because of the lack of appropriate detection methods for each individual photoproduct, little is known about the effect of the sequence on their formaiton. In the present work, the photoproduct distribution obtained upon exposure of a series of dinucleoside monophosphate to 254 nm light was determined. (author)

  18. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCTION ACTIVITY AND ADHESIVE PROPERTIES OF AEROCOCCI, ISOLATED IN WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanskyi D.O.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antagonistic activity of probiotic microorganisms against other species of bacteria is an important mechanism of their ecology and it is widely used in practice. This activity is inherent in many heme-deficient bacteria, which include aerococci, and can be composed of several components: the production of organic acids, antibiotics, lysozyme, hydrogen peroxide and others. Ability to produce hydrogen peroxide under aerobic conditions and in a state of relative anaerobiosis was established in aerococci. They were divided into strong and weak producers, depending on the amount of peroxides. Lack of data about peroxide-productive ability of aerococci, isolated from the lower genital tract of women, as well as a proven mechanism of hydrogen peroxide excretion in the oxidation of lactic acid, led to need in studying the aerococci hydrogen peroxide production level, to create autobacterial drugs, based on aerococci symbiont strains for sanitation of birth canal. Colonization resistance of the vaginal mucous and normal microflora value depends largely on the degree of adhesion of microbial cells to the mucosal surface. Along with numerous studies of lactobacilli adhesive properties to the vaginal epithelium, there are no data on the adsorption capacity of aerococci to the vaginal epithelial cells. Material and methods. 18 aerococci resident strains and 1 museum strain were explored in total. Presence and quantity of autosymbiont aerococci content in different parts of the birth tract (cervical canal, vagina, external genitalia skin (EGS and perineum was studied in 44 healthy women. Isolation and identification of aerococci from the women body was conducted by the method, taking into account growth on selective indicator medium, growth and biochemical activity in environments with selenium and tellurium salts, lactate oxidase and superoxide dismutase activity. Hydrogen peroxide was determined by iodometric method. Hydrogen peroxide

  19. Photoproduction within the two-component Dual Parton Model: amplitudes and cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, R.; Siegen Univ.

    1995-01-01

    In the framework of the Dual Parton Model an approximation scheme to describe high energy photoproduction processes is presented. Based on the distinction between direct, resolved soft, and resolved hard interaction processes we construct effective impact parameter amplitudes. In order to treat low mass diffraction within the eikonal formalism in a consistent way a phenomenological ansatz is proposed. The free parameters of the model are determined by fits to high energy hadro- and photoproduction cross sections. We calculate the partial photoproduction cross sections and discuss predictions of the model at HERA energies. Using hadro- and photoproduction data together, the uncertainties of the model predictions are strongly reduced. (orig.)

  20. Hydrogen adsorption-mediated synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes and their enhanced electrocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bang-An; Du, Jia-Huan; Sheng, Tian; Tian, Na; Xiao, Jing; Liu, Li; Xu, Bin-Bin; Zhou, Zhi-You; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-06-01

    Concave nanocubes are enclosed by high-index facets and have negative curvature; they are expected to have enhanced reactivity, as compared to nanocubes with flat surfaces. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a new strategy for the synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes with {hk0} high-index facets, by using a hydrogen adsorption-mediated electrochemical square-wave potential method. It was found that Pt atoms prefer to deposit on edge sites rather than terrace sites on Pt surfaces with intensive hydrogen adsorption, resulting in the formation of concave structures. The as-prepared concave Pt nanocubes exhibit enhanced catalytic activity and stability towards oxidation of ethanol and formic acid in acidic solutions, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts.Concave nanocubes are enclosed by high-index facets and have negative curvature; they are expected to have enhanced reactivity, as compared to nanocubes with flat surfaces. Herein, we propose and demonstrate a new strategy for the synthesis of concave Pt nanocubes with {hk0} high-index facets, by using a hydrogen adsorption-mediated electrochemical square-wave potential method. It was found that Pt atoms prefer to deposit on edge sites rather than terrace sites on Pt surfaces with intensive hydrogen adsorption, resulting in the formation of concave structures. The as-prepared concave Pt nanocubes exhibit enhanced catalytic activity and stability towards oxidation of ethanol and formic acid in acidic solutions, compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of DFT calculation, SEM images of concave Pt nanocubes, mass activity and stability characterization of the catalysts. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02349e

  1. Diffractive photoproduction of D*±(2010) at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2007-03-01

    Diffractive photoproduction of D *± (2010) mesons was measured with the ZEUS detector at the ep collider HERA, using an integrated luminosity of 78.6 pb -1 . The D * mesons were reconstructed in the kinematic range: transverse momentum p T (D * )>1.9 GeV and pseudorapidity vertical stroke η(D * ) vertical stroke *+ → D 0 π + s followed by D 0 → K - π + (+c.c.). Diffractive events were identified by a large gap in pseudorapidity between the produced hadronic state and the outgoing proton. Cross sections are reported for photon-proton centre-of-mass energies in the range 130 2 2 , in two ranges of the Pomeron fractional momentum x P P *± (2010) photoproduction cross section is about 6%. The data are in agree- ment with perturbative QCD calculations based on various parameterisations of diffractive parton distribution functions. The results are consistent with diffractive QCD factorisation. (orig.)

  2. Role of nucleon resonance excitation in φ meson photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Q.; Didelez, J.P.; Guidal, M.; Saghai, B.

    2000-01-01

    The resonance effects are investigated in the φ meson photoproduction near threshold through a quark model approach with an effective Lagrangian. The diffractive contribution is consistently estimated by the t-channel Pomeron exchange. Another non-diffractive process, t-channel π 0 exchange is also included. The numerical result shows that the Pomeron exchange plays dominant role in the φ meson photoproduction, while the cross sections of the non-diffractive processes, i.e., s- and u-channel excitations, and t-channel π 0 exchange, are quite small. In the polarization observables, we find that large asymmetries are produced in the backward direction by the interferences from the s- and u-channel resonances, while in the forward direction, only very small asymmetries are generated. Meanwhile, we find that the effects from the π 0 exchange are generally negligible. (author)

  3. Photoproduction of events with rapidity gaps between jets at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2006-12-15

    The photoproduction of dijet events, where the two jets with the highest transverse energy are separated by a large gap in pseudorapidity, have been studied with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 39 pb{sup -1}. Rapidity-gap events are defined in terms of the energy flow between the jets, such that the total summed transverse energy in this region is less than some value E{sub T}{sup C}UT. The data show a clear excess over the predictions of standard photoproduction models. This is interpreted as evidence for a strongly interacting exchange of a color-singlet object. Monte Carlo models which include such a color-singlet exchange are able to describe the data. (orig.)

  4. Pion photoproduction cross section at large momentum transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoegren, Johan [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom

    2015-02-27

    The Real Compton Scattering experiment was performed in Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. It was designed to measure, for Compton scattering and π0-photoproduction, the differential cross section over a range of kinematic points and the polarisation transfer to the proton at a single kinematic point. The full range of the experiment in Mandelstam variables t and s was 1.6-6.46 GeV2 and 4.82-10.92 GeV2 respectively with beam energies of 2-6 GeV. The motivation for the experiment is to test the cross section and polarisation transfer predictions of perturbative QCD versus that of predictions from Generalised Parton Distribution models. This thesis will give an overview of the pertinent theory, experimental setup in Hall A and the extracting of the π0-photoproduction cross section.

  5. Photoproduction of events with rapidity gaps between jets at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2006-12-01

    The photoproduction of dijet events, where the two jets with the highest transverse energy are separated by a large gap in pseudorapidity, have been studied with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 39 pb -1 . Rapidity-gap events are defined in terms of the energy flow between the jets, such that the total summed transverse energy in this region is less than some value E T C UT. The data show a clear excess over the predictions of standard photoproduction models. This is interpreted as evidence for a strongly interacting exchange of a color-singlet object. Monte Carlo models which include such a color-singlet exchange are able to describe the data. (orig.)

  6. Near-threshold photoproduction of {phi} mesons from deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, X., E-mail: xqian@caltech.ed [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, CA 91125 (United States); Chen, W.; Gao, H. [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Hicks, K. [Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Kramer, K. [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Laget, J.M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Mibe, T. [Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Qiang, Y. [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Stepanyan, S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Tedeschi, D.J. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Xu, W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Adhikari, K.P.; Amaryan, M. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Anghinolfi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Ball, J. [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/Service de Physique Nucleaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Battaglieri, M. [INFN, Sezione di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Batourine, V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Bedlinskiy, I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow 117259 (Russian Federation); Bellis, M. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Biselli, A.S. [Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06824 (United States); Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2011-02-07

    We report the first, kinematically-complete measurement of the differential cross section of {phi}-meson photoproduction from deuterium near the production threshold for a proton using the CLAS detector and a tagged-photon beam in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The measurement was carried out by a triple coincidence detection of a proton, K{sup +} and K{sup -} near the theoretical production threshold of 1.57 GeV. The extracted differential cross sections (d{sigma})/(dt) for the initial photon energy range of 1.65-1.75 GeV are consistent with predictions based on a quasifree mechanism. Our finding is different from recent LEPS results on {phi}-meson photoproduction from deuterium in a similar incident photon energy range, but in a different momentum transfer region.

  7. Dijet angular distributions in direct and resolved photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1996-05-01

    Jet photoproduction, where the two highest transverse energy (E T jet ) jets have E T jet above 6 GeV and a jet-jet invariant mass above 23 GeV, has been studied with the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. Resolved and direct photoproduction samples have been separated. The cross section as a function of the angle between the jet-jet axis and the beam direction in the dijet rest frame has been measured for the two samples. The measured angular distributions differ markedly from each other. They agree with the predictions of QCD calculations, where the different angular distributions reflect the different spins of the quark and gluon exchanged in the hard subprocess. (orig.)

  8. Activating basal-plane catalytic activity of two-dimensional MoS2 monolayer with remote hydrogen plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Chia-Chin

    2016-09-10

    Two-dimensional layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials such as Molybdenum disufide (MoS2) have been recognized as one of the low-cost and efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The crystal edges that account for a small percentage of the surface area, rather than the basal planes, of MoS2 monolayer have been confirmed as their active catalytic sites. As a result, extensive efforts have been developing in activating the basal planes of MoS2 for enhancing their HER activity. Here, we report a simple and efficient approach-using a remote hydrogen-plasma process-to creating S-vacancies on the basal plane of monolayer crystalline MoS2; this process can generate high density of S-vacancies while mainly maintaining the morphology and structure of MoS2 monolayer. The density of S-vacancies (defects) on MoS2 monolayers resulted from the remote hydrogen-plasma process can be tuned and play a critical role in HER, as evidenced in the results of our spectroscopic and electrical measurements. The H2-plasma treated MoS2 also provides an excellent platform for systematic and fundamental study of defect-property relationships in TMDs, which provides insights for future applications including electrical, optical and magnetic devices. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Pseudoscalar meson photoproduction: from known to undiscovered resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghai, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee; Tabakin, F.

    1996-12-31

    The role of dynamics in spin observables for pseudoscalar meson photoproduction is investigated using a density matrix approach in a multipole truncated framework. Extraction of novel rules for {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}n, K{sup +}{Lambda} and {eta}p reactions based on resonance dominance, and on other broad and reasonable dynamical assumptions, are discussed. Observables that are particularly sensitive to missing nucleonic resonances predicted by quark-based approaches, are singled out. (authors). 25 refs.

  10. Autumn photoproduction of carbon monoxide in Jiaozhou Bay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chunyan; Yang, Guipeng; Lu, Xiaolan

    2014-06-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) plays a significant role in global warming and atmospheric chemistry. Global oceans are net natural sources of atmospheric CO. CO at surface ocean is primarily produced from the photochemical degradation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). In this study, the effects of photobleaching, temperature and the origin (terrestrial or marine) of CDOM on the apparent quantum yields (AQY) of CO were studied for seawater samples collected from Jiaozhou Bay. Our results demonstrat that photobleaching, temperature and the origin of CDOM strongly affected the efficiency of CO photoproduction. The concentration, absorbance and fluorescence of CDOM exponentially decreased with increasing light dose. Terrestrial riverine organic matter could be more prone to photodegradation than the marine algae-derived one. The relationships between CO AQY and the dissolved organic carbon-specific absorption coefficient at 254 nm for the photobleaching study were nonlinear, whereas those of the original samples were strongly linear. This suggests that: 1) terrestrial riverine CDOM was more efficient than marine algae-derived CDOM for CO photoproduction; 2) aromatic and olefinic moieties of the CDOM pool were affected more strongly by degradation processes than by aliphatic ones. Water temperature and the origin of CDOM strongly affected the efficiency of CO photoproduction. The photoproduction rate of CO in autumn was estimated to be 31.98 μmol m-2 d-1 and the total DOC photomineralization was equivalent to 3.25%-6.35% of primary production in Jiaozhou Bay. Our results indicate that CO photochemistry in coastal areas is important for oceanic carbon cycle.

  11. On rescattering in meson coherent photoproduction on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starkov, N.I.; Tsarev, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    Screening corrections for cross section of π deg-meson photoproduction on He nuclei were calculated: γ + 4 He → π 0 + 4 He. On the basis of the Glauber theory the effect of meson rescattering in the range of small transferred pulses (t) 2 and ''mean'' photon energies 2 2 ), determined by interference of members of one-and twofold interactions. The results are compared with those obtained by other authors

  12. Results from high energy photoproduction at the CERN SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, F.

    1979-09-01

    Results from a photoproduction experiment using the CERN spectrometer with a tagged photon beam giving energies between 20 and 70 GeV are presented here. Charm physics and vector meson searches are emphasized. A luminosity of 80 events/nb was obtained on events with a detected charged kaon and of 60 events/nb on events with at least four prongs. Results on an emulsion exposure using the same apparatus are also presented

  13. Coherent pion photoproduction from deuterium at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osland, P.; Rej, A.K.

    1975-12-01

    The coherent photoproduction of neutral pions on deuterons is studied at energies around the (3,3) resonance and discuss the effects of the Fermi motion, rescattering and kinematical approximations. The results are very dependent upon what kinematical approximations one adopts for the impulse approximation term, which dominates up to very large angles. Allowing for this uncertainty in the kinematics, our results are in good agreement with the most recent experimental data

  14. Beauty in photoproduction at HERA II with the ZEUS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutle, Sarah

    2010-02-15

    The production of beauty quarks in ep collisions should be accurately calculable in perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) since the large mass of the b quark provides a hard scale. Therefore it is interesting to compare such predictions to results using photoproduction events where a low-virtuality photon, emitted by the incoming lepton, collides with a parton from the incoming proton. A measurement of beauty in photoproduction has been made at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 126 pb{sup -}1. Beauty was identified in events with a muon in the final state by using the transverse momentum of the muon relative to the closest jet. Lifetime information from the silicon vertex detector was also used; the impact parameter of the muon with respect to the primary vertex was exploited to discriminate between signal and background. Cross sections for beauty production as a function of the muon and the jet variables were measured and compared to QCD predictions and to previous measurements. The data were found to be well described by the predictions from next-to-leading-order QCD. The dijet sample of beauty photoproduction events was also used to study higher-order QCD topologies. At leading order, the two jets in the event are produced back-to-back in azimuthal angle, such that {delta}{phi}{sup jj}={phi}{sup j1}-{phi}{sup j2}={pi}. Additional soft radiation causes small azimuthal decorrelations, whilst {delta}{phi}{sup jj} significantly lower than {pi} is evidence of additional hard radiation. In this thesis, the cross section versus {delta}{phi}{sup jj} for beauty photoproduction and the comparison to NLO QCD predictions and Monte Carlo models are presented. (orig.)

  15. Neutral pion photoproduction off nucleons and nuclei near threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamalov, S.S.; Chumbalov, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The modern experimental data on the coherent photoproduction off 4 He, 6 Li, 12 C, 16 O, 40 Ca and 208 Pb are analyzed in terms of the DWIA in the momentum space. It is shown that the elaborated elementary amplitudes do not give a possibility of the simultaneous self-consistent description of the process on free nucleons and nuclei. 36 refs.; 11 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Beauty in photoproduction at HERA II with the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutle, Sarah

    2010-02-01

    The production of beauty quarks in ep collisions should be accurately calculable in perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) since the large mass of the b quark provides a hard scale. Therefore it is interesting to compare such predictions to results using photoproduction events where a low-virtuality photon, emitted by the incoming lepton, collides with a parton from the incoming proton. A measurement of beauty in photoproduction has been made at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 126 pb - 1. Beauty was identified in events with a muon in the final state by using the transverse momentum of the muon relative to the closest jet. Lifetime information from the silicon vertex detector was also used; the impact parameter of the muon with respect to the primary vertex was exploited to discriminate between signal and background. Cross sections for beauty production as a function of the muon and the jet variables were measured and compared to QCD predictions and to previous measurements. The data were found to be well described by the predictions from next-to-leading-order QCD. The dijet sample of beauty photoproduction events was also used to study higher-order QCD topologies. At leading order, the two jets in the event are produced back-to-back in azimuthal angle, such that Δφ jj =φ j1 -φ j2 =π. Additional soft radiation causes small azimuthal decorrelations, whilst Δφ jj significantly lower than π is evidence of additional hard radiation. In this thesis, the cross section versus Δφ jj for beauty photoproduction and the comparison to NLO QCD predictions and Monte Carlo models are presented. (orig.)

  17. Nondiffraction photoproduction of vector mesons and the photon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badalyan, R.G.; Gulkanyan, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    In the framework of the recombination model of hadron production a self-consistent description of the available data on the inclusive spectra of the nondiffraction photoproduction of vector mesons in the fragmentation region of photons at high energies is obtained. The parameters of parton distribution in the hadron component of a photon are estimated and its structure is compared with the measurements of the photon structure function in γγ-interactions at low Q 2 . 15 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Study of the photon remnant in resolved photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-01-01

    Photoproduction at HERA is studied in ep collisions, with the ZEUS detector, for γp centre-of-mass energies ranging from 130-270 GeV. A sample of events with two high-p T jets (p T >6 GeV, η T with respect to the beam axis is measured to be 2.1±0.2 GeV, which demonstrates substantial mean transverse momenta for the photon remnant. (orig.)

  19. Pseudoscalar meson photoproduction: from known to undiscovered resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saghai, B.; Tabakin, F.

    1996-01-01

    The role of dynamics in spin observables for pseudoscalar meson photoproduction is investigated using a density matrix approach in a multipole truncated framework. Extraction of novel rules for γp → π + n, K + Λ and ηp reactions based on resonance dominance, and on other broad and reasonable dynamical assumptions, are discussed. Observables that are particularly sensitive to missing nucleonic resonances predicted by quark-based approaches, are singled out. (authors)

  20. Exclusive ϒ photoproduction in hadronic collisions at CERN LHC energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonçalves, V.P., E-mail: barros@ufpel.edu.br [High and Medium Energy Group, Instituto de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Moreira, B.D.; Navarra, F.S. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-06

    The exclusive ϒ photoproduction in proton–proton and proton–nucleus collisions at LHC energies is investigated using the color dipole formalism and considering different models for the ϒ wave function and forward dipole–target scattering amplitude. Our goal is to update the color dipole predictions and estimate the theoretical uncertainty present in these predictions. We present predictions for the kinematical ranges probed by the ALICE, CMS and LHCb Collaborations.

  1. A novel endo-hydrogenase activity recycles hydrogen produced by nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Gordon; Tom, Curtis G S; Park, Angela S; Zenad, Lounis; Ludwig, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen (N(2)) fixation also yields hydrogen (H(2)) at 1:1 stoichiometric amounts. In aerobic diazotrophic (able to grow on N(2) as sole N-source) bacteria, orthodox respiratory hupSL-encoded hydrogenase activity, associated with the cell membrane but facing the periplasm (exo-hydrogenase), has nevertheless been presumed responsible for recycling such endogenous hydrogen. As shown here, for Azorhizobium caulinodans diazotrophic cultures open to the atmosphere, exo-hydrogenase activity is of no consequence to hydrogen recycling. In a bioinformatic analysis, a novel seven-gene A. caulinodans hyq cluster encoding an integral-membrane, group-4, Ni,Fe-hydrogenase with homology to respiratory complex I (NADH: quinone dehydrogenase) was identified. By analogy, Hyq hydrogenase is also integral to the cell membrane, but its active site faces the cytoplasm (endo-hydrogenase). An A. caulinodans in-frame hyq operon deletion mutant, constructed by "crossover PCR", showed markedly decreased growth rates in diazotrophic cultures; normal growth was restored with added ammonium--as expected of an H(2)-recycling mutant phenotype. Using A. caulinodans hyq merodiploid strains expressing beta-glucuronidase as promoter-reporter, the hyq operon proved strongly and specifically induced in diazotrophic culture; as well, hyq operon induction required the NIFA transcriptional activator. Therefore, the hyq operon is constituent of the nif regulon. Representative of aerobic N(2)-fixing and H(2)-recycling alpha-proteobacteria, A. caulinodans possesses two respiratory Ni,Fe-hydrogenases: HupSL exo-hydrogenase activity drives exogenous H(2) respiration, and Hyq endo-hydrogenase activity recycles endogenous H(2), specifically that produced by N(2) fixation. To benefit human civilization, H(2) has generated considerable interest as potential renewable energy source as its makings are ubiquitous and its combustion yields no greenhouse gases. As such, the reversible, group-4 Ni,Fe-hydrogenases, such

  2. Weak hydrogen bonding interactions influence slip system activity and compaction behavior of pharmaceutical powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomane, Kailas S; Bansal, Arvind K

    2013-12-01

    Markedly different mechanical behavior of powders of polymorphs, cocrystals, hydrate/anhydrate pairs, or structurally similar molecules has been attributed to the presence of active slip planes system in their crystal structures. Presence of slip planes in the crystal lattice allows easier slip under the applied compaction pressure. This allows greater plastic deformation of the powder and results into increased interparticulate bonding area and greater tensile strength of the compacts. Thus, based on this crystallographic feature, tableting performance of the active pharmaceutical ingredients can be predicted. Recently, we encountered a case where larger numbers of CH···O type interactions across the proposed slip planes hinder the slip and thus resist plastic deformation of the powder under the applied compaction pressure. Hence, attention must be given to these types of interactions while identifying slip planes by visualization method. Generally, slip planes are visualized as flat layers often strengthened by a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network within the layers or planes. No hydrogen bonding should exist between these layers to consider them as slip planes. Moreover, one should also check the presence of CH···O type interactions across these planes. Mercury software provides an option for visualization of these weak hydrogen bonding interactions. Hence, caution must be exercised while selecting appropriate solid form based on this crystallographic feature. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  3. Hydrolytic hydrogen generation using milled aluminum in water activated by Li, In, and Zn additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, M.Q.; Liu, S.; Wang, C.; Chen, D.; Shu, K.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2012-08-15

    A method for obtaining hydrogen through the hydrolytic reaction of highly activated aluminum (Al) alloy is investigated. The optimized Al-3 wt.% Li-4 wt.% In-7 wt.% Zn alloy significantly improves the maximum hydrogen generation rate and amount (137 mL g{sup -1} min{sup -1} and 1,243 mL g{sup -1}, respectively). An efficiency of 100% was reached within 1 h at 298 K. The synergistic catalytic effects of Li, In, and Zn, which stimulated Al hydrolysis through the formation of micro galvanic cells of In-Li and Al-In-Zn alloys in water, were observed. The reactions were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and hydrolytic experiments. The In-Li alloy functions as an initial active center and produces LiOH in water, which further stimulates and changes the hydrolytic process of the Al-In-Zn alloy. The effects of alloy composition, milling time, and hydrolytic temperature were considered and discussed. The results indicate that the hydrolytic reaction of Al-Li-In-Zn alloy in water might be feasible for the production of inexpensive, pure, and safe hydrogen for micro fuel cells. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. An obligately aerobic soil bacterium activates fermentative hydrogen production to survive reductive stress during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Michael; Greening, Chris; Conrad, Ralf; Jacobs, William R; Cook, Gregory M

    2014-08-05

    Oxygen availability is a major factor and evolutionary force determining the metabolic strategy of bacteria colonizing an environmental niche. In the soil, conditions can switch rapidly between oxia and anoxia, forcing soil bacteria to remodel their energy metabolism accordingly. Mycobacterium is a dominant genus in the soil, and all its species are obligate aerobes. Here we show that an obligate aerobe, the soil actinomycete Mycobacterium smegmatis, adopts an anaerobe-type strategy by activating fermentative hydrogen production to adapt to hypoxia. This process is controlled by the two-component system DosR-DosS/DosT, an oxygen and redox sensor that is well conserved in mycobacteria. We show that DosR tightly regulates the two [NiFe]-hydrogenases: Hyd3 (MSMEG_3931-3928) and Hyd2 (MSMEG_2719-2718). Using genetic manipulation and high-sensitivity GC, we demonstrate that Hyd3 facilitates the evolution of H2 when oxygen is depleted. Combined activity of Hyd2 and Hyd3 was necessary to maintain an optimal NAD(+)/NADH ratio and enhanced adaptation to and survival of hypoxia. We demonstrate that fermentatively-produced hydrogen can be recycled when fumarate or oxygen become available, suggesting Mycobacterium smegmatis can switch between fermentation, anaerobic respiration, and aerobic respiration. Hydrogen metabolism enables this obligate aerobe to rapidly meet its energetic needs when switching between microoxic and anoxic conditions and provides a competitive advantage in low oxygen environments.

  5. Hydrogen Cyanide Produced by Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 Exhibits Nematicidal Activity against Meloidogyne hapla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Ryong Kang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp. are parasites that attack many field crops and orchard trees, and affect both the quantity and quality of the products. A root-colonizing bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6, possesses beneficial traits including strong nematicidal activity. To determine the molecular mechanisms involved in the nematicidal activity of P. chlororaphis O6, we constructed two mutants; one lacking hydrogen cyanide production, and a second lacking an insecticidal toxin, FitD. Root drenching with wild-type P. chlororaphis O6 cells caused juvenile mortality in vitro and in planta. Efficacy was not altered in the fitD mutant compared to the wild-type but was reduced in both bioassays for the mutant lacking hydrogen cyanide production. The reduced number of galls on tomato plants caused by the wild-type strain was comparable to that of a standard chemical nematicide. These findings suggest that hydrogen cyanide-producing root colonizers, such as P. chlororaphis O6, could be formulated as “green” nematicides that are compatible with many crops and offer agricultural sustainability.

  6. Hydrogen Adsorption on Activated Carbon an Carbon Nanotubes Using Volumetric Differential Pressure Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanip, S. M.; Saidin, M. A. R.; Aziz, M.; Ismail, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    A simple hydrogen adsorption measurement system utilizing the volumetric differential pressure technique has been designed, fabricated and calibrated. Hydrogen adsorption measurements have been carried out at temperatures 298 K and 77 K on activate carbon and carbon nanotubes with different surface areas. The adsorption data obtained will be helpful in understanding the adsorption property of the studied carbon materials using the fundamentals of adsorption theory. The principle of the system follows the Sievert-type method. The system measures a change in pressure between the reference cell, R1 and the sample cell S1, S2, S3 over a certain temperature range, R1, S1, S2, and S3 having known fixed volume. The sample temperatures will be monitored by thermocouple TC while the pressures in R1 an S1, S2, S3 will be measured using a digital pressure transducer. The maximum operating pressure of the pressure transducer is 20 bar and calibrated with an accuracy of ±0.01 bar. High purity hydrogen is being used in the system and the amount of samples for the study is between 1.0-2.0 grams. The system was calibrated using helium gas without any samples in S1, S2 an S3. This will provide a correction factor during the adsorption process providing an adsorption free reference point when using hydrogen gas resulting in a more accurate reading of the adsorption process by eliminating the errors caused by temperature expansion effects and other non-adsorption related phenomena. The ideal gas equation of state is applied to calculate the hydrogen adsorption capacity based on the differential pressure measurements. Activated carbon with a surface area of 644.87 m 2 /g showed a larger amount of adsorption as compared to multiwalled nanotubes (commercial) with a surface area of 119.68 m 2 /g. This study als indicated that there is a direct correlation between the amounts of hydrogen adsorbed an surface area of the carbon materials under the conditions studied and that the adsorption

  7. Strangeness photoproduction at the BGO-OD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jude, Thomas [Physikalisches Institut, Bonn University (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The BGO-OD experiment at the ELSA accelerator facility uses an energy tagged bremstrahlung photon beam to investigate the internal structure of the nucleon. The setup consists of a highly segmented BGO calorimeter surrounding the target, with a particle tracking magnetic spectrometer at forward angles. Compared to constituent quark models (CQMs), models including psuedoscalar meson-baryon interactions have had improved success in describing baryon excitation spectra. For example, the Λ(1405) appears to be dynamically generated from meson-baryon interactions at least to some extent. Vector-meson baryon interactions have also been predicted to dynamically generate states, which may have been observed in photoproduction reactions. BGO-OD is ideal for investigating low momentum transfer processes due to the acceptance and high momentum resolution at forward angles. This enables the investigation of degrees of freedom not derived from CQMs, and in particular, strangeness photoproduction where t-channel exchange mechanisms play a dominant role. With the first major data taking periods for BGO-OD complete, an extensive programme for the investigation of associated strangeness photoproduction has begun.

  8. Phototransformation of amlodipine: degradation kinetics and identification of its photoproducts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jakimska

    Full Text Available Nowadays, monitoring focuses on the primary compounds and does not include degradation products formed during various biological and chemical processes. Transformation products may have the same effects to human health and the environment or sometimes they can be more toxic than the parent compound. Unfortunately, knowledge about the formation of degradation products is still limited, however, can be very important for the environmental risk assessment. Firstly, the photodegradation kinetic of amlodipine was investigated in two experimental conditions: during the exposure to solar radiation and during the exposure to the light emitted by the xenon lamp. In all cases degradation of amlodipine followed a pseudo-first-order kinetics. In the next step, identification of transformation products of amlodipine formed during the exposure to xenon lamp irradiation was performed using ultra high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS. As a result sixteen photoproducts were identified, their structures were elucidated and ultimately the transformation pathway was proposed. Fifteen compounds (out of 16 photoproducts were newly identified and reported here for the first time; some of those compounds were formed from the first photoproduct, amlodipine pyridine derivative. Several analytes were formed only in acidic or basic conditions. Furthermore, the occurrence of amlodipine and its identified degradation products was investigated in environmental waters. Only one out of 16 compounds was found in wastewater effluent. The possibility of the sorption of examined analytes to sewage sludge particles was discussed based on QSAR.

  9. Radioassay for hydrogenase activity in viable cells and documentation of aerobic hydrogen-consuming bacteria living in extreme environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schink, B.; Lupton, F.S.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    An isotopic tracer assay based on the hydrogenase-dependent formation of tritiated water from tritium gas was developed for in life analysis of microbial hydrogen transformation. This method allowed detection of bacterial hydrogen metabolism in pure cultures or in natural samples obtained from aquatic ecosystems. A differentiation between chemical-biological and aerobic-anaerobic hydrogen metabolism was established by variation of the experimental incubation temperature or by addition of selective inhibitors. Hydrogenase activity was shown to be proportional to the consumption or production of hydrogen by cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Clostridium pasteurianum, and Methanosarcina barkeri. This method was applied, in connection with measurements of free hydrogen and most-probable-number enumerations, in aerobic natural source waters to establish the activity and document the ecology of hydrogen-consuming bacteria in extreme acid, thermal, or saline environments. The utility of the assay is based in part on the ability to quantify bacterial hydrogen transformation at natural hydrogen partial pressures, without the use of artificial electron acceptors

  10. Enhancement of hydrogen production during waste activated sludge anaerobic fermentation by carbohydrate substrate addition and pH control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinguang; Xiao, Naidong; Zhao, Yuxiao; Mu, Hui

    2012-06-01

    The effects of carbohydrate/protein ratio (CH/Pr) and pH on hydrogen production from waste activated sludge (WAS) were investigated. Firstly, the optimal pH value for hydrogen production was influenced by the CH/Pr ratio, which was pH 10, 9, 8, 8, 8 and 6 at the CH/Pr ratio (COD based) of 0.2 (sole sludge), 1, 2.4, 3.8, 5 and 6.6, respectively. The maximal hydrogen production (100.6 mL/g-COD) was achieved at CH/Pr of 5 and pH 8, which was due to the synergistic effect of carbohydrate addition on hydrogen production, the enhancement of sludge protein degradation and protease and amylase activities, and the suitable fermentation pathway for hydrogen production. As hydrogen consumption was observed at pH 8, in order to further increase hydrogen production a two-step pH control strategy (pH 8+pH 10) was developed and the hydrogen production was further improved by 17.6%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Incorporating nitrogen atoms into cobalt nanosheets as a strategy to boost catalytic activity toward CO2 hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangbing; Zhang, Wenbo; Zheng, Xusheng; Chen, Yizhen; Wu, Wenlong; Qiu, Jianxiang; Zhao, Xiangchen; Zhao, Xiao; Dai, Yizhou; Zeng, Jie

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogenation of CO2 into fuels and useful chemicals could help to reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Although great progress has been made over the past decades to improve the activity of catalysts for CO2 hydrogenation, more efficient catalysts, especially those based on non-noble metals, are desired. Here we incorporate N atoms into Co nanosheets to boost the catalytic activity toward CO2 hydrogenation. For the hydrogenation of CO2, Co4N nanosheets exhibited a turnover frequency of 25.6 h-1 in a slurry reactor under 32 bar pressure at 150 °C, which was 64 times that of Co nanosheets. The activation energy for Co4N nanosheets was 43.3 kJ mol-1, less than half of that for Co nanosheets. Mechanistic studies revealed that Co4N nanosheets were reconstructed into Co4NHx, wherein the amido-hydrogen atoms directly interacted with the CO2 to form HCOO* intermediates. In addition, the adsorbed H2O* activated amido-hydrogen atoms via the interaction of hydrogen bonds.

  12. Organic matter and hydrogen as electron donor for SRB and IRB activities in a clayey medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chautard, C.; Mifsud, A.; Libert, M.; Marsal, F.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. According to the French concept for the disposal of High-Level radioactive Waste (HLW), waste will be emplaced in an environment with multiple metallic components into a geological clay formation. The presence of microorganisms has recently been evidenced in deep clayey environment. Therefore, neither the introduction of microbial species during the construction and operational phases nor the survival of bacteria after the disposal closure can be excluded. Indeed, microbial species may be able to tolerate specific environment with few nutrients to sustain life under high temperature, dry and highly radioactive conditions. Moreover, despite the low porosity of clays, cracks in the excavated disturbed zone and remaining void spaces between disposal components may be favorable for bacterial growth. Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (SRB) and Iron-Reducing Bacteria (IRB) activities are notably expected to influence iron-clay reactivity, including corrosion processes. Their potential development must be investigated in order to better assess their metabolism, which may in turn influence the evolution of metallic and clayey materials involved in a HLW disposal cell. More specifically, deep geological environments containing low amounts of biodegradable Organic Matter (OM) are generally nutrient poor for microbial development. However, the radiolysis of pore water and the corrosion of metallic components of HLW disposal cell in anoxic conditions will lead to the production of hydrogen, which may also be used as an electron donor for microbial activity. Thus, the purpose of the present work is to quantify the potential of bacterial growth stimulation due either to the production of hydrogen or the presence of OM. In a first step, characterization of DOM leached from Tournemire clay powder has been performed in order to identify and estimate the concentration of soluble organic matter available for bacteria activity which will

  13. Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, David A.; Arduengo, Anthony J. III

    2010-01-01

    . This goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of ± 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized σ- or π-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an 'endless' hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular

  14. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of ± 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized σ- or π-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an “endless” hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular

  15. {eta} meson photoproduction on deuterium; Photoproduction du meson {eta} sur le deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann-Rothe, P.

    1996-05-30

    Measurements of the total and differential cross sections for {eta}-meson photoproduction on a D{sub 2} liquid target from threshold to 1.2 GeV, have been taken using the tagged Bremsstrahlung photon beam produced by the electrons extracted from the ELSA storage ring at Bonn. The reaction was identified by detecting the eta decay products in the neutral meson spectrometer SPES0-2{pi}, while the recoil baryons (proton, neutron or deuteron) were detected by a variety of large angle scintillator detectors. We succeeded to identify completely the final states corresponding to the production of an {eta} meson on a Quasi-Free (QF) proton, a QF neutron and the coherent deuteron. The differential cross sections corresponding to the production of a coherent deuteron n the final state have been measured, from threshold to 800 MeV; they are 6 times smaller the only previous measurement reported by Anderson and Prepost in 1969. This is consistent with an Isoscalar part of the Amplitude much smaller than the Isovector one. The differential cross sections are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction on the impulse approximation mechanism; indicating in particular, fairly small contributions from rescattering terms. A direct measurement of the neutron to proton cross section ratios has been obtained by integrating the counting rates on the corresponding QF peaks and is 0.70 {+-} 0.03, from 700 MeV to 900 MeV, with a small angular dependence. These two results by comparison to the measured free proton data should allow to reconstruct the free neutron cross sections in a rather model-independent way. (authors). 56 refs., 90 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. The Synthesis and Electrocatalytic Activities of Molybdenum Sulfide for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhengxing

    2014-07-01

    In the context of the future hydrogen economy, effective production of hydrogen (H2) from readily available and sustainable resources is of crucial importance. Hydrogen generation via water splitting by solar energy or electricity has attracted great attention in recent years. In comparison with photocatalytic water-splitting directly using solar light, which is ideal but the relevant technologies are not yet mature, electrolysis of water with catalyst is more practical at the current stage. The Pt-group noble metals are the most effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water, but their high costs limit their applications. Due to the earth-abundance and low price, MoS2 is expected to be a good alternative of the Pt-group metals for HER. Plenty of researches have been conducted for improving the HER activities of MoS2 by optimizing its synthesis method. However, it remains challenging to prepare MoS2 catalysts with high and controllable activity, and more investigations are still needed to better understand the structure-performance correlation in this system. In this thesis, we report a new strategy for fabricating MoS2 eletrocatalysts which gives rise to much improved HER performance and allows us to tune the electrocatalytic activity by varying the preparation conditions. Specifically, we sulfurized molybdenum oxide on the surface of a Ti foil electrode via a facile chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, and directly used the electrode for HER testing. Depending on the CVD temperature, the MoO2-MoS2 nanocomposites show different HER activities. Under the optimal synthesis condition (400ºC), the resulting catalyst exhibited excellent HER activity: an onset potential (overpotential) of 0.095 V versus RHE and the Tafel slope of 40 mv/dec. Such a performance exceeds those of most reported MoS2 based HER electrocatalysts. We demonstrated that the CVD temperature has significant influence on the catalysts in crystallinity degree, particle

  17. Simulation of the effect of hydrogen bonds on water activity of glucose and dextran using the Veytsman model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito, Francesca; Veytsman, Boris; Painter, Paul; Kokini, Jozef L

    2015-03-06

    Carbohydrates exhibit either van der Waals and ionic interactions or strong hydrogen bonding interactions. The prominence and large number of hydrogen bonds results in major contributions to phase behavior. A thermodynamic framework that accounts for hydrogen bonding interactions is therefore necessary. We have developed an extension of the thermodynamic model based on the Veytsman association theory to predict the contribution of hydrogen bonds to the behavior of glucose-water and dextran-water systems and we have calculated the free energy of mixing and its derivative leading to chemical potential and water activity. We compared our calculations with experimental data of water activity for glucose and dextran and found excellent agreement far superior to the Flory-Huggins theory. The validation of our calculations using experimental data demonstrated the validity of the Veytsman model in properly accounting for the hydrogen bonding interactions and successfully predicting water activity of glucose and dextran. Our calculations of the concentration of hydrogen bonds using the Veytsman model were instrumental in our ability to explain the difference between glucose and dextran and the role that hydrogen bonds play in contributing to these differences. The miscibility predictions showed that the Veytsman model is also able to correctly describe the phase behavior of glucose and dextran. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydrogen activated axial inter-conversion in SiC nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruemmeli, Mark H.; Adebimpe, David B.; Borowiak-Palen, Ewa; Gemming, Thomas; Ayala, Paola; Ioannides, Nicholas; Pichler, Thomas; Huczko, Andrzej; Cudzilo, Stanislaw; Knupfer, Martin; Buechner, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    A facile low pressure annealing route using NH 3 as a hydrogen source for the structural and chemical modification of SiC nanowires (SiCNWs) is presented. The developed route transforms SiCNWs into tubular SiC nanostructures while coaxial SiO 2 /SiCNWs reverse their sheath/core structure. Our findings suggest a decomposition process induced via the preferential substitution of silicon by hydrogen and via the difference in diffusion rates of available atomic species, which leads to axial structural rearrangement. In addition to these effects, the procedure improves the crystallinity of the samples. The process could be exploited as a viable route to manipulate a variety of nanostructures and films for doping and etching and structural manipulation. - Graphical abstract: SiC and SiO 2 /SiCNWs are shown to be structurally modified through a hydrogen activated replacement route which can even lead to the axial inter-conversion of species. The process could be exploited as a viable route to manipulate a variety of nanostructures and films for doping and etching and structural manipulation

  19. Nickel-hydrogen battery state of charge management in the absence of active cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lurie, C.; Foroozan, S. [TRW, Redondo Beach, CA (United States); Brewer, J.; Jackson, L.G. [NASA, Huntsville, AL (United States). Marshall Space Flight Center

    1995-12-31

    Battery management during prelaunch activities has always required special attention and careful planning. `ne transition from nickel-cadmium to nickel-hydrogen batteries, with their higher self discharge rate and lower charge efficiency, as well as longer prelaunch scenarios, have made this aspect of spacecraft management even more challenging. The NASA AXAF-I Program requires high battery state of charge at launch. The use of active cooling, to ensure adequate state of charge during prelaunch charge, trickle charge, and stand was considered and proved to be expensive and difficult to implement. Alternate approaches were considered. A procedure including optimized charging and low rate (active cooling, appeared promising and was investigated. The investigation includes three phases: (1) demonstration of the feasibility of the proposed procedure (2) development of a parametric data base (3) validation in an AXAF-I mission simulation test. Charging, trickle charging, and open circuit stand are considered in each phase. The major conclusion of this work is that nickel-hydrogen batteries can achieve and maintain high states of charge, in the absence of active cooling, using the approach described in this paper.

  20. Inoculum development by using activated sludge to remove hydrogen sulphide (H2S through biofiltration*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Mora

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Different activated sludges were used for developing an inoculum able to degrade hydrogen sulphide in a pilot scale biofiltration plant using two different support materials: sugarcane bagasse and this bagasse mixed with pumice stone. Adapting and selecting microbial species which degrade hydrogen sulphide (H2S was aided by adding nutrients plus a specific substrate to the activated sludge. Population variation was monitored within the different trophic groups in the biofiter medium during pilot scale plant operation, a general trend towards sulphur-oxidising bacteria (SOB growth being observed as was a decrease in heterotrophic bacteria, molds and yeasts. The activated sludge which showed the highest substrate degradation speed was selected for standardising inoculum preparation; the different nutritional mediums were evaluated during this process. Measuring some variables for controlling the process led to choosing the pH for determining the proper point of inoculum adaptation for this specific substrate. The inoculation procedure and support characteristics in terms of establishing and developing the microbial species increased biofilter removal efficiency by up to 99% from start-up. Key words: biofilter, activated sludge, adapted microorganisms, sulphur-oxidising bacteria, respirometry. Este artículo es el resultado de un proyecto cofinanciado por Colciencias y desarrollado por un grupo de investigadores vinculados al proyecto a través de las entidades Corporación

  1. Hydrogen Adsorption on Activated Carbon an Carbon Nanotubes Using Volumetric Differential Pressure Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanip, S. M.; Saidin, M. A. R.; Aziz, M.; Ismail, A. F.

    2010-03-01

    A simple hydrogen adsorption measurement system utilizing the volumetri differential pressure technique has been designed, fabricated and calibrated. Hydroge adsorption measurements have been carried out at temperatures 298 K and 77 K on activate carbon and carbon nanotubes with different surface areas. The adsorption data obtained will b helpful in understanding the adsorption property of the studied carbon materials using th fundamentals of adsorption theory. The principle of the system follows the Sievert-type metho The system measures a change in pressure between the reference cell, R1 and the sample cell S1, S2, S3 over a certain temperature range. R1, S1, S2, and S3 having known fixed volume The sample temperatures will be monitored by thermocouple TC while the pressures in R1 an S1, S2, S3 will be measured using a digital pressure transducer. The maximum operatin pressure of the pressure transducer is 20 bar and calibrated with an accuracy of ±0.01 bar. Hig purity hydrogen is being used in the system and the amount of samples for the study is betwee 1.0-2.0 grams. The system was calibrated using helium gas without any samples in S1, S2 an S3. This will provide a correction factor during the adsorption process providing an adsorption free reference point when using hydrogen gas resulting in a more accurate reading of th adsorption process by eliminating the errors caused by temperature expansion effects and oth non-adsorption related phenomena. The ideal gas equation of state is applied to calculate th hydrogen adsorption capacity based on the differential pressure measurements. Activated carbo with a surface area of 644.87 m2/g showed a larger amount of adsorption as compared to multiwalled nanotubes (commercial) with a surface area of 119.68 m2/g. This study als indicated that there is a direct correlation between the amounts of hydrogen adsorbed an surface area of the carbon materials under the conditions studied and that the adsorption significant at 77

  2. Final Report for the DOE-BES Program Mechanistic Studies of Activated Hydrogen Release from Amine-Boranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Sneddon; R. Thomas Baker

    2013-01-13

    Effective storage of hydrogen presents one of the most significant technical gaps to successful implementation of the hydrogen economy, particularly for transportation applications. Amine boranes, such as ammonia borane H3NBH3 and ammonia triborane H3NB3H7, have been identified as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage media containing potentially readily released protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens. At the outset of our studies, dehydrogenation of ammonia borane had been studied primarily in the solid state, but our DOE sponsored work clearly demonstrated that ionic liquids, base-initiators and/or metal-catalysts can each significantly increase both the rate and extent of hydrogen release from amine boranes under moderate conditions. Our studies also showed that depending upon the activation method, hydrogen release from amine boranes can occur by very different mechanistic steps and yield different types of spent-fuel materials. The fundamental understanding that was developed during this grant of the pathways and controlling factors for each of these hydrogen-release mechanisms is now enabling continuing discovery and optimization of new chemical-hydride based hydrogen storage systems.

  3. Energy-independent multipole analysis of single-pion photoproduction from protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Get' man, V.A.; Sanin, V.M.; Telegin, Y.N.; Shalatskii, S.V.

    1983-08-01

    For the first time photoproduction multipole amplitudes are evaluated unambiguously on the basis of new experimental data on pion photoproduction from protons and the latest ..pi..N scattering phase shifts. The multipole amplitudes obtained are compared with the results of previous multipole analyses and dispersion-relation predictions.

  4. Energy-independent multipole analysis of single-pion photoproduction from protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Get'man, V.A.; Sanin, V.M.; Telegin, Y.N.; Shalatskii, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    For the first time photoproduction multipole amplitudes are evaluated unambiguously on the basis of new experimental data on pion photoproduction from protons and the latest πN scattering phase shifts. The multipole amplitudes obtained are compared with the results of previous multipole analyses and dispersion-relation predictions

  5. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Liang

    2015-04-22

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  6. Excess Adsorption Isotherms of Hydrogen on Activated Carbons from Agricultural Waste Materials.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Karel; Hejtmánek, Vladimír; Cruz, G.J.F.; Jandová, Věra; Šolcová, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 5 (2017), s. 900-906 ISSN 0930-7516. [International Congress of Chemical and Process Engineering CHISA 2016 and the 19th Conference PRES 2016 /22./. Prague, 27.08.2016-31.08.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-14228S Grant - others:NUT(PE) 0722-2014/UNT-R Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : activated carbon * hydrogen * excess adsorption Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 2.051, year: 2016

  7. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-04-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold-gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  8. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF PEROXYDISUCCINIC ACID, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND THEIR MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blazheyevskiy M.Ye.,

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It is known that reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in vivo by cell aerobic metabolism cause multiple damage in different cell organelles and kill not only obligate anaerobes and microaerophilles, but also aerobes. ROS generated by phagocytes and representatives of normal microflora are an important component of macroorganism defense from most pathogens, which is explained by their ability to damage different biological structures. ROS have high reactivity and let us use them in vitro as effective biocides. Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in many industries, in particular, in medicine and veterinary as antiseptic and disinfectant agent due to its safety for environment and broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity including spore-forming bacteria. However, in the recent years certain decrease of background sensitivity of microorganisms to hydrogen peroxide and occurrence of resistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms to this agent has been noted. The aim of this work is to carry out a comparative study of antimicrobial activity of hydrogen peroxide, peroxydisuccinic acid (PDSA, monoperoxysuccinic acid (MPSA, and mixture of PDSA and hydrogen peroxide (Н2О2. Materials and methods. The substances of peroxydisuccinic acid (PDSA and monoperoxysuccinic acid (MPSA were prepared by well known methods. The following test-strains were used to assess antimicrobial activity of the agents: Staphylococcus aureus АТСС 25923, Escherichia coli АТСС 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa АТСС 27853, Pseudomonas aeruginosa АТСС 9027, Basillus сereus АТСС 10702, Basillus сereus АТСС 96, Basillus subtilis АТСС 6633, Proteus vulgaris ATCC 4636, Candida albicans АТСС 885/653, and Candida albicans АТСС 10231. All disinfectant agents were diluted in distilled water at 40 ºС and stirred. The microbial burden was 2∙109 CFU/ml of the medium, and for kinetic studies 105 CFU/ml of the medium, it was standardizing

  9. Performance of Pd on activated carbon as hydrogen electrode with respect to hydrogen yield in a single cell proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolyser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naga Mahesh, K.; Sarada Prasad, J.; Venkateswer Rao, M.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally, Hyderabad 500085 (A.P.) (India); Yerramilli, Anjaneyulu [TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 32917 - 0939 (United States); Raghunathan Rao, P. [Fuel cell section, Heavy Water Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)

    2009-08-15

    Palladium (Pd) on activated carbon is used as electrocatalyst coated on Nafion 115 membrane as Hydrogen electrode and RuO{sub 2} is coated on other side of membrane used as oxygen electrode. 5 wt% and 10 wt% Pd on activated carbon is prepared as membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and investigated the performance of the same using inhouse prepared 10 cm{sup 2} single cell. The performance of the single cell assembly and the hydrogen yield are reported during electrolysis operation at temperatures 27 C, 45 C and 65 C at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 A/cm{sup 2} current densities with respect to voltages. (author)

  10. Hydrogen production from molasses by anaerobic fermentation in an activated sludge immobilized bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, W.; Yao, X.; Chen, H.; Yue, L.R. [Northeast Forestry Univ., Harbin (China). Forestry School; Li, Y.F. [Shanghai Univ. of Engineering and Science (China). School of Chemical Engineering; Northeast Forestry Univ., Harbin (China). Forestry School

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the use of granular activated carbon as a support material for the production of biohydrogen in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with 5.4 L of molasses as a substrate. The CSTR contained both granular activated carbon and pre-treated sludge operating and was operated at a temperature of 36 degrees C with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 hours. The procedure increased both biogas and hydrogen yields. The biogas was principally comprised of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}). The H{sub 2} percentage ranged from 38.4 per cent to 41 per cent. The maximum H{sub 2} production rate of 3.56 L was obtained at an OLR of 24 kg/m{sup t}d. H{sub 2} yield was influenced by the presence of ethanol to acetic acid in the liquid phase. Maximum H{sub 2} production rates occurred when the ratio of ethanol to acetic acid was close to 1. The study indicated that granular activated carbon can help to stabilize H{sub 2} production systems.

  11. Molecular hydrogen: an energy source for bacterial activity in nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libert, M.; Esnault, L.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Hydrogen is a common product of microbial metabolism, large number of bacteria are able to use it as energetic substrate in subsurface ecosystems. Moreover H 2 is known as one of the most energetic substrates for deep subsurface ecosystem. It could be produced in different ways mainly volcanic activity (basalts iron rich volcanic rocks) or natural radiolysis of water or even fermentation. The millimolar concentrations of H 2 observed in the ground waters are consistent with the activity of a large variety of hydrogen-oxidising bacteria as described in the following Table. Electron acceptors are identified as O 2 , CO 2 , NO 3 , SO 4 or Fe +++ . Aerobic, anaerobic, obligate and facultative autotrophs are included. Numerous of these bacteria are thermophilic bacteria. This bacterial activity leads to the production of methane, acetate, nitrogen, hydrogen sulphur or ferrous oxides. In anoxic environments, H 2 concentrations are governed by microbial metabolism. In most cases, H 2 producing microorganisms are thermodynamically controlled by the abundance of H 2 , and survive thanks to H 2 consumers, a metabolism called inter-species H 2 transfer. Metabolism of H 2 is catalysed by hydrogenase as cytoplasmic enzymes or membrane bound enzymes. Several situations of H 2 production will occur in nuclear waste repository: - Radiolysis of water. - Radiolysis of organic matter (such as bitumen, in case of B waste), H 2 production due to gamma radiolysis of bitumen is evaluated to 1 L H 2 /kg of bitumen /MGy. - Corrosion of metal containers (in deaerated solutions). Large amount of H 2 are predicted in some situations, and will select the development of hydrogen species. Then, aerobic hydrogen bacteria oxidising hydrogen could be found in basins containing irradiating waste, or during the oxic period of storage, denitrifying bacteria or sulfate reducing bacteria will develop near the bitumen waste. Groundwater of the Callovo

  12. Manganese-Oxygen Intermediates in O-O Bond Activation and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Derek B; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A

    2017-11-21

    Biological systems capitalize on the redox versatility of manganese to perform reactions involving dioxygen and its derivatives superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and water. The reactions of manganese enzymes influence both human health and the global energy cycle. Important examples include the detoxification of reactive oxygen species by manganese superoxide dismutase, biosynthesis by manganese ribonucleotide reductase and manganese lipoxygenase, and water splitting by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. Although these enzymes perform very different reactions and employ structurally distinct active sites, manganese intermediates with peroxo, hydroxo, and oxo ligation are commonly proposed in catalytic mechanisms. These intermediates are also postulated in mechanisms of synthetic manganese oxidation catalysts, which are of interest due to the earth abundance of manganese. In this Account, we describe our recent efforts toward understanding O-O bond activation pathways of Mn III -peroxo adducts and hydrogen-atom transfer reactivity of Mn IV -oxo and Mn III -hydroxo complexes. In biological and synthetic catalysts, peroxomanganese intermediates are commonly proposed to decay by either Mn-O or O-O cleavage pathways, although it is often unclear how the local coordination environment influences the decay mechanism. To address this matter, we generated a variety of Mn III -peroxo adducts with varied ligand environments. Using parallel-mode EPR and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption techniques, the decay pathway of one Mn III -peroxo complex bearing a bulky macrocylic ligand was investigated. Unlike many Mn III -peroxo model complexes that decay to oxo-bridged-Mn III Mn IV dimers, decay of this Mn III -peroxo adduct yielded mononuclear Mn III -hydroxo and Mn IV -oxo products, potentially resulting from O-O bond activation of the Mn III -peroxo unit. These results highlight the role of ligand sterics in promoting the formation of mononuclear products and mark an important

  13. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER.

  14. Nippon oil's activities toward realization of hydrogen society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Kojiro; Okazaki, Junji; Kobori, Yoshihiro; Iki, Hideshi [Nippon Oil Corporation (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Nippon Oil Corporation, a major Japanese energy distributor, has been devoting extensive efforts toward the establishment of hydrogen supply systems. The Council on Competitiveness-Nippon (COCN), an advisory organization which has influence on Japanese government policy, has announced that the establishment of hydrogen infrastructure should be started in 2015. By that time, we plan to have completed the development of necessary technologies for the infrastructure. It is well recognized that the storage and transportation of hydrogen is the sticking point on the path to realization of a hydrogen economy. The scope of our research covers key technologies for hydrogen storage and transportation, including carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) tanks for compressed hydrogen gas, hydrogen storage materials, and hydrogen transportation systems which utilize organic chemical hydride (OCH). This article describes Nippon Oil's strategy for realization of the hydrogen economy. (orig.)

  15. Ultraviolet-induced mutations in Cockayne syndrome cells are primarily caused by cyclobutane dimer photoproducts while repair of other photoproducts is normal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parris, C.N.; Kraemer, K.H.

    1993-01-01

    The authors compared the contribution to mutagenesis on Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells of the major class of UV photoproducts, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, to that of other DNA photoproducts by using the mutagenesis shuttle vector pZ189. Lymphoblastoid cell lines from the DNA repair-deficient disorders CS and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and a normal line were transfected with UV-treated pZ189. Cyclobutane dimers were selectively removed before transfection by photoreactivation (PR), leaving nondimer photoproducts intact. After UV exposure and replication in CS and XP cells, plasmid survival was abnormally elevated. After PR, plasmid survival increased and mutation frequency in CS cells decreased to normal levels but remained abnormal in XP cells. Sequence analysis of >200 mutant plasmids showed that with CS cells a major mutational hot spot was caused by unrepaired cyclobutane dimers. These data indicate that with both CS and XP cyclobutane dimers are major photoproducts generating reduced plasmid survival and increased mutation frequency. However, unlike XP, CS cells are proficient in repair of nondimer photoproducts. Since XP but not CS patients have a high frequency of UV-induced skin cancers, the data suggest that prevention of UV-induced skin cancers is associated with proficient repair of nondimer photoproducts. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Wenhui [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Jihong; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He{sup +} beam and sequential He{sup +} and H{sup +} beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C.

  17. Synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen for bubble swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel under sequential helium and hydrogen irradiation at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wenhui; Guo, Liping; Chen, Jihong; Luo, Fengfeng; Li, Tiecheng; Ren, Yaoyao; Suo, Jinping; Yang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Helium/hydrogen synergistic effect can increase irradiation swelling of RAFM steel. • Hydrogen can be trapped to the outer surface of helium bubbles. • Too large a helium bubble can become movable. • Point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations at high temperature. • The peak swelling temperature for RAFM steel is 450 °C. - Abstract: In order to investigate the synergistic effect of helium and hydrogen on swelling in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel, specimens were separately irradiated by single He + beam and sequential He + and H + beams at different temperatures from 250 to 650 °C. Transmission electron microscope observation showed that implantation of hydrogen into the specimens pre-irradiated by helium can result in obvious enhancement of bubble size and swelling rate which can be regarded as a consequence of hydrogen being trapped by helium bubbles. But when temperature increased, Ostwald ripening mechanism would become dominant, besides, too large a bubble could become mobile and swallow many tiny bubbles on their way moving, reducing bubble number density. And these effects were most remarkable at 450 °C which was the peak bubble swelling temperature for RAMF steel. When temperature was high enough, say above 450, point defects would become mobile and annihilate at dislocations or surface. As a consequence, helium could no longer effectively diffuse and clustering in materials and bubble formation was suppressed. When temperature was above 500, helium bubbles would become unstable and decompose or migrate out of surface. Finally no bubble was observed at 650 °C

  18. A novel endo-hydrogenase activity recycles hydrogen produced by nitrogen fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrogen (N(2 fixation also yields hydrogen (H(2 at 1:1 stoichiometric amounts. In aerobic diazotrophic (able to grow on N(2 as sole N-source bacteria, orthodox respiratory hupSL-encoded hydrogenase activity, associated with the cell membrane but facing the periplasm (exo-hydrogenase, has nevertheless been presumed responsible for recycling such endogenous hydrogen. METHODS AND FINDINGS: As shown here, for Azorhizobium caulinodans diazotrophic cultures open to the atmosphere, exo-hydrogenase activity is of no consequence to hydrogen recycling. In a bioinformatic analysis, a novel seven-gene A. caulinodans hyq cluster encoding an integral-membrane, group-4, Ni,Fe-hydrogenase with homology to respiratory complex I (NADH: quinone dehydrogenase was identified. By analogy, Hyq hydrogenase is also integral to the cell membrane, but its active site faces the cytoplasm (endo-hydrogenase. An A. caulinodans in-frame hyq operon deletion mutant, constructed by "crossover PCR", showed markedly decreased growth rates in diazotrophic cultures; normal growth was restored with added ammonium--as expected of an H(2-recycling mutant phenotype. Using A. caulinodans hyq merodiploid strains expressing beta-glucuronidase as promoter-reporter, the hyq operon proved strongly and specifically induced in diazotrophic culture; as well, hyq operon induction required the NIFA transcriptional activator. Therefore, the hyq operon is constituent of the nif regulon. CONCLUSIONS: Representative of aerobic N(2-fixing and H(2-recycling alpha-proteobacteria, A. caulinodans possesses two respiratory Ni,Fe-hydrogenases: HupSL exo-hydrogenase activity drives exogenous H(2 respiration, and Hyq endo-hydrogenase activity recycles endogenous H(2, specifically that produced by N(2 fixation. To benefit human civilization, H(2 has generated considerable interest as potential renewable energy source as its makings are ubiquitous and its combustion yields no greenhouse gases. As

  19. Microwave-activated Ni/carbon catalysts for highly selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinhuan; He, Jie; Jing, Run; Tao, Peipei; Nie, Renfeng; Zhou, Dan; Xia, Qinghua

    2017-06-01

    Biocarbon supported Ni catalysts have been prepared by facile impregnation of Ni species by microwave-heating and used for selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine. These catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, N2 sorption measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature programmed reduction of H2 and H2 temperature-programmed desorption. The morphology and particle size of catalysts were imaged by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. For the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to cyclohexylamine, 10%Ni/CSC-II(b) exhibits the best catalytic activity to achieve 100 mol% conversion of nitrobenzene and 96.7% selectivity of cyclohexylamine under reaction conditions of 2.0 MPa H2 and 200 °C, ascribed to high dispersion of Ni species and formation of nanosized Ni particles on the support aided by microwave-heating. Thus-prepared Ni/CSC catalyst is greatly activated, in which the addition of precious metal like Rh is totally avoided.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide extends the postharvest life and enhances antioxidant activity of kiwifruit during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liqin; Wang, Wei; Shi, Jingying; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yonggen; Du, Huaying; Wu, Shaofu

    2014-10-01

    Exogenous hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) treatment can prolong the postharvest life of cut flowers and strawberries. Little work has been done to explore the effects of H₂S on respiratory climacteric fruits such as kiwifruits during storage. Therefore the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of H₂S treatment at concentrations of 15–1000 µmol L⁻¹ on the postharvest life of kiwifruit during 25 °C storage and the role of H₂S in regulating the antioxidant defensive system of kiwifruit. Treatments with 45 and 90 µmol L⁻¹ H₂S significantly inhibited the increase in soluble sugar content and the decrease in vitamin C (Vit C), chlorophyll content and firmness, inhibited ethylene production and both superoxide production rate (O(·2)⁻) and hydrogen peroxide content. Kiwifruits with 45 and 90 µmol L⁻¹ H₂S exhibited significantly higher activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase. Treatment with 180 µmol L⁻¹ H₂S promoted the ripening of kiwifruits. Treatments with 45 and 90 µmol L⁻¹ H₂S could delay the maturation and senescence of kiwifruits and maintain higher titratable acid (TA) and Vit C during eating-ripe storage by inhibiting ethylene production, improving protective enzyme activities and decreasing the accumulation of reactive oxygen species to protect the cell membrane during storage. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Effect of Co crystallinity on Co/CNT catalytic activity in CO/CO{sub 2} hydrogenation and CO disproportionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyak, Sergei A., E-mail: chernyak.msu@gmail.com [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Physical Chemistry, Leninsky Avenue 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Suslova, Evgeniya V.; Egorov, Alexander V.; Maslakov, Konstantin I. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Savilov, Serguei V.; Lunin, Valery V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Physical Chemistry, Leninsky Avenue 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-30

    Highlights: • Amorphous and crystalline Co supported on CNTs were obtained by tuning of CNT surface. • CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation does not occur on amorphous Co particles. • Thermal activation of amorphous Co led to crystallization of metal. • Amorphous Co promotes CO disproportionation. • Carbon shells around the amorphous metal particles after the CO hydrogenation. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different degree of surface oxidation were used as supports for 5 wt.% Co catalysts. CNTs and Co/CNT catalysts were analyzed by XPS, nitrogen adsorption, TEM and electron diffraction to reveal their structure. High oxidation degree of CNT surface (8.6 at.% of O) and low Co loading led to predominantly amorphous Co species. This resulted in the absence of catalytic activity in both CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in opposite to the catalyst supported on less oxidized CNTs (5.4 at.% of O) where Co species were found to be crystalline. Thermal treatment of inactive catalyst in H{sub 2} and He led to the formation of Co crystal phase which was active in catalysis. Co particle size in catalyst supported on strongly oxidized CNTs was unchanged during CO hydrogenation in opposite to Co supported on less oxidized CNTs. Carbon shell formation on the surface of amorphous Co particles during CO hydrogenation was revealed, which testified CO disproportionation. Qualitative mechanism of CO hydrogenation on small Co particles was proposed.

  2. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nucleons near threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friman, B.; Soyeur, M.

    1995-11-01

    We propose a simple meson-exchange model of the photoproduction of ρ-and ω-mesons off protons near threshold (E γ < or∼2 GeV). We show that this model provides a good description of the available data and implies a large ρ-nucleon interaction in the scalar channel (σ-exchange). We use this phenomenological interaction to estimate the leading contribution to the self-energy of ρ-mesons in matter. We discuss the implications of our calculation for experimental studies of the ρ-meson mass in nuclei. (orig.)

  3. Latest results from meson photoproduction at ELSA and MAMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusche, B.

    2014-06-01

    Photoproduction of mesons plays a key role for the investigation of the excitation spectrum of the nucleon and thus for our understanding of the strong interaction in the non-perturbative regime. In this contribution we discuss recent results from the experiments at the tagged photon beams of the electron accelerators ELSA in Bonn and MAMI in Mainz. They include the measurement of cross sections and (double) polarization observables for single meson production and production of meson pairs off free protons as well as of quasi-free nucleons bound in light nuclei (in particular the deuteron).

  4. Study ω and φ photoproduction in the nucleon isotopic channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Q.

    2002-01-01

    We present results for the photoproduction of ω and φ meson in the nucleon isotopic channels. A recently developed quark model with an effective Lagrangian is employed to account for the non-diffractive s- and u-channel processes; the diffractive feature arising from the natural parity exchange is accounted for by the t-channel pomeron exchange, while the unnatural parity exchange is accounted for by the t-channel pion exchange. In the ω production, the isotopic effects could provide more information concerning the search of 'missing resonances', while in the φ production, the isotopic effects could highlight non-diffractive resonance excitation mechanisms at large angles. (author)

  5. Photoproduction of {omega} mesons on nuclei near the production threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanova, M.; Friedrich, S.; Metag, V.; Thiel, M.; Gregor, R.; Kotulla, M.; Lugert, S.; Novotny, R.; Pant, L.M.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Schadmand, S.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R. [Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Weil, J.; Mosel, U. [Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, Giessen (Germany); Anton, G.; Bogendoerfer, R.; Hoessl, J.; Suft, G. [Universitaet Erlangen, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Bacelar, J.C.S.; Castelijns, R.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Shende, S. [Kernfysisch Versneller Institut, Groningen (Netherlands); Bartholomy, O.; Crede, V.; Ehmanns, A.; Essig, K.; Fabry, I.; Fuchs, M.; Funke, C.; Gutz, E.; Hoeffgen, S.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Klempt, E.; Lotz, J.; Pee, H. van; Schmidt, C.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Walther, D.; Weinheimer, C.; Wendel, C. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Bayadilov, D. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Beloglazov, Y.A.; Gridnev, A.B.; Lopatin, I.V.; Radkov, A.; Sumachev, V.V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Gothe, R.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Konrad, M.; Menze, D.; Morales, C.; Ostrick, M.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Suele, A. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Jaegle, I.; Krusche, B.; Mertens, T. [Universitaet Basel, Physikalisches Institut, Basel (Switzerland); Kopf, B. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Universitaet Bochum, Physikalisches Institut, Bochum (Germany); Langheinrich, J. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Universitaet Bochum, Physikalisches Institut, Bochum (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    The photoproduction of {omega} mesons on LH{sub 2}, C and Nb has been measured for incident photon energies from 900 to 1300MeV using the CB/TAPS detector at ELSA. The {omega} lineshape does not show any significant difference between the LH{sub 2} and the Nb targets. The experiment was motivated by transport calculations that predicted a sensitivity of the {omega} lineshape to in-medium modifications near the production threshold on a free nucleon of E{sub {gamma}}{sup lab}=1109 MeV. A comparison with recent calculations is given. (orig.)

  6. Beauty photoproduction using decays into electrons at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2008-05-15

    Photoproduction of beauty quarks in events with two jets and an electron associated with one of the jets has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb{sup -1}. The fractions of events containing b quarks, and also of events containing c quarks, were extracted from a likelihood fit using variables sensitive to electron identification as well as to semileptonic decays. Total and differential cross sections for beauty and charm production were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations and Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  7. Measurement of heavy-quark jet photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.

    2011-04-01

    Photoproduction of beauty and charm quarks in events with at least two jets has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 133 pb -1 . The fractions of jets containing b and c quarks were extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of jet transverse momentum, p jet T , and pseudorapidity, η jet , were measured. The data are compared with previous measurements and are well described by next-to-leading-order QCD predictions. (orig.)

  8. Recent results in photoproduction with real and virtual photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diekmann, B.

    1984-10-01

    An overview of recent experimental results on soft photon-hadron-interactions is given. It contains results on inclusive photoproduction of rho and ω-mesons, hyperons and the totally inclusive reaction: γp -> Xp. Results on the search for radially excited vectormesons and on the determination of the radiative width of the rho- meson are updated. An improved measurement of the pion form factor and a test of Vector-Meson-Dominance in case of virtual photons (vertical strokeq 2 vertical stroke 2 ) will be presented. (orig.)

  9. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nucleons near threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friman, B.

    1995-01-01

    A simple meson-exchange model is proposed for the photoproduction of ρ- and ω-mesons off protons near threshold. This model provides a good description of the available data and implies a large ρ-nucleon interaction in the scalar channel (σ-exchange). This phenomenological interaction is applied to estimate the leading contribution to the self-energy of ρ-mesons in matter. The implications of our calculation for experimental studies of the ρ-meson mass in nuclei are discussed. (author)

  10. Threshold pion photoproduction in A light-cone quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konen, W.; Drechsel, D.

    1991-01-01

    The instantaneous and seagull graphs are calculated for pion photoproduction in a relativistic light-cone model of the nucleon. In both pseudoscalar and pseudovector coupling we find the ratios A (-) :A (0) :A (+) =1:(-1/2μ):(-9/5 1/2μ) in the nonrelativistic limit. These results correspond to the sum of seagull and Z-graph in the nonrelativistic quark model. In pseudovector coupling also the numerical results for realistic-model parameters are close to those values. (orig.)

  11. Hard photoproduction: An analysis of the first ZEUS data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feld, L.W.

    1993-10-01

    The electron-proton storage ring HERA gives the unique opportunity to study photon-proton collisions at center of mass energies around 200 GeV. This analysis covers the extraction of hard photoproduction events from the data taken by the ZEUS-detector in its first year of operation. It is shown, that these events are well described by the Monte Carlo generators PYTHIA and HERWIG. A jet analysis allows to measure the kinematics of the hard subprocess. Clear evidence for both direct and resolved photon processes is seen in the data. In detailed Monte Carlo studies different photon structure functions are compared to the data. (orig.)

  12. Color-octet contributions to J/ψ photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, M.; Kraemer, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have calculated the leading color-octet contributions to the production of J/ψ particles in photon-proton collisions. Using the values for the color-octet matrix elements extracted from fits to prompt J/ψ data at the Tevatron, we demonstrate that distinctive color-octet signatures should be visible in J/ψ photoproduction. However, these predictions appear at variance with recent experimental data obtained at HERA, indicating that the phenomenological importance of the color-octet contributions is smaller than expected from theoretical considerations and suggested by the Tevatron fits. (orig.)

  13. Meson Spectroscopy in Photo-production at CLAS

    OpenAIRE

    Nozar, Mina

    2003-01-01

    Photo-production of excited mesons in the 1-2 GeV mass range decaying via multi-pion or multi-kaon emission has been investigated at the TJNAF\\thanks{This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and The U.S. National Science Foundation.} experiment E01-017 (g6c) in the $4.8-5.4$ GeV photon beam energy range. The main objective of the experiment is to extract resonance parameters of the produced states by way of a Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) technique. In this paper, we will focus ...

  14. Soft and hard contributions to hard pion photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasev, Andrei; Carlson, Carl E.; Wahlquist, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Pion photoproduction at high transverse momentum supplements what can be learned in the standard probes of deep inelastic scattering and Drell-Yan processes. With polarized initial states there is sensitivity to the polarized gluon distribution, Δg, in leading order. This contrasts to other processes mentioned, which have no leading order gluon contribution. Additionally, in some kinematic regions the process occurs mainly due to pion production at short distances ('direct pion production', resulting in kinematically isolated pions), which gives sensitivity to the high-x valence quark distribution

  15. Beauty photoproduction using decays into electrons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2008-05-01

    Photoproduction of beauty quarks in events with two jets and an electron associated with one of the jets has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 120 pb -1 . The fractions of events containing b quarks, and also of events containing c quarks, were extracted from a likelihood fit using variables sensitive to electron identification as well as to semileptonic decays. Total and differential cross sections for beauty and charm production were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations and Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  16. Isotensor electromagnetic current in low energy pion photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aznauryan, I.G.; Nagorskaya, I.A.; Zaslavskij, A.N.

    1974-01-01

    Recent experimental data on single pion photoproduction in the Δ (1236) resonance region are discussed. The role of the high energy contributions into the dispersion integrals are analyzed. Estimates for the magnitude of the isotensor contributions are obtained in the dispersion approach using the experimental data of various groups. In spite of the great number of the experiments the estimate is ambiguous yet since there are direct discrepancies between the data of various groups, besides, certain available data are incomplete. The data of some groups are compatible with 10% isotensor contribution

  17. Observation of hard scattering in photoproduction at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Sugano, K.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Thron, J.; Arzarello, F.; Ayed, R.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Ciralli, F.; Contin, A.; D'Auria, S.; Del Papa, C.; Frasconi, F.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Lin, Q.; Lisowski, B.; Maccarrone, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Barreiro, F.; Crittenden, J.; Dabbous, H.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Gutjahr, B.; Hartmann, H.; Hartmann, J.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kramarczyk, S.; Kückes, M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Müsch, H.; Paul, E.; Schattevoy, R.; Schneider, B.; Schneider, J.-L.; Wedemeyer, R.; Cassidy, A.; Cussans, D. G.; Dyce, N.; Fawcett, H. F.; Foster, B.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Lancaster, M.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Malos, J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Rau, R. R.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Gialas, I.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Barillari, T.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Burkot, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Dwuraźny, A.; Eskreys, A.; Nizioł, B.; Jakubowski, Z.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Borzemski, P.; Eskreys, K.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Kulka, J.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajaç, J.; Kȩdzierski, T.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Bienlein, J. K.; Coldewey, C.; Dannemann, A.; Dierks, K.; Dorth, W.; Drews, G.; Erhard, P.; Flasiński, M.; Fleck, I.; Fürtjes, A.; Gläser, R.; Göttlicher, P.; Haas, T.; Hagge, L.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hultschig, H.; Jahnen, G.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mainusch, J.; Manczak, O.; Momayezi, M.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Park, I.; Pösnecker, K.-U.; Rohde, M.; Ros, E.; Schneekloth, U.; Schroeder, J.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Tscheslog, E.; Tsurugai, T.; Turkot, F.; Vogel, W.; Woeniger, T.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Grabosch, H. J.; Leich, A.; Meyer, A.; Rethfeldt, C.; Schlenstedt, S.; Casalbuoni, R.; De Curtis, S.; Dominici, D.; Francescato, A.; Nuti, M.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Casaccia, R.; Laakso, I.; De Pasquale, S.; Qian, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Freidhof, A.; Poser, T.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Theisen, G.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Forbes, J. R.; Jamieson, V. A.; Raine, C.; Saxon, D. H.; Gloth, G.; Holm, U.; Kammerlocher, H.; Krebs, B.; Neumann, T.; Wick, K.; Hofmann, A.; Kröger, W.; Krüger, J.; Lohrmann, E.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Salomon, R.; Seidman, A.; Schott, W.; Wiik, B. H.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Markou, C.; McQuillan, D.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Prinias, A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Bienz, T.; Kreutzmann, H.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Roco, M.; Wang, M. Z.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Chen, L.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Cases, G.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Roldán, J.; Terrón, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Ikraiam, F.; Mayer, J. K.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Hanna, D. S.; Hung, L. W.; Mitchell, J. W.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; Ullmann, R.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kuznetsov, E. N.; Savin, A. A.; Voronin, A. G.; Zotov, N. P.; Bentvelsen, S.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; van der Lugt, H.; O'Dell, V.; Straver, J.; Tenner, A.; Tiecke, H.; Uijterwaal, H.; Vermeulen, J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Yoshida, R.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, S. K.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Blair, G. A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hallam-Baker, P. M.; Harnew, N.; Khatri, T.; Long, K. R.; Luffman, P.; McArthur, I.; Morawitz, P.; Nash, J.; Smith, S. J. P.; Roocroft, N. C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abbiendi, G.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; De Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Fanin, C.; Gasparini, F.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Lim, J. N.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J.; Bonori, M.; Contino, U.; D'Agostini, G.; Guida, M.; Iori, M.; Mari, S.; Marini, G.; Mattioli, M.; Monaldi, D.; Nigro, A.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Heusch, C.; Hubbard, B.; Leslie, J.; Ng, J. S. T.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Sadrozinski, H. F.; Seiden, A.; Badura, E.; Biltzinger, J.; Chaves, H.; Rost, M.; Seifert, R. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Weihs, W.; Zech, G.; Dagan, S.; Heifetz, R.; Levy, A.; Zer-Zion, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kasai, S.; Kuze, M.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nakao, M.; Okuno, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Watanabe, T.; Yamada, S.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Kitamura, S.; Nagayama, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Arneodo, M.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Bhadra, S.; Brkic, M.; Burow, B. D.; Chlebana, F. S.; Crombie, M. B.; Hartner, G. F.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Prentice, J. D.; Sampson, C. R.; Stairs, G. G.; Teuscher, R. J.; Yoon, T.-S.; Bullock, F. W.; Catterall, C. D.; Giddings, J. C.; Jones, T. W.; Khan, A. M.; Lane, J. B.; Makkar, P. L.; Shaw, D.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Kochocki, J.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Charchuła, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Stojda, K.; Stopczyński, A.; Szwed, R.; Tymieniecka, T.; Walczak, R.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Eisenberg, Y.; Glasman, C.; Karshon, U.; Montag, A.; Revel, D.; Shapira, A.; Ali, I.; Behrens, B.; Camerini, U.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Lomperski, M.; Loveless, R. J.; Nylander, P.; Ptacek, M.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Silverstein, S.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Iga, Y.; ZEUS Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    We report a study of electron proton collisions at very low Q2, corresponding to virtual photoproduction at centre of mass energies in the range 100-295 GeV. The distribution in transverse energy of the observed hadrons is much harder than can be explained by soft processes. Some of the events show back-to-back two-jet production at the rate and with the characteristics expected from hard two-body scattering. A subset of the two-jet events have energy in the electron direction consistent with that expected from the photon remnant in resolved photon processes.

  18. Measurement of heavy-quark jet photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (PL). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] (and others)

    2011-04-15

    Photoproduction of beauty and charm quarks in events with at least two jets has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 133 pb{sup -1}. The fractions of jets containing b and c quarks were extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of jet transverse momentum, p{sup jet}{sub T}, and pseudorapidity, {eta}{sup jet}, were measured. The data are compared with previous measurements and are well described by next-to-leading-order QCD predictions. (orig.)

  19. Self-assembled air-stable magnesium hydride embedded in 3-D activated carbon for reversible hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, S S; Kim, Dong-Hyung; Yu, Jin-Young; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2017-06-01

    The rational design of stable, inexpensive catalysts with excellent hydrogen dynamics and sorption characteristics under realistic environments for reversible hydrogen storage remains a great challenge. Here, we present a simple and scalable strategy to fabricate a monodispersed, air-stable, magnesium hydride embedded in three-dimensional activated carbon with periodic synchronization of transition metals (MHCH). The high surface area, homogeneous distribution of MgH 2 nanoparticles, excellent thermal stability, high energy density, steric confinement by carbon, and robust architecture of the catalyst resulted in a noticeable enhancement of the hydrogen storage performance. The resulting MHCH-5 exhibited outstanding hydrogen storage performance, better than that of most reported Mg-based hydrides, with a high storage density of 6.63 wt% H 2 , a rapid kinetics loading in hydrogenation compared to that of commercial MgH 2 . The origin of the intrinsic hydrogen thermodynamics was elucidated via solid state 1 H NMR. This work presents a readily scaled-up strategy towards the design of realistic catalysts with superior functionality and stability for applications in reversible hydrogen storage, lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells.

  20. Electrochemically reduced water exerts superior reactive oxygen species scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeki Hamasaki

    Full Text Available Electrochemically reduced water (ERW is produced near a cathode during electrolysis and exhibits an alkaline pH, contains richly dissolved hydrogen, and contains a small amount of platinum nanoparticles. ERW has reactive oxygen species (ROS-scavenging activity and recent studies demonstrated that hydrogen-dissolved water exhibits ROS-scavenging activity. Thus, the antioxidative capacity of ERW is postulated to be dependent on the presence of hydrogen levels; however, there is no report verifying the role of dissolved hydrogen in ERW. In this report, we clarify whether the responsive factor for antioxidative activity in ERW is dissolved hydrogen. The intracellular ROS scavenging activity of ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water was tested by both fluorescent stain method and immuno spin trapping assay. We confirm that ERW possessed electrolysis intensity-dependent intracellular ROS-scavenging activity, and ERW exerts significantly superior ROS-scavenging activity in HT1080 cells than the equivalent level of hydrogen-dissolved water. ERW retained its ROS-scavenging activity after removal of dissolved hydrogen, but lost its activity when autoclaved. An oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay and chemiluminescence assay could not detect radical-scavenging activity in both ERW and hydrogen-dissolved water. These results indicate that ERW contains electrolysis-dependent hydrogen and an additional antioxidative factor predicted to be platinum nanoparticles.

  1. Widely available active sites on Ni2P for electrochemical hydrogen evolution - insights from first principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Hangaard; Stern, Lucas-Alexandre; Feng, Ligang

    2015-01-01

    We present insights into the mechanism and the active site for hydrogen evolution on nickel phosphide (Ni2P). Ni2P was recently discovered to be a very active non-precious hydrogen evolution catalyst. Current literature attributes the activity of Ni2P to a particular site on the (0001) facet....... In the present study, using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, we show that several widely available low index crystal facets on Ni2P have better properties for a high catalytic activity. DFT calculations were used to identify moderately bonding nickel bridge sites and nickel hollow sites for hydrogen...... adsorption and to calculate barriers for the Tafel pathway. The investigated surfaces in this study were the (10 (1) over bar0), ((1) over bar(1) over bar 20), (11 (2) over bar0), (11 (2) over bar1) and (0001) facets of the hexagonal Ni2P crystal. In addition to the DFT results, we present experiments on Ni2...

  2. Fail-safe system for activity cooled supersonic and hypersonic aircraft. [using liquid hydrogen fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. A.; Braswell, D. O.; Richie, C. B.

    1975-01-01

    A fail-safe-system concept was studied as an alternative to a redundant active cooling system for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft which use the heat sink of liquid-hydrogen fuel for cooling the aircraft structure. This concept consists of an abort maneuver by the aircraft and a passive thermal protection system (TPS) for the aircraft skin. The abort manuever provides a low-heat-load descent from normal cruise speed to a lower speed at which cooling is unnecessary, and the passive TPS allows the aircraft skin to absorb the abort heat load without exceeding critical skin temperature. On the basis of results obtained, it appears that this fail-safe-system concept warrants further consideration, inasmuch as a fail-safe system could possibly replace a redundant active cooling system with no increase in weight and would offer other potential advantages.

  3. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators.

  4. The Behaviour of Gas Bubble during Rest Period of Pulse-Activated Electrolysis Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilasmongkolchai Thanet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulse-activated electrolyzer has been developed and used for several years. With the capability of enhancing the efficiency of an electrolytic process and easy operation, this technique becomes an interesting process for hydrogen production. Unfortunately during electrolytic reaction, the creation of bubbles becomes a reaction inhibitor and consumes energy. This paper aims to study the proper rest period that gives the bubble free rise-off the solution without additional bubble created. The mathematical method and acoustic emission method were used for investigation of bubble’s rising velocity. The result shows that the variation of rest period on pulse-activated makes production efficiency enhanced. For the practicality of use and set control parameters, duty cycle and frequency were demonstrated instead of rest period.

  5. Pt3Co concave nanocubes: synthesis, formation understanding, and enhanced catalytic activity toward hydrogenation of styrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenyu; Lin, Cuikun; Zhang, Lihua; Quan, Zewei; Sun, Kai; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Feng; Porter, Nathan; Wang, Yuxuan; Fang, Jiye

    2014-02-03

    We report a facile synthesis route to prepare high-quality Pt3Co nanocubes with a concave structure, and further demonstrate that these concave Pt3Co nanocubes are terminated with high-index crystal facets. The success of this preparation is highly dependent on an appropriate nucleation process with a successively anisotropic overgrowth and a preservation of the resultant high-index planes by control binding of oleyl-amine/oleic acid with a fine-tuned composition. Using a hydrogenation of styrene as a model reaction, these Pt3Co concave nanocubes as a new class of nanocatalysts with more open structure and active atomic sites located on their high-index crystallographic planes exhibit an enhanced catalytic activity in comparison with low-indexed surface terminated Pt3Co nanocubes in similar size. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Electrochemical investigations of activation and degradation of hydrogen storage alloy electrodes in sealed Ni/MH battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.X.; Xu, Z.D. [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Chemistry; Tu, J.P. [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2002-04-01

    The M1Ni{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.6}Al{sub 0.4} alloy was treated with hot alkaline solution containing a small amount of KBH{sub 4} and its effect on the activation and degradation behaviors of the hydrogen storage alloy electrodes in sealed Ni/MH batteries was investigated. It was found that the treated alloy electrode exhibited a better activation property than the untreated one in the sealed battery as well as in open cell. For the treated alloy electrode activating, the polarization resistance in the sealed battery was almost equal to that in the open cell. But in the case of the untreated alloy electrode activating, the polarization resistance in the sealed battery was larger than that in the open cell. The reason is that the oxide film on the untreated alloy surface suppressed the combination of the oxygen evolved on the positive electrode with hydrogen on the negative alloy surface. In addition, the decaying of capacity of the untreated alloy electrode was much faster than that of the treated one. The reasons were, that after surface treatment, the Ni-rich and Al-poor layer on the alloy surface not only had a high electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen electrode reaction, but also facilitated the combination of the oxygen with hydrogen and hydrogen adsorption on the alloy surface. (author)

  7. Modulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide Generated through Heme in L. amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Rocco-Machado

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in many areas of Brazil and causes skin lesions. Using this parasite, our group showed the activation of Na+/K+ ATPase through a signaling cascade that involves the presence of heme and protein kinase C (PKC activity. Heme is an important biomolecule that has pro-oxidant activity and signaling capacity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS can act as second messengers, which are required in various signaling cascades. Our goal in this work is to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generated in the presence of heme in the Na+/K+ ATPase activity of L. amazonensis. Our results show that increasing concentrations of heme stimulates the production of H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 2.5 μM heme. To confirm that the effect of heme on the Na+/K+ ATPase is through the generation of H2O2, we measured enzyme activity using increasing concentrations of H2O2 and, as expected, the activity increased in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 0.1 μM H2O2. To investigate the role of PKC in this signaling pathway, we observed the production of H2O2 in the presence of its activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and its inhibitor calphostin C. Both showed no effect on the generation of H2O2. Furthermore, we found that PKC activity is increased in the presence of H2O2, and that in the presence of calphostin C, H2O2 is unable to activate the Na+/K+ ATPase. 100 μM of Mito-TEMPO was capable of abolishing the stimulatory effect of heme on Na+/K+ ATPase activity, indicating that mitochondria might be the source of the hydrogen peroxide production induced by heme. The modulation of L. amazonensis Na+/K+ ATPase by H2O2 opens new possibilities for understanding the signaling pathways of this parasite.

  8. Phototransformation of the insecticide fipronil: identification of novel photoproducts and evidence for an alternative pathway of photodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveton, Muriel; Aajoud, Asmae; Willison, John C; Aouadi, Heddia; Tissut, Michel; Ravanel, Patrick

    2006-07-01

    Fipronil is a recently discovered insecticide of the phenylpyrazole series. It has a highly selective biochemical mode of action, which has led to its use in a large number of important agronomical, household, and veterinary applications. Previous studies have shown that, during exposure to light, fipronil is converted into a desulfurated derivative (desulfinyl-fipronil), which has slightly reduced insecticidal activity. In this study, the photodegradation of fipronil was studied in solution at low light intensities (sunlight or UV lamp). In addition to desulfinyl-fipronil, a large number of minor photoproducts were observed, including diversely substituted phenylpyrazole derivatives and aniline derivatives that had lost the pyrazole ring. Desulfinylfipronil itself was shown to be relatively stable under both UV light and sunlight, with only limited changes occurring in the substitution of the aromatic ring. Since this compound accumulated to levels corresponding to only 30-55% of the amount of fipronil degraded, it was concluded that one or more alternative pathways of photodegradation must be operating. On the basis of the structurally identified photoproducts, it is proposed that fipronil photodegradation occurs via at least two distinct pathways, one of which involves desulfuration at the 4-position of the pyrazole ring giving the desulfinyl derivative and the other of which involves a different modification of the 4-substituent, leading to cleavage of the pyrazole ring and the formation of aniline derivatives. The latter compounds do not accumulate to high levels and may, therefore, be degraded further. The ecological significance of these results is discussed, particularly with regard to the insecticidal activity of the photoproducts.

  9. Active Edge Sites Engineering in Nickel Cobalt Selenide Solid Solutions for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan; Liang, Hanfeng; Zhu, Jiajie; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    free energy for atomic hydrogen adsorption in NiCoSe, identified by temperature-dependent conductivities and density functional theory calculations, the authors have achieved unprecedented fast hydrogen evolution kinetics, approaching that of Pt

  10. Hydrogen permeation measurement of the reduced activation ferritic steel F82H by the vacuum thermo-balance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hajime; Enoeda, Mikio; Abe, Tetsuya; Akiba, Masato

    2005-03-01

    Hydrogen permeation fluxes of the reduced activation ferritic steel F82H were quantitatively measured by a newly proposed method, vacuum thermo-balance method, for a precise estimation of tritium leakage in a fusion reactor. We prepared sample capsules made of F82H, which enclosed hydrogen gas. The hydrogen in the capsules permeated through the capsule wall, and subsequently desorbed from the capsule surface during isothermal heating. The vacuum thermo-balance method allows simultaneous measurement of the hydrogen permeation flux by two independent methods, namely, the net weight reduction of the sample capsule and exhaust gas analysis. Thus the simultaneous measurements by two independent methods increase the reliability of the permeability measurement. When the gas pressure of enclosed hydrogen was 0.8 atm at the sample temperature of 673 K, the hydrogen permeation flux of F82H obtained by the net weight reduction and the exhaust gas analysis was 0.75x10 18 (H 2 /m 2 s) and 2.2x10 18 (H 2 /m 2 s), respectively. The ratio of the hydrogen permeation fluxes obtained by the net weight reduction to that measured by the exhaust gas analysis was in the range from 1/4 to 1/1 in this experiment. The temperature dependence of the estimated permeation flux was similar in both methods. Taking the uncertainties of both measurements into consideration, both results are supposed to be consistent. The enhancement of hydrogen permeation flux was observed from the sample of which outer surface was mechanically polished. Through the present experiments, it has been demonstrated that the vacuum thermo-balance method is effective for the measurement of hydrogen permeation rate of F82H. (author)

  11. Significant change of local atomic configurations at surface of reduced activation Eurofer steels induced by hydrogenation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greculeasa, S.G.; Palade, P.; Schinteie, G. [National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Kuncser, A.; Stanciu, A. [National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Lungu, G.A. [National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Porosnicu, C.; Lungu, C.P. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Kuncser, V., E-mail: kuncser@infim.ro [National Institute for Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG-7, 77125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Engineering of Eurofer slab properties by hydrogenation treatments. • Hydrogenation modifies significantly the local atomic configurations at the surface. • Hydrogenation increases the expulsion of the Cr atoms toward the very surface. • Approaching binomial atomic distribution by hydrogenation in the next surface 100 nm. - Abstract: Reduced-activation steels such as Eurofer alloys are candidates for supporting plasma facing components in tokamak-like nuclear fusion reactors. In order to investigate the impact of hydrogen/deuterium insertion in their crystalline lattice, annealing treatments in hydrogen atmosphere have been applied on Eurofer slabs. The resulting samples have been analyzed with respect to local structure and atomic configuration both before and after successive annealing treatments, by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). The corroborated data point out for a bcc type structure of the non-hydrogenated alloy, with an average alloy composition approaching Fe{sub 0.9}Cr{sub 0.1} along a depth of about 100 nm. EDS elemental maps do not indicate surface inhomogeneities in concentration whereas the Mössbauer spectra prove significant deviations from a homogeneous alloying. The hydrogenation increases the expulsion of the Cr atoms toward the surface layer and decreases their oxidation, with considerable influence on the surface properties of the steel. The hydrogenation treatment is therefore proposed as a potential alternative for a convenient engineering of the surface of different Fe-Cr based alloys.

  12. Antibacterial Properties and Mechanism of Activity of a Novel Silver-Stabilized Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy L Martin

    Full Text Available Huwa-San peroxide (hydrogen peroxide; HSP is a NSF Standard 60 (maximum 8 mg/L(-1 new generation peroxide stabilized with ionic silver suitable for continuous disinfection of potable water. Experiments were undertaken to examine the mechanism of HSP against planktonic and biofilm cultures of indicator bacterial strains. Contact/kill time (CT relationships that achieve effective control were explored to determine the potential utility in primary disinfection. Inhibitory assays were conducted using both nutrient rich media and a medium based on synthetic wastewater. Assays were compared for exposures to three disinfectants (HSP, laboratory grade hydrogen peroxide (HP and sodium hypochlorite at concentrations of 20 ppm (therefore at 2.5 and 5 times the NSF limit for HP and sodium hypochlorite, respectively and at pH 7.0 and 8.5 in dechlorinated tap water. HSP was found to be more or equally effective as hypochlorite or HP. Results from CT assays comparing HSP and HP at different bacterial concentrations with neutralization of residual peroxide with catalase suggested that at a high bacterial concentration HSP, but not HP, was protected from catalase degradation possibly through sequestration by bacterial cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, at a low bacterial cell density residual HSP was more effectively neutralized as less HSP was associated with bacteria and therefore accessible to catalase. Silver in HSP may facilitate this association through electrostatic interactions at the cell surface. This was supported by experiments where the addition of mono (K(+ and divalent (Ca(+2 cations (0.005-0.05M reduced the killing efficacy of HSP but not HP. Experiments designed to distinguish any inhibitory effect of silver from that of peroxide in HSP were carried out by monitoring the metabolic activity of established P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Concentrations of 70-500 ppm HSP had a pronounced effect on metabolic activity while the equivalent

  13. Catalytic activity of mono and bimetallic Zn/Cu/MWCNTs catalysts for the thermocatalyzed conversion of methane to hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdelyi, B. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Moyzesova 11, 041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelium 9, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Oriňak, A., E-mail: andrej.orinak@upjs.sk [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Moyzesova 11, 041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Oriňaková, R. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Moyzesova 11, 041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Lorinčík, J. [Research Center Rez, Hlavní 130, 250 68 Husinec-Řež (Czech Republic); Jerigová, M. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina 842 15 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Velič, D. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina 842 15 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); International Laser Centre, Ilkovičová 3, 841 01 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mičušík, M. [Polymer institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravská cesta 9, 84541 Bratislava (Slovakia); and others

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Zn/Cu/MWCNTs catalyst with good activity. • Methane conversion to hydrogen with high effectivity. • ZnO/Cu responsible for catalytic activity. - Abstract: Mono and bimetallic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) fortified with Cu and Zn metal particles were studied to improve the efficiency of the thermocatalytic conversion of methane to hydrogen. The surface of the catalyst and the dispersion of the metal particles were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). It was confirmed that the metal particles were successfully dispersed on the MWCNT surface and XPS analysis showed that the Zn was oxidised to ZnO at high temperatures. The conversion of methane to hydrogen during the catalytic pyrolysis was studied by pyrolysis gas chromatography using different amounts of catalyst. The best yields of hydrogen were obtained using pyrolysis conditions of 900 °C and 1.2 mg of Zn/Cu/MWCNT catalyst for 1.5 mL of methane.The initial conversion of methane to hydrogen obtained with Zn/Cu/MWCNTs was 49%, which represent a good conversion rate of methane to hydrogen for a non-noble metal catalyst.

  14. Certain tryptophan photoproducts are inhibitors of cytochrome P450-dependent mutagenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannug, U.; Agurell, E.; Cederberg, H.; Rannug, A.

    1992-01-01

    Two photoproducts, derived from UV-irradiation of the amino acid L-tryptophan and with high Ah (TCDD) receptor binding affinity, were tested for genotoxic and antimutagenic effects. The two indolo[3,2-b]carbazole derivatives, with the molecular weights of 284 and 312, respectively, were tested in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7 for mitotic gene conversion and reverse mutation and in strain RS112 for sister chromatid conversion and gene conversion. No significant (P > 0.05) genotoxic effects were found in strain D7, while strain RS112 showed a small but significant increase in the frequency of sister chromatid conversions. In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells the two compounds induced a statistically significant but less than twofold increase in the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). No mutations were detected when the compounds were tested in Salmonella tphimurium strains TA98 and TA100. However, both 284 and 312 acted as antimutagens on strain TA100+S9 in the presence of benzo(a)pyrene. The decrease in mutagenicity by the most potent compound 284 was 20 revertants/nmol. This effect could be explained by an inhibitory effect on the cytochrome P450-dependent ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity as seen in rat hepatocytes. The two compounds were also tested with hamster cells expressing rat cytochrome P-4501A1. The results support the conclusion that this cytochrome P-450 isozyme is inhibited by the tryptophan photoproducts. Similar results were also seen with two other high affinity Ah receptor ligands the quinazolinocarboline alkaloids rutaecapine and dehydrorutaecarpine. 20 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Photoproduction de Mesons sur le Nucleon aux Energies Intermediaire (in French) [Photoproduction of mesons on the nucleon at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidal, Michel [Univ. of Paris, Orsay (France)

    1996-12-13

    One object of this thesis is to propose a model taking account of low transfer reaction mechanisms for a series of photoproduction reactions on nucleons for photon energies ≳4 GeV. If our comprehension of processes with low transfers is correct, then extrapolating our model in the domain of large transfers and the comparison with data supplied will give us information on the domains in energy and transfers from which an interpretation of reactions in terms of the "soft" process ceases to be valid. In the domain of large transfers, only one approach in terms of "hard" process can then explain the data. We are interested in electromagnetic photoproduction reactions because the probe, firstly, interacts with the target via an exact and well known mechanism (described by the QED theory) and also eliminates the interaction phenomena in the initial state. No probe is as well known as the photon. The extraction of reaction mechanisms, amplitudes and coupling constants match is made easier than in the case of hadronic probes. The energy domain Eγ >4 GeV studied is particularly interesting because it is from this energy of incident photons that can be expected to achieve large enough pulse transfers to hope for emergence of hard processes and therefore see the cessation of validity of interpretation of hadron models. Also, resonance effects are minor and do not interfere with our interpretations. Experimentally, this area is widely unexplored and the new generation accelerators of a large duty cycle (CEBAF, MAMI, ESRF, ELF, ...) combined with 4π detectors will allow to precisely measure low cross sections reactions of a large transfer. We first study pion photoproduction reactions on nucleon because they are the most experimentally accessible reactions and many data of high energy and low transfers exist. This will require strong constraints on the model parameters of the numerous analyses performed previously. Then we'll move on to kaon photoproduction

  16. Photoproduction of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solution with algae under high-pressure mercury lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianli; Wu, Feng; Deng, Nansheng

    2004-01-01

    Photoproduction of hydroxyl radicals (*OH) could be induced in aqueous solution with algae (Nitzschia hantzschiana, etc.) and (or not) Fe3+ under high-pressure mercury lamp with an exposure time of 4 h. *OH was determined by HPLC using benzene as a probe. The photoproduction of *OH increased with increasing algae concentration. Fe3+ could enhance the photoproduction of *OH in aqueous solution with algae. The results showed that the photoproduction of *OH in algal solution with Fe3+ was greater than that in algal solution without Fe3+. The light intensity and pH affected the photoproduction of *OH in aqueous solution with algae with/without Fe3+. The photoproduction of *OH in aqueous solution with algae and Fe3+ under 250 W was greater than that under 125 W HPML. The photoproduction of *OH in algal solution (pH ranged from 4.0 to 7.0) with (or not) Fe3+ at pH 4 was the greatest.

  17. Research activities for measurement of hydrogen solubility in LiPb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, K.; Edao, Y.; Fukada, S.

    2014-01-01

    Research activities for measurement of hydrogen solubility in LiPb has been conducted under the U.S.-Japan TITAN collaboration program at STAR facility in Idaho National Laboratory. The solubility test using a quartz crucible has been tried at 300degC but the crack had been caused at about 15 hours after temperature reached 300degC. This is caused by chemical reaction of LLE and SiO_2. Hydrogen solubility and apparent diffusivity has been estimated from data obtained by solubility tests using alumina crucible by fitting method assuming one dimensional diffusion. The estimated solubility in the range from 300degC to 500degC is close to Reiter's one. However, the value of solubility increased sharply at 600degC. This seemed to be caused by chemical reaction of LLE and Al_2O_3. The estimated diffusivity was two orders of magnitude larger than literature data. This large difference may be due to natural convection of LLE in the alumina crucible. (author)

  18. Adsorption/oxidation of hydrogen sulfide on nitrogen-containing activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adib, F.; Bagreev, A.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2000-02-22

    Wood-based activated carbon was modified by impregnation with urea and heat treatment at 450 and 950 C. The chemical and physical properties of materials were determined using acid/base titration, FTIR, thermal analysis, IGC, and sorption of nitrogen. The surface features were compared to those of a commercial urea-modified carbon. Then, the H{sub 2}S breakthrough capacity tests were carried out, and the sorption capacity was evaluated. The results showed that urea-modified sorbents have a capacity similar to that of the received material; however, the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to a water-soluble species is significantly higher. It happens due to a high dispersion of basic nitrogen compounds in the small pores of carbons, where oxidation of hydrogen sulfide ions to sulfur radicals followed by the creation of sulfur oxides and sulfuric acid occurs. It is proposed that the process proceeds gradually, from small pores to larger, and that the degree of microporosity is an important factor.

  19. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane).

  20. Elastic photoproduction of ρ0 mesons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.

    1995-12-01

    The cross section for the elastic photoproduction of ρ 0 mesons (γp→ρ 0 p) has been measured with the H1 detector at HERA for two average photon-proton centre-of-mass energies of 55 and 187 GeV. The lower energy point was measured by observing directly the ρ 0 decay giving a cross section of 9.1±0.9 (stat.)±2.5 (syst.) μb. The logarithmic slope parameter of the differential cross section, dσ/dt, is found to be 10.9±2.4 (stat.)±1.1 (syst.) GeV -2 . The ρ 0 decay polar angular distribution is found to be consistent with s-channel helicity conservation. The higher energy cross section was determined from analysis of the lower part of the hadronic invariant mass spectrum of diffractive photoproduction and found to be 13.6±0.8 (stat.)±2.4 (syst.) μb. (orig.)

  1. Measurement of elastic ρ0 photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-07-01

    Elastic ρ 0 photoproduction has been measured using the ZEUS detector at HERA. Untagged photoproduction events from ep interactions were used to measure the reaction γp→ρ 0 p (ρ 0 →π + π - ) at photon-proton centre-of-mass energies between 60 and 80 GeV and vertical stroke tvertical stroke 2 , where t is the square of the four-momentum transferred at the proton vertex. The differential cross section dσ/dM ππ , where M ππ is the invariant mass of the two pions, and the integrated cross section, σsub(γp→ρ 0 p), are presented; the latter was measured to be 14.7±0.4(stat.)±2.4(syst.) μb. The differential cross section dσ/dt has an approximately exponential shape; a fit of the type A' t exp(-b' t vertical stroke tvertical stroke +c' t t 2 ) yields a t-slope b' t =9.9±1.2(stat.)±1.4(syst.) μb. The results, when compared to low energy data, show a weak energy dependence of both σsub(γp→ρ 0 p) and of the t-slope. The ρ 0 is produced predominantly with transverse polarisation, demonstrating that s-channel helicity conservation holds at these energies. (orig.)

  2. Photoproduction of pions on low-energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grushin, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that a study is made of the complete experiment problem and photoproduction of pions on protons. The problem of the volume and content of a complete experiment is solved in the area of photon energies up to 500 MeV for the channels γp-π + n and γp-π → π 0 p. Experimental data assuring a complete experiment are used for multipole analysis of the channels γp → π + n, π 0 p and the real and imaginary parts of s- and p-wave multipole amplitudes are obtained. Estimates are produced for the pole parameters (mass and width) of the Δ + 33 isobar. An electrical quadrupole amplitude of the transition γp → Δ + 33 was found which is significantly different form zero, indicating the existence of a tensor interaction between quarks in hadrons. Data on photoproduction on mesons are used to extract quantitative estimates of the vector and tensor constants of interaction of an ω meson with nucleons

  3. High energy photoproduction of the rho and rho' vector mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronstein, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    In an experiment in the broad band photon beam at Fermilab diffractive production of 2π + and 4π +- states from Be, Al, Cu, and Pb targets was observed. The 2π + data are dominated by the rho(770) and the 4π +- is dominated by the rho'(1500). The energy dependence of rho photoproduction from Be was measured, and no evidence was seen for energy variation of the forward cross section in the range 30 to 160 GeV. The forward cross section is consistent with its average value d sigma/dtlt. slash 0 = 3.42 +- 0.28 μb/GeV 2 over the entire range. For the /sub rho'// a mass of 1487 +- 20 MeV and a width of 675 +- 60 MeV are obtained. All quoted errors are statistical. A standard optical model analysis of the A dependence of the rho and rho'/ photoproduction yields the following results. f/sub rho'/ 2 /f/sub rho/ 2 = 3.7 +- 0.7, sigma /sub rho'//sigma /sub rho/ = 1.05 +- 0.18. Results for the photon coupling constants are in good agreement with GVMD and with the e + e - storage ring results. The approximate equality of the rho-nucleon and rho'-nucleon total cross sections is inconsistent with the diagonal version of GVMD and provides strong motivation for including transitions between different vector mesons in GVMD

  4. F observable in double π{sup 0}-photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garni, Stefanie [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Collaboration: A2-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The measurement of single and double polarization observables gives information about the different resonance contributions in the cross section and hence leads to a better understanding of the nucleon and its excited states. The double π{sup 0}-photoproduction is one of the most interesting reaction for the measurement of these observables. It allows to search for excited nucleon states which decay preferentially via cascades involving intermediate excited states. Furthermore, the background from non-resonant terms is small since the photon does not couple directly to neutral pions. Double π{sup 0}-photoproduction off a transversally polarized H-Butanol target has been measured using circularly polarized bremsstrahlung photons produced by MAMI-C with incident energies up to 1.5 GeV. The double π{sup 0} reaction was identified using a combined setup of the Crystal Ball colorimeter and a TAPS forward wall which results in an almost 4π acceptance. Preliminary results on the single polarization observable T and double polarization observable F are presented.

  5. Quarkonium momentum distributions in photoproduction and B decay

    CERN Document Server

    Beneke, Martin; Wolf, S

    2000-01-01

    According to our present understanding many $J/\\psi$ production processes proceed through a coloured $c\\bar{c}$ state followed by the emission of soft particles in the quarkonium rest frame. The kinematic effect of soft particle emission is usually a higher-order effect in the non-relativistic expansion, but becomes important near the kinematic endpoint of quarkonium energy (momentum) distributions. In an intermediate region a systematic resummation of the non-relativistic expansion leads to the introduction of so-called `shape functions'. In this paper we provide an implementation of the kinematic effect of soft gluon emission which is consistent with the non-relativistic shape function formalism in the region where it is applicable and which models the extreme endpoint region. We then apply the model to photoproduction of $J/\\psi$ and $J/\\psi$ production in $B$ meson decay. A satisfactory description of $B$ decay data is obtained. For inelastic charmonium photoproduction we conclude that a sensible comparis...

  6. Measurement of elastic ρ0 photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-01-01

    Elastic ρ 0 photoproduction has been measured using the ZEUS detector at HERA. Untagged photoproduction events from ep interactions were used to measure the reaction γp→ρ 0 p (ρ 0 →π + π - )at photon-proton centre-of-mass energies between 60 and 80 GeV and vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 , where t is the square of the four-momentum transferred at the proton vertex. The differential cross section dσ/dM ππ , where M ππ is the invariant mass of the two pions, and the integrated cross section, σ γp →ρ 0 p , are presented; the latter was measured to be 14.7 ±0.4(stat.)±2.4(syst.) μb. The differential cross section dσ/dt has an approximately exponential shape; a fit of the type A' t exp(-b' t vertical stroke t vertical stroke +c' t t 2 ) yields a t-slope b' t =9.9±1.2(stat.)±1.4(syst.) GeV -2 . The results, when compared to low energy data, show a weak energy dependence of both σ γp→ρ 0 p and of the t-slope. The ρ 0 is produced predominantly with transverse polarisation, demostrating that s-channel helicity conservation holds at these energies. (orig.)

  7. MC rate at NLO for heavy flavour photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toll, Tobias

    2010-02-15

    A Monte Carlo at next-to-leading order (MC rate at NLO) has been constructed for the production of heavy quark flavours in photoproduction. As such, it is the rst Monte Carlo event generator with next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy for a process in lepton hadron scattering. In order to construct such an MC rate at NLO, the matrix element for the process has to be calculated at NLO and then be matched with a parton shower. When doing this, it is important that none of the parton configurations produced are doubly counted. In this thesis, the concept of a Monte Carlo event generator will be explained, with emphasis on the HERWIG parton shower. Also, different techniques of calculating matrix elements at NLO accuracy will be explained. It will then be shown how the NLO calculation can be matched with the HERWIG parton shower in an MC rate at NLO without double counting, producing unweighted events at NLO-accuracy. Many comparisons are made between the MC rate at NLO here constructed, the HERWIG Monte Carlo and the FMNR NLO calculation. Also many comparisons are made to HERA data from the H1 and ZEUS experiments. It is shown that all HERA data with heavy quarks produced in photoproduction can be described by the MC rate at NLO program constructed in this thesis. (orig.)

  8. Diffractive photoproduction of D{sup *{+-}}(2010) at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-03-15

    Diffractive photoproduction of D{sup *{+-}}(2010) mesons was measured with the ZEUS detector at the ep collider HERA, using an integrated luminosity of 78.6 pb{sup -1}. The D{sup *} mesons were reconstructed in the kinematic range: transverse momentum p{sub T}(D{sup *})>1.9 GeV and pseudorapidity vertical stroke {eta}(D{sup *}) vertical stroke <1.6, using the decay D{sup *+} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{sub s} followed by D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}(+c.c.). Diffractive events were identified by a large gap in pseudorapidity between the produced hadronic state and the outgoing proton. Cross sections are reported for photon-proton centre-of-mass energies in the range 130photoproduction cross section is about 6%. The data are in agree- ment with perturbative QCD calculations based on various parameterisations of diffractive parton distribution functions. The results are consistent with diffractive QCD factorisation. (orig.) ZEUS Collaboration

  9. MC rate at NLO for heavy flavour photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toll, Tobias

    2010-02-01

    A Monte Carlo at next-to-leading order (MC rate at NLO) has been constructed for the production of heavy quark flavours in photoproduction. As such, it is the rst Monte Carlo event generator with next-to-leading order (NLO) accuracy for a process in lepton hadron scattering. In order to construct such an MC rate at NLO, the matrix element for the process has to be calculated at NLO and then be matched with a parton shower. When doing this, it is important that none of the parton configurations produced are doubly counted. In this thesis, the concept of a Monte Carlo event generator will be explained, with emphasis on the HERWIG parton shower. Also, different techniques of calculating matrix elements at NLO accuracy will be explained. It will then be shown how the NLO calculation can be matched with the HERWIG parton shower in an MC rate at NLO without double counting, producing unweighted events at NLO-accuracy. Many comparisons are made between the MC rate at NLO here constructed, the HERWIG Monte Carlo and the FMNR NLO calculation. Also many comparisons are made to HERA data from the H1 and ZEUS experiments. It is shown that all HERA data with heavy quarks produced in photoproduction can be described by the MC rate at NLO program constructed in this thesis. (orig.)

  10. Diffractive Photoproduction of Psi(2S) Mesons at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Wolf, E.A.De; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Mangano, S.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Samson, J.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; zur Nedden, M.

    2002-01-01

    Results on diffractive photoproduction of psi(2S) mesons are presented using data collected between 1996 and 2000 with the H1 detector at the HERA ep collider. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 77 pb^(-1). The energy dependence of the diffractive psi(2S) cross section is found to be similar to or possibly somewhat steeper than that for J/psi mesons. The dependences of the elastic and proton dissociative psi(2S) photoproduction cross sections on the squared momentum transfer t at the proton vertex are measured. The t-dependence of the elastic channel, parametrised as e^(bt), yields b_(el)^(psi(2S))=(4.31+-0.57+-0.46) GeV^(-2), compatible with that of the J/psi. For the proton dissociative channel the result b_(pd)^(psi(2S))=(0.59+-0.13+-0.12) GeV^(-2) is 2.3 standard deviations smaller than that measured for the J/psi. With proper account of the individual wavefunctions theoretical predictions based on perturbative QCD are found to describe the measurements well.

  11. Correlations between electrochemical activity and heterogeneous catalysis for hydrogen dissociation on platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, P N; Stonehart, P [Pratt and Whitney Aircraft, Middletown, Conn. (USA)

    1975-02-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates on platinum surfaces have been compared to equivalent hydrogen molecule and adsorbed hydrogen atom electrochemical oxidation rates on the same surfaces. Over a temperature range of 293 to 360/sup 0/K the first order rate constants for H/sub 2/-D/sub 2/ exchange and hydrogen molecule electrochemical oxidation are the same, showing that the absorption-dissociation reaction (TAFEL, BONHOEFFER-FARKAS) is rate controlling. The rate of oxidation of the adsorbed hydrogen atom reaction involving electron transfer (VOLMER) is an order of magnitude larger.

  12. Charm decays and high energy photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The activities during the first nine months of the three-year grant period have concentrated on the development of computer resources both hardware and software as well as the design of a muon detector for Fermilab Experiment E831. An important related activity has been a successful search of funds to complement the resources provided by this grant and permit the involvement of additional personnel as well as a much-better leveraged impact of the funds provided. Grant funds were the main providers of a new computer system which is dedicated to the High Energy Physics group at Mayaguez. This system can be considered a minimum configuration to carry out the simulation and analysis loads of E831. The bulk of the software development has been directed at developing a Monte Carlo simulation for E831 in particular the E831 muon detector

  13. The thymine-thymine pyrimidine-pyrimidone(6-4) ultraviolet light photoproduct is highly mutagenic and specifically induces 3' thymine-to-cytosine transitions in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeClerc, J.E.; Borden, A.; Lawrence, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have constructed single-stranded, M13-based vectors that contain a specifically located thymine-thymine pyrimidine-pyrimidone(6-4) UV photoproduct and have used these to estimate the frequency and accuracy of DNA replication past this adduct in uvrA6 cells of Escherichia coli. Both the normal and the Dewar valence photoisomer of the (6-4) adduct were studied. In the absence of SOS induction, vectors carrying the photoproducts were rarely replicated; relative to the lesion-free control, 1.9% of vectors carrying the normal (6-4) isomer produced plaques, and with the Dewar valence isomer the proportion was 0.4%. In SOS-induced cells, these frequencies rose to 22.1% and 12.3%, respectively. The error frequency of replication past the normal isomer in SOS-induced cells was high. They speculate that the high error frequency and specificity arise from the formation of a stable T·G base pair, involving hydrogen bonds at O-2 and N-3 in the pyrimidone ring. Potential hydrogen bonds at these sites are coplanar in the normal but not in the Dewar isomer, perhaps explaining the reduced specificity of mutagenesis with the latter adduct

  14. Search for Odderon induced contributions to exclusive Meson Photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, J.

    2001-01-01

    A search for exclusive photoproduction of π 0 , f 2 (1270) and a 2 (1320), induced by Odderon exchange, was performed using multi-photon final states. No signal was found. Upper limits for the cross sections are below the predictions of a model based on non-perturbative QCD. Exclusive ω and ωπ 0 photoproduction is observed in three and five photon final states, at levels consistent with the expectations from Pomeron exchange and consistent with other observations of exclusive vector and axial vector meson photoproduction

  15. Mechanistic modeling of sulfur-deprived photosynthesis and hydrogen production in suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C R; Bees, M A

    2014-02-01

    The ability of unicellular green algal species such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to produce hydrogen gas via iron-hydrogenase is well known. However, the oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase is closely linked to the photosynthetic chain in such a way that hydrogen and oxygen production need to be separated temporally for sustained photo-production. Under illumination, sulfur-deprivation has been shown to accommodate the production of hydrogen gas by partially-deactivating O2 evolution activity, leading to anaerobiosis in a sealed culture. As these facets are coupled, and the system complex, mathematical approaches potentially are of significant value since they may reveal improved or even optimal schemes for maximizing hydrogen production. Here, a mechanistic model of the system is constructed from consideration of the essential pathways and processes. The role of sulfur in photosynthesis (via PSII) and the storage and catabolism of endogenous substrate, and thus growth and decay of culture density, are explicitly modeled in order to describe and explore the complex interactions that lead to H2 production during sulfur-deprivation. As far as possible, functional forms and parameter values are determined or estimated from experimental data. The model is compared with published experimental studies and, encouragingly, qualitative agreement for trends in hydrogen yield and initiation time are found. It is then employed to probe optimal external sulfur and illumination conditions for hydrogen production, which are found to differ depending on whether a maximum yield of gas or initial production rate is required. The model constitutes a powerful theoretical tool for investigating novel sulfur cycling regimes that may ultimately be used to improve the commercial viability of hydrogen gas production from microorganisms. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Collisional activation by MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry induces intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Bache, Nicolai; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    of doubly protonated peptides that the original regioselective deuterium pattern of these peptides is completely erased (Jørgensen, T. J. D., Gårdsvoll, H., Ploug, M., and Roepstorff, P. (2005) Intramolecular migration of amide hydrogens in protonated peptides upon collisional activation. J. Am. Chem. Soc...... randomization among all exchangeable sites (i.e. all N- and O-linked hydrogens) also occurs upon high energy collisional activation of singly protonated peptides. This intense proton/deuteron traffic precludes the use of MALDI tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry to obtain reliable information...

  17. Electrodeposition of Amorphous Molybdenum Chalcogenides from Ionic Liquids and Their Activity for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Daniel W; Rose, Michael J; Stevenson, Keith J

    2017-09-19

    This work reports on the general electrodeposition mechanism of tetrachalcogenmetallates from 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide. Both tetrathio- and tetraselenomolybdate underwent anodic electrodeposition and cathodic corrosion reactions as determined by UV-vis spectroelectrochemistry. Electrodeposition was carried out by cycling the potential between the anodic and cathodic regimes. This resulted in a film of densely packed nanoparticles of amorphous MoS x or MoSe x as determined by SEM, Raman, and XPS. The films were shown to have high activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The onset potential (J = 1 mA/cm 2 ) of the MoS x film was E = -0.208 V vs RHE, and that of MoSe x was E = -0.230 V vs RHE. The Tafel slope of MoS x was 42 mV/decade, and that of MoSe x was 59 mV/decade.

  18. Penetration of 35% hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber in bovine teeth after LED or Nd:YAG laser activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Cardoso, Paula Elaine; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; de Araújo, Maria Amélia Máximo; Kojima, Alberto Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    This aim of the present study was to evaluate the pulp chamber penetration of 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED (light-emitting diode) or Nd:YAG laser in bovine teeth, after an in-office bleaching technique. Forty-eight bovine lateral incisors were divided into four groups, acetate buffer was placed into the pulp chamber and bleaching agent was applied as follows: for group A (n = 12), activation was performed by LED; for group B (n = 12), activation was performed by Nd:YAG laser (60 mJ, 20 Hz); group C (n = 12) received no light or laser activation; and the control group (n = 12) received no bleaching gel application or light or laser activation. The acetate buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube and Leuco Crystal Violet and horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of this solution was determined spectrophotometrically and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. The results were analysed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). It was verified that the effect of activation was significant, as groups activated by LED or laser presented greater hydrogen peroxide penetration into the pulp chamber (0.499 +/- 0.622 microg) compared with groups that were not (0.198 +/- 0.218 microg). There was no statistically significant difference in the penetration of hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber between the two types of activation (LED or laser). The results suggest that activation by laser or LED caused an increase in hydrogen peroxide penetration into the pulp chamber.

  19. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of MoSx on TCNQ-treated electrode for hydrogen evolution reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Yunghuang

    2014-10-22

    Molybdenum sulfide has recently attracted much attention because of its low cost and excellent catalytical effects in the application of hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). To improve the HER efficiency, many researchers have extensively explored various avenues such as material modification, forming hybrid structures or modifying geometric morphology. In this work, we reported a significant enhancement in the electrocatalytic activity of the MoSx via growing on Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) treated carbon cloth, where the MoSx was synthesized by thermolysis from the ammonium tetrathiomolybdate ((NH4)2MoS4) precursor at 170 °C. The pyridinic N- and graphitic N-like species on the surface of carbon cloth arising from the TCNQ treatment facilitate the formation of Mo5+ and S2 2- species in the MoSx, especially with S2 2- serving as an active site for HER. In addition, the smaller particle size of the MoSx grown on TCNQ-treated carbon cloth reveals a high ratio of edge sites relative to basal plane sites, indicating the richer effective reaction sites and superior electrocatalytic characteristics. Hence, we reported a high hydrogen evolution rate for MoSx on TCNQ-treated carbon cloth of 6408 mL g-1 cm-2 h-1 (286 mmol g-1 cm-2 h-1) at an overpotential of V = 0.2 V. This study provides the fundamental concepts useful in the design and preparation of transition metal dichalcogenide catalysts, beneficial in the development in clean energy.

  20. Pt Single Atoms Embedded in the Surface of Ni Nanocrystals as Highly Active Catalysts for Selective Hydrogenation of Nitro Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuhan; Geng, Zhigang; Zhao, Songtao; Wang, Liangbing; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Xu; Zheng, Xusheng; Zhu, Junfa; Li, Zhenyu; Si, Rui; Zeng, Jie

    2018-06-13

    Single-atom catalysts exhibit high selectivity in hydrogenation due to their isolated active sites, which ensure uniform adsorption configurations of substrate molecules. Compared with the achievement in catalytic selectivity, there is still a long way to go in exploiting the catalytic activity of single-atom catalysts. Herein, we developed highly active and selective catalysts in selective hydrogenation by embedding Pt single atoms in the surface of Ni nanocrystals (denoted as Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals). During the hydrogenation of 3-nitrostyrene, the TOF numbers based on surface Pt atoms of Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals reached ∼1800 h -1 under 3 atm of H 2 at 40 °C, much higher than that of Pt single atoms supported on active carbon, TiO 2 , SiO 2 , and ZSM-5. Mechanistic studies reveal that the remarkable activity of Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals derived from sufficient hydrogen supply because of spontaneous dissociation of H 2 on both Pt and Ni atoms as well as facile diffusion of H atoms on Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals. Moreover, the ensemble composed of the Pt single atom and nearby Ni atoms in Pt 1 /Ni nanocrystals leads to the adsorption configuration of 3-nitrostyrene favorable for the activation of nitro groups, accounting for the high selectivity for 3-vinylaniline.

  1. Mechanism of Sporicidal Activity for the Synergistic Combination of Peracetic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, Mark J; Schwarz, J Spencer; Burke, Peter A; McDonnell, Gerald; Denyer, Stephen P; Maillard, Jean-Yves

    2016-02-15

    There is still great interest in controlling bacterial endospores. The use of chemical disinfectants and, notably, oxidizing agents to sterilize medical devices is increasing. With this in mind, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and peracetic acid (PAA) have been used in combination, but until now there has been no explanation for the observed increase in sporicidal activity. This study provides information on the mechanism of synergistic interaction of PAA and H2O2 against bacterial spores. We performed investigations of the efficacies of different combinations, including pretreatments with the two oxidizers, against wild-type spores and a range of spore mutants deficient in the spore coat or small acid-soluble spore proteins. The concentrations of the two biocides were also measured in the reaction vessels, enabling the assessment of any shift from H2O2 to PAA formation. This study confirmed the synergistic activity of the combination of H2O2 and PAA. However, we observed that the sporicidal activity of the combination is largely due to PAA and not H2O2. Furthermore, we observed that the synergistic combination was based on H2O2 compromising the spore coat, which was the main spore resistance factor, likely allowing better penetration of PAA and resulting in the increased sporicidal activity. Copyright © 2016 Leggett et al.

  2. Improving the catalytic activity of amorphous molybdenum sulfide for hydrogen evolution reaction using polydihydroxyphenylalanine modified MWCNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoguo; Yu, Muping; Li, Xiang

    2018-05-01

    Molybdenum sulfides are promising electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acid medium due to their unique properties. In order to improve their HER activity, different strategies have been developed. In this study, amorphous molybdenum sulfide was prepared by a simple wet chemical method and its HER activity was further improved by using polydihydroxyphenylalanine (PDOPA) modified MWCNTs as supports. It was found that the PDOPA can effectively improve the hydrophilic properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and amorphous MoSx can uniformly grow on the surface of PDOPA@MWCNTs. Compared with MoSx and MoSx/MWCNTs, MoSx/PDOPA@MWCNTs show obviously enhanced HER activities due to the superior electrical conductivity and more exposed active sites. In addition, the effect of the ratio of MoSx and PDOPA@MWCNTs and the loading amount of catalysts on the electrodes are also investigated in detail. At the optimum conditions, MoSx/PDOPA@MWCNTs display an overpotential of 198 mV at 10 mA/cm2, a Tafel slope of 53 mV/dec and a good long-term stability in 0.5 M H2SO4, which make them promising candidates for HER application.

  3. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chien-Sheng [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei-Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kawamura, Tomohiro; Peng, Ximei [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tochigi, Naobumi [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States); Shigemura, Norihisa [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Billiar, Timothy R. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nakao, Atsunori, E-mail: anakao@imap.pitt.edu [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Toyoda, Yoshiya [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. {yields} There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. {yields} Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF{kappa}B) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NF{kappa}B activation, as indicated by NF{kappa}B DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NF{kappa}B during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NF{kappa}B activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NF{kappa}B activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the

  4. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chien-Sheng; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Peng, Ximei; Tochigi, Naobumi; Shigemura, Norihisa; Billiar, Timothy R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Toyoda, Yoshiya

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. → There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. → Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. → NFκB activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. → NFκB activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NFκB activation, as indicated by NFκB DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NFκB DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NFκB DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NFκB during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NFκB activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NFκB activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the cytoprotective effects of hydrogen against apoptotic and inflammatory signaling pathway

  5. Low-cost metal oxide activated carbon prepared and modified by microwave heating method for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, S. E. [Islamic Azad University, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Novel microporous activated carbon (MAC) with high surface area and pore volume has been synthesized by microwave heating. Iron oxide nanoparticles were loaded into MAC by using Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·9H{sub 2}O followed by microwave irradiation for up to five minutes. The surface modified microporous activated carbon was characterized by BET, XRD, SEM and thermogravimetric examinations. Adsorption data of H{sub 2} on the unmodified and modified MACs were collected with PCT method for a pressure range up to 120 bar at 303 K. Greater hydrogen adsorption was observed on the carbon adsorbents doped with 1.45 wt% of iron oxide nanoparticle loaded due to the joint properties of hydrogen adsorption on the carbon surface and the spill-over of hydrogen molecules into carbon structures.

  6. Activation of hydrogen storage materials in the Li-Mg-N-H system: Effect on storage properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jun; Sudik, Andrea; Wolverton, C.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics, kinetics, and capacity of the hydrogen storage reaction: Li 2 Mg(NH) 2 + 2H 2 ↔ Mg(NH 2 ) 2 + 2LiH. Starting with LiNH 2 and MgH 2 , two distinct procedures have been previously proposed for activating samples to induce the reversible storage reaction. We clarify here the impact of these two activation procedures on the resulting capacity for the Li-Mg-N-H reaction. Additionally, we measure the temperature-dependent kinetic absorption data for this hydrogen storage system. Finally, our experiments confirm the previously reported formation enthalpy (ΔH), hydrogen capacity, and pressure-composition-isotherm (PCI) data, and suggest that this system represents a kinetically (but not thermodynamically) limited system for vehicular on-board storage applications

  7. The role of destabilization of palladium hydride in the hydrogen uptake of Pd-containing activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, V V; Contescu, C I; Gallego, N C

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on differences in stability of Pd hydride phases in palladium particles with various degrees of contact with microporous carbon supports. A sample containing Pd embedded in activated carbon fibre (2 wt% Pd) was compared with commercial Pd nanoparticles deposited on microporous activated carbon (3 wt% Pd) and with support-free nanocrystalline palladium. The morphology of the materials was characterized by electron microscopy, and the phase transformations were analysed over a large range of hydrogen partial pressures (0.003-10 bar) and at several temperatures using in situ x-ray diffraction. The results were verified with volumetric hydrogen uptake measurements. Results indicate that higher degrees of Pd-carbon contacts for Pd particles embedded in a microporous carbon matrix induce efficient 'pumping' of hydrogen out of β- PdH x . It was also found that thermal cleaning of carbon surface groups prior to exposure to hydrogen further enhances the hydrogen pumping power of the microporous carbon support. In brief, this study highlights that the stability of β- PdH x phase supported on carbon depends on the degree of contact between Pd and carbon and on the nature of the carbon surface.

  8. Non-thermal hydrogen plasma processing effectively increases the antibacterial activity of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Zhigang; Ma, Yulong; Zhu, Zhongjie; Zhao, Hongwei; Wang, Qi; Huang, Qing

    2018-01-01

    Graphene-based materials (GMs) are promising antibacterial agents which provide an alternative route to treat pathogenic bacteria with resistance to conventional antibiotics. To further improve their antibacterial activity, many methods have been developed to functionalize the GMs with chemicals. However, the application of additional chemicals may pose potential risks to the environment and human being. Herein, a radio-frequency-driven inductively coupled non-thermal hydrogen plasma was used to treat and reduce graphene oxide (GO) without using any other chemicals, and we found that the plasma-reduced GO (prGO) is with significantly higher bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli. The mechanism of the increased antibacterial activity of prGO is due to that plasma processing breaks down the GO sheets into smaller layers with more rough surface defects, which can thus induce more destructive membrane damages to the bacteria. This work sets another good example, showing that plasma processing is a green and low-cost alternative for GM modification for biomedical applications.

  9. Color-singlet and color-octet contributions to J/ψ photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, M.

    1996-09-01

    I discuss the impact of color-octet contributions and higher-order QCD corrections on the cross section for inelastic J/ψ photoproduction. The theoretical predictions are compared with recent experimental data obtained at HERA. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of coherent π0 photoproduction on 3He and 3H in the resonance region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellinghausen, B.; Gassen, H.J.; Reese, E.; Reichelt, T.; Stipp, P.

    1984-01-01

    Neutral pion photoproduction has been measured on 3 He and 3 H nuclei in the Δ(1,232) resonance region. Resonance averaged cross-sections are presented as a function of momentum transfer and compared to theoretical calculations. (orig.)

  11. Photoproduction of charmed D mesons at γ energies of 40-70 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aston, D.; Atkinson, M.; Bailey, R.; Ball, A.H.; Bouquet, B.; Brookes, G.R.; Broering, J.; Bussey, P.J.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A.B.

    1980-01-01

    Inclusive anti D 0 photoproduction is observed in K + π - and K + π - π 0 . Evidence is presented for an associated (C anti D) production mechanism. Cross section estimates and limits are given for anti D and D mesons. (orig.)

  12. Aspects of the heavy-quark photoproduction in the semihard approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariotto, C. Brenner; Ducati, M.B. Gay; Machado, M.V.T.

    2002-01-01

    In this contribution we report on the calculations of heavy-quark photoproduction using the K p erpendicular to-factorization (semihard) approach, emphasizing the results obtained with the phenomenological saturation model. (author)

  13. The relative cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and photoproducts in Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Moon-shong; Hrncir, J.; Mitchell, D.; Ross, J.; Clarkson, J.

    1986-01-01

    In order to calculate the relative cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and photoproducts, the authors have measured survival and mutation induction in UV-irradiated excision-deficient E. coli uvrA cells, with or without complete photoreactivation of the dimers. Radioimmunoassays with specificity for dimers or photoproducts have shown that maximum photoreactivation eliminates all of the dimers produce up to 10 Jm -2 254-nm light, while it has no effect on photoproducts. These results were confirmed by measuring the frequency of T4 endonuclease V-sensitive sites. Based on the best fit equations for survival and mutation induction, the authors have found that the calculated cytotoxicity of photoproducts is similar to that of dimers; however, the former is much more mutagenic than the latter. (Auth.)

  14. Exclusive photoproduction of quarkonium at the LHC energies within the color dipole approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducati, M. B. Gay; Griep, M. T.; Machado, M. V. T. [High Energy Physics Phenomenology Group, GFPAE IF-UFRGS, Caixa Postal 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-04-10

    The exclusive photoproduction of ψ(2S) meson was investigated and the coherent and the incoherent contributions were evaluated. The light-cone dipole formalism was considered in this analysis and predictions are done for PbPb collisions at the CERN-LHC energy of 2.76 TeV. A comparison is done to the recent ALICE Collaboration data for the ψ(1S) state photoproduction with good agreement.

  15. Off-shell form factors in the soft photon limit for pion photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumbalov, A.A.; Kamalov, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    The low energy theorems for the pion photoproduction are considered on the basis of the Adler-Dothan procedure. It is shown that the soft photon limit necessarily leads to the Born approximation for the π 0 -photoproduction amplitude at the threshold. All additional terms, according to the Adler-Dothan recipe, are to be neglected in the derivation of the LET. 5 refs.; 2 figs

  16. Energy-independent multiple analysis of one-pion photoproduction processes on protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Get' man, V.A.; Sanin, V.M.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Shalatskij, S.V. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kharkov. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst.)

    1983-08-01

    For the first time unambiguous estimates are obtained for the multipole photoproduction amplitudes which are based upon the new experimental data on the pion photoproduction on protons combined with the new estiamtes of the ..pi..N-scattering phase shifts. The obtained estimates of the multipole amplitudes are compared with the results of the previous multipole analyses and with the predictions based uoon the dispersion relations.

  17. Using a Hands-On Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition Activity to Teach Catalysis Concepts to K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-01-01

    A versatile and transportable laboratory apparatus was developed for middle and high school (6th-12th grade) students as part of a hands-on outreach activity to estimate catalytic rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition from oxygen evolution rates measured by using a volumetric displacement method. The apparatus was constructed with inherent…

  18. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► H 2 O 2 activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. ► H 2 O 2 induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. ► H 2 O 2 enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. ► H 2 O 2 stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H 2 O 2 -induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H 2 O 2 (100 μM) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min (Δ 183%, P 2 O 2 >. Furthermore, H 2 O 2 inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; Δ −32%, P 2 O 2 on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 ± 0.28 to 1.28 ± 0.12, P 2 O 2 increased glucose uptake in podocytes (from 0.88 ± 0.04 to 1.29 ± 0.12 nmol/min/mg protein, P 2 O 2 activated the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake via AMPK in cultured rat podocytes. This signaling may play a potential role in the prevention of insulin resistance under conditions associated with oxidative stress.

  19. Mechanistic Insights on C-O and C-C Bond Activation and Hydrogen Insertion during Acetic Acid Hydrogenation Catalyzed by Ruthenium Clusters in Aqueous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shangguan, Junnan; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Chin, Ya-Huei [Cathy

    2016-06-07

    Catalytic pathways for acetic acid (CH3COOH) and hydrogen (H2) reactions on dispersed Ru clusters in the aqueous medium and the associated kinetic requirements for C-O and C-C bond cleavages and hydrogen insertion are established from rate and isotopic assessments. CH3COOH reacts with H2 in steps that either retain its carbon backbone and lead to ethanol, ethyl acetate, and ethane (47-95 %, 1-23 %, and 2-17 % carbon selectivities, respectively) or break its C-C bond and form methane (1-43 % carbon selectivities) at moderate temperatures (413-523 K) and H2 pressures (10-60 bar, 298 K). Initial CH3COOH activation is the kinetically relevant step, during which CH3C(O)-OH bond cleaves on a metal site pair at Ru cluster surfaces nearly saturated with adsorbed hydroxyl (OH*) and acetate (CH3COO*) intermediates, forming an adsorbed acetyl (CH3CO*) and hydroxyl (OH*) species. Acetic acid turnover rates increase proportionally with both H2 (10-60 bar) and CH3COOH concentrations at low CH3COOH concentrations (<0.83 M), but decrease from first to zero order as the CH3COOH concentration and the CH3COO* coverages increase and the vacant Ru sites concomitantly decrease. Beyond the initial CH3C(O)-OH bond activation, sequential H-insertions on the surface acetyl species (CH3CO*) lead to C2 products and their derivative (ethanol, ethane, and ethyl acetate) and the competitive C-C bond cleavage of CH3CO* causes the eventual methane formation. The instantaneous carbon selectivities towards C2 species (ethanol, ethane, and ethyl acetate) increase linearly with the concentration of proton-type Hδ+ (derived from carboxylic acid dissociation) and chemisorbed H*. The selectivities towards C2 products decrease with increasing temperature, because of higher observed barriers for C-C bond cleavage than H-insertion. This study offers an interpretation of mechanism and energetics and provides kinetic evidence of carboxylic acid assisted proton-type hydrogen (Hδ+) shuffling during H

  20. Study of metabolic pathways for hydrogen production in chlamydomonas reinhardtii and transposition on a torus photo bioreactor; Etude des voies metaboliques de production d'hydrogene chez la microalgue Chlamydomonas reinhardtii et transposition en photobioreacteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouchard, S

    2006-04-15

    Considering the recent increase in energy consumption. aide associated environmental risks, new trails are followed today to develop the use of clean and renewable alternative energies. In this context hydrogen seems to be a serious solution and this study, based on micro-algae photosynthetic capacities exploitation, will allow to devise a process for hydrogen production from only water and solar energy without greenhouse gas release. The sulphur deprivation protocol on TAP medium, known to lead to hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii species was particularly studied. At the metabolic level, two important phenomena are induced under these conditions: an over-accumulation of the intracellular starch reserves and a simultaneous alteration of the PsII activity which leads to anoxia and Fe-hydrogenase induction, an enzyme with a strong specific activity responsible for the hydrogen production. The contribution of the two electron transfer pathways implied in the hydrogen production process (PsII-dependent and PSII-independent) as well as the importance of the previously accumulated starch were highlighted here. We also investigated the potential for designing autotrophic protocols for hydrogen photoproduction. Various protocols, considered to be relevant, were then transposed on a torus photo-bioreactor, specifically developed in this study and which allows the control of culture parameters as well as the precise measurement of gas release kinetics, in order to obtain first estimates of productivity of the system. Integration of the physical; aspects of the pilot and biological aspects of the process in a model, finally opens new prospects for subject development, in particular for a reasoned optimization of hydrogen production via this double physiology/process approach. (author)

  1. Study of metabolic pathways for hydrogen production in chlamydomonas reinhardtii and transposition on a torus photo bioreactor; Etude des voies metaboliques de production d'hydrogene chez la microalgue Chlamydomonas reinhardtii et transposition en photobioreacteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouchard, S

    2006-04-15

    Considering the recent increase in energy consumption. aide associated environmental risks, new trails are followed today to develop the use of clean and renewable alternative energies. In this context hydrogen seems to be a serious solution and this study, based on micro-algae photosynthetic capacities exploitation, will allow to devise a process for hydrogen production from only water and solar energy without greenhouse gas release. The sulphur deprivation protocol on TAP medium, known to lead to hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii species was particularly studied. At the metabolic level, two important phenomena are induced under these conditions: an over-accumulation of the intracellular starch reserves and a simultaneous alteration of the PsII activity which leads to anoxia and Fe-hydrogenase induction, an enzyme with a strong specific activity responsible for the hydrogen production. The contribution of the two electron transfer pathways implied in the hydrogen production process (PsII-dependent and PSII-independent) as well as the importance of the previously accumulated starch were highlighted here. We also investigated the potential for designing autotrophic protocols for hydrogen photoproduction. Various protocols, considered to be relevant, were then transposed on a torus photo-bioreactor, specifically developed in this study and which allows the control of culture parameters as well as the precise measurement of gas release kinetics, in order to obtain first estimates of productivity of the system. Integration of the physical; aspects of the pilot and biological aspects of the process in a model, finally opens new prospects for subject development, in particular for a reasoned optimization of hydrogen production via this double physiology/process approach. (author)

  2. Multiple parton interactions in photoproduction at HERA/H1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magro, Lluis Marti

    2009-02-15

    Photoproduction data of HERA-I are analysed by requiring dijets with transverse momenta of at least 5 GeV. The two jets define in azimuth a towards region (leading jet), an away region (usually the 2nd jet) and transverse regions between them. The charged particle and jet with low transverse momentum multiplicity, so called minijets, are measured in these regions as a function of the variables x{sup obs}{sub {gamma}} and P{sup Jet{sub 1T}} (leading jet). The measurement is compared to predictions including parton showers and matrix elements at leading order in {alpha}{sub s}. Some predictions include contributions from multiple parton interactions and use different parton evolution equations. It was found that existing MC programs do not fully describe the measurements but the description can be improved by including multiple parton interactions. (orig.)

  3. Photoproduction of Inelastic and Elastic $J/\\psi$ Vector Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stundzia, Audrius Bronius [Toronto U.

    1992-06-01

    Results and analysis on the inelastic and elastic photoproduction of $J /\\psi$ vector mesons by Fermilab experiment E691 are presented. The inelastic, deep inelastic, coherent elastic and incoherent elastic cross sections were measured at ($E_{\\gamma}$) = 145 GeV. The $d\\sigma / dzdp^2_{\\tau}$} distribution and the photon energy dependence of the cross sections for these production processes were also measured. The deep inelastic $J /\\psi$ was analyzed in the colour-singlet photon-gluon-fusion model. It was found that the $d\\sigma / dzdp^2_{\\tau}$ distribution and the the rise of the cross section with $E\\gamma$ are both well described by a relatively soft gluon distribution [xG( x) $\\alpha$ ($1 - x )^{ng}$, where $n_g$ = 6.5 ± 1.1 (stat.)$^{+1.0}_{-0.6}$(syst.)].

  4. Spin Observables in h Meson Photoproduction on the Proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Ross [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2016-05-01

    A series of experiments using a polarized beam incident on a polarized frozen spin target (FROST) was conducted at Jefferson Lab in 2010. Results presented here were taken during the second running period with the FROST target using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) detector at Jefferson Lab, which used transversely-polarized protons in a butanol target and a circularly-polarized incident tagged photon beam with energies between 0:62 and 2:93 GeV. Data are presented for the F and T polarization observables for n meson photoproduction on the proton from W = 1:55 GeV to 1:80 GeV. The data presented here will improve the world database and refine theoretical approaches of nucleon structure.

  5. Lambda Polarization in Exclusive Electro- and Photoproduction at CLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestayer, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    The CLAS collaboration at JLab has recent results on Λ polarization for both electroproduction and photoproduction of K + Λ exclusive states. I note the striking phenomenological trends in the data and discuss the underlying physics which might give rise to these phenomena; both in the context of an e.ective Lagrangian formalism, where the degrees of freedom are intermediate mesons and baryons, and also in the context of a simple quark picture. The quark model argument leads to the conclusion that the s and (bar s) quarks are produced with spins anti-aligned, in apparent contradiction to the popular 3 P 0 model of quark pair creation in which the pair is created with vacuum quantum numbers (J=0 and positive parity), i.e. in an S=1, L=1, J=0 angular momentum state

  6. Application of the Lorentz-transform technique to meson photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiss, C.; Leidemann, W.; Orlandini, G.; Tomusiak, E.L.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the Lorentz integral transform (LIT) technique which has been successfully applied to photoreactions in light nuclei can also be applied to photoreactions involving particle production. A simple model where results are easily calculable in the traditional fashion is used to test the technique. Specifically, we compute inclusive π + photoproduction from deuterium for photon energies less than 200 MeV using a Yamaguchi model for the NN interaction. It is demonstrated that, although the response functions for inclusive meson production do not have favourable asymptotic behavior, one can nonetheless extract them by inversion of the transform. The implication is that one can treat realistic problems of photo-meson production, including all final-state interactions, by means of the LIT technique. (orig.)

  7. Studies of the diffractive photoproduction of isolated photons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.

    2017-01-01

    The photoproduction of isolated photons has been measured in diffractive events recorded by the ZEUS detector at HERA. Cross sections are evaluated in the photon transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 50.9, where z meas P is the fraction of the longitudinal momentum of the colourless ''Pomeron'' exchange that is transferred to the photon-jet final state, giving evidence for direct Pomeron interactions.

  8. Dijets in diffractive photoproduction measured with the ZEUS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renner, R.

    2006-10-01

    The diffractive photoproduction of dijets in electron-proton scattering has been studied using 77.1 pb -1 of data taken with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The measurements have been made at a centre-of- mass energy √s=318 GeV in the kinematic range 0.2 P P is the fraction of the proton momentum taken by the diffractive exchange. The jets have been reconstructed using the k T algorithm. The two jets with the highest transversal energy have been required to satisfy E T >7.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to be in the pseudorapidity range -1.5<η<1.5. Differential cross sections have been measured and been confronted with the predictions from leading order Monte Carlo simulations and next-to-leading order QCD calculations. (orig.)

  9. Photoproduction of ρ mesons with a final state proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karschnick, O.

    2001-06-01

    The elastic photoproduction of ρ mesons is studied with the H1 detector for the first time by measuring the final state proton using the forward proton spectrometer. In these reactions the proton is scattered under small angles θ p -1 . The photon-proton center-of-mass energy in this analysis is in the range 25 GeV 2 2 at the proton vertex. The distribution of the π + π - invariant mass is found to be skewed. In the Soeding Model this is attributed to an interference between resonant and non-resonant production of π + π - pairs. The amount of skewing increases with decreasing vertical stroke t vertical stroke as expected. A variation with W is not observed. (orig.)

  10. Diffractive photoproduction of dijets in ep collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2007-09-01

    Diffractive photoproduction of dijets was measured with the ZEUS detector at the ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 77.2 pb -1 . The measurements were made in the kinematic range Q 2 2 , 0.20 P 2 is the photon virtuality, y is the inelasticity and x P is the fraction of the proton momentum taken by the diffractive exchange. The two jets with the highest transverse energy, E jet T , were required to satisfy E jet T >7.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to lie in the pseudorapidity range -1.5 jet <1.5. Differential cross sections were compared to perturbative QCD calculations using available parameterisations of diffractive parton distributions of the proton. (orig.)

  11. Measurement of Dijet Cross Sections in Photoproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Becker, J.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Mangano, S.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; zur Nedden, M.

    2002-01-01

    Dijet cross sections as functions of several jet observables are measured in photoproduction using the H1 detector at HERA. The data sample comprises e^+p data with an integrated luminosity of 34.9 pb^(-1). Jets are selected using the inclusive k_T algorithm with a minimum transverse energy of 25 GeV for the leading jet. The phase space covers longitudinal proton momentum fraction x_p and photon longitudinal momentum fraction x_gamma in the ranges 0.05

  12. Measurement of Prompt Photon Cross Sections in Photoproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.-B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kuckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leiner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Ratiani, Z.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2004-01-01

    Results are presented on the photoproduction of isolated prompt photons, inclusively and associated with jets, in the gamma p center of mass energy range 142 4.5 GeV. They are measured differentially as a function of E_T^gamma, E_T^jet, the pseudorapidities eta^gamma and eta^jet and estimators of the momentum fractions x_gamma and x_p of the incident photon and proton carried by the constituents participating in the hard process. In order to further investigate the underlying dynamics, the angular correlation between the prompt photon and the jet in the transverse plane is studied. Predictions by perturbative QCD calculations in next to leading order are about 30% below the inclusive prompt photon data after corrections for hadronisation and multiple interactions, but are in reasonable agreement with the results for prompt photons associated with jets. Comparisons with the predictions of the event generators PYTHIA and HERWIG are also presented.

  13. Lambda-neutron interaction in kaon photoproduction from the deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelseck, R.A.; Wright, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of hyperon-nucleon final-state interaction in kaon photoproduction from the deuteron is examined. By calculating the deuteron wave function using the Reid, Paris, or Bonn NN potentials, the uncertainty of this process due to the nucleonic wave function is found to be negligible. The insignificance of off-shell and relativistic effects is demonstrated by employing a completely relativistic wave function and comparing various approximations. We find the influence of the kaon production operator to be the most critical ingredient in this calculation. Final-state effects, which are included via a distorted-wave formalism, involve partial waves up to l = 3. They produce a sharp rise of the cross section near threshold resulting in an enhancement by about a factor of 3, but diminish rapidly as the energy increases. Different ΛN potential models show variations of the effect by up to 10%

  14. Recent Results from Photoproduction of Mesons in A2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walford Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments using the Crystal Ball/TAPS setup at the MAMI accelerator in Mainz, Germany continue to study the properties and the excitation spectrum of the nucleon with meson photoproduction. Electromagnetic excitations of the proton and neutron are essential for understanding their isospin decomposition. The electromagnetic coupling of photons to protons is different than that of neutrons in certain states. Hence, a complete partial wave analysis (PWA can assist in yielding more information about any reaction, but gains from polarization observables constraining the fits. Polarization observables play a crucial role as they are essential in disentangling the contributing resonant and non-resonant amplitudes, whereas cross-section data alone is not sufficient for separating resonances. Preliminary results of polarization observables (E, T, and F of η and double π production off a polarized neutron (dButanol target are shown with comparison to predictions of recent multipole analyses. These results will allow for developing the world database.

  15. A-dependence of inclusive πsup(+-) meson photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanakyan, K.V.; Amaryan, M.D.; Demirchyan, R.A.; Egiyan, K.Sh.; Kocharova, Zh.L.; Ogandjanyan, M.S.; Sharabyan, Yu.G.; Stepanyan, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental data on A-dependence of photopions in wide energy and angular intervals of secondary PI +- -mesons are discussed. It is shown that if the invariant cross section of photopion production on 12 C, 27 Al, 63 Cu, 118 Sn and 208 Pb nuclei in the γ+A→PI +- +X reaction is represented in the form of f approximately equal to BAsup(n), then in the energy dependence of exponent n one can observe the same singularities as in the analogous hadron processes. The expansion of the angular interval up to 20-160 deg in the laboratory system made it possible to study in detail the nature of these singularities. The attempts are made to explain the observed singularities in the energy dependence n=n(TPI) by taking into account additional (to tne direct process of photoproduction on nuclear nucleons) sources of the inclusive PI-meson production [ru

  16. Photoproduction of Dijets with High Transverse Momenta at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Differential dijet cross sections are measured in photoproduction in the region of photon virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the H1 detector at the HERA ep collider using an integrated luminosity of 66.6 pb^{-1}. Jets are defined with the inclusive k_T algorithm and a minimum transverse momentum of the leading jet of 25 GeV is required. Dijet cross sections are measured in direct and resolved photon enhanced regions separately. Longitudinal proton momentum fractions up to 0.7 are reached. The data compare well with predictions from Monte Carlo event generators based on leading order QCD and parton showers and with next-to-leading order QCD calculations corrected for hadronisation effects.

  17. Photoproduction of dijets with high transverse momenta at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    H1 Collaboration; Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kückens, J.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-07-01

    Differential dijet cross sections are measured in photoproduction in the region of photon virtualities Q<1 GeV with the H1 detector at the HERA ep collider using an integrated luminosity of 66.6 pb-1. Jets are defined with the inclusive k algorithm and a minimum transverse momentum of the leading jet of 25 GeV is required. Dijet cross sections are measured in direct and resolved photon enhanced regions separately. Longitudinal proton momentum fractions up to 0.7 are reached. The data compare well with predictions from Monte Carlo event generators based on leading order QCD and parton showers and with next-to-leading order QCD calculations corrected for hadronisation effects.

  18. Photoproduction of mesons on the nucleon at intermediate energies; Photoproduction de mesons sur le nucleon aux energies intermediaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidal, M

    1997-01-01

    In this work a model is proposed to simulate the photoproduction of pseudoscalar mesons ('PI' and K) on the nucleon at high energy. This model is based on the exchange of mesonic or baryonic Regge trajectories, it is gauge invariant and it uses a Feynman diagram formalism inspired from isobaric models. The measurements concerning the following reactions {gamma}p {yields} n{pi}{sup +}, {gamma}n {yields} p{pi}{sup -}, {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup 0} and {gamma}n {yields} n{pi}{sup 0} are reviewed and the new model is confronted to the experimental results. The model gives a reasonable and coherent description of these 4 reactions. The model has also been applied to the photoproduction of strange mesons and of {lambda} and {sigma} baryons and has been extrapolated at low energy to the threshold of the reaction, the model matches the results even up to E{sub {gamma}} = 2 GeV for differential cross-sections and recoil polarization. An attempt has been made to associate a Regge based description, which is valid with low transfers, with perturbative quantum chromodynamics which is valid with high transfers. The model relies on the saturation of trajectories in the high transfer region and on the counting laws that give the right variation of the cross-section. It seems that a model based on linear trajectories can be reliable up to 4 GeV. The domain of high transfer has been too little investigated to provide enough experimental data to validate the model. An experiment whose purpose is to study the photoproduction of {phi} at high transfer, is proposed. This experiment requires an accelerator with high useful cycle because of the smallness of the expected cross-section. The CEBAF (continuous electron beam accelerator facility) as well as the CLAS 4{pi} detector is presented. The study of {gamma}p {yields} p{phi} and {gamma}p {yields} K{lambda}{sup *} (1520) requires the discrimination of kaons from pions so the measurement of 180 ps as time resolution allows the

  19. Hydrogen determination in chemically delithiated lithium ion battery cathodes by prompt gamma activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Emilio, II

    2007-12-01

    Lithium ion batteries, due to their relatively high energy density, are now widely used as the power source for portable electronics. Commercial lithium ion cells currently employ layered LiCoO2 as a cathode but only 50% of its theoretical capacity can be utilized. The factors that cause the limitation are not fully established in the literature. With this perspective, prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) has been employed to determine the hydrogen content in various oxide cathodes that have undergone chemical extraction of lithium (delithiation). The PGAA data is complemented by data obtained from atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), redox titration, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and mass spectroscopy to better understand the capacity limitations and failure mechanisms of lithium ion battery cathodes. As part of this work, the PGAA facility has been redesigned and reconstructed. The neutron and gamma-ray backgrounds have been reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Detection limits for elements have also been improved. Special attention was given to the experimental setup including potential sources of error and system calibration for the detection of hydrogen. Spectral interference with hydrogen arising from cobalt was identified and corrected for. Limits of detection as a function of cobalt mass present in a given sample are also discussed. The data indicates that while delithiated layered Li1- xCoO2, Li1-xNi 1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2, and Li1- xNi0.5Mn0.5O2 take significant amounts of hydrogen into the lattice during deep extraction, orthorhombic Li 1-xMnO2, spinel Li1- xMn2O4, and olivine Li1- xFePO4 do not. Layered LiCoO2, LiNi 0.5Mn0.5O2, and LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co 1/3O2 have been further analyzed to assess their relative chemical instabilities while undergoing stepped chemical delithiation. Each system takes increasing amounts of protons at lower lithium contents. The differences are attributed to the relative chemical instabilities of the various cathodes

  20. Theoretical study of incoherent φ photoproduction on a deuteron target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekihara, T.; Martinez Torres, A.; Jido, D.; Oset, E.

    2012-01-01

    We study the photoproduction of φ mesons in deuteron, paying attention to the modification of the cross-section from bound protons to the free ones. For this purpose we take into account Fermi motion in single scattering and rescattering of φ to account for φ absorption on a second nucleon as well as the rescattering of the proton on the neutron. We find that the contribution of the double scattering for φ is much smaller than the typical cross-section of γp→φp in free space, which implies a very small screening of the φ production in deuteron. The contribution from the proton rescattering, on the other hand, is found to be not negligible compared to the cross-section of γp→φp in free space, and leads to a moderate reduction of the φ photoproduction cross-section on a deuteron at forward angles if the LEPS set-up is taken into account. The Fermi motion allows contribution of the single scattering in regions forbidden by phase-space in the free case. In particular, we find that for momentum transfer squared close to the maximum value, the Fermi motion changes drastically the shape of dσ/dt, to the point that the ratio of this cross-section to the free one becomes very sensitive to the precise value of t chosen, or the size of the bin used in an experimental analysis. Hence, this particular region of t does not seem to be the most indicated to find effects of a possible φ absorption in the deuteron. This reaction is studied theoretically as a function of t and the results are contrasted with recent experiments at LEPS and Jefferson Lab. The effect of the experimental angular cuts at LEPS is also discussed, providing guidelines for future experimental analyses of the reaction. (orig.)

  1. Photoproduction of scalar mesons using CLAS at JLab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandavar, Shloka; Hicks, Kenneth; Weygand, Dennis; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The search for glueballs has been ongoing for decades. The lightest glueball has been predicted by quenched lattice QCD to have a mass in the range of 1.0-1.7 GeV and JPC =0++ . The mixing of glueball states with neighbouring meson states complicates their identification. The f0 (1500) is one of several candidates for the lightest glueball, whose presence in the Ks0 Ks0 channel is investigated in photoproduction using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. This is done by studying the reaction, γp -->fJ p -->Ks0> Ks0p --> 2 (π+π-) p using data from the g12 experiment. A brief description of this analysis, along with a preliminary partial wave analysis results will be presented. The search for glueballs has been ongoing for decades. The lightest glueball has been predicted by quenched lattice QCD to have a mass in the range of 1.0-1.7 GeV and JPC =0++ . The mixing of glueball states with neighbouring meson states complicates their identification. The f0 (1500) is one of several candidates for the lightest glueball, whose presence in the Ks0Ks0 channel is investigated in photoproduction using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. This is done by studying the reaction, γp -->fJ p -->Ks0 Ks0p --> 2 (π+π-) p using data from the g12 experiment. A brief description of this analysis, along with a preliminary partial wave analysis results will be presented. NSF.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide mediates Rac1 activation of S6K1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Gyu-Un; Kim, Yong Kee; Kwon, Hyoung-Keun; Park, Jong Woo; Lee, Eun Kyung; Paek, Se Jin; Choi, Wahn Soo; Jung, In Duk; Lee, Hoi Young; Cho, Eun-Jung; Lee, Hyang Woo; Han, Jeung-Whan

    2004-01-01

    We previously reported that hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) mediates mitogen activation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) which plays an important role in cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we investigated a possible role of H 2 O 2 as a molecular linker in Rac1 activation of S6K1. Overexpression of recombinant catalase in NIH-3T3 cells led to the drastic inhibition of H 2 O 2 production by PDGF, which was accompanied by a decrease in S6K1 activity. Similarly, PDGF activation of S6K1 was significantly inhibited by transient transfection or stable transfection of the cells with a dominant-negative Rac1 (Rac1N17), while overexpression of constitutively active Rac1 (Rac1V12) in the cells led to an increase in basal activity of S6K1. In addition, stable transfection of Rat2 cells with Rac1N17 dramatically attenuated the H 2 O 2 production by PDGF as compared with that in the control cells. In contrast, Rat2 cells stably transfected with Rac1V12 produced high level of H 2 O 2 in the absence of PDGF, comparable to that in the control cells stimulated with PDGF. More importantly, elimination of H 2 O 2 produced in Rat2 cells overexpressing Rac1V12 inhibited the Rac1V12 activation of S6K1, indicating the possible role of H 2 O 2 as a mediator in the activation of S6K1 by Rac1. However, H 2 O 2 could be also produced via other pathway, which is independent of Rac1 or PI3K, because in Rat2 cells stably transfected with Rac1N17, H 2 O 2 could be produced by arsenite, which has been shown to be a stimulator of H 2 O 2 production. Taken together, these results suggest that H 2 O 2 plays a pivotal role as a mediator in Rac1 activation of S6K1

  3. Study of metabolic pathways for hydrogen production in chlamydomonas reinhardtii and transposition on a torus photo bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouchard, S.

    2006-04-01

    Considering the recent increase in energy consumption. aide associated environmental risks, new trails are followed today to develop the use of clean and renewable alternative energies. In this context hydrogen seems to be a serious solution and this study, based on micro-algae photosynthetic capacities exploitation, will allow to devise a process for hydrogen production from only water and solar energy without greenhouse gas release. The sulphur deprivation protocol on TAP medium, known to lead to hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii species was particularly studied. At the metabolic level, two important phenomena are induced under these conditions: an over-accumulation of the intracellular starch reserves and a simultaneous alteration of the PsII activity which leads to anoxia and Fe-hydrogenase induction, an enzyme with a strong specific activity responsible for the hydrogen production. The contribution of the two electron transfer pathways implied in the hydrogen production process (PsII-dependent and PSII-independent) as well as the importance of the previously accumulated starch were highlighted here. We also investigated the potential for designing autotrophic protocols for hydrogen photoproduction. Various protocols, considered to be relevant, were then transposed on a torus photo-bioreactor, specifically developed in this study and which allows the control of culture parameters as well as the precise measurement of gas release kinetics, in order to obtain first estimates of productivity of the system. Integration of the physical; aspects of the pilot and biological aspects of the process in a model, finally opens new prospects for subject development, in particular for a reasoned optimization of hydrogen production via this double physiology/process approach. (author)

  4. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  5. Production of bioelectricity, bio-hydrogen, high value chemicals and bioinspired nanomaterials by electrochemically active biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathil, Shafeer; Khan, Mohammad Mansoob; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2013-11-01

    Microorganisms naturally form biofilms on solid surfaces for their mutual benefits including protection from environmental stresses caused by contaminants, nutritional depletion or imbalances. The biofilms are normally dangerous to human health due to their inherited robustness. On the other hand, a recent study suggested that electrochemically active biofilms (EABs) generated by electrically active microorganisms have properties that can be used to catalyze or control the electrochemical reactions in a range of fields, such as bioenergy production, bioremediation, chemical/biological synthesis, bio-corrosion mitigation and biosensor development. EABs have attracted considerable attraction in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells, where they act as living bioanode or biocathode catalysts. Recently, it was reported that EABs can be used to synthesize metal nanoparticles and metal nanocomposites. The EAB-mediated synthesis of metal and metal-semiconductor nanocomposites is expected to provide a new avenue for the greener synthesis of nanomaterials with high efficiency and speed than other synthetic methods. This review covers the general introduction of EABs, as well as the applications of EABs in BESs, and the production of bio-hydrogen, high value chemicals and bio-inspired nanomaterials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Towards magnetic liquefaction of hydrogen: experiments with an active magnetic regenerator test apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, M.-A.; Rowe, A.M.; Chahine, R.; Bose, T.; Barclay, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Refrigeration based on an Active Magnetic Regenerative (AMR) cycle has the potential to be a more efficient way of liquefying hydrogen than conventional gas cycles. Because the magnetocaloric effect decreases quickly for most materials as the temperature moves away from the phase transition region, the combination of many magnetic refrigerants in a multi-layers active magnetic regenerator is needed as a way to produce larger temperature spans for each stage of a liquefier. An investigation of a multi layer regenerator has been performed using an AMR test apparatus (AMRTA). Gadolinium and a gadolinium-terbium alloy were used as the two layers in the fabrication of two reciprocating multi-layer regenerators working near room temperature. The performances of the multi-material regenerator is compared to a Gd regenerator in terms of temperature span (respectively 20 K and 16 K at 2 Tesla respectively) and cooling power. For the first time, a multi-material AMR has been shown to produce a larger temperature span and cooling power than a single material of equivalent mass and geometry. (author)

  7. Conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond network between TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Hansen, Louise Valentin; Mokrosinski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Five highly conserved polar residues connected by a number of structural water molecules together with two rotamer micro-switches, TrpVI:13 and TyrVII:20, constitute an extended hydrogen bond network between the intracellular segments of TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII of 7TM receptors. Molecular dynamics...... to apparently function as a catching trap for water molecules. Mutational analysis of the beta2-adrenergic receptor demonstrated that the highly conserved polar residues of the hydrogen bond network were all important for receptor signaling but served different functions, some dampening constitutive activity...... (AsnI:18, AspII:10, and AsnVII:13), whereas others (AsnVII:12 and AsnVII:16) located one helical turn apart and sharing a water molecule were shown to be essential for agonist-induced signaling. It is concluded that the conserved water hydrogen bond network of 7TM receptors constitutes an extended...

  8. Fe(III)-TAML activator: a potent peroxidase mimic for chemiluminescent determination of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovenko, Marina M; Demiyanova, Alexandra S; Kopylov, Kirill E; Sakharov, Ivan Yu

    2014-07-01

    Efforts to replace native peroxidase with its low molecular weight alternatives have stimulated a search for peroxidase mimetics. Herein we describe the oxidation of luminol with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by commercially available Fe(III)-TAML activator 1a, which was shown to be a more active catalyst than hemin. At Fe(III)-TAML activator 1a use in chemiluminescent assay for H2O2 determination the detection limit value (3σ) of 5×10(-8)M was similar to the detection limit obtained with horseradish peroxidase (1×10(-7)M) and significantly lower than that obtained in the presence of hemin (6×10(-7)M). The linear ranges (R(2)=0.98) of the assay were 6×10(-8)-1×10(-6)M and 6×10(-7)-1×10(-6)M H2O2 for Fe(III)-TAML 1a and hemin, respectively. The CV values for Fe(III)-TAML 1a-based assay measured within the working range varied from 1.0% to 3.7% (n=4), whereas in the case of hemin -5.0% to 9.7% (n=4). Moreover, the sensitivity of Fe(III)-TAML 1a-based method was 56 and 5 times higher than that of hemin- and HRP-based methods, respectively. The obtained results open good perspectives to apply Fe(III)-TAML activator 1a in CL analytical methods instead of hemin, a traditionally used peroxidase mimetic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrogen Codes and Standards: An Overview of U.S. DOE Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James M Ohi

    2006-01-01

    The Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), with the help of leading standards and model code development organizations, other national laboratories, and key stakeholders, are developing a coordinated and collaborative government-industry effort to prepare, review, and promulgate hydrogen codes and standards needed to expedite hydrogen infrastructure development. The focus of this effort is to put in place a coordinated and comprehensive hydrogen codes and standards program at the national and international levels. This paper updates an overview of the U.S. program to facilitate and coordinate the development of hydrogen codes and standards that was presented by the author at WHEC 15. (authors)

  10. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  11. Homogeneous activation of molecular hydrogen: on the development of effective catalysts for isotopic exchange in protolytic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakharovskij, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of different catalytic systems for hydrogen isotopic exchange with protolytic solvent based on activation enthalpy and entropy values is carried out. Particular attention is paid to the effect of ligand environment of complex forming metallic central ion and solvent composition on free activation energy and stability of catalytic system. A conclusion is drawn on impossibility of absolutely stable and high-temperature catalyst in an isolated system

  12. IEA Agreement on the Production and utilization of hydrogen: 1998 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Carolyn C. (National Renewable Energy Lab, Golden, CO (US)) (ed.)

    1999-01-31

    The annual report includes an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including its guiding principles. The Chairman's report section includes highlights of the agreement for 1998. Annex reports are given on various tasks: Task 10, Photoproduction of Hydrogen, Task 11, Integrated Systems, and Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage. Lastly, a feature article by Karsten Wurr, E3M Material Consulting, GmbH, Hamburg Germany, is included titled 'Hydrogen in Material Science and Technology: State of the Art and New Tendencies'.

  13. Reactive radical-driven bacterial inactivation by hydrogen-peroxide-enhanced plasma-activated-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songjie; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    The combined effects of plasma activated water (PAW) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), PAW/HP, in sterilization were investigated in this study. To assess the synergistic effects of PAW/HP, S. aureus was selected as the test microorganism to determine the inactivation efficacy. Also, the DNA/RNA and proteins released by the bacterial suspensions under different conditions were examined to confirm membrane integrity. Additionally, the intracellular pH (pHi) of S. aureus was measured in our study. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) was employed to identify the presence of radicals. Finally, the oxidation reduction potential (ORP), conductivity and pH were measured. Our results revealed that the inactivation efficacy of PAW/HP is much greater than that of PAW, while increased H2O2 concentration result in higher inactivation potential. More importantly, as compared with PAW, the much stronger intensity ESR signals and higher ORP in PAW/HP suggests that the inactivation mechanism of the synergistic effects of PAW/HP: more reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), especially OH and NO radicals, are generated in PAW combined with H2O2 resulting in more deaths of the bacteria.

  14. Anti-tumor Effects of Plasma Activated Media and Correlation with Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Mohades, Soheila; Barekzi, Nazir; Maruthamuthu, Venkat; Razavi, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Plasma activated media (PAM) can induce death in cancer cells. In our research, PAM is produced by exposing liquid culture medium to a helium plasma pencil. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the aqueous state are known factors in anti-tumor effects of PAM. The duration of plasma exposure determines the concentrations of reactive species produced in PAM. Stability of the plasma generated reactive species and their lifetime depend on parameters such as the chemical composition of the medium. Here, a complete cell culture medium was employed to make PAM. Later, PAM was used to treat SCaBER cancer cells either as an immediate PAM (right after exposure) or as an aged-PAM (after storage). SCaBER (ATCC®HTB-3™) is an epithelial cell line from a human bladder with the squamous carcinoma disease. A normal epithelial cell line from a kidney tissue of a dog - MDCK (ATCC®CCL-34™) - was used to analyze the selective effect of PAM. Correspondingly, we measured the concentration of hydrogen peroxide- as a stable species with biological impact on cell viability- in both immediate PAM and aged-PAM. In addition, we report on the effect of serum supplemented in PAM on the H2O2 concentration measured by Amplex red assay kit. Finally, we evaluate the effects of PAM on growth and morphological changes in MDCK cells using fluorescence microscopy.

  15. Resistance to Hydrogen Peroxide Highlights Gymnodinium catenatum (Dinophyceae) Sensitivity to Geomagnetic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Paulo

    2018-01-01

    The chain-forming dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum was exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Microscopical examination revealed striking dose-response alterations in chain formation above 245 μm: singlets replaced the dominance of long chain formations. These observations were valid for cells acclimated to halogen light. Under fluorescent light, cells were more resistant to modifications in chain length after H 2 O 2 exposure. Growth along 9 h in the presence of extracellular H 2 O 2 followed an hormesis response in both light regimes. Under halogen light conditions, alterations in chain formation and net growth were related to culture time, inocula concentration and geomagnetic activity (GMA) in the proceeding hours. Below a 16 nT threshold in GMA average growth was 0%, while above 16 nT it was circa +9%, independently if the local static magnetic field was altered by a permanent magnet or not. Mycosporine-like amino acids that can have an antioxidant role and are easily oxidized decreased from 7.1 to 6.5 pg cell -1 (P < 0.05) under halogen light and exposure to 245 μm H 2 O 2 . GMA, as well as UV-A, increased stress responsiveness that can momentarily protect cells from extracellular H 2 O 2 addition. However, stress response is dependent on bio-availability of several micronutrients and macronutrients, many found at limiting concentrations in oceanic waters. © 2017 The American Society of Photobiology.

  16. Highly Selective TiN-Supported Highly Dispersed Pt Catalyst: Ultra Active toward Hydrogen Oxidation and Inactive toward Oxygen Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junming; Tang, Haibo; Tian, Xinlong; Hou, Sanying; Li, Xiuhua; Du, Li; Liao, Shijun

    2018-01-31

    The severe dissolution of the cathode catalyst, caused by an undesired oxygen reduction reaction at the anode during startup and shutdown, is a fatal challenge to practical applications of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. To address this important issue, according to the distinct structure-sensitivity between the σ-type bond in H 2 and the π-type bond in O 2 , we design a HD-Pt/TiN material by highly dispersing Pt on the TiN surface to inhibit the unwanted oxygen reduction reaction. The highly dispersed Pt/TiN catalyst exhibits excellent selectivity toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. With a Pt loading of 0.88 wt %, our catalyst shows excellent hydrogen oxidation reaction activity, close to that of commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst, and much lower oxygen reduction reaction activity than the commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst. The lack of well-ordered Pt facets is responsible for the excellent selectivity of the HD-Pt/TiN materials toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. Our work provides a new and cost-effective solution to design selective catalysts toward hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions, making the strategy of using oxygen-tolerant anode catalyst to improve the stability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells during startup and shutdown more affordable and practical.

  17. Hydrogen-rich water affected blood alkalinity in physically active men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojic, Sergej M; Stojanovic, Marko D

    2014-01-01

    Possible appliance of effective and safe alkalizing agent in the treatment of metabolic acidosis could be of particular interest to humans experiencing an increase in plasma acidity, such as exercise-induced acidosis. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that the daily oral intake of 2L of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) for 14 days would increase arterial blood alkalinity at baseline and post-exercise as compared with the placebo. This study was a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 52 presumably healthy physically active male volunteers. Twenty-six participants received HRW and 26 a placebo (tap water) for 14 days. Arterial blood pH, partial pressure for carbon dioxide (pCO2), and bicarbonates were measured at baseline and postexercise at the start (day 0) and at the end of the intervention period (day 14). Intake of HRW significantly increased fasting arterial blood pH by 0.04 (95% confidence interval; 0.01 - 0.08; p < 0.001), and postexercise pH by 0.07 (95% confidence interval; 0.01 - 0.10; p = 0.03) after 14 days of intervention. Fasting bicarbonates were significantly higher in the HRW trial after the administration regimen as compared with the preadministration (30.5 ± 1.9 mEq/L vs. 28.3 ± 2.3 mEq/L; p < 0.0001). No volunteers withdrew before the end of the study, and no participant reported any vexatious side effects of supplementation. These results support the hypothesis that HRW administration is safe and may have an alkalizing effect in young physically active men.

  18. A 2-deoxyribonolactone-containing nucleotide: Isolation and characterization of the alkali-sensitive photoproduct of the trideoxyribonucleotide d(ApCpA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Akagi, M.; Hiroaki, H.; Uesugi, S.

    1989-01-01

    It has been reported that ACA sequences in DNA are mutagenic hot spots in UV-induced mutagenesis and are sites of an alkali-sensitive lesion produced by UV irradiation. In order to characterize the UV-induced lesion of an ACA site, chemically synthesized trideoxyribonucleotide d(ApCpA) was irradiated with UV light and the alkali-sensitive photoproduct was isolated. The structure of this photoproduct was characterized as the trinucleotide containing 2-deoxyribonolactone at the internal residue by 2D DQF-COSY, FT-IR, FAB-MS, and chemical properties. It is known that this lesion is also produced by gamma-irradiation, neocarzinostatin, the 1,10-phenanthroline-copper complex, and hydrogen peroxide and is highly mutagenic because of its resistance to cleavage by certain apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases. Thus, 2-deoxyribonolactone may be one of the lethal DNA lesions induced by UV irradiation to organisms and one of the intermediates of UV-induced DNA strand breaks because the DNA strand is cleaved at this site with beta- and subsequent delta-elimination mechanisms

  19. Measuring hydrogen by cold-neutron prompt-gamma activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, R M; Paul, R L; Greenberg, R R [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Div. of Inorganic Analytical Research; Vincent, D H [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1994-05-01

    By irradiating with cold neutrons and avoiding hydrogenous materials of construction, a PGAA instrument was developed at the Cold Neutron Research Facility at NIST with hydrogen detection limits in the microgram range in many materials. Quantities of 5-10 [mu]g H/g are presently measurable in gram-sized samples of silicon or quartz, and of order 0.01 wt % can be quantitatively measured in complex silicate rocks. (author) 19 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab.

  20. Hydrotreating NiMo/sepiolite catalysts: influence of catalyst preparation on activity for HDS, hydrogenation and chain isomerization reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, F.V.; Sanz, E.; Corma, A.; Mifsud, A.

    1987-01-01

    A series of NiMo catalysts supported on a sepiolite: a) in its natural state, b) modified by acid leaching, and c) modified by cation exchange, have been prepared. The preparation variables studied were: Method of metal deposition, amount of active phase, sepiolite pretreatment, and temperature and time of sulfurization. The catalytic activity for HDS, hydrogenation, and cracking-isomerization has been studied by feeding a thiophene-cyclohexene-cyclohexane mixture and carrying out the reaction in the following conditions: 300 0 and 400 0 C reaction temperature, 20 Kg.cm -2 total pressure, and 3 to 1 molar ratio of H 2 to hydrocarbons. An optimium for HDS and hydrogenation activity was found for a 12% wt MoO 3 , and 5% wt NiO, prepared by simultaneous impregnation by the pore volume method at Ph = 5.0. The optimum conditions with these catalysts are 400 0 C and 3 hours of sulfurization. An increase in the acidity of the support produces a decrease of HDS and hydrogenation and an increase of the cracking-isomerization activities. A good correlation between HDS and the concentration of an XNiO.MoO 3 phase is found. The XNiO.MoO 3 phase is completely sulfurized to a modified MoS 2 , while NiMoO 4 and MoO 3 are only slightly sulfurized. 31 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 table

  1. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  2. A Comparative Evaluation of Dried Activated Sludge and Mixed Dried Activated Sudge with Rice Husk silica to Remove Hydrogen Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mahmoud Mehdinia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of dried activated sludge (DAS and mixed dried activated sludge with rice husk silica (DAS & RHS for removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S. Two laboratory-scale filter columns (packed one litter were operated. Both systems were operated under different conditions of two parameters, namely different inlet gas concentrations and different inlet flow rates. The DAS & RHS packed filter showed more than 99.96% removal efficiency (RE with empty bed residence time (EBRT of 45 to 90 s and 300 mg/L inlet concentration of H2S. However, the RE decreased to 96.87% with the EBRT of 30 s. In the same condition, the DAS packed filter showed 99.37% RE. Nonetheless, the RE was shown to have dropped to 82.09% with the EBRT of 30 s. The maximum elimination capacity (EC was obtained in the DAS & RHS packed filter up to 52.32 g/m3h, with the RE of 96.87% and H2S mass loading rate of 54 g/m3h. The maximum EC in the DAS packed filter was obtained up to 44.33 g/m3h with the RE of 82.09% and the H2S mass loading rate of 54 g/m3h. After 53 days of operating time and 54 g/m3h of loading rates, the maximum pressure drop reached to 3.0 and 8.0 (mm H2O for the DAS & RHS packed and DAS packed filters, respectively. Based on the findings of this study, the DAS & RHS could be considered as a more suitable packing material to remove H2S.

  3. Antioxidant activities of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water assessed by ESR and 2,2′-bipyridyl methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shinya; Matsuoka, Daigo; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We prepared nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water (nano-H water) which contained hydrogen nano-bubbles of < 717-nm diameter for 54% of total bubbles. In the DMPO-spin trap electron spin resonance (ESR) method, the DMPO-OH:MnO ratio, being attributed to amounts of hydroxyl radicals (·OH), was 2.78 for pure water (dissolved hydrogen [DH] ≤ 0.01 ppm, oxidation-reduction potential [ORP] = + 324 mV), 2.73 for tap water (0.01 ppm, + 286 mV), 2.93 for commercially available hydrogen water (0.075 ppm, + 49 mV), and 2.66 for manufactured hydrogen water (0.788 ppm, − 614 mV), whereas the nano-H water (0.678 ppm, − 644 mV) exhibited 2.05, showing the superiority of nano-H water to other types of hydrogen water in terms of ·OH-scavenging activity. Then, the reduction activity of nano-H water was assessed spectrophotometrically by the 2,2′-bipyridyl method. Differential absorbance at 530 nm was in the order: 0.018 for pure water, 0.055 for tap water, 0.079 for nano-H water, 0.085 for commercially available hydrogen water, and 0.090 for manufactured hydrogen water, indicating a prominent reduction activity of hydrogen water and nano-H water against oxidation in ascorbate-coupled ferric ion–bipyridyl reaction. Thus, nano-H water has an improved antioxidant activity as compared to hydrogen water of similar DH-level, indicating the more marked importance of nano-bubbles rather than the concentration of hydrogen in terms of ·OH-scavenging. - Highlights: • We assessed the antioxidant activity of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water (nano-H water). • Nano-H water exhibited superior ·OH-scavenging activity in DMPO-spin trap ESR. • A reduction ability of nano-H water was shown in 2,2′-bipyridyl reaction. • Nano-H water has an improved antioxidant activity as compared to hydrogen water of similar DH-level. • Results indicated the importance of nano-bubbles rather than the concentration of hydrogen

  4. Carbon Monoxide Photoproduction from Particles and Solutes in the Delaware Estuary under Contrasting Hydrological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guisheng; Richardson, John D; Werner, James P; Xie, Huixiang; Kieber, David J

    2015-12-15

    Full-spectrum, ultraviolet (UV), and visible broadband apparent quantum yields (AQYs) for carbon monoxide (CO) photoproduction from chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) were determined in the Delaware Estuary in two hydrologically contrasting seasons in 2012: an unusually low flow in August and a storm-driven high flow in November. Average AQYs for CDOM and POM in November were 10 and 16 times the corresponding AQYs in August. Maximum AQYs in November occurred in a midestuary particle absorption maximum zone. Although POM AQYs were generally smaller than CDOM AQYs, the ratio of the former to the latter increased substantially from the UV to the visible. In both seasons, UV solar radiation was the primary driver for CO photoproduction from CDOM whereas visible light was the principal contributor to POM-based CO photoproduction. CDOM dominated CO photoproduction in the uppermost water layer while POM prevailed at deeper depths. On a depth-integrated basis, the Delaware Estuary shifted from a CDOM-dominated system in August to a POM-dominated system in November with respect to CO photoproduction. This study reveals that flood events may enhance photochemical cycling of terrigenous organic matter and switch the primary photochemical driver from CDOM to POM.

  5. Mechanism of the alkali degradation of (6-4) photoproduct-containing DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arichi, Norihito; Inase, Aki; Eto, Sachise; Mizukoshi, Toshimi; Yamamoto, Junpei; Iwai, Shigenori

    2012-03-21

    The (6-4) photoproduct is one of the major damaged bases produced by ultraviolet light in DNA. This lesion is known to be alkali-labile, and strand breaks occur at its sites when UV-irradiated DNA is treated with hot alkali. We have analyzed the product obtained by the alkali treatment of a dinucleoside monophosphate containing the (6-4) photoproduct, by HPLC, NMR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. We previously found that the N3-C4 bond of the 5' component was hydrolyzed by a mild alkali treatment, and the present study revealed that the following reaction was the hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond at the 3' component. The sugar moiety of this component was lost, even when a 3'-flanking nucleotide was not present. Glycosidic bond hydrolysis was also observed for a dimer and a trimer containing 5-methyl-2-pyrimidinone, which was used as an analog of the 3' component of the (6-4) photoproduct, and its mechanism was elucidated. Finally, the alkali treatment of a tetramer, d(GT(6-4)TC), yielded 2'-deoxycytidine 5'-monophosphate, while 2'-deoxyguanosine 3'-monophosphate was not detected. This result demonstrated the hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond at the 3' component of the (6-4) photoproduct and the subsequent strand break by β-elimination. It was also shown that the glycosidic bond at the 3' component of the Dewar valence isomer was more alkali-labile than that of the (6-4) photoproduct.

  6. Improved hydrogen generation from alkaline NaBH{sub 4} solution using cobalt catalysts supported on modified activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan; Guo, Qingjie; Yue, Xuehai [College of Chemical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Dai, Ping [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061 (China)

    2008-12-15

    Hydrogen production from alkaline sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) solution via hydrolysis process over activated carbon supported cobalt catalysts is studied. Activated carbons are used in their original form and after liquid phase oxidation with HNO{sub 3}. The changes in surface functional groups of the activated carbon are detected by FTIR spectroscopy. The effects of HNO{sub 3} oxidation on the properties of the activated carbon and the resulting catalyst performance are investigated. FTIR analysis reveals that the oxidative treatment leads to the formation of various functional groups on the surface of the activated carbon. Cobalt catalysts supported on the modified activated carbon are found to exhibit higher activity and stability. (author)

  7. Efficient room temperature hydrogen sensor based on UV-activated ZnO nano-network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohit; Kumar, Rahul; Rajamani, Saravanan; Ranwa, Sapana; Fanetti, Mattia; Valant, Matjaz; Kumar, Mahesh

    2017-09-01

    Room temperature hydrogen sensors were fabricated from Au embedded ZnO nano-networks using a 30 mW GaN ultraviolet LED. The Au-decorated ZnO nano-networks were deposited on a SiO2/Si substrate by a chemical vapour deposition process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum analysis revealed a hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO and presence of Au. The ZnO nanoparticles were interconnected, forming nano-network structures. Au nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on ZnO surfaces, as confirmed by FESEM imaging. Interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) were fabricated on the ZnO nano-networks using optical lithography. Sensor performances were measured with and without UV illumination, at room temperate, with concentrations of hydrogen varying from 5 ppm to 1%. The sensor response was found to be ˜21.5% under UV illumination and 0% without UV at room temperature for low hydrogen concentration of 5 ppm. The UV-photoactivated mode enhanced the adsorption of photo-induced O- and O2- ions, and the d-band electron transition from the Au nanoparticles to ZnO—which increased the chemisorbed reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. The sensor response was also measured at 150 °C (without UV illumination) and found to be ˜18% at 5 ppm. Energy efficient low cost hydrogen sensors can be designed and fabricated with the combination of GaN UV LEDs and ZnO nanostructures.

  8. Melanin offers protection against induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts by UVB in cultured human melanocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, N.P.M.; Vink, A.A.; Kolb, R.M.; Steenwinkel, M.J.S.T.; Berg, P.T.M. van den; Nieuwpoort, F. van; Roza, L.; Pavel, S.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to correlate the melanin content in human pigmentary cells with the generation of UVB-induced photoproducts and to examine the relationship between the melanin content and the removal of the photoproducts. Cultured melanocytes from light-skinned individuals

  9. Soft gluon approach for diffractive photoproduction of J/ψ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, J.P.; Xu Jiasheng

    2002-01-01

    We study diffractive photoproduction of J/ψ by taking the charm quark as a heavy quark. A description of nonperturbative effect related to J/ψ can be made by using NRQCD. In the forward region of the kinematics, the interaction between the cc-bar-pair and the initial hadron is due to exchange of soft gluons. The effect of the exchange can be studied by using the expansion in the inverse of the quark mass m c . At the leading order we find that the nonperturbative effect related to the initial hadron is represented by a matrix element of field strength operators, which are separated in the moving direction of J/ψ in the spacetime. The S-matrix element is then obtained without using perturbative QCD and the results are not based on any model. Corrections to the results can be systematically added. Keeping the dominant contribution of the S-matrix element in the large energy limit we find that the imaginary part of the S-matrix element is related to the gluon distribution for x→0 with a reasonable assumption, the real part can be obtained with another approximation or with dispersion relation. Our approach is different than previous approaches and also our results are different than those in these approaches. The differences are discussed in detail. A comparison with experiment is also made and a qualitative agreement is found. (author)

  10. Spin information from vector-meson decay in photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloet, W.M.; Chiang, W.; Tabakin, F.

    1998-01-01

    For the photoproduction of vector mesons, all single and double spin observables involving vector-meson two-body decays are defined consistently in the γN center-of-mass frame. These definitions yield a procedure for extracting physically meaningful single and double spin observables that are subject to known rules concerning their angle and energy evolution. As part of this analysis, we show that measuring the two-meson decay of a photo produced ρ or φ does not determine the vector meson's vector polarization, but only its tensor polarization. The vector meson decay into lepton pairs is also insensitive to the vector meson's vector polarization, unless one measures the spin of one of the leptons. Similar results are found for all double spin observables which involve observation of vector-meson decay. To access the vector meson's vector polarization, one therefore needs to either measure the spin of the decay leptons, make an analysis of the background interference effects, or relate the vector meson's vector polarization to other accessible spin observables. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  11. Strangeness photoproduction at the BGO-OD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jude, Thomas [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Nussallee 12, Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The BGO-OD experiment at the ELSA accelerator facility uses an energy tagged bremstrahlung photon beam to investigate the internal structure of the nucleon. The setup consists of a highly segmented BGO calorimeter surrounding the target, with a particle tracking magnetic spectrometer at forward angles. The BGO-OD is ideal for investigating the photoproduction of hadrons of non-zero strangeness. The high momentum resolution at forward angles covers a kinematic region where t-channel exchange mechanisms play a dominant role. This is complemented by the neutral and charged particle identification in the BGO calorimeter for the identification of hyperon decays. The first part of an extensive physics programme includes measurements of the differential cross section at forward angles for γp → K{sup +}Λ and, using linearly polarised photons, the beam asymmetry, Σ, for γp → K{sup 0}Σ{sup +}. This latter measurement is focussed on the K* threshold region where a cusp-like structure was recently observed in the total cross section. Analysis of these reaction channels for both real and simulated data is presented.

  12. Diffractive dijet photoproduction in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2010-03-15

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb{sup -1}. The events are of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x{sub {gamma}} of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  13. Diffractive photoproduction of dijets in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-09-15

    Diffractive photoproduction of dijets was measured with the ZEUS detector at the ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 77.2 pb{sup -1}. The measurements were made in the kinematic range Q{sup 2}<1 GeV{sup 2}, 0.207.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to lie in the pseudorapidity range -1.5<{eta}{sup jet}<1.5. Differential cross sections were compared to perturbative QCD calculations using available parameterisations of diffractive parton distributions of the proton. (orig.)

  14. Beauty photoproduction using decays into muons at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, U.

    2008-05-15

    Inclusive cross-sections for the production of open beauty in ep collisions at HERA are measured. The data were recorded with the ZEUS detector between 1996 and 2000. The measurements are restricted to photoproduction processes, i.e. collision events with small four-momentum transfer squared, Q{sup 2}{approx}0. Two jets with transverse momentum p{sub T}>7(6) GeV and pseudo-rapidities vertical stroke {eta} vertical stroke <2.5 are required. The flavour is tagged by the identification of muons from semi-leptonic decays of the beauty quark. The variable used to discriminate between beauty and background is the transverse momentum of the muon with respect to the jet axis. The fraction of beauty is determined by a fit of Monte Carlo templates to the data. Cross-sections have been measured as a function of the muon and jet variables as well as a function of dijet correlation variables. Dijet correlations in beauty production have been measured for the first time in ZEUS and are found in agreement with QCD NLO predictions. (orig.)

  15. Studies of the diffractive photoproduction of isolated photons at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science; Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration; and others

    2017-07-20

    The photoproduction of isolated photons has been measured in diffractive events recorded by the ZEUS detector at HERA. Cross sections are evaluated in the photon transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 50.9, where z{sup meas}{sub P} is the fraction of the longitudinal momentum of the colourless ''Pomeron'' exchange that is transferred to the photon-jet final state, giving evidence for direct Pomeron interactions.

  16. Dijets in diffractive photoproduction measured with the ZEUS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, R.

    2006-10-15

    The diffractive photoproduction of dijets in electron-proton scattering has been studied using 77.1 pb{sup -1} of data taken with the ZEUS detector at HERA. The measurements have been made at a centre-of- mass energy {radical}s=318 GeV in the kinematic range 0.27.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to be in the pseudorapidity range -1.5<{eta}<1.5. Differential cross sections have been measured and been confronted with the predictions from leading order Monte Carlo simulations and next-to-leading order QCD calculations. (orig.)

  17. Quasifree η photoproduction from nuclei and medium modifications of resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventel, B.I.S. van der; Abu-Raddad, L.J.; Hillhouse, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    This paper establishes the case that the process of quasifree η photoproduction from nuclei is an important tool to study medium modifications and changes to the elementary process γN→ηN in the nuclear medium. We investigate the sensitivity of the differential cross section, recoil nucleon polarization, and the photon asymmetry to changes in the elementary amplitude, medium modifications of the resonance (S 11 ,D 13 ) masses, as well as nuclear target effects. All calculations are performed within a relativistic plane-wave impulse approximation formalism resulting in analytical expressions for all observables. Our results indicate that polarization observables are largely insensitive to nuclear target effects. Depending on the type of coupling, the spin observables do display a sensitivity to the magnitude of the ηNN coupling constant. The polarization observables are identified to be the prime candidates to investigate the background processes and their medium modifications in the elementary process such as the D 13 resonance. Moreover, as a consequence of the large dominance in the differential cross section of the S 11 resonance, the quasifree differential cross section provides an exceptional instrument to study medium modifications to the S 11 resonance in such a manner that helps to distinguish between various models that attempt to understand the S 11 resonance and its distinctive position as the lowest lying negative parity state in the baryon spectrum

  18. Beauty photoproduction using decays into muons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, U.

    2008-05-01

    Inclusive cross-sections for the production of open beauty in ep collisions at HERA are measured. The data were recorded with the ZEUS detector between 1996 and 2000. The measurements are restricted to photoproduction processes, i.e. collision events with small four-momentum transfer squared, Q 2 ∼0. Two jets with transverse momentum p T >7(6) GeV and pseudo-rapidities vertical stroke η vertical stroke <2.5 are required. The flavour is tagged by the identification of muons from semi-leptonic decays of the beauty quark. The variable used to discriminate between beauty and background is the transverse momentum of the muon with respect to the jet axis. The fraction of beauty is determined by a fit of Monte Carlo templates to the data. Cross-sections have been measured as a function of the muon and jet variables as well as a function of dijet correlation variables. Dijet correlations in beauty production have been measured for the first time in ZEUS and are found in agreement with QCD NLO predictions. (orig.)

  19. High-E{sub T} dijet photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The cross section for high-E{sub T} dijet production in photoproduction has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 81.8 pb{sup -1}. The events were required to have a virtuality of the incoming pho- ton, Q{sup 2}, of less than 1 GeV{sup 2} and a photon-proton centre-of-mass energy in the range 14220 GeV and E{sub T}{sup jet2}>15 GeV and pseudorapidity requirements of -1<{eta}{sup jet1,2}<3, with at least one of the jets satisfying -1<{eta}{sup jet}<2.5. The measurements show sensitivity to the parton distributions in the photon and proton and effects beyond next-to-leading order in QCD. Hence these data can be used to constrain further the parton densities in the proton and photon. (orig.)

  20. Diffractive Dijet Photoproduction in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Tabasco, J.E.Ruiz; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb^-1. The events are of the type ep -> eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x_gamma of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models.

  1. Measurement of inclusive jet cross sections in photoproduction at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Chekelian, V.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Katzy, J.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhr, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wiesand, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; zur Nedden, M.

    2003-01-01

    Inclusive jet cross sections are measured in photoproduction at HERA using the H1 detector. The data sample of e+ p -> e+ + jet + X events in the kinematic range of photon virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 and photon-proton centre-of-mass energies 95 < W_gammap < 285 GeV represents an integrated luminosity of 24.1 pb^-1. Jets are defined using the inclusive k_T algorithm. Single- and multi-differential cross sections are measured as functions of jet transverse energy E_T^jet and pseudorapidity \\eta^jet in the domain 5 < E_T^jet < 75 GeV and -1 < \\eta^jet < 2.5. The cross sections are found to be in good agreement with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations corrected for fragmentation and underlying event effects. The cross section differential in E_T^jet, which varies by six orders of magnitude over the measured range, is compared with similar distributions from p pbar colliders at equal and higher energies.

  2. Inelastic Photoproduction of J/Psi Mesons at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Mangano, S.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Samson, J.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; zur Nedden, M.

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of inelastic photoproduction of J/Psi mesons is presented using data collected at the ep collider HERA corresponding to an integrated luminosity of above 80pb-1. Differential and double differential cross sections are measured in a wide kinematic region: 60

  3. Diffractive dijet photoproduction in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [Univ. of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (ME); Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); Barrelet, E. [CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Univ. Denis Diderot Paris 7, Paris (France); Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Marti, Ll.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Driesch, M. von den; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Inst. of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A. [CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (RS); Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy] (and others)

    2010-11-15

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb{sup -1}. The events are of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x{sub {gamma}} of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  4. Photoproduction of J/{psi}mesons at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, T.; Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Ban, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H.P.; Behrend, H.J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, C.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besancon, M.; Beyer, R.; Biddulph, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Botterweck, F.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Buchholz, R.; Buengener, L.; Buerger, J.; Buesser, F.W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A.B.; Colombo, M.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, C.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D.G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J.B.; Danilov, M.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J.D.; Dreis, H.B.; Duboc, J.; Duellmann, D.; Duenger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T.R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R.J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Fluegge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; Goodall, A.M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Graessler, H.; Graessler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E.M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W.J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; H1 Collaboration

    1994-08-01

    We present a study of J/{psi} meson production in collisions of 26.7 GeV electrons with 820 GeV protons, performed with the H1-detector at the HERA collider at DESY. The J/{psi} mesons are detected via their leptonic decays both to electrons and muons. Requiring exactly two particles in the detector, a cross section of {sigma}(ep{yields}J/{psi}X)=(8.8{+-}2.0{+-}2.2) nb is determined for 30 GeV{<=}W{sub {gamma}p}{<=}180 GeV and Q{sup 2}< or {approx}4 GeV{sup 2}. Using the flux of quasi-real photons with Q{sup 2}< or {approx}4 GeV{sup 2}, a total photoproduction cross section of {sigma}({gamma}p{yields}J/{psi}X)=(56{+-}13{+-}14) nb is derived at an average W{sub {gamma}p}=90 GeV. The distribution of the squared momentum transfer t from the proton to the J/{psi} can be fitted using an exponential exp(-bvertical stroke tvertical stroke ) below avertical stroke tvertical stroke of 0.75 GeV{sup 2} yielding a slope parameter of b=(4.7{+-}1.9) GeV{sup -2}. (orig.)

  5. Diffractive dijet photoproduction in ep collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Marti, Ll.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Driesch, M. von den; Wuensch, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Brinkmann, M.; Dobre, M.; List, B.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Kogler, R.; Raspiareza, A.; Shushkevich, S.; Bystritskaya, L.; Efremenko, V.; Fedotov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Mozer, M.U.; Roosen, R.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Mechelen, P. van; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Falkiewicz, A.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Jung, A.W.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Urban, K.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Radescu, V.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Joensson, L.; Osman, S.; Jung, H.; DESY, Hamburg; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Thompson, G.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Nowak, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; South, D.; Wegener, D.; Stella, B.; INFN Roma 3, Rome

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb -1 . The events are of the type ep→eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x γ of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  6. Measurement of charm fragmentation fractions in photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Muinch (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] [and others; Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration

    2013-06-15

    The production of D{sup 0}, D{sup *+}, D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} charm hadrons and their antiparticles in ep scattering at HERA has been studied with the ZEUS detector, using a total integrated luminosity of 372 pb{sup -1}. The fractions of charm quarks hadronising into a particular charm hadron were derived. In addition, the ratio of neutral to charged D-meson production rates, the fraction of charged D mesons produced in a vector state, and the strangeness-suppression factor have been determined. The measurements have been performed in the photoproduction regime. The charm hadrons were reconstructed in the range of transverse momentum p{sub T} > 3.8GeV and pseudorapidity vertical stroke {eta} vertical stroke <1.6. The charm fragmentation fractions are compared to previous results from HERA and from e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments. The data support the hypothesis that fragmentation is independent of the production process.

  7. Double KS0 photoproduction off the proton at CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandavar, S.; Goetz, J. T.; Hicks, K.; Keller, D.; Kunkel, M. C.; Paolone, M.; Weygand, D. P.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adhikari, S.; Akbar, Z.; Ball, J.; Balossino, I.; Barion, L.; Bashkanov, M.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, F.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Defurne, M.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fradi, A.; Gavalian, G.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Heddle, D.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Johnston, S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Kabir, M. L.; Khachatryan, G.; Khachatryan, M.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mineeva, T.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Riser, D.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Sokhan, D.; Smith, G. D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Wei, X.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; CLAS Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    The f0(1500 ) meson resonance is one of several contenders to have significant mixing with the lightest glueball. This resonance is well established from several previous experiments. Here we present the first photoproduction data for the f0(1500 ) via decay into the KS0KS0 channel using the CLAS detector. The reaction γ p →fJp →KS0KS0p , where J =0 ,2 , was measured with photon energies from 2.7-5.1 GeV. A clear peak is seen at 1500 MeV in the background subtracted invariant mass spectra of the two kaons. This is enhanced if the measured four-momentum transfer to the proton target is restricted to be less than 1.0 GeV2. By comparing data with simulations, it can be concluded that the peak at 1500 MeV is produced primarily at low t , which is consistent with a t -channel production mechanism.

  8. Large-pT photoproduction of D*± mesons in ep collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniehl, B.A.; Kramer, G.; Spira, M.

    1996-10-01

    The cross section for the inclusive photoproduction of large-p T D *± mesons is calculated at next-to-leading order, adopting different approaches to describe the fragmentation of charm quarks into D *± mesons. We treat the charm quark according to the massless factorization scheme, where it is assumed to be one of the active flavours inside the proton and the photon. We present inclusive single-particle distributions in transverse momentum and rapidity, including the contributions due to both direct and resolved photons. We compare and assess the various implementations of fragmentation. We argue that, in the high-p T regime, a particularly realistic description can be obtained by convoluting the Altarelli-Parisi-evolved fragmentation functions of Peterson et al. with the hard-scattering cross sections of massless partons where the factorization of the collinear singularities associated with final-state charm quarks is converted to the massive-charm scheme. The predictions thus obtained agree well with recent experimental data by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at DESY HERA, better than the all-massive calculation. (orig.)

  9. Dendritic Tip-on Polytriazine-Based Carbon Nitride Photocatalyst with High Hydrogen Evolution Activity

    KAUST Repository

    Bhunia, Manas Kumar

    2015-11-23

    Developing stable, ubiquitous and efficient water-splitting photocatalyst material that has extensive absorption in the visible-light range is desired for a sustainable solar energy-conversion device. We herein report a triazine-based carbon nitride (CN) material with different C/N ratios achieved by varying the monomer composition ratio between melamine (Mel) and 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine (TAP). The CN material with a different C/N ratio was obtained through a two-step synthesis protocol: starting with the solution state dispersion of the monomers via hydrogen-bonding supramolecular aggregate, followed by a salt-melt high temperature polycondensation. This protocol ensures the production of a highly crystalline polytriazine imide (PTI) structure con-sisting of a copolymerized Mel-TAP network. The observed bandgap narrowing with an increasing TAP/Mel ratio is well simulated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, revealing a positive shift in the valence band upon substitution of N with CH in the aromatic rings. Increasing the TAP amount could not maintain the crystalline PTI structure, consistent with DFT calculation showing the repulsion associated with additional C-H introduced in the aromatic rings. Due to the high exciton binding energy calculated by DFT for the obtained CN, the cocatalyst must be close to any portion of the material to assist the separation of excit-ed charge carriers for an improved photocatalytic performance. The photocatalytic activity was improved by providing a dendritic tip-on-like shape grown on a porous fibrous silica KCC-1 spheres, and highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles (<5 nm) were photodepos-ited to introduce heterojunction. As a result, the Pt/CN/KCC-1 photocatalyst exhibited an apparent quantum efficiency (AQE) as high as 22.1 ± 3% at 400 nm and the silica was also beneficial for improving photocatalytic stability. The results obtained by time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy measurements were consistent with

  10. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka, E-mail: apiwkowska@cmdik.pan.pl [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Jankowski, Maciej [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Medical University of Gdansk, Department of Therapy Monitoring and Pharmacogenetics (Poland)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  11. NNLO contributions to jet photoproduction and determination of {alpha}{sub s}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, Michael; Michael, Markus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Kramer, Gustav [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-10-15

    We present the first calculation of inclusive jet photoproduction with next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) contributions, obtained from a unified threshold resummation formalism. The leading coefficients for direct photoproduction are computed analytically. Together with the coefficients pertinent to parton-parton scattering, they are shown to agree with those appearing in our full next-to-leading order calculations. For hadron-hadron scattering, numerical agreement is found with a previous calculation of jet production at the Tevatron. We show that the direct and resolved NNLO contributions considerably improve the description of final ZEUS data on jet photoproduction and that the error on the determination of the strong coupling constant is significantly reduced.

  12. J/Psi and Gamma Photoproduction in Pb-Pb Collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Li Yun De; CERN. Geneva

    1996-01-01

    abstractINT-96-01 Hard photoproduction of J/psi and upsilon at LHC Pb-Pb collisions with cms energy 6300 AGeV, is discussed in the process Pb+Pb--Pb + J/psi (upsilon) + X with three types of equivalent photon spectrum function. It turns out that in hard photoproduction the J/psi cross section is dominated by the gluon and heavy quark fragmentation, especially the gluon fragmentation is very important at large pt; while the Upsilon cross section is dominated by the leading order process. It may be concluded from the result that the hard photoproduction processes can be used to test several important problems such as the gluon distribution in nucleus, gluon and heavy quark fragmentation of J/psi , etc. In addition, these processes also provide a new way of testing the EMC effects.

  13. Evidence for a ωrhosup(+-)πsup(+-) state in diffractive photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.; Davenport, M.; Flower, P.; Hutton, J.S.; Kumar, B.R.; Morris, J.A.G.; Morris, J.V.; Sharp, P.H.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Clegg, A.B.; Flynn, P.J.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Newton, D.; Brookes, G.R.; Bunn, J.J.; Galbraith, W.; McClatchey, R.H.; Bussey, P.J.; Dainton, J.B.; Paterson, C.; Raine, C.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Diekmann, B.; Heinloth, K.; Jakob, H.P.; Jung, M.; Liebenau, V.; Paul, E.; Reidenbach, M.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schloesser, A.; Laberrigue, J.; La Vaissilere, C. de; Yiou, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    The photoproduction of the final state ωπ + π - π 0 has been studied as part of a survey of photoproduction in the energy range 20-70 GeV in the Omega spectrometer at CERN. The π + π - π 0 system produced with the ω meson has a strong rhosup(+-)πsup(+-) component which is predominantly I=1 and Jsup(π)=1+. For the ωrhosup(+-)π + state a spin-parity analysis favours Jsup(π)=1-, and the mass spectrum peaks at 2.28+-0.05 GeV. The fitted width is GAMMA=0.44+-0.11 GeV. The photoproduction cross-section of the ωrhosup(+-)rhosup(+-) state, averaged over the energy range 25-60 GeV, is 150+-50 nb. (orig.)

  14. Phototransformation of Amlodipine in Aqueous Solution: Toxicity of the Drug and Its Photoproduct on Aquatic Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina DellaGreca

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The phototransformation of amlodipine in water was investigated under various conditions. A quantum yield ΦS2.2×10−4 and a half-life time t1/2 0.419 days were calculated when the drug in water (10−4 M was exposed to sunlight. The only photoproduct found was its pyridine derivative. Formation of this product was explained on the basis of a radical cation intermediate. The acute and chronic toxicity of the drug and its photoproduct were evaluated on different organisms of the freshwater chain (Brachionus calyciflorus, Thamnocephalus platyurus, Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia. The photoproduct exhibited a stronger toxic potential than the parent drug on the long time for C. dubia.

  15. [Isolation and identification of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria producing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase and the determination of enzymatic activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bo; Wang, Weiwei; Tang, Ming; Chen, Xingdu

    2009-03-01

    We used Medicago sativa rhizosphere in Shaanxi province of China to isolate and identify hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria that produced ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) deaminase, and then studied the mechanism why they can promote the growth of plants. Hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria were isolated by gas-cycle incubation system. We studied the morphological character, physiological characteristics, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and built the phylogenic tree. Thin layer chromatography was used to isolate the strain that produced ACC deaminase. Ninhydrin reaction was used to test the enzyme activity. In total 37 strains were isolated, 8 of which could oxidize H2 strongly and grow chemolithoautotrophically. We initially identified them as hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. Only strain WMQ-7 produced ACC deaminase among these 8 strains. Morphological and physiological characteristics analysis showed that strain WMQ-7 was essentially consistent with Pseudomonas putida. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis (GenBank accession number EU807744) suggested that strain WMQ-7 was clustered together with Pseudomonas putida in phylogenetic tree, with the sequence identity of 99%. Based on all these results, strain WMQ-7 was identified as Pseudomonas putida. The enzyme activity of strain WMQ-7 was 0.671 U/microg. A strain producing ACC deaminase was identified and tested.

  16. H{sub 2} - photoproduction by a non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum : a model tool for biotechnological exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Kashyap, A.K.; Pandey, K.D. [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India). Dept. of Botany

    2001-07-01

    A parallel increase in nitrogenase activity and H{sub 2} evolution in Plectonema boryanum under microaerobic (Ar/N{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}: 72/24/4; v/v) phototrophic condition indicated that later process was nitrogenase mediated. Enhanced H{sub 2} photoproduction was observed in presence of reducing substances and metabolic inhibitors (DCMU and MSX). N{sub 2}-fixed during the process was simultaneously released in the medium as NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Further enhancement and sustainability in both the processes was achieved by immobilization in alginate or sponge. A comparison with heterocystous cyanobacteria suggested that Plectonema was efficient H{sub 2} producing organism. (orig.)

  17. Mechanistic Switching by Hydronium Ion Activity for Hydrogen Evolution and Oxidation over Polycrystalline Platinum Disk and Platinum/Carbon Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2014-07-22

    Fundamental electrochemical reactions, namely the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), are re-evaluated under various pH conditions over polycrystalline Pt disk electrodes and Pt/C electrodes to investigate the overpotential and Tafel relations. Kinetic trends are observed and can be classified into three pH regions: acidic (1-5), neutral (5-9), and alkaline (9-13). Under neutral conditions, in which H2O becomes the primary reactant, substantial overpotential, which is not affected by pH and the supporting electrolyte type, is required for electrocatalysis in both directions. This ion independence, including pH, suggests that HER/HOR performance under neutral conditions solely reflects the intrinsic electrocatalytic activity of Pt in the rate determining steps, which involve electron transfer with water molecules. A global picture of the HER/HOR, resulting from mechanistic switching accompanied by change in pH, is detailed.

  18. Cyanide leaching of Au/CeO2: highly active gold clusters for 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Y; Hensen, E J M

    2009-11-07

    Ceria-supported gold catalysts before and after leaching by NaCN were investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Au L(III) edge. After gold leaching, isolated gold cations remain in close interaction with the support. These ions form an ideal precursor to very small clusters of a few gold atoms upon reduction. The resulting gold clusters exhibit a very high intrinsic activity in the hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene, which is at least one order of magnitude higher than that of the nanometre-sized gold particles in the non-leached parent catalyst. These findings point to a very strong structure sensitivity of the gold-catalyzed hydrogenation of dienes.

  19. Friedel-Crafts reaction of benzyl fluorides: selective activation of C-F bonds as enabled by hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pier Alexandre; Benhassine, Yasmine; Desroches, Justine; Paquin, Jean-François

    2014-12-08

    A Friedel-Crafts benzylation of arenes with benzyl fluorides has been developed. The reaction produces 1,1-diaryl alkanes in good yield under mild conditions without the need for a transition metal or a strong Lewis acid. A mechanism involving activation of the C-F bond through hydrogen bonding is proposed. This mode of activation enables the selective reaction of benzylic C-F bonds in the presence of other benzylic leaving groups. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Partially Hydrogenated Graphene Materials Exhibit High Electrocatalytic Activities Related to Unintentional Doping with Metallic Impurities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jankovský, O.; Libánská, A.; Bouša, D.; Sedmidubský, D.; Matějková, Stanislava; Sofer, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 25 (2016), s. 8627-8634 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-09001S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : electrocatalysis * electrochemistry * graphene * hydrogenation * sensing Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.317, year: 2016

  1. Hydrogen Storage Activities at HySA from (Nano)materials to Systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available One of HySA’s missions is to deliver technologies for hydrogen storage infrastructure that meet the set cost targets and provide the best balance of safety, reliability, robustness, quality and functionality. HySA aims to develop storage...

  2. Substrate-mediated enhanced activity of Ru nanoparticles in catalytic hydrogenation of benzene

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The impact of carbon substrate-Ru nanoparticle interactions on benzene and hydrogen adsorption that is directly related to the performance in catalytic hydrogenation of benzene has been investigated by first-principles based calculations. The stability of Ru 13 nanoparticles is enhanced by the defective graphene substrate due to the hybridization between the dsp states of the Ru 13 particle with the sp 2 dangling bonds at the defect sites. The local curvature formed at the interface will also raise the Ru atomic diffusion barrier, and prohibit the particle sintering. The strong interfacial interaction results in the shift of averaged d-band center of the deposited Ru nanoparticle, from -1.41 eV for a freestanding Ru 13 particle, to -1.17 eV for the Ru/Graphene composites, and to -1.54 eV on mesocellular foam carbon. Accordingly, the adsorption energies of benzene are increased from -2.53 eV for the Ru/mesocellular foam carbon composites, to -2.62 eV on freestanding Ru 13 particles, to -2.74 eV on Ru/graphene composites. A similar change in hydrogen adsorption is also observed, and all these can be correlated to the shift of the d-band center of the nanoparticle. Thus, Ru nanoparticles graphene composites are expected to exhibit both high stability and superior catalytic performance in hydrogenation of arenes. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  3. Overview on hydrogen risk research and development activities: Methodology and open issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentaib, Ahmed; Meynet, Nicolas; Bleyer, Alexande [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Severe Accident Department, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-02-15

    During the course of a severe accident in a light water nuclear reactor, large amounts of hydrogen can be generated and released into the containment during reactor core degradation. Additional burnable gases [hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO)] may be released into the containment in the corium/concrete interaction. This could subsequently raise a combustion hazard. As the Fukushima accidents revealed, hydrogen combustion can cause high pressure spikes that could challenge the reactor buildings and lead to failure of the surrounding buildings. To prevent the gas explosion hazard, most mitigation strategies adopted by European countries are based on the implementation of passive autocatalytic recombiners (PARs). Studies of representative accident sequences indicate that, despite the installation of PARs, it is difficult to prevent at all times and locations, the formation of a combustible mixture that potentially leads to local flame acceleration. Complementary research and development (R and D) projects were recently launched to understand better the phenomena associated with the combustion hazard and to address the issues highlighted after the Fukushima Daiichi events such as explosion hazard in the venting system and the potential flammable mixture migration into spaces beyond the primary containment. The expected results will be used to improve the modeling tools and methodology for hydrogen risk assessment and severe accident management guidelines. The present paper aims to present the methodology adopted by Institut de Radioprotection et de Su.

  4. Hydrogen-Rich Water Intake Accelerates Oral Palatal Wound Healing via Activation of the Nrf2/Antioxidant Defense Pathways in a Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orihuela-Campos, Rita Cristina; Fukui, Makoto; Ito, Hiro-O

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process attempts to restore the integrity and function of the injured tissue. Additionally, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress play important roles in wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrogen-rich water intake induces the activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway in rat palatal tissue, thereby reducing systemic oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoting healing-associated genes. A circular excisional wound was created in the oral palatal region, and the wound healing process was observed. The rats were divided into two experimental groups in which either hydrogen-rich water or distilled water was consumed. In the drinking hydrogen-rich water, the palatal wound healing process was accelerated compared to that in the control group. As molecular hydrogen upregulated the Nrf2 pathway, systemic oxidative stresses were decreased by the activation of antioxidant activity. Furthermore, hydrogen-rich water intake reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels and promoted the expression of healing-associated factors in rat palatal tissue. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich water intake exhibited multiple beneficial effects through activation of the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway. The results of this study support the hypothesis that oral administration of hydrogen-rich water benefits the wound healing process by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:26798423

  5. Evidences of oxidative stress during hydrogen photoproduction in sulfur-deprived cultures of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sáens, M. E.; Bišová, Kateřina; Touloupakis, E.; Faraloni, C.; Dario Di Marzio, W.; Torzillo, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 30 (2015), s. 10410-10417 ISSN 0360-3199 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Oxidative stress * Chlamydomonas reinhardtii * H-2 production Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.205, year: 2015

  6. Preliminary results for the helicity asymmetry E for eta photoproduction on the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Polarization observables are an important tool for clarifying the nucleon resonance spectrum. No previous measurements for double polarization asymmetries have been published for eta photoproduction. Double polarization measurements have been made at Jefferson Lab using a polarized photon beam and protons in a polarized frozen spin target (FROST). Data were taken during the first running period of FROST using the CLAS detector with photon energies from 0.33 to 2.35 GeV. Preliminary results for the E polarization observable for eta meson photoproduction from the proton at threshold and above, along with comparisons to several theoretical predictions are presented.

  7. CLAS+FROST: new generation of photoproduction experiments at jefferson lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasyuk, E.

    2009-01-01

    A large part of the experimental program in Hall B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to baryon spectroscopy. Photoproduction experiments are essential part of this program. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and availability of circularly and linearly polarized tagged photon beams provide unique conditions for this type of experiments. Recent addition of the Frozen Spin Target (FROST) gives a remarkable opportunity to measure double and triple polarization observables for different pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction processes. For the first time, a complete or nearly complete experiment becomes possible and will allow model independent extraction of the reaction amplitude. An overview of the experiment and its current status is presented. (author)

  8. Phi photoproduction near threshold with Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka evading phi NN interactions

    CERN Document Server

    William, R A

    1998-01-01

    Existing intermediate and high energy phi-photoproduction data is consistent with purely diffractive production (i.e., Pomeron exchange). However, near threshold (1.574 GeV K sup + K sup - decay angular distribution. We stress the importance of measurements with linearly polarized photons near the phi threshold to separate natural and unnatural parity exchange mechanisms. Approved and planned phi photoproduction and electroproduction experiments at Jefferson Lab will help establish the relative dynamical contributions near threshold and clarify outstanding theoretical issues related to apparent Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka violations.

  9. Photoproduction of events with rapidity gaps between jets with ZEUS at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, P.D.

    2006-11-15

    Cross sections for the photoproduction of dijet events, where the two jets with the highest transverse energy are separated by a large gap in pseudorapidity, have been studied with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 38.6 pb{sup -1}. Rapidity-gap events are defined in terms of the energy flow between the jets, such that the total summed transverse energy in this region is less than some value E{sup CUT}{sub T}. The data show a clear excess above the predictions of standard photoproduction models. Models which include color-singlet exchange are able to describe the data. (orig.)

  10. Detailed comparison of next-to-leading order predictions for jet photoproduction at HERA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, B. W.; Klassen, M.; Vossebeld, J.

    1999-06-02

    The precision of new HERA data on jet photoproduction opens up the possibility to discriminate between different models of the photon structure. This requires equally precise theoretical predictions from perturbative QCD calculations. In the past years, next-to-leading order calculations for the photoproduction of jets at HERA have become available. Using the kinematic cuts of recent ZEUS analyses, we compare the predictions of three calculations for different dijet and three-jet distributions. We find that in general all three calculations agree within the statistical accuracy of the Monte Carlo integration yielding reliable theoretical predictions. In certain restricted regions of phase space, the calculations differ by up to 5%.

  11. Exclusive photoproduction of Upsilon in pPb collisions at LHC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Dipanwita; Chudasama, Ruchi; Mohanty, A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent results of exclusive photoproduction of heavy vector mesons at LHC energies by ALICE and LHCb in pp, pPb and PbPb Ultraperipheral collisions (UPC) confirmed the expectations that UPCs are a very promising probe to study the gluon distributions in nucleons and in nuclei at small x. In this work, we have estimated the photoproduction of γ in pPb collisions at √s NN = 5.02 TeV in the framework of perturbative two-gluon exchange formalism employing various parametrization of gluon distributions functions

  12. Electro- and Photoproduction of Omega(783) Mesons using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manak, J.J.; Volker Burkert; Franz Klein; Bernhard Mecking; Alan Coleman; Herb Funsten

    2000-01-01

    Electro- and photoproduction of w(783) from a proton target have been measured in the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News VA. The photoproduction data were taken over a photon energy range from 0.5 to 2.3 GeV, while the electroproduction data was obtained over a W range of 1.8-2.5 GeV/c2. Preliminary acceptance corrected center-of-mass angular distributions have been examined for both data sets

  13. Photoproduction of events with rapidity gaps between jets with ZEUS at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, P.D.

    2006-11-01

    Cross sections for the photoproduction of dijet events, where the two jets with the highest transverse energy are separated by a large gap in pseudorapidity, have been studied with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 38.6 pb -1 . Rapidity-gap events are defined in terms of the energy flow between the jets, such that the total summed transverse energy in this region is less than some value E CUT T . The data show a clear excess above the predictions of standard photoproduction models. Models which include color-singlet exchange are able to describe the data. (orig.)

  14. Upper limits for the photoproduction cross section for the Φ--(1860) pentaquark state off the deuteron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egiyan, H.; Langheinrich, J.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Holtrop, M.; Lu, H.; Mattione, P.; Mutchler, G.; Park, K.; Smith, E. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Zhao, Z. W.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Contalbrigo, M.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; de Vita, R.; de Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mao, Y.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niculescu, G.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Phelps, E.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.

    2012-01-01

    We searched for the Φ--(1860) pentaquark in the photoproduction process off the deuteron in the Ξ-π--decay channel using CLAS. The invariant-mass spectrum of the Ξ-π- system does not indicate any statistically significant enhancement near the reported mass M=1.860 GeV. The statistical analysis of the sideband-subtracted mass spectrum yields a 90%-confidence-level upper limit of 0.7 nb for the photoproduction cross section of Φ--(1860) with a consecutive decay into Ξ-π- in the photon-energy range 4.5GeV

  15. Palladium-pyridyl catalytic films: a highly active and recyclable catalyst for hydrogenation of styrene under mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuiying; Li, Weijin; Cao, Rong

    2015-03-01

    Palladium-pyridyl catalytic films, (PdCl2/bpy)n, were created by alternating immersions of a substrate in PdCl2 and bpy (bpy=4, 4'-bipyridyl) solutions. The as-prepared (PdCl2/bpy)10 catalyst demonstrated a remarkable catalytic activity toward hydrogenation of styrene under mild conditions and the turnover frequency (TOF) is as high as 6944h(-1). Pd(II) ions of (PdCl2/bpy)n films are in situ reduced to Pd nanoparticles (NPs) during the hydrogenation of styrene process, which results in the catalytic activity of the films. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) further demonstrate that Pd(II) ions of (PdCl2/bpy)n films were gradually converted to Pd(0) states. The catalytic activity is related to bilayer numbers and the activity increases with the number of bilayers below 10 bilayers. The solid substrates coated with (PdCl2/bpy)n multilayer catalysts were easily removed from the reaction mixture without separation filtration. Moreover, (PdCl2/bpy)n catalysts were reused for 10 consecutive reactions without loss of activity. The present (PdCl2/bpy)n heterogeneous catalysts have the advantages of easy separation and good recyclability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors determining the activity of catalysts of various chemical types in the oxidation of hydrogen. I. Oxidation and isotope exchange of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgikh, L.Y.; Golodets, G.I.; Il'chenko, N.I.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of data on the kinetics of the reaction 2H 2 + O 2 = 2H 2 O isotope exchange H 2 + D 2 = 2HD under the conditions of oxidative catalysis, and the kinetic isotope effect, a mechanism is proposed for the oxidation of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide. At low temperatures the reaction proceeds according to a mechanism of alternating reduction-reoxidation of the surface with the participation of hydrogen adsorbed in molecular form; at increased temperature and low P 02 /P /SUB H2/ ratios, a significant contribution to the observed rate is made by a mechanism including dissociative chemisorption of hydrogen

  17. Study of the Two Pion Photoproduction on Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauss, Lewis P. Graham, Jr.

    Understanding the structure of baryons in terms of the fundamental interaction of the constituent quarks and gluons is one of the primary challenges in strong inter-action physics. This interaction is governed by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), which is a theory for understanding the dynamics of strong. QCD displays the asymptotic freedom of hadrons at very short distances and also the confinement of quarks and gluons inside hadrons. However, solutions of this QCD theory in the non-perturbative domain of the interaction are extremely difficult to achieve, mainly because confinement happens on the hadronic scale on which the coupling constant is large and prevents any perturbative approach. Thus leaving us with strategies such as lattice QCD or formulating QCD sum rules to get around this problem. In exclusive hadron production the γN interaction is recognized for being a powerful method for investigating hadrons and the mysteries that still exist within the strong interaction. From reactions with the nucleon, the strong interaction can be investigated through the transition amplitudes to the N and Δ resonances. More specifically, if an electromagnetic interaction is well known then the intermediate resonance states may be evaluated through meson photoproduction. To gain more detailed insight into this interaction, we look to probe the baryon structure of the nucleon and the photo-excited resonance decays through photon scattering off a deuteron producing two pions in the final state. This photoproduction process off the deuteron will be used to investigate known baryon resonances in the two pion channel. The two pion final state will be investigated for unraveling new information into the photo-coupling strengths. We want to explore final state interactions, search for properties of known resonances, and to explore the possibility of seeing missing states that are predicted by quark models but have not yet been found experimentally. Using the CEBAF Large Acceptance

  18. Study of the Two-pion Photoproduction on the Deuteron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Lewis P. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the structure of baryons in terms of the fundamental interaction of the constituent quarks and gluons is one of the primary challenges in strong interaction physics. This interaction is governed by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), which is a theory for understanding the dynamics of strong. QCD displays the asymptotic freedom of hadrons at very short distances and also the confinement of quarks and gluons inside hadrons. However, solutions of this QCD theory in the non-perturbative domain of the interaction are extremely difficult to achieve, mainly because confinement happens on the hadronic scale on which the coupling constant is large and prevents any perturbative approach. Thus leaving us with strategies such as lattice QCD or formulating QCD sum rules to get around this problem. In exclusive hadron production the yN interaction is recognized for being a powerful method for investigating hadrons and the mysteries that still exist within the strong interaction. From reactions with the nucleon, the strong interaction can be investigated through the transition amplitudes to the N and Delta resonances. More specifically, if an electromagnetic interaction is well known then the intermediate resonance states may be evaluated through meson photoproduction. To gain more detailed insight into this interaction, we look to probe the baryon structure of the nucleon and the photo-excited resonance decays through photon scattering off a deuteron producing two pions in the final state. This photoproduction process off the deuteron will be used to investigate known baryon resonances in the two pion channel. The two pion final state will be investigated for unraveling new information into the photo-coupling strengths. We want to explore final state interactions, search for properties of known resonances, and to explore the possibility of seeing missing states that are predicted by quark models but have not yet been found experimentally. Using the CEBAF Large

  19. Photoproduction of the f1(1285 ) meson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, R.; Schumacher, R. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Badui, R. A.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Holtrop, M.; Hicks, K.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mattione, P.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Markov, N.; Mokeev, V.; Moriya, K.; Munevar, E.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Ni, A.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Salgado, C.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Stankovic, I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weygand, D.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The f1(1285 ) meson with mass 1281.0 ±0.8 MeV/c2 and width 18.4 ±1.4 MeV (full width at half maximum) was measured for the first time in photoproduction from a proton target using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. Differential cross sections were obtained via the η π+π-,K+K¯0π- , and K-K0π+ decay channels from threshold up to a center-of-mass energy of 2.8 GeV. The mass, width, and an amplitude analysis of the η π+π- final-state Dalitz distribution are consistent with the axial-vector JP=1+ f1(1285 ) identity, rather than the pseudoscalar 0- η (1295 ) . The production mechanism is more consistent with s -channel decay of a high-mass N* state and not with t -channel meson exchange. Decays to η π π go dominantly via the intermediate a0±(980 ) π∓ states, with the branching ratio Γ [a0π (noK ¯K )] /Γ [η π π (all)] =0.74 ±0.09 . The branching ratios Γ (K K ¯π ) /Γ (η π π ) =0.216 ±0.033 and Γ (γ ρ0) /Γ (η π π ) =0.047 ±0.018 were also obtained. The first is in agreement with previous data for the f1(1285 ) , while the latter is lower than the world average.

  20. Photoproduction of ηπ pairs off nucleons and deuterons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeser, A.; Mueller, F.; Dieterle, M.; Garni, S.; Jaegle, I.; Keshelashvili, I.; Krusche, B.; Maghrbi, Y.; Oberle, M.; Pheron, F.; Rostomyan, T.; Strub, T.; Walford, N.K.; Witthauer, L. [University of Basel, Department of Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Ahrens, J.; Arends, H.J.; Bartolome, P.A.; Ostrick, M.; Otte, P.; Thomas, A. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Annand, J.R.M.; Hamilton, D.; Howdle, D.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Mancell, J.; McGeorge, J.C.; McNicoll, E.; Robinson, J. [University of Glasgow, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Bantawa, K.; Manley, D.M. [Kent State University, Kent, OH (United States); Beck, R.; Nikolaev, A.; Schumann, S.; Unverzagt, M. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); University Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Braghieri, A.; Costanza, S.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Pedroni, P. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Briscoe, W.J.; Marinides, Z. [The George Washington University, Center for Nuclear Studies, Washington (United States); Cherepnya, S.; Fil' kov, L.V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Downie, E.J. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); University of Glasgow, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); The George Washington University, Center for Nuclear Studies, Washington (United States); Drexler, P.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Thiel, M. [University of Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Fix, A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Laboratory of Mathematical Physics, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Glazier, D.I. [University of Glasgow, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); University of Edinburgh, SUPA School of Physics, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Hornidge, D.; Middleton, D.G. [Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick (Canada); Huber, G.M. [University of Regina, Regina (Canada); Jude, T.C.; Sikora, M.H.; Watts, D.P. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA School of Physics, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kashevarov, V.L. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kondratiev, R.; Lisin, V.; Polonski, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Korolija, M.; Mekterovic, D.; Micanovic, S.; Supek, I. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Oussena, B. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); The George Washington University, Center for Nuclear Studies, Washington (United States); Prakhov, S.; Starostin, A. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sober, D. [The Catholic University of America, Washington (United States); Werthmueller, D. [University of Basel, Department of Physics, Basel (Switzerland); University of Glasgow, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Collaboration: The A2 Collaboration

    2016-09-15

    Quasi-free photoproduction of πη-pairs has been investigated from threshold up to incident photon energies of 1.4 GeV, respectively up to photon-nucleon invariant masses up to 1.9 GeV. Total cross sections, angular distributions, invariant-mass distributions of the πη and meson-nucleon pairs, and beam-helicity asymmetries have been measured for the reactions γp → pπ{sup 0}η, γn → nπ{sup 0}η, γp → nπ{sup +}η, and γn → pπ{sup -}η from nucleons bound inside the deuteron. For the γp initial-state data for free protons have also been analyzed. Finally, the total cross sections for quasi-free production of π{sup 0}η pairs from nucleons bound in {sup 3} He nuclei have been investigated in view of final state interaction (FSI) effects. The experiments were performed at the tagged photon beam facility of the Mainz MAMI accelerator using an almost 4π covering electromagnetic calorimeter composed of the Crystal Ball and TAPS detectors. The shapes of all differential cross section data and the asymmetries are very similar for protons and neutrons and agree with the conjecture that the reactions are dominated by the sequential Δ*3/2{sup -} → ηΔ(1232) → πηN decay chain, mainly with Δ(1700)3/2{sup -} and Δ(1940)3/2{sup -}. The ratios of the magnitude of the total cross sections also agree with this assumption. However, the absolute magnitudes of the cross sections are reduced by FSI effects with respect to free proton data. (orig.)

  1. Fully functional global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts and compromised transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in condensed mitotic chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komura, Jun-ichiro, E-mail: junkom@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Ikehata, Hironobu [Department of Cell Biology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Mori, Toshio [Radioisotope Research Center, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Department of Cell Biology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2012-03-10

    During mitosis, chromatin is highly condensed, and activities such as transcription and semiconservative replication do not occur. Consequently, the condensed condition of mitotic chromatin is assumed to inhibit DNA metabolism by impeding the access of DNA-transacting proteins. However, about 40 years ago, several researchers observed unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated mitotic chromosomes, suggesting the presence of excision repair. We re-examined this subject by directly measuring the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions by an ELISA and by a Southern-based technique in HeLa cells arrested at mitosis. We observed that the removal of (6-4) photoproducts from the overall genome in mitotic cells was as efficient as in interphase cells. This suggests that global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully functional during mitosis, and that the DNA in mitotic chromatin is accessible to proteins involved in this mode of DNA repair. Nevertheless, not all modes of DNA repair seem fully functional during mitosis. We also observed that the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the dihydrofolate reductase and c-MYC genes in mitotic cells was very slow. This suggests that transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is compromised or non-functional during mitosis, which is probably the consequence of mitotic transcriptional repression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully active in mitotic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA in condensed mitotic chromatin does not seem inaccessible or inert. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitotic transcriptional repression may impair transcription-coupled repair.

  2. Fully functional global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts and compromised transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in condensed mitotic chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, Jun-ichiro; Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Ono, Tetsuya

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, chromatin is highly condensed, and activities such as transcription and semiconservative replication do not occur. Consequently, the condensed condition of mitotic chromatin is assumed to inhibit DNA metabolism by impeding the access of DNA-transacting proteins. However, about 40 years ago, several researchers observed unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated mitotic chromosomes, suggesting the presence of excision repair. We re-examined this subject by directly measuring the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions by an ELISA and by a Southern-based technique in HeLa cells arrested at mitosis. We observed that the removal of (6-4) photoproducts from the overall genome in mitotic cells was as efficient as in interphase cells. This suggests that global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully functional during mitosis, and that the DNA in mitotic chromatin is accessible to proteins involved in this mode of DNA repair. Nevertheless, not all modes of DNA repair seem fully functional during mitosis. We also observed that the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the dihydrofolate reductase and c-MYC genes in mitotic cells was very slow. This suggests that transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is compromised or non-functional during mitosis, which is probably the consequence of mitotic transcriptional repression. -- Highlights: ► Global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully active in mitotic cells. ► DNA in condensed mitotic chromatin does not seem inaccessible or inert. ► Mitotic transcriptional repression may impair transcription-coupled repair.

  3. Combining Ru, Ni and Ni(OH){sub 2} active sites for improving catalytic performance in benzene hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Lihua, E-mail: lihuazhu@stu.xmu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Sun, Hanlei; Zheng, Jinbao [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Yu, Changlin, E-mail: yuchanglinjx@163.com [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Zhang, Nuowei [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Shu, Qing [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Chen, Bing H., E-mail: chenbh@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(T) catalysts were successfully prepared by the simple methods of hydrazine-reduction and galvanic replacement, where 0.04/0.96 and T represented the Ru/Ni atomic ratio and reducing temperature of the catalyst in N{sub 2}+10%H{sub 2}, respectively. The nanostructures of the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96} nanoparticles in the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(T) catalysts were controlled by modulating their annealing temperature in N{sub 2}+10%H{sub 2} and characterized by an array of techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) mapping and high-sensitivity low-energy ion scattering (HS-LEIS). The Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(30) catalyst, which was composed of Ru clusters or single atoms supported on Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles, exhibited much better catalytic performance for benzene hydrogenation than the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(T) catalysts reduced at above 30 °C, such as Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(160) with the nanostructure of partial Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.9} alloy and Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(280) with the nanostructure of complete Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.9} alloy. The reason was that the synergistic effect of multiple active sites – Ru, Ni and Ni(OH){sub 2} sites was present in the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(30) catalyst, where hydrogen was preferentially activated at Ru sites, benzene was probably activated at Ni(OH){sub 2} surface and Ni acted as a “bridge” for transferring activated H{sup ∗} species to activated benzene by hydrogen spillover effect, hydrogenating and forming product – cyclohexane. This study also provided a typical example to illustrate that the synergy effect of multiple active sites can largely improve the catalytic hydrogenation performance. - Highlights: • The Ru

  4. Self-optimization of the active site of molybdenum disulfide by an irreversible phase transition during photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Longlu; Duan, Xidong; Liu, Chengbin; Zhang, Shuqu; Zeng, Yunxiong [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha (China); Liu, Xia; Pei, Yong [Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Ministry of Education, Xiangtan University (China); Luo, Jinming; Crittenden, John [Brook Byers Institute for Sustainable Systems and School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Duan, Xiangfeng [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-06-19

    The metallic 1T-MoS{sub 2} has attracted considerable attention as an effective catalyst for hydrogen evolution reactions (HERs). However, the fundamental mechanism about the catalytic activity of 1T-MoS{sub 2} and the associated phase evolution remain elusive and controversial. Herein, we prepared the most stable 1T-MoS{sub 2} by hydrothermal exfoliation of MoS{sub 2} nanosheets vertically rooted into rigid one-dimensional TiO{sub 2} nanofibers. The 1T-MoS{sub 2} can keep highly stable over one year, presenting an ideal model system for investigating the HER catalytic activities as a function of the phase evolution. Both experimental studies and theoretical calculations suggest that 1T phase can be irreversibly transformed into a more active 1T' phase as true active sites in photocatalytic HERs, resulting in a ''catalytic site self-optimization''. Hydrogen atom adsorption is the major driving force for this phase transition. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. NOX4-dependent Hydrogen peroxide promotes shear stress-induced SHP2 sulfenylation and eNOS activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Calvo, Enrique; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Fierro-Fernández, Marta; Anilkumar, Narayana; Shah, Ajay M; Schröder, Katrin; Brandes, Ralf P; Vázquez, Jesús; Lamas, Santiago

    2015-12-01

    Laminar shear stress (LSS) triggers signals that ultimately result in atheroprotection and vasodilatation. Early responses are related to the activation of specific signaling cascades. We investigated the participation of redox-mediated modifications and in particular the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the sulfenylation of redox-sensitive phosphatases. Exposure of vascular endothelial cells to short periods of LSS (12 dyn/cm(2)) resulted in the generation of superoxide radical anion as detected by the formation of 2-hydroxyethidium by HPLC and its subsequent conversion to H2O2, which was corroborated by the increase in the fluorescence of the specific peroxide sensor HyPer. By using biotinylated dimedone we detected increased total protein sulfenylation in the bovine proteome, which was dependent on NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4)-mediated generation of peroxide. Mass spectrometry analysis allowed us to identify the phosphatase SHP2 as a protein susceptible to sulfenylation under LSS. Given the dependence of FAK activity on SHP2 function, we explored the role of FAK under LSS conditions. FAK activation and subsequent endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation were promoted by LSS and both processes were dependent on NOX4, as demonstrated in lung endothelial cells isolated from NOX4-null mice. These results support the idea that LSS elicits redox-sensitive signal transduction responses involving NOX4-dependent generation of hydrogen peroxide, SHP2 sulfenylation, and ulterior FAK-mediated eNOS activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigation of cryogenic hydrogen storage on high surface area activated carbon. Equilibrium and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggiaro, Ricardo Gaspar

    2008-11-29

    This thesis investigates cryo-adsorptive systems for hydrogen storage for mobile applications. By means of macroscopic and microscopic balance models, an extensive analysis is carried out, including among others the investigation of the thermal effects during high-pressure system filling, venting losses during normal operation and inactivity, time-course of system pressure and temperature and gas delivery under various operating conditions. Model results were compared with experimental data, good agreement was obtained. The analysis also includes a comparison to other storage technologies such as cryo-compressed gas and liquefaction storage. The results show that cryo-adsorptive systems have storage characteristics comparable to compressed gas systems, but at a much lower pressure. They are also energetically more efficient than liquid hydrogen systems. However, the necessity of cryotemperatures and thermal management during operation and filling might limit their application. (orig.)

  7. Canada's hydrogen energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, T.B.

    2009-01-01

    Canada produces the most hydrogen per capita of any Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country. The majority of this hydrogen is produced by steam methane reforming for industrial use (predominantly oil upgrading and fertilizer production). Canada also has a world leading hydrogen and fuel cell sector. This sector is seeking new methods for making hydrogen for its future energy needs. The paper will discuss Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell sector in the context of its capabilities, its demonstration and commercialization activities and its stature on the world stage. (author)

  8. Simultaneous waste activated sludge disintegration and biological hydrogen production using an ozone/ultrasound pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shan-Shan; Guo, Wan-Qian; Cao, Guang-Li; Zheng, He-Shan; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2012-11-01

    This paper offers an effective pretreatment method that can simultaneously achieve excess sludge reduction and bio-hydrogen production from sludge self-fermentation. Batch tests demonstrated that the combinative use of ozone/ultrasound pretreatment had an advantage over the individual ozone and ultrasound pretreatments. The optimal condition (ozone dose of 0.158 g O(3)/g DS and ultrasound energy density of 1.423 W/mL) was recommended by response surface methodology. The maximum hydrogen yield was achieved at 9.28 mL H(2)/g DS under the optimal condition. According to the kinetic analysis, the highest hydrogen production rate (1.84 mL/h) was also obtained using combined pretreatment, which well fitted the predicted equation (the squared regression statistic was 0.9969). The disintegration degrees (DD) were limited to 19.57% and 46.10% in individual ozone and ultrasound pretreatments, while it reached up to 60.88% in combined pretreatment. The combined ozone/ultrasound pretreatment provides an ideal and environmental friendly solution to the problem of sludge disposal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Distributed H2 Supply for Fuel Cell Utility Vehicles Year 6 - Activity 3.5 - Development fo a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almlie, Jay

    2012-04-15

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a high-pressure hydrogen production system that reforms a liquid organic feedstock and water at operating pressures up to 800 bar (~12,000 psig). The advantages of this system include the elimination of energy-intensive hydrogen compression, a smaller process footprint, and the elimination of gaseous or liquid hydrogen transport. This system could also potentially enable distributed hydrogen production from centralized coal. Processes have been investigated to gasify coal and then convert the syngas into alcohol or alkanes. These alcohols and alkanes could then be easily transported in bulk to distributed high-pressure water-reforming (HPWR)-based systems to deliver hydrogen economically. The intent of this activity was to utilize the EERC’s existing HPWR hydrogen production process, previously designed and constructed in a prior project phase, as a basis to improve operational and production performance of an existing demonstration unit. Parameters to be pursued included higher hydrogen delivery pressure, higher hydrogen production rates, and the ability to refill within a 5-minute time frame.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide prevents hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of epithelial sodium channel through a PTEN/PI(3,4,5P3 dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianing Zhang

    Full Text Available Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC at the distal segment of the kidney plays an important role in salt-sensitive hypertension. We reported previously that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 stimulates ENaC in A6 distal nephron cells via elevation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5P3 in the apical membrane. Here we report that H2S can antagonize H2O2-induced activation of ENaC in A6 cells. Our cell-attached patch-clamp data show that ENaC open probability (PO was significantly increased by exogenous H2O2, which is consistent with our previous finding. The aberrant activation of ENaC induced by exogenous H2O2 was completely abolished by H2S (0.1 mM NaHS. Pre-treatment of A6 cells with H2S slightly decreased ENaC P(O; however, in these cells H2O2 failed to elevate ENaC PO . Confocal microscopy data show that application of exogenous H2O2 to A6 cells significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level and induced accumulation of PI(3,4,5P3 in the apical compartment of the cell membrane. These effects of exogenous H2O2 on intracellular ROS levels and on apical PI(3,4,5P3 levels were almost completely abolished by treatment of A6 cells with H2S. In addition, H2S significantly inhibited H2O2-induced oxidative inactivation of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN which is a negative regulator of PI(3,4,5P3. Moreover, BPV(pic, a specific inhibitor of PTEN, elevated PI(3,4,5P3 and ENaC activity in a manner similar to that of H2O2 in A6 cells. Our data show, for the first time, that H2S prevents H2O2-induced activation of ENaC through a PTEN-PI(3,4,5P3 dependent pathway.

  11. Charm decays and high energy photoproduction. Final report, April 1994--May 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    This project involved continued participation by the Physics Department at the Mayaguez Campus of the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) in high energy physics experiments carried out at Fermilab. The UPR is a member of the E831 collaboration which includes Fermilab and leading US, Italian, Brazilian and Korean universities. E831 is an upgrade to the E687 spectrometer with the goal of a tenfold increase in the statistics for the study of the photoproduction and decay of charmed particles. This spectrometer has been significantly upgraded to maintain and expand its capabilities even at considerably higher beam intensities. E687 completed its last data run in January 1992. Approximately 100,000 charm events were fully reconstructed from this data and results of the analysis have appeared in several publications. The UPR has been participating in E687 since 1985 when the experiment was in its early stages of construction. A grant from the DOE Division of High Energy Physics (starting in April 1994) and another from the DOE EPSCoR Program (starting in October 1994) allowed a considerable increase in the activities of the UPR group. Given the group's capable performance, the responsibilities assigned to it by the collaboration have increased to the point where they now include four major detectors in E831. All four detectors were ready on time for the start of the E831 run in July 1996. This is a remarkable performance if one considers that there is only one senior member in the group and that the students are all MS or undergraduate students. The group has also been active in the development of simulation, data acquisition and analysis software

  12. Catalytic oxidative desulfurization of diesel utilizing hydrogen peroxide and functionalized-activated carbon in a biphasic diesel-acetonitrile system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haw, Kok-Giap; Bakar, Wan Azelee Wan Abu; Ali, Rusmidah; Chong, Jiunn-Fat [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Kadir, Abdul Aziz Abdul [Department of Petroleum Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents the development of granular functionalized-activated carbon as catalysts in the catalytic oxidative desulfurization (Cat-ODS) of commercial Malaysian diesel using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Granular functionalized-activated carbon was prepared from oil palm shell using phosphoric acid activation method and carbonized at 500 C and 700 C for 1 h. The activated carbons were characterized using various analytical techniques to study the chemistry underlying the preparation and calcination treatment. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms exhibited the characteristic of microporous structure with some contribution of mesopore property. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy results showed that higher activation temperature leads to fewer surface functional groups due to thermal decomposition. Micrograph from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope showed that activation at 700 C creates orderly and well developed pores. Furthermore, X-ray Diffraction patterns revealed that pyrolysis has converted crystalline cellulose structure of oil palm shell to amorphous carbon structure. The influence of the reaction temperature, the oxidation duration, the solvent, and the oxidant/sulfur molar ratio were examined. The rates of the catalytic oxidative desulfurization reaction were found to increase with the temperature, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/S molar ratio. Under the best operating condition for the catalytic oxidative desulfurization: temperature 50 C, atmospheric pressure, 0.5 g activated carbon, 3 mol ratio of hydrogen peroxide to sulfur, 2 mol ratio of acetic acid to sulfur, 3 oxidation cycles with 1 h for each cycle using acetonitrile as extraction solvent, the sulfur content in diesel was reduced from 2189 ppm to 190 ppm with 91.3% of total sulfur removed. (author)

  13. Connections between Compton scattering and pion photoproduction in the delta region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.; Benmerrouche, M.

    1992-01-01

    Using textbook tools like analyticity, unitarity and optical theorem, the authors discuss the relationship between pion-nucleon scattering, pion photoproduction and Compton scattering in the Δ(1232) resonance region. They review the relevant data and draw conclusions pertinent to the QCD-inspired models. 27 refs

  14. Search for exclusive photoproduction of Z(c)(+/-) (3900) at COMPASS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alekseev, M.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V. A.; Austregisilio, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.; Donskov, S.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.V.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger jr., M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joerg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.; Khokhlov, Y.; Kisselev, Y.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.; Kolosov, V.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.; Kotzinian, A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Král, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Y.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W. D.; Nunes, A.S.; Orlov, I.; Olshevsky, A.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V. K.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D.; Samoylenko, V.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlütter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmiden, H.; Schmitt, L.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, Aleš; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 742, MAR 6 (2015), s. 330-334 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : COMPASS * Z(c)(3900) * Photoproduction * Tetraquark Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.787, year: 2015

  15. Helicity Asymmetry Measurement for π0 Photoproduction with FROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Hideko [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-08-15

    This thesis reports on the first helicity asymmetry measurement for single neutral pion photoproduction using the CLAS detector in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). This measurement used longitudinally polarized protons and circularly polarized photons at energies between 350 MeV and 2400 MeV. The experimental results are compared to three available model calculations.

  16. ω(→ π+π−π0) meson photoproduction on proton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAMANA c Indian Academy of Sciences. Vol. 75, No. 4. — journal of. October 2010 physics pp. 665–674 ω(→ π+π−π0) meson photoproduction on proton ... The vector meson can probe the low-lying nucleonic resonances [7] because it ... reaction amplitudes from the latest measurement of the four-momentum transfer.

  17. Helicity Asymmetry Measurement for pi0 Photoproduction with FROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, Hideko [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-08-15

    This thesis reports on the first helicity asymmetry measurement for single neutral pion photoproduction using the CLAS detector in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). This measurement used longitudinally polarized protons and circularly polarized photons at energies between 350 MeV and 2400 MeV. The experimental results are compared to three available model calculations.

  18. Measurement of the t dependence in exclusive photoproduction of Upsilon(1S) mesons at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H.

    2012-02-14

    The exclusive photoproduction reaction gamma p -> Upsilon(1S) p has been studied with the ZEUS detector in ep collisions at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 468 pb^-1. The measurement covers the kinematic range 60 Upsilon(1S) p cross section.

  19. Search for a PHI' vector meson in diffractive photoproduction of K+K-π+π-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.; Davenport, M.; Flower, P.; Hutton, J.S.; Kumar, B.R.; Morris, J.A.G.; Morris, J.V.; Patrick, G.N.; Sharp, P.H.; Bussey, P.J.; Dainton, J.B.; Paterson, C.; Raine, C.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Brodbeck, T.J.; Clegg, A.B.; Flynn, P.J.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Newton, D.; Axon, T.J.; Barberis, D.; Dickinson, B.; Donnachie, A.; Ellison, R.J.; Hughes-Jones, R.E.; Ibbotson, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lane, J.B.; Mercer, D.; Thompson, R.J.; Waite, A.P.; Worsell, M.F.; Levy, J.M.; Laberrigue, J.; La Vaissiere, C. de; Yiou, T.P.; Brookes, G.R.; Bunn, J.J.; Galbraith, W.; McClatchey, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    A study of photoproduction of K + K - π + π - shows a broad threshold enhancement, about 30% of which is due to Ksup(*)Kπ production. This Ksup(*)Kπ component shows no dynamical features indicative of the existence of a PHI' vector meson in this channel. (orig.)

  20. Neutrino photoproduction on an electron in the QED two-dimensional approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loskutov, Yu.M.; Skobelev, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    Characteristic reactions of electron and muon neutrino photoproduction on an electron in a strong magnetic field are considered in the Weinberg model. The ratio of the corresponding cross sections depending on the charged boson mass permits to cherish hopes on the possibility of evaluating its mass on the basis of the experiment according to neutrino luminosity of neutron stars [ru

  1. Beam asymmetry Σ for π0 and η photoproduction on the proton at GlueX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; GlueX Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of meson photoproduction at high energies began almost 50 years ago with bubble chamber experiments at SLAC, DESY, and Cambridge. These data have been successfully described through Regge theory in terms of t-channel quasi-particle exchange. High statistics measurements of pseudoscalar meson photoproduction at GlueX, using the 9 GeV linearly-polarized, tagged photon beam in Jefferson Lab's Hall D, will provide important new constraints on these Regge models. These measurements will test our understanding of the photoproduction mechanism at high energy, which is a necessary first step toward the broader meson spectroscopy program at GlueX. Through finite energy sum rules, these measurements can also impose new constraints on the extraction of nucleon resonances from low energy photoproduction data. In this talk, preliminary results for the linearly polarized photon beam asymmetry Σ for the exclusive reactions γp -> pπ0 and γp -> pη will be presented. These are the first measurements of the η beam asymmetry at these energies. Supported by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177 and the China Scholarship Council No. 201506275156.

  2. Exclusive ρ.sup.0./sup. meson photoproduction with a leading neutron at HERA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Cvach, Jaroslav; Hladký, Jan; Reimer, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 1 (2016), 1-21, č. článku 41. ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14033 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : deep-inelastic scattering * vector meson production * pion exchange model * elastic photoproduction Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.331, year: 2016

  3. Electroproduction and photoproduction of vector mesons and generalized vector meson dominance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraas, H.; Kuroda, M.

    1977-05-01

    Using generalized vector meson dominance, electro- and photoproduction of vector mesons is studied. The unnatural parity exchange part of ω(1.2) production is estimated to be about one fourth of that of ω-production. The off diagonal transition model suggests the suppression of diffractive rho(1.2) and ω(1.2) production. (orig.) [de

  4. Photoproduction of eta-mesons off nuclei for E(gamma)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, T.; Jaegle, I.; Muehlich, P.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, B.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D. E.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Castelijns, R.; Crede, V.; Dutz, H.; Ehmanns, A.; Elsner, D.; Essig, K.; Ewald, R.; Fabry, I.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Fuchs, M.; Funke, C.; Gothe, R.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A. B.; Gutz, E.; Hoeffgen, S.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammer, S.; Kleber, V.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Konrad, M.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Lang, M.; Langheinrich, J.; Loehner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lotz, J.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Morales, C.; Mosel, U.; Nanova, M.; Novinski, D. V.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Radkov, A. K.; Roy, A.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S. V.; Sokhoyan, V.; Suele, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Weinheimer, C.; Wendel, C.

    2008-01-01

    The photoproduction of eta-mesons off (12)C, (40)Ca, (93)Nb, and (nat)Pb nuclei has been measured with a tagged photon beam with energies between 0.6 and 2.2 GeV. The experiment was performed at the Bonn ELSA accelerator with the combined setup of the Crystal Barrel and TAPS calorimeters. It aimed

  5. Inelastic J/Ψ photoproduction off nuclei: Gluon enhancement or double color exchange?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huefner, J.; Zamolodchikov, A.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear enhancement observed in inelastic photoproduction of J/Ψ should not be interpreted as evidence for an increased gluon density in nuclei. The nuclear suppression of the production rate due to initial and final state interactions is calculated and a novel two-step color exchange process is proposed, which is able to explain the data. (orig.)

  6. Photo-production of neutral kaons on C-12 in the threshold region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Watanabe, T.; Bydžovský, Petr; Dobashi, K.; Endo, S.; Fujii, Y.; Hashimoto, O.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, K.; Kanda, H.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 651, č. 4 (2007), s. 269-274 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2142 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : photo-production * neutral kaon * quasi-free reaction Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 4.189, year: 2007

  7. The investigation of strangeness photoproduction in the threshold region at ELPH-Tohoku

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaneta, M.; Beckford, B.; Bydžovský, Petr; Fujibayashi, T.; Fujii, T.; Fujii, Y.; Futatsukawa, K.; Gogami, T.; Han, Y. C.; Hashimoto, O.; Hirose, K.; Hosomi, K.; Honda, R.; Iguchi, A.; Ishikawa, T.; Kanda, H.; Kaneko, Y.; Kasai, Y.; Kawasaki, T.; Kimura, C.; Kiyokawa, S.; Koike, T.; Maeda, K.; Maruyama, N.; Matsubara, M.; Miwa, K.; Miyagi, Y.; Nagao, S.; Nakamura, S. N.; Okuyama, A.; Sotona, Miloslav; Tamae, T.; Tamura, H.; Tsukada, K.; Terada, N.; Wang, T. S.; Yamamoto, F.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamazaki, H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 914, SEP (2013), s. 69-73 ISSN 0375-9474 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : strangeness * photoproduction * tagged photon beam * lambda detection Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 2.499, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0375947413005344

  8. Photoproduction of colored pseudo-Goldstone bosons at very high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grifols, J.A.; Mendez, A.

    1982-01-01

    We estimate the photoproduction cross section of the color-octet pseudo-Goldstone bosons P 0 8 and P 3 8 in e-p collisions at very high energy. The calculated rates are within detectability limits, especially for the P 3 8 state which, besides, cannot be produced in hadron-hardon interactions

  9. Measurement of Anti-Deuteron Photoproduction and a Search for Heavy Stable Charged Particles at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kuckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leiner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Ratiani, Z.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2004-01-01

    The cross section for anti-deuteron photoproduction is measured at HERA at a mean centre-of-mass energy of W_{\\gamma p} = 200 GeV in the range 0.2 < p_T/M < 0.7 and |y| < 0.4, where M, p_T and y are the mass, transverse momentum and rapidity in the laboratory frame of the anti-deuteron, respectively. The numbers of anti-deuterons per event are found to be similar in photoproduction to those in central proton-proton collisions at the CERN ISR but much lower than those in central Au-Au collisions at RHIC. The coalescence parameter B_2, which characterizes the likelihood of anti-deuteron production, is measured in photoproduction to be 0.010 \\pm 0.002 \\pm 0.001, which is much higher than in Au-Au collisions at a similar nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy. No significant production of particles heavier than deuterons is observed and upper limits are set on the photoproduction cross sections for such particles.

  10. Measurement of antideuteron photoproduction and a search for heavy stable charged particles at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A; Anthonis, T; Asmone, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Bähr, J; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, Christoph; Berndt, T; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Böhme, J; Boudry, V; Bracinik, J; Brisson, V; Broker, H B; Brown, D P; Bruncko, Dusan; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Büsser, F W; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Caron, S; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Chekelian, V; Collard, Caroline; Contreras, J G; Coppens, Y R; Coughlan, J A; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Delcourt, B; Demirchyan, R; Desch, Klaus; Diaconu, C; Dingfelder, J; Dodonov, V; Dubak, A; Duprel, C; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Fleischer, M; Fleischmann, P; Fleming, Y H; Flucke, G; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Franke, G; Frising, G; Gabathuler, E; Gabathuler, K; Garutti, E; Garvey, J; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Görlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Grab, C; Grassler, J; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grindhammer, G; Gwilliam, C; Haidt, D; Hajduk, L; Haller, J; Hansson, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Henshaw, O; Heremans, R; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Heuer, R D; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hoting, P; Hovhannisyan, A; Ibbotson, M; Ismail, M; Jacquet, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Johnson, D P; Jönsson, L B; Jung, H; Kant, D; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Katzy, J; Keller, N; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Koblitz, B; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Koutouev, R; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kroseberg, J; Kuckens, J; Kuhr, T; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leissner, B; Lemrani, R; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lindfeld, L; Lipka, K; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lüders, H; Lüke, D; Lux, T; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malden, N; Malinovski, E; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Meer, D; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michine, S; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz, I; Milstead, D; Mohamed, A; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morozov, I; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Müller, K; Murín, P; Nagovizin, V; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nozicka, M; Oganezov, R; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Ossoskov, G; Ozerov, D; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peez, M; Pérez, E; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Portheault, B; Pöschl, R; Povh, B; Raicevic, N; Ratiani, Z; Reimer, P; Reisert, B; Rimmer, A; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Rybicki, K; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schleper, P; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, M; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schröder, V; Schultz Coulon, H C; Schwanenberger, C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sirois, Y; Sloan, T; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu V; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Spitzer, H; Stamen, R; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Strauch, I; Straumann, U; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Trevino, A V; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Tsuri, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Uraev, A; Urban, M; Usik, A; Utkin, D; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vest, A; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Wagner, J; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Werner, N; Wessels, M; Wessling, B; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Woerling, E E; Wolf, R; Wünsch, E; Xella, S M; Yan, W; Yeganov, V; Zácek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; 10.1140/epjc/s2004-01978-x

    2004-01-01

    The cross section for antideuteron photoproduction is measured at HERA at a mean centre-of-mass energy of W/sub gamma p/=200 GeV in the range 0.2

    photoproduction to those in central proton-proton collisions at the CERN ISR but much lower than those in central Au-Au collisions at RHIC. The coalescence parameter B/sub 2/, which characterizes the likelihood of antideuteron production, is measured in photoproduction to be 0.010+or-0.002+or-0.001, which is much higher than in Au-Au collisions at a similar nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass energy. No significant production of particles heavier than deuterons is observed and upper limits are set on the photoproduction cross sections for such particles.

  11. Final states in electroproduction and photoproduction at low and medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, R.

    1977-01-01

    A review is given of electroproduction and photoproduction at photon energies extending from the resonance region up to about 10 GeV. Comparisons are made between the various experiments and the appropriate theories in an attempt to understand more about the different production mechanisms - s channel resonances, t and u channel exchanges and quark-parton effects. (orig.) [de

  12. Rho0 Photoproduction in Ultra-Peripheral Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions with STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Coll

    2007-12-20

    Photoproduction reactions occur when the electromagnetic field of a relativistic heavy ion interacts with another heavy ion. The STAR collaboration presents a measurement of {rho}{sup 0} and direct {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} photoproduction in ultra-peripheral relativistic heavy ion collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We observe both exclusive photoproduction and photoproduction accompanied by mutual Coulomb excitation. We find a coherent cross-section of {sigma}(AuAu {yields} Au*Au* {rho}{sup 0}) = 530 {+-} 19 (stat.) {+-} 57 (syst.) mb, in accord with theoretical calculations based on a Glauber approach, but considerably below the predictions of a color dipole model. The {rho}{sup 0} transverse momentum spectrum (p{sub T}{sup 2}) is fit by a double exponential curve including both coherent and incoherent coupling to the target nucleus; we find {sigma}{sub inc}/{sigma}{sub coh} = 0.29 {+-} 0.03 (stat.) {+-} 0.08 (syst.). The ratio of direct {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} production is comparable to that observed in {gamma}p collisions at HERA, and appears to be independent of photon energy. Finally, the measured {rho}{sup 0} spin helicity matrix elements agree within errors with the expected s-channel helicity conservation.

  13. Q.C.D. predictions for the forward photoproduction of heavy vector mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navelet, H.; Peschanski, R.

    1984-03-01

    From the inelastic QantiQ-Nucleon cross section, we get predictions for the forward photoproduction of heavy QantiQ mesons by using V.D.M. and the optical theorem. These cross sections are computed from perturbative Q.C.D. through gluon radiation mechanism

  14. Induction of UV photoproducts and DNA damage by solar simulator UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfreys, A.; Henderson, L.; Clingen, P.

    1997-01-01

    The recent increased incidence of skin cancer and the depletion of the ozone layer has increased interest in the ultraviolet (UV) component of natural sunlight and its role in the induction of skin cancer. Previous research on UV radiation has concentrated on UVC (254nm) but, as only UVB and UVA are present in natural sunlight, its relevance is unknown. We have investigated the induction of two forms of direct DNA damage - the pyrimidine dimer and the (6-4) photoproduct - in human DNA repair deficient XP-G (Xeroderma pigmentosum group G) lymphoblastoid cells following exposure to simulated sunlight. As exposure to natural sunlight is highly variable, a solar simulator lamp was used which is known to mimic natural sunlight at midday in Central Europe. Cells were irradiated on ice to minimise DNA repair and the relative induction of pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts was measured using specific monoclonal antibodies and a computer assisted image analysis system. A time dependent increase in both cyclobutane dimer and (6-4) photoproduct antibody binding sites was seen. The increases in pyrimidine dimer and (6-4) photoproduct antibody binding sites differed to that reported with natural sunlight in the UK but was similar to that seen with a similar solar simulator lamp

  15. Evidence of superstoichiometric H/D LENR active sites and high-temperature superconductivity in a hydrogen-cycled Pd/PdO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, A.G.; Castano, C.H.; Miley, G.H.; Lyakhov, B.F.; Tsivadze, A.Yu.; Mitin, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    Electron transport and magnetic properties have been studied in a 12.5 μm thick Pd foil with a thermally grown oxide and a low-residual concentration of hydrogen. This foil was deformed by cycling across the Pd hydride miscibility gap and the residual hydrogen was trapped at dislocation cores. Anomalies of both resistance and magnetic susceptibility have been observed below 70 K, indicating the appearance of excess conductivity and a diamagnetic response that we interpret in terms of filamentary superconductivity. These anomalies are attributed to a condensed hydrogen-rich phase at dislocation cores. The role of deuterium rich dislocation cores as LENR active sites is discussed. (author)

  16. Evidence of Superstoichiometric H/d Lenr Active Sites and High-Temperature Superconductivity in a Hydrogen-Cycled Pd/PdO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, A. G.; Castano, C. H.; Miley, G. H.; Lyakhov, B. F.; Tsivadze, A. Yu.; Mitin, A. V.

    Electron transport and magnetic properties have been studied in a 12.5 μm thick Pd foil with a thermally grown oxide and a low-residual concentration of hydrogen. This foil was deformed by cycling across the Pd hydride miscibility gap and the residual hydrogen was trapped at dislocation cores. Anomalies of both resistance and magnetic susceptibility have been observed below 70 K, indicating the appearance of excess conductivity and a diamagnetic response that we interpret in terms of filamentary superconductivity. These anomalies are attributed to a condensed hydrogen-rich phase at dislocation cores. The role of deuterium rich dislocation cores as LENR active sites is discussed.

  17. The effect of standard heat and filtration processing procedures on antimicrobial activity and hydrogen peroxide levels in honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cuilan; Campbell, Leona T; Blair, Shona E; Carter, Dee A

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the antimicrobial properties of honey. In most honey types, antimicrobial activity is due to the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), but this can vary greatly among samples. Honey is a complex product and other components may modulate activity, which can be further affected by commercial processing procedures. In this study we examined honey derived from three native Australian floral sources that had previously been associated with H(2)O(2)-dependent activity. Antibacterial activity was seen in four red stringybark samples only, and ranged from 12 to 21.1% phenol equivalence against Staphylococcus aureus. Antifungal activity ranged from MIC values of 19-38.3% (w/v) against Candida albicans, and all samples were significantly more active than an osmotically equivalent sugar solution. All honey samples were provided unprocessed and following commercial processing. Processing was usually detrimental to antimicrobial activity, but occasionally the reverse was seen and activity increased. H(2)O(2) levels varied from 0 to 1017 μM, and although samples with no H(2)O(2) had little or no antimicrobial activity, some samples had relatively high H(2)O(2) levels yet no antimicrobial activity. In samples where H(2)O(2) was detected, the correlation with antibacterial activity was greater in the processed than in the unprocessed samples, suggesting other factors present in the honey influence this activity and are sensitive to heat treatment. Antifungal activity did not correlate with the level of H(2)O(2) in honey samples, and overall it appeared that H(2)O(2) alone was not sufficient to inhibit C. albicans. We conclude that floral source and H(2)O(2) levels are not reliable predictors of the antimicrobial activity of honey, which currently can only be assessed by standardized antimicrobial testing. Heat processing should be reduced where possible, and honey destined for medicinal use should be retested post-processing to ensure that

  18. Spectrally resolved efficiencies of carbon monoxide (CO photoproduction in the western Canadian Arctic: particles versus solutes

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