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Sample records for hydrogen phosphate binding

  1. Expanding sapphyrin: towards selective phosphate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayev, Evgeny A; Boev, Nikolay V; Myshkovskaya, Ekaterina; Khrustalev, Victor N; Ustynyuk, Yu A

    2008-01-01

    The anion-templated syntheses and binding properties of novel macrocyclic oligopyrrole receptors in which pyrrole rings are linked through amide or imine bonds are described. The efficient synthesis was accomplished by anion-templated [1+1] Schiff-base condensation and acylation macrocyclization reactions. Free receptors and their host-guest complexes with hydrochloric acid, acetic acid, tetrabutylammonium chloride, and hydrogen sulfate were analyzed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Stability constants with different tetrabutylammonium salts of inorganic acids were determined by standard 1H NMR and UV/Vis titration techniques in [D6]DMSO/0.5% water solution. According to the titration data, receptors containing three pyrrole rings (10 and 12) exhibit high affinity (log Ka=5-7) for bifluoride, acetate, and dihydrogen phosphate, and interact weakly with chloride and hydrogen sulfate. The amido-bipyrrole receptors 11 and 13 with four pyrrole rings exhibit 10(4)- and 10(2)-fold selectivity for dihydrogen phosphate, respectively, as inferred from competitive titrations in the presence of tetrabutylammonium acetate.

  2. Hydrogen Bonding in Phosphine Oxide/Phosphate-Phenol Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, R.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2010-01-01

    To develop a new solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) system for the removal of phenols and thiophenols from water, complex formation by hydrogen bonding of phosphine oxides and phosphates is studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and quantum chemical modeling. Six different computational m

  3. Polaron effects in the protonic conductor hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupu, D. (Inst. of Isotopic and Molecular Technology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)); Grecu, R. (Inst. of Chemistry, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)); Biris, A.R. (Inst. of Isotopic and Molecular Technology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania))

    1993-08-01

    The isotope effects on the conductivity of hydrogen uranyl phosphate reveal ionic polaron effects in this solid protonic conductor, in agreement with the small polaron theory. An absorption band is observed at 0.67 eV, which can be correlated with the conduction mechanism consisting in both tunnelling and over-barrier hopping processes. (orig.)

  4. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrels: D-Allulose 6-Phosphate 3-Epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan,K.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    phosphate group hydrogen bonds not only with the conserved motif but also with an active site loop following the sixth {beta}-strand, providing a potential structural mechanism for coupling substrate binding with catalysis.

  5. Phosphate-binding protein from Polaromonas JS666: purification, characterization, crystallization and sulfur SAD phasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegos, Vanessa R.; Hey, Louis; LaMirande, Jacob; Pfeffer, Rachel; Lipsh, Rosalie; Amitay, Moshe; Gonzalez, Daniel; Elias, Mikael (JCT-Israel); (UMM); (CNRS-UMR)

    2017-05-25

    Phosphate-binding proteins (PBPs) are key proteins that belong to the bacterial ABC-type phosphate transporters. PBPs are periplasmic (or membrane-anchored) proteins that capture phosphate anions from the environment and release them to the transmembrane transporter. Recent work has suggested that PBPs have evolved for high affinity as well as high selectivity. In particular, a short, unique hydrogen bond between the phosphate anion and an aspartate residue has been shown to be critical for selectivity, yet is not strictly conserved in PBPs. Here, the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 is focused on. Interestingly, this PBP is predicted to harbor different phosphate-binding residues to currently known PBPs. Here, it is shown that the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 is capable of binding phosphate, with a maximal binding activity at pH 8. Its structure is expected to reveal its binding-cleft configuration as well as its phosphate-binding mode. Here, the expression, purification, characterization, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data collection to 1.35 Å resolution of the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 are reported.

  6. Evaluation of intestinal phosphate binding to improve the safety profile of oral sodium phosphate bowel cleansing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef Robijn

    Full Text Available Prior to colonoscopy, bowel cleansing is performed for which frequently oral sodium phosphate (OSP is used. OSP results in significant hyperphosphatemia and cases of acute kidney injury (AKI referred to as acute phosphate nephropathy (APN; characterized by nephrocalcinosis are reported after OSP use, which led to a US-FDA warning. To improve the safety profile of OSP, it was evaluated whether the side-effects of OSP could be prevented with intestinal phosphate binders. Hereto a Wistar rat model of APN was developed. OSP administration (2 times 1.2 g phosphate by gavage with a 12h time interval induced bowel cleansing (severe diarrhea and significant hyperphosphatemia (21.79 ± 5.07 mg/dl 6h after the second OSP dose versus 8.44 ± 0.97 mg/dl at baseline. Concomitantly, serum PTH levels increased fivefold and FGF-23 levels showed a threefold increase, while serum calcium levels significantly decreased from 11.29 ± 0.53 mg/dl at baseline to 8.68 ± 0.79 mg/dl after OSP. OSP administration induced weaker NaPi-2a staining along the apical proximal tubular membrane. APN was induced: serum creatinine increased (1.5 times baseline and nephrocalcinosis developed (increased renal calcium and phosphate content and calcium phosphate deposits on Von Kossa stained kidney sections. Intestinal phosphate binding (lanthanum carbonate or aluminum hydroxide was not able to attenuate the OSP induced side-effects. In conclusion, a clinically relevant rat model of APN was developed. Animals showed increased serum phosphate levels similar to those reported in humans and developed APN. No evidence was found for an improved safety profile of OSP by using intestinal phosphate binders.

  7. Phosphate binding therapy in dialysis patients: focus on lanthanum carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail A Mohammed

    2008-11-01

    carbonate, dialysis, phosphate binding

  8. Phosphate binding energy and catalysis by small and large molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Janet R; Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2008-04-01

    Catalysis is an important process in chemistry and enzymology. The rate acceleration for any catalyzed reaction is the difference between the activation barriers for the uncatalyzed (Delta G(HO)(#)) and catalyzed (Delta G(Me)(#)) reactions, which corresponds to the binding energy (Delta G(S)(#) = Delta G(Me)(#)-Delta G(HO)(#)) for transfer of the reaction transition state from solution to the catalyst. This transition state binding energy is a fundamental descriptor of catalyzed reactions, and its evaluation is necessary for an understanding of any and all catalytic processes. We have evaluated the transition state binding energies obtained from interactions between low molecular weight metal ion complexes or high molecular weight protein catalysts and the phosphate group of bound substrate. Work on catalysis by small molecules is exemplified by studies on the mechanism of action of Zn2(1)(H2O). A binding energy of Delta G(S)(#) = -9.6 kcal/mol was determined for Zn2(1)(H2O)-catalyzed cleavage of the RNA analogue HpPNP. The pH-rate profile for this cleavage reaction showed that there is optimal catalytic activity at high pH, where the catalyst is in the basic form [Zn2(1)(HO-)]. However, it was also shown that the active form of the catalyst is Zn2(1)(H2O) and that this recognizes the C2-oxygen-ionized substrate in the cleavage reaction. The active catalyst Zn2(1)(H2O) shows a high affinity for oxyphosphorane transition state dianions and a stable methyl phosphate transition state analogue, compared with the affinity for phosphate monoanion substrates. The transition state binding energies, Delta G(S)(#), for cleavage of HpPNP catalyzed by a variety of Zn2+ and Eu3+ metal ion complexes reflect the increase in the catalytic activity with increasing total positive charge at the catalyst. These values of Delta G(S)(#) are affected by interactions between the metal ion and its ligands, but these effects are small in comparison with Delta G(S)(#) observed for catalysis

  9. A facile synthesis of ω-aminoalkyl ammonium hydrogen phosphates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Bo Kong; Xiao Yong Zhou; Yang Yang; Xing Yi Xie

    2012-01-01

    A series of ω-aminoalkyl ammonium hydrogen phosphates were synthesized through a simple and efficient three-step method.The starting materials,ω-aminoalkyl alcohols (AC-n,with carbon number n =3,4,5,6),were amino-protected with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (Fmoc-Cl),followed by phosphorylation with POCl3 and deprotection in piperidine/DMF The structures of each intermediate and final product were confirmed by 1H NMR,FTIR and mass spectrum.The yield of each step was about 77-92%,with a total yield higher than 56%.This new method was superior in low-cost raw materials,mild reaction temperatures (0-25 ℃) and easy purification methods.

  10. The presence of phosphate-binding protein in inner mitochondrial membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatase,Osamu

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate-binding protein(s was found in the inner mitochondrial membrane of calf heart by Sephadex G-200 and G-25 gel filtration. The binding activity was inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and competed by a large amount of cold phosphate. The amount of phosphate bound to the fraction was 29 nmoles per mg of protein. Affinity chromatography with phosphate-bound Sepharose 4B confirmed the presence of phosphate-binding protein(s in the active fraction of mitochondrial membrane fractionated by gel filtration.

  11. Binding of reactive organophosphate by oximes via hydrogen bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrea Pappalardo; Maria E Amato; Francesco P Ballistreri; Valentina La Paglia Fragola; Gaetano A Tomaselli; Rosa Maria Toscano; Giuseppe Trusso Sfrazzetto

    2013-07-01

    In this contribution, the ability of simple oximes to bind a well-known nerve agent simulant (dimethylmethylphosphonate, DMMP) via hydrogen bond is reported. UV/Vis measurements indicate the formation of 1:1 complexes. 1H-, 31P-NMR titrations and T-ROESY experiments confirm that oximes bind the organophosphate via hydrogen bond.

  12. Phosphate binding protein as the biorecognition element in a biosensor for phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Lyndon L E.; Deo, Sapna K.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2004-01-01

    This work explores the potential use of a member of the periplasmic family of binding proteins, the phosphate binding protein (PBP), as the biorecognition element in a sensing scheme for the detection of inorganic phosphate (Pi). The selectivity of this protein originates from its natural role which, in Escherichia coli, is to serve as the initial receptor for the highly specific translocation of Pi to the cytoplasm. The single polypeptide chain of PBP is folded into two similar domains connected by three short peptide linkages that serve as a hinge. The Pi binding site is located deep within the cleft between the two domains. In the presence of the ligand, the two globular domains engulf the former in a hinge-like manner. The resultant conformational change constitutes the basis of the sensor development. A mutant of PBP (MPBP), where an alanine was replaced by a cysteine residue, was prepared by site-directed mutagenesis using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The mutant was expressed, from plasmid pSD501, in the periplasmic space of E. coli and purified in a single chromatographic step on a perfusion anion-exchange column. Site-specific labeling was achieved by attaching the fluorophore, N-[2-(1-maleimidyl)ethyl]-7-(diethylamino)coumarin-3-carboxamide (MDCC), to the protein through the sulfhydryl group of the cysteine moiety. Steady-state fluorescence studies of the MPBP-MDCC conjugate showed a change in the intensity of the signal upon addition of Pi. Calibration curves for Pi were constructed by relating the intensity of the fluorescence signal with the amount of analyte present in the sample. The sensing system was first developed and optimized on a spectrofluorometer using ml volumes of sample. It was then adapted to be used on a microtiter plate arrangement with microliter sample volumes. The system's versatility was finally proven by developing a fiber optic fluorescence-based sensor for monitoring Pi. In all three cases the detection limits for the

  13. Binding Mode and Selectivity of Steroids towards Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase from the Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Ortiz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH plays a housekeeping role in cell metabolism by generating reducing power (NADPH and fueling the production of nucleotide precursors (ribose-5-phosphate. Based on its indispensability for pathogenic parasites from the genus Trypanosoma, G6PDH is considered a drug target candidate. Several steroid-like scaffolds were previously reported to target the activity of G6PDH. Epiandrosterone (EA is an uncompetitive inhibitor of trypanosomal G6PDH for which its binding site to the enzyme remains unknown. Molecular simulation studies with the structure of Trypanosoma cruzi G6PDH revealed that EA binds in a pocket close to the G6P binding-site and protrudes into the active site blocking the interaction between substrates and hence catalysis. Site directed mutagenesis revealed the important steroid-stabilizing effect of residues (L80, K83 and K84 located on helix α-1 of T. cruzi G6PDH. The higher affinity and potency of 16α-Br EA by T. cruzi G6PDH is explained by the formation of a halogen bond with the hydrogen from the terminal amide of the NADP+-nicotinamide. At variance with the human enzyme, the inclusion of a 21-hydroxypregnane-20-one moiety to a 3β-substituted steroid is detrimental for T. cruzi G6PDH inhibition. The species-specificity of certain steroid derivatives towards the parasite G6PDH and the corresponding biochemically validated binding models disclosed in this work may prove valuable for the development of selective inhibitors against the pathogen’s enzyme.

  14. Binding Mode and Selectivity of Steroids towards Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase from the Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Cecilia; Moraca, Francesca; Medeiros, Andrea; Botta, Maurizio; Hamilton, Niall; Comini, Marcelo A

    2016-03-17

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) plays a housekeeping role in cell metabolism by generating reducing power (NADPH) and fueling the production of nucleotide precursors (ribose-5-phosphate). Based on its indispensability for pathogenic parasites from the genus Trypanosoma, G6PDH is considered a drug target candidate. Several steroid-like scaffolds were previously reported to target the activity of G6PDH. Epiandrosterone (EA) is an uncompetitive inhibitor of trypanosomal G6PDH for which its binding site to the enzyme remains unknown. Molecular simulation studies with the structure of Trypanosoma cruzi G6PDH revealed that EA binds in a pocket close to the G6P binding-site and protrudes into the active site blocking the interaction between substrates and hence catalysis. Site directed mutagenesis revealed the important steroid-stabilizing effect of residues (L80, K83 and K84) located on helix α-1 of T. cruzi G6PDH. The higher affinity and potency of 16α-Br EA by T. cruzi G6PDH is explained by the formation of a halogen bond with the hydrogen from the terminal amide of the NADP+-nicotinamide. At variance with the human enzyme, the inclusion of a 21-hydroxypregnane-20-one moiety to a 3β-substituted steroid is detrimental for T. cruzi G6PDH inhibition. The species-specificity of certain steroid derivatives towards the parasite G6PDH and the corresponding biochemically validated binding models disclosed in this work may prove valuable for the development of selective inhibitors against the pathogen's enzyme.

  15. MLKL Compromises Plasma Membrane Integrity by Binding to Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates

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    Yves Dondelinger

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Although mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL protein has emerged as a specific and crucial protein for necroptosis induction, how MLKL transduces the death signal remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the full four-helical bundle domain (4HBD in the N-terminal region of MLKL is required and sufficient to induce its oligomerization and trigger cell death. Moreover, we found that a patch of positively charged amino acids on the surface of the 4HBD binds to phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs and allows recruitment of MLKL to the plasma membrane. Importantly, we found that recombinant MLKL, but not a mutant lacking these positive charges, induces leakage of PIP-containing liposomes as potently as BAX, supporting a model in which MLKL induces necroptosis by directly permeabilizing the plasma membrane. Accordingly, we found that inhibiting the formation of PI(5P and PI(4,5P2 specifically inhibits tumor necrosis factor (TNF-mediated necroptosis but not apoptosis.

  16. Heme binding properties of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Luciana; Collins, Daniel; Brassard, Julie; Chakravarti, Ritu; Vempati, Rajesh; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Dawson, John H; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2012-10-30

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme that also functions in transcriptional regulation, oxidative stress, vesicular trafficking, and apoptosis. Because GAPDH is required for the insertion of cellular heme into inducible nitric oxide synthase [Chakravarti, R., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 18004-18009], we extensively characterized the heme binding properties of GAPDH. Substoichiometric amounts of ferric heme bound to GAPDH (one heme per GAPDH tetramer) to form a low-spin complex with UV-visible maxima at 362, 418, and 537 nm and when reduced to ferrous gave maxima at 424, 527, and 559 nm. Ferric heme association and dissociation rate constants at 10 °C were as follows: k(on) = 17800 M(-1) s(-1), k(off1) = 7.0 × 10(-3) s(-1), and k(off2) = 3.3 × 10(-4) s(-1) (giving approximate affinities of 19-390 nM). Ferrous heme bound more poorly to GAPDH and dissociated with a k(off) of 4.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). Magnetic circular dichroism, resonance Raman, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic data on the ferric, ferrous, and ferrous-CO complexes of GAPDH showed that the heme is bis-ligated with His as the proximal ligand. The distal ligand in the ferric complex was not displaced by CN(-) or N(3)(-) but in the ferrous complex could be displaced by CO at a rate of 1.75 s(-1) (for >0.2 mM CO). Studies with heme analogues revealed selectivity toward the coordinating metal and porphyrin ring structure. The GAPDH-heme complex was isolated from bacteria induced to express rabbit GAPDH in the presence of δ-aminolevulinic acid. Our finding of heme binding to GAPDH expands the protein's potential roles. The strength, selectivity, reversibility, and redox sensitivity of heme binding to GAPDH are consistent with it performing heme sensing or heme chaperone-like functions in cells.

  17. Kinetic and thermodynamic evaluation of phosphate ions binding onto sevelamer hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsiddig, Reem; Hughes, Helen; Owens, Eleanor; O' Reilly, Niall J; O'Grady, David; McLoughlin, Peter

    2014-10-20

    Sevelamer hydrochloride is the first non-aluminium, non-calcium-based phosphate binder developed for the management of hyperphosphatemia in end stage renal diseases. It is a synthetic ion-exchange polymer which binds and removes phosphate ions due to the high content of cationic charge associated with protonated amine groups on the polymer matrix. This is the first in-depth study investigating phosphate removal in vitro from aqueous solutions using commercially available sevelamer hydrochloride at physiological conditions of phosphate level, pH and temperature. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of phosphate binding onto the sevelamer hydrochloride particles were evaluated in order to define the binding process. A series of kinetic studies were carried out in order to delineate the effect of initial phosphate concentration, absorbent dose and temperature on the rate of binding. The results were analysed using three kinetic models with the best-fit of the experimental data obtained using a pseudo-second order model. Thermodynamic parameters provide in-depth information on inherent energetic changes that are associated with binding. Free energy ΔG°, enthalpy ΔH°, and entropy ΔS° changes were calculated in this study in order to assess the relationship of these parameters to polymer morphology. The binding reaction was found to be a spontaneous endothermic process with increasing entropy at the solid-liquid interface.

  18. Studies of Reversible Hydrogen Binding in Nano- Sized Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Lesničenoks, Pēteris; Zemītis, Jānis; Kleperis, Jānis; Čikvaidze, Georgijs; Ignatāns, Reinis

    2015-01-01

    Experimental review of materials suitable for reversible hydrogen binding in nanoporous and nanosized structures of materials, based on natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) and graphene (exfoliated electrochemically from raw graphite), were analyzed. Characterization of materials with SEM, XRD, EDS and Raman spectroscopy methods and aspects of synthesis of a nanostructured zeolite and a few-layer graphite material was done in this work. It was established from gas analyzer results that hydrogen m...

  19. Phosphate binding by natural iron-rich colloids in streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baken, S.; Moens, C.; Griffioen, J.J.; Smolders, E.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in natural waters may be bound to iron (Fe) bearing colloids. However, the natural variation in composition and P binding strength of these colloids remain unclear. We related the composition of "coarse colloids" (colloids in the 0.1-1.2 μm size range) in 47 Belgian streams to the

  20. Phosphate binding by natural iron-rich colloids in streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baken, S.; Moens, C.; Griffioen, J.J.; Smolders, E.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in natural waters may be bound to iron (Fe) bearing colloids. However, the natural variation in composition and P binding strength of these colloids remain unclear. We related the composition of "coarse colloids" (colloids in the 0.1-1.2 μm size range) in 47 Belgian streams to the che

  1. DING proteins; novel members of a prokaryotic phosphate-binding protein superfamily which extends into the eukaryotic kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna, Anne; Bernier, François; Chabrière, Eric; Perera, Tekla; Scott, Ken

    2008-01-01

    PstS proteins are the cell-bound phosphate-binding elements of the ubiquitous bacterial ABC phosphate uptake mechanisms. Primary and tertiary structures, characteristic of pstS proteins, are conserved in proteins, which are expressed in secretory operons and induced by phosphate deprivation, in Pseudomonas species. There are two subsets of these proteins; AP proteins, which are alkaline phosphatases, and DING proteins, named for their N-terminal sequence, which are phosphate-binding proteins. Both form elements of a proposed phosphate-scavenging system in pseudomonads. DING proteins have also been isolated from many eukaryotic sources, and are associated with both normal and pathological functions in mammals. Their phosphate-binding function suggests a role in biomineralization, but the ability to bind other ligands may be related to signal transduction in eukaryotes. Though it has been claimed that all such proteins may originate from pseudomonads, many eukaryotic DING proteins have unique features which are incompatible with a bacterial origin.

  2. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Debasish

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure, function and reaction mechanism of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH have been extensively studied. Based on these studies, three anion binding sites have been identified, one 'Ps' site (for binding the C-3 phosphate of the substrate and two sites, 'Pi' and 'new Pi', for inorganic phosphate. According to the original flip-flop model, the substrate phosphate group switches from the 'Pi' to the 'Ps' site during the multistep reaction. In light of the discovery of the 'new Pi' site, a modified flip-flop mechanism, in which the C-3 phosphate of the substrate binds to the 'new Pi' site and flips to the 'Ps' site before the hydride transfer, was proposed. An alternative model based on a number of structures of B. stearothermophilus GAPDH ternary complexes (non-covalent and thioacyl intermediate proposes that in the ternary Michaelis complex the C-3 phosphate binds to the 'Ps' site and flips from the 'Ps' to the 'new Pi' site during or after the redox step. Results We determined the crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum GAPDH in the apo and holo (enzyme + NAD state and the structure of the ternary enzyme-cofactor-substrate complex using an active site mutant enzyme. The C. parvum GAPDH complex was prepared by pre-incubating the enzyme with substrate and cofactor, thereby allowing free movement of the protein structure and substrate molecules during their initial encounter. Sulfate and phosphate ions were excluded from purification and crystallization steps. The quality of the electron density map at 2Å resolution allowed unambiguous positioning of the substrate. In three subunits of the homotetramer the C-3 phosphate group of the non-covalently bound substrate is in the 'new Pi' site. A concomitant movement of the phosphate binding loop is observed in these three subunits. In the fourth subunit the C-3 phosphate occupies an unexpected site not seen before and the phosphate binding loop remains in

  3. Simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewater by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Tokumura, Masahiro; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The zero-valent iron (ZVI) wastewater treatment has been applied to simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewaters. The simultaneous removal occurs by the reactions performed due to the sequential transformation of ZVI under the acidic condition. Fortunately the solution pH of semiconductor acidic wastewaters is low which is effective for the sequential transformation of ZVI. Firstly the reduction of nitrate is taken place by electrons generated by the corrosion of ZVI under acidic conditions. Secondly the ferrous ion generated by the corrosion of ZVI reacts with hydrogen peroxide and generates ·OH radical (Fenton reaction). The Fenton reaction consists of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and the generation of ferric ion. Finally phosphate precipitates out with iron ions. In the simultaneous removal process, 1.6 mM nitrate, 9.0 mM hydrogen peroxide and 1.0 mM phosphate were completely removed by ZVI within 100, 15 and 15 min, respectively. The synergy among the reactions for the removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate was found. In the individual pollutant removal experiment, the removal of phosphate by ZVI was limited to 80% after 300 min. Its removal rate was considerably improved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and the complete removal of phosphate was achieved after 15 min.

  4. Engineering the pentose phosphate pathway to improve hydrogen yield in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Mi; Cho, Han-Saem; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Park, Jong Moon

    2011-12-01

    Among various routes for the biological hydrogen production, the NAD(P)H-dependent pentose phosphate (PP) pathway is the most efficient for the dark fermentation. Few studies, however, have focused on the glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase, encoded by zwf, as a key enzyme activating the PP pathway. Although the gluconeogenic activity is essential for activating the PP pathway, it is difficult to enhance the NADPH production by regulating only this activity because the gluconeogenesis is robust and highly sensitive to concentrations of glucose and AMP inside the cell. In this study, the FBPase II (encoded by glpX), a regulation-insensitive enzyme in the gluconeogenic pathway, was activated. Physiological studies of several recombinant, ferredoxin-dependent hydrogenase system-containing Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains showed that overexpression of glpX alone could increase the hydrogen yield by 1.48-fold compared to a strain with the ferredoxin-dependent hydrogenase system only; the co-overexpression of glpX with zwf increased the hydrogen yield further to 2.32-fold. These results indicate that activation of the PP pathway by glpX overexpression-enhanced gluconeogenic flux is crucial for the increase of NAD(P)H-dependent hydrogen production in E. coli BL21(DE3).

  5. Inositol phosphates and phosphoinositides activate insulin-degrading enzyme, while phosphoinositides also mediate binding to endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eun Suk; Jang, HyeIn; Guo, Hou-Fu; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Morris, Andrew J; Galperin, Emilia; Rodgers, David W; Hersh, Louis B

    2017-04-04

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) hydrolyzes bioactive peptides, including insulin, amylin, and the amyloid β peptides. Polyanions activate IDE toward some substrates, yet an endogenous polyanion activator has not yet been identified. Here we report that inositol phosphates (InsPs) and phosphatdidylinositol phosphates (PtdInsPs) serve as activators of IDE. InsPs and PtdInsPs interact with the polyanion-binding site located on an inner chamber wall of the enzyme. InsPs activate IDE by up to ∼95-fold, affecting primarily Vmax The extent of activation and binding affinity correlate with the number of phosphate groups on the inositol ring, with phosphate positional effects observed. IDE binds PtdInsPs from solution, immobilized on membranes, or presented in liposomes. Interaction with PtdInsPs, likely PtdIns(3)P, plays a role in localizing IDE to endosomes, where the enzyme reportedly encounters physiological substrates. Thus, InsPs and PtdInsPs can serve as endogenous modulators of IDE activity, as well as regulators of its intracellular spatial distribution.

  6. Spectrin interactions with globin chains in the presence of phosphate metabolites and hydrogen peroxide: implications for thalassaemia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Poppy Datta; Sudipa Chakrabarty; Amit Chakrabarty; Abhijit Chakrabarti

    2007-09-01

    We have shown the differential interactions of the erythroid skeletal protein spectrin with the globin subunits of adult haemoglobin (HbA); these indicate a preference for -globin over that for -globin and intact HbA in an adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent manner. The presence of Mg/ATP led to an appreciable decrease in the binding affinity of the -globin chain to spectrin and the overall yield of globin–spectrin cross-linked complexes formed in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Similar effects were also seen in the presence of 2-,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3 DPG), the other important phosphate metabolite of erythrocytes. The binding affinity and yield of cross-linked high molecular weight complexes (HMWCs) formed under oxidative conditions were significantly higher in -globin compared with intact haemoglobin, HbA and the -globin chain. The results of this study indicate a possible correlation of the preferential spectrin binding of the -globin chain over that of the -globin in the haemoglobin disorder -thalassaemia.

  7. Competition between transferrin and the serum ligands citrate and phosphate for the binding of aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wesley R; Wang, Zhepeng; Hamada, Yahia Z

    2003-05-19

    A key issue regarding the speciation of Al(3+) in serum is how well the ligands citric acid and phosphate can compete with the iron transport protein serum transferrin for the aluminum. Previous studies have attempted to measure binding constants for each ligand separately, but experimental problems make it very difficult to obtain stability constants with the accuracy required to make a meaningful comparison between these ligands. In this study, effective binding constants for Al-citrate and Al-phosphate at pH 7.4 have been determined using difference UV spectroscopy to monitor the direct competition between these ligands and transferrin. The analysis of this competition equilibrium also includes the binding of citrate and phosphate as anions to apotransferrin. The effective binding constants are 10(11.59) for the 1:1 Al-citrate complexes and 10(14.90) for the 1:2 Al-citrate complexes. The effective binding constant for the 1:2 Al-phosphate complex is 10(12.02). No 1:1 Al-phosphate complex was detected. Speciation calculations based on these effective binding constants indicate that, at serum concentrations of citrate and phosphate, citrate will be the primary low-molecular-mass ligand for aluminum. Formal stability constants for the Al-citrate system have also been determined by potentiometric methods. This equilibrium system is quite complex, and information from both electrospray mass spectrometry and difference UV experiments has been used to select the best model for fitting the potentiometric data. The mass spectra contain peaks that have been assigned to complexes having aluminum:citrate stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, 2:2, 2:3, and 3:3. The difference UV results were used to determine the stability constant for Al(H(-1)cta)-, which was then used in the least-squares fitting of the potentiometric data to determine stability constants for Al(Hcta)+, Al(cta), Al(cta)2(3-), Al(H(-1)cta)(cta)(4-), Al2(H(-1)cta)2(2-), and Al3(H(-1)cta)3(OH)(4-).

  8. Insights into Phosphate Cooperativity and Influence of Substrate Modifications on Binding and Catalysis of Hexameric Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Giuseppe, Priscila O.; Martins, Nadia H.; Meza, Andreia N.; dos Santos, Camila R.; Pereira, Humberto D’Muniz; Murakami, Mario T.

    2012-01-01

    The hexameric purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Bacillus subtilis (BsPNP233) displays great potential to produce nucleoside analogues in industry and can be exploited in the development of new anti-tumor gene therapies. In order to provide structural basis for enzyme and substrates rational optimization, aiming at those applications, the present work shows a thorough and detailed structural description of the binding mode of substrates and nucleoside analogues to the active site of the hexameric BsPNP233. Here we report the crystal structure of BsPNP233 in the apo form and in complex with 11 ligands, including clinically relevant compounds. The crystal structure of six ligands (adenine, 2′deoxyguanosine, aciclovir, ganciclovir, 8-bromoguanosine, 6-chloroguanosine) in complex with a hexameric PNP are presented for the first time. Our data showed that free bases adopt alternative conformations in the BsPNP233 active site and indicated that binding of the co-substrate (2′deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate might contribute for stabilizing the bases in a favorable orientation for catalysis. The BsPNP233-adenosine complex revealed that a hydrogen bond between the 5′ hydroxyl group of adenosine and Arg43* side chain contributes for the ribosyl radical to adopt an unusual C3’-endo conformation. The structures with 6-chloroguanosine and 8-bromoguanosine pointed out that the Cl6 and Br8 substrate modifications seem to be detrimental for catalysis and can be explored in the design of inhibitors for hexameric PNPs from pathogens. Our data also corroborated the competitive inhibition mechanism of hexameric PNPs by tubercidin and suggested that the acyclic nucleoside ganciclovir is a better inhibitor for hexameric PNPs than aciclovir. Furthermore, comparative structural analyses indicated that the replacement of Ser90 by a threonine in the B. cereus hexameric adenosine phosphorylase (Thr91) is responsible for the lack of negative cooperativity of phosphate binding in this

  9. Insights into phosphate cooperativity and influence of substrate modifications on binding and catalysis of hexameric purine nucleoside phosphorylases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila O de Giuseppe

    Full Text Available The hexameric purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Bacillus subtilis (BsPNP233 displays great potential to produce nucleoside analogues in industry and can be exploited in the development of new anti-tumor gene therapies. In order to provide structural basis for enzyme and substrates rational optimization, aiming at those applications, the present work shows a thorough and detailed structural description of the binding mode of substrates and nucleoside analogues to the active site of the hexameric BsPNP233. Here we report the crystal structure of BsPNP233 in the apo form and in complex with 11 ligands, including clinically relevant compounds. The crystal structure of six ligands (adenine, 2'deoxyguanosine, aciclovir, ganciclovir, 8-bromoguanosine, 6-chloroguanosine in complex with a hexameric PNP are presented for the first time. Our data showed that free bases adopt alternative conformations in the BsPNP233 active site and indicated that binding of the co-substrate (2'deoxyribose 1-phosphate might contribute for stabilizing the bases in a favorable orientation for catalysis. The BsPNP233-adenosine complex revealed that a hydrogen bond between the 5' hydroxyl group of adenosine and Arg(43* side chain contributes for the ribosyl radical to adopt an unusual C3'-endo conformation. The structures with 6-chloroguanosine and 8-bromoguanosine pointed out that the Cl(6 and Br(8 substrate modifications seem to be detrimental for catalysis and can be explored in the design of inhibitors for hexameric PNPs from pathogens. Our data also corroborated the competitive inhibition mechanism of hexameric PNPs by tubercidin and suggested that the acyclic nucleoside ganciclovir is a better inhibitor for hexameric PNPs than aciclovir. Furthermore, comparative structural analyses indicated that the replacement of Ser(90 by a threonine in the B. cereus hexameric adenosine phosphorylase (Thr(91 is responsible for the lack of negative cooperativity of phosphate binding

  10. Inactive mutants of human pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase: a possible role for a noncatalytic pyridoxal 5'-phosphate tight binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatge, Mohini S; Karve, Sayali S; David, Tanya M S; Ahmed, Mostafa H; Musayev, Faik N; Cunningham, Kendra; Schirch, Verne; Safo, Martin K

    2016-05-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) is a cofactor for many vitamin B6-requiring enzymes that are important for the synthesis of neurotransmitters. Pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase (PNPO) is one of two enzymes that produce PLP. Some 16 known mutations in human PNPO (hPNPO), including R95C and R229W, lead to deficiency of PLP in the cell and have been shown to cause neonatal epileptic encephalopathy (NEE). This disorder has no effective treatment, and is often fatal unless treated with PLP. In this study, we show that R95C hPNPO exhibits a 15-fold reduction in affinity for the FMN cofactor, a 71-fold decrease in affinity for the substrate PNP, a 4.9-fold decrease in specific activity, and a 343-fold reduction in catalytic activity, compared to the wild-type enzyme. We have reported similar findings for R229W hPNPO. This report also shows that wild-type, R95C and R229W hPNPO bind PLP tightly at a noncatalytic site and transfer it to activate an apo-B6 enzyme into the catalytically active holo-form. We also show for the first time that hPNPO forms specific interactions with several B6 enzymes with dissociation constants ranging from 0.3 to 12.3 μm. Our results suggest a possible in vivo role for the tight binding of PLP in hPNPO, whether wild-type or variant, by protecting the very reactive PLP, and transferring this PLP directly to activate apo-B6 enzymes.

  11. Human-Phosphate-Binding-Protein inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candolfi Ermanno

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Human Phosphate-Binding protein (HPBP is a serendipitously discovered lipoprotein that binds phosphate with high affinity. HPBP belongs to the DING protein family, involved in various biological processes like cell cycle regulation. We report that HPBP inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication in T cell line, primary peripherical blood lymphocytes and primary macrophages. We show that HPBP is efficient in naïve and HIV-1 AZT-resistant strains. Our results revealed HPBP as a new and potent anti HIV molecule that inhibits transcription of the virus, which has not yet been targeted by HAART and therefore opens new strategies in the treatment of HIV infection.

  12. Regulation of in vitro calcium phosphate mineralization by combinatorially selected hydroxyapatite-binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungormus, Mustafa; Fong, Hanson; Kim, Il Won; Evans, John Spencer; Tamerler, Candan; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2008-03-01

    We report selection and characterization of hydroxyapatite-binding heptapeptides from a peptide-phage library and demonstrate the effects of two peptides, with different binding affinities and structural properties, on the mineralization of calcium phosphate mineral. In vitro mineralization studies carried out using one strong- and one weak-binding peptide, HABP1 and HABP2, respectively, revealed that the former exhibited a drastic outcome on mineralization kinetics and particle morphology. Strong-binding peptide yielded significantly larger crystals, as observed by electron microscopy, in comparison to those formed in the presence of a weak-binding peptide or in the negative control. Molecular structural studies carried out by circular dichroism revealed that HABP1 and HABP2 differed in their secondary structure and conformational stability. The results indicate that sequence, structure, and molecular stability strongly influence the mineralization activity of these peptides. The implication of the research is that the combinatorially selected short-sequence peptides may be used in the restoration or regeneration of hard tissues through their control over of the formation of calcium phosphate biominerals.

  13. Structural features of PhoX, one of the phosphate-binding proteins from Pho regulon of Xanthomonas citri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegos, Vanessa R.; Santos, Rodrigo M. L.; Medrano, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the ATP-Binding Cassette transporter for phosphate is encoded by the pstSCAB operon. PstS is the periplasmic component responsible for affinity and specificity of the system and has also been related to a regulatory role and chemotaxis during depletion of phosphate. Xanthomonas citri has two phosphate-binding proteins: PstS and PhoX, which are differentially expressed under phosphate limitation. In this work, we focused on PhoX characterization and comparison with PstS. The PhoX three-dimensional structure was solved in a closed conformation with a phosphate engulfed in the binding site pocket between two domains. Comparison between PhoX and PstS revealed that they originated from gene duplication, but despite their similarities they show significant differences in the region that interacts with the permeases. PMID:28542513

  14. Comparison of monofunctional and multifunctional monomers in phosphate binding molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangyang; Goswami, Kisholoy; Shimizu, Ken D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) prepared using a multifunctional and a monofunctional monomer were compared with respect to their affinities, selectivities, and imprinting efficiencies for organophosphates. This is of interest because multifunctional monomers have higher affinities than traditional monofunctional monomers for their target analytes and thus should yield MIPs with higher affinities and selectivities. However, polymers containing multifunctional monomer may also have a higher number of unselective, non-templated binding sites. This increase in background binding sites could lead to a decrease in the magnitude of the imprinting effect and in the selectivity of the MIP. Therefore, phosphate selective imprinted and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) were prepared using a novel multifunctional triurea monomer. The binding properties of these polymers were compared with polymers prepared using a monofunctional monourea monomer. The binding affinities and selectivities of the monomers, imprinted polymers, and NIPs were characterized by NMR titration, binding uptake studies, and binding isotherms. MIPs prepared with the triurea monomer showed higher binding affinity and selectivity for the diphenylphosphate anion in organic solvents than the MIPs prepared with the monofunctional monomer. Surprisingly, the binding properties of the NIPs revealed that the polymers prepared using the multifunctional and monofunctional monomers were very similar in affinity and selectivity. Thus, the multifunctional monomers increase not only the affinity of the MIP but also enhance the imprinting effect.

  15. Glucose-6-phosphate mediates activation of the carbohydrate responsive binding protein (ChREBP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming V. [Program of Cardiovascular Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Chen, Weiqin [Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Harmancey, Romain N. [Division of Cardiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Nuotio-Antar, Alli M.; Imamura, Minako; Saha, Pradip [Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Taegtmeyer, Heinrich [Division of Cardiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Chan, Lawrence, E-mail: lchan@bcm.tmc.edu [Program of Cardiovascular Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a Mondo family transcription factor that activates a number of glycolytic and lipogenic genes in response to glucose stimulation. We have previously reported that high glucose can activate the transcriptional activity of ChREBP independent of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated increase in nuclear entry and DNA binding. Here, we found that formation of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) is essential for glucose activation of ChREBP. The glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP is attenuated by D-mannoheptulose, a potent hexokinase inhibitor, as well as over-expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase); kinetics of activation of GAL4-ChREBP can be modified by exogenously expressed GCK. Further metabolism of G-6-P through the two major glucose metabolic pathways, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway, is not required for activation of ChREBP; over-expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) diminishes, whereas RNAi knockdown of the enzyme enhances, the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP, respectively. Moreover, the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), which is phosphorylated by hexokinase, but not further metabolized, effectively upregulates the transcription activity of ChREBP. In addition, over-expression of phosphofructokinase (PFK) 1 and 2, synergistically diminishes the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP. These multiple lines of evidence support the conclusion that G-6-P mediates the activation of ChREBP.

  16. Conversion of Oximes to Carbonyl Compounds by Triscetylpyridinium Tetrakis(oxodiperoxotungsto) Phosphate (PCWP)-mediated Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Toscano, Rosa M.; Gaetano Tomaselli; Antonio Rescifina; Ugo Chiacchio; Francesco P. Ballistreri

    2008-01-01

    Aromatic and aliphatic oximes have been deoximated in chloroform-water to the corresponding aldehydes with dilute hydrogen peroxide and triscetylpyridinium tetrakis (oxodiperoxotungsto) phosphate as catalyst. The presence of dipolarophiles in the reaction mixtures allows a competitive reaction that converts oximes into isoxazole and isoxazoline derivatives via the intermediate formation of nitrile oxide species.

  17. Conversion of Oximes to Carbonyl Compounds by Triscetylpyridinium Tetrakis(oxodiperoxotungsto Phosphate (PCWP-mediated Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M. Toscano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic and aliphatic oximes have been deoximated in chloroform-water to the corresponding aldehydes with dilute hydrogen peroxide and triscetylpyridinium tetrakis (oxodiperoxotungsto phosphate as catalyst. The presence of dipolarophiles in the reaction mixtures allows a competitive reaction that converts oximes into isoxazole and isoxazoline derivatives via the intermediate formation of nitrile oxide species.

  18. Solvent Extraction and QSPR of Catecholamines with a Bis(2-ethlhexyl) Hydrogen Phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizuka, Kazuharu.; Fujimoto, Yuko.; Ota, Keisuke.; Inoue, Katsutoshi. [Saga University, Saga (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    1999-02-01

    In order to develop an effective separation recess for catecholamine (CA), a basic investigation on solvent extraction of dopamine (DA), adrenaline (Ad) and noradrenaline (NA) from hydrochloric acid solution and their stripping is conducted at 30 degree C employing bis(2-ethylhexyl) hydrogen phosphate (D2EHPA) in chloroform, n-hexane and toluene as the organic diluents. From the dependencies of the distribution ratios on the concentrations of reactant species, i.e. CA, hydrogen ion and D2EHPA, it is elucidated that CA (RNH{sub 2}) is extracted with D2EHPA (HR`) according to the ion exchange mechanism, as the complex type, RNH{sub 3}R` (HR`){sub 3}, and the equilibrium constants (K{sub ex,CA}) for the extraction reactions are also evaluated. The quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) of K{sub ex,CA} values for each organic diluent is discussed using molecular modeling with semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations considering the solvent effect. (author)

  19. Disruption of NAD~+ binding site in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase affects its intranuclear interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manali; Phadke; Natalia; Krynetskaia; Anurag; Mishra; Carlos; Barrero; Salim; Merali; Scott; A; Gothe; Evgeny; Krynetskiy

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To characterize phosphorylation of human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GAPDH),and mobility of GAPDH in cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS:We used proteomics analysis to detect and characterize phosphorylation sites within human GAPDH. Site-specific mutagenesis and alanine scanning was then performed to evaluate functional significance of phosphorylation sites in the GAPDH polypeptide chain. Enzymatic properties of mutated GAPDH variants were assessed using kinetic studies. Intranuclear dynamics parameters(diffusion coefficient and the immobile fraction) were estimated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching(FRAP) experiments and confocal microscopy. Molecular modeling experiments were performed to estimate the effects of mutations on NAD+ cofactor binding.RESULTS:Using MALDI-TOF analysis,we identified novel phosphorylation sites within the NAD+ binding center of GAPDH at Y94,S98,and T99. Using polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-T99-containing peptide within GAPDH,we demonstrated accumulation of phospho-T99-GAPDH inthe nuclear fractions of A549,HCT116,and SW48 cancer cel s after cytotoxic stress. We performed site-mutagenesis,and estimated enzymatic properties,intranuclear distribution,and intranuclear mobility of GAPDH mutated variants. Site-mutagenesis at positions S98 and T99 in the NAD+ binding center reduced enzymatic activity of GAPDH due to decreased affinity to NAD+(Km = 741 ± 257 μmol/L in T99 I vs 57 ± 11.1 μmol/L in wild type GAPDH. Molecular modeling experiments revealed the effect of mutations on NAD+ binding with GAPDH. FRAP(fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching) analysis showed that mutations in NAD+ binding center of GAPDH abrogated its intranuclear interactions. CONCLUSION:Our results suggest an important functional role of phosphorylated amino acids in the NAD+ binding center in GAPDH interactions with its intranuclear partners.

  20. Homeodomain leucine zipper proteins bind to the phosphate response domain of the soybean VspB tripartite promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Z; Sadka, A; Morishige, D T; Mullet, J E

    2001-02-01

    The soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Williams 82) genes VspA and VspB encode vacuolar glycoprotein acid phosphatases that serve as vegetative storage proteins during seed fill and early stages of seedling growth. VspB expression is activated by jasmonates (JAs) and sugars and down-regulated by phosphate and auxin. Previous promoter studies demonstrated that VspB promoter sequences between -585 and -535 mediated responses to JA, and sequences between -535 and -401 mediated responses to sugars, phosphate, and auxin. In this study, the response domains were further delineated using transient expression of VspB promoter-beta-glucuronidase constructs in tobacco protoplasts. Sequences between -536 and -484 were identified as important for phosphate responses, whereas the region from -486 to -427 mediated sugar responses. Gel-shift and deoxyribonuclease-I footprinting assays revealed four DNA-binding sites between -611 and -451 of the soybean VspB promoter: one in the JA response domain, two in the phosphate response domain, and one binding site in the sugar response domain. The sequence CATTAATTAG present in the phosphate response domain binds soybean homeodomain leucine zipper proteins, suggesting a role for these transcription factors in phosphate-modulated gene expression.

  1. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is a surface-associated, fibronectin-binding protein of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, A; Kucknoor, A; Mundodi, V; Alderete, J F

    2009-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis colonizes the urogenital tract of humans and causes trichomonosis, the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted disease. We have shown an association of T. vaginalis with basement membrane extracellular matrix components, a property which we hypothesize is important for colonization and persistence. In this study, we identify a fibronectin (FN)-binding protein of T. vaginalis. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) from a library of hybridomas that inhibited the binding of T. vaginalis organisms to immobilized FN was identified. The MAb (called ws1) recognized a 39-kDa protein and was used to screen a cDNA expression library of T. vaginalis. A 1,086-bp reactive cDNA clone that encoded a protein of 362 amino acids with identity to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was obtained. The gapdh gene was cloned, and recombinant GAPDH (rGAPDH) was expressed in Escherichia coli cells. Natural GAPDH and rGAPDH bound to immobilized FN and to plasminogen and collagen but not to laminin. MAb ws1 inhibited binding to FN. GAPDH was detected on the surface of trichomonads and was upregulated in synthesis and surface expression by iron. Higher levels of binding to FN were seen for organisms grown in iron-replete medium than for organisms grown in iron-depleted medium. In addition, decreased synthesis of GAPDH by antisense transfection of T. vaginalis gave lower levels of organisms bound to FN and had no adverse effect on growth kinetics. Finally, GAPDH did not associate with immortalized vaginal epithelial cells (VECs), and neither GAPDH nor MAb ws1 inhibited the adherence of trichomonads to VECs. These results indicate that GAPDH is a surface-associated protein of T. vaginalis with alternative functions.

  2. Diacylglycerol pyrophosphate binds and inhibits the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in barley aleurone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorquiza, Paula Luján; Usorach, Javier; Racagni, Graciela; Villasuso, Ana Laura

    2016-04-01

    The aleurona cell is a model that allows the study of the antagonistic effect of gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Previous results of our laboratory demonstrated the involvement of phospholipids during the response to ABA and GA. ABA modulates the levels of diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol pyrophosphate (DAG, PA, DGPP) through the activities of phosphatidate phosphatases, phospholipase D, diacylglycerol kinase and phosphatidate kinase (PAP, PLD, DGK and PAK). PA and DGPP are key phospholipids in the response to ABA, since both are capable of modifying the hydrolitic activity of the aleurona. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanism of action of these phospholipids during the ABA signal. DGPP is an anionic phospholipid with a pyrophosphate group attached to diacylglycerol. The ionization of the pyrophosphate group may be important to allow electrostatic interactions between DGPP and proteins. To understand how DGPP mediates cell functions in barley aleurone, we used a DGPP affinity membrane assay to isolate DGPP-binding proteins from Hordeum vulgare, followed by mass spectrometric sequencing. A cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12) was identified for being bound to DGPP. To validate our method, the relatively abundant GAPDH was characterized with respect to its lipid-binding properties, by fat western blot. GAPDH antibody interacts with proteins that only bind to DGPP and PA. We also observed that ABA treatment increased GAPDH abundance and enzyme activity. The presence of phospholipids during GAPDH reaction modulated the GAPDH activity in ABA treated aleurone. These data suggest that DGPP binds to GAPDH and this DGPP and GAPDH interaction provides new evidences in the study of DGPP-mediated ABA responses in barley aleurone.

  3. Growth and characterization of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate crystals from single diffusion gel technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, K.; Dale Keefe, C. [Department of Chemistry, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2010-09-15

    Calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, CHPD) a dissolved mineral in urine is known to cause renal or bladder stones in both human and animals. Growth of CHPD or brushite using sodium metasilicate gel techniques followed by light and polarizing microscopic studies revealed its structural and morphological details. Crystal identity by powder x-ray diffraction confirmed the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic techniques as alternate methods for fast analysis of brushite crystals which could form as one type of renal stones. P-O-P asymmetric stretchings in both FT-IR (987.2, 874.1 and 792 cm{sup -1}) and FT-Raman (986.3 cm{sup -1}, 1057.6 cm{sup -1} and 875.2 cm{sup -1}) were found as characteristics of brushite crystals. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis revealed brushite crystallization purity using gel method by studying their endothermic peaks. This study incorporated a multidisciplinary approach in characterizing CHPD crystals grown in vitro to help formulate prevention or dissolution strategy in controlling urinary stone growth. Initial studies with 0.2 M citric acid ions as controlling agent in the nucleation of brushite crystals further support the presented approach. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Noriko, Fujii

    2009-06-01

    Tryptophanase, an enzyme with extreme absolute stereospecificity for optically active stereoisomers, catalyzes the synthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine and indole through a beta-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type, and has no activity on d-serine. We previously reported that tryptophanase changed its stereospecificity to degrade d-tryptophan in highly concentrated diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) solution. The present study provided the same stereospecific change seen in the d-tryptophan degradation reaction also occurs in tryptophan synthesis from d-serine. Tryptophanase became active to d-serine to synthesize l-tryptophan in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate. This reaction has never been reported before. d-serine seems to undergo beta-replacement via an enzyme-bonded alpha-aminoacylate intermediate to yield l-tryptophan.

  5. XPS evidence for structure-performance relationship in selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol on platinum systems supported on natural phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Carrillo, Jesús; Sebti, Jalila; Marinas, Alberto; Marinas, José M; Sebti, Said; Urbano, Francisco J

    2012-09-15

    Natural phosphates are an important natural resource in Morocco, which needs to be valorised. They can be used not only as fertilisers but also as catalysts. Here, we report for the first time on its use as support for platinum and the application of the resulting systems to the liquid-phase selective hydrogenation of an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compound (crotonaldehyde) to the corresponding unsaturated alcohol (crotyl alcohol), a process of interest in the production of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and fragrances. Catalytic results are related to the surface solid structure as determined by XPS. Therefore, the most active systems showed new surface interactions as evidenced by the appearance of new P, O, Ca, F and C peaks and the shift of Pt ones to lower binding energies. Further modification of the most active system with FeCl(2) led to 70% selectivity to crotyl alcohol at 34% conversion.

  6. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the phosphate-binding efficacy, side effects, and cost of therapy of calcium ketoglutarate granulate as compared with calcium carbonate tablets in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The study design used was a randomized, crossover open trial, and the main...

  7. Tryptophanase-Catalyzed l-Tryptophan Synthesis from d-Serine in the Presence of Diammonium Hydrogen Phosphate

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii Noriko; Haruka Ozaki; Takeshi Saito; Akihiko Shimada

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophanase, an enzyme with extreme absolute stereospecificity for optically active stereoisomers, catalyzes the synthesis of L-tryptophan from L-serine and indole through a β-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type, and has no activity on D-serine. We previously reported that tryptophanase changed its stereospecificity to degrade D-tryptophan in highly concentrated diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH4)2HPO4 solution. The present study provided the same stereospecific change seen in the...

  8. Tryptophanase-Catalyzed l-Tryptophan Synthesis from d-Serine in the Presence of Diammonium Hydrogen Phosphate

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophanase, an enzyme with extreme absolute stereospecificity for optically active stereoisomers, catalyzes the synthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine and indole through a β-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type, and has no activity on d-serine. We previously reported that tryptophanase changed its stereospecificity to degrade d-tryptophan in highly concentrated diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH4)2HPO4 solution. The present study provided the same stereospecific change seen in the...

  9. Phosphate binding reduces aortic angiotensin-converting enzyme and enhances nitric oxide bioactivity in experimental renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eräranta, Arttu; Törmänen, Suvi; Kööbi, Peeter; Vehmas, Tuija I; Lakkisto, Päivi; Tikkanen, Ilkka; Moilanen, Eeva; Niemelä, Onni; Mustonen, Jukka; Pörsti, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    Disturbed calcium-phosphorus metabolism is associated with increased kidney angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in experimental chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). However, information about the effects of phosphate binding and loading on vascular ACE is lacking. Fifteen weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy (NX), rats were placed on a phosphate-binding (NX+Ca, 3.0% Ca), phosphate-loading (NX+Pi, 1.5% Pi), or control diet for 12 weeks (NX and sham). Aortic ACE, blood pressure, plasma phosphate, and parathyroid hormone were increased in the NX and NX+Pi groups, but were reduced with phosphate binding. Endothelium-mediated relaxations of isolated mesenteric conduit artery rings to acetylcholine were impaired in the NX and NX+Pi groups, but did not differ from sham in NX+Ca rats. Experiments with nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibition in vitro suggested that the NO-mediated component of acetylcholine response was lower in the NX and NX+Pi groups, but did not differ from sham in NX+Ca rats. In all NX groups, aortic endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was reduced, while plasma and urine concentrations of NO metabolites were increased. Aortic nitrated proteins and calcification were increased in the NX and NX+Pi groups when compared with the NX+Ca and sham groups. Hypertension in the NX model of CRI was associated with reduced vasorelaxation, decreased eNOS, and increased ACE and nitrated proteins in the aorta. Phosphate binding with calcium carbonate enhanced vasorelaxation via endogenous NO and suppressed elevation of ACE and nitrated proteins, suggesting reduced vascular oxidative stress. Our findings support the view that correction of the calcium-phosphorus balance prevents CRI-induced vascular pathophysiology.

  10. D-Ribulose 5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase: Functional and Structural Relationships to Members of the Ribulose-Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrel Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akana,J.; Federov, A.; Federov, E.; Novak, W.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    The 'ribulose phosphate binding' superfamily defined by the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database is considered the result of divergent evolution from a common ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8}-barrel ancestor. The superfamily includes D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), and 3-keto-L-gulonate 6-phosphate decarboxylase (KGPDC), members of the OMPDC suprafamily, as well as enzymes involved in histidine and tryptophan biosynthesis that utilize phosphorylated metabolites as substrates. We now report studies of the functional and structural relationships of RPE to the members of the superfamily. As suggested by the results of crystallographic studies of the RPEs from rice and Plasmodium falciparum, the RPE from Streptococcus pyogenes is activated by Zn{sup 2+} which binds with a stoichiometry of one ion per polypeptide. Although wild type RPE has a high affinity for Zn{sup 2+} and inactive apoenzyme cannot be prepared, the affinity for Zn{sup 2+} is decreased by alanine substitutions for the two histidine residues that coordinate the Zn{sup 2+} ion (H34A and H67A); these mutant proteins can be prepared in an inactive, metal-free form and activated by exogenous Zn{sup 2+}. The crystal structure of the RPE was solved at 1.8 Angstroms resolution in the presence of D-xylitol 5-phosphate, an inert analogue of the D-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate. This structure suggests that the 2,3-enediolate intermediate in the 1,1-proton transfer reaction is stabilized by bidentate coordination to the Zn{sup 2+} that also is liganded to His 34, Asp 36, His 67, and Asp 176; the carboxylate groups of the Asp residues are positioned also to function as the acid/base catalysts. Although the conformation of the bound analogue resembles those of ligands bound in the active sites of OMPDC and KGPDC, the identities of the active site residues that coordinate the essential Zn{sup 2+} and participate as acid/base catalysts

  11. A conserved loop in polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) essential for both RNA and ADP/phosphate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Mazzantini, Elisa; Nardini, Marco; Regonesi, Maria Elena; Greco, Claudio; Briani, Federica; De Gioia, Luca; Dehò, Gianni; Tortora, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) reversibly catalyzes RNA phosphorolysis and polymerization of nucleoside diphosphates. Its homotrimeric structure forms a central channel where RNA is accommodated. Each protomer core is formed by two paralogous RNase PH domains: PNPase1, whose function is largely unknown, hosts a conserved FFRR loop interacting with RNA, whereas PNPase2 bears the putative catalytic site, ∼20 Å away from the FFRR loop. To date, little is known regarding PNPase catalytic mechanism. We analyzed the kinetic properties of two Escherichia coli PNPase mutants in the FFRR loop (R79A and R80A), which exhibited a dramatic increase in Km for ADP/Pi binding, but not for poly(A), suggesting that the two residues may be essential for binding ADP and Pi. However, both mutants were severely impaired in shifting RNA electrophoretic mobility, implying that the two arginines contribute also to RNA binding. Additional interactions between RNA and other PNPase domains (such as KH and S1) may preserve the enzymatic activity in R79A and R80A mutants. Inspection of enzyme structure showed that PNPase has evolved a long-range acting hydrogen bonding network that connects the FFRR loop with the catalytic site via the F380 residue. This hypothesis was supported by mutation analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of PNPase domains and RNase PH suggests that such network is a unique feature of PNPase1 domain, which coevolved with the paralogous PNPase2 domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrogen binding effect on charged P2 ( = 1-7) clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhicong Fang; Xiangjun Kuang

    2013-11-01

    An all-electron (AE) calculation of the hydrogen binding effect on charged phosphorus clusters has been performed under the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Compared with the P$^{\\pm}_{2n}$ ( = 1-7) clusters, the HP$^{\\pm}_{2n}$ ( = 1-7), cluster has shorter average P-P bond length, larger binding energy and HOMOLUMO gap (HLG), higher chemical hardness and frequency of P-P mode. After binding with one hydrogen atom, the electronic structure is changed from open electronic shell to closed electronic shell. Geometrical stability, chemical stability and electronic stability are strengthened. These stability enhancements may be simply understood considering the electron pairing effect.

  13. Mutagenesis of residue betaArg-246 in the phosphate-binding subdomain of catalytic sites of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Senior, Alan E

    2004-07-23

    Residues responsible for phosphate binding in F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase catalytic sites are of significant interest because phosphate binding is believed linked to proton gradient-driven subunit rotation. From x-ray structures, a phosphate-binding subdomain is evident in catalytic sites, with conserved betaArg-246 in a suitable position to bind phosphate. Mutations betaR246Q, betaR246K, and betaR246A in Escherichia coli were found to impair oxidative phosphorylation and to reduce ATPase activity of purified F(1) by 100-fold. In contrast to wild type, ATPase of mutants was not inhibited by MgADP-fluoroaluminate or MgADP-fluoroscandium, showing the Arg side chain is required for wild-type transition state formation. Whereas 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl) inhibited wild-type ATPase essentially completely, ATPase in mutants was inhibited maximally by approximately 50%, although reaction still occurred at residue betaTyr-297, proximal to betaArg-246 in the phosphate-binding pocket. Inhibition characteristics supported the conclusion that NBD-Cl reacts in betaE (empty) catalytic sites, as shown previously by x-ray structure analysis. Phosphate protected against NBD-Cl inhibition in wild type but not in mutants. The results show that phosphate can bind in the betaE catalytic site of E. coli F(1) and that betaArg-246 is an important phosphate-binding residue.

  14. Thermodynamics of binding of divalent magnesium and manganese to uridine phosphates: implications for diabetes-related hypomagnesaemia and carbohydrate biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pohl Nicola L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the necessity of divalent magnesium and manganese for full activity of sugar nucleotidyltransferases and glycosyltransferases is well known, the role of these metal cations in binding the substrates (uridine 5'-triphosphate, glucose-1-phosphate, N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate, and uridine 5'-diphosphate glucose, products (uridine 5'-diphosphate glucose, uridine 5'-diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine, pyrophosphate, and uridine 5'-diphosphate, and/or enzyme is not clearly understood. Results Using isothermal titration calorimetry we have studied the binding relationship between the divalent metals, magnesium and manganese, and uridine 5'-phosphates to determine the role these metals play in carbohydrate biosynthesis. It was determined from the isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC data that Mg+2 and Mn+2 are most tightly bound to PPi, Kb = 41,000 ± 2000 M-1 and 28,000 ± 50,000 M-1 respectively, and UTP, Kb = 14,300 ± 700 M-1 and 13,000 ± 2,000 M-1 respectively. Conclusion Our results indicate that the formal charge state of the phosphate containing substrates determine the binding strength. Divalent metal cations magnesium and manganese showed similar trends in binding to the sugar substrates. Enthalpy of binding values were all determined to be endothermic except for the PPi case. In addition, entropy of binding values were all found to be positive. From this data, we discuss the role of magnesium and manganese in both sugar nucleotidyltransferase and glycosyltransferase reactions, the differences in metal-bound substrates expected under normal physiological metal concentrations and those of hypomagnesaemia, and the implications for drug design.

  15. New hydrogen titanium phosphate sulfate electrodes for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ran; Mieritz, Daniel; Seo, Dong-Kyun; Chan, Candace K.

    2017-03-01

    NASICON-type materials with general formula AxM2(PO4)3 (A = Li or Na, M = Ti, V, and Fe) are promising candidates for Li- and Na-ion batteries due to their open three-dimensional framework structure. Here we report the electrochemical properties of hydrogen titanium phosphate sulfate, H0.4Ti2(PO4)2.4(SO4)0.6 (HTPS), a new mixed polyanion material with NASICON structure. Micron-sized HTPS aggregates with crystallite grain size of ca. 23 nm are synthesized using a sol-gel synthesis in an acidic medium. The properties of the as-synthesized HTPS, ball-milled HTPS, and samples prepared as carbon composites using an in-situ glucose decomposition reaction are investigated. A capacity of 148 mAh g-1 corresponding to insertion of 2 Li+ per formula unit is observed in the ball-milled HTPS over the potential window of 1.5-3.4 V vs. Li/Li+. Lithiation at ca. 2.8 and 2.5 V is determined to occur through filling of the M1 and M2 sites, respectively. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are used characterize the HTPS before and after cycling. Evaluation of the HTPS in a Na-ion cell is also performed. A discharge capacity of 93 mAh g-1 with sodiation at ca. 2.9 and 2.2 V vs. Na/Na+ is observed.

  16. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  17. Binding energies of hydrogen molecules to isoreticular metal-organic framework materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Tatsuhiko; Klassen, James; Ortony, Julia; Ganz, Eric

    2005-07-01

    Recently, several novel isoreticular metal-organic framework (IRMOF) structures have been fabricated and tested for hydrogen storage applications. To improve our understanding of these materials, and to promote quantitative calculations and simulations, the binding energies of hydrogen molecules to the MOF have been studied. High-quality second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) calculations using the resolution of the identity approximation and the quadruple zeta QZVPP basis set were used. These calculations use terminated molecular fragments from the MOF materials. For H2 on the zinc oxide corners, the MP2 binding energy using Zn4O(HCO2)6 molecule is 6.28kJ/mol. For H2 on the linkers, the binding energy is calculated using lithium-terminated molecular fragments. The MP2 results with coupled-cluster singles and doubles and noniterative triples method corrections and charge-transfer corrections are 4.16kJ/mol for IRMOF-1, 4.72kJ/mol for IRMOF-3, 4.86kJ/mol for IRMOF-6, 4.54kJ/mol for IRMOF-8, 5.50 and 4.90kJ/mol for IRMOF-12, 4.87 and 4.84kJ/mol for IRMOF-14, 5.42kJ/mol for IRMOF-18, and 4.97 and 4.66kJ/mol for IRMOF-993. The larger linkers are all able to bind multiple hydrogen molecules per side. The linkers of IRMOF-12, IRMOF-993, and IRMOF-14 can bind two to three, three, and four hydrogen molecules per side, respectively. In general, the larger linkers have the largest binding energies, and, together with the enhanced surface area available for binding, will provide increased hydrogen storage. We also find that adding up NH2 or CH3 groups to each linker can provide up to a 33% increase in the binding energy.

  18. Bone Tissue Engineering by Using Calcium Phosphate Glass Scaffolds and the Avidin-Biotin Binding System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Chul; Hong, Min-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Choi, Heon-Jin; Ko, Yeong-Mu; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-12-01

    Highly porous and interconnected scaffolds were fabricated using calcium phosphate glass (CPG) for bone tissue engineering. An avidin-biotin binding system was used to improve osteoblast-like cell adhesion to the scaffold. The scaffolds had open macro- and micro-scale pores, and continuous struts without cracks or defects. Scaffolds prepared using a mixture (amorphous and crystalline CPG) were stronger than amorphous group and crystalline group. Cell adhesion assays showed that more cells adhered, with increasing cell seeding efficiency to the avidin-adsorbed scaffolds, and that cell attachment to the highly porous scaffolds significantly differed between avidin-adsorbed scaffolds and other scaffolds. Proliferation was also significantly higher for avidin-adsorbed scaffolds. Osteoblastic differentiation of MG-63 cells was observed at 3 days, and MG-63 cells in direct contact with avidin-adsorbed scaffolds were positive for type I collagen, osteopontin, and alkaline phosphatase gene expression. Osteocalcin expression was observed in the avidin-adsorbed scaffolds at 7 days, indicating that cell differentiation in avidin-adsorbed scaffolds occurred faster than the other scaffolds. Thus, these CPG scaffolds have excellent biological properties suitable for use in bone tissue engineering.

  19. Vitamin B12 Phosphate Conjugation and Its Effect on Binding to the Human B12 -Binding Proteins Intrinsic Factor and Haptocorrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ó Proinsias, Keith; Ociepa, Michał; Pluta, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The binding of vitamin B12 derivatives to human B12 transporter proteins is strongly influenced by the type and site of modification of the cobalamin original structure. We have prepared the first cobalamin derivative modified at the phosphate moiety. The reaction conditions were fully optimized...... and its limitations examined. The resulting derivatives, particularly those bearing terminal alkyne and azide groups, were isolated and used in copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reactions (CuAAC). Their sensitivity towards light revealed their potential as photocleavable molecules. The binding...

  20. HIV-1 Nef binds with human GCC185 protein and regulates mannose 6 phosphate receptor recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Manjeet; Kaur, Supinder; Nazir, Aamir; Tripathi, Raj Kamal, E-mail: rajkamalcdri@gmail.com

    2016-05-20

    HIV-1 Nef modulates cellular function that enhances viral replication in vivo which culminate into AIDS pathogenesis. With no enzymatic activity, Nef regulates cellular function through host protein interaction. Interestingly, trans-cellular introduction of recombinant Nef protein in Caenorhabditis elegans results in AIDS like pathogenesis which might share common pathophysiology because the gene sequence of C. elegans and humans share considerable homology. Therefore employing C. elegans based initial screen complemented with sequence based homology search we identified GCC185 as novel host protein interacting with HIV-1 Nef. The detailed molecular characterization revealed N-terminal EEEE{sub 65} acidic domain of Nef as key region for interaction. GCC185 is a tethering protein that binds with Rab9 transport vesicles. Our results show that Nef-GCC185 interaction disrupts Rab9 interaction resulting in delocalization of CI-MPR (cation independent Mannose 6 phosphate receptor) resulting in elevated secretion of hexosaminidase. In agreement with this, our studies identified novel host GCC185 protein that interacts with Nef EEEE65 acidic domain interfering GCC185-Rab9 vesicle membrane fusion responsible for retrograde vesicular transport of CI-MPR from late endosomes to TGN. In light of existing report suggesting critical role of Nef-GCC185 interaction reveals valuable mechanistic insights affecting specific protein transport pathway in docking of late endosome derived Rab9 bearing transport vesicle at TGN elucidating role of Nef during viral pathogenesis. -- Highlights: •Nef, an accessory protein of HIV-1 interacts with host factor and culminates into AIDS pathogenesis. •Using Caenorhabditis elegans based screen system, novel Nef interacting cellular protein GCC185 was identified. •Molecular characterization of Nef and human protein GCC185 revealed Nef EEEE{sub 65} key region interacted with full length GCC185. •Nef impeded the GCC185-Rab 9 interaction and

  1. Single-chain antibody-fragment M6P-1 possesses a mannose 6-phosphate monosaccharide-specific binding pocket that distinguishes N-glycan phosphorylation in a branch-specific manner†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackler, Ryan J; Evans, Dylan W; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D; Brooks, Cory L; Braulke, Thomas; Liu, Xinyu; Evans, Stephen V; Müller-Loennies, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of mannose 6-phosphate (Man6P) on N-linked glycans of lysosomal enzymes is a structural requirement for their transport from the Golgi apparatus to lysosomes mediated by the mannose 6-phosphate receptors, 300 kDa cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR300) and 46 kDa cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR46). Here we report that the single-chain variable domain (scFv) M6P-1 is a unique antibody fragment with specificity for Man6P monosaccharide that, through an array-screening approach against a number of phosphorylated N-glycans, is shown to bind mono- and diphosphorylated Man6 and Man7 glycans that contain terminal αMan6P(1 → 2)αMan(1 → 3)αMan. In contrast to MPR300, scFv M6P-1 does not bind phosphodiesters, monophosphorylated Man8 or mono- or diphosphorylated Man9 structures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis to 2.7 Å resolution of Fv M6P-1 in complex with Man6P reveals that specificity and affinity is achieved via multiple hydrogen bonds to the mannose ring and two salt bridges to the phosphate moiety. In common with both MPRs, loss of binding was observed for scFv M6P-1 at pH values below the second pKa of Man6P (pKa = 6.1). The structures of Fv M6P-1 and the MPRs suggest that the change of the ionization state of Man6P is the main driving force for the loss of binding at acidic lysosomal pH (e.g. lysosome pH ∼ 4.6), which provides justification for the evolution of a lysosomal enzyme transport pathway based on Man6P recognition. PMID:26503547

  2. Kinetic mechanism and order of substrate binding for sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase from squash (Cucurbita moschata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Matthew W; Fawcett, Tony; Slabas, Antoni R

    2002-03-13

    sn-Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PAT, EC 2.3.1.15), a component of glycerolipid biosynthesis, is an important enzyme in chilling sensitivity in plants. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme from squash (Cucurbita moschata), without bound substrate, has been determined [Turnbull et al. (2001) Acta Crystallogr. D 57, 451-453; Turnbull et al. (2001) Structure 9, 347-353]. Here we report the kinetic mechanism of plastidial G3PAT from squash and the order of substrate binding using acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) substrates. The reaction proceeds via a compulsory-ordered ternary complex with acyl-ACP binding before glycerol-3-phosphate. We have also determined that the reaction will proceed with C(4:0)-CoA, C(6:0)-CoA and C(12:0)-ACP substrates, allowing a wider choice of acyl groups for future co-crystallisation studies.

  3. Tight-binding study of hydrogen adsorption on palladium decorated graphene and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Corral, I.; German, E.; Brizuela, G.P.; Juan, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Volpe, M.A. [Planta Piloto de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Sur-CONICET, camino de La Carrindanga Km. 7, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2010-03-15

    In this work we report a theoretical study on the atomic and molecular hydrogen adsorption onto Pd-decorated graphene monolayer and carbon nanotubes by a semi-empirical tight-binding method. We first investigated the preferential adsorption geometry, considering different adsorption sites on the carbon surface, and then studied the evolution of the chemical bonding by evaluation of the overlap population (OP) and crystal orbital overlap population (COOP). Our results show that strong C-Pd and H-Pd bonds are formed during atomic hydrogen adsorption, with an important role in the bonding of C 2p{sub z} and Pd 5s, 5p{sub z} and 4d{sub z}{sup 2} orbitals. The hydrogen storage mechanism in Pd-doped carbon-based materials seems to involve the dissociation of H{sub 2} molecule on the decoration points and the bonding between resultant atomic hydrogen and the carbon surface. (author)

  4. Hydrogen bonding in the protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate explored by density functional tight binding simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentel, Tobias; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    The applicability of the density functional based tight binding (DFTB) method to the description of hydrogen bond dynamics and infrared (IR) spectroscopy is addressed for the exemplary protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate. Potential energy curves for proton transfer in gas and liquid phases are shown to be comparable to the high level coupled cluster theory in the thermally accessible range of bond lengths. Geometric correlations in the hydrogen bond dynamics are analyzed for a cluster of six ion pairs. Comparing DFTB and DFT data lends further support for the reliability of the DFTB method. Therefore, DFTB bulk simulations are performed to quantify the extent of geometric correlations in terms of Pauling's bond order model. Further, IR absorption spectra are obtained using DFTB and analyzed putting emphasis on the signatures of hydrogen bonding in the NH-stretching and far IR hydrogen bond range.

  5. Hydrogen bonding in the protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate explored by density functional tight binding simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zentel, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The applicability of the density functional based tight binding (DFTB) method to the description of hydrogen bond dynamics and infrared spectroscopy is addressed for the exemplary protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate. Potential energy curves for proton transfer in gas and liquid phase are shown to be comparable to high level coupled cluster theory in the thermally accessible range of bond lengths. Geometric correlations in the hydrogen bond dynamics are analyzed for a cluster of six ion pairs. Comparing DFTB and regular DFT data lends further support for the reliability of the DFTB method. Therefore, DFTB bulk simulations are performed to quantify the extent of geometric correlations in terms of Pauling's bond order model. Further, infrared (IR) absorption spectra are obtained and analyzed putting emphasis on the signatures of hydrogen bonding in the NH-stretching and far IR hydrogen bond range.

  6. Enhanced resistance in Theobroma cacao against oomycete and fungal pathogens by secretion of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, Emily E; Vega-Arreguín, Julio; Shi, Zi; Bailey, Bryan; Xiao, Shunyuan; Maximova, Siela N; Tyler, Brett M; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2016-03-01

    The internalization of some oomycete and fungal pathogen effectors into host plant cells has been reported to be blocked by proteins that bind to the effectors' cell entry receptor, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). This finding suggested a novel strategy for disease control by engineering plants to secrete PI3P-binding proteins. In this study, we tested this strategy using the chocolate tree Theobroma cacao. Transient expression and secretion of four different PI3P-binding proteins in detached leaves of T. cacao greatly reduced infection by two oomycete pathogens, Phytophthora tropicalis and Phytophthora palmivora, which cause black pod disease. Lesion size and pathogen growth were reduced by up to 85%. Resistance was not conferred by proteins lacking a secretory leader, by proteins with mutations in their PI3P-binding site, or by a secreted PI4P-binding protein. Stably transformed, transgenic T. cacao plants expressing two different PI3P-binding proteins showed substantially enhanced resistance to both P. tropicalis and P. palmivora, as well as to the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum theobromicola. These results demonstrate that secretion of PI3P-binding proteins is an effective way to increase disease resistance in T. cacao, and potentially in other plants, against a broad spectrum of pathogens. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Effect of 3% Phosphate Ascorbyl Gel on Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Enamel treated with 35% Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Milena de Fátima Schalcher; Silva, Alice Carvalho; Franco, Marcela Mayana Pereira; Silva, Ana Paula Brito; Bramante, Fausto da Silva; da Silva, Monica Barros; Lima, Darlon Martins; Pereira, Adriana de Fátima Vasconcelos

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel (PA) in different times onto the microshear bond strength of composite resin (CR) to bovine enamel treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP). Thirty enamel blocks of bovine incisors were made and divided into 5 groups (n = 6) with three specimens per group (n = 18), according to treatment: G1= No bleaching + CR; G2 = HP + CR after 15d; G3 = HP + CR after 24 hours; G4 = HP + PA (15 min) + CR after 24 hours; G5 = HP + PA (2 hours) + CR after 24 hours. The resin cylinders were made by Tygon matrices. Microshear bond strength test was performed using universal testing machine with a 50N load at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fracture modes were assessed by a stereomicroscope 40 ×. Microshear bond strength values were submitted to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) one-way and Tukey test (p 0.05). Failure modes were categorized into adhesive (90%) and mixed (10%). The use of 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel for 15 minutes was able to improve bond strength of composite resin to bleached bovine enamel, but when 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel was applied during 40 minutes it negatively interfered in the adhesion of the resin to bleached bovine enamel.

  8. On the hydrates of codeine phosphate: the remarkable influence of hydrogen bonding on the crystal size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runčevski, Tomče; Petruševski, Gjorgji; Makreski, Petre; Ugarkovic, Sonja; Dinnebier, Robert E

    2014-07-07

    Codeine phosphate forms three hydrates and two anhydrates. The sesquihydrate and hemihydrate, which differ by one water molecule, are stable at room temperature. The influence of this molecule on the internal crystal structure and how it translates into the external crystal shape are reported.

  9. Structure of L-Xylulose-5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase (UlaE) from the Anaerobic L-Ascorbate Utilization Pathway of Escherichia coli: Identification of a Novel Phosphate Binding Motif within a TIM Barrel Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rong; Pineda, Marco; Ajamian, Eunice; Cui, Qizhi; Matte, Allan; Cygler, Miroslaw (McGill); (NRC-Canada)

    2009-01-15

    Three catabolic enzymes, UlaD, UlaE, and UlaF, are involved in a pathway leading to fermentation of L-ascorbate under anaerobic conditions. UlaD catalyzes a {beta}-keto acid decarboxylation reaction to produce L-xylulose-5-phosphate, which undergoes successive epimerization reactions with UlaE (L-xylulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase) and UlaF (L-ribulose-5-phosphate 4-epimerase), yielding D-xylulose-5-phosphate, an intermediate in the pentose phosphate pathway. We describe here crystallographic studies of UlaE from Escherichia coli O157:H7 that complete the structural characterization of this pathway. UlaE has a triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold and forms dimers. The active site is located at the C-terminal ends of the parallel {beta}-strands. The enzyme binds Zn{sup 2+}, which is coordinated by Glu155, Asp185, His211, and Glu251. We identified a phosphate-binding site formed by residues from the {beta}1/{alpha}1 loop and {alpha}3' helix in the N-terminal region. This site differs from the well-characterized phosphate-binding motif found in several TIM barrel superfamilies that is located at strands {beta}7 and {beta}8. The intrinsic flexibility of the active site region is reflected by two different conformations of loops forming part of the substrate-binding site. Based on computational docking of the L-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate to UlaE and structural similarities of the active site of this enzyme to the active sites of other epimerases, a metal-dependent epimerization mechanism for UlaE is proposed, and Glu155 and Glu251 are implicated as catalytic residues. Mutation and activity measurements for structurally equivalent residues in related epimerases supported this mechanistic proposal.

  10. Phosphate-binding pocket in Dicer-2 PAZ domain for high-fidelity siRNA production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Suresh K; Fukunaga, Ryuya

    2016-12-06

    The enzyme Dicer produces small silencing RNAs such as micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). In Drosophila, Dicer-1 produces ∼22-24-nt miRNAs from pre-miRNAs, whereas Dicer-2 makes 21-nt siRNAs from long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs). How Dicer-2 precisely makes 21-nt siRNAs with a remarkably high fidelity is unknown. Here we report that recognition of the 5'-monophosphate of a long dsRNA substrate by a phosphate-binding pocket in the Dicer-2 PAZ (Piwi, Argonaute, and Zwille/Pinhead) domain is crucial for the length fidelity, but not the efficiency, in 21-nt siRNA production. Loss of the length fidelity, meaning increased length heterogeneity of siRNAs, caused by point mutations in the phosphate-binding pocket of the Dicer-2 PAZ domain decreased RNA silencing activity in vivo, showing the importance of the high fidelity to make 21-nt siRNAs. We propose that the 5'-monophosphate of a long dsRNA substrate is anchored by the phosphate-binding pocket in the Dicer-2 PAZ domain and the distance between the pocket and the RNA cleavage active site in the RNaseIII domain corresponds to the 21-nt pitch in the A-form duplex of a long dsRNA substrate, resulting in high-fidelity 21-nt siRNA production. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism by which Dicer-2 produces 21-nt siRNAs with a remarkably high fidelity for efficient RNA silencing.

  11. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  12. The sweet side of RNA regulation: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a noncanonical RNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael R; Garcin, Elsa D

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has a vast array of extraglycolytic cellular functions, including interactions with nucleic acids. GAPDH has been implicated in the translocation of transfer RNA (tRNA), the regulation of cellular messenger RNA (mRNA) stability and translation, as well as the regulation of replication and gene expression of many single-stranded RNA viruses. A growing body of evidence supports GAPDH-RNA interactions serving as part of a larger coordination between intermediary metabolism and RNA biogenesis. Despite the established role of GAPDH in nucleic acid regulation, it is still unclear how and where GAPDH binds to its RNA targets, highlighted by the absence of any conserved RNA-binding sequences. This review will summarize our current understanding of GAPDH-mediated regulation of RNA function. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:53-70. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1315 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  13. Fabrication of Carbonate Apatite Block through a Dissolution–Precipitation Reaction Using Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Dihydrate Block as a Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanji Tsuru

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate apatite (CO3Ap block, which is a bone replacement used to repair defects, was fabricated through a dissolution–precipitation reaction using a calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (DCPD block as a precursor. When the DCPD block was immersed in NaHCO3 or Na2CO3 solution at 80 °C, DCPD converted to CO3Ap within 3 days. β-Tricalcium phosphate was formed as an intermediate phase, and it was completely converted to CO3Ap within 2 weeks when the DCPD block was immersed in Na2CO3 solution. Although the crystal structures of the DCPD and CO3Ap blocks were different, the macroscopic structure was maintained during the compositional transformation through the dissolution–precipitation reaction. CO3Ap block fabricated in NaHCO3 or Na2CO3 solution contained 12.9 and 15.8 wt % carbonate, respectively. The diametral tensile strength of the CO3Ap block was 2 MPa, and the porosity was approximately 57% regardless of the carbonate solution. DCPD is a useful precursor for the fabrication of CO3Ap block.

  14. {tau} - hydrogen phosphate of zirconia in sodium salt form and some of its properties; {tau} - hidrogenofosfato de zirconio en forma sodica y algunas de sus propiedades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez V, S.M.; Ordonez R, E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    It is reported the obtaining and characterization in the sodium salt form of the {tau}-hydrogen phosphate of zirconium in sodium form, this compound it was synthesized, for a new technique developed in the laboratory of Dept. of Chemistry of the ININ. The characterization was carried out for XRD, IR, Sem and EDS the thermal gravimetric analysis is also reported. (Author)

  15. Crystal Structure And Magnetic Property of the Complex of Hydrogen-bonded Two-dimensional Layer Copper(Ⅱ) Acrylate with Trimethyl Phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ Copper carboxylate complexes play an important role in catalysing the enzymatic activities[1-4], and the phosphate has an especial use in DNA recognition[5]. Indeed the report about copper carboxylate complexes with phosphate ligands is rare. A chain structure supramolecule [Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2]n has been reported recently[6], in which a Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2 unit is linked by four O(water)-H...O(carboxyl) hydrogen bonds with two adjacent units(Fig.1). In this work a layer structure complex {Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2[OP(OCH3)3]}n was synthesized by means of hydrogen-bonded assembly approach between complex [Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2]n with trimethyl phosphate(TMP).

  16. Crystal structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis phosphate binding protein PstS3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Davide M; Spallek, Ralf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Rizzi, Menico

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis evades host immune responses by colonizing macrophages. Intraphagosomal M. tuberculosis is exposed to environmental stresses such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates as well as acid shock and inorganic phosphate (Pi) depletion. Experimental evidence suggests that expression levels of mycobacterial protein PstS3 (Rv0928) are significantly increased when M. tuberculosis bacilli are exposed to Pi starvation. Hence, PstS3 may be important for survival of Mtb in conditions where there is limited supply of Pi. We report here the structure of PstS3 from M. tuberculosis at 2.3-Å resolution. The protein presents a structure typical for ABC phosphate transfer receptors. Comparison with its cognate receptor PstS1 showed a different pattern distribution of surface charges in proximity to the Pi recognition site, suggesting complementary roles of the two proteins in Pi uptake. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Computational study of hydrogen binding by metal-organic framework-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Tatsuhiko; Klassen, James; Ganz, Eric

    2004-12-01

    We report the results of quantum chemistry calculations on H2 binding by the metal-organic framework-5 (MOF)-5. Density functional theory calculations were used to calculate the atomic positions, lattice constant, and effective atomic charges from the electrostatic potential for the MOF-5 crystal structure. Second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory was used to calculate the binding energy of H2 to benzene and H2-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate-H2. To achieve the necessary accuracy, the large Dunning basis sets aug-cc-pVTZ, and aug-cc-pVQZ were used, and the results were extrapolated to the basis set limit. The binding energy results were 4.77 kJ/mol for benzene, 5.27 kJ/mol for H2-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate-H2. We also estimate binding of 5.38 kJ/mol for Li-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate-Li and 6.86 kJ/mol at the zinc oxide corners using second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. In order to compare our theoretical calculations to the experimental hydrogen storage results, grand canonical Monte Carlo calculations were performed. The Monte Carlo simulations identify a high energy binding site at the corners that quickly saturated with 1.27 H2 molecules at 78 K. At 300 K, a broad range of binding sites are observed.

  18. Roles of phosphate recognition in inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase (IPK1) substrate binding and activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosein, Varin; Miller, Gregory J

    2013-09-13

    Inositol phosphate kinases (IPKs) sequentially phosphorylate inositol phosphates (IPs) to yield a group of small signaling molecules involved in diverse cellular processes. IPK1 (inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase) phosphorylates inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate to inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate; however, the mechanism of IP recognition employed by IPK1 is currently unresolved. We demonstrated previously that IPK1 possesses an unstable N-terminal lobe in the absence of IP, which led us to propose that the phosphate profile of the IP was linked to stabilization of IPK1. Here, we describe a systematic study to determine the roles of the 1-, 3-, 5-, and 6-phosphate groups of inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate in IP binding and IPK1 activation. The 5- and 6-phosphate groups were the most important for IP binding to IPK1, and the 1- and 3-phosphate groups were more important for IPK1 activation than the others. Moreover, we demonstrate that there are three critical residues (Arg-130, Lys-170, and Lys-411) necessary for IPK1 activity. Arg-130 is the only substrate-binding N-terminal lobe residue that can render IPK1 inactive; its 1-phosphate is critical for full IPK1 activity and for stabilization of the active conformation of IPK1. Taken together, our results support the model for recognition of the IP substrate by IPK1 in which (i) the 4-, 5-, and 6-phosphates are initially recognized by the C-terminal lobe, and subsequently, (ii) the interaction between the 1-phosphate and Arg-130 stabilizes the N-terminal lobe and activates IPK1. This model of IP recognition, believed to be unique among IPKs, could be exploited for selective inhibition of IPK1 in future studies that investigate the role of higher IPs.

  19. AIScore chemically diverse empirical scoring function employing quantum chemical binding energies of hydrogen-bonded complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raub, Stephan; Steffen, Andreas; Kämper, Andreas; Marian, Christel M

    2008-07-01

    In this work we report on a novel scoring function that is based on the LUDI model and focuses on the prediction of binding affinities. AIScore extends the original FlexX scoring function using a chemically diverse set of hydrogen-bonded interactions derived from extensive quantum chemical ab initio calculations. Furthermore, we introduce an algorithmic extension for the treatment of multifurcated hydrogen bonds (XFurcate). Charged and resonance-assisted hydrogen bond energies and hydrophobic interactions as well as a scaling factor for implicit solvation were fitted to experimental data. To this end, we assembled a set of 101 protein-ligand complexes with known experimental binding affinities. Tightly bound water molecules in the active site were considered to be an integral part of the binding pocket. Compared to the original FlexX scoring function, AIScore significantly improves the prediction of the binding free energies of the complexes in their native crystal structures. In combination with XFurcate, AIScore yields a Pearson correlation coefficient of R P = 0.87 on the training set. In a validation run on the PDBbind test set we achieved an R P value of 0.46 for 799 attractively scored complexes, compared to a value of R P = 0.17 and 739 bound complexes obtained with the FlexX original scoring function. The redocking capability of AIScore, on the other hand, does not fully reach the good performance of the original FlexX scoring function. This finding suggests that AIScore should rather be used for postscoring in combination with the standard FlexX incremental ligand construction scheme.

  20. Defining the DNA Binding Site Recognized by the Fission Yeast Zn2Cys6 Transcription Factor Pho7 and Its Role in Phosphate Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwer, Beate; Sanchez, Ana M; Garg, Angad; Chatterjee, Debashree; Shuman, Stewart

    2017-08-15

    Fission yeast phosphate homeostasis entails transcriptional induction of genes encoding phosphate-mobilizing proteins under conditions of phosphate starvation. Transcription factor Pho7, a member of the Zn2Cys6 family of fungal transcription regulators, is the central player in the starvation response. The DNA binding sites in the promoters of phosphate-responsive genes have not been defined, nor have any structure-function relationships been established for the Pho7 protein. Here we narrow this knowledge gap by (i) delineating an autonomous DNA-binding domain (DBD) within Pho7 that includes the Zn2Cys6 module, (ii) deploying recombinant Pho7 DBD in DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to map the Pho7 recognition sites in the promoters of the phosphate-regulated pho1 and tgp1 genes to a 12-nucleotide sequence motif [5'-TCG(G/C)(A/T)xxTTxAA], (iii) independently identifying the same motif as a Pho7 recognition element via in silico analysis of available genome-wide ChIP-seq data, (iv) affirming that mutations in the two Pho7 recognition sites in the pho1 promoter efface pho1 expression in vivo, and (v) establishing that the zinc-binding cysteines and a pair of conserved arginines in the DBD are essential for Pho7 activity in vivoIMPORTANCE Fungi respond to phosphate starvation by inducing the transcription of a set of phosphate acquisition genes that comprise a phosphate regulon. Pho7, a member of the Zn2Cys6 family of fungal transcription regulators, is the central player in the phosphate starvation response in fission yeast. The present study identifies a 12-nucleotide Pho7 DNA binding motif [5'-TCG(G/C)(A/T)xxTTxAA] in the promoters of phosphate-regulated genes, pinpoints DNA and protein features important for Pho7 binding to DNA, and correlates them with Pho7-dependent gene expression in vivo The results highlight distinctive properties of Pho7 vis-a-vis other fungal zinc binuclear cluster transcription factors as well as the

  1. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  2. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  3. Fluorescence sensor for sequential detection of zinc and phosphate ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Miran; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Seo, Hansol; Helal, Aasif; Kim, Hong-Seok

    2016-12-01

    A new, highly selective turn-on fluorescent chemosensor based on 2-(2‧-tosylamidophenyl)thiazole (1) for the detection of zinc and phosphate ions in ethanol was synthesized and characterized. Sensor 1 showed a high selectivity for zinc compared to other cations and sequentially detected hydrogen pyrophosphate and hydrogen phosphate. The fluorescence mechanism can be explained by two different mechanisms: (i) the inhibition of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and (ii) chelation-induced enhanced fluorescence by binding with Zn2 +. The sequential detection of phosphate anions was achieved by the quenching and subsequent revival of ESIPT.

  4. Hydrogen cyanide in the rhizosphere: not suppressing plant pathogens, but rather regulating availability of phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Rijavec

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria produce chemical compounds with different benefits for the plant. Among them, HCN is recognized as a biocontrol agent, based on its ascribed toxicity against plant pathogens. Based on several past studies questioning the validity of this hypothesis, we have re-addressed the issue by designing a new set of in vitro experiments, to test if HCN-producing rhizobacteria could inhibit the growth of phytopathogens. The level of HCN produced by the rhizobacteria in vitro does not correlate with the observed biocontrol effects, thus disproving the biocontrol hypothesis. We developed a new concept, in which HCN does not act as a biocontrol agent, but rather is involved in geochemical processes in the substrate (e.g. chelation of metals, indirectly increasing the availability of phosphate. Since this scenario can be important for the pioneer plants living in oligotrophic alpine environments, we inoculated HCN producing bacteria into sterile mineral sand together with germinating plants and showed that the growth of the pioneer plant French sorrel was increased on granite-based substrate. No such effect could be observed for maize, where plantlets depend on the nutrients stored in the endosperm. To support our concept, we used KCN and mineral sand and showed that mineral mobilization and phosphate release could be caused by cyanide in vitro. We propose that in oligotrophic alpine environments, and possibly elsewhere, the main contribution of HCN is in the sequestration of metals and the consequential indirect increase of nutrient availability, which is beneficial for the rhizobacteria and their plant hosts.

  5. WBC27, an Adenosine Tri-phosphate-binding Cassette Protein, Controls Pollen Wall Formation and Patterning in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ying Dou; Ke-Zhen Yang; Yi Zhang; Wei Wang; Xiao-Lei Liu; Li-Qun Chen; Xue-Qin Zhang; De Ye

    2011-01-01

    In flowering plants, the exine components are derived from tapetum. Despite its importance to sexual plant reproduction, little is known about the translocation of exine materials from tapetum to developing microspores. Here we report functional characterization of the arabidopsis WBC27 gene. WBC27 encodes an adenosine tri-phosphate binding cassette (ABC) transporter and is expressed preferentially in tapetum. Mutation of WBC27 disrupted the exine formation. The wbc27 mutant microspores began to degenerate once released from tetrads and most of the microspores collapsed at the uninucleate stage. Only a small number of wbc27-1 microspores could develop into tricellular pollen grains. These survival pollen grains lacked exine and germinated in the anther before anthesis. All of these results suggest that the ABC transporter, WBC27 plays important roles in the formation of arabidopsis exine, possibly by translocation of lipidic precursors of sporopollenin from tapetum to developing microspores.

  6. Ancestral mutations as a tool for solubilizing proteins: The case of a hydrophobic phosphate-binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable and soluble proteins are ideal candidates for functional and structural studies. Unfortunately, some proteins or enzymes can be difficult to isolate, being sometimes poorly expressed in heterologous systems, insoluble and/or unstable. Numerous methods have been developed to address these issues, from the screening of various expression systems to the modification of the target protein itself. Here we use a hydrophobic, aggregation-prone, phosphate-binding protein (HPBP as a case study. We describe a simple and fast method that selectively uses ancestral mutations to generate a soluble, stable and functional variant of the target protein, here named sHPBP. This variant is highly expressed in Escherichia coli, is easily purified and its structure was solved at much higher resolution than its wild-type progenitor (1.3 versus 1.9 Å, respectively.

  7. Rheb Protein Binds CAD (Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase 2, Aspartate Transcarbamoylase, and Dihydroorotase) Protein in a GTP- and Effector Domain-dependent Manner and Influences Its Cellular Localization and Carbamoyl-phosphate Synthetase (CPSase) Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-01

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. PMID:25422319

  8. Rheb protein binds CAD (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase) protein in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner and influences its cellular localization and carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase (CPSase) activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Akasu, Hitomi; Shimono, Wataru; Matsu, Chisa; Fujiwara, Yuki; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Heard, Jeffrey J; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Hattori, Seisuke

    2015-01-09

    Rheb small GTPases, which consist of Rheb1 and Rheb2 (also known as RhebL1) in mammalian cells, are unique members of the Ras superfamily and play central roles in regulating protein synthesis and cell growth by activating mTOR. To gain further insight into the function of Rheb, we carried out a search for Rheb-binding proteins and found that Rheb binds to CAD protein (carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamoylase, and dihydroorotase), a multifunctional enzyme required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. CAD binding is more pronounced with Rheb2 than with Rheb1. Rheb binds CAD in a GTP- and effector domain-dependent manner. The region of CAD where Rheb binds is located at the C-terminal region of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase domain and not in the dihydroorotase and aspartate transcarbamoylase domains. Rheb stimulated carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity of CAD in vitro. In addition, an elevated level of intracellular UTP pyrimidine nucleotide was observed in Tsc2-deficient cells, which was attenuated by knocking down of Rheb. Immunostaining analysis showed that expression of Rheb leads to increased accumulation of CAD on lysosomes. Both a farnesyltransferase inhibitor that blocks membrane association of Rheb and knockdown of Rheb mislocalized CAD. These results establish CAD as a downstream effector of Rheb and suggest a possible role of Rheb in regulating de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. 1,1′-Binaphthalene-2,2′-diyl hydrogen phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K. Nayak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, racemic bnppa, C20H13O4P, crystallizes with four molecules in the asymmetric unit. Two independent centrosymmetric O—H...O hydrogen-bonded tetramers, each involving two of the symmetry-independent molecules in the asymmetric unit generate the packing motif in the crystal structure. The hydrophobic parts of the tetramers connect to their neighbours via C—H...π and π–π interactions [3.899 (2, 3.895 (2 and 3.803 (2 Å within the symmetric unit, 3.851 (2, 4.000 (2, 3.988 (2 and 3.905 (2 Å across centres of symmetry].

  10. Randomized crossover study comparing the phosphate-binding efficacy of calcium ketoglutarate versus calcium carbonate in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bro, S; Rasmussen, R A; Handberg, J; Olgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1998-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the phosphate-binding efficacy, side effects, and cost of therapy of calcium ketoglutarate granulate as compared with calcium carbonate tablets in patients on chronic hemodialysis. The study design used was a randomized, crossover open trial, and the main outcome measurements were plasma ionized calcium levels, plasma phosphate levels, plasma intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, requirements for supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate therapy, patient tolerance, and cost of therapy. Nineteen patients on chronic hemodialysis were treated with a dialysate calcium concentration of 1.25 mmol/L and a fixed alfacalcidol dose for at least 2 months. All had previously tolerated therapy with calcium carbonate. Of the 19 patients included, 10 completed both treatment arms. After 12 weeks of therapy, the mean (+/-SEM) plasma ionized calcium level was significantly lower in the ketoglutarate arm compared with the calcium carbonate arm (4.8+/-0.1 mg/dL v 5.2+/-0.1 mg/dL; P = 0.004), whereas the mean plasma phosphate (4.5+/-0.3 mg/dL v 5.1+/-0.1 mg/dL) and PTH levels (266+/-125 pg/mL v 301+/-148 pg/mL) did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms. Supplemental aluminum-aminoacetate was not required during calcium ketoglutarate treatment, while two patients needed this supplement when treated with calcium carbonate. Five of 17 (29%) patients were withdrawn from calcium ketoglutarate therapy within 1 to 2 weeks due to intolerance (anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, general uneasiness), whereas the remaining 12 patients did not experience any side effects at all. The five patients with calcium ketoglutarate intolerance all had pre-existing gastrointestinal symptoms; four of them had received treatment with cimetidine or omeprazol before inclusion into the study. Calculations based on median doses after 12 weeks showed that the cost of the therapy in Denmark was 10 times higher for calcium ketoglutarate compared with calcium

  11. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is a slow tight binding inhibitor of E. coli pyridoxal kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohini S Ghatge

    Full Text Available Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP is a cofactor for dozens of B(6 requiring enzymes. PLP reacts with apo-B(6 enzymes by forming an aldimine linkage with the ε-amino group of an active site lysine residue, thus yielding the catalytically active holo-B(6 enzyme. During protein turnover, the PLP is salvaged by first converting it to pyridoxal by a phosphatase and then back to PLP by pyridoxal kinase. Nonetheless, PLP poses a potential toxicity problem for the cell since its reactive 4'-aldehyde moiety forms covalent adducts with other compounds and non-B(6 proteins containing thiol or amino groups. The regulation of PLP homeostasis in the cell is thus an important, yet unresolved issue. In this report, using site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic, spectroscopic and chromatographic studies we show that pyridoxal kinase from E. coli forms a complex with the product PLP to form an inactive enzyme complex. Evidence is presented that, in the inhibited complex, PLP has formed an aldimine bond with an active site lysine residue during catalytic turnover. The rate of dissociation of PLP from the complex is very slow, being only partially released after a 2-hour incubation with PLP phosphatase. Interestingly, the inactive pyridoxal kinase•PLP complex can be partially reactivated by transferring the tightly bound PLP to an apo-B(6 enzyme. These results open new perspectives on the mechanism of regulation and role of pyridoxal kinase in the Escherichia coli cell.

  12. Comparative study of the hydration systems formed during interactions of hydrogen phosphate dianions with putrescine, nor-putrescine and magnesium dications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figlerowicz, M.; Utzig, E.; Alejska, M.; Bratek-Wiewiórowska, M. D.; Wiewiórowski, M.

    1997-10-01

    A comparative study of hydration systems, formed as a result of the interaction between hydrogen phosphate dianions and three naturally occurring cations (putrescine (Put), its nor-homologue (nPut) and magnesium), is presented. On the basis of X-ray data and IR, NMR and calorimetric measurements, we have determined how the structure and physicochemical properties of the cations influence the system of phosphate residue hydration. Our study demonstrates that the stability of the hydration systems depends not only on the character of the bonds used by water to link with other salt components (coordinate or hydrogen bonds), but also on the location of the water molecules in the crystal lattice. In addition, contrary to magnesium salts, the dehydration of diamine (Put and nPut) hydrogen phosphates is reversible. Both dehydration and rehydration processes take place in the solid state. During rehydration, the crystalline anhydrous salt absorbs water molecules from the atmosphere. This leads to the reconstruction of the hydrated salt structure; this means that the salt which is the product of rehydration is identical with that obtained by crystallization from water solution.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of two polyoxometalates consisting of different Cu-ligand hydrogen phosphate units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jinshuang; Zhao, Xiaofang; Huang, Jiao; Gong, Kaining; Han, Zhangang, E-mail: hanzg116@126.com; Zhai, Xueliang, E-mail: xlzhai253@mail.hebtu.edu.cn

    2014-03-15

    Two polyoxometalates [(Cu-mbpy){sub 4}(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}]·H{sub 2}O (1) and [(Cu-mbpy){sub 6}(HPO{sub 4}){sub 4}][PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]·4H{sub 2}O (2) (mbpy=4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-dipyridyl in 1; 5,5″-dimethyl-2,2'-dipyridyl in 2) have been synthesized and characterized by IR, X-ray powder diffraction, TG analysis and electrochemical property. The structural features of 1–2 are in their cationic moieties consisting of different linkages of [Cu-mbpy]{sup 2+} and HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−} groups. In 1 four Cu-mbpy bridged by two HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ions form a discrete cluster with an interesting octahedron of (Cu{sub 4}P{sub 2}), while in 2 Cu-mbpy fragments are bridged by HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ions into 1D structure consisting of trigonal bipyramidal polyhedra of (Cu{sub 3}P{sub 2}). Photocatalytic experiments indicate that compounds 1 and 2 are actively photocatalytic for degradation of methyl orange in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under UV light irradiation. -- Graphical abstract: Two polyoxometalate-based supramolecular compounds consisting of different linkages based on Cu-ligand and HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−} groups have been synthesized and characterized. The photocatalytic activity are studied. Highlights: • Two polyoxometalate-based supramolecular compounds consisting of different linkages based on Cu-ligand and HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−} groups have been synthesized. • Hydrogen bonding and π…π interactions play important roles in constructing crystal supramolecular frameworks. • Two compounds represent a high photocatalytic activity in the degradation of methyl orange.

  14. Modulation of oncogenic DBL activity by phosphoinositol phosphate binding to pleckstrin homology domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, C; Gao, Y; Mancini, P; Vanni, C; Porotto, M; Falasca, M; Torrisi, M R; Zheng, Y; Eva, A

    2001-06-01

    The Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) contain a region of sequence similarity consisting of a catalytic Dbl homology (DH) domain in tandem with a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. PH domains are involved in the regulated targeting of signaling molecules to plasma membranes by protein-protein and/or protein-lipid interactions. Here we show that Dbl PH domain binding to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate results in the inhibition of Dbl GEF activity on Rho family GTPase Cdc42. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding to the PH domain significantly inhibits the Cdc42 interactive activity of the DH domain suggesting that the DH domain is subjected to the PH domain modulation under the influence of phosphoinositides (PIPs). We generated Dbl mutants unable to interact with PIPs. These mutants retained GEF activity on Cdc42 in the presence of PIPs and showed a markedly enhanced activating potential for both Cdc42 and RhoA in vivo while displaying decreased cellular transforming activity. Immunofluorescence analysis of NIH3T3 transfectants revealed that whereas the PH domain localizes to actin stress fibers and plasma membrane, the PH mutants are no longer detectable on the plasma membrane. These results suggest that modulation of PIPs in both the GEF catalytic activity and the targeting to plasma membrane determines the outcome of the biologic activity of Dbl.

  15. Sites for phosphates and iron-sulfur thiolates in the first membranes: 3 to 6 residue anion-binding motifs (nests).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner-White, E James; Russell, Michael J

    2005-02-01

    Nests are common three to six amino acid residue motifs in proteins where successive main chain NH groups bind anionic atoms or groups. On average 8% of residues in proteins belong to nests. Nests form a key part of a number of phosphate binding sites, notably the P-loop, which is the commonest of the binding sites for the phosphates of ATP and GTP. They also occur regularly in sites that bind [Fe2S2](RS)4 [Fe3S4](RS)3and [Fe4S4](RS)4 iron-sulfur centers, which are also anionic groups. Both phosphates and iron-sulfur complexes would have occurred in the precipitates within hydrothermal vents of moderate temperature as key components of the earliest metabolism and it is likely existing organisms emerging in this milieu would have benefited from evolving molecules binding such anions. The nest conformation is favored by high proportions of glycine residues and there is evidence for glycine being the commonest amino acid during the stage of evolution when proteins were evolving so it is likely nests would have been common features in peptides occupying the membranes at the dawn of life.

  16. Effect of a new phosphorus source, magnesium hydrogen phosphate (MHP on growth, utilization of phosphorus, and physiological responses in carp Cyprinus carpio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyun Yoon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Magnesium hydrogen phosphate (MHP, MgHPO4 recovered from swine manure was prepared as an alternative phosphorus (P source. Conventional P additives, monocalcium phosphate (MCP, dicalcium phosphate (DCP, and tricalcium phosphate (TCP were compared with the MHP in terms of growth and P availability by juvenile carp Cyprinus carpio. A basal diet as a negative control was prepared using practical feed ingredients without P supplementation to which four supplemental P sources were added at the level of 2%. Five groups of 450 fish having mean body weight of 6.5 g following 24 h fasting after 2 weeks of adaptation period were randomly distributed into each of 15 tanks (30 fish/tank. Fish were hand-fed to apparent satiety twice a day for 9 weeks. Fish fed the MHP had weight gain (WG, feed conversion ratio (FCR, protein efficiency ratio (PER, and specific growth rate (SGR comparable to those fed the MCP. Those values of both the MHP and MCP groups were significantly different (p  0.05 from other phosphate groups, fish fed the MCP and MHP retained higher P in whole body than the other groups. P availability was determined to be 93.2, 62.4, 6.1, and 98.0% for MCP, DCP, TCP, and MHP, respectively. The present results suggested that the MHP recovered from wastewater stream could be used as an alternative P source in carp diet.

  17. Dihydrogen Phosphate Selective Anion Receptor Based on Acylhydrazone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthil Pandian, T.; Kang, Jongmin [Sejong Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Anion receptor based on acylhydrazone has been designed and synthesized. UV-vis and {sup 1}H NMR titration showed that receptor is selective receptor for dihydrogen phosphate (H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -}). Dihydrogen phosphate was complexed by the receptor via at least 4 hydrogen bonding interactions, contributing from two amide N-Hs and two imine C-Hs. In addition, nitrogen in the aromatic ring could make 2 additional hydrogen bondings with OH groups in the dihydrogen phosphate. However, the receptor could make only 4 hydrogen bonds with halides. Therefore, receptor could bind anions through hydrogen bonds with a selectivity in the order of H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -} > Br{sup -} > Cl{sup -} in highly polar solvent such as DMSO.

  18. The crystal structure of a ternary complex of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provides new insight into the reaction mechanism and shows a novel binding mode of the 2'-phosphate of NADP+ and a novel cation binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Segura, Lilian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A; Horjales, Eduardo

    2009-01-16

    In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the NAD(P)(+)-dependent betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (PaBADH) may play the dual role of assimilating carbon and nitrogen from choline or choline precursors--abundant at infection sites--and producing glycine betaine and NADPH, potentially protective against the high-osmolarity and oxidative stresses prevalent in the infected tissues. Disruption of the PaBADH gene negatively affects the growth of bacteria, suggesting that this enzyme could be a target for antibiotic design. PaBADH is one of the few ALDHs that efficiently use NADP(+) and one of the even fewer that require K(+) ions for stability. Crystals of PaBADH were obtained under aerobic conditions in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, glycerol, NADP(+) and K(+) ions. The three-dimensional structure was determined at 2.1-A resolution. The catalytic cysteine (C286, corresponding to C302 of ALDH2) is oxidized to sulfenic acid or forms a mixed disulfide with 2-mercaptoethanol. The glutamyl residue involved in the deacylation step (E252, corresponding to E268 of ALDH2) is in two conformations, suggesting a proton relay system formed by two well-conserved residues (E464 and K162, corresponding to E476 and K178, respectively, of ALDH2) that connects E252 with the bulk water. In some active sites, a bound glycerol molecule mimics the thiohemiacetal intermediate; its hydroxyl oxygen is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen of the amide groups of the side chain of the conserved N153 (N169 of ALDH2) and those of the main chain of C286, which form the "oxyanion hole." The nicotinamide moiety of the nucleotide is not observed in the crystal, and the adenine moiety binds in the usual way. A salt bridge between E179 (E195 of ALDH2) and R40 (E53 of ALDH2) moves the carboxylate group of the former away from the 2'-phosphate of the NADP(+), thus avoiding steric clashes and/or electrostatic repulsion between the two groups. Finally, the crystal shows two K(+) binding sites per subunit

  19. Inactive mutants of human pyridoxine 5′‐phosphate oxidase: a possible role for a noncatalytic pyridoxal 5′‐phosphate tight binding site

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5′‐phosphate (PLP) is a cofactor for many vitamin B6‐requiring enzymes that are important for the synthesis of neurotransmitters. Pyridoxine 5′‐phosphate oxidase (PNPO) is one of two enzymes that produce PLP. Some 16 known mutations in human PNPO (hPNPO), including R95C and R229W, lead to deficiency of PLP in the cell and have been shown to cause neonatal epileptic encephalopathy (NEE). This disorder has no effective treatment, and is often fatal unless treated with PLP. In this stu...

  20. Modeling of 1-D Nanowires and analyzing their Hydrogen and Noble Gas Binding Ability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SUDIP PAN; RANAJIT SAHA; ASHUTOSH GUPTA; PRATIM K CHATTARAJ

    2017-07-01

    The theoretical calculation at the M05-2X/6-311+G(d,p) level reveals that the B–B bond length in [N ₄ ₋B ₂ ₋N ₄] ²⁻ system (1.506 Å) is slightly smaller than that of typical B=B bond in B ₂H ₂ (1.518 Å). These systems interact with each M ⁺ (M = Li, Na, K) ion very strongly with a binding energy of 213.5 (Li), 195.2 (Na) and 180.3 (K) kcal/mol. Additionally, the relief of the Coulomb repulsion due to the presence of counterion, M ⁺, the B–B bond contracts to 1.484–1.488Å in [N ₄ ₋B ₂ ₋N ₄]M ₂. We have further extended our study to [N ₄ ₋B ₂ ₋N ₄ ₋B ₂ ₋N ₄] ⁴⁻ and [N ₄ ₋B ₂ ₋N ₄-B ₂ ₋N ₄ ₋B ₂ ₋N ₄] ⁶⁻ systems. The B–B bond length is found to be 1.496Å in the former case, whereas the same is found to be 1.493Å and 1.508 Å, respectively, for the two B–B bonds present in the latter one. The M ⁺ counter-ions stabilize such negatively charged systems and thus, create a possibility to design a long 1-D nanowire. Their utilities as probable hydrogen and noble gas (Ng) binding templates are explored taking [N ₄ ₋B ₂2 ₋N ₄ ₋B ₂ ₋N ₄]Li ₄ system as a reference. It is found that each Li center binds with three H ₂ molecules with an average binding energy of 2.1 kcal/mol, whereas each Ng (Ar–Rn) atom interacts with Li center having a binding energy of 1.8–2.1 kcal/mol. The H ₂ molecules interact with Li centers mainly through equal contribution from orbital and electrostatic interaction, whereas the orbital interaction is found to be major term (ca. 51–58%) in Ng-Li interaction followed by dispersion (ca. 24–27%) and electrostatic interaction (ca. 17–24%).

  1. Hydride-induced amplification of performance and binding enthalpies in chromium hydrazide gels for Kubas-type hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaed, Ahmad; Hoang, Tuan K A; Moula, Golam; Aroca, Ricardo; Trudeau, Michel L; Antonelli, David M

    2011-10-05

    Hydrogen is the ideal fuel because it contains the most energy per gram of any chemical substance and forms water as the only byproduct of consumption. However, storage still remains a formidable challenge because of the thermodynamic and kinetic issues encountered when binding hydrogen to a carrier. In this study, we demonstrate how the principal binding sites in a new class of hydrogen storage materials based on the Kubas interaction can be tuned by variation of the coordination sphere about the metal to dramatically increase the binding enthalpies and performance, while also avoiding the shortcomings of hydrides and physisorpion materials, which have dominated most research to date. This was accomplished through hydrogenation of chromium alkyl hydrazide gels, synthesized from bis(trimethylsilylmethyl) chromium and hydrazine, to form materials with low-coordinate Cr hydride centers as the principal H(2) binding sites, thus exploiting the fact that metal hydrides form stronger Kubas interactions than the corresponding metal alkyls. This led to up to a 6-fold increase in storage capacity at room temperature. The material with the highest capacity has an excess reversible storage of 3.23 wt % at 298 K and 170 bar without saturation, corresponding to 40.8 kg H(2)/m(3), comparable to the 2015 DOE system goal for volumetric density (40 kg/m(3)) at a safe operating pressure. These materials possess linear isotherms and enthalpies that rise on coverage, retain up to 100% of their adsorption capacities on warming from 77 to 298 K, and have no kinetic barrier to adsorption or desorption. In a practical system, these materials would use pressure instead of temperature as a toggle and can thus be used in compressed gas tanks, currently employed in the majority of hydrogen test vehicles, to dramatically increase the amount of hydrogen stored, and therefore range of any vehicle.

  2. Hydrogen molecule binding to unsaturated metal sites in metal-organic frameworks studied by neutron powder diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Brown, Craig; Neumann, Dan; Dinca, Mircea; Long, Jeffrey; Peterson, Vanessa; Kepert, Cameron

    2007-03-01

    Metal organic framework (MOF) materials have shown considerable potential for hydrogen storage arising from very large surface areas. However, the low binding energy of hydrogen molecules limits its storage capability to very low temperatures (hydrogen adsorption sites in a selected series of MOF materials with exposed unsaturated metal ions. Direct binding between the unsaturated metal ions and hydrogen molecules is observed and responsible for the enhanced initial hydrogen adsorption enthalpy. The different metals centers in these MOFs show different binding strength and interaction distances between the hydrogen molecule and metal ions. The organic linker also affects the overall H2 binding strength. Inelastic neutron scattering spectra of H2 in these MOFs are also discussed.

  3. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is largely unresponsive to low regulatory levels of hydrogen peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa-Lopes Ana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reversible oxidation of protein SH groups has been considered to be the basis of redox regulation by which changes in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 concentrations may control protein function. Several proteins become S-glutathionylated following exposure to H2O2 in a variety of cellular systems. In yeast, when using a high initial H2O2 dose, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH was identified as the major target of S-glutathionylation which leads to reversible inactivation of the enzyme. GAPDH inactivation by H2O2 functions to reroute carbohydrate flux to produce NADPH. Here we report the effect of low regulatory H2O2 doses on GAPDH activity and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results A calibrated and controlled method of H2O2 delivery - the steady-state titration - in which cells are exposed to constant, low, and known H2O2 concentrations, was used in this study. This technique, contrary to the common bolus addition, allows determining which H2O2 concentrations trigger specific biological responses. This work shows that both in exponential- and stationary-phase cells, low regulatory H2O2 concentrations induce a large upregulation of catalase, a fingerprint of the cellular oxidative stress response, but GAPDH oxidation and the ensuing activity decrease are only observed at death-inducing high H2O2 doses. GAPDH activity is constant upon incubation with sub-lethal H2O2 doses, but in stationary-phase cells there is a differential response in the expression of the three GAPDH isoenzymes: Tdh1p is strongly upregulated while Tdh2p/Tdh3p are slightly downregulated. Conclusions In yeast GAPDH activity is largely unresponsive to low to moderate H2O2 doses. This points to a scenario where (a cellular redoxins efficiently cope with levels of GAPDH oxidation induced by a vast range of sub-lethal H2O2 concentrations, (b inactivation of GAPDH cannot be considered a sensitive biomarker of H2O2-induced oxidation in vivo

  4. Determination of the stability of the uranyl ion sipped in {tau}-hydrogen phosphate of zirconium in sodic form; Determinacion de la estabilidad del ion uranilo sorbido en {tau}-hidrogenofosfato de zirconio en forma sodica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Fernandez V, S.M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Drot, R.; Simoni, E. [Universite de Paris-Sud-XI, Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Groupe de radiochimie, Bat. 100, 91406 Orsay (France)]. e-mail: edo@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    The stability of the uranyl sipped in the zirconium {tau}-hydrogen phosphate in sodic form ({tau}-NaZrP), was carried out characterizing the complexes formed by Laser spectroscopy in the visible region and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The material was prepared by a new synthesis technique working in nitrogen atmosphere and to low temperatures. The sorption of the uranyl ion was made in acid media with concentrations of 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -5} of uranyl nitrate and with ion forces of 0.1 and 0.5 M of NaClO{sub 4}. The spectra of induced fluorescence with laser (TRLFS) show that the uranyl is fixed in very acid media in three well differentiated species, to pH less acid, the specie of long half life disappears and are only those of short half life. The results of the binding energy obtained by XPS indicate that the binding energy of the uranyl confer it a stable character to the complex formed in the {tau}-NaZP, that makes to this material appropriate to retain to the uranyl in solution to high ion forces and in acid media. (Author)

  5. Rational design of a cytotoxic dinuclear Cu2 complex that binds by molecular recognition at two neighboring phosphates of the DNA backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jany, Thomas; Moreth, Alexander; Gruschka, Claudia; Sischka, Andy; Spiering, Andre; Dieding, Mareike; Wang, Ying; Samo, Susan Haji; Stammler, Anja; Bögge, Hartmut; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele; Anselmetti, Dario; Glaser, Thorsten

    2015-03-16

    The mechanism of the cytotoxic function of cisplatin and related anticancer drugs is based on their binding to the nucleobases of DNA. The development of new classes of anticancer drugs requires establishing other binding modes. Therefore, we performed a rational design for complexes that target two neighboring phosphates of the DNA backbone by molecular recognition resulting in a family of dinuclear complexes based on 2,7-disubstituted 1,8-naphthalenediol. This rigid backbone preorganizes the two metal ions for molecular recognition at the distance of two neighboring phosphates in DNA of 6-7 Å. Additionally, bulky chelating pendant arms in the 2,7-position impede nucleobase complexation by steric hindrance. We successfully synthesized the Cu(II)2 complex of the designed family of dinuclear complexes and studied its binding to dsDNA by independent ensemble and single-molecule methods like gel electrophoresis, precipitation, and titration experiments followed by UV-vis spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), as well as optical tweezers (OT) and magnetic tweezers (MT) DNA stretching. The observed irreversible binding of our dinuclear Cu(II)2 complex to dsDNA leads to a blocking of DNA synthesis as studied by polymerase chain reactions and cytotoxicity for human cancer cells.

  6. Enhanced Binding of a Non-hydrogen Bond Ligand to DNA by Introducing an Apurine/Apyrimidine Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Yong; NIU Zhenjiang; CHEN Jianrong; ZHANG Liangke

    2009-01-01

    Intercalators are well known for their DNA binding specificity by inserting between base pairs, whereas the binding event occurring to apurine/apyrimidine site (AP site)-containing DNA for this type of noncovalent interac-tion is still not highlighted although AP site is frequently in vivo produced in living cells. Here proflavine (PF) as an example is used to investigate the binding specificity of the AP site in DNA for a non-hydrogen bond iigand. Ex-perimental results indicate that the AP site should be the preferential binding site for PE The intrinsic binding con-stant of PF for the AP site is one order of magnitude greater than that occurring for PF intercalation. Additionally, the thermostability of the AP site-containing DNA is significantly increased after PF binding. The PF bound to the AP site should adopt a specific binding orientation distinguishable from that by which PF intercalated into base pairs. The results obtained here should be very useful for judging biochemical and biophysical effectiveness of small molecules based on their different binding behavior to DNA.

  7. Loss of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding by the C-terminal Tiam-1 pleckstrin homology domain prevents in vivo Rac1 activation without affecting membrane targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Mark A; Martinu, Lenka; Rossman, Kent L; Sondek, John; Lemmon, Mark A; Chou, Margaret M

    2003-03-28

    Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho family small GTPases invariably contain a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain that immediately follows their Dbl homology (DH) domain. Although the DH domain is responsible for GEF activity, the role of the PH domain is less clear. We previously reported that PH domains from several Dbl family members bind phosphoinositides with very low affinity (K(d) values in the 10 microM range). This suggests that, unlike several other PH domains, those from Dbl proteins will not function as independent membrane-targeting modules. To determine the functional relevance of low affinity phosphoinositide binding, we mutated the corresponding PH domain from Tiam-1 to abolish its weak, specific binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. We first confirmed in vitro that phosphoinositide binding by the isolated DH/PH domain was impaired by the mutations but that intrinsic GEF activity was unaffected. We then introduced the PH domain mutations into full-length Tiam-1 and found that its ability to activate Rac1 or serum response factor in vivo was abolished. Immunofluorescence studies showed that membrane targeting of Tiam-1 was essentially unaffected by mutations in the C-terminal PH domain. Our studies therefore indicate that low affinity phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding by the C-terminal PH domain may be critical for in vivo regulation and activity of Tiam-1 but that the PH domain exerts its regulatory effects without altering membrane targeting. We suggest instead that ligand binding to the PH domain induces conformational and/or orientational changes at the membrane surface that are required for maximum exchange activity of its adjacent DH domain.

  8. Simulations of hydrogen sorption in rht-MOF-1: identifying the binding sites through explicit polarization and quantum rotation calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Pham, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations of hydrogen sorption were performed in rht-MOF-1, a metal-organic framework (MOF) that consists of isophthalate groups joined by copper paddlewheel clusters and Cu3O trimers through tetrazolate moeities. This is a charged rht-MOF that contains extra-framework nitrate counterions within the material. For the simulations performed herein, excellent agreement with experiment was achieved for the simulated hydrogen sorption isotherms and calculated isosteric heat of adsorption, Qst, values only when using a polarizable potential. Thermodynamic agreement is demonstrated via comparing to experimental isotherms and binding sites are revealed by combining simulation and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data. Simulations involving explicit many-body polarization interactions assisted in the determination of the binding sites in rht-MOF-1 through the distribution of the induced dipoles that led to strong adsorbate interactions. Four distinct hydrogen sorption sites were determined from the polarization distribution: the nitrate ions located in the corners of the truncated tetrahedral cages, the Cu2+ ions of the paddlewheels that project into the truncated tetrahedral and truncated octahedral cages (Cu1 ions), the Cu2+ ions of the Cu3O trimers (Cu3 ions), and the sides of the paddlewheels in the cuboctahedral cage. The simulations revealed that the initial sorption sites for hydrogen in rht-MOF-1 are the nitrate ions; this site corresponds to the high initial Qst value for hydrogen (9.5 kJ mol-1) in the MOF. The radial distribution functions, g(r), about the Cu2+ ions at various loadings revealed that the Cu1 ions are the preferred open-metal sorption sites for hydrogen at low loading, while the Cu3 ions become occupied at higher loadings. The validation of the aforementioned sorption sites in rht-MOF-1 was confirmed by calculating the two-dimensional quantum rotational levels about each site and comparing the levels to the

  9. Crystal structure of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima for insights into the coordination of conformational changes and an inhibitor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenoya, Mihoko; Ohtaki, Akashi; Noguchi, Keiichi; Endo, Kiwamu; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Ohsawa, Kanju; Yajima, Shunsuke; Yohda, Masafumi

    2010-06-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate is a precursor of various isoprenoids and is produced by the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway in plastids of plants, protozoa and many eubacteria. A key enzyme in the MEP pathway, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), has been shown to be the target of fosmidomycin, which works as an antimalarial, antibacterial and herbicidal compound. In this paper, we report studies of kinetics and the crystal structures of the thermostable DXR from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima. Unlike the mesophilic DXRs, Thermotoga DXR (tDXR) showed activity only with Mg(2+) at its growth temperature. We solved the crystal structures of tDXR with and without fosmidomycin. The structure without fosmidomycin but unexpectedly bound with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD), revealing a new extra space available for potential drug design. This structure adopted the closed form by rigid domain rotation but without the flexible loop over the active site, which was considered as a novel conformation. Further, the conserved Asp residue responsible for cation binding seemed to play an important role in adjusting the position of fosmidomycin. Taken together, our kinetic and the crystal structures illustrate the binding mode of fosmidomycin that leads to its slow, tight binding according to the conformational changes of DXR.

  10. Role of receptor-attached phosphates in binding of visual and non-visual arrestins to G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Luis E; Kook, Seunghyi; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Ahmed, M Rafiuddin; Gurevich, Eugenia V; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2012-03-16

    Arrestins are a small family of proteins that regulate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Arrestins specifically bind to phosphorylated active receptors, terminating G protein coupling, targeting receptors to endocytic vesicles, and initiating G protein-independent signaling. The interaction of rhodopsin-attached phosphates with Lys-14 and Lys-15 in β-strand I was shown to disrupt the interaction of α-helix I, β-strand I, and the C-tail of visual arrestin-1, facilitating its transition into an active receptor-binding state. Here we tested the role of conserved lysines in homologous positions of non-visual arrestins by generating K2A mutants in which both lysines were replaced with alanines. K2A mutations in arrestin-1, -2, and -3 significantly reduced their binding to active phosphorhodopsin in vitro. The interaction of arrestins with several GPCRs in intact cells was monitored by a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based assay. BRET data confirmed the role of Lys-14 and Lys-15 in arrestin-1 binding to non-cognate receptors. However, this was not the case for non-visual arrestins in which the K2A mutations had little effect on net BRET(max) values for the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine (M2R), β(2)-adrenergic (β(2)AR), or D2 dopamine receptors. Moreover, a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of M2R interacted with wild type non-visual arrestins normally, whereas phosphorylation-deficient β(2)AR mutants bound arrestins at 20-50% of the level of wild type β(2)AR. Thus, the contribution of receptor-attached phosphates to arrestin binding varies depending on the receptor-arrestin pair. Although arrestin-1 always depends on receptor phosphorylation, its role in the recruitment of arrestin-2 and -3 is much greater in the case of β(2)AR than M2R and D2 dopamine receptor.

  11. Ferroelectric phase transition in hydrogen-bonded 2-aminopyridine phosphate (NC sub 4 H sub 4 NH sub 2)centre dot H sub 3 PO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Czapla, Z; Waskowska, A

    2003-01-01

    A new crystal of 2-aminopyridine phosphate (NC sub 4 H sub 4 NH sub 2)centre dot H sub 3 PO sub 4 has been grown and its x-ray structure and physical properties were studied. At room temperature the crystals are monoclinic, space group C2/c. The flat 2-aminopyridine cations are hydrogen bonded to the anionic [PO sub 4 ] groups. The interesting feature of the crystal structure is the three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds including, among others, two strong, symmetrical O centre dot centre dot centre dot H, H centre dot centre dot centre dot O interactions with disordered proton locations. Symmetrically related PO sub 4 anions linked through these protons form infinite (PO sub 4) subinfinity chains along the crystal a-axis. The anomalies in the temperature dependence of the electric permittivity showed that the crystal undergoes ferroelectric phase transition at T sub c = 103.5 K. The spontaneous polarization takes place along the crystal a-axis, being parallel to the chains of the hydrogen-bonded PO sub ...

  12. Characterization of the sterol and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate binding properties of Golgi-associated OSBP-related protein 9 (ORP9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Liu

    Full Text Available Oxysterol binding protein (OSBP and OSBP-related proteins (ORPS have a conserved lipid-binding fold that accommodates cholesterol, oxysterols and/or phospholipids. The diversity of OSBP/ORPs and their potential ligands has complicated the analysis of transfer and signalling properties of this mammalian gene family. In this study we explored the use of the fluorescent sterol cholestatrienol (CTL to measure sterol binding by ORP9 and competition by other putative ligands. Relative to cholesterol, CTL and dehydroergosterol (DHE were poor ligands for OSBP. In contrast, both long (ORP9L and short (ORP9S variants of ORP9 rapidly extracted CTL, and to a lesser extent DHE, from liposomes. ORP9L and ORP9S also extracted [32P]phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI-4P from liposomes, which was inhibited by mutating two conserved histidine residues (HH488,489AA at the entrance to the binding pocket but not by a mutation in the lid region that inhibited cholesterol binding. Results of direct binding and competition assays showed that phosphatidylserine was poorly extracted from liposomes by ORP9 compared to CTL and PI-4P. ORP9L and PI-4P did not co-localize in the trans-Golgi/TGN of HeLa cells, and siRNA silencing of ORP9L expression did not affect PI-4P distribution in the Golgi apparatus. However, transient overexpression of ORP9L or ORP9S in CHO cells, but not the corresponding PI-4P binding mutants, prevented immunostaining of Golgi-associated PI-4P. The apparent sequestration of Golgi PI-4P by ORP9S was identified as a possible mechanism for its growth inhibitory effects. These studies identify ORP9 as a dual sterol/PI-4P binding protein that could regulate PI-4P in the Golgi apparatus.

  13. Triiodothyronine (T3)-associated upregulation and downregulation of nuclear T3 binding in the human fibroblast cell (MRC-5)--stimulation of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase, and 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase by insulin, but not by T3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The specific nuclear binding of triiodothyronine (T3) (NBT3) and the activity of malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD), and 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase (6PGD) were studied in the human fibroblast cell (MRC-5). The overall apparent binding affinity (Ka) was 2.7 x 10(9) L...

  14. Influence of Different Phosphate Concentrations on Hydrogen Production by Anaerobic Granular Sludge%不同磷酸盐浓度对厌氧颗粒污泥发酵产氢的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝伟平; 周兴求; 伍健东

    2012-01-01

    The experiments were carried out to study the fermentative bio-hydrogen production by granular sludge under conditions of different phosphate concentrations with high concentrated organic wastewater as fermentation substrate. The results showed that, the phosphate under concentration of 6 mmol · L-1 ~ 8 mmol · L-1 had a catalytic effect on hydrogen production. The maximum hydrogen content of 56. 3% was appeared at phosphate concentration of 8 mmol · L-1. The phosphate concentration, COD removal rate and effluent VFA concentrations gradually increased with the increase of phosphate concentration. But hydrogen production decreased when the phosphate concentration reached to 10 mmol · L-1, due to the imbalance of nutrition and the activity of hydrogen - producing acetic bacteria was inhibited.%实验以高浓度有机废水为发酵底物,接种颗粒污泥进行厌氧发酵制氢,研究不同磷酸盐浓度条件下的产氢效果.结果表明:当磷酸盐的浓度为6mmol·L-1~8mmol·L-1时,对有机废水制氢具有促进作用,在浓度为8mmol·L-1时,氢气含量为56.3%达到最大.随着磷酸盐浓度的增加,化学需氧量(COD)去除率和出水挥发性脂肪酸(VFA)浓度也逐步提高,但当磷酸盐浓度升至10 mmol·L-1时,由于进水营养比例失衡,产氢产乙酸菌群的活性受到抑制,产气率也因此减少.

  15. Amide-mediated hydrogen bonding at organic crystal/water interfaces enables selective endotoxin binding with picomolar affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Thirumoorthi, Navanita; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-05-22

    Since the discovery of endotoxins as the primary toxic component of Gram-negative bacteria, researchers have pursued the quest for molecules that detect, neutralize, and remove endotoxins. Selective removal of endotoxins is particularly challenging for protein solutions and, to this day, no general method is available. Here, we report that crystals of the purine-derived compound allantoin selectively adsorb endotoxins with picomolar affinity through amide-mediated hydrogen bonding in aqueous solutions. Atom force microscopy and chemical inhibition experiments indicate that endotoxin adsorption is largely independent from hydrophobic and ionic interactions with allantoin crystals and is mediated by hydrogen bonding with amide groups at flat crystal surfaces. The small size (500 nm) and large specific surface area of allantoin crystals results in a very high endotoxin-binding capacity (3 × 10(7) EU/g) which compares favorably with known endotoxin-binding materials. These results provide a proof-of-concept for hydrogen bond-based molecular recognition processes in aqueous solutions and establish a practical method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions.

  16. Urinary stone formation: Efficacy of seed extract of Ensete superbum (Roxb.) Cheesman on growth inhibition of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, K. J.; George, K. V.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of aqueous seed extract of Ensete superbum (Roxb.) Cheesman on in vitro crystallization and growth patterns of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO4·2H2O, CHPD) crystals was studied using single diffusion gel growth technique. Reduction in growth of CHPD crystals was noticed with increasing concentrations of seed extract. The morphology of CHPD or brushite crystals was studied by microscopy. The structural changes of the treated crystals were assessed by SEM, FT-IR, XRD and TGA/DTA analysis. It is expected that this multidisciplinary approach for in vitro crystallization and characterization of CHPD crystals will provide a better explanation to develop novel strategies for prevention of urinary stones.

  17. Indigo Carmine-Cu complex probe exhibiting dual colorimetric/fluorimetric sensing for selective determination of mono hydrogen phosphate ion and its logic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Moaddeli, Ali; Asghari, Khadijeh

    2017-08-01

    A new selective probe based on copper complex of Indigo Carmine (IC-Cu2) for colorimetric, naked-eye, and fluorimetric recognition of mono hydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion in H2O/DMSO (4:1 v/v, 1.0 mmol L- 1 HEPES buffer solution pH 7.5) was developed. Detection limit of HPO42 - determination, achieved by fluorimetric and 3lorimetric method, are 0.071 and 1.46 μmol L- 1, respectively. Potential, therefore is clearly available in IC-Cu2 complex to detect HPO42 - in micromolar range via dual visible color change and fluorescence response. Present method shows high selectivity toward HPO42 - over other phosphate species and other anions and was successfully utilized for analysis of P2O5 content of a fertilizer sample. The results obtained by proposed chemosensor presented good agreement with those obtained the colorimetric reference method. INHIBIT and IMPLICATION logic gates operating at molecular level have been achieved using Cu2 + and HPO42 - as chemical inputs and UV-Vis absorbance signal as output.

  18. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  19. Interaction between the PH and START domains of ceramide transfer protein competes with phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate binding by the PH domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashek, Jennifer; Bouyain, Samuel; Fu, Mingui; Li, Yong; Berkes, Dusan; Yao, Xiaolan

    2017-08-25

    De novo synthesis of the sphingolipid sphingomyelin requires non-vesicular transport of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi by the multidomain protein ceramide transfer protein (CERT). CERT's N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain targets it to the Golgi by binding to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) in the Golgi membrane, whereas its C-terminal StAR-related lipid transfer domain (START) carries out ceramide transfer. Hyperphosphorylation of a serine-rich motif immediately after the PH domain decreases both PtdIns(4)P binding and ceramide transfer by CERT. This down-regulation requires both the PH and START domains, suggesting a possible inhibitory interaction between the two domains. In this study we show that isolated PH and START domains interact with each other. The crystal structure of a PH-START complex revealed that the START domain binds to the PH domain at the same site for PtdIns(4)P-binding, suggesting that the START domain competes with PtdIns(4)P for association with the PH domain. We further report that mutations disrupting the PH-START interaction increase both PtdIns(4)P-binding affinity and ceramide transfer activity of a CERT-serine-rich phosphorylation mimic. We also found that these mutations increase the Golgi localization of CERT inside the cell, consistent with enhanced PtdIns(4)P binding of the mutant. Collectively, our structural, biochemical, and cellular investigations provide important structural insight into the regulation of CERT function and localization. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. An Innovative Approach to Treat Incisors Hypomineralization (MIH: A Combined Use of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Hydrogen Peroxide—A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Mastroberardino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH is characterized by a developmentally derived deficiency in mineral enamel. Affected teeth present demarcated enamel opacities, ranging from white to brown; also hypoplasia can be associated. Patient frequently claims aesthetic discomfort if anterior teeth are involved. This problem leads patients to request a bleaching treatment to improve aestheticconditions.Nevertheless, hydrogen peroxide can produce serious side-effects, resulting from further mineral loss. Microabrasion and/or a composite restoration are the treatments of choice in teeth with mild/moderate MIH, but they also need enamel loss. Recently, a new remineralizing agent based on Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP has been proposed to be effective in hypomineralized enamel, improving also aesthetic conditions. The present paper presents a case report of a young man with white opacities on incisors treated with a combined use of CPP-ACP mousse and hydrogen peroxide gel to correct the aesthetic defect. The patient was instructed to use CPP-ACP for two hours per day for three months in order to obtain enamel remineralization followed by a combined use of CPP-ACP and bleaching agent for further two months. At the end of this five-month treatment, a noticeable aesthetic improvement of the opacities was observed.

  1. An Innovative Approach to Treat Incisors Hypomineralization (MIH): A Combined Use of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Hydrogen Peroxide-A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroberardino, Stefano; Campus, Guglielmo; Strohmenger, Laura; Villa, Alessandro; Cagetti, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is characterized by a developmentally derived deficiency in mineral enamel. Affected teeth present demarcated enamel opacities, ranging from white to brown; also hypoplasia can be associated. Patient frequently claims aesthetic discomfort if anterior teeth are involved. This problem leads patients to request a bleaching treatment to improve aestheticconditions.Nevertheless, hydrogen peroxide can produce serious side-effects, resulting from further mineral loss. Microabrasion and/or a composite restoration are the treatments of choice in teeth with mild/moderate MIH, but they also need enamel loss. Recently, a new remineralizing agent based on Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) has been proposed to be effective in hypomineralized enamel, improving also aesthetic conditions. The present paper presents a case report of a young man with white opacities on incisors treated with a combined use of CPP-ACP mousse and hydrogen peroxide gel to correct the aesthetic defect. The patient was instructed to use CPP-ACP for two hours per day for three months in order to obtain enamel remineralization followed by a combined use of CPP-ACP and bleaching agent for further two months. At the end of this five-month treatment, a noticeable aesthetic improvement of the opacities was observed.

  2. Ab initio design of Ca-decorated organic frameworks for high capacity molecular hydrogen storage with enhanced binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y. Y.; Lee, Kyuho; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Zhang, S. B.

    2009-07-01

    Ab initio calculations show that Ca can decorate organic linkers of metal-organic framework, MOF-5, with a binding energy of 1.25 eV. The Ca-decorated MOF-5 can store molecular hydrogen (H2) in both high gravimetric (4.6 wt %) and high volumetric (36 g/l) capacities. Even higher capacities (5.7 wt % and 45 g/l) can be obtained in a rationally designed covalent organic framework system, COF-α, with decorated Ca. Both density functional theory and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation calculations show that the H2 binding in these systems is significantly stronger than the van der Waals interactions, which is required for H2 storage at near ambient conditions.

  3. Regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase: conformational changes upon phenylalanine binding detected by hydrogen/deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Dangott, Lawrence J; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2010-04-20

    Phenylalanine acts as an allosteric activator of the tetrahydropterin-dependent enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry has been used to gain insight into local conformational changes accompanying activation of rat phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine. Peptides in the regulatory and catalytic domains that lie in the interface between these two domains show large increases in the extent of deuterium incorporation from solvent in the presence of phenylalanine. In contrast, the effects of phenylalanine on the exchange kinetics of a mutant enzyme lacking the regulatory domain are limited to peptides surrounding the binding site for the amino acid substrate. These results support a model in which the N-terminus of the protein acts as an inhibitory peptide, with phenylalanine binding causing a conformational change in the regulatory domain that alters the interaction between the catalytic and regulatory domains.

  4. Inositol phosphates compete with nucleic acids for binding to bovine leukemia virus matrix protein: implications for deltaretroviral assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualley, Dominic F; Lackey, Crystal M; Paterson, Justin P

    2013-08-01

    The matrix (MA) domain of retroviral Gag proteins plays a crucial role in virion assembly. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a lentivirus, the presence of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate triggers a conformational change allowing the MA domain to bind the plasma membrane (PM). In this study, the MA protein from bovine leukemia virus (BLV) was used to investigate the mechanism of viral Gag binding to the membrane during replication of a deltaretrovirus. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the binding affinity of MA for two RNA constructs derived from the BLV genome as well as for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The importance of electrostatic interactions and the ability of inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) to compete with nucleic acids for binding to MA were also investigated. Our data show that IP6 effectively competes with RNA and DNA for BLV MA binding, while [NaCl] of greater than 100 mM is required to produce any observable effect on DNA-MA binding. These results suggest that BLV assembly may be highly dependent on the specific interaction of the MA domain with components of the PM, as observed previously with HIV-1. The mode of MA binding to nucleic acids and the implications for BLV assembly are discussed.

  5. Reduction of Oxygen Bound with Hemoglobin by Electrolytic Method Using Hydrogen Gas in Phosphate-buffered Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Hemoglobin(Hb) is important as an oxygen carrier.The trace amount of oxygen in Hb was reduced by an electrolytic method using hydrogen as an electron donor.The deoxygenated Hb(deoxyHb) was stable against heat treatment at 60 ℃ with little precipitant.This method is safe,fast,and would be of potential use for large scale purification of Hb.

  6. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  7. Identification of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH as a binding protein for a 68-kDa Bacillus thuringiensis parasporal protein cytotoxic against leukaemic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadarajah Vishna

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt, an ubiquitous gram-positive spore-forming bacterium forms parasporal proteins during the stationary phase of its growth. Recent findings of selective human cancer cell-killing activity in non-insecticidal Bt isolates resulted in a new category of Bt parasporal protein called parasporin. However, little is known about the receptor molecules that bind parasporins and the mechanism of anti-cancer activity. A Malaysian Bt isolate, designated Bt18 produces parasporal protein that exhibit preferential cytotoxic activity for human leukaemic T cells (CEM-SS but is non-cytotoxic to normal T cells or other cancer cell lines such as human cervical cancer (HeLa, human breast cancer (MCF-7 and colon cancer (HT-29 suggesting properties similar to parasporin. In this study we aim to identify the binding protein for Bt18 in human leukaemic T cells. Methods Bt18 parasporal protein was separated using Mono Q anion exchange column attached to a HPLC system and antibody was raised against the purified 68-kDa parasporal protein. Receptor binding assay was used to detect the binding protein for Bt18 parasporal protein in CEM-SS cells and the identified protein was sent for N-terminal sequencing. NCBI protein BLAST was used to analyse the protein sequence. Double immunofluorescence staining techniques was applied to localise Bt18 and binding protein on CEM-SS cell. Results Anion exchange separation of Bt18 parasporal protein yielded a 68-kDa parasporal protein with specific cytotoxic activity. Polyclonal IgG (anti-Bt18 for the 68-kDa parasporal protein was successfully raised and purified. Receptor binding assay showed that Bt18 parasporal protein bound to a 36-kDa protein from the CEM-SS cells lysate. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 36-kDa protein was GKVKVGVNGFGRIGG. NCBI protein BLAST revealed that the binding protein was Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH. Double immunofluorescence staining showed

  8. The role of multiple hydrogen-bonding groups in specific alcohol binding sites in proteins: insights from structural studies of LUSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thode, Anna B; Kruse, Schoen W; Nix, Jay C; Jones, David N M

    2008-03-07

    It is now generally accepted that many of the physiological effects of alcohol consumption are a direct result of binding to specific sites in neuronal proteins such as ion channels or other components of neuronal signaling cascades. Binding to these targets generally occurs in water-filled pockets and leads to alterations in protein structure and dynamics. However, the precise interactions required to confer alcohol sensitivity to a particular protein remain undefined. Using information from the previously solved crystal structures of the Drosophila melanogaster protein LUSH in complexes with short-chain alcohols, we have designed and tested the effects of specific amino acid substitutions on alcohol binding. The effects of these substitutions, specifically S52A, T57S, and T57A, were examined using a combination of molecular dynamics, X-ray crystallography, fluorescence spectroscopy, and thermal unfolding. These studies reveal that the binding of ethanol is highly sensitive to small changes in the composition of the alcohol binding site. We find that T57 is the most critical residue for binding alcohols; the T57A substitution completely abolishes binding, while the T57S substitution differentially affects ethanol binding compared to longer-chain alcohols. The additional requirement for a potential hydrogen-bond acceptor at position 52 suggests that both the presence of multiple hydrogen-bonding groups and the identity of the hydrogen-bonding residues are critical for defining an ethanol binding site. These results provide new insights into the detailed chemistry of alcohol's interactions with proteins.

  9. Identification of inhibitors that target dual-specificity phosphatase 5 provide new insights into the binding requirements for the two phosphate pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Terrence S; Span, Elise A; Kalous, Kelsey S; Bongard, Robert; Gastonguay, Adam; Lepley, Michael A; Kutty, Raman G; Nayak, Jaladhi; Bohl, Chris; Lange, Rachel G; Sarker, Majher I; Talipov, Marat R; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani; Sem, Daniel S

    2015-08-19

    Dual-specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5) plays a central role in vascular development and disease. We present a p-nitrophenol phosphate (pNPP) based enzymatic assay to screen for inhibitors of the phosphatase domain of DUSP5. pNPP is a mimic of the phosphorylated tyrosine on the ERK2 substrate (pERK2) and binds the DUSP5 phosphatase domain with a Km of 7.6 ± 0.4 mM. Docking followed by inhibitor verification using the pNPP assay identified a series of polysulfonated aromatic inhibitors that occupy the DUSP5 active site in the region that is likely occupied by the dual-phosphorylated ERK2 substrate tripeptide (pThr-Glu-pTyr). Secondary assays were performed with full length DUSP5 with ERK2 as substrate. The most potent inhibitor has a naphthalene trisulfonate (NTS) core. A search for similar compounds in a drug database identified suramin, a dimerized form of NTS. While suramin appears to be a potent and competitive inhibitor (25 ± 5 μM), binding to the DUSP5 phosphatase domain more tightly than the monomeric ligands of which it is comprised, it also aggregates. Further ligand-based screening, based on a pharmacophore derived from the 7 Å separation of sulfonates on inhibitors and on sulfates present in the DUSP5 crystal structure, identified a disulfonated and phenolic naphthalene inhibitor (CSD (3) _2320) with IC₅₀ of 33 μM that is similar to NTS and does not aggregate. The new DUSP5 inhibitors we identify in this study typically have sulfonates 7 Å apart, likely positioning them where the two phosphates of the substrate peptide (pThr-Glu-pTyr) bind, with one inhibitor also positioning a phenolic hydroxyl where the water nucleophile may reside. Polysulfonated aromatic compounds do not commonly appear in drugs and have a tendency to aggregate. One FDA-approved polysulfonated drug, suramin, inhibits DUSP5 and also aggregates. Docking and modeling studies presented herein identify polysulfonated aromatic inhibitors that do not aggregate, and provide

  10. Multi-spectral characterization & effect of metal ions on the binding of bovine serum albumin upon interaction with a lincosamide antibiotic drug, clindamycin phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meti, Manjunath D; Byadagi, Kirthi S; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A

    2014-09-05

    The interaction of clindamycin phosphate (CP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) is studied by using fluorescence spectra, UV-visible absorption, synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS), CD, 3D fluorescence spectra and lifetime measurements under simulated physiological conditions. CP effectively quenched intrinsic fluorescence of BSA. The binding constants KA values are 2.540×10(5), 4.960×10(5), 7.207×10(5) L mol(-1), the number of binding sites n and corresponding thermodynamic parameters ΔG(o), ΔH(o) and ΔS(o) between CP and BSA were calculated at different temperatures. The interaction between CP and BSA occurs through dynamic quenching and the effect of CP on the conformation of BSA was also analyzed using SFS. The average binding distance r between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (CP) was determined based on Förster's theory. The results of fluorescence spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra and SFS show that the secondary structure of the protein has been changed in the presence of CP.

  11. The glycine brace: a component of Rab, Rho, and Ran GTPases associated with hinge regions of guanine- and phosphate-binding loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuwald Andrew F

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ras-like GTPases function as on-off switches in intracellular signalling pathways and include the Rab, Rho/Rac, Ran, Ras, Arf, Sar and Gα families. How these families have evolutionarily diverged from each other at the sequence level provides clues to underlying mechanisms associated with their functional specialization. Results Bayesian analysis of divergent patterns within a multiple alignment of Ras-like GTPase sequences identifies a structural component, termed here the glycine brace, as the feature that most distinguishes Rab, Rho/Rac, Ran and (to some degree Ras family GTPases from other Ras-like GTPases. The glycine brace consists of four residues: An aromatic residue that forms a stabilizing CH-π interaction with a conserved glycine at the start of the guanine-binding loop; a second aromatic residue, which is nearly always a tryptophan, that likewise forms stabilizing CH-π and NH-π interactions with a glycine at the start of the phosphate-binding P-loop; and two other residues (typically an aspartate and a serine or threonine that, together with a conserved buried water molecule, form a network of interactions connecting the two aromatic residues. Conclusion It is proposed that the two glycine residues function as hinges and that the glycine brace influences guanine nucleotide binding and release by interacting with these hinges.

  12. Replacement of water molecules in a phosphate binding site by furanoside-appended lin-benzoguanine ligands of tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barandun, Luzi J; Ehrmann, Frederik R; Zimmerli, Daniel; Immekus, Florian; Giroud, Maude; Grünenfelder, Claudio; Schweizer, W Bernd; Bernet, Bruno; Betz, Michael; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard; Diederich, François

    2015-01-02

    The enzyme tRNA-guanine transglycosylase has been identified as a drug target for the foodborne illness shigellosis. A key challenge in structure-based design for this enzyme is the filling of the polar ribose-34 pocket. Herein, we describe a novel series of ligands consisting of furanoside-appended lin-benzoguanines. They were designed to replace a conserved water cluster and differ by the functional groups at C(2) and C(3) of the furanosyl moiety being either OH or OMe. The unfavorable desolvation of Asp102 and Asp280, which are located close to the ribose-34 pocket, had a significant impact on binding affinity. While the enzyme has tRNA as its natural substrate, X-ray co-crystal structures revealed that the furanosyl moieties of the ligands are not accommodated in the tRNA ribose-34 site, but at the location of the adjacent phosphate group. A remarkable similarity of the position of the oxygen atoms in these two structures suggests furanosides as a potential phosphate isoster. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Bulkiness or aromatic nature of tyrosine-143 of actin is important for the weak binding between F-actin and myosin-ADP-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomibuchi, Yuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Uyeda, Taro Q.P. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki, E-mail: tw007@nasu.bio.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Department of Judo Therapy, Faculty of Medical Technology, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    ) of the replaced amino acid molecule. Because 1/K{sub app} reflects the affinity of F-actin for the myosin–ADP-phosphate intermediate (M.ADP.Pi) through the weak binding, these data suggest that the bulkiness or the aromatic nature of the tyrosin-143 is important for the initial binding of the M.ADP.Pi intermediate with F-actin but not for later processes such as the phosphate release.

  14. The Binding And Release of Oxygen And Hydrogen Peroxide are Directed 1 By a Hydrophobic Tunnel in Cholesterol Oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.; Lyubimov, A.Y.; Brammer, L.; Vrielink, A.; Sampson, N.S.

    2009-05-12

    The usage by enzymes of specific binding pathways for gaseous substrates or products is debated. The crystal structure of the redox enzyme cholesterol oxidase, determined at sub-angstrom resolution, revealed a hydrophobic tunnel that may serve as a binding pathway for oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. This tunnel is formed by a cascade of conformational rearrangements and connects the active site with the exterior surface of the protein. To elucidate the relationship between this tunnel and gas binding and release, three mutant enzymes were constructed to block the tunnel or its putative gate. Mutation of the proposed gating residue Asn485 to Asp or tunnel residue Phe359 or Gly347 to Trp or Asn reduces the catalytic efficiency of oxidation. The K mO 2 increases from 300 +/- 35 microM for the wild-type enzyme to 617 +/- 15 microM for the F359W mutant. The k cat for the F359W mutant-catalyzed reaction decreases 13-fold relative to that of the wild-type-catalyzed reaction. The N485D and G347N mutants could not be saturated with oxygen. Transfer of hydride from the sterol to the flavin prosthetic group is no longer rate-limiting for these tunnel mutants. The steady-state kinetics of both wild-type and tunnel mutant enzymes are consistent with formation of a ternary complex of steroid and oxygen during catalysis. Furthermore, kinetic cooperativity with respect to molecular oxygen is observed with the tunnel mutants, but not with the wild-type enzyme. A rate-limiting conformational change for binding and release of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, respectively, is consistent with the cooperative kinetics. In the atomic-resolution structure of F359W, the indole ring of the tryptophan completely fills the tunnel and is observed in only a single conformation. The size of the indole is proposed to limit conformational rearrangement of residue 359 that leads to tunnel opening in the wild-type enzyme. Overall, these results substantiate the functional importance of the tunnel for

  15. Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding of Arabidopsis trehalose-phosphate synthase 5 in response to 2-deoxyglucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthill, Jean E; Meek, Sarah E M; Morrice, Nick

    2006-01-01

    -like domains, although whether these have enzymatic activity is unknown. In this paper, we show that TPS5, 6 and 7 are phosphoproteins that bind to 14-3-3 proteins, by using 14-3-3 affinity chromatography, 14-3-3 overlay assays, and by co-immunoprecipitating TPS5 and 14-3-3 isoforms from cell extracts. GST...

  16. Interaction of molecular hydrogen with open transition metal centers for enhanced binding in metal-organic frameworks: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochan, Rohini C; Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-19

    Molecular hydrogen is known to form stable, "nonclassical" sigma complexes with transition metal centers that are stabilized by donor-acceptor interactions and electrostatics. In this computational study, we establish that strong H2 sorption sites can be obtained in metal-organic frameworks by incorporating open transition metal sites on the organic linkers. Using density functional theory and energy decomposition analysis, we investigate the nature and characteristics of the H2 interaction with models of exposed open metal binding sites {half-sandwich piano-stool shaped complexes of the form (Arene)ML(3- n)(H2)n [M=Cr, Mo, V(-), Mn(+); Arene = C6H5X (X=H, F, Cl, OCH3, NH2, CH3, CF3) or C6H3Y2X (Y=COOH, X=CF3, Cl; L=CO; n=1-3]}. The metal-H2 bond dissociation energy of the studied complexes is calculated to be between 48 and 84 kJ/mol, based on the introduction of arene substituents, changes to the metal core, and of charge-balancing ligands. Thus, design of the binding site controls the H2 binding affinity and could be potentially used to control the magnitude of the H2 interaction energy to achieve reversible sorption characteristics at ambient conditions. Energy decomposition analysis illuminates both the possibilities and present challenges associated with rational materials design.

  17. Nature of the Hydrogen Binding in Metal Organic Frameworks with Exposed Transition Metal Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Yildirim, Taner

    2008-03-01

    MOFs with exposed transition metal (TM) sites were recently found to exhibit significantly larger experimental heat of H2 adsorption than classical MOFs, thus attracted great attention. [1, 2] Understanding the nature of the H2 interaction with the exposed metal sites is of critical importance for the further development of these materials. Using Mn4Cl-MOF as an example, here we show that the H2 binding with the exposed TM site is not of the expected Kubas type, in strong contrast to ``similar'' systems investigated previously (e.g., ref. [3] and [4]). In Mn4Cl-MOF, there are a) no charge transfer from TM to H2, b) no significant H-H bond elongation, and c) no evidence of any H2-σ^* Mn-d orbital hybridization. We also study the H2 binding as a function of Mn4-magnetic spin configurations, and find no significant effect of the magnetic state on the binding energy. We further reveal that the major contribution to the overall binding is classical Coulomb interaction arising from the small charge overlap of H2-σ and Mn-d orbitals. This coulomb interaction is very anisotropic, and when the quantum nature of H2-orientation is taken into account, the actual binding energy is significantly reduced from the calculated classical binding energy. [1] J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 16876 (2006). [2] Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 46, 1419 (2007). [3] Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 087205 (2005). [4] Phys. Rev. B 76, 085434 (2007).

  18. The role of hydrogen bonding in the thermal expansion and dehydration of brushite, di-calcium phosphate dihydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, P. F.; Knight, K. S.; Houwen, J. A. M. Van Der; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2004-12-01

    The unit-cell and atomic parameters of perdeuterated brushite have been extracted from Rietveld analysis of neutron powder diffraction data within the temperature range 4.2 to 470 K. The thermal expansion of brushite is anisotropic, with the largest expansion along the b axis due principally to the effect of the O(1)···D(4) and O(3)···D(2) hydrogen bonds. Expansion along the c axis, influenced by the Ow1···D(5) interwater hydrogen bond, is also large. The high temperature limits for the expansion coefficients for the unit-cell edges a, b and c are 9.7(5) × 10-6, 3.82(9) × 10-5 and 5.54(5) × 10-5 K-1, respectively, and for the cell volume it is 9.7(1) × 10-5 K-1. The β angle displays oscillatory variation, and empirical data analysis results in αβ = 1.28(3) × 10-6sin(0.0105 T) K-1, within this temperature range. The evolution of the thermal expansion tensor of brushite has been calculated between 50 ≤T≤ 400 K. At 300 K the magnitudes of the principal axes are α11 = 50(6) × 10-6 K-1, α22 = 26.7(7) × 10-6 K-1 and α33 = 7.0(5) × 10-6 K-1. The intermediate axis, α22, is parallel to b, and using IRE convention for the tensor orthonormal basis, the axes α11 and α33 have directions equal to (-0.228, 0, -0.974) and (-0.974, 0, 0.228) respectively. Under the conditions of these experiments, the onset of dehydration occurred at temperatures above 400 K. Bond valence analysis combined with assessments of the thermal evolution of the bonding within brushite suggests that dehydration is precipitated through instabilities in the chemical environment of the second water molecule.

  19. Co-production of hydrogen and ethanol from glucose by modification of glycolytic pathways in Escherichia coli - from Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway to pentose phosphate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Eunhee; Sekar, Balaji Sundara; Raj, Subramanian Mohan; Park, Sunghoon

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen (H2) production from glucose by dark fermentation suffers from the low yield. As a solution to this problem, co-production of H2 and ethanol, both of which are good biofuels, has been suggested. To this end, using Escherichia coli, activation of pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, which can generate more NADPH than the Embden-Meyhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway, was attempted. Overexpression of two key enzymes in the branch nodes of the glycolytic pathway, Zwf and Gnd, significantly improved the co-production of H2 and ethanol with concomitant reduction of pyruvate secretion. Gene expression analysis and metabolic flux analysis (MFA) showed that, upon overexpression of Zwf and Gnd, glucose assimilation through the PP pathway, compared with that of the EMP or Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway, was greatly enhanced. The maximum co-production yields were 1.32 mol H2 mol(-1) glucose and 1.38 mol ethanol mol(-1) glucose, respectively. It is noteworthy that the glycolysis and the amount of NAD(P)H formed under anaerobic conditions could be altered by modifying (the activity of) several key enzymes. Our strategy could be applied for the development of industrial strains for biological production of reduced chemicals and biofuels which suffers from lack of reduced co-factors.

  20. A Raman spectroscopic study of the mono-hydrogen phosphate mineral dorfmanite Na 2(PO 3OH)·2H 2O and in comparison with brushite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L.; Palmer, Sara J.; Xi, Yunfei

    2011-11-01

    Aspects of the molecular structure of the mineral dorfmanite Na 2(PO 3OH)·2H 2O were determined by Raman spectroscopy. The mineral originated from the Kedykverpakhk Mt., Lovozero, Kola Peninsula, Russia. Raman bands are assigned to the hydrogen phosphate units. The intense Raman band at 949 cm -1 and the less intense band at 866 cm -1 are assigned to the PO 3 and POH stretching vibrations. Bands at 991, 1066 and 1141 cm -1 are assigned to the ν3 antisymmetric stretching modes. Raman bands at 393, 413 and 448 cm -1 and 514, 541 and 570 cm -1 are attributed to the ν2 and ν4 bending modes of the HPO 4 units, respectively. Raman bands at 3373, 3443 and 3492 cm -1 are assigned to water stretching vibrations. POH stretching vibrations are identified by bands at 2904, 3080 and 3134 cm -1. Raman spectroscopy has proven very useful for the study of the structure of the mineral dorfmanite.

  1. Effects of mutagenesis of aspartic acid residues in the putative phosphoribosyl diphosphate binding site of Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase on metal ion specificity and ribose 5-phosphate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Nilsson, Dan; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    an increase in KM for ribose 5-phosphate in the presence of at least one of the divalent metal ions Mg2+, Mn2+, Co2+, or Cd2+, with the most dramatic changes revealed by the D220E and D220F enzymes in the presence of Co2+ and the D221A enzyme in the presence of Mn2+ or Co2+. The D220F and D221A enzymes both...... showed large decreases in Vapp in the presence of the various divalent metal ions, except for the D221A enzyme in the presence of Co2+. Vapp of the D220E enzyme was similar to that of the wild-type enzyme in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, or Cd2+, whereas the Vapp was increased in the presence of Co2+. Vapp...... enzymes were dependent on the metal ion present, suggesting a function of the investigated aspartic acid residues both in the binding of ribose 5-phosphate, possibly via a divalent metal ion, and in the interaction with a divalent metal ion during catalysis...

  2. Magnetic resonance studies of atomic hydrogen at zero field and low temperature. Recombination and binding on liquid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jochemsen, R.; Morrow, M.; Berlinsky, A.J.; Hardy, W.N. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Physics)

    1982-07-01

    Magnetic resonance studies at zero field are reported for atomic hydrogen gas confined in a closed glass bulb with helium-coated walls for T<1 K in a dilution refrigerator. Low-energy r.f. discharge pulses have been used to produce H atoms at temperatures as low as T=0.06 K. The atom density nsub(H) (10/sup 9/..H/sub 2/+wall. From the temperature dependence of the rate constant K we have determined the binding energy of H on liquid /sup 4/He and /sup 3/He, and also the cross section for recombination on the surface.

  3. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dechang Li

    Full Text Available To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  4. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  5. Observation of Binding and Rotation of Methane and Hydrogen within a Functional Metal–Organic Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Savage, Mathew

    2016-07-27

    The key requirement for a portable store of natural gas is to maximize the amount of gas within the smallest possible space. The packing of methane (CH4) in a given storage medium at the highest possible density is, therefore, a highly desirable but challenging target. We report a microporous hydroxyl-decorated material, MFM-300(In) (MFM = Manchester Framework Material, replacing the NOTT designation), which displays a high volumetric uptake of 202 v/v at 298 K and 35 bar for CH4 and 488 v/v at 77 K and 20 bar for H2. Direct observation and quantification of the location, binding, and rotational modes of adsorbed CH4 and H2 molecules within this host have been achieved, using neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering experiments, coupled with density functional theory (DFT) modeling. These complementary techniques reveal a very efficient packing of H2 and CH4 molecules within MFM-300(In), reminiscent of the condensed gas in pure component crystalline solids. We also report here, for the first time, the experimental observation of a direct binding interaction between adsorbed CH4 molecules and the hydroxyl groups within the pore of a material. This is different from the arrangement found in CH4/water clathrates, the CH4 store of nature.

  6. Observation of Binding and Rotation of Methane and Hydrogen within a Functional Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Mathew; da Silva, Ivan; Johnson, Mark; Carter, Joseph H; Newby, Ruth; Suyetin, Mikhail; Besley, Elena; Manuel, Pascal; Rudić, Svemir; Fitch, Andrew N; Murray, Claire; David, William I F; Yang, Sihai; Schröder, Martin

    2016-07-27

    The key requirement for a portable store of natural gas is to maximize the amount of gas within the smallest possible space. The packing of methane (CH4) in a given storage medium at the highest possible density is, therefore, a highly desirable but challenging target. We report a microporous hydroxyl-decorated material, MFM-300(In) (MFM = Manchester Framework Material, replacing the NOTT designation), which displays a high volumetric uptake of 202 v/v at 298 K and 35 bar for CH4 and 488 v/v at 77 K and 20 bar for H2. Direct observation and quantification of the location, binding, and rotational modes of adsorbed CH4 and H2 molecules within this host have been achieved, using neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering experiments, coupled with density functional theory (DFT) modeling. These complementary techniques reveal a very efficient packing of H2 and CH4 molecules within MFM-300(In), reminiscent of the condensed gas in pure component crystalline solids. We also report here, for the first time, the experimental observation of a direct binding interaction between adsorbed CH4 molecules and the hydroxyl groups within the pore of a material. This is different from the arrangement found in CH4/water clathrates, the CH4 store of nature.

  7. Benchmarking ab initio binding energies of hydrogen-bonded molecular clusters based on FTIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Du, Lin; Reiman, Heidi;

    2014-01-01

    Models of formation and growth of atmospheric aerosols are highly dependent on accurate cluster binding energies. These are most often calculated by ab initio electronic structure methods but remain associated with significant uncertainties. We present a computational benchmarking study......) and compare this range to predictions from several widely used electronic structure methods, including five density functionals, Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and five coupled cluster methods up to CCSDT quality, considering also the D3 dispersion correctional scheme. With some exceptions, we find...... that most electronic structure methods overestimate ΔG°295 K. The effects of vibrational anharmonicity is approximated using scaling factors, reducing ΔG°295 K by ca. 1.8 kJ mol(-1), whereby ΔG°295 K predictions well within the experimental range can be obtained....

  8. Effect of Cd⁺² on phosphate solubilizing abilities and hydrogen peroxide production of soil-borne micromycetes isolated from Phragmites australis-rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga-Silva, Jose Roberto; Chan-Cupul, Wilberth; Kuschk, Peter; Loera, Octavio; Aguilar-López, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Refugio

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this work were to evaluate the phosphate-solubilization and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by the soil-borne micromycetes, Aspergillus japonicus, Penicillium italicum and Penicillium dipodomyicola, isolated from Phragmites australis rhizosphere and to study the effect of several concentrations of Cadmium (Cd(2+)) on both variables. Our results showed that P. italicum achieved a higher P-solubilization and H2O2 production than A. japonicus and P. dipodomyicola, as only P. italicum showed a positive correlation (R(2) = 0.71) between P-solubilization and H2O2 production. In dose-response assays, P. italicum was also more tolerant to Cd(2+) (0.31 mM) in comparison to A. japonicus (0.26 mM). Analysis of the 2(4) factorial experimental design showed that P-solubilization by P. italicum was negatively affected by increases in Cd(2+) (p = 0.04) and yeast extract (p = 0.02) in the culture medium. The production of H2O2 was positively affected only by glucose (p = 0.002). Fungal biomass production was reduced significantly (p = 0.0009) by Cd(2+) and increased (p = 0.0003) by high glucose concentration in the culture medium. The tolerance and correlation between P-solubilization and H2O2 production in the presence of Cd(2+) was strain and species dependent. The effects of Cd(2+), glucose, ammonium sulfate and yeast extract on those variables were evaluated through a two-level factorial design. P. italicum is promising for P-solubilization in soils contaminated with Cd(2+) and may be an alternative for manufacture of biofertilizers to replace chemical fertilizers.

  9. Mannobiose Binding Induces Changes in Hydrogen Bonding and Protonation States of Acidic Residues in Concanavalin A As Revealed by Neutron Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlits, Oksana O; Coates, Leighton; Woods, Robert J; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2017-08-30

    Plant lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins with various biomedical applications. Concanavalin A (Con A) holds promise in treating cancerous tumors. To better understand the Con A carbohydrate binding specificity, we obtained a room-temperature neutron structure of this legume lectin in complex with a disaccharide Manα1-2Man, mannobiose. The neutron structure afforded direct visualization of the hydrogen bonding between the protein and ligand, showing that the ligand is able to alter both protonation states and interactions for residues located close to and distant from the binding site. An unprecedented low-barrier hydrogen bond was observed forming between the carboxylic side chains of Asp28 and Glu8, with the D atom positioned equidistant from the oxygen atoms having an O···D···O angle of 101.5°.

  10. Determination of binding constants and stoichiometries of short-range, hydrogen-bonding solvation by use of a proton-transfer indicator reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullery, Stephen E.; Wojdyla, Stephen M.; Ostroski, Robert A.; Scott, Ronald M.

    1997-10-01

    A recent method for determination of stoichiometries and binding constants for short-range, hydrogen bonding solvation is reviewed and new results are presented. The method exploits the sensitivity of a proton-transfer equilibrium, KPT to changes in solvent composition. Solvation numbers and binding constants for primary and secondary stages of solvation of an aminephenol proton-transfer adduct and the phenol and amine are determined as adjustable parameters when model isotherms are fitted to KPT versus [ S] data, where [ S] is the concentration of a hydrogen-bonding minor component of a mixed solvent, Results for most of the twenty-three aprotic solvents investigated are modeled by bifurcation-type hydrogen bonding of two or more electron pairs to a single polar hydrogen. Results for the seven protic solvents studied, including new data for ethanol, 2-choloroethanol, and 2,2-dichloroethanol, are modeled by two, or possibly three, successive stages of solvation, assumed to involve hydrogen-bonded chains. Preliminary results indicate that solvation by water is amenable to this analysis.

  11. Optimizing Binding Energies of Key Intermediates for CO2 Hydrogenation to Methanol over Oxide-Supported Copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattel, Shyam; Yan, Binhang; Yang, Yixiong; Chen, Jingguang G; Liu, Ping

    2016-09-28

    Rational optimization of catalytic performance has been one of the major challenges in catalysis. Here we report a bottom-up study on the ability of TiO2 and ZrO2 to optimize the CO2 conversion to methanol on Cu, using combined density functional theory (DFT) calculations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations, in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) measurements, and steady-state flow reactor tests. The theoretical results from DFT and KMC agree with in situ DRIFTS measurements, showing that both TiO2 and ZrO2 help to promote methanol synthesis on Cu via carboxyl intermediates and the reverse water-gas-shift (RWGS) pathway; the formate intermediates, on the other hand, likely act as a spectator eventually. The origin of the superior promoting effect of ZrO2 is associated with the fine-tuning capability of reduced Zr(3+) at the interface, being able to bind the key reaction intermediates, e.g. *CO2, *CO, *HCO, and *H2CO, moderately to facilitate methanol formation. This study demonstrates the importance of synergy between theory and experiments to elucidate the complex reaction mechanisms of CO2 hydrogenation for the realization of a better catalyst by design.

  12. Ammonium Additives to Dissolve Lithium Sulfide through Hydrogen Binding for High-Energy Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Huilin; Han, Kee Sung; Vijayakumar, M.; Xiao, Jie; Cao, Ruiguo; Chen, Junzheng; Zhang, Jiguang; Mueller, Karl T.; Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun

    2016-07-01

    In rechargeable Li-S batteries, the uncontrollable passivation of electrodes by highly insulating Li2S limits sulfur utilization, increases polarization and decreases cycling stability. Dissolving Li2S in organic electrolyte is a facile solution to maintain the active reaction interface between electrolyte and sulfur cathode, and thus address the above issues. Herein, ammonium salts are demonstrated as effective additives to promote the dissolution of Li2S to 1.25 M in DMSO solvent at room temperature. NMR measurements show that the strong hydrogen binding effect of N-H groups plays a critical role in dissolving Li2S by forming complex ligands with S2- anions coupled with the solvent’s solvating surrounding. Ammonium additives in electrolyte can also significantly improve the oxidation kinetics of Li2S, therefore enables the direct use of Li2S as cathode material in Li-S battery system in the future. This provides a new approach to manage the solubility of lithium sulfides through cation coordination with sulfide anion.

  13. Hydrogen adsorption properties of metal-organic frameworks within the density-functional based tight-binding approach

    OpenAIRE

    BASSEM ASSFOUR; THAER ASSAAD; ADNAN ODEH

    2014-01-01

    Practical methods for hydrogen storage are still a prime challenge in the realization of an energy economy based on Hydrogen. Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline ultra-porous materials with ability to trap and store voluminous amounts of gas molecules. MOFs represent an encouraging storage method relying on their enormous surface area. However, MOFs show reduced hydrogen uptake at room temperature due to low adsorption energy of hydrogen. To increase the adsorption uptake of MOFs ...

  14. Effects of mutagenesis of aspartic acid residues in the putative phosphoribosyl diphosphate binding site of Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase on metal ion specificity and ribose-5-phosphate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Nilsson, Dan; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    The three conserved aspartic acid residues of the 5-phospho-d-ribosyl a-1-diphosphate binding site (213-GRDCVLVDDMIDTGGT-228) of Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase were studied by analysis of the mutant enzymes D220E, D220F, D221A, D224A, and D224S. The mutant enzymes showed...... an increase in KM for ribose 5-phosphate in the presence of at least one of the divalent metal ions Mg2+, Mn2+, Co2+, or Cd2+, with the most dramatic changes revealed by the D220E and D220F enzymes in the presence of Co2+ and the D221A enzyme in the presence of Mn2+ or Co2+. The D220F and D221A enzymes both...... showed large decreases in Vapp in the presence of the various divalent metal ions, except for the D221A enzyme in the presence of Co2+. Vapp of the D220E enzyme was similar to that of the wild-type enzyme in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, or Cd2+, whereas the Vapp was increased in the presence of Co2+. Vapp...

  15. Effects of mutagenesis of aspartic acid residues in the putative phosphoribosyl diphosphate binding site of Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase on metal ion specificity and ribose 5-phosphate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Nilsson, Dan; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    The three conserved aspartic acid residues of the 5-phospho-D-ribosyl α-1-diphosphate binding site (213-GRDCVLVDDMIDTGGT-228) of Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase were studied by analysis of the mutant enzymes D220E, D220F, D221A, D224A, and D224S. The mutant enzymes showed...... an increase in KM for ribose 5-phosphate in the presence of at least one of the divalent metal ions Mg2+, Mn2+, Co2+, or Cd2+, with the most dramatic changes revealed by the D220E and D220F enzymes in the presence of Co2+ and the D221A enzyme in the presence of Mn2+ or Co2+. The D220F and D221A enzymes both...... showed large decreases in Vapp in the presence of the various divalent metal ions, except for the D221A enzyme in the presence of Co2+. Vapp of the D220E enzyme was similar to that of the wild-type enzyme in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, or Cd2+, whereas the Vapp was increased in the presence of Co2+. Vapp...

  16. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Reveals Specific Changes in the Local Flexibility of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 upon Binding to the Somatomedin B Domain of Vitronectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trelle, Morten Beck; Hirschberg, Daniel; Jansson, Anna

    2012-01-01

    and increases the thermal stability of the protein dramatically. We have used hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to assess the inherent structural flexibility of PAI-1 and to monitor the changes induced by SMB binding. Our data show that the PAI-1 core consisting of β-sheet B is rather protected......The native fold of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) represents an active metastable conformation that spontaneously converts to an inactive latent form. Binding of the somatomedin B domain (SMB) of the endogenous cofactor vitronectin to PAI-1 delays the transition to the latent state...... against exchange with the solvent, while the remainder of the molecule is more dynamic. SMB binding causes a pronounced and widespread stabilization of PAI-1 that is not confined to the binding interface with SMB. We further explored the local structural flexibility in a mutationally stabilized PAI-1...

  17. The Crystal Structure of a Ternary Complex of Betaine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Provides New Insight Into the Reaction Mechansim and Shows A Novel Binding Mode of the 2'-Phosphate of NADP+ and A Novel Cation Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Segura, L.; Rudino-Pinera, E; Munoz-Clares, R; Horjales, E

    2009-01-01

    In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the NAD(P)+-dependent betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (PaBADH) may play the dual role of assimilating carbon and nitrogen from choline or choline precursors-abundant at infection sites-and producing glycine betaine and NADPH, potentially protective against the high-osmolarity and oxidative stresses prevalent in the infected tissues. Disruption of the PaBADH gene negatively affects the growth of bacteria, suggesting that this enzyme could be a target for antibiotic design. PaBADH is one of the few ALDHs that efficiently use NADP+ and one of the even fewer that require K+ ions for stability. Crystals of PaBADH were obtained under aerobic conditions in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol, glycerol, NADP+ and K+ ions. The three-dimensional structure was determined at 2.1-A resolution. The catalytic cysteine (C286, corresponding to C302 of ALDH2) is oxidized to sulfenic acid or forms a mixed disulfide with 2-mercaptoethanol. The glutamyl residue involved in the deacylation step (E252, corresponding to E268 of ALDH2) is in two conformations, suggesting a proton relay system formed by two well-conserved residues (E464 and K162, corresponding to E476 and K178, respectively, of ALDH2) that connects E252 with the bulk water. In some active sites, a bound glycerol molecule mimics the thiohemiacetal intermediate; its hydroxyl oxygen is hydrogen bonded to the nitrogen of the amide groups of the side chain of the conserved N153 (N169 of ALDH2) and those of the main chain of C286, which form the 'oxyanion hole.' The nicotinamide moiety of the nucleotide is not observed in the crystal, and the adenine moiety binds in the usual way. A salt bridge between E179 (E195 of ALDH2) and R40 (E53 of ALDH2) moves the carboxylate group of the former away from the 2?-phosphate of the NADP+, thus avoiding steric clashes and/or electrostatic repulsion between the two groups. Finally, the crystal shows two K+ binding sites per subunit. One is

  18. Correlation of biological value of feed phosphates with their solubility in water, dilute hydrogen chloride, dilute citric acid, and neutral ammonium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, T W; Douglas, J H; Gonzalez, N J; Bond, P L

    1992-12-01

    Relative biological values (BV) of 36 feed phosphates were determined with female turkeys in bioassays of 21-day duration using three response criteria: weight gain, tibia ash percentage, and gain:feed ratio. Calcium phosphate, dibasic dihydrate (United States Pharmacopeia) was the reference standard. Nine mono-dicalcium phosphates (M-DCP, 21.0% phosphorus), 13 di-monocalcium phosphates (D-MCP, 18.5% phosphorus), and 14 defluorinated phosphates (DFP, 18.0% phosphorus) were evaluated. The average relative BV for M-DCP, D-MCP, and DFP samples were 97.6, 94.6, and 90.8%, respectively. Solubility of phosphates was determined by four recognized methods. The solvents were water, .4% HCl, 2.0% citric acid (CA), and neutral ammonium citrate (NAC). Water solubility of M-DCP samples was greater (67.5%) than that of D-MCP (38.8%) and DFP (8.9%) samples. Correlation of water solubility of phosphates to their relative BV was quite low, and water solubility was a poor indicator of BV. When .4% HCl was the solvent, correlation coefficients (r) were .55, .33, and .72 for M-DCP, D-MCP, and DFP, respectively. Based on these results and prediction equations, .4% HCl solubility would be inappropriate for estimating BV of M-DCP and D-MCP samples. Solubility of feed phosphates (mainly D-MCP and DFP) in 2.0% CA or NAC was positively correlated with BV; the r values were .87 to .95. Both of these solubility tests provided a good index of BV. However, it would seem inappropriate and risky to replace bioassays totally with these tests. Feed phosphate users could perform either the 2.0% CA or NAC solubility test easily as a screen for BV along with other quality control procedures (i.e., phosphorus, calcium, sodium, and fluoride determinations).

  19. Molecular evolution of B6 enzymes: Binding of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate and Lys41Arg substitution turn ribonuclease A into a model B6 protoenzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marra Ersilia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP-dependent or vitamin B6-dependent enzymes that catalyze manifold reactions in the metabolism of amino acids belong to no fewer than four evolutionarily independent protein families. The multiple evolutionary origin and the essential mechanistic role of PLP in these enzymes argue for the cofactor having arrived on the evolutionary scene before the emergence of the respective apoenzymes and having played a dominant role in the molecular evolution of the B6 enzyme families. Here we report on an attempt to re-enact the emergence of a PLP-dependent protoenzyme. The starting protein was pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase, in which active-site Lys41 or Lys7 readily form a covalent adduct with PLP. Results We screened the PLP adduct of wild-type RNase and two variant RNases (K7R and K41R for catalytic effects toward L- and D-amino acids. RNase(K41R-PLP, in which the cofactor is bound through an imine linkage to Lys7, qualifies for a model proto-B6 enzyme by the following criteria: (1 covalent linkage of PLP (internal aldimine; (2 catalytic activity toward amino acids that depends on formation of an imine linkage with the substrate (external aldimine; (3 adjoining binding sites for the cofactor and amino acid moiety that facilitate the transimination reaction of the internal to the external aldimine and stabilize the resulting noncovalent complex of the coenzyme-substrate adduct with the protein; (4 reaction specificity, the only detectable reactions being racemization of diverse amino acids and β-decarboxylation of L-aspartate; (5 acceleration factors for racemization and β-decarboxylation of >103 over and above that of PLP alone; (6 ribonuclease activity that is 103-fold lower than that of wild-type RNase, attenuation of a pre-existing biological activity being indispensable for the further evolution as a PLP-dependent protoenzyme. Conclusion A single amino acid substitution (Lys41Arg and covalent

  20. Significantly Dense Two-Dimensional Hydrogen-Bond Network in a Layered Zirconium Phosphate Leading to High Proton Conductivities in Both Water-Assisted Low-Temperature and Anhydrous Intermediate-Temperature Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Daxiang; Zheng, Tao; Xie, Jian; Cai, Yawen; Wang, Yaxing; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao

    2016-12-19

    A highly stable layered zirconium phosphate, (NH4)2[ZrF2(HPO4)2] (ZrP-1), was synthesized by an ionothermal method and contains an extremely dense two-dimensional hydrogen-bond network that is thermally stable up to 573 K, leading to combined ultrahigh water-assisted proton conductivities of 1.45 × 10(-2) S cm(-1) at 363 K/95% relative humidity and sustainable anhydrous proton conductivity of 1.1 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) at 503 K.

  1. Sodium Phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium phosphate is used in adults 18 years of age or older to empty the colon (large intestine, bowel) ... view of the walls of the colon. Sodium phosphate is in a class of medications called saline ...

  2. Phosphate salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels that are too high, and for preventing kidney stones. They are also taken for treating osteomalacia (often ... But intravenous phosphate salts should not be used. Kidney stones (nephrolithiasis). Taking potassium phosphate by mouth might help ...

  3. Binding characteristics of homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers for acyclovir using an (acceptor-donor-donor)-(donor-acceptor-acceptor) hydrogen-bond strategy, and analytical applications for serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Suqin; Tan, Lei; Wang, Ganquan; Peng, Guiming; Kang, Chengcheng; Tang, Youwen

    2013-04-12

    This paper demonstrates a novel approach to assembling homogeneous molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) based on mimicking multiple hydrogen bonds between nucleotide bases by preparing acyclovir (ACV) as a template and using coatings grafted on silica supports. (1)H NMR studies confirmed the AAD-DDA (A for acceptor, D for donor) hydrogen-bond array between template and functional monomer, while the resultant monodisperse molecularly imprinted microspheres (MIMs) were evaluated using a binding experiment, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and solid phase extraction. The Langmuir isothermal model and the Langmuir-Freundlich isothermal model suggest that ACV-MIMs have more homogeneous binding sites than MIPs prepared through normal imprinting. In contrast to previous MIP-HPLC columns, there were no apparent tailings for the ACV peaks, and ACV-MIMs had excellent specific binding properties with a Ka peak of 3.44 × 10(5)M(-1). A complete baseline separation is obtained for ACV and structurally similar compounds. This work also successfully used MIMs as a specific sorbent for capturing ACV from serum samples. The detection limit and mean recovery of ACV was 1.8 ng/mL(-1) and 95.6%, respectively, for molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction coupled with HPLC. To our knowledge, this was the first example of MIPs using AAD-DDA hydrogen bonds.

  4. Role of citrate and phosphate anions in the mechanism of iron(III) sequestration by ferric binding protein: kinetic studies of the formation of the holoprotein of wild-type FbpA and its engineered mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Katherine D; Gabricević, Mario; Anderson, Damon S; Adhikari, Pratima; Mietzner, Timothy A; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2010-07-27

    Ferric binding protein A (FbpA) plays a central role in the iron acquisition processes of pathogenic Neisseria gonorrheae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. FbpA functions as an iron shuttle within the periplasmic space of these Gram-negative human pathogens. Iron is picked up by FbpA at the periplasmic aspect of the outer membrane with concomitant acquisition of a synergistic anion. Here we report the kinetics and mechanisms involved with loading of iron(III) into iron-free FbpA using iron(III) citrate as an iron source in the presence of excess citrate or phosphate (physiologically available anions) at pH 6.5. In the presence of excess phosphate, iron(III) citrate loads into apo-FbpA in three kinetically distinguishable steps, while in the presence of excess citrate, only two steps are discernible. A stable intermediate containing iron(III) citrate-bound FbpA is observed in each case. The observation of an additional kinetic step and moderate increase in apparent rate constants suggests an active role for phosphate in the iron insertion process. To further elucidate a mechanism for iron loading, we report on the sequestration kinetics of iron(III) citrate in the presence of phosphate with binding site mutant apo-FbpAs, H9E, E57D, E57Q, Q58A, Y195F, and Y196H. Tyrosine mutations drastically alter the kinetics and hamper iron sequestration ability. H9E, E57D, and E57Q have near native iron sequestration behavior; however, iron binding rates are altered, enabling assignment of sequential side chain interactions. Additionally, this investigation elaborates on the function of FbpA as a carrier for iron chelates as well as "naked" or free iron as originally proposed.

  5. Effects of Dietary Supplementation of Magnesium Hydrogen Phosphate (MgHPO4) as an Alternative Phosphorus Source on Growth and Feed Utilization of Juvenile Far Eastern Catfish (Silurus asotus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Won, Seung-Gun; Ra, Chang-Six; Kim, Jeong-Dae

    2014-08-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate a supplemental effect of magnesium hydrogen phosphate (MHP, MgHPO4) as an alternative phosphorus (P) source on growth and feed utilization of juvenile far eastern catfish (Silurus asotus) in comparison with three conventional P additives (monocalcium phosphate (MCP), dicalcium phosphate (DCP) and tricalcium phosphate [TCP]) as positive controls. A basal diet as a negative control was prepared without P supplementation and four supplemental P sources were added at the level of 2%. Five groups of 450 fish having mean body weight of 11.3 g following 24 h fasting after three week adaptation period were randomly distributed into each of 15 tanks (30 fish/tank). Fish were hand-fed to apparent satiety twice a day for 8 weeks. Fish fed MHP had weight gain (WG), protein efficiency ratio and specific growth rate comparable to those fed MCP. Fish fed MHP and MCP had feed efficiency (FE) significantly higher (pDCP. Fish groups fed control and TCP showed the lower FE than the other groups which was significantly different (p0.05) among treatments. Fish fed control had the lowest hematocrit, which was significantly different (pDCP and TCP to MHP were found to be 100.5 and 101.3%, 92.0 and 91.6%, and 79.1 and 80.9% for WG and FE, respectively. P availability was determined to be 88.1%, 75.2%, 8.7%, and 90.9% for MCP, DCP, TCP, and MHP, respectively. Consequently, MHP recovered from wastewater stream showed that as an alternative P source its performance was comparative with MCP on growth and feed utilization of juvenile far eastern catfish.

  6. Phosphate control in dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Gallieni, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Caria, Stefania; Meola, Mario; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2013-10-04

    Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive-convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P) mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200-300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source. Finally, boiling should be the preferred cooking procedure, because it induces food demineralization, including phosphate loss. The integrated approach outlined in this article should be actively adapted as a therapeutic alliance by clinicians, dieticians, and patients for an effective control of phosphate balance in dialysis patients.

  7. Hydrogen storage in a potassium-ion-bound metal-organic framework incorporating crown ether struts as specific cation binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dae-Woon; Chyun, Seung An; Suh, Myunghyun Paik

    2014-07-21

    To develop a metal-organic framework (MOF) for hydrogen storage, SNU-200 incorporating a 18-crown-6 ether moiety as a specific binding site for selected cations has been synthesized. SNU-200 binds K(+), NH4(+), and methyl viologen (MV(2+)) through single-crystal to single-crystal transformations. It exhibits characteristic gas-sorption properties depending on the bound cation. SNU-200 activated with supercritical CO2 shows a higher isosteric heat (Qst) of H2 adsorption (7.70 kJ mol(-1)) than other zinc-based MOFs. Among the cation inclusions, K(+) is the best for enhancing the isosteric heat of the H2 adsorption (9.92 kJ mol(-1)) as a result of the accessible open metal sites on the K(+) ion. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Binding and Release between Polymeric Carrier and Protein Drug: pH-Mediated Interplay of Coulomb Forces, Hydrogen Bonding, van der Waals Interactions, and Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Sergio; Chen, Fan; Seal, Prasenjit; Stenzel, Martina H; Smith, Sean C

    2017-10-02

    The accelerating search for new types of drugs and delivery strategies poses challenge to understanding the mechanism of delivery. To this end, a detailed atomistic picture of binding between the drug and carrier is quintessential. Although many studies focus on the electrostatics of drug-vector interactions, it has also been pointed out that entropic factors relating to water and counterions can play an important role. By carrying out extensive molecular dynamics simulations and subsequently validating with experiments, we shed light herein on the binding in aqueous solution between a protein drug and polymeric carrier. We examined the complexation between the polymer poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate-b-poly(carboxyethyl acrylate (PEGMEA-b-PCEA) and the protein egg white lysozyme, a system that acts as a model for polymer-vector/protein-drug delivery systems. The complexation has been visualized and characterized using contact maps and hydrogen bonding analyses for five independent simulations of the complex, each running over 100 ns. Binding at physiological pH is, as expected, mediated by Coulombic attraction between the positively charged protein and negatively charged carboxylate groups on the polymer. However, we find that consideration of electrostatics alone is insufficient to explain the complexation behavior at low pH. Intracomplex hydrogen bonds, van der Waals interactions, as well as water-water interactions dictate that the polymer does not release the protein at pH 4.8 or indeed at pH 3.2 even though the Coulombic attractions are largely removed as carboxylate groups on the polymer become titrated. Experiments in aqueous solution carried out at pH 7.0, 4.5, and 3.0 confirm the veracity of the computed binding behavior. Overall, these combined simulation and experimental results illustrate that coulomb interactions need to be complemented with consideration of other entropic forces, mediated by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding

  9. Analysis of Copper-binding Proteins in Rice Radicles Exposed to Excess Copper and Hydrogen Peroxide Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiao Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu is an essential micronutrient for plants, but excess Cu can inactivate and disturb the protein function due to unavoidable binding to proteins at the cellular level. As a redox-active metal, Cu toxicity is mediated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Cu-binding structural motifs may alleviate Cu-induced damage by decreasing free Cu2+ activity in cytoplasm or scavenging ROS. The identification of Cu-binding proteins involved in the response of plants to Cu or ROS toxicity may increase our understanding the mechanisms of metal toxicity and tolerance in plants. This study investigated change of Cu-binding proteins in radicles of germinating rice seeds under excess Cu and oxidative stress using immobilized Cu2+ affinity chromatography, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and mass spectra analysis. Quantitative image analysis revealed that 26 protein spots showed more than a 1.5-fold difference in abundances under Cu or H2O2 treatment compared to the control. The identified Cu-binding proteins were involved in anti-oxidative defense, stress response and detoxification, protein synthesis, protein modification, and metabolism regulation. The present results revealed that 17 out of 24 identified Cu-binding proteins have a similar response to low concentration Cu and H2O2 stress, and 5 out of 24 were increased under low and high concentration Cu but unaffected under H2O2 stress, which hint Cu ions can regulate Cu-binding proteins accumulation by H2O2 or no H2O2 pathway to cope with excess Cu in cell. The change pattern of these Cu-binding proteins and their function analysis warrant to further study the roles of Cu ions in these Cu-binding proteins of plant cells.

  10. Transcription of lncRNA prt, clustered prt RNA sites for Mmi1 binding, and RNA polymerase II CTD phospho-sites govern the repression of pho1 gene expression under phosphate-replete conditions in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Sanchez, Ana M; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart; Schwer, Beate

    2016-07-01

    Expression of fission yeast Pho1 acid phosphatase is repressed during growth in phosphate-rich medium. Repression is mediated by transcription of the prt locus upstream of pho1 to produce a long noncoding (lnc) prt RNA. Repression is also governed by RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation status, whereby inability to place a Ser7-PO4 mark (as in S7A) derepresses Pho1 expression, and inability to place a Thr4-PO4 mark (as in T4A) hyper-represses Pho1 in phosphate replete cells. Here we find that basal pho1 expression from the prt-pho1 locus is inversely correlated with the activity of the prt promoter, which resides in a 110-nucleotide DNA segment preceding the prt transcription start site. CTD mutations S7A and T4A had no effect on the activity of the prt promoter or the pho1 promoter, suggesting that S7A and T4A affect post-initiation events in prt lncRNA synthesis that make it less and more repressive of pho1, respectively. prt lncRNA contains clusters of DSR (determinant of selective removal) sequences recognized by the YTH-domain-containing protein Mmi1. Altering the nucleobase sequence of two DSR clusters in the prt lncRNA caused hyper-repression of pho1 in phosphate replete cells, concomitant with increased levels of the prt transcript. The isolated Mmi1 YTH domain binds to RNAs with single or tandem DSR elements, to the latter in a noncooperative fashion. We report the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the Mmi1 YTH domain and provide evidence that Mmi1 recognizes DSR RNA via a binding mode distinct from that of structurally homologous YTH proteins that recognize m(6)A-modified RNA.

  11. Phosphate control in dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cupisti A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Adamasco Cupisti,1 Maurizio Gallieni,2 Maria Antonietta Rizzo,2 Stefania Caria,3 Mario Meola,4 Piergiorgio Bolasco31Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 2Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Milan, Italy; 3Territorial Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, ASL Cagliari, Italy; 4Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyAbstract: Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive–convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200–300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source

  12. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  13. Binding of hydrocarbons and other extremely weak ligands to transition metal complexes that coordinate hydrogen: Investigation of cis-interactions and delocalized bonding involving sigma bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J.; Luo, X.L. [and others

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the forefront of chemistry are efforts to catalytically transform the inert C-H bonds in alkanes to more useful products using metal compounds. The goal is to observe binding and cleavage of alkane C-H bonds on metals or to use related silane Si-H bonding as models, analogous to the discovery of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) binding to metals. Studies of these unique sigma complexes (M{hor_ellipsis}H-Y; Y{double_bond}H, Si, C) will aid in developing new catalysts or technologies relevant to DOE interest, e.g., new methods for tritium isotope separation. Several transition metals (Mo, W, Mn, and Pt) were found to reversibly bind and cleave H{sub 2}, silanes, and halocarbons. The first metal-SiH{sub 4} complexes, thus serving as a model for methane reactions. A second goal is to study the dynamics and energetics of H-Y bonds on metals by neutron scattering, and evidence for interactions between bound H-Y and nearby H atoms on metal complexes has been found.

  14. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of D-galactose-6-phosphate isomerase complexed with substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Suk Jung

    Full Text Available D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26, which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD, catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi. Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays.

  15. Inhibition of blue-light-dependent binding of 14-3-3 proteins to phototropins by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao; SHIMAZAKI Kenichiro

    2005-01-01

    @@ Phototropins, following the discovery of phytochromes[1,2] and cryptochromes[3,4], are the most recently characterized blue-light (BL) receptors in plants. The N- terminal regions of the proteins contain two light oxygen and voltage (LOV)――LOV1 and LOV2, which belong to PAS domain involved in protein-protein interaction and ligand binding, possessing non-covalent binding sites for the chromophore FMN[5]. The C-terminal regions contain Ser/Thr kinase domains[6].

  16. Molecular basis of reduced pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase catalytic activity in neonatal epileptic encephalopathy disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musayev, Faik N; Di Salvo, Martino L; Saavedra, Mario A; Contestabile, Roberto; Ghatge, Mohini S; Haynes, Alexina; Schirch, Verne; Safo, Martin K

    2009-11-06

    Mutations in pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase are known to cause neonatal epileptic encephalopathy. This disorder has no cure or effective treatment and is often fatal. Pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of pyridoxine 5'-phosphate to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, the active cofactor form of vitamin B(6) required by more than 140 different catalytic activities, including enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism and biosynthesis of neurotransmitters. Our aim is to elucidate the mechanism by which a homozygous missense mutation (R229W) in the oxidase, linked to neonatal epileptic encephalopathy, leads to reduced oxidase activity. The R229W variant is approximately 850-fold less efficient than the wild-type enzyme due to an approximately 192-fold decrease in pyridoxine 5'-phosphate affinity and an approximately 4.5-fold decrease in catalytic activity. There is also an approximately 50-fold reduction in the affinity of the R229W variant for the FMN cofactor. A 2.5 A crystal structure of the R229W variant shows that the substitution of Arg-229 at the FMN binding site has led to a loss of hydrogen-bond and/or salt-bridge interactions between FMN and Arg-229 and Ser-175. Additionally, the mutation has led to an alteration of the configuration of a beta-strand-loop-beta-strand structure at the active site, resulting in loss of two critical hydrogen-bond interactions involving residues His-227 and Arg-225, which are important for substrate binding and orientation for catalysis. These results provide a molecular basis for the phenotype associated with the R229W mutation, as well as providing a foundation for understanding the pathophysiological consequences of pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase mutations.

  17. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrah, L.A.; Mead, K.E.; Smith, H.M.

    1983-09-20

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (1) a solid acetylenic compound and (2) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  18. Predicting laser-induced bulk damage and conditioning for deuterated potassium di-hydrogen phosphate crystals using ADM (absorption distribution model)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Z M; Spaeth, M L; Manes, K; Adams, J J; Carr, C W

    2010-02-26

    We present an empirical model that describes the experimentally observed laser-induced bulk damage and conditioning behavior in deuterated Potassium dihydrogen Phosphate (DKDP) crystals in a self-consistent way. The model expands on an existing nanoabsorber precursor model and the multi-step absorption mechanism to include two populations of absorbing defects, one with linear absorption and another with nonlinear absorption. We show that this model connects previously uncorrelated small-beam damage initiation probability data to large-beam damage density measurements over a range of ns pulse widths relevant to ICF lasers such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In addition, this work predicts the damage behavior of laser-conditioned DKDP and explains the upper limit to the laser conditioning effect. The ADM model has been successfully used during the commissioning and early operation of the NIF.

  19. 抗菌蛋白磷酸盐结合蛋白前体的分离及其产生菌的鉴定%Isolation of antifungal protein phosphate-binding protein precursor and identification of its producing strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范丽霞; 李红兵; 宗兆锋; 辛红梅; 祁志军; 魏少鹏; 吴文君

    2012-01-01

    Guided by the results of the bioassay against Bacillus cereus, a protein that the antimicrobial activity was not reported in the literature was isolated from the fermentation broth of actinomycete GXW1 which was collected from the soil of Guangxi province by ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography, gel column chromatography and SDS-PAGE in turn. According to the analysis of protein mass spectroscopy by a BLASTn search in NCBInr database, the antifungal protein was identified as phosphate-binding protein precursor with the molecular weight of 39.18 ku. The strain GXW1 was characterized as Streptomyces rubiginosohelvolus based on the morphological characteristics, cultural characteristics, physiological and biochemical characteristics, as well as phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequence.%以抑菌活性生物测定结果为指导,采用硫酸铵沉淀、离子交换柱层析、凝胶柱层析和SDS-聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳等方法,从采自广西土壤的1株放线菌菌株GXW1发酵液中分离到1种未见文献报道具有抑菌活性的蛋白,经质谱鉴定并与NCBInr蛋白数据库比对,认为其应为磷酸盐结合蛋白前体(phosphate-binding protein precursor,pre-PBP),分子质量为39.18 ku.根据其形态特征、培养特征、生理生化特性及16S rDNA序列分析,将菌株GXW1归入链霉菌属,并鉴定为锈赤蜡黄链霉菌Streptomyces rubiginosohelvolus.

  20. The influenza fusion peptide promotes lipid polar head intrusion through hydrogen bonding with phosphates and N-terminal membrane insertion depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, Sébastien; Lagüe, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Influenza infection requires fusion between the virus envelope and a host cell endosomal membrane. The influenza hemagglutinin fusion peptide (FP) is essential to viral membrane fusion. It was recently proposed that FPs would fuse membranes by increasing lipid tail protrusion, a membrane fusion transition state. The details of how FPs induce lipid tail protrusion, however, remain to be elucidated. To decipher the molecular mechanism by which FPs promote lipid tail protrusion, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type (WT) FP, fusogenic mutant F9A, and nonfusogenic mutant W14A in model bilayers. This article presents the peptide-lipid interaction responsible for lipid tail protrusion and a related lipid perturbation, polar head intrusion, where polar heads are sunk under the membrane surface. The backbone amides from the four N-terminal peptide residues, deeply inserted in the membrane, promoted both perturbations through H bonding with lipid phosphates. Polar head intrusion correlated with peptides N-terminal insertion depth and activity: the N-termini of WT and F9A were inserted deeper into the membrane than nonfusogenic W14A. Based on these results, we propose that FP-induced polar head intrusion would complement lipid tail protrusion in catalyzing membrane fusion by reducing repulsions between juxtaposed membranes headgroups. The presented model provides a framework for further research on membrane fusion and influenza antivirals.

  1. Computational Design of Biomimetic Phosphate Scavengers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruber, Mathias Felix; Wood, Elizabeth Baker; Truelsen, Sigurd Friis

    2015-01-01

    for phosphorus recovery, as well as improving existing techniques, has increased. In this study we apply a hybrid simulation approach of molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics to investigate the binding modes of phosphate anions by a small intrinsically disordered peptide. Our results confirm...... that the conformational ensemble of the peptide is significantly changed, or stabilized, by the binding of phosphate anions and that binding does not take place purely as a result of a stable P-loop binding nest, but rather that multiple binding modes may be involved. Such small synthetic peptides capable of binding...... phosphate could be the starting point of new novel technological approaches toward phosphorus recovery, and they represent an excellent model system for investigating the nature and dynamics of functional de novo designed intrinsically disordered proteins....

  2. Influence of halide binding on the hydrogen bonding network in the active site of Salinibacter sensory rhodopsin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissig, Louisa; Iwata, Tatsuya; Kikukawa, Takashi; Demura, Makoto; Kamo, Naoki; Kandori, Hideki; Sudo, Yuki

    2012-11-06

    In nature, organisms are subjected to a variety of environmental stimuli to which they respond and adapt. They can show avoidance or attractive behaviors away from or toward such stimuli in order to survive in the various environments in which they live. One such stimuli is light, to which, for example, the receptor sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) has been found to respond by regulating both negative and positive phototaxis in, e.g., the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. Interestingly, to date, all organisms having SRI-like proteins live in highly halophilic environments, suggesting that salt significantly influences the properties of SRIs. Taking advantage of the discovery of the highly stable SRI homologue from Salinibacter ruber (SrSRI), which maintains its color even in the absence of salt, the importance of the chloride ion for the color tuning and for the slow M-decay, which is thought to be essential for the phototaxis function of SRIs, has been reported previously [Suzuki, D., et al. (2009) J. Mol. Biol.392, 48-62]. Here the effects of the anion binding on the structure and structural changes of SRI during its photocycle are investigated by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical experiments. Our results reveal that, among other things, the structural change and proton movement of a characteristic amino acid residue, Asp102 in SrSRI, is suppressed by the binding of an anion in its vicinity, both in the K- and M-intermediate. The presence of this anion also effects the extent of chromophore distrotion, and tentative results indicate an influence on the number and/or properties of internal water molecules. In addition, a photoinduced proton transfer could only be observed in the absence of the bound anion. Possible proton movement pathways, including the residues Asp102 and the putative Cl binding site His131, are discussed. In conclusion, the results show that the anion binding to SRI is not only important for the color tuning

  3. Inelastic neutron scattering study of binding of para-hydrogen in an ultra-microporous metal-organic framework

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Sihai; Ramirez - Cuesta, Anibal J.; Schröder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials show promise for H2 storage and it is widely predicted by computational modelling that MOFs incorporating ultra-micropores are optimal for H2 binding due to enhanced overlapping potentials. We report the investigation using inelastic neutron scattering of the interaction of H2 in an ultra-microporous MOF material showing low H2 uptake capacity. The study has revealed that adsorbed H2 at 5 K has a liquid recoil motion along the channel with very little i...

  4. Inelastic neutron scattering study of binding of para-hydrogen in an ultra-microporous metal-organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sihai; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Schröder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials show promise for H2 storage and it is widely predicted by computational modelling that MOFs incorporating ultra-micropores are optimal for H2 binding due to enhanced overlapping potentials. We report the investigation using inelastic neutron scattering of the interaction of H2 in an ultra-microporous MOF material showing low H2 uptake capacity. The study has revealed that adsorbed H2 at 5 K has a liquid recoil motion along the channel with very little interaction with the MOF host, consistent with the observed low uptake. The low H2 uptake is not due to incomplete activation or decomposition as the desolvated MOF shows CO2 uptake with a measured pore volume close to that of the single crystal pore volume. This study represents a unique example of surprisingly low H2 uptake within a MOF material, and complements the wide range of studies on systems showing higher uptake capacities and binding interactions.

  5. HOMOLOGY MODELLING AND BINDING SITE IDENTIFICATION OF 1DEOXY D-XYLULOSE 5 PHOSPHATE REDUCTOISOMERASE OF PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM: NEW DRUG TARGET FOR PLSMODIUM FALCIPARUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JYOTSNA CHOUBEY

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is major global health problem. Malaria parasite had developed resistance to the drug being used till date. It implies the development of new effective drug with different mode of action. Apicoplast in malaria and related parasite offer various new target for drug therapy[1]. Apicoplast contains various metabolic pathways that differ from those of host thereby presenting ideal strategies for drug therapy. Plasmodium falciparum 1deoxy- Dxylulose 5- phosphate reductoisomerase (pfDXR is a potential target for antimalarial chemotherapy. The three dimentional model (3D of this enzyme was determined by means of homology modeling through multiplealignment followed by intensive optimization and validation. The comparative modeling of pfDXPR was performed by using comparative modeling program MODELLER, Swiss Model, 3Djigsaw, and Geno3D.The modelling of the three dimensional structure of pfDXPR shows that models generated by Modeller were more acceptable in comparison to that by 3Djigsaw, Geno3D and Swiss Model. The obtained models were verified with the structure validation programs like, PROCHECK & Swiss pdb viewer was used for energy refinement of the model. SelfOptimized Prediction Method with Alignment (SOPMA is employed for calculating the secondary structural features of pfDXR protein sequences considered for this study. The secondary structure indicates whether a given amino acid lies in a helix, strand or coil. The results revealed that alpha helix dominated among secondary structure elements followed by random coils, extended strand and beta turns for all sequences. Active site determination through CASTp suggests that this protein can acts as potential drug target.

  6. Ionic association of hydroperoxide anion HO2- in the binding mean spherical approximation. Spectroscopic study of hydrogen peroxide in concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlistunoff, Jerzy; Simonin, Jean-Pierre

    2006-12-28

    The ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy of hydrogen peroxide in concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions was studied. The peroxide band in the UV range shifts from approximately 214 nm to approximately 236 nm as the NaOH concentration increases from 0.338 mol dm-3 to 13.1 mol dm-3. The band originates from an intramolecular electronic transition of the hydroperoxide anion HO2-, as indicated by the negligible temperature effect on the band position and confirmed by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations. It is postulated that the bathochromic shift of the peroxide band that accompanies the increase in NaOH concentration originates from the formation of the ion pair (Na+HO2-). The equilibrium constant for the ion association reaction (0.048 mol-1 dm3) and the characteristics of the individual absorption bands of the hydroperoxide anion and its associate with Na+ were determined from the numerical modeling of the absorbance data, using the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA).

  7. Stimulation of d- and l-lactate dehydrogenases transcriptional levels in presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate resulting to enhanced lactic acid production by Lactobacillus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhvi, Mamata; Zendo, Takeshi; Iida, Hiroshi; Gokhale, Digambar; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2017-08-08

    The present study revealed the effect of nitrogen sources on lactic acid production and stimulation of d- and l-lactate dehydrogenases (LDH) of parent Lactobacillus lactis NCIM 2368 and its mutant RM2-24 generated after UV mutagenesis. Both the parent and mutant strains were evaluated for d-lactic acid production in control and modified media. The modified media did not show remarkable effect on lactic acid production in case of parent whereas mutant exhibited significant enhancement in d-lactic acid production along with the appearance of l-lactic acid in the broth. Both LDH activities and specific activities were found to be higher in mutant than the parent strain. These results suggested that the diammonium hydrogen phosphate in modified media triggered the expression of LDH genes leading to enhanced lactic acid production. This observation has been proved by studying the expression levels of d- and l-LDH genes of parent and mutant in control and modified media using quantitative RT-PCR technique. In case of mutant, the transcriptional levels of d-LDH and l-LDH increased ∼17 fold and ∼1.38 fold respectively in modified medium compared to the values obtained with control medium. In case of parent, no significant change in transcriptional levels of d- and l-LDH was found when the cells were grown in either control medium or modified medium. This study suggested that the mutant, RM2-24 has l-LDH gene which is expressed in presence of (NH4)2HPO4 resulting in l-lactic acid production. Co-production of l-lactic acid in d-lactic acid fermentation may be detrimental in the PLA production. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural Diversity Within the Mononuclear and Binuclear Active Sites of N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Deacetylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall,R.; Brown, S.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Xu, C.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Raushel, F.

    2007-01-01

    NagA catalyzes the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate to D-glucosamine-6-phosphate and acetate. X-ray crystal structures of NagA from Escherichia coli were determined to establish the number and ligation scheme for the binding of zinc to the active site and to elucidate the molecular interactions between the protein and substrate. The three-dimensional structures of the apo-NagA, Zn-NagA, and the D273N mutant enzyme in the presence of a tight-binding N-methylhydroxyphosphinyl-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate inhibitor were determined. The structure of the Zn-NagA confirms that this enzyme binds a single divalent cation at the beta-position in the active site via ligation to Glu-131, His-195, and His-216. A water molecule completes the ligation shell, which is also in position to be hydrogen bonded to Asp-273. In the structure of NagA bound to the tight binding inhibitor that mimics the tetrahedral intermediate, the methyl phosphonate moiety has displaced the hydrolytic water molecule and is directly coordinated to the zinc within the active site. The side chain of Asp-273 is positioned to activate the hydrolytic water molecule via general base catalysis and to deliver this proton to the amino group upon cleavage of the amide bond of the substrate. His-143 is positioned to help polarize the carbonyl group of the substrate in conjunction with Lewis acid catalysis by the bound zinc. The inhibitor is bound in the {alpha}-configuration at the anomeric carbon through a hydrogen bonding interaction of the hydroxyl group at C-1 with the side chain of His-251. The phosphate group of the inhibitor attached to the hydroxyl at C-6 is ion paired with Arg-227 from the adjacent subunit. NagA from Thermotoga maritima was shown to require a single divalent cation for full catalytic activity.

  9. Structure of the trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase from Brugia malayi reveals key design principles for anthelmintic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah D Farelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic nematodes are responsible for devastating illnesses that plague many of the world's poorest populations indigenous to the tropical areas of developing nations. Among these diseases is lymphatic filariasis, a major cause of permanent and long-term disability. Proteins essential to nematodes that do not have mammalian counterparts represent targets for therapeutic inhibitor discovery. One promising target is trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (T6PP from Brugia malayi. In the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, T6PP is essential for survival due to the toxic effect(s of the accumulation of trehalose 6-phosphate. T6PP has also been shown to be essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of T6PP from B. malayi. The protein structure revealed a stabilizing N-terminal MIT-like domain and a catalytic C-terminal C2B-type HAD phosphatase fold. Structure-guided mutagenesis, combined with kinetic analyses using a designed competitive inhibitor, trehalose 6-sulfate, identified five residues important for binding and catalysis. This structure-function analysis along with computational mapping provided the basis for the proposed model of the T6PP-trehalose 6-phosphate complex. The model indicates a substrate-binding mode wherein shape complementarity and van der Waals interactions drive recognition. The mode of binding is in sharp contrast to the homolog sucrose-6-phosphate phosphatase where extensive hydrogen-bond interactions are made to the substrate. Together these results suggest that high-affinity inhibitors will be bi-dentate, taking advantage of substrate-like binding to the phosphoryl-binding pocket while simultaneously utilizing non-native binding to the trehalose pocket. The conservation of the key residues that enforce the shape of the substrate pocket in T6PP enzymes suggest that development of broad-range anthelmintic and antibacterial therapeutics employing this platform may be possible.

  10. Molecular Docking Studies of Catechin and Its Derivatives as Anti-bacterial Inhibitor for Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikrika, H.; Ambarsari, L.; Sumaryada, T.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular docking simulation of catechin and its derivatives on Glucosamine-6- Phosphate Synthase (GlmS) has been performed in this research. GlmS inhibition by a particular ligand will suppress the production of bacterial cell wall and significantly reduce the population of invading bacteria. In this study, catechin derivatives i.e epicatechin, galloatechin and epigalloatechin were found to have stronger binding affinities as compared to natural ligand of GlmS, Fructose-6-Phosphate (F6P). Those three ligands were docked on the same pocket in GlmS target as F6P, with 70% binding sites similarity. Based on the docking results, gallocatechin turns out to be the most potent ligand for anti-bacterial agent with ΔG= -8.00 kcal/mol. The docking between GlmS and catechin derivatives are characterized by a constant present of a strong hydrogen bond between functional group O3 and Ser-349. This hydrogen bond most likely plays a significant role in the docking mechanism and binding modes selection. The surprising result is catechin itself exhibited a quite strong binding with GlmS (ΔG= -7.80 kcal.mol), but docked on a completely different pocket compared to other ligands. This results suggest that catechin might still have a curing effect but with a completely different pathway and mechanism as compared to its derivatives.

  11. A new human NHERF1 mutation decreases renal phosphate transporter NPT2a expression by a PTH-independent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Courbebaisse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sodium-hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1 binds to the main renal phosphate transporter NPT2a and to the parathyroid hormone (PTH receptor. We have recently identified mutations in NHERF1 that decrease renal phosphate reabsorption by increasing PTH-induced cAMP production in the renal proximal tubule. METHODS: We compared relevant parameters of phosphate homeostasis in a patient with a previously undescribed mutation in NHERF1 and in control subjects. We expressed the mutant NHERF1 protein in Xenopus Oocytes and in cultured cells to study its effects on phosphate transport and PTH-induced cAMP production. RESULTS: We identified in a patient with inappropriate renal phosphate reabsorption a previously unidentified mutation (E68A located in the PDZ1 domain of NHERF1.We report the consequences of this mutation on NHERF1 function. E68A mutation did not modify cAMP production in the patient. PTH-induced cAMP synthesis and PKC activity were not altered by E68A mutation in renal cells in culture. In contrast to wild-type NHERF1, expression of the E68A mutant in Xenopus oocytes and in human cells failed to increase phosphate transport. Pull down experiments showed that E68A mutant did not interact with NPT2a, which robustly interacted with wild type NHERF1 and previously identified mutants. Biotinylation studies revealed that E68A mutant was unable to increase cell surface expression of NPT2a. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the PDZ1 domain is critical for NHERF1-NPT2a interaction in humans and for the control of NPT2a expression at the plasma membrane. Thus we have identified a new mechanism of renal phosphate loss and shown that different mutations in NHERF1 can alter renal phosphate reabsorption via distinct mechanisms.

  12. Phosphate homeostasis and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghat, P; Sodi, R; Swaminathan, R

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies of inherited disorders of phosphate metabolism have shed new light on the understanding of phosphate metabolism. Phosphate has important functions in the body and several mechanisms have evolved to regulate phosphate balance including vitamin D, parathyroid hormone and phosphatonins such as fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). Disorders of phosphate homeostasis leading to hypo- and hyperphosphataemia are common and have clinical and biochemical consequences. Notably, recent studies have linked hyperphosphataemia with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This review outlines the recent advances in the understanding of phosphate homeostasis and describes the causes, investigation and management of hypo- and hyperphosphataemia.

  13. Synthesis, screening for antiacetylcholinesterase activity and binding mode prediction of a new series of [3-(disubstituted-phosphate)-4,4,4-trifluoro-butyl]-carbamic acid ethyl esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanatta, Nilo; Marchi, Tiago M.; Bonacorso, Helio G.; Martins, Marcos A.P.; Flores, Alex F.C. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica. Nucleo de Quimica de Heterociclos]. E-mail: zanatta@base.ufsm.br; Borchhardt, Deise M.; Andricopulo, Adriano D.; Salum, Livia B. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia Molecular Estrutural. Lab. de Quimica Medicinal e Computacional; Carpes, Adriana D.; Schetinger, Maria R.C. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica. Lab. de Enzimologia Toxicologica

    2008-07-01

    A series of nine new [3-(disubstituted-phosphate)-4,4,4-trifluoro-butyl]-carbamic acid ethyl esters (phosphate-carbamate compounds) was obtained through the reaction of (4,4,4-trifluoro-3-hydroxybut-1-yl)-carbamic acid ethyl esters with phosphorus oxychloride followed by the addition of alcohols. The products were characterized by {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P, and {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy, GC-MS, and elemental analysis. All the synthesized compounds were screened for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity using the Ellman method. All compounds containing phosphate and carbamate pharmacophores in their structures showed enzyme inhibition, being the compound bearing the diethoxy phosphate group (2b) the most active compound. Molecular modeling studies were performed to investigate the detailed interactions between AChE active site and small-molecule inhibitor candidates, providing valuable structural insights into AChE inhibition. (author)

  14. Hydrogen physisorption on metal-organic framework linkers and metalated linkers: a computational study of the factors that control binding strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivion, Ehud; Long, Jeffrey R; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2014-12-24

    In order for hydrogen gas to be used as a fuel, it must be stored in sufficient quantity on board the vehicle. Efforts are being made to increase the hydrogen storage capabilities of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by introducing unsaturated metal sites into their linking element(s), as hydrogen adsorption centers. In order to devise successful hydrogen storage strategies there is a need for a fundamental understanding of the weak and elusive hydrogen physisorption interaction. Here we report our findings from the investigation of the weak intermolecular interactions of adsorbed hydrogen molecules on MOF-linkers by using cluster models. Since physical interactions such as dispersion and polarization have a major contribution to attraction energy, our approach is to analyze the adsorption interaction using energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that distinguishes the contribution of the physical interactions from the charge-transfer (CT) "chemical" interaction. Surprisingly, it is found that CT from the adsorbent to the σ*(H2) orbital is present in all studied complexes and can contribute up to approximately -2 kJ/mol to the interaction. When metal ions are present, donation from the σ(H2) → metal Rydberg-like orbital, along with the adsorbent → σ*(H2) contribution, can contribute from -2 to -10 kJ/mol, depending on the coordination mode. To reach a sufficient adsorption enthalpy for practical usage, the hydrogen molecule must be substantially polarized. Ultimately, the ability of the metalated linker to polarize the hydrogen molecule is highly dependent on the geometry of the metal ion coordination site where a strong electrostatic dipole or quadrupole moment is required.

  15. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike; Lohse, Brian; Ming, Shonoi A;

    2014-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide-protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydro......Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide-protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use...

  16. [Effects of Phosphate and Zeolite on the Transformation of Cd Speciation in Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-li; Liang, Cheng-hua; Ma, Zi-hui; Han, Yue

    2015-04-01

    The test simulated exogenous Cd contaminated soil indoors, and studied separate application of potassium dihydrogen phosphate, diammonium hydrogen phosphate and zeolite, and combined application of zeolite and dipotassium hydrogen phosphate, zeolite and diammonium hydrogen phosphate, as well as the effect on the morphological changes of Cd contaminated soil. The results showed that soil exchangeable Cd contents were reduced in different degrees after the application of different modifiers, and the carbonate bound and Fe-Mn oxide bound, organic bound and residual Cd contents increased. By comparison, the separate application of potassium dihydrogen phosphate, diammonium hydrogen phosphate and zeolite, and the combined application of zeolite and dipotassium hydrogen phosphate, zeolite and diammonium hydrogen phosphate respectively reduced the soil available Cd contents at 25.2% -51.7%, 21.6% - 46.8%, 6.4% - 23.2%, 38.6% - 61.4%, and 34.1% - 56.4%. All treatments could increase the soil available phosphorus contents, making the soil available phosphorus contents negatively correlated with the available Cd contents significantly, with the correlation coefficient r = - 0.902 6, and the soil pH values had a negative correlation with the available Cd content during the treatments. Therefore, it could be known that the changes of soil available phosphorus contents were the major factor in reducing the availability of soil cadmium under the conditions of the application of phosphate and natural zeolite.

  17. S-Transnitrosation reactions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S/HS(-)/S(2-)) with S-nitrosated cysteinyl thiols in phosphate buffer of pH 7.4: Results and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Böhmer, Anke

    2017-05-01

    Cysteine (CysSH) and its derivatives including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione (GSH), and cysteine residues in proteins and enzymes are nitrosated with nitric oxide (NO) reaction products such as N2O3 to form S-nitrosated cysteine thiols (RCysSNO). RCysSNO undergo with cysteine thiols (RCysSH) S-transnitrosation reactions, thereby transferring reversibly their nitrosyl ((+)NO) group to RCysSH to form RCysSNO. (•)NO release from RCysSNO and S-transnitrosation are considered the most important features and signalling pathways of RCysSNO. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S: pKa1, 7; HS(-): pKa2, 12.9) is an endogenous product of cysteine metabolism. We hypothesized that RCysSNO would also undergo S-transnitrosation reaction with H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) to form thionitrite (ONS(-)), the smallest S-nitrosated thiol. This article describes spectrophotometric and mass spectrometric investigations of S-transnitrosation reactions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 between H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) (supplied as Na2S) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), S-nitroso-l-cysteine (CysSNO), S-nitroso-N-acetyl-l-cysteine (SNAC), and the synthetic S-nitroso-N-acetyl-l-cysteine ethyl ester (SNACET). For comparison, we also investigated the reactions of H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) with NO(+)BF4(-) and NO2(+)BF4(-), direct ON(+) and O2N(+) donors, respectively, and assumed formation of ONS(-) and thionitrate (O2NS(-)), respectively. Addition of Na2S (at 1 mM) to buffered RCysSNO solutions resulted in decreases of the absorbance at 340 nm and concomitant increases in the absorbance at 410 nm depending upon the nature and concentration of RCysSNO (range, 25-1000 μM). The reactivity order of RCysSNO against H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) was: CysSNO > SNACET > GSNO > SNAC. Our spectrophotometric and GC-MS analyses indicate that H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) and RCysSNO undergo multiple reactions. Major final reaction products were found to be nitrite and nitrate. ONS(-) and O2NS(-) were not detected by GC-MS, suggesting rapid and

  18. Chloroquine Phosphate Oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloroquine phosphate is in a class of drugs called antimalarials and amebicides. It is used to prevent and treat ... Chloroquine phosphate comes as a tablet to take by mouth. For prevention of malaria in adults, one dose is ...

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a protein that helps red ...

  20. Isotherms and kinetic study of dihydrogen and hydrogen phosphate ions (H{2}PO{4}- and HPO{4}2-) adsorption onto crushed plant matter of the semi-arid zones of Morocco: Asphodelus microcarpus, Asparagus albus and Senecio anthophorbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiban, M.; Benhima, H.; Saadi, B.; Nounah, A.; Sinan, F.

    2005-03-01

    In the present work H{2}PO4- and HPO42- ions adsorption onto organic matter (OM) obtained from ground dried three plants growing in arid zones of Morocco has been studied. The adsorption process is affected by various parameters such as contact time, particle size and initial concentration of phosphate solution (Ci ≤ 30 mg/l). The uptake of both ions is increased by increasing the concentration of them selves. The retention of phosphate ions by Asphodelus microcarpus, Asparagus albus are well defined by several isotherms such as the Langmuir, Temkin and Freundlich.

  1. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  2. Dual mechanism of ion permeation through VDAC revealed with inorganic phosphate ions and phosphate metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Eva-Maria; Vu, Giang Thi; Homblé, Fabrice; Prévost, Martine

    2015-01-01

    In the exchange of metabolites and ions between the mitochondrion and the cytosol, the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is a key element, as it forms the major transport pathway for these compounds through the mitochondrial outer membrane. Numerous experimental studies have promoted the idea that VDAC acts as a regulator of essential mitochondrial functions. In this study, using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations, free-energy calculations, and electrophysiological measurements, we investigated the transport of ions through VDAC, with a focus on phosphate ions and metabolites. We showed that selectivity of VDAC towards small anions including monovalent phosphates arises from short-lived interactions with positively charged residues scattered throughout the pore. In dramatic contrast, permeation of divalent phosphate ions and phosphate metabolites (AMP and ATP) involves binding sites along a specific translocation pathway. This permeation mechanism offers an explanation for the decrease in VDAC conductance measured in the presence of ATP or AMP at physiological salt concentration. The binding sites occur at similar locations for the divalent phosphate ions, AMP and ATP, and contain identical basic residues. ATP features a marked affinity for a central region of the pore lined by two lysines and one arginine of the N-terminal helix. This cluster of residues together with a few other basic amino acids forms a "charged brush" which facilitates the passage of the anionic metabolites through the pore. All of this reveals that VDAC controls the transport of the inorganic phosphates and phosphate metabolites studied here through two different mechanisms.

  3. Why nature chose phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westheimer, F H

    1987-03-06

    Phosphate esters and anhydrides dominate the living world but are seldom used as intermediates by organic chemists. Phosphoric acid is specially adapted for its role in nucleic acids because it can link two nucleotides and still ionize; the resulting negative charge serves both to stabilize the diesters against hydrolysis and to retain the molecules within a lipid membrane. A similar explanation for stability and retention also holds for phosphates that are intermediary metabolites and for phosphates that serve as energy sources. Phosphates with multiple negative charges can react by way of the monomeric metaphosphate ion PO3- as an intermediate. No other residue appears to fulfill the multiple roles of phosphate in biochemistry. Stable, negatively charged phosphates react under catalysis by enzymes; organic chemists, who can only rarely use enzymatic catalysis for their reactions, need more highly reactive intermediates than phosphates.

  4. Control of Enzyme IIscr and Sucrose-6-Phosphate Hydrolase Activities in Streptococcus mutans by Transcriptional Repressor ScrR Binding to the cis-Active Determinants of the scr Regulon

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bing; Kuramitsu, Howard K.

    2003-01-01

    In Streptococcus mutans, enzyme IIscr and sucrose-6-phosphate hydrolase are two important enzymes in the transport and metabolism of dietary sucrose. The scr regulon of S. mutans is composed of three genes, scrA and scrB, which code for enzyme IIscr and sucrose-6-phosphate hydrolase, respectively, and scrR, which codes for a GalR-LacI-type transcription regulator. It was previously shown that expression of both scrA and scrB is similarly induced by sucrose. Mutation in the scrR gene resulted ...

  5. Research and engineering assessment of biological solubilization of phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.D.; McIlwain, M.E.; Losinski, S.J.; Taylor, D.D.

    1993-03-01

    This research and engineering assessment examined a microbial phosphate solubilization process as a method of recovering phosphate from phosphorus containing ore compared to the existing wet acid and electric arc methods. A total of 860 microbial isolates, collected from a range of natural environments were tested for their ability to solubilize phosphate from rock phosphate. A bacterium (Pseudomonas cepacia) was selected for extensive characterization and evaluation of the mechanism of phosphate solubilization and of process engineering parameters necessary to recover phosphate from rock phosphate. These studies found that concentration of hydrogen ion and production of organic acids arising from oxidation of the carbon source facilitated microbial solubilization of both pure chemical insoluble phosphate compounds and phosphate rock. Genetic studies found that phosphate solubilization was linked to an enzyme system (glucose dehydrogenase). Process-related studies found that a critical solids density of 1% by weight (ore to liquid) was necessary for optimal solubilization. An engineering analysis evaluated the cost and energy requirements for a 2 million ton per year sized plant, whose size was selected to be comparable to existing wet acid plants.

  6. 2-substituted derivatives of adenosine and inosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate. Synthesis, enzymic activity, and analysis of the structural requirements of the binding locale of the 2-substituent on bovine brain protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, R B; Uno, H; Robins, R K; Simon, L N; Miller, J P

    1975-07-29

    A number of 2-substituted cyclic nucleotide derivatives were synthesized and investigated as activators of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and as substrates for and inhibitors of cAMP phosphodiesterase. Ring closure of 5-amino-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylimidazol-4-carboxamide cyclic 3',5'-phosphate (1) with various aldehydes according to a new procedure (Meyer, R. B., Jr., Shuman, D.A., and Robins, R. K. (1974), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 96, 4962) gave new derivatives of adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate with the following 2-substituents: n-propyl, n-hexl, n-octyl, n-decyl, styryl, o-methoxyphenyl, and 2-thienyl. Alkylation of 2-mercaptoadenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate (20, Meyer et al., 1974) gave new cAMP derivatives with the following 2-substituent: ethylthio, n-propylthio, isopropylthio, allylthio, n-decylthio, and benzylthio. Deamination of 2-methyl-,2-n-butyl-, and 2-ethylthioadenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate. Using multiple regression analysis, a striking relationship was found between the relative potency of the compounds as activators of bovine brain cAMP-dependent protein kinase and parameters describing the hydrophobic, steric, and electronic character of the substituents on these compounds. All compounds were substrates for a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase preparation from rabbit kidney. Additionally, the compounds were as a group, good inhibitors of the hydrolysis of cAMP by phosphodiesterase preparations from rabbit lung, beef heart, and dog heart.

  7. Adsorption of 2 Chloroethyl Ethyl Sulfide on Silica: Binding Mechanism and Energy of a Bifunctional Hydrogen-Bond Acceptor at the Gas Surface Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-19

    Edwards, Wesley O. Gordon, Erin M. Durke, Christopher J. Karwacki, Diego Troya, John R. Morris 611102 c. THIS PAGE The public reporting burden for...Karwacki,∥ Diego Troya,† and John R. Morris*,† †Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, United States ‡Department of...Molecular Hydrogen Bonding in Salicylic Acid Derivatives. J. Mol. Struct. 2010, 948, 47−54. (33) Rivera - Rivera , L. A.; McElmurry, B. A.; Scott, K. W

  8. Seven-coordinate anion complex with a tren-based urea: binding discrepancy of hydrogen sulfate in solid and solution states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Avijit; Thompson, Bethtrice; Hayes, Trina; Tucker, Kimberly; Powell, Douglas R; Bonnesen, Peter V; Ellis, Erick D; Lee, Ken S; Yu, Hongtao; Hossain, Md Alamgir

    2011-06-21

    Structural characterization of a hydrogen sulfate complex with a tren-based urea suggests that the anion is coordinated with six NH···O bonds (d(N···O) = 2.857 (3) to 3.092 (3) Å) and one OH···O bond (d(O···O) = 2.57 (2) Å) from three receptors; however, in solution the anion is bound within the pseudo-cavity of one receptor.

  9. Boron Nanoparticles with High Hydrogen Loading: Mechanism for B-H Binding, Size Reduction, and Potential for Improved Combustibility and Specific Impulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    kerosene -based fuel (RP1) and the liquid storable oxidizer, dinitrogen tetroxide (NTO). In comparison, theoretical performance of a bipropellant system...two ionic liquids, using methods we have previously reported.34 1-butyl-3- methyl -imidazolium dicyanamide ([BMIM][DCA]) and 1- methyl -4-amino-1,2,4...hydrogenated boron nanoparticles. The IL precursors, 1-butyl-3- methyl -imidazolium chloride and 1- methyl -4-amino-1,2,4- triazolium iodide were synthesized

  10. Seven-coordinate anion complex with a tren-based urea: Binding discrepancy of hydrogen sulfate in solid and solution states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, Avijit [Jackson State University; Thompson, Bethtrice [Jackson State University; Hayes, Trina [Jackson State University; Tucker, Kimberly [Jackson State University; Powell, Douglas R. [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Bonnesen, Peter V [ORNL; Ellis, Erick D [Jackson State University; Lee, Ken S. [Jackson State University; Yu, Hongtau [Jackson State University; Hossain, Md. Alamgir [Jackson State University

    2011-01-01

    Structural characterization of a hydrogen sulfate complex with a tren-based urea suggests that the anion is coordinated with sixNH Obonds (dN O = 2.857 (3) to 3.092 (3)A ) and one OH O bond (dO O = 2.57 (2) A ) from three receptors; however, in solution the anion is bound within the pseudocavity of one receptor.

  11. Discussion about magnesium phosphating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes results from recently published research focused on production of non-conventional magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO42・4H2O – bobierrite, or MgHPO4・3H2O – newberyite coating for both magnesium alloys and/or mild steel. This new kind of coating is categorized in the context of current state of phosphating technology and its potential advantages and crystal structure is discussed. At the same time, the suitable comparison techniques for magnesium phosphate coating and conventional zinc phosphate coating are discussed.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The biomineral calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO4·2H2O), known as brushite, is a malleable material that both grows and dissolves faster than most other calcium minerals, including other calcium phosphate phases, calcium carbonates and calcium oxalates. Within the body, this ready formation and dissolution can play a role in certain diseases, such as kidney stone and plaque formation. However, these same properties, along with brushite’s excellent biocompatibility, can be used to gr...

  13. Solvothermal synthesis of strontium phosphate chloride nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, W. M.; Wong, C. T.; Li, Z. Y.; Luk, K. D. K.; Chan, W. K.; Yang, C.; Chiu, K. Y.; Xu, B.; Lu, W. W.

    2007-08-01

    Strontium phosphate chloride nanowire was synthesized via a solvothermal treatment of strontium tri-polyphosphate and Collin salt in 1,4-dioxane at 150 °C. The effects of 1,4-dioxane concentration on particle morphology, crystallinity and phase purity were investigated in this study. The specimen morphology was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). When the concentration of 1,4-dioxane was below 10%, micron-sized whisker was the dominant form. At 20-25% concentration of 1,4-dioxane, strontium phosphate chloride single-crystalline nanowire was 31±12 nm in diameter and 1.43±0.6 μm in length with an aspect ratio of 52.28±29.41. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of this nanowire matched with that of strontium phosphate chloride (JCPDS #083-0973). When 1,4-dioxane concentration exceeded 25%, nanorod aggregate was the dominant form instead of nanowire. At 20-25% 1,4-dioxane concentration suitable strontium concentration combine with high chemical potential environment favors the formation of nanowires. By adding 1,4-dioxane impure phase such as β-strontium hydrogen phosphate, nanorod formation was suppressed. This method provides an efficient way to synthesize high aspect ratio strontium phosphate chloride nanowire. It has potential bioactive nanocomposite, high mechanical performance bioactive bone cement filler and fluorescent material applications.

  14. Dissecting the effect of RNA aptamer binding on the dynamics of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trelle, Morten B; Dupont, Daniel Miotto; Madsen, Jeppe Buur

    2014-01-01

    , about their effects on protein conformation and dynamics. We have employed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry to study the effect of RNA aptamers on the structural flexibility of the serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The aptamers have characteristic effects...... of the aptamers to PAI-1 is associated with substantial and widespread protection against deuterium uptake in PAI-1. The aptamers induce protection against exchange with the solvent both in the protein-aptamer interface as well as in other specific areas. Interestingly, the aptamers induce substantial protection...

  15. Study of the effect hydrogen binding in the solvation of alkaline earth cations with MeOH in nitromethane using 1 H NMR technique and determination of ionic solvation number

    CERN Document Server

    Alizadeh, N

    2001-01-01

    A proton NMR method for the study of the effect hydrogen binding and determination of solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations with methanol (MeOH) in in tromethane (NM) as diluent is described. The method is based on monitoring the resonance frequency of MeOH protons as a function of MeOH to metal ion mole ratio at constant metal ion concentration. the average solvation number of cation, n, at any MeOH/ metal ion mole ration was calculated from the NMR chemical shift-mole ration data and was plotted against the mole ration values. The solvation numbers of alkaline earth cations were obtained from the limiting values of the corresponding n, vs. mole ratio plots.

  16. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  17. Effects of retinoic acid and hydrogen peroxide on sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a activation during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eldaim, Mabrouk A. Abd; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Terao, Akira; Kimura, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Both retinoic acid (RA) and oxidative stress (H2O2) increased transcription and cleavage of membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1, leading to enhanced transcription of fatty acid synthase (FAS) in hepatoma cells. On the other hand, RA and H2O2 decreased and increased lipogenesis in adipocytes, respectively, although roles of SREBP-1 activation in these effects remain to be elucidated. To elucidate its involvement, we examined the activation of SREBP...

  18. Hydrogen storage with titanium-functionalized graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Mashoff, Torge; Tanabe, Shinichi; Hibino, Hiroki; Beltram, Fabio; Heun, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We report on hydrogen adsorption and desorption on titanium-covered graphene in order to test theoretical proposals to use of graphene functionalized with metal atoms for hydrogen storage. At room temperature titanium islands grow with an average diameter of about 10 nm. Samples were then loaded with hydrogen, and its desorption kinetics was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy. We observe the desorption of hydrogen in the temperature range between 400K and 700 K. Our results demonstrate the stability of hydrogen binding at room temperature and show that hydrogen desorbs at moderate temperatures in line with what required for practical hydrogen-storage applications.

  19. Apolar Distal Pocket Mutants of Yeast Cytochrome c Peroxidase: Hydrogen Peroxide Reactivity and Cyanide Binding of the TriAla, TriVal, and TriLeu Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwai, Anil K.; Meyen, Cassandra; Kilheeney, Heather; Wroblewski, Damian; Vitello, Lidia B.; Erman, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Three yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) variants with apolar distal heme pockets have been constructed. The CcP variants have Arg48, Trp51, and His52 mutated to either all alanines, CcP(triAla), all valines, CcP(triVal), or all leucines, CcP(triLeu). The triple mutants have detectable enzymatic activity at pH 6 but the activity is less than 0.02% that of wild-type CcP. The activity loss is primarily due to the decreased rate of reaction between the triple mutants and H2O2 compared to wild-type CcP. Spectroscopic properties and cyanide binding characteristics of the triple mutants have been investigated over the pH stability region of CcP, pH 4 to 8. The absorption spectra indicate that the CcP triple mutants have hemes that are predominantly five-coordinate, high-spin at pH 5 and six-coordinate, low-spin at pH 8. Cyanide binding to the triple mutants is biphasic indicating that the triple mutants have two slowly-exchanging conformational states with different cyanide affinities. The binding affinity for cyanide is reduced at least two orders of magnitude in the triple mutants compared to wild-type CcP and the rate of cyanide binding is reduced by four to five orders of magnitude. Correlation of the reaction rates of CcP and 12 distal pocket mutants with H2O2 and HCN suggests that both reactions require ionization of the reactants within the distal heme pocket allowing the anion to bind the heme iron. Distal pocket features that promote substrate ionization (basic residues involved in base-catalyzed substrate ionization or polar residues that can stabilize substrate anions) increase the overall rate of reaction with H2O2 and HCN while features that inhibit substrate ionization slow the reactions. PMID:23022490

  20. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme.

  1. Accessing alkali-free NASICON-type compounds through mixed oxoanion sol-gel chemistry: Hydrogen titanium phosphate sulfate, H1-xTi2(PO4)3-x(SO4)x (x=0.5-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieritz, Daniel; Davidowski, Stephen K.; Seo, Dong-Kyun

    2016-10-01

    We report a direct sol-gel synthesis and characterization of new proton-containing, rhombohedral NASICION-type titanium compounds with mixed phosphate and sulfate oxoanions. The synthetic conditions were established by utilizing peroxide ion as a decomposable and stabilizing ligand for titanyl ions in the presence of phosphates in a strong acidic medium. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), induction-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopic (ICP-OES) elemental analysis, and Raman and 1H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopic studies have determined the presence of sulfate and proton ions in the structure, for which the compositional range has been found to be H1-xTi2(PO4)3-x(SO4)x (x=0.5-1). The particulate products exhibit a nanocrystalline nature observed through characterization with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The N2 sorption isotherm measurements and subsequent Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analyses confirmed the presence of the textural meso- and macropores in the materials. Future studies would determine the potential of the new compounds in various applications as battery materials, proton conductors and solid acid catalysts.

  2. Radioactivity of phosphate mineral products

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrović Branislava; Vitorović Gordana; Stojanović Mirjana; Vitorović Duško

    2011-01-01

    The phosphate industry is one of the biggest polluters of the environment with uranium. Different products are derived after processing phosphoric ore, such as mineral and phosphate fertilizers and phosphate mineral supplements (dicalcium-and monocalcium phosphate) for animal feeding. Phosphate mineral additives used in animal food may contain a high activity of uranium. Research in this study should provide an answer to the extent in which phosphate minera...

  3. Hydrogen storage by polylithiated molecules and nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Er, S.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, G.

    2009-01-01

    We study polylithiated molecules as building blocks for hydrogen storage materials, using first-principles calculations. CLi4 and OLi2 bind 12 and 10 hydrogen molecules, respectively, with an average binding energy of 0.10 and 0.13 eV, leading to gravimetric densities of 37.8 and 40.3 wt % of H2.

  4. Specificity of acceptor binding to Leuconostoc mesenteroides B-512F dextransucrase: binding and acceptor-product structure of alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside analogs modified at C-2, C-3, and C-4 by inversion of the hydroxyl and by replacement of the hydroxyl with hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, D T; Slodki, M E; Robyt, J F

    1990-02-01

    The specificity of acceptor binding to the active site of dextransucrase was studied by using alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside analogs modified at C-2, C-3, and C-4 positions by (a) inversion of the hydroxyl group and (b) replacement of the hydroxyl group with hydrogen. 2-Deoxy-alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside was synthesized from 2-deoxyglucose; 3- and 4-deoxy-alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranosides were synthesized from alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside; and alpha-methyl-D-allopyranoside was synthesized from D-glucose. The analogs were incubated with [14C]sucrose and dextransucrase, and the products were separated by thin-layer chromatography and quantitated by liquid scintillation spectrometry. Structures of the acceptor products were determined by methylation analyses and optical rotation. The relative effectiveness of the acceptor analogs in decreasing order were 2-deoxy, 2-inverted, 3-deoxy, 3-inverted, 4-inverted, and 4-deoxy. The enzyme transfers D-glucopyranose to the C-6 hydroxyl of analogs modified at C-2 and C-3, to the C-4 hydroxyl of 4-inverted, and to the C-3 hydroxyl of 4-deoxy analogs of alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside. The data indicate that the hydroxyl group at C-2 is not as important for acceptor binding as the hydroxyl groups at C-3 and C-4. The hydroxyl group at C-4 is particularly important as it determines the binding orientation of the alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside ring.

  5. Hydrogen in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.; Hervig, R.; Irving, T.

    2017-01-01

    Most volatile studies of Mars have targeted its surface via spacecraft and rover data, and have evidenced surficial water in polar caps and the atmosphere, in the presence of river channels, and in the detection of water bearing minerals. The other focus of Martian volatile studies has been on Martian meteorites which are all from its crust. Most of these studies are on hydrous phases like apatite, a late-stage phase, i.e. crystallizing near the end of the differentiation sequence of Martian basalts and cumulates. Moreover, calculating the water content of the magma a phosphate crystallized from is not always possible, and yet is an essential step to estimate how much water was present in a parent magma and its source. Water, however, is primarily dissolved in the interiors of differentiated planets as hydrogen in lattice defects of nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, feldspar) of the crust and mantle. This hydrogen has tremendous influence, even in trace quantities, on a planet's formation, geodynamics, cooling history and the origin of its volcanism and atmosphere as well as its potential for life. Studies of hydrogen in nominally anhydrous phases of Martian meteorites are rare. Measuring water contents and hydrogen isotopes in well-characterized nominally anhydrous minerals of Martian meteorites is the goal of our study. Our work aims at deciphering what influences the distribution and origin of hydrogen in Martian minerals, such as source, differentiation, degassing and shock.

  6. Tetramethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate hemihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Fujita

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, C4H12N+·H2PO4−·0.5H2O, the anions form an infinite hydrogen-bonded chain along the [1overline{1}0] direction. The anion chains are connected by water molecules, which lie on crystallographic twofold rotation axes, through O—H...O hydrogen bonds. These hydrogen bonds are almost perpendicular to the other hydrogen bonds which create an assembled structure of anions. In addition, C—H...O hydrogen bonds between anions and cations are observed.

  7. First continuous phosphate record from Greenland ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Kjær

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A continuous and highly sensitive absorption method for detection of soluble phosphate in ice cores has been developed using a molybdate reagent and a 2 m liquid waveguide (LWCC. The method is optimized to meet the low concentrations of phosphate in Greenland ice, it has a detection limit of around 0.1 ppb and a depth resolution of approximately 2 cm. The new method has been applied to obtain phosphate concentrations from segments of two Northern Greenland ice cores: from a shallow firn core covering the most recent 120 yr and from the recently obtained deep NEEM ice core in which sections from the late glacial period have been analysed. Phosphate concentrations in 20th century ice are around 0.32 ppb with no indication of anthropogenic influence in the most recent ice. In the glacial part of the NEEM ice core concentrations in the cold stadial periods are significantly higher, in the range of 6–24 ppb, while interstadial ice concentrations are around 2 ppb. In the shallow firn core, a strong correlation between concentrations of phosphate and insoluble dust suggests a similar deposition pattern for phosphate and dust. In the glacial ice, phosphate and dust also correlate quite strongly, however it is most likely that this correlation originates from the phosphate binding to dust during transport, with only a fraction coming directly from dust. Additionally a constant ratio between phosphate and potassium concentrations shows evidence of a possible biogenic land source.

  8. Phosphate sensing and signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) deficiency is a global problem for food production. Plants have evolved complex mechanisms to adapt to low Pi. We focused on the initial aspects of adaptation to low Pi - perception and immediate-early responses to changes in external Pi. To examine whether a labile repressor controls expression of the high affinity Pi transporter, Pht1;1, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) but observed only weak protein-DNA binding activity using extrac...

  9. Binding of divalent magnesium by Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of the substrates Mg x ATP and ribose 5-phosphate as well as Mg2+ to the enzyme 5-phospho-D-ribosyl (alpha-1-diphosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli has been analyzed. By use of the competive inhibitors of ATP and ribose 5-phosphate binding, alpha,beta-methylene ATP ...

  10. Electrochemical behavior of hydrogen peroxide sensor based on new methylene blue as mediator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jie; WU Hai; ZHU Yaqi

    2007-01-01

    A novel amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor was proposed by co-immobilizing new methylene blue (NMB) and Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on glassy carbon electrode through covalent binding.The electrochemical behavior of the sensor was studied extensively in 0.1 mol/L phosphate buffering solution (pH = 7.0).The experiments showed NMB could effectively transfer electrons between hydrogen peroxide and glassy carbon electrode.The electron transfer coefficient and apparent reaction rate constant were determined to be 0.861 and 1.27 s-1.The kinetic characteristics and responses of sensor on HzO2 were investigated.The Michaelis constant is 8.27 mol/L and the linear dependence of current on H2O2 is in the range of 2.5-100 μmol/L.At the same time,the effects of solution pH,buffer capacity,and temperature on the sensor were examined.

  11. Sources of conductance changes during bacterial reduction of trimethylamine oxide to trimethylammonium in phosphate buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, J D; Miskin, D R; Wacher-Viveros, M C; Benge, L C

    1985-06-01

    The sources of conductance changes during reduction of trimethylamine oxide to trimethylamine by Escherichia coli with formate as electron donor and in the presence of phosphate buffer were investigated. Theoretical considerations and experimental results suggest that the major source of conductance change is the conversion of dihydrogen phosphate to hydrogen phosphate. This transformation contributes almost twice as much to the total conductance change as does the conversion of uncharged trimethylamine oxide to charged trimethylammonium.

  12. Metal-phosphate binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  13. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of alcohols and hydroxylamines by hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by methyltrioxorhenium, MTO, and the oxygen binding properties of cobalt Schiff base complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauche, Timothy [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Catalysis is a very interesting area of chemistry, which is currently developing at a rapid pace. A great deal of effort is being put forth by both industry and academia to make reactions faster and more productive. One method of accomplishing this is by the development of catalysts. Enzymes are an example of catalysts that are able to perform reactions on a very rapid time scale and also very specifically; a goal for every man-made catalyst. A kinetic study can also be carried out for a reaction to gain a better understanding of its mechanism and to determine what type of catalyst would assist the reaction. Kinetic studies can also help determine other factors, such as the shelf life of a chemical, or the optimum temperature for an industrial scale reaction. An area of catalysis being studied at this time is that of oxygenations. Life on this earth depends on the kinetic barriers for oxygen in its various forms. If it were not for these barriers, molecular oxygen, water, and the oxygenated materials in the land would be in a constant equilibrium. These same barriers must be overcome when performing oxygenation reactions on the laboratory or industrial scale. By performing kinetic studies and developing catalysts for these reactions, a large number of reactions can be made more economical, while making less unwanted byproducts. For this dissertation the activation by transition metal complexes of hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen coordination will be discussed.

  14. Comparative sorption properties of metal(III) phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustafa, S.; Naeem, A.; Murtaza, S.; Rehana, N.; Samad, H.Y.

    1999-12-01

    Sorption behavior of metal(III) phosphates toward Zn{sup 2+} was investigated using different concentrations, pHs, and temperatures. Ion exchange between protons from the surface and metal cations from solutions was found to be responsible for metal sorption by metal(III) phosphates. Dissociation constants of metal(III) phosphates and binding constants of the Zn{sup 2+} with metal(III) phosphates were determined using Henderson-Hasselbach and modified Langmuir equations, respectively. The sorption process in all the three metal phosphates was found to be endothermic in nature while the dissociation process was observed to be endothermic in AlPO{sub 4} and FePO{sub 4} and exothermic in CrPO{sub 4}.

  15. A novel analytical method for in vivo phosphate tracking (Corrigendum in FEBS Letters, 2007, 581 p. 579)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, H.; Lalonde, S.; Okumoto, S.

    2006-01-01

    Genetically-encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors for phosphate (Pi) (FLIPPi) were engineered by fusing a predicted Synechococcus phosphate-binding protein (PiBP) to eCFP and Venus. Purified fluorescent indicator protein for inorganic phosphate (FLIPPi), in which the fluor...

  16. NMR studies on mechanism of isomerisation of fructose 6-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate catalysed by phosphoglucose isomerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Shahzada Nadeem; Mok, Kenneth Hun; Rashid, Naeem; Xie, Yongjing; Ruether, Manuel; O'Brien, John; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    The fate of hydrogen atoms at C-2 of glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) and C-1 of fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) was studied in the reaction catalysed by phosphoglucose isomerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis (TkPGI) through 1D and 2D NMR methods. When the reaction was performed in (2)H2O the hydrogen atoms in the aforementioned positions were exchanged with deuterons indicating that the isomerization occurred by a cis-enediol intermediate involving C-1 pro-R hydrogen of F6P. These features are similar to those described for phosphoglucose isomerases from rabbit muscle and Pyrococcus furiosus.

  17. New agent to treat elevated phosphate levels: magnesium carbonate/calcium carbonate tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Caitlin; Cameron, Karen; Battistella, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    In summary, Binaphos CM, a magnesium carbonate/calcium carbonate combination phosphate binder, is marketed for treating elevated phosphate levels in dialysis patients. Although studies using magnesium/calcium carbonate as a phosphate binder are short term with small numbers of patients, this phosphate binder has shown some promising results and may provide clinicians with an alternative for phosphate binding. Using a combination phosphate binder may reduce pill burden and encourage patient compliance. In addition to calcium and phosphate, it is imperative to diligently monitor magnesium levels in patients started on this medication, as magnesium levels may increase with longer duration of use. Additional randomized controlled trials are necessary to evaluate long-term efficacy and safety of this combination phosphate binder.

  18. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization.

  19. Hydrogen sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, T L

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is the primary chemical hazard in natural gas production in 'sour' gas fields. It is also a hazard in sewage treatment and manure-containment operations, construction in wetlands, pelt processing, certain types of pulp and paper production, and any situation in which organic material decays or inorganic sulphides exist under reducing conditions. H2S dissociates into free sulphide in the circulation. Sulphide binds to many macromolecules, among them cytochrome oxidase. Although this is undoubtedly an important mechanism of toxicity due to H2S, there may be others H2S provides little opportunity for escape at high concentrations because of the olfactory paralysis it causes, the steep exposure-response relationships, and the characteristically sudden loss of consciousness it can cause which is colloquially termed 'knockdown.' Other effects may include mucosal irritation, which is associated at lower concentrations with a keratoconjunctivitis called 'gas eye' and at higher concentrations with risk of pulmonary oedema. Chronic central nervous system sequelae may possibly follow repeated knockdowns: this is controversial and the primary effects of H2S may be confounded by anoxia or head trauma. Treatment is currently empirical, with a combination of nitrite and hyperbaric oxygen preferred. The treatment regimen is not ideal and carries some risk.

  20. Determination of Vitamin D2 Content in Vitamin D2 and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Tablets by RP-HPLC%反相高效液相色谱法测定维D2磷酸氢钙片中维生素D2含量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯国

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish a RP-HPLC method for the content determination of vitamin D2 in Vitamin D2 and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Tablets.Methods The chromatographic column of AlltimaTM C18 was adopted with the mobile phase of acetonitrilemethanol(1∶9).The detection wavelength was set at 265 nm,the flow velocity was 1.0 mL/min and column temperature was 30 ℃.Results The sample size of vitamin D2 within the range of 0.005-0.065 μg(r=1.000 0)showed the good linearity with the peak area.The mean recovery rate was 99.38%,RSD =0.68% (n =9).Conclusion This method has the advantages of rapidness,simpleness,accuracy and low test cost,and can be used for the quality control of vitamin D2 in Vitamin D2 and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Tablets.%目的 建立测定维D2磷酸氢钙片中维生素D2含量的反相高效液相色谱法.方法 采用Alhima C18色谱柱(250 mm×4.6mm,5 μm),流动相为乙腈-甲醇(1∶9),检测波长为265 nm,流速为1.0 mL/min,柱温30℃.结果 维生素D2进样量在0.005~0.065 μg范围内与峰面积具有良好的线性关系,r=1.0000,平均回收率为99.38%,RSD=0.68%(n=9).结论 该法具有快速、简便、准确、检验成本低的优点,可用于维D2磷酸氢钙片中维生素D2的质量控制.

  1. Improvement of the determination method for the contents of vitamin D2 in Eight Vitamins and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate,Zinc Sulphate Tablets%八维钙锌片中维生素D2含量测定方法的改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳小秦; 尹琳; 吴少平

    2011-01-01

    目的 改进八维钙锌片中维生素D2含量测定的方法.方法 采用HPLC法,以Thermo 硅胶(250 mm×4.6 mm,5 μm) 为色谱柱;流动相:正己烷-异丙醇(110∶1);流速:1.0 mL·min-1;检测波长:254 nm;柱温:35 ℃.结果 维生素D2的线性范围为质量浓度0.5~10 mg·L-1,相关系数为0.995 8,回收率为100.8%(n=9).结论 该方法简便准确,重复性好,可作为控制八维钙锌片中维生素D2的含量测定方法.%Objective To improve the contents determination method of vitamin D2 in Eight Vitamins and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate, Zinc Sulphate Tablets. Methods The contents of vitamin D2 were measured by HPLC with a Thermo Silica chromatographic column (250 mm×4.6 mm,5 μm). n -Hexane-isopropanol(ll0 ∶ 1) was used as the mobile phase at flow rate 1. 0 mL · min-1. The detection wavelength was 254 nm and the column temperature was 35 ℃ . Results The calibration curves showed good linearity in the range of 0. 5-10 mg · L-1 and the correlation coefficient was 0. 995 8. The average recoveries were 100. 8% ( n = 9) .Conclusion The established method is accurate and reproducible,and can be used for the quality control of vitamin D2 in Eight Vitamins and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate, Zinc Sulphate Tablets.

  2. Phosphate inhibits in vitro Fe3+ loading into transferrin by forming a soluble Fe(III)-phosphate complex: a potential non-transferrin bound iron species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert J; Seare, Matthew C; Andros, N David; Kenealey, Zachary; Orozco, Catalina Matias; Webb, Michael; Watt, Richard K

    2012-05-01

    In chronic kidney diseases, NTBI can occur even when total iron levels in serum are low and transferrin is not saturated. We postulated that elevated serum phosphate concentrations, present in CKD patients, might disrupt Fe(3+) loading into apo-transferrin by forming Fe(III)-phosphate species. We report that phosphate competes with apo-transferrin for Fe(3+) by forming a soluble Fe(III)-phosphate complex. Once formed, the Fe(III)-phosphate complex is not a substrate for donating Fe(3+) to apo-transferrin. Phosphate (1-10mM) does not chelate Fe(III) from diferric transferrin under the conditions examined. Complexed forms of Fe(3+), such as iron nitrilotriacetic acid (Fe(3+)-NTA), and Fe(III)-citrate are not susceptible to this phosphate complexation reaction and efficiently deliver Fe(3+) to apo-transferrin in the presence of phosphate. This reaction suggests that citrate might play an important role in protecting against Fe(III), phosphate interactions in vivo. In contrast to the reactions of Fe(3+) and phosphate, the addition of Fe(2+) to a solution of apo-transferrin and phosphate lead to rapid oxidation and deposition of Fe(3+) into apo-transferrin. These in vitro data suggest that, in principle, elevated phosphate concentrations can influence the ability of apo-transferrin to bind iron, depending on the oxidation state of the iron.

  3. In silico docking of forchlorfenuron (FCF to septins suggests that FCF interferes with GTP binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Angelis

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that form cytoskeleton-like filaments, which are essential for many functions in eukaryotic organisms. Small molecule compounds that disrupt septin filament assembly are valuable tools for dissecting septin functions with high temporal control. To date, forchlorfenuron (FCF is the only compound known to affect septin assembly and functions. FCF dampens the dynamics of septin assembly inducing the formation of enlarged stable polymers, but the underlying mechanism of action is unknown. To investigate how FCF binds and affects septins, we performed in silico simulations of FCF docking to all available crystal structures of septins. Docking of FCF with SEPT2 and SEPT3 indicated that FCF interacts preferentially with the nucleotide-binding pockets of septins. Strikingly, FCF is predicted to form hydrogen bonds with residues involved in GDP-binding, mimicking nucleotide binding. FCF docking with the structure of SEPT2-GppNHp, a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, and SEPT7 showed that FCF may assume two alternative non-overlapping conformations deeply into and on the outer side of the nucleotide-binding pocket. Surprisingly, FCF was predicted to interact with the P-loop Walker A motif GxxxxGKS/T, which binds the phosphates of GTP, and the GTP specificity motif AKAD, which interacts with the guanine base of GTP, and highly conserved amino acids including a threonine, which is critical for GTP hydrolysis. Thus, in silico FCF exhibits a conserved mechanism of binding, interacting with septin signature motifs and residues involved in GTP binding and hydrolysis. Taken together, our results suggest that FCF stabilizes septins by locking them into a conformation that mimics a nucleotide-bound state, preventing further GTP binding and hydrolysis. Overall, this study provides the first insight into how FCF may bind and stabilize septins, and offers a blueprint for the rational design of FCF derivatives that could target septins with

  4. Mutations in FMN Binding Pocket Diminish Chromate Reduction Rates for Gh-ChrR Isolated from Gluconacetobacter hansenii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Janin A.; Gong, Chunhong; Zhang, Yanfeng; Tan, Ruimin; Squier, Thomas C.; Jin, Hongjun

    2013-06-01

    A putative chromate ion binding site was identified proximal to a rigidly bound FMN from electron densities in the crystal structure of the quinone reductase from Gluconacetobacter hansenii (Gh-ChrR) (3s2y.pdb). To clarify the location of the chromate binding site, and to understand the role of FMN in the NADPH-dependent reduction of chromate, we have expressed and purified four mutant enzymes involving the site-specific substitution of individual side chains within the FMN binding pocket that form non-covalent bonds with the ribityl phosphate (i.e., S15A and R17A in loop 1 between β1 sheet and α1 helix) or the isoalloxanzine ring (E83A or Y84A in loop 4 between the β3 sheet and α4 helix). Mutations that selectively disrupt hydrogen bonds between either the N3 nitrogen on the isoalloxanzine ring (i.e., E83) or the ribitylphos- phoate (i.e., S15) respectively result in 50% or 70% reductions in catalytic rates of chromate reduction. In comparison, mutations that disrupt π-π ring stacking interactions with the isoal-loxanzine ring (i.e., Y84) or a salt bridge with the ribityl phosphate result in 87% and 97% inhibittion. In all cases there are minimal alterations in chromate binding affinities. Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that chromate binds proximal to FMN, and implicate a structural role for FMN positioning for optimal chromate reduction rates. As side chains proximal to the β3/α4 FMN binding loop 4 contribute to both NADH and metal ion binding, we propose a model in which structural changes around the FMN binding pocket couples to both chromate and NADH binding sites.

  5. Adsorption of glyphosate in chilean soils and its relationship with unoccupied phosphate binding sites Adsorção de glifosato em solos chilenos e sua relação com sítios de adsorção disponíveis para adsorção de fosfato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Kogan

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate glyphosate adsorption by soils and its relationship with unoccupied binding sites for phosphate adsorption. Soil samples of three Chilean soils series - Valdivia (Andisol, Clarillo (Inceptisol and Chicureo (Vertisol - were incubated with different herbicide concentrations. Glyphosate remaining in solution was determined by adjusting a HPLC method with a UV detector. Experimental maximum adsorption capacity were 15,000, 14,300 and 4,700 mg g¹ for Valdivia, Clarillo, and Chicureo soils, respectively. Linear, Freundlich, and Langmuir models were used to describe glyphosate adsorption. Isotherms describing glyphosate adsorption differed among soils. Maximum adjusted adsorption capacity with the Langmuir model was 231,884, 17,874 and 5,670 mg g-1 for Valdivia, Clarillo, and Chicureo soils, respectively. Glyphosate adsorption on the Valdivia soil showed a linear behavior at the range of concentrations used and none of the adjusted models became asymptotic. The high glyphosate adsorption capacity of the Valdivia soil was probably a result of its high exchangeable Al, extractable Fe, and alophan and imogolite clay type. Adsorption was very much related to phosphate dynamics in the Valdivia soil, which showed the larger unoccupied phosphate binding sites. However relationship between unoccupied phosphate binding sites and glyphosate adsorption in the other two soils (Clarillo and Chicureo was not clear.O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar a adsorção de glifosato em solos e sua relação com os sítios disponíveis para adsorção de fosfato. Amostras de três solos chilenos - Valdivia (Andisol, Clarillo (Inceptisol e Chicureo (Vertisol - foram incubadas com diferentes concentrações do herbicida. O glifosato remanescente na solução foi determinado pelo método de HPLC com detector de UV modificado. A capacidade de adsorção máxima experimental foi de 15.000, 14.300 e 4.700 mg g-1 para os solos de

  6. Phosphate mineral formation on the supported dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra

    2014-07-01

    Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) mono- and bilayers supported on mica surface were soaked for two weeks in a simulated body fluid (SBF) with ion concentrations nearly equal to those of human blood plasma. Two solutions were investigated: with and without Tris. The experiment was conducted at 20°C and at a physiological temperature equal to 37°C. Raman spectroscopy was used for the characterization of the precipitated phosphate minerals. These studies may provide information about the physiological mineralization of cell membranes that are mainly composed of phospholipids. Findings from these experiments suggest that the DPPC bilayers enhance the formation of less soluble phosphate forms especially at a temperature of 37°C. In the solution without Tris temperature increase gives more mineral deposits. It is probably the hydrogen interactions between phosphate groups of the phospholipid and hydroxyl groups from Tris that lower exposure of the phosphate group to interact with calcium ions.

  7. Reagentless phosphate ion sensor system for environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.; Kurata, H.; Inoue, Y.; Shin, H. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of computer Science and Systems; Kubo, I. [Soka University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Nakamura, H.; Ikebukuro, K.; Karube, I. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology

    1998-06-05

    Phosphate ion sensor system using an electrochemical detector was developed by the use of recombinant pyruvate oxidase (PyOD) from Lactobacillus plantarum, which needs no addition of thiamine pyrophosphate and flavin adenine dinucleotide for reaction. This system could detect 2 nM hydrogen peroxide. Response time for phosphate ion was 80 s and total measurement time for one sample was 3 min. Citrate buffer solution (pH 6.3) was most suitable for the measurement and optimum flow rate was 0.6 ml/min. Under these optimum conditions minimum detection limit of phosphate ion was 15 nM, which was enough for the determination of phosphate ion in dam-lake. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Iron Phosphate Coating:A Novel Approach to Controlling Pyrite Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGXIAO; V.P.EVANGELOU

    1997-01-01

    A novel coating technique was develped for controlling pyrite oxidation .The technique involved leaching pyrite particles with a solution containing low concentrations of phosphate and hydrogen peroxide.During the leaching rpocess,the iron released from pyrite by hydrogen proxide was precipitated by phosphate as a ferric phosphate coating .This coating was shown to be able to effectively prevent pyirte from oxidation and it could be established at the expense of only surface portions of pyrite.The emergence of this technique could provide a unique potential route for abating acid mine draingage and reclaiming sulfide-containing degraded mining land.

  9. Biomimetic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  10. Gastrointestinal phosphate handling in CKD and its association with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinman, Edward J; Light, Paul D; Suki, Wadi N

    2013-11-01

    Increases in serum concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) and ultimately phosphate and decreases in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D level are thought to play a central role in the progressive nature of kidney disease and the development of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. The initial changes in PTH and FGF-23 levels are adaptive to maintain serum phosphate concentration and phosphate load within defined levels by increasing urinary excretion of phosphate. Less well appreciated is the unanticipated finding that absorption of phosphate from the gastrointestinal tract is not downregulated in chronic kidney disease. This maladaptive response maintains higher levels of phosphate absorption, thereby contributing to the phosphate burden. Moreover, in response to a low-phosphate diet, as often is prescribed to such patients, gut phosphate absorption may be enhanced, undermining the potential beneficial effects of this intervention. Given the poor response to limiting phosphate intake and the use of phosphate binders, we suggest that research efforts be oriented toward better understanding of the factors that affect phosphate absorption in the gastrointestinal tract and the development of agents that directly inhibit phosphate transporters in the small intestine and/or their associated binding proteins.

  11. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  12. Hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Sloan, E.D.

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to the storage of hydrogen. The invention relates especially to storing hydrogen in a clathrate hydrate. The clathrate hydrate according to the present invention originates from a composition, which comprises water and hydrogen, as well as a promotor compound. The promotor comp

  13. Local silico-aluminophosphate interfaces within phosphated H-ZSM-5 zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bij, Hendrik E; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2014-06-01

    In order to elucidate phosphorus-zeolite H-ZSM-5 interactions, a variety of phosphorus-modified zeolite H-ZSM-5 materials were studied in a multi-spectroscopic manner. By deploying single pulse (27)Al, (31)P MAS NMR, 2D heteronuclear (27)Al-(31)P correlation (HETCOR), (27)Al MQ MAS NMR spectroscopy, TPD of pyridine monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy, and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) the interplay and influence of acidity, thermal treatment and phosphorus on the structure and acidity of H-ZSM-5 were established. It was found that while acid treatment did not affect the zeolite structure, thermal treatment leads to the breaking of Si-OH-Al bonds, a decrease in the strong acid site number and the formation of terminal Al-OH groups. No extra-framework aluminium species was observed. Phosphorus precursors interact with the zeolitic framework through hydrogen bonds and physical coordination, as phosphorus species can be simply washed out with hot water. After phosphatation and thermal treatment two effects occur simultaneously, namely (i) phosphorus species transform into water insoluble condensed poly-phosphoric acid and (ii) phosphoric acid binds irreversibly to the terminal Al-OH groups of partially dislodged four-coordinated framework aluminium, forming local silico-aluminophosphate interfaces. These interfaces are potentially the promoters of hydrothermal stability in phosphated zeolite H-ZSM-5.

  14. Tethering of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) to Beta Tricalcium Phosphate (βTCP) via Fusion to a High Affinity, Multimeric βTCP-Binding Peptide: Effects on Human Multipotent Stromal Cells/Connective Tissue Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Luis M; Rivera, Jaime J; Stockdale, Linda; Saini, Sunil; Lee, Richard T; Griffith, Linda G

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of freshly-aspirated autologous bone marrow, together with a scaffold, is a promising clinical alternative to harvest and transplantation of autologous bone for treatment of large defects. However, survival proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of the marrow-resident stem and progenitor cells with osteogenic potential can be limited in large defects by the inflammatory microenvironment. Previous studies using EGF tethered to synthetic polymer substrates have demonstrated that surface-tethered EGF can protect human bone marrow-derived osteogenic stem and progenitor cells from pro-death inflammatory cues and enhance their proliferation without detriment to subsequent osteogenic differentiation. The objective of this study was to identify a facile means of tethering EGF to clinically-relevant βTCP scaffolds and to demonstrate the bioactivity of EGF tethered to βTCP using stimulation of the proliferative response of human bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC) as a phenotypic metric. We used a phage display library and panned against βTCP and composites of βTCP with a degradable polyester biomaterial, together with orthogonal blocking schemes, to identify a 12-amino acid consensus binding peptide sequence, LLADTTHHRPWT, with high affinity for βTCP. When a single copy of this βTCP-binding peptide sequence was fused to EGF via a flexible peptide tether domain and expressed recombinantly in E. coli together with a maltose-binding domain to aid purification, the resulting fusion protein exhibited modest affinity for βTCP. However, a fusion protein containing a linear concatamer containing 10 repeats of the binding motif the resulting fusion protein showed high affinity stable binding to βTCP, with only 25% of the protein released after 7 days at 37oC. The fusion protein was bioactive, as assessed by its abilities to activate kinase signaling pathways downstream of the EGF receptor when presented in soluble form, and to enhance

  15. Tethering of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF to Beta Tricalcium Phosphate (βTCP via Fusion to a High Affinity, Multimeric βTCP-Binding Peptide: Effects on Human Multipotent Stromal Cells/Connective Tissue Progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Alvarez

    Full Text Available Transplantation of freshly-aspirated autologous bone marrow, together with a scaffold, is a promising clinical alternative to harvest and transplantation of autologous bone for treatment of large defects. However, survival proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of the marrow-resident stem and progenitor cells with osteogenic potential can be limited in large defects by the inflammatory microenvironment. Previous studies using EGF tethered to synthetic polymer substrates have demonstrated that surface-tethered EGF can protect human bone marrow-derived osteogenic stem and progenitor cells from pro-death inflammatory cues and enhance their proliferation without detriment to subsequent osteogenic differentiation. The objective of this study was to identify a facile means of tethering EGF to clinically-relevant βTCP scaffolds and to demonstrate the bioactivity of EGF tethered to βTCP using stimulation of the proliferative response of human bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSC as a phenotypic metric. We used a phage display library and panned against βTCP and composites of βTCP with a degradable polyester biomaterial, together with orthogonal blocking schemes, to identify a 12-amino acid consensus binding peptide sequence, LLADTTHHRPWT, with high affinity for βTCP. When a single copy of this βTCP-binding peptide sequence was fused to EGF via a flexible peptide tether domain and expressed recombinantly in E. coli together with a maltose-binding domain to aid purification, the resulting fusion protein exhibited modest affinity for βTCP. However, a fusion protein containing a linear concatamer containing 10 repeats of the binding motif the resulting fusion protein showed high affinity stable binding to βTCP, with only 25% of the protein released after 7 days at 37oC. The fusion protein was bioactive, as assessed by its abilities to activate kinase signaling pathways downstream of the EGF receptor when presented in soluble form

  16. Phosphate Mines, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Jordan's leading industry and export commodities are phosphate and potash, ranked in the top three in the world. These are used to make fertilizer. The Jordan Phosphate Mines Company is the sole producer, having started operations in 1935. In addition to mining activities, the company produces phosphoric acid (for fertilizers, detergents, pharmaceuticals), diammonium phosphate (for fertilizer), sulphuric acid (many uses), and aluminum fluoride (a catalyst to make aluminum and magnesium). The image covers an area of 27.5 x 49.4 km, was acquired on September 17, 2005, and is located near 30.8 degrees north latitude, 36.1 degrees east longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  17. Binding to Redox-Inactive Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Ions Strongly Deactivates the C-H Bonds of Tertiary Amides toward Hydrogen Atom Transfer to Reactive Oxygen Centered Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Carboni, Giulia; Mangiacapra, Livia; Bietti, Massimo

    2015-09-18

    The effect of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) with N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) was studied by laser flash photolysis. In acetonitrile, a >2 order of magnitude decrease in the rate constant for hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) from the C-H bonds of these substrates (kH) was measured after addition of Li(+). This behavior was explained in terms of a strong interaction between Li(+) and the oxygen atom of both DMF and DMA that increases the extent of positive charge on the amide, leading to C-H bond deactivation toward HAT to the electrophilic radical CumO(•). Similar effects were observed after addition of Ca(2+), which was shown to strongly bind up to four equivalents of the amide substrates. With Mg(2+), weak C-H deactivation was observed for the first two substrate equivalents followed by stronger deactivation for two additional equivalents. No C-H deactivation was observed in DMSO after addition of Li(+) and Mg(2+). These results point toward the important role played by metal ion Lewis acidity and solvent Lewis basicity, indicating that C-H deactivation can be modulated by varying the nature of the metal cation and solvent and allowing for careful control over the HAT reactivity of amide substrates.

  18. Symmetry-Driven Band Gap Engineering in Hydrogen Functionalized Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Holm; Grubisic Cabo, Antonija; Balog, Richard;

    2016-01-01

    Band gap engineering in hydrogen functionalized graphene is demonstrated by changing the symmetry of the functionalization structures. Small differences in hydrogen adsorbate binding energies on graphene on Ir(111) allow tailoring of highly periodic functionalization structures favoring one disti...

  19. Synthesis and controllable wettability of micro- and nanostructured titanium phosphate thin films formed on titanium plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Mitsunori; Inoue, Yuko; Sakamoto, Ayako; Torikai, Toshio; Watari, Takanori

    2014-05-28

    The hydrothermal treatment of a titanium plate in a mixed aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide and aqueous phosphoric acid under different conditions results in the formation of various titanium phosphate thin films. The films have various crystal structures such as Ti2O3(H2PO4)2·2H2O, α-titanium phosphate (Ti(HPO4)2·H2O), π-titanium phosphate (Ti2O(PO4)2·H2O), or low-crystallinity titanium phosphate and different morphologies that have not been previously reported such as nanobelts, microflowers, nanosheets, nanorods, or nanoplates. The present study also suggests the mechanisms behind the formation of these thin films. The crystal structure and morphology of the titanium phosphate thin films depend strongly on the concentration of the aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution, the amount of phosphoric acid, and the reaction temperature. In particular, hydrogen peroxide plays an important role in the formation of the titanium phosphate thin films. Moreover, controllable wettability of the titanium phosphate thin films, including superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity, is reported. Superhydrophobic surfaces with controllable adhesion to water droplets are obtained on π-titanium phosphate nanorod thin films modified with alkylamine molecules. The adhesion force between a water droplet and the thin film depends on the alkyl chain length of the alkylamine and the duration of ultraviolet irradiation utilized for photocatalytic degradation.

  20. Investigation on binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase by absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Li; Zhu, Shuhua; Ma, Hongmei; Zhou, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Binding of nitric oxide to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) has been investigated by absorption spectrometry in 0.2 M anaerobic phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). Based on this binding equilibrium, a model equation for evaluating the binding constant of nitric oxide to HRP is developed and the binding constant is calculated to be (1.55 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1, indicating that HRP can form a stable complex with nitric oxide. The type of inhibition by nitric oxide is validated on the basis of studying initial reaction rates of HRP-catalyzed oxidation of guaiacol in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide. The inhibition mechanism is found to follow an apparent non-competitive inhibition by Lineweaver-Burk method. Based on this kinetic mechanism, the binding constant is also calculated to be (5.22 ± 0.06) × 10 4 M -1. The values of the binding constant determined by the two methods are almost identical. The non-competitive inhibition model is also applicable to studying the effect of nitric oxide on other metalloenzymes, which catalyze the two-substrate reaction with the "ping-pong" mechanism.

  1. HPLC法同时测定三维葡磷钙咀嚼片中维生素B1、维生素B2的含量%Content Determination of Vitamin B1 and Vitamin B2 in Trivitamin and Calcium Gluconate,Calcium Hydro-gen Phosphate Chewable Tablets by HPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹凤

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To establish a method for the content determination of vitamin B1 and vitamin B2 in Trivitamin and calci-um gluconate,calcium hydrogen phosphate chewable tablets. METHODS:HPLC was conducted. The column was Inertsil C18 with the mobile phase of 1%triethylamine contained 0.02 mol/L of sodium heptane solution(pH was adjusted to 5.5 by phosphate)-methanol (74∶26,V/V)at the flow rate of 1.0 ml/min,the detection wavelength was 260 nm,temperature was 30℃and the volume was 20μl. RESULTS:There was a good linear relationship between the quality concentration of vitamin B1 and peak area in the range of 0.22-1.10μg/ml(r=0.999 8)and vitamin B2 was in the range of 0.22-1.09μg/ml(r=0.999 7). The RSDs of precision,reproducibility and stabil-ity tests were all less than 1%;the average recovery was respectively 99.66%(RSD=0.96%,n=9)and 100.31%(RSD=0.92%,n=9). CONCLUSIONS:The method is simple,accurate,sensitive and reliable and suitable for the content determination of vitamin B1 and vitamin B2 in Trivitamin and calcium gluconate,calcium hydrogen phosphate chewable tablets.%目的:建立同时测定三维葡磷钙咀嚼片中维生素B1、维生素B2含量的方法。方法:采用高效液相色谱法。色谱柱为Inertsil C18,流动相为含1%三乙胺的0.02 mol/L庚烷磺酸钠溶液(磷酸调pH至5.5)-甲醇(74∶26,V/V),检测波长为260 nm,流速为1.0 ml/min,柱温为30℃,进样量为20μl。结果:维生素B1、维生素B2质量浓度分别在0.22~1.10、0.22~1.09μg/ml范围内与各自峰面积呈良好的线性关系(r=0.9998、0.9997);精密度、稳定性、重复性试验的RSD<1%;平均加样回收率分别为99.66%、100.31%,RSD分别为0.96%、0.92%(n=9)。结论:本方法简便、准确度高,可用于三维葡磷钙咀嚼片中维生素B1、维生素B2的含量测定。

  2. Phytate (Inositol Hexakisphosphate) in Soil and Phosphate Acquisition from Inositol Phosphates by Higher Plants. A Review

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Phosphate (P) fixation to the soil solid phase is considered to be important for P availability and is often attributed to the strong binding of orthophosphate anion species. However, the fixation and subsequent immobilization of inositolhexa and pentaphosphate isomers (phytate) in soil is often much stronger than that of the orthosphate anion species. The result is that phytate is a main organic P form in soil and the dominating form of identifiable organic P. The reasons for the accumulatio...

  3. Research on Uncrystallized Phosphating Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG En-jun; XING Ze-kuan

    2004-01-01

    This article excogitated a kind of uncrystallized phosphating film bears wearing capacity goodly by adding Ca2 + in normal phosphating solution. This technology is very useful to protect steel parts working in oil from abrasion.

  4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition in which ...

  5. Phosphate enhances Fgf23 expression through reactive oxygen species in UMR-106 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Michiko; Kinoshita, Yuka; Taguchi, Manabu; Fukumoto, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) has been shown to work as a phosphotropic hormone. Although FGF23 reduces the serum phosphate level, it has not been established that phosphate directly regulates FGF23 production. In this study, we investigated whether phosphate can enhance Fgf23 expression using the rat osteoblastic cell line UMR-106, which has been shown to express Fgf23 in response to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D]. Phosphate increased Fgf23 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D. Phosphate also increased Fgf23 promoter activity, but showed no effect on the half-life of Fgf23 messenger RNA. Phosphonoformic acid and PD98059, an inhibitor of MEK, inhibited the effects of phosphate on Fgf23 expression and promoter activity. In addition, phosphate enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in UMR-106 cells, and hydrogen peroxide enhanced FGF23 production in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Hydrogen peroxide also enhanced Elk1 reporter activity, a target of the MEK-extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Furthermore, the effect of phosphate on ROS production and Fgf23 expression was inhibited by apocynin, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. These results indicate that phosphate directly enhances Fgf23 transcription without affecting the stability of Fgf23 messenger RNA by stimulating NADPH-induced ROS production and the MEK-ERK pathway in UMR-106 cells.

  6. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  7. Pentose phosphate pathway function affects tolerance to the G-quadruplex binder TMPyP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Elizabeth J; Merchan, Stephanie; Lawless, Conor; Banks, A Peter; Wilkinson, Darren J; Lydall, David

    2013-01-01

    G-quadruplexes form in guanine-rich regions of DNA and the presence of these structures at telomeres prevents the activity of telomerase in vitro. Ligands such as the cationic porphyrin TMPyP4 stabilise G-quadruplexes and are therefore under investigation for their potential use as anti-cancer drugs. In order to investigate the mechanism of action of TMPyP4 in vivo, we carried out a genome-wide screen in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that deletion of key pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) genes increased the sensitivity of yeast to the presence of TMPyP4. The PPP plays an important role in the oxidative stress response and sensitivity to TMPyP4 also increased when genes involved in the oxidative stress response, CCS1 and YAP1, were deleted. For comparison we also report genome wide-screens using hydrogen peroxide, which causes oxidative stress, RHPS4, another G-quadruplex binder and hydroxyurea, an S phase poison. We found that a number of TMPyP4-sensitive strains are also sensitive to hydrogen peroxide in a genome-wide screen. Overall our results suggest that treatment with TMPyP4 results in light-dependent oxidative stress response in budding yeast, and that this, rather than G-quadruplex binding, is the major route to cytotoxicity. Our results have implications for the usefulness and mechanism of action of TMPyP4.

  8. Characterization of VPS34-IN1, a selective inhibitor of Vps34, reveals that the phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate-binding SGK3 protein kinase is a downstream target of class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bago, Ruzica; Malik, Nazma; Munson, Michael J; Prescott, Alan R; Davies, Paul; Sommer, Eeva; Shpiro, Natalia; Ward, Richard; Cross, Darren; Ganley, Ian G; Alessi, Dario R

    2014-11-01

    The Vps34 (vacuolar protein sorting 34) class III PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) phosphorylates PtdIns (phosphatidylinositol) at endosomal membranes to generate PtdIns(3)P that regulates membrane trafficking processes via its ability to recruit a subset of proteins possessing PtdIns(3)P-binding PX (phox homology) and FYVE domains. In the present study, we describe a highly selective and potent inhibitor of Vps34, termed VPS34-IN1, that inhibits Vps34 with 25 nM IC50 in vitro, but does not significantly inhibit the activity of 340 protein kinases or 25 lipid kinases tested that include all isoforms of class I as well as class II PI3Ks. Administration of VPS34-IN1 to cells induces a rapid dose-dependent dispersal of a specific PtdIns(3)P-binding probe from endosome membranes, within 1 min, without affecting the ability of class I PI3K to regulate Akt. Moreover, we explored whether SGK3 (serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-3), the only protein kinase known to interact specifically with PtdIns(3)P via its N-terminal PX domain, might be controlled by Vps34. Mutations disrupting PtdIns(3)P binding ablated SGK3 kinase activity by suppressing phosphorylation of the T-loop [PDK1 (phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1) site] and hydrophobic motif (mammalian target of rapamycin site) residues. VPS34-IN1 induced a rapid ~50-60% loss of SGK3 phosphorylation within 1 min. VPS34-IN1 did not inhibit activity of the SGK2 isoform that does not possess a PtdIns(3)P-binding PX domain. Furthermore, class I PI3K inhibitors (GDC-0941 and BKM120) that do not inhibit Vps34 suppressed SGK3 activity by ~40%. Combining VPS34-IN1 and GDC-0941 reduced SGK3 activity ~80-90%. These data suggest SGK3 phosphorylation and hence activity is controlled by two pools of PtdIns(3)P. The first is produced through phosphorylation of PtdIns by Vps34 at the endosome. The second is due to the conversion of class I PI3K product, PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 into PtdIns(3)P, via the sequential actions of the Ptd

  9. Practical application of phosphate treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravaggio, Mike [Integrated Chemistry Solutions Pte. Ltd., Singapore (Singapore)

    2011-05-15

    Phosphate treatment has been applied to subcritical fossil power boilers for well over half a century, as well as being used frequently in heat recovery steam generators. The use of this treatment has evolved over the decades, with the operating sodium to phosphate ratio being the defining factor for the evolution of the treatment. The evolving prescribed sodium to phosphate ratios have been based on the scientific research results and operating experience available at the time, and in the latest EPRI Guidelines issued in 2004 are set at a minimum sodium to phosphate ratio of 3:1, with provision to add up to 1 mg . L{sup -1} of additional free caustic. The ratio limitation has always been set in an effort to minimize the potential for corrosion caused by the potential misapplication of the treatment. Typically, the operating ranges for phosphate treatments are depicted on an x-y plot with the x-axis the phosphate concentration and the y-axis the corrected pH value based on the maximum sodium to phosphate ratio allowed for by the treatment. These operating range plots define the theoretical operating range of a phosphate treatment. This paper briefly discusses the origin of the current phosphate control limits in the EPRI Guidelines, discusses phosphate chemistry, outlines the limitations involved when applying a phosphate treatment and provides additional practical guidance for overcoming these limitations and minimizing the potential for corrosion induced by the incorrect application of a phosphate treatment. (orig.)

  10. Hydrogen Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The series of absorption or emission lines that are characteristic of the hydrogen atom. According to the Bohr theory of the hydrogen atom, devised by Danish physicist Neils Bohr (1885-1962) in 1913, the hydrogen atom can be envisaged as consisting of a central nucleus (a proton) around which a single electron revolves. The electron is located in one of a number of possible permitted orbits, each...

  11. Engineering Potato Starch with a Higher Phosphate Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuan; Huang, Xing-Feng; Visser, Richard G. F.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphate esters are responsible for valuable and unique functionalities of starch for industrial applications. Also in the cell phosphate esters play a role in starch metabolism, which so far has not been well characterized in storage starch. Laforin, a human enzyme composed of a carbohydrate-binding module and a dual-specificity phosphatase domain, is involved in the dephosphorylation of glycogen. To modify phosphate content and better understand starch (de)phosphorylation in storage starch, laforin was engineered and introduced into potato (cultivar Kardal). Interestingly, expression of an (engineered) laforin in potato resulted in significantly higher phosphate content of starch, and this result was confirmed in amylose-free potato genetic background (amf). Modified starches exhibited altered granule morphology and size compared to the control. About 20–30% of the transgenic lines of each series showed red-staining granules upon incubation with iodine, and contained higher phosphate content than the blue-stained starch granules. Moreover, low amylose content and altered gelatinization properties were observed in these red-stained starches. Principle component and correlation analysis disclosed a complex correlation between starch composition and starch physico-chemical properties. Ultimately, the expression level of endogenous genes involved in starch metabolism was analysed, revealing a compensatory response to the decrease of phosphate content in potato starch. This study provides a new perspective for engineering starch phosphate content in planta by making use of the compensatory mechanism in the plant itself. PMID:28056069

  12. sphingosine-1-phosphate transport and its role in immunology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsema, V.; Bouma, Hjalmar; Kok, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingolipid metabolite with many important functions in cellular and systemic physiology, including the immune system. As it cannot traverse the membrane, it is exported from cells by transporters. Several members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter fami

  13. The catalytic mechanism of indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase: crystal structures of complexes of the enzyme from Sulfolobus solfataricus with substrate analogue, substrate, and product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Michael; Darimont, B D; Jansonius, J N; Kirschner, K

    2002-06-07

    Indoleglycerol phosphate synthase catalyzes the ring closure of an N-alkylated anthranilate to a 3-alkyl indole derivative, a reaction requiring Lewis acid catalysis in vitro. Here, we investigated the enzymatic reaction mechanism through X-ray crystallography of complexes of the hyperthermostable enzyme from Sulfolobus solfataricus with the substrate 1-(o-carboxyphenylamino) 1-deoxyribulose 5-phosphate, a substrate analogue and the product indole-3-glycerol phosphate. The substrate and the substrate analogue are bound to the active site in a similar, extended conformation between the previously identified phosphate binding site and a hydrophobic pocket for the anthranilate moiety. This binding mode is unproductive, because the carbon atoms that are to be joined are too far apart. The indole ring of the bound product resides in a second hydrophobic pocket adjacent to that of the anthranilate moiety of the substrate. Although the hydrophobic moiety of the substrate moves during catalysis from one hydrophobic pocket to the other, the triosephosphate moiety remains rigidly bound to the same set of hydrogen-bonding residues. Simultaneously, the catalytically important residues Lys53, Lys110 and Glu159 maintain favourable distances to the atoms of the ligand undergoing covalent changes. On the basis of these data, the structures of two putative catalytic intermediates were modelled into the active site. This new structural information and the modelling studies provide further insight into the mechanism of enzyme-catalyzed indole synthesis. The charged epsilon-amino group of Lys110 is the general acid, and the carboxylate group of Glu159 is the general base. Lys53 guides the substrate undergoing conformational transitions during catalysis, by forming a salt-bridge to the carboxylate group of its anthranilate moiety.

  14. Conformational Changes in Orotidine 5’-Monophosphate Decarboxylase: A Structure-Based Explanation for How the 5’-Phosphate Group Activates the Enzyme†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Bijoy J.; Wood, McKay; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Goryanova, Bogdana; Amyes, Tina L.; Richard, John P.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The binding of a ligand to orotidine 5’-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) is accompanied by a conformational change from an open, inactive conformation (Eo) to a closed, active conformation (Ec). As the substrate traverses the reaction coordinate to form the stabilized vinyl carbanion/carbene intermediate, interactions are enforced that destabilize the carboxylate group of the substrate as well as stabilize the intermediate (in the Ec•S‡ complex). Focusing on the OMPDC from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, the “remote” 5’-phosphate group of the substrate activates the enzyme 2.4 × 108-fold; the activation is equivalently described by an intrinsic binding energy (IBE) of 11.4 kcal/mol. We studied residues in the activation that 1) directly contact the 5’-phosphate group; 2) participate in a hydrophobic cluster near the base of the active site loop that sequesters the bound substrate from solvent; and 3) form hydrogen-bonding interactions across the interface between the “mobile” and “fixed” half-barrel domains of the (β/α8-barrel structure. Our data support a model in which the IBE provided by the 5’-phosphate group is used to enable interactions both near the N-terminus of the active site loop and across the domain interface that stabilize both the Ec•S and Ec•S‡ complexes relative to the Eo•S complex. The conclusion that the IBE of the 5’-phosphate group provides stabilization of both the Ec•S and Ec•S‡ complexes, not just the Ec•S‡ complex, is central to understanding the structural origins of enzymatic catalysis as well as the requirements for the de novo design of enzymes that catalyze novel reactions. PMID:23030629

  15. The ferroxidase center is essential for ferritin iron loading in the presence of phosphate and minimizes side reactions that form Fe(III)-phosphate colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Robert J; David Andros, N; Watt, Richard K

    2012-04-01

    Ferritin iron loading was studied in the presence of physiological serum phosphate concentrations (1 mM), elevated serum concentrations (2-5 mM), and intracellular phosphate concentrations (10 mM). Experiments compared iron loading into homopolymers of H and L ferritin with horse spleen ferritin. Prior to studying the reactions with ferritin, a series of control reactions were performed to study the solution chemistry of Fe(2+) and phosphate. In the absence of ferritin, phosphate catalyzed Fe(2+) oxidation and formed soluble polymeric Fe(III)-phosphate complexes. The Fe(III)-phosphate complexes were characterized by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, which revealed spherical nanoparticles with diameters of 10-20 nm. The soluble Fe(III)-phosphate complexes also formed as competing reactions during iron loading into ferritin. Elemental analysis on ferritin samples separated from the Fe(III)-phosphate complexes showed that as the phosphate concentration increased, the iron loading into horse ferritin decreased. The composition of the mineral that does form inside horse ferritin has a higher iron/phosphate ratio (~1:1) than ferritin purified from tissue (~10:1). Phosphate significantly inhibited iron loading into L ferritin, due to the lack of the ferroxidase center in this homopolymer. Spectrophotometric assays of iron loading into H ferritin showed identical iron loading curves in the presence of phosphate, indicating that the ferroxidase center of H ferritin efficiently competes with phosphate for the binding and oxidation of Fe(2+). Additional studies demonstrated that H ferritin ferroxidase activity could be used to oxidize Fe(2+) and facilitate the transfer of the Fe(3+) into apo transferrin in the presence of phosphate.

  16. Calcium Phosphate Biomaterials: An Update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Current calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials for bone repair, substitution, augmentation and regeneration include hydroxyapatite ( HA ) from synthetic or biologic origin, beta-tricalcium phosphate ( β-TCP ) , biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and are available as granules, porous blocks, components of composites (CaP/polymer) cements, and as coatings on orthopedic and dental implants. Experimental calcium phosphate biomaterials include CO3- and F-substituted apatites, Mg-and Zn-substituted β-TCP, calcium phosphate glasses. This paper is a brief review of the different types of CaP biomaterials and their properties such as bioactivity, osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity.

  17. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Alan H.; Rogers, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

  18. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  19. Phosphates sensing: two polyamino-phenolic zinc receptors able to discriminate and signal phosphates in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Gianluca; Formica, Mauro; Fusi, Vieri; Giorgi, Luca; Guerri, Annalisa; Macedi, Eleonora; Micheloni, Mauro; Paoli, Paola; Pontellini, Roberto; Rossi, Patrizia

    2009-07-06

    Two Zn(II)-dinuclear systems were studied as receptors for phosphates; they were obtained by using the two polyamino-phenolic ligands 3,3'-bis[N,N-bis(2-aminoethyl)aminomethyl]-2,2'-dihydroxybiphenyl (L1) and 2,6-bis[N,N-bis(2-aminoethyl)aminomethyl]phenol (L2) in which the difference lies in the spacers between the two dien units, biphenol or phenol in L1 and L2, respectively. The metallo-receptors obtained are able to selectively discriminate phosphate (Pi) from pyrophosphate (PPi) and vice versa in aqueous solution in a wide range of pH (6 phosphate in a bridge disposition, fit in a different way with the different guests. Furthermore, NMR studies supported the model of interaction proposed between guests and receptors, highlighting that they are also able to bind biological phosphates such as G6P and ATP at physiological pH. Fluorescence studies showed that the receptor system based on L1 is able to signal the presence in solution of Pi and PPi at physiological pH; the presence of Pi is detected by a quenching of the emission, that of PPi by an enhancement of it. With the aid of an external colored sensor (PCV), the receptors were then used to produce simple signaling systems for phosphates based on the displacement method; the two chemosensors obtained are able to signal and quantify these anions at physiological pH, preserving the selectivity between phosphate and pyrophosphate and extending it to G6P and ATP.

  20. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  1. Hydrogen carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  2. Effect of Phosphate on U(VI) Sorption to Montmorillonite: Ternary Complexation and Precipitation Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Wang, Zimeng; Mehta, Vrajesh; Giammar, Daniel; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-02-15

    Phosphate addition is a potential treatment method to lower the solubility of U(VI) in soil and groundwater systems by causing U(VI) phosphate precipitation as well as enhancing adsorption. Previous work has shown that iron oxide surfaces may facilitate the nucleation of U(VI) phosphate minerals and, that under weakly acidic conditions, phosphate also enhances U(VI) adsorption to such phases. Like iron oxides, clays are important reactive phases in the subsurface but little is known about the interaction of U(VI) and phosphate with these minerals. The effect of aqueous phosphate on U(VI) binding to Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) in air-equilibrated systems was investigated. Equilibrium U(VI) uptake to montmorillonite was determined at pH 4, 6 and 8 at discrete initial phosphate concentrations between 0 and 100 μM. The observed behavior of U(VI) indicates a transition from adsorption to precipitation with increasing total uranium and phosphate concentrations at all pH values. At the highest phosphate concentration examined at each pH value, a barrier to U(VI) phosphate nucleation is observed. At lower concentrations, phosphate has no effect on macroscopic U(VI) adsorption. To assess the mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate interactions on smectite surfaces, U(VI) speciation was investigated under selected conditions using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Samples above the precipitation threshold display EXAFS and LIFS spectral signatures consistent with the autunite family of U(VI) phosphate minerals. However, at lower U(VI) concentrations, changes in LIFS spectra upon phosphate addition suggest that U(VI)-phosphate ternary surface complexes form on the montmorillonite surface at pH 4 and 6 despite the lack of a macroscopic effect on adsorption. The speciation of solid-associated U(VI) below the precipitation threshold at pH 8 is dominated by U(VI)-carbonate surface complexes. This work

  3. Effect of phosphate on U(VI) sorption to montmorillonite: Ternary complexation and precipitation barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Lyndsay D.; Maillot, Fabien; Wang, Zheming; Wang, Zimeng; Mehta, Vrajesh S.; Giammar, Daniel E.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-02-01

    Phosphate addition is a potential treatment method to lower the solubility of U(VI) in soil and groundwater systems by causing U(VI) phosphate precipitation as well as enhancing adsorption. Previous work has shown that iron oxide surfaces may facilitate the nucleation of U(VI) phosphate minerals and, that under weakly acidic conditions, phosphate also enhances U(VI) adsorption to such phases. Like iron oxides, clays are important reactive phases in the subsurface but little is known about the interaction of U(VI) and phosphate with these minerals. The effect of aqueous phosphate on U(VI) binding to Wyoming montmorillonite (SWy-2) in air-equilibrated systems was investigated. Equilibrium U(VI) uptake to montmorillonite was determined at pH 4, 6 and 8 at discrete initial phosphate concentrations between 0 and 100 μM. The observed behavior of U(VI) indicates a transition from adsorption to precipitation with increasing total uranium and phosphate concentrations at all pH values. At the highest phosphate concentration examined at each pH value, a barrier to U(VI) phosphate nucleation is observed. At lower concentrations, phosphate has no effect on macroscopic U(VI) adsorption. To assess the mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate interactions on smectite surfaces, U(VI) speciation was investigated under selected conditions using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Samples above the precipitation threshold display EXAFS and LIFS spectral signatures consistent with the autunite family of U(VI) phosphate minerals. However, at lower U(VI) concentrations, changes in LIFS spectra upon phosphate addition suggest that U(VI)-phosphate ternary surface complexes form on the montmorillonite surface at pH 4 and 6 despite the lack of a macroscopic effect on adsorption. The speciation of solid-associated U(VI) below the precipitation threshold at pH 8 is dominated by U(VI)-carbonate surface complexes. This work

  4. ION EXCHANGE SUBSTANCES BY SAPONIFICATION OF ALLYL PHOSPHATE POLYMERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J.

    1959-04-14

    An ion exchange resin having a relatively high adsorption capacity tor uranyl ion as compared with many common cations is reported. The resin comprises an alphyl-allyl hydrogen phosphate polymer, the alphyl group being either allyl or a lower alkyl group having up to 5 carbon atoins. The resin is prepared by polymerizing compounds such as alkyl-diallyl phosphate and triallyl phosphate in the presence of a free radical generating substance and then partially hydrolyzing the resulting polymer to cause partial replacement of organic radicals by cations. A preferred free radical gencrating agent is dibenzoyl peroxide. The partial hydrolysis is brought about by refluxing the polymer with concentrated aqueous NaOH for three or four hours.

  5. Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent neonatal epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, S; Zschocke, J; Hoffmann, G F; Bast, T; Klepper, J; Müller, A; Heep, A; Bartmann, P; Franz, A R

    2008-03-01

    Pyridox(am)ine-5'-phosphate oxidase converts pyridoxine phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate to pyridoxal phosphate, a cofactor in many metabolic reactions, including neurotransmitter synthesis. A family with a mutation in the pyridox(am)ine-5'-phosphate oxidase gene presenting with neonatal seizures unresponsive to pyridoxine and anticonvulsant treatment but responsive to pyridoxal phosphate is described. Pyridoxal phosphate should be considered in neonatal epileptic encephalopathy unresponsive to pyridoxine.

  6. Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent neonatal epileptic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase converts pyridoxine phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate to pyridoxal phosphate, a cofactor in many metabolic reactions, including neurotransmitter synthesis. A family with a mutation in the pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase gene presenting with neonatal seizures unresponsive to pyridoxine and anticonvulsant treatment but responsive to pyridoxal phosphate is described. Pyridoxal phosphate should be considered in neonatal epileptic encephalopathy unrespons...

  7. Conductance based sensing and analysis of soluble phosphates in wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Christopher; Guerreiro, Antonio; Gomez-Caballero, Alberto; Wood, Elizabeth; Kitson, James; Robinson, James; Soares, Ana

    2014-02-15

    The current standard method used for measuring soluble phosphate in environmental water samples is based on a colourimetric approach, developed in the early 1960s. In order to provide an alternative, label free sensing solution, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was designed to function as a phosphate receptor. A combination of functional monomer (N-allylthiourea), cross-linker and monomer/template ratios were optimised in order to maximise the binding capacity for phosphate. When produced in membrane format, the MIP's ability to produce a reversible change in conductance in the presence of phosphate was explored for fabrication of a sensor which was able to selectively detect the presence of phosphate compared to sulphate, nitrate and chloride. In wastewater samples the sensor had a limit of detection of 0.16 mg P/l, and a linear range between 0.66 and 8 mg P/l. This is below the minimum monitoring level (1 mg P/l) as required by current legislation for wastewater discharges, making the sensor as developed promising for direct quantification of phosphate in environmental monitoring applications.

  8. Inorganic Phosphate Export by the Retrovirus Receptor XPR1 in Metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Giovannini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic phosphate uptake is a universal function accomplished by transporters that are present across the living world. In contrast, no phosphate exporter has ever been identified in metazoans. Here, we show that depletion of XPR1, a multipass membrane molecule initially identified as the cell-surface receptor for xenotropic and polytropic murine leukemia retroviruses (X- and P-MLV, induced a decrease in phosphate export and that reintroduction of various XPR1 proteins, from fruit fly to human, rescued this defect. Inhibition of phosphate export was also obtained with a soluble ligand generated from the envelope-receptor-binding domain of X-MLV in all human cell lines tested, as well as in diverse stem cells and epithelial cells derived from renal proximal tubules, the main site of phosphate homeostasis regulation. These results provide new insights on phosphate export in metazoans and the role of Xpr1 in this function.

  9. Structural basis for regulation of stability and activity in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases. Differential scanning calorimetry and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makshakova, Olga N; Semenyuk, Pavel I; Kuravsky, Mikhail L; Ermakova, Elena A; Zuev, Yuriy F; Muronetz, Vladimir I

    2015-05-01

    Tissue specific isoforms of human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, somatic (GAPD) and sperm-specific (GAPDS), have been reported to display different levels of both stability and catalytic activity. Here we apply MD simulations to investigate molecular basis of this phenomenon. The protein is a tetramer where each subunit consists of two domains - catalytic and NAD-binding one. We demonstrated key residues responsible for intersubunit and interdomain interactions. Effect of several residues was studied by point mutations. Overall we considered three mutations (Glu96Gln, Glu244Gln and Asp311Asn) disrupting GAPDS-specific salt bridges. Comparison of calculated interaction energies with calorimetric enthalpies confirmed that intersubunit interactions were responsible for enhanced thermostability of GAPDS whereas interdomain interactions had indirect influence on intersubunit contacts. Mutation Asp311Asn was around 10Å far from the active center and corresponded to the closest natural substitution in the isoenzymes. MD simulations revealed that this residue had slight interaction with catalytic residues but influenced the hydrogen bond net and dynamics in active site. These effects can be responsible for a strong influence of this residue on catalytic activity. Overall, our results provide new insight into glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase structure-function relationships and can be used for the engineering of mutant proteins with modified properties and for development of new inhibitors with indirect influence on the catalytic site. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation of magnesium phosphate cement by recycling the product of thermal transformation of asbestos containing wastes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Asbestos containing wastes have been employed for the first time in the formulation of magnesium phosphate cements. Two samples were mixed with magnesium carbonate and calcined at 1100 and 1300 C. Under these conditions, complete destruction of asbestos minerals is known to occur. The product, containing MgO, after reaction with water-soluble potassium di-hydrogen phosphate, led to the formation of hydrated phases at room temperature. Crystalline and amorphous reaction products were detected,...

  11. Stimulation of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Increased Extracellular Phosphate Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Voelkl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Anemia in renal insufficiency results in part from impaired erythrocyte formation due to erythropoietin and iron deficiency. Beyond that, renal insufficiency enhances eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Eryptosis may be stimulated by increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. Several uremic toxins have previously been shown to stimulate eryptosis. Renal insufficiency is further paralleled by increase of plasma phosphate concentration. The present study thus explored the effect of phosphate on erythrocyte death. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin V binding, and [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence. Results: Following a 48 hours incubation, the percentage of phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes markedly increased as a function of extracellular phosphate concentration (from 0-5 mM. The exposure to 2 mM or 5 mM phosphate was followed by slight but significant hemolysis. [Ca2+]i did not change significantly up to 2 mM phosphate but significantly decreased at 5 mM phosphate. The effect of 2 mM phosphate on phosphatidylserine exposure was significantly augmented by increase of extracellular Ca2+ to 1.7 mM, and significantly blunted by nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+, by additional presence of pyrophosphate as well as by presence of p38 inhibitor SB203580. Conclusion: Increasing phosphate concentration stimulates erythrocyte membrane scrambling, an effect depending on extracellular but not intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is hypothesized that suicidal erythrocyte death is triggered by complexed CaHPO4.

  12. Triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, L; Andersen, K E; Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    A case of triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames is reported. Patch tests with analytical grade triphenyl phosphate, tri-m-cresyl phosphate, and tri-p-cresyl phosphate in the concentrations 5%, 0.5% and 0.05% pet. showed positive reactions to 0.05% triphenyl phosphate and 0.5% tri-m-cr...

  13. Folding of RNA tertiary structure: Linkages between backbone phosphates, ions, and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, David E

    2013-12-01

    The functional forms of many RNAs have compact architectures. The placement of phosphates within such structures must be influenced not only by the strong electrostatic repulsion between phosphates, but also by networks of interactions between phosphates, water, and mobile ions. This review first explores what has been learned of the basic thermodynamic constraints on these arrangements from studies of hydration and ions in simple DNA molecules, and then gives an overview of what is known about ion and water interactions with RNA structures. A brief survey of RNA crystal structures identifies several interesting architectures in which closely spaced phosphates share hydration shells or phosphates are buried in environments that provide intramolecular hydrogen bonds or site-bound cations. Formation of these structures must require strong coupling between the uptake of ions and release of water.

  14. Metal Phosphates as Proton Conducting Materials for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cell and Electrolyser Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana

    The present thesis presents the results achieved during my ph.d. project on a subject of intermediate temperature proton conducting metal phosphates as electrolyte materials for fuel cells and electrolysers. Fuel cells and electrolysers are electrochemical devices with high energy conversion...... with a proton conductivity of above 10-2S cm-1. Chapter 1 of the thesis is an introduction to basics of fuel cell and electrolyser technologies as well as proton conducting materials. Extended discussion on the proton conducting materials, a particularly phosphates is made in Chapter 2. Three major types...... of phosphates were systematically reviewed including solid acids or alkali hydrogen phosphates, pyrophosphates, and rare earth metal phosphates. Demonstration of the fuel cell technology based on solid acid proton conductor CsH2PO4 has inspired the active research in the area. Based on the literature survey...

  15. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  16. Light weight phosphate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Natarajan, Ramkumar,; Kahn, David

    2010-03-09

    A sealant having a specific gravity in the range of from about 0.7 to about 1.6 for heavy oil and/or coal bed methane fields is disclosed. The sealant has a binder including an oxide or hydroxide of Al or of Fe and a phosphoric acid solution. The binder may have MgO or an oxide of Fe and/or an acid phosphate. The binder is present from about 20 to about 50% by weight of the sealant with a lightweight additive present in the range of from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said sealant, a filler, and water sufficient to provide chemically bound water present in the range of from about 9 to about 36% by weight of the sealant when set. A porous ceramic is also disclosed.

  17. A novel analytical method for in vivo phosphate tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hong; Lalonde, Sylvie; Okumoto, Sakiko; Looger, Loren L; Scharff-Poulsen, Anne Marie; Grossman, Arthur R; Kossmann, Jens; Jakobsen, Iver; Frommer, Wolf B

    2006-10-30

    Genetically-encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors for phosphate (P(i)) (FLIPPi) were engineered by fusing a predicted Synechococcus phosphate-binding protein (PiBP) to eCFP and Venus. Purified fluorescent indicator protein for inorganic phosphate (FLIPPi), in which the fluorophores are attached to the same PiBP lobe, shows P(i)-dependent increases in FRET efficiency. FLIPPi affinity mutants cover P(i) changes over eight orders of magnitude. COS-7 cells co-expressing a low-affinity FLIPPi and a Na(+)/P(i) co-transporter exhibited FRET changes when perfused with 100 microM P(i), demonstrating concentrative P(i) uptake by PiT2. FLIPPi sensors are suitable for real-time monitoring of P(i) metabolism in living cells, providing a new tool for fluxomics, analysis of pathophysiology or changes of P(i) during cell migration.

  18. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian

    Oftentimes caries lesions develop in protected sites that are difficult to access by self-performed mechanical tooth cleaning. At present, there is a growing interest in chemical adjuncts to mechanical procedures of oral hygiene that aim at biofilm control rather than biofilm eradication. Calcium......-phosphate-osteopontin particles are a new promising therapeutic approach to caries control. They are designed to bind to dental biofilms and interfere with biofilm build-up, lowering the bacterial burden on the tooth surface without affecting bacterial viability in the oral cavity. Moreover, they dissolve when pH in the biofilm...... drops to 6 or below and release buffering phosphate ions that stabilize biofilm pH above the critical level for enamel dissolution. With that twofold approach, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles may make a relevant contribution to clinical caries control....

  19. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Birkedal, Henrik; Olsen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Caries is caused by acid production in biofilms on dental surfaces. Preventing caries therefore involves control of microorganisms and/or the acid produced. Here, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles are presented as a new approach to caries control. The particles are made by co......-precipitation and designed to bind to bacteria in biofilms, impede biofilm build-up without killing the microflora, and release phosphate ions to buffer bacterial acid production if the pH decreases below 6. Analysis of biofilm formation and pH in a five-species biofilm model for dental caries showed that treatment......H always remained above 5.5. Hence, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles show potential for applications in caries control....

  20. A ’Hydrogen Partitioning’ Model for Hydrogen Assisted Crack Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    ABSTRACT’ (Centfaue en revere aide it MWueaein ~VIdantiv by hioc ehm ~m) A "hydrogen partitioning"’ model has been developed to account for the pressure and...boundaries are strong trapping sites for hydrogen [19-21]. The equilibrium partitioning of hydrogen between the grain boundaries and the lattice can...has been estimated to be 73 k/mol, which satisfies the requirement of binding enthalpy for strong traps. (iii) The pressure dependence of T is

  1. THERMODINAMIC PARAMETERS ON THE SORPTION OF PHOSPHATE IONS BY MONTMORILLONITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhsan Jaslin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of phosphate by montmorillonite at 10, 30, and 50 oC were investigated aiming to mainly determine thermodynamic parameters for the formation of surface complexes in the adsorption of phosphate ions by montmorillonite. Data were collected by adsorption edge experiments investigating the effect of pH, adsorption isotherms enabling the effect of sorbate concentration, and acid-base titration calculating protons released or taken up by adsorption process. Data analysis was carried out using surface complexation model to fit the data collected in this study using the parameters obtained from previous study, as well as to calculate the values of ΔH and ΔS. Previous study reported that phosphate ions formed two outer-sphere surface complexes with active sites of montmorillonite through hydrogen bonding. In the first complex,  [(XH0– H2L─]─, the phosphate was held to permanent-charge X─ sites on the tetrahedral siloxane faces, and the second complex, [[(SO─(SOH]– – [H2L]─] 2─ was formed through the interaction between the phosphate and variable charge surface hydroxyl groups at the edges of montmorillonite crystals and on the octahedral alumina faces. The values of ΔH for the first and second reactions are 39.756 and 3.765x10-7 kJ mol‒1 respectively. Since both reactions have positive enthalpy values, it can be concluded that the reactions are endothermic. Large energy for the first reaction is needed by X─  sites (permanent negatively charge sites of montmorillonite to be partially desolvated, on which K+ or other surface cations are replaced by H+ ions in the surface protonated process, and are then ready to interact phosphate ions in the solution. Small values of ΔH for the second reactions indicates that hydrogen bonds formed by phosphate and SOH sites in the second reaction are easily broken out, and the phosphate can easily desorbed from the surface. The values of ΔS for the first and second reactions are

  2. Crystallo-chemical analyses of calcium phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakae, Toshiro; Hayakawa, Tohru; Maruyama, Fumiaki; Nemoto, Kimiya; Kozawa, Yukishige [Nihon Univ., Matsudo, Chiba (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-12-01

    Several analytical techniques, methodology and their practical data processing were briefly described to investigate the crystallographic properties of calcium phosphates which are encountered in the field of dental sciences. The applied analytical techniques were X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XFS), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The used materials were tetracalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite, {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate, {beta}-tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate, monetite, brushite and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate. (author)

  3. Conserved inhibitory mechanism and competent ATP binding mode for adenylyltransferases with Fic fold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Goepfert

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous FIC domain is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to human and has been shown to catalyze AMP transfer onto protein side-chain hydroxyl groups. Recently, it was predicted that most catalytically competent Fic proteins are inhibited by the presence of an inhibitory helix αinh that is provided by a cognate anti-toxin (class I, or is part of the N- or C-terminal part of the Fic protein itself (classes II and III. In vitro, inhibition is relieved by mutation of a conserved glutamate of αinh to glycine. For the class III bacterial Fic protein NmFic from Neisseria meningitidis, the inhibitory mechanism has been elucidated. Here, we extend above study by including bacterial class I and II Fic proteins VbhT from Bartonella schoenbuchensis and SoFic from Shewanella oneidensis, respectively, and the respective E->G mutants. Comparative enzymatic and crystallographic analyses show that, in all three classes, the ATP substrate binds to the wild-type FIC domains, but with the α-phosphate in disparate and non-competent orientations. In the E->G mutants, however, the tri-phosphate moiety is found reorganized to the same tightly bound structure through a unique set of hydrogen bonds with Fic signature motif residues. The γ-phosphate adopts the location that is taken by the inhibitory glutamate in wild-type resulting in an α-phosphate orientation that can be attacked in-line by a target side-chain hydroxyl group. The latter is properly registered to the Fic active center by main-chain β-interactions with the β-hairpin flap. These data indicate that the active site motif and the exposed edge of the flap are both required to form an adenylylation-competent Fic protein.

  4. Effectiveness and cost-efficiency of phosphate binders in hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsifkovits, Johannes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: In 2006, the prevalence of chronic renal insufficiency in Germany was 91,718, of which 66,508 patients were on dialysis. The tendency is clearly growing. Scientific background: Chronic renal insufficiency results in a disturbance of the mineral balance. It leads to hyperphosphataemia, which is the strongest independent risk factor for mortality in renal patients. Usually, a reduction in the phosphate intake through nutrition and the amount of phosphate filtered out during dialysis are not sufficient to reduce the serum phosphate values to the recommended value. Therefore, phosphate binders are used to bind ingested phosphate in the digestive tract in order to lower the phosphate concentration in the serum. Four different groups of phosphate binders are available: calcium- and aluminium salts are the traditional therapies. Sevelamer and Lanthanum are recent developments on the market. In varying doses, all phosphate binders are able to effectively lower phosphate concentrations. However, drug therapies have achieved recommended phosphate levels in only 50 percent of patients during the last years. Research questions: How effective and efficient are the different phosphate binders in chronic renal insufficient patients? Methods: The systematic literature search yielded 1,251 abstracts. Following a two-part selection process with predefined criteria 18 publications were included in the assessment. Results: All studies evaluated conclude that serum phosphate, serum calcium and intact parathyroid hormone can be controlled effectively with all phosphate binders. Only the number of episodes of hypercalcaemia is higher when using calcium-containing phosphatebinders compared to Sevelamer and Lanthanum. Regarding the mortality rate, the cardiovascular artery calcification and bone metabolism no definite conclusions can be drawn. In any case, the amount of calcification at study start seems to be crucial for the further

  5. Sperm motility under exposure of hydrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evdokimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains research data on the effect of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide on human sperm motility and specific enzyme activity of sperms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It is shown that incubation of sperms with hydrogen dioxide in a low concentration leads to a change and motility in sperm and activity of sperm enzyme. Intensity of observed effect depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide: active mobility increased by 17–19 % and the total mobility – 11 %. Motility changes in sperms were accompanied by increased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 24 %, in normozoospermia response was higher than in pathozoospermia and also depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide. The use of sperm analyzer enabled revealing changes in the diapason of different speeds of the active fraction of sperm, which have been observed in the first 15 min of incubation with hydrogen dioxide. A possible mechanism of action of the detected effect is discussed. Reactive oxygen species easily oxidize enzyme for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of sperms, which leads to a loss of sperm motility, for example, in varicocele. Initially low enzyme activity in varicocele (pathozoospermia may be associated with the suppression of sperm antioxidant defense. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide into sperm samples leads to an increase in the concentration of reduced glutathione in a cell. Increase of sperm motility in this case can serve as an indicator of normal operation of the cellular antioxidant defense system. Obtained experimental results provide a background for their introduction into clinical practice in the program of assisted reproductive technologies. 

  6. Sperm motility under exposure of hydrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evdokimov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains research data on the effect of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide on human sperm motility and specific enzyme activity of sperms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It is shown that incubation of sperms with hydrogen dioxide in a low concentration leads to a change and motility in sperm and activity of sperm enzyme. Intensity of observed effect depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide: active mobility increased by 17–19 % and the total mobility – 11 %. Motility changes in sperms were accompanied by increased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 24 %, in normozoospermia response was higher than in pathozoospermia and also depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide. The use of sperm analyzer enabled revealing changes in the diapason of different speeds of the active fraction of sperm, which have been observed in the first 15 min of incubation with hydrogen dioxide. A possible mechanism of action of the detected effect is discussed. Reactive oxygen species easily oxidize enzyme for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of sperms, which leads to a loss of sperm motility, for example, in varicocele. Initially low enzyme activity in varicocele (pathozoospermia may be associated with the suppression of sperm antioxidant defense. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide into sperm samples leads to an increase in the concentration of reduced glutathione in a cell. Increase of sperm motility in this case can serve as an indicator of normal operation of the cellular antioxidant defense system. Obtained experimental results provide a background for their introduction into clinical practice in the program of assisted reproductive technologies. 

  7. Organic acid production in vitro and plant growth promotion in maize under controlled environment by phosphate-solubilizing fluorescent Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyas Pratibha

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorus deficiency is a major constraint to crop production due to rapid binding of the applied phosphorus into fixed forms not available to the plants. Microbial solubilization of inorganic phosphates has been attributed mainly to the production of organic acids. Phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms enhance plant growth under conditions of poor phosphorus availability by solubilizing insoluble phosphates in the soil. This paper describes the production of organic acids during inorganic phosphate solubilization and influence on plant growth as a function of phosphate solubilization by fluorescent Pseudomonas. Results Nineteen phosphate-solubilizing fluorescent Pseudomonas strains of P. fluorescens, P. poae, P. trivialis, and Pseudomonas spp. produced gluconic acid, oxalic acid, 2-ketogluconic acid, lactic acid, succinic acid, formic acid, citric acid and malic acid in the culture filtrates during the solubilization of tricalcium phosphate, Mussoorie rock phosphate, Udaipur rock phosphate and North Carolina rock phosphate. The strains differed quantitatively and qualitatively in the production of organic acids during solubilization of phosphate substrates. Cluster analysis based on organic acid profiling revealed inter-species and intra-species variation in organic acids produced by Pseudomonas strains. The phosphate-solubilizing bacterial treatments P. trivialis BIHB 745, P. trivialis BIHB 747, Pseudomonas sp. BIHB 756 and P. poae BIHB 808 resulted in significantly higher or statistically at par growth and total N, P and K content over single super phosphate treatment in maize. These treatments also significantly affected pH, organic matter, and N, P, and K content of the soil. Conclusion The results implied that organic acid production by Pseudomonas strains is independent of their genetic relatedness and each strain has its own ability of producing organic acids during the solubilization of inorganic phosphates

  8. Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  9. Selective recognition of sulfate anions by a cyclopeptide-derived receptor in aqueous phosphate buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaly, Astrid; Belda, Raquel; García-España, Enrique; Kubik, Stefan

    2013-12-20

    A cyclopeptide-based anion receptor containing alternating 6-aminopicolinic acid and substituted (4R)-4-aminoproline subunits with appended β-alanine residues binds sulfate anions in water. Importantly, appreciable sulfate binding is even observed in phosphate buffer, hence in the presence of anions of similar structure but with a different degree of protonation. The cause for the high selectivity of this receptor is related to the mode of action of the sulfate-binding protein.

  10. Kinetic mechanism of indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Sandra; Dietrich, Susanne; Kurćon, Tomasz; Delaney, Pamela; Goodey, Nina M; Sterner, Reinhard

    2013-01-08

    The (βα)(8)-barrel enzyme indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS) catalyzes the multistep transformation of 1-(o-carboxyphenylamino)-1-deoxyribulose 5-phosphate (CdRP) into indole-3-glycerol phosphate (IGP) in tryptophan biosynthesis. Mutagenesis data and crystal structure analysis of IGPS from Sulfolobus solfataricus (sIGPS) allowed for the formulation of a plausible chemical mechanism of the reaction, and molecular dynamics simulations suggested that flexibility of active site loops might be important for catalysis. Here we developed a method that uses extrinsic fluorophores attached to active site loops to connect the kinetic mechanism of sIGPS to structure and conformational motions. Specifically, we elucidated the kinetic mechanism of sIGPS and correlated individual steps in the mechanism to conformational motions of flexible loops. Pre-steady-state kinetic measurements of CdRP to IGP conversion monitoring changes in intrinsic tryptophan and IGP fluorescence provided a minimal three-step kinetic model in which fast substrate binding and chemical transformation are followed by slow product release. The role of sIGPS loop conformational motion during substrate binding and catalysis was examined via variants that were covalently labeled with fluorescent dyes at the N-terminal extension of the enzyme and mobile active site loop β1α1. Analysis of kinetic data monitoring dye fluorescence revealed a conformational change that follows substrate binding, suggesting an induced-fit-type binding mechanism for the substrate CdRP. Global fitting of all kinetic results obtained with wild-type sIGPS and the labeled variants was best accommodated by a four-step kinetic model. In this model, both the binding of CdRP and its on-enzyme conversion to IGP are accompanied by conformational transitions. The liberation of the product from the active site is the rate-limiting step of the overall reaction. Our results confirm the importance of flexible active loops for substrate

  11. Triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars; Andersen, Klaus E.; Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    A case of triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames is reported. Patch tests with analytical grade triphenyl phosphate, tri-m-cresyl phosphate, and tri-p-cresyl phosphate in the concentrations 5%, 0.5% and 0.05% pet. showed positive reactions to 0.05% triphenyl phosphate and 0.5% tri......-m-cresyl phosphate, but no reaction to tri-p-cresyl phosphate. Gas chromatography of the tricresyl phosphate 5% pet. patch test material supplied from Trolab showed that it contained a mixture of a wide range of triaryl phosphates, including 0.08% triphenyl phosphate which is above the threshold for detecting...... triphenyl phosphate allergy in our patient....

  12. The Influence of Graphene Curvature on Hydrogen Adsorption: Towards Hydrogen Storage Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Goler, Sarah; Tozzini, Valentina; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mashoff, Torge; Beltram, Fabio; Pellegrini, Vittorio; Heun, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The ability of atomic hydrogen to chemisorb on graphene makes the latter a promising material for hydrogen storage. Based on scanning tunneling microscopy techniques, we report on site-selective adsorption of atomic hydrogen on convexly curved regions of monolayer graphene grown on SiC(0001). This system exhibits an intrinsic curvature owing to the interaction with the substrate. We show that at low coverage hydrogen is found on convex areas of the graphene lattice. No hydrogen is detected on concave regions. These findings are in agreement with theoretical models which suggest that both binding energy and adsorption barrier can be tuned by controlling the local curvature of the graphene lattice. This curvature-dependence combined with the known graphene flexibility may be exploited for storage and controlled release of hydrogen at room temperature making it a valuable candidate for the implementation of hydrogen-storage devices.

  13. Developing an Inositol-Phosphate-Actuated Nanochannel System by Mimicking Biological Calcium Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Tang, Qiuhan; Chen, Zhonghui; Zhao, Shilong; Qing, Guangyan; Sun, Taolei

    2017-09-13

    In eukaryotic cells, ion channels, which ubiquitously present as polypeptides or proteins, usually regulate the ion transport across biological membranes by conformational switching of the channel proteins in response to the binding of diverse signaling molecules (e.g., inositol phosphate, abbreviated to InsP). To mimic the gating behaviors of natural Ca(2+) channels manipulated by InsPs, a smart poly[(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-4-(3-acryloylthioureido) benzoic acid)0.2] (denoted as PNI-co-ATBA0.2) was integrated onto a porous anodic alumina (PAA) membrane, building an InsP-actuated nanochannel system. Driven by the intensive hydrogen bonding complexation of ATBA monomer with InsP, the copolymer chains displayed a remarkable and reversible conformational transition from a contracted state to a swollen one, accompanied with significant changes in surface morphology, wettability, and viscoelasticity. Benefiting from these features, dynamic gating behaviors of the nanochannels located on the copolymer-modified PAA membrane could be precisely manipulated by InsPs, reflected as a satisfactory linear relationship between real-time variation in transmembrane ionic current and the InsP concentration over a wide range from 1 nmol L(-1) to 10 μmol L(-1), as well as a clear discrimination among InsP2, InsP3, and InsP6. This study indicates the great potential of biomolecule-responsive polymers in the fabrication of biomimetic ion nanochannels and other nanoscale biodevices.

  14. Roles of sphingosine 1-phosphate on tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsinyu; Lee

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid with a variety of biological activities.It is generated from the conversion of ceramide to sphingosine by ceramidase and the subsequent conversion of sphingosine to S1P,which is catalyzed by sphingosine kinases.Through increasing its intracellular levels by sphingolipid metabolism and binding to its cell surface receptors,S1P regulates several physiological and pathological processes,including cell proliferation,migration,angiogenesis and autophagy.These processes are responsible for tumor growth,metastasis and invasion and promote tumor survival.Since ceramide and S1P have distinct functions in regulating in cell fate decision,the balance between the ceramide/sphingosine/S1P rheostat becomes a potent therapeutic target for cancer cells.Herein,we summarize our current understanding of S1P signaling on tumorigenesis and its potential as a target for cancer therapy.

  15. Tuning the affinity of anion binding sites in porin channels with negatively charged residues: molecular details for OprP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Niraj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Bains, Manjeet; Benz, Roland; Hancock, Robert E W; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2015-02-20

    The cell envelope of the Gram negative opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is poorly permeable to many classes of hydrophilic molecules including antibiotics due to the presence of the narrow and selective porins. Here we focused on one of the narrow-channel porins, that is, OprP, which is responsible for the high-affinity uptake of phosphate ions. Its two central binding sites for phosphate contain a number of positively charged amino acids together with a single negatively charged residue (D94). The presence of this negatively charged residue in a binding site for negatively charged phosphate ions is highly surprising due to the potentially reduced binding affinity. The goal of this study was to better understand the role of D94 in phosphate binding, selectivity, and transport using a combination of mutagenesis, electrophysiology, and free-energy calculations. The presence of a negatively charged residue in the binding site is critical for this specific porin OprP as emphasized by the evolutionary conservation of such negatively charged residue in the binding site of several anion-selective porins. Mutations of D94 in OprP to any positively charged or neutral residue increased the binding affinity of phosphate for OprP. Detailed analysis indicated that this anionic residue in the phosphate binding site of OprP, despite its negative charge, maintained energetically favorable phosphate binding sites in the central region of the channel and at the same time decreased residence time thus preventing excessively strong binding of phosphate that would oppose phosphate flux through the channel. Intriguingly mutations of D94 to positively charged residues, lysine and arginine, resulted in very different binding affinities and free energy profiles, indicating the importance of side chain conformations of these positively charged residues in phosphate binding to OprP.

  16. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  17. Variability of nitrate and phosphate

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Sundar, D.

    Nitrate and phosphate are important elements of the biogeochemical system of an estuary. Observations carried out during the dry season April-May 2002, and March 2003 and wet season September 2002, show temporal and spatial variability of these two...

  18. Recent advances in phosphate biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan; Verma, Nishant

    2015-07-01

    A number of biosensors have been developed for phosphate analysis particularly, concerning its negative impact within the environmental and biological systems. Enzymatic biosensors comprising either a single or multiple enzymatic system have been extensively used for the direct and indirect analysis of phosphate ions. Furthermore, some non-enzymatic biosensors, such as affinity-based biosensors, provide an alternative analytical approach with a higher selectivity. This article reviews the recent advances in the field of biosensor developed for phosphate estimation in clinical and environmental samples, concerning the techniques involved, and the sensitivity toward phosphate ions. The biosensors have been classified and discussed on the basis of the number of enzymes used to develop the analytical system, and a comparative analysis has been performed.

  19. Binding Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  20. 21 CFR 573.320 - Diammonium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diammonium phosphate. 573.320 Section 573.320 Food... Additive Listing § 573.320 Diammonium phosphate. The food additive diammonium phosphate may be safely used... crude protein from diammonium phosphate, adequate directions for use and a prominent statement,...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... solution of magnesite with phosphoric acid. (b) Magnesium phosphate, dibasic, meets the specifications of... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes...

  2. FORMATION OF PHOSPHATE-CONTAINING CALCIUM-FLUORIDE AT THE EXPENSE OF ENAMEL, HYDROXYAPATITE AND FLUORAPATITE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHRISTOFFERSEN, J; CHRISTOFFERSEN, MR; ARENDS, J; LEONARDSEN, ES

    1995-01-01

    During the caries process complex reactions involving calcium, phosphate, hydrogen and fluoride ions as main species take place. In this study the precipitation and dissolution reactions occurring in suspensions of enamel, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and fluorapatite (FAP) on addition of fluoride were inve

  3. FORMATION OF PHOSPHATE-CONTAINING CALCIUM-FLUORIDE AT THE EXPENSE OF ENAMEL, HYDROXYAPATITE AND FLUORAPATITE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHRISTOFFERSEN, J; CHRISTOFFERSEN, MR; ARENDS, J; LEONARDSEN, ES

    1995-01-01

    During the caries process complex reactions involving calcium, phosphate, hydrogen and fluoride ions as main species take place. In this study the precipitation and dissolution reactions occurring in suspensions of enamel, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and fluorapatite (FAP) on addition of fluoride were

  4. Spectral analysis of naturally occurring methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine and caffeine) binding with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Irudayam Maria; Prakash, Halan; Prathiba, Jeyaguru; Raghunathan, Raghavachary; Malathi, Raghunathan

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids exist in a dynamic equilibrium with a number of molecules that constantly interact with them and regulate the cellular activities. The inherent nature of the structure and conformational integrity of these macromolecules can lead to altered biological activity through proper targeting of nucleic acids binding ligands or drug molecules. We studied the interaction of naturally occurring methylxanthines such as theophylline, theobromine and caffeine with DNA, using UV absorption and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods, and especially monitored their binding affinity in the presence of Mg(2+) and during helix-coil transitions of DNA by temperature (T(m)) or pH melting profiles. The study indicates that all these molecules effectively bind to DNA in a dose dependent manner. The overall binding constants of DNA-theophylline = 3.5×10(3) M(-1), DNA-theobromine = 1.1×10(3) M(-1), and DNA-Caffeine = 3.8×10(3) M(-1). On the other hand T(m)/pH melting profiles showed 24-35% of enhanced binding activity of methylxanthines during helix-coil transitions of DNA rather than to its native double helical structure. The FTIR analysis divulged that theophylline, theobromine and caffeine interact with all the base pairs of DNA (A-T; G-C) and phosphate group through hydrogen bond (H-bond) interaction. In the presence of Mg(2+), methylxanthines altered the structure of DNA from B to A-family. However, the B-family structure of DNA remained unaltered in DNA-methylxanthines complexes or in the absence of Mg(2+). The spectral analyses indicated the order of binding affinity as "caffeine≥theophylline>theobromine" to the native double helical DNA, and "theophylline≥theobromine>caffeine to the denatured form of DNA and in the presence of divalent metal ions.

  5. Spectral analysis of naturally occurring methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine and caffeine binding with DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irudayam Maria Johnson

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids exist in a dynamic equilibrium with a number of molecules that constantly interact with them and regulate the cellular activities. The inherent nature of the structure and conformational integrity of these macromolecules can lead to altered biological activity through proper targeting of nucleic acids binding ligands or drug molecules. We studied the interaction of naturally occurring methylxanthines such as theophylline, theobromine and caffeine with DNA, using UV absorption and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic methods, and especially monitored their binding affinity in the presence of Mg(2+ and during helix-coil transitions of DNA by temperature (T(m or pH melting profiles. The study indicates that all these molecules effectively bind to DNA in a dose dependent manner. The overall binding constants of DNA-theophylline = 3.5×10(3 M(-1, DNA-theobromine = 1.1×10(3 M(-1, and DNA-Caffeine = 3.8×10(3 M(-1. On the other hand T(m/pH melting profiles showed 24-35% of enhanced binding activity of methylxanthines during helix-coil transitions of DNA rather than to its native double helical structure. The FTIR analysis divulged that theophylline, theobromine and caffeine interact with all the base pairs of DNA (A-T; G-C and phosphate group through hydrogen bond (H-bond interaction. In the presence of Mg(2+, methylxanthines altered the structure of DNA from B to A-family. However, the B-family structure of DNA remained unaltered in DNA-methylxanthines complexes or in the absence of Mg(2+. The spectral analyses indicated the order of binding affinity as "caffeine≥theophylline>theobromine" to the native double helical DNA, and "theophylline≥theobromine>caffeine to the denatured form of DNA and in the presence of divalent metal ions.

  6. Novel Hydrogen Bioreactor and Detection Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A; Ye, Xinhao; Del Campo, Julia Martin; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-01-01

    In vitro hydrogen generation represents a clear opportunity for novel bioreactor and system design. Hydrogen, already a globally important commodity chemical, has the potential to become the dominant transportation fuel of the future. Technologies such as in vitro synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB)-the use of more than 10 purified enzymes to catalyze unnatural catabolic pathways-enable the storage of hydrogen in the form of carbohydrates. Biohydrogen production from local carbohydrate resources offers a solution to the most pressing challenges to vehicular and bioenergy uses: small-size distributed production, minimization of CO2 emissions, and potential low cost, driven by high yield and volumetric productivity. In this study, we introduce a novel bioreactor that provides the oxygen-free gas phase necessary for enzymatic hydrogen generation while regulating temperature and reactor volume. A variety of techniques are currently used for laboratory detection of biohydrogen, but the most information is provided by a continuous low-cost hydrogen sensor. Most such systems currently use electrolysis for calibration; here an alternative method, flow calibration, is introduced. This system is further demonstrated here with the conversion of glucose to hydrogen at a high rate, and the production of hydrogen from glucose 6-phosphate at a greatly increased reaction rate, 157 mmol/L/h at 60 °C.

  7. Structure-based rationalization of urease inhibition by phosphate: novel insights into the enzyme mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benini, S; Rypniewski, W R; Wilson, K S; Ciurli, S; Mangani, S

    2001-10-01

    The structure of Bacillus pasteurii urease (BPU) inhibited with phosphate was solved and refined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data from a vitrified crystal (1.85 A resolution, 99.3% completeness, data redundancy 4.6, R-factor 17.3%, PDB code 6UBP). A distance of 3.5 A separates the two Ni ions in the active site. The binding mode of the inhibitor involves the formation of four coordination bonds with the two Ni ions: one phosphate oxygen atom symmetrically bridges the two metal ions (1.9-2.0 A), while two of the remaining phosphate oxygen atoms bind to the Ni atoms at 2.4 A. The fourth phosphate oxygen is directed into the active site channel. Analysis of the H-bonding network around the bound inhibitor indicates that phosphate is bound as the H2PO4- anion, and that an additional proton is present on the Odelta2 atom of Asp(alpha363), an active site residue involved in Ni coordination through Odelta1. The flexible flap flanking the active site cavity is in the open conformation. Analysis of the complex reveals why phosphate is a relatively weak inhibitor and why sulfate does not bind to the nickels in the active site. The implications of the results for the understanding of the urease catalytic mechanism are reviewed. A novel alternative for the proton donor is presented.

  8. Hydrogen as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    A panel of the Committee on Advanced Energy Storage Systems of the Assembly of Engineering has examined the status and problems of hydrogen manufacturing methods, hydrogen transmission and distribution networks, and hydrogen storage systems. This examination, culminating at a time when rapidly changing conditions are having noticeable impact on fuel and energy availability and prices, was undertaken with a view to determining suitable criteria for establishing the pace, timing, and technical content of appropriate federally sponsored hydrogen R and D programs. The increasing urgency to develop new sources and forms of fuel and energy may well impact on the scale and timing of potential future hydrogen uses. The findings of the panel are presented. Chapters are devoted to hydrogen sources, hydrogen as a feedstock, hydrogen transport and storage, hydrogen as a heating fuel, automotive uses of hydrogen, aircraft use of hydrogen, the fuel cell in hydrogen energy systems, hydrogen research and development evaluation, and international hydrogen programs.

  9. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  10. Recognizing the Effects of Terrestrial Contamination on D/H Ratios in Shergottite Phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D. K.; Ito, M.; Hervig, R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios in shergottite phosphate minerals have been investigated by SIMS in the meteorites Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201 and Los Angeles. We have also collected electron probe data on these phosphates in order to characterize the phosphate minerals and attempt to document any potential hydrogen isotopic differences between chlor-apatite and whitlockite. In the section of Los Angeles we studied (748), we found both chlor-apatite and whitlockite, but in the section of QUE 94201,38 studied, we found only whitlockite. In both meteorites, D/H ratios (expressed in units of delta D (sub SMOW) vary, from terrestrial values up to approximately 5400%o in QUE 94201, and to approximately 3800%o in Los Angeles. We have carefully examined the ion probed pits with high-resolution FE-SEM. In most cases where the D/H ratios are low, we have iden-tified cracks that instersect the ion probe pit. These cracks are not visible in the optical microscope attached to the SIMS instument, making them impossible to avoid during SIMS data collection. We contend that the low ratios are a function of substantial terrestrial contamination, and that similar contamination is a likely factor in previously published studies on D/H ratios in martian phosphates. Here we highlight the difficulty of attempts to constrain the martian mantle D/H ratio using phosphate data, given that both terrestrial contamination and martian mantle hydrogen will move phosphate D/H ratios in the same direction, toward lower values. We note that our data include some of the most deuterium-rich values ever reported for martian phosphates. It is clear that some of our measurements are only minimally or totally uncontaminated, but the question arises, are intermediate values diminished because of true martian variability, or do they reflect contamination?

  11. Thermally highly stable amorphous zinc phosphate intermediates during the formation of zinc phosphate hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Sven; Celinski, Vinicius R; Dietzsch, Michael; Panthöfer, Martin; Bienert, Ralf; Emmerling, Franziska; Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2015-02-18

    The mechanisms by which amorphous intermediates transform into crystalline materials are still poorly understood. Here we attempt to illuminate the formation of an amorphous precursor by investigating the crystallization process of zinc phosphate hydrate. This work shows that amorphous zinc phosphate (AZP) nanoparticles precipitate from aqueous solutions prior to the crystalline hopeite phase at low concentrations and in the absence of additives at room temperature. AZP nanoparticles are thermally stable against crystallization even at 400 °C (resulting in a high temperature AZP), but they crystallize rapidly in the presence of water if the reaction is not interrupted. X-ray powder diffraction with high-energy synchrotron radiation, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and small-angle X-ray scattering showed the particle size (≈20 nm) and confirmed the noncrystallinity of the nanoparticle intermediates. Energy dispersive X-ray, infrared, and Raman spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and optical emission spectrometry as well as thermal analysis were used for further compositional characterization of the as synthesized nanomaterial. (1)H solid-state NMR allowed the quantification of the hydrogen content, while an analysis of (31)P{(1)H} C rotational echo double resonance spectra permitted a dynamic and structural analysis of the crystallization pathway to hopeite.

  12. Synthesis of nanocrystalline calcium phosphate in microemulsion--effect of nature of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sujata; Bhardwaj, Pallavi; Singh, V; Aggarwal, S; Mandal, U K

    2008-03-01

    Nanosized calcium phosphate (CP) powders have been synthesized by an inverse microemulsion system using kerosene as the oil phase, a cationic surfactant Aliquat 336, a non-ionic surfactant Tween 20 and their mixture and aqueous solutions of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and biammonium hydrogen phosphate as the water phase. It has been found that the nature of surfactants played an important role to regulate the size and morphologies of the calcium phosphate nanoparticles. The cationic surfactant Aliquat 336 has been found to regulate the nucleation and crystal growth. The synthesized powders have been comprehensively characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Our results show that the brushite (DCPD) is the major phase comprising the calcium phosphate nanoparticles. In mixed surfactants mediated system a morphological controlled highly crystalline particles have been synthesized. Further, the role of Aliquat 336 has been established and a plausible synthetic mechanism has been proposed.

  13. Identification of structural determinants of NAD(P)H selectivity and lysine binding in lysine N(6)-monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahab, Heba; Robinson, Reeder; Rodriguez, Pedro; Adly, Camelia; El-Sohaimy, Sohby; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-09-15

    l-lysine (l-Lys) N(6)-monooxygenase (NbtG), from Nocardia farcinica, is a flavin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of l-Lys in the presence of oxygen and NAD(P)H in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore nocobactin. NbtG displays only a 3-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, different from well-characterized related enzymes, which are highly selective for NADPH. The structure of NbtG with bound NAD(P)(+) or l-Lys is currently not available. Herein, we present a mutagenesis study targeting M239, R301, and E216. These amino acids are conserved and located in either the NAD(P)H binding domain or the l-Lys binding pocket. M239R resulted in high production of hydrogen peroxide and little hydroxylation with no change in coenzyme selectivity. R301A caused a 300-fold decrease on kcat/Km value with NADPH but no change with NADH. E216Q increased the Km value for l-Lys by 30-fold with very little change on the kcat value or in the binding of NAD(P)H. These results suggest that R301 plays a major role in NADPH selectivity by interacting with the 2'-phosphate of the adenine-ribose moiety of NADPH, while E216 plays a role in l-Lys binding.

  14. Effectiveness of nano-calcium phosphate paste on sensitivity during and after bleaching: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; Lidia Yileng TAY; HERRERA,Daniel Rodrigo; Bauer,Jose; Reis, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of in-office bleaching and associated tooth sensitivity on application of nano-calcium phosphate paste as desensitizing agent. Bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel in 40 patients who were randomly divided into placebo and nano-calcium phosphate paste groups. Bleaching efficacy (BE) was evaluated using a value-oriented Vita shade guide. Tooth sensitivity was recorded using a numeric rating scale (0–4) during bleaching and up...

  15. [Binding to chicken liver lactatedehydrogenase (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lluís, C; Bozal, J

    1976-06-01

    Some information about the lactate dehydrogenase NAD binding site has been obtained by working with coenzymes analogs of incomplete molecules. 5'AMP, 5'-ADP, ATP, 5'-c-AMP and 3'(2)-AMP inhibit chicken liver LDH activity competitively with NADH. 5"-AMP and 5'-ADP show a stronger inhibition power than ATP, suggesting that the presence of one or two phosphate groups at the 5' position of adenosine, is essential for the binding of the coenzyme analogs at the enzyme binding site. Ribose and ribose-5'-P do not appear to inhibit the LDH activity, proving that purine base lacking mononucleotides do not bind to the enzyme. 5"-ADPG inhibits LDH activity in the exactly as 5'-ADP, showing that ribose moiety may be replaced by glucose, without considerable effects on the coenzyme analog binding. 2'-desoxidenosin-5'-phosphate proves to be a poorer inhibitor of the LDH activity than 5'-AMP, indicating that an interaction between the--OH groups and the amino-acids of the LDH active center takes place. Nicotinamide does not produce any inhibition effect, while NMN and CMP induce a much weaker inhibition than the adenine analogues, thus indicating a lesser binding capacity to the enzyme. Therefore, the LDH binding site seems to show some definite specificity towards the adenina groups of the coenzyme.

  16. Surface chemistry studies of phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Amy Suzanne

    This research examined the surface of an undoped and rare-earth doped sodium alumino metaphosphate glass after fracture or surface finishing and subsequent exposure to humid and aqueous environments. In addition, the adsorption of aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APS), and the dominant parameters controlling the structure of the deposited film, were studied. Typically, commercial glasses must be cut and polished into optical components for engineering applications. This process involves a series of aqueous treatments in both acidic and basic media. The experiments performed here on aluminophosphate glass showed that this results in dissolution, surface composition changes (depletion of Na) and surface pitting. In both alkaline detergent and acid etching solution, dissolution at a rate of approximately 4 x 10 -3 mol/m2/hr (0.2 mum/hr) occurs along with a drastic alteration of the surface morphology. When exposed to an environment of elevated humidity and temperature for an extended period of time, this aluminophosphate glass was observed to break down, forming a soluble phosphate gel that dissolves away from the surface. Simultaneously, the surface became enriched in silica, a trace contaminant in the glass, which eventually precipitated and coalesced into a dendritic pattern that covered the surface. The freshly powdered phosphate glass was found to contain surface hydroxyls weakly associated with one another, and some bound by a stronger hydrogen bond, likely to adjacent non-bridging oxygens. Most of these hydroxyls could be desorbed upon heating above the glass transition temperature to leave only a small concentration of weakly associated hydroxyls and free hydroxyls on the surface. The characterization of hydroxyls and water on the phosphate glass surface was used to understand the adsorption of aminopropyl tri-ethoxysilane (APS) also through the use of in-situ DRIFTS. The concentration of adsorbed APS was found to be independent of solution pH, but the measured

  17. Hydrogen diffusion in Al-Li alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyalebechi, P. N.

    1990-08-01

    The diffusion coefficients of hydrogen in binary Al-Li alloys containing 1,2, and 3 wt pct Li have been determined from desorption curves of samples saturated with hydrogen at 473 to 873 K. Within this temperature range, the diffusivity of hydrogen in the binary Al-Li alloys investigated has an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence and follows the equation of the general form D = DT) where D 0exp(-Q/R is the diffusion coefficient (m2/s), D 0 is the preexponential or frequency factor (m2/s), R is the gas constant (J/K mol), Q is the activation energy (J/mol), and T is absolute temperature (K). The rate of diffusion of hydrogen in aluminum decreases with increase in lithium additions. This is provisionally attributed to the stronger local binding energy between hydrogen and lithium atoms in the aluminum metal lattice.

  18. Formation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate by isomerization from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate.

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, J P; Caldwell, K K; Majerus, P W

    1991-01-01

    We have synthesized phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate by using diisopropylcarbodiimide to promote migration of the 4-phosphate via a cyclic phosphodiester intermediate. The product was isolated by a thin-layer chromatographic method that depends on the ability of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, but not phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, to form complexes with boric acid. The final yield of the procedure was 8% phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, which was a...

  19. Predicting the Structure-Activity Relationship of Hydroxyapatite-Binding Peptides by Enhanced-Sampling Molecular Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weilong; Xu, Zhijun; Cui, Qiang; Sahai, Nita

    2016-07-12

    Understanding the molecular structural and energetic basis of the interactions between peptides and inorganic surfaces is critical to their applications in tissue engineering and biomimetic material synthesis. Despite recent experimental progresses in the identification and functionalization of hydroxyapatite (HAP)-binding peptides, the molecular mechanisms of their interactions with HAP surfaces are yet to be explored. In particular, the traditional method of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation suffers from insufficient sampling at the peptide-inorganic interface that renders the molecular-level observation dubious. Here we demonstrate that an integrated approach combining bioinformatics, MD, and metadynamics provides a powerful tool for investigating the structure-activity relationship of HAP-binding peptides. Four low charge density peptides, previously identified by phage display, have been considered. As revealed by bioinformatics and MD, the binding conformation of the peptides is controlled by both the sequence and the amino acid composition. It was found that formation of hydrogen bonds between lysine residue and phosphate ions on the surface dictates the binding of positively charged peptide to HAP. The binding affinities of the peptides to the surface are estimated by free energy calculation using parallel-tempering metadynamics, and the results compare favorably to measurements reported in previous experimental studies. The calculation suggests that the charge density of the peptide primarily controls the binding affinity to the surface, while the backbone secondary structure that may restrain side chain orientation toward the surface plays a minor role. We also report that the application of enhanced-sampling metadynamics effects a major advantage over the steered MD method by significantly improving the reliability of binding free energy calculation. In general, our novel integration of diverse sampling techniques should contribute to the rational

  20. The hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on hydrogenic impurity binding energies in lattice matched InP/In0.53Ga0.47As/InP square quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başer, P.; Elagoz, S.

    2017-02-01

    The on-center shallow-donor impurity binding energy in lattice matched InP/In0.53Ga0.47As square quantum well structure have been theoretically investigated using effective mass and variational techniques. The effects of hydrostatic pressure, temperature and well width has been calculated and the results are discussed.

  1. Decontamination of liquid radioactive waste by thorium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousselle, J.; Grandjean, S.; Dacheux, N.; Genet, M

    2004-07-01

    In the field of the complete reexamination of the chemistry of thorium phosphate and of the improvement of the homogeneity of Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD, Th{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}) prepared at high temperature, several crystallized compounds were prepared as initial powdered precursors. Due to the very low solubility products associated to these phases, their use in the field of the efficient decontamination of high-level radioactive liquid waste containing actinides (An) was carefully considered. Two main processes (called 'oxalate' and 'hydrothermal' chemical routes) were developed through a new concept combining the decontamination of liquid waste and the immobilization of the actinides in a ceramic matrix (TPD). In phosphoric media ('hydrothermal route'), the key-precursor was the Thorium Phosphate Hydrogen Phosphate hydrate (Th{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}). H{sub 2}O, TPHP, solubility product log(K{sub S,0}{sup 0}) {approx} - 67). The replacement of thorium by other tetravalent actinides (U, Np, Pu) in the structure, leading to the preparation of Th{sub 2-x/2}An{sub x/2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}). H{sub 2}O solid solutions, was examined. A second method was also considered in parallel to illustrate this concept using the more well-known precipitation of oxalate as the initial decontamination step. For this method, the final transformation to single phase TPD containing actinides was purchased by heating a mixture of phosphate ions with the oxalate precipitate at high temperature. (authors)

  2. Steady state kinetic model for the binding of substrates and allosteric effectors to Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl-diphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Larsen, Sine

    2000-01-01

    saturation with ribose 5-phosphate leads to the binding of Mg2+ and substrates via a slow pathway where Pi binds to the enzyme last. The random mechanism for Pi binding was further supported by studies with competitive inhibitors of Mg2+, MgATP, and ribose 5-phosphate that all appeared noncompetitive when...... varying Pi at either saturating or unsaturating ribose 5-phosphate concentrations. Furthermore, none of the inhibitors induced inhibition at increasing Pi concentrations. Results from ADP inhibition of Pi activation suggest that these effectors compete for binding to a common regulatory site....

  3. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  4. Photorelease of phosphates: Mild methods for protecting phosphate derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeewa N. Senadheera

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new photoremovable protecting group for caging phosphates in the near UV. Diethyl 2-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthyl-2-oxoethyl phosphate (14a quantitatively releases diethyl phosphate upon irradiation in aq MeOH or aq MeCN at 350 nm, with quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.021 to 0.067 depending on the solvent composition. The deprotection reactions originate from the triplet excited state, are robust under ambient conditions and can be carried on to 100% conversion. Similar results were found with diethyl 2-(4-methoxy-1-naphthyl-2-oxoethyl phosphate (14b, although it was significantly less efficient compared with 14a. A key step in the deprotection reaction in aq MeOH is considered to be a Favorskii rearrangement of the naphthyl ketone motif of 14a,b to naphthylacetate esters 25 and 26. Disruption of the ketone-naphthyl ring conjugation significantly shifts the photoproduct absorption away from the effective incident wavelength for decaging of 14, driving the reaction to completion. The Favorskii rearrangement does not occur in aqueous acetonitrile although diethyl phosphate is released. Other substitution patterns on the naphthyl or quinolin-5-yl core, such as the 2,6-naphthyl 10 or 8-benzyloxyquinolin-5-yl 24 platforms, also do not rearrange by aryl migration upon photolysis and, therefore, do not proceed to completion. The 2,6-naphthyl ketone platform instead remains intact whereas the quinolin-5-yl ketone fragments to a much more complex, highly absorbing reaction mixture that competes for the incident light.

  5. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available of hydrogen in metals processing and treatment identified, and mechanisms for hydrogen entry into a ferritic surface are discussed. The differences between hydrogen attack of ferritic steels and copper alloys are contrasted, and an unusual case study...

  6. Phosphorus release from phosphate rock and iron phosphate by low-molecular-weight organic acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ren-kou; ZHU Yong-guan; David Chittleborough

    2004-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight(LMW) organic acids widely exist in soils, particularly in the rhizosphere. A series of batch experiments were carried out to investigate the phosphorus release from rock phosphate and iron phosphate by Iow-molecular-weight organic acids.Results showed that citric acid had the highest capacity to solubilize P from both rock and iron phosphate. P solubilization from rock phosphate and iron phosphate resulted in net proton consumption. P release from rock phosphate was positively correlated with the pKa values. P release from iron phosphate was positively correlated with Fe-organic acid stability constants except for aromatic acids, but was not correlated with PKa. Increase in the concentrations of organic acids enhanced P solubilization from both rock and iron phosphate almost linearrly. Addition of phenolic compounds further increased the P release from iron phosphate. Initial solution pH had much more substantial effect on P release from rock phosphate than from iron phosphate.

  7. Characterization of hydroxyphenol-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers: interactions with phosphates by chemical force spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Alyza A; Ebralidze, Iraklii I; Dickson, Steven E; Horton, J Hugh

    2013-03-01

    Tannins and humic substances, commonly referred to as natural organic matter (NOM), constitute an important component of natural water and soil systems. These species contain numerous hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups whose reactivity is strongly dependent on both the quantity and location of these moieties on the aromatic ring. In the present study, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 4-(12-mercaptododecyl)benzene-1,2-diol (o-hydroxyphenol-terminated); 5-(12-mercaptododecyl)benzene-1,3-diol (m-hydroxyphenol-terminated); bis(11-thioundecyl) hydrogen phosphate (monoprotic phosphate); and 11-thioundecyl dihydrogen phosphate (diprotic phosphate) were prepared and characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), and water contact angle measurements. The interactions between phenolic groups with phosphates were examined as a function of pH using the chemical force spectrometry (CFS) technique. The observations are discussed in the context of hydrogen bonding and electrostatic repulsion interaction between corresponding species. Adhesion force profiles of hydroxyphenol isomers interacting with monoprotic phosphate are dominated by ionic H-bonding; however the strength of o-hydroxyphenol interactions is significantly higher. The difference in location of hydroxyl groups on the interface also results in significantly different force-distance profiles for the isomeric hydroxyphenols when interacting with diprotic phosphate.

  8. Organic acid production in vitro and plant growth promotion in maize under controlled environment by phosphate-solubilizing fluorescent Pseudomonas

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas Pratibha; Gulati Arvind

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Phosphorus deficiency is a major constraint to crop production due to rapid binding of the applied phosphorus into fixed forms not available to the plants. Microbial solubilization of inorganic phosphates has been attributed mainly to the production of organic acids. Phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms enhance plant growth under conditions of poor phosphorus availability by solubilizing insoluble phosphates in the soil. This paper describes the production of organic acid...

  9. Hydrogen heat treatment of hydrogen absorbing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choong-Nyeon

    2000-12-01

    This study introduces the hydrogen heat treatment of hydrogen absorbing materials and its applicability for practical use. This treatment is somewhat different from normal heat treatment because of the interaction between metal atoms and hydrogen. Since hydrogen can be removed very fast by pumping it out the hydrogen-induced new lattice phase which can not be obtained without hydrogen can be preserved in a meta-stable state. A thermodynamic interpretation of the hydrogen heat treatment established previously was reformulated for graphical and analytical methods and applied to Pd-Pt-H and Pd-Ag-H alloy systems and a fair correlation between the calculation and experimental results was shown. The feasibility of applying the thermodynamic interpretation to intermetallic compounds-hydrogen systems was also discussed.

  10. SCALEUP OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE CATALYST FOR PILOT PLANT LPDMEtm RUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew W. Wang

    2002-01-01

    The Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) process converts synthesis gas to dimethyl ether in a single slurry bubble column reactor. A mixed slurry of methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst in a neutral mineral oil simultaneously synthesizes methanol from syngas and converts some of it to dimethyl ether and water. The reaction scheme is shown below: 2H{sub 2} + CO = CH{sub 3}OH; 2CH{sub 3}OH = CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O; H{sub 2}O + CO = CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. Most of the water produced in this reaction is converted to hydrogen by reduction with carbon monoxide (water gas shift reaction). This synergy permits higher per pass conversion than methanol synthesis alone. The enhancement in conversion occurs because dehydration of the methanol circumvents the equilibrium constraint of the syngas-to-methanol step. The slurry bubble column reactor provides the necessary heat transfer capacity to handle the greater heat duty associated with high conversion. In order to improve the stability of the catalyst system, non-stoichiometric aluminum phosphate was proposed as the dehydration catalyst for the LPDME{trademark} process. This aluminum phosphate material is a proprietary catalyst. This catalyst system of a standard methanol catalyst and the aluminum phosphate provided stable process performance that met the program targets under our standard test process conditions in the laboratory. These targets are (1) an initial methanol equivalent productivity of 28 gmol/kg/hr, (2) a CO{sub 2}-free, carbon selectivity of 80% to dimethyl ether and (3) stability of both catalysts equivalent to that of the methanol catalyst in the absence of the aluminum phosphate. A pilot plant trial of the LPDME{trademark} process using the aluminum phosphate catalyst was originally planned for March 1998 at the DOE-owned, Air Products (APCI)-operated facility at LaPorte, Texas. Because the aluminum phosphate catalyst is not commercially available, we initiated a

  11. SCALEUP OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE CATALYST FOR PILOT PLANT LPDMEtm RUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew W. Wang

    2002-05-15

    The Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) process converts synthesis gas to dimethyl ether in a single slurry bubble column reactor. A mixed slurry of methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst in a neutral mineral oil simultaneously synthesizes methanol from syngas and converts some of it to dimethyl ether and water. The reaction scheme is: 2H{sub 2} + CO = CH{sub 3}OH 2CH{sub 3}OH = CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}O + CO = CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. Most of the water produced in this reaction is converted to hydrogen by reduction with carbon monoxide (water gas shift reaction). This synergy permits higher per pass conversion than methanol synthesis alone. The enhancement in conversion occurs because dehydration of the methanol circumvents the equilibrium constraint of the syngas-to-methanol step. The slurry bubble column reactor provides the necessary heat transfer capacity to handle the greater heat duty associated with high conversion. In order to improve the stability of the catalyst system, non-stoichiometric aluminum phosphate was proposed as the dehydration catalyst for the LPDME{trademark} process. This aluminum phosphate material is a proprietary catalyst. This catalyst system of a standard methanol catalyst and the aluminum phosphate provided stable process performance that met the program targets under our standard test process conditions in the laboratory. These targets are (1) an initial methanol equivalent productivity of 28 gmol/kg/hr, (2) a CO{sub 2}-free, carbon selectivity of 80% to dimethyl ether and (3) stability of both catalysts equivalent to that of the methanol catalyst in the absence of the aluminum phosphate. A pilot plant trial of the LPDME{trademark} process using the aluminum phosphate catalyst was originally planned for March 1998 at the DOE-owned, Air Products (APCI)-operated facility at LaPorte, Texas. Because the aluminum phosphate catalyst is not commercially available, we initiated a scaleup project

  12. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  13. Structural models of zebrafish (Danio rerio NOD1 and NOD2 NACHT domains suggest differential ATP binding orientations: insights from computational modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Maharana

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1 and NOD2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors playing pivotal roles in innate immune signaling. NOD1 and NOD2 recognize bacterial peptidoglycan derivatives iE-DAP and MDP, respectively and undergoes conformational alternation and ATP-dependent self-oligomerization of NACHT domain followed by downstream signaling. Lack of structural adequacy of NACHT domain confines our understanding about the NOD-mediated signaling mechanism. Here, we predicted the structure of NACHT domain of both NOD1 and NOD2 from model organism zebrafish (Danio rerio using computational methods. Our study highlighted the differential ATP binding modes in NOD1 and NOD2. In NOD1, γ-phosphate of ATP faced toward the central nucleotide binding cavity like NLRC4, whereas in NOD2 the cavity was occupied by adenine moiety. The conserved 'Lysine' at Walker A formed hydrogen bonds (H-bonds and Aspartic acid (Walker B formed electrostatic interaction with ATP. At Sensor 1, Arg328 of NOD1 exhibited an H-bond with ATP, whereas corresponding Arg404 of NOD2 did not. 'Proline' of GxP motif (Pro386 of NOD1 and Pro464 of NOD2 interacted with adenine moiety and His511 at Sensor 2 of NOD1 interacted with γ-phosphate group of ATP. In contrast, His579 of NOD2 interacted with the adenine moiety having a relatively inverted orientation. Our findings are well supplemented with the molecular interaction of ATP with NLRC4, and consistent with mutagenesis data reported for human, which indicates evolutionary shared NOD signaling mechanism. Together, this study provides novel insights into ATP binding mechanism, and highlights the differential ATP binding modes in zebrafish NOD1 and NOD2.

  14. X-ray structures of uridine phosphorylase from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with uridine, thymidine, uracil, thymine, and phosphate anion: Substrate specificity of bacterial uridine phosphorylases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofev, I. I.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Balaev, V. V.; Seregina, T. A.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    In many types of human tumor cells and infectious agents, the demand for pyrimidine nitrogen bases increases during the development of the disease, thus increasing the role of the enzyme uridine phosphorylase in metabolic processes. The rational use of uridine phosphorylase and its ligands in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries requires knowledge of the structural basis for the substrate specificity of the target enzyme. This paper summarizes the results of the systematic study of the three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae in complexes with substrates of enzymatic reactions—uridine, phosphate anion, thymidine, uracil, and thymine. These data, supplemented with the results of molecular modeling, were used to consider in detail the structural basis for the substrate specificity of uridine phosphorylases. It was shown for the first time that the formation of a hydrogen-bond network between the 2'-hydroxy group of uridine and atoms of the active-site residues of uridine phosphorylase leads to conformational changes of the ribose moiety of uridine, resulting in an increase in the reactivity of uridine compared to thymidine. Since the binding of thymidine to residues of uridine phosphorylase causes a smaller local strain of the β-N1-glycosidic bond in this the substrate compared to the uridine molecule, the β-N1-glycosidic bond in thymidine is more stable and less reactive than that in uridine. It was shown for the first time that the phosphate anion, which is the second substrate bound at the active site, interacts simultaneously with the residues of the β5-strand and the β1-strand through hydrogen bonding, thus securing the gate loop in a conformation

  15. Zinc phosphate as versatile material for potential biomedical applications Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschke, L; Rottstegge, J; Lieberwirth, I; Wegner, G

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic alpha - and beta -Hopeite, two polymorphs of zinc phosphate tetrahydrates (ZPT) have been synthesized by hydrothermal crystallization from aqueous solution at 20 degrees C and 90 degrees C respectively. Aside from their sub-title crystallographic differences originating from a unique hydrogen bonding pattern, their thermodynamic interrelation has been thoroughfully investigated by means of X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), combined with thermogravimetry (TGA-MS). Using a new heterogeneous step-reaction approach, the kinetics of dehydration of the two forms of ZPT was studied and their corresponding transition temperature determined. Low temperature DRIFT, FT-Raman and (1)H, (31)P MAS-NMR reveal an oriented distortion of the zinc phosphate tetrahedra, due to a characteristic hydrogen bonding pattern and in accordance with the molecular tetrahedral linkage scheme of the phosphate groups. Biogenic Hydroxyapatite (HAP) and one of its metastable precursors, a calcium dihydrogen phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) or Brushite were also obtained and used to underline the resulting variations of chemical reactivity in zinc phosphates.

  16. Phosphate Recognition in Structural Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, Anna K.H.; Fischer, Felix R.; Diederich, François

    2007-01-01

    Drug-discovery research in the past decade has seen an increased selection of targets with phosphate recognition sites, such as protein kinases and phosphatases, in the past decade. This review attempts, with the help of database-mining tools, to give an overview of the most important principles in

  17. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor agonist FTY720-phosphate causes marginal zone B cell displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Kalpit A; Nichols, Elizabeth; Porter, Gene; Cui, Yan; Keohane, Carol Ann; Hajdu, Richard; Hale, Jeffery; Neway, William; Zaller, Dennis; Mandala, Suzanne

    2005-08-01

    FTY720 is an immunosuppressive agent that modulates lymphocyte trafficking. It is phosphorylated in vivo to FTY720-phosphate (FTY-P) and binds to a family of G protein-coupled receptors recognizing sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) as the natural ligand. It has previously been reported that FTY-P blocks egress of lymphocytes from the thymus and lymph nodes, resulting in peripheral blood lymphopenia. We now report that FTY-P also causes displacement of marginal zone (MZ) B cells to the splenic follicles, an effect that is similar to that observed after in vivo administration of lipopolysaccharide. This effect is specific to B cells in the MZ, as treatment with FTY-P does not cause redistribution of the resident macrophage population. A small but statistically significant decrease in the expression of beta1 integrin on MZ B cells was observed with FTY-P treatment. The redistribution of MZ B cells from the MZ sinuses does not abolish the ability of these cells to respond to the T-independent antigen, trinitrophenol-Ficoll. It has been proposed that the displacement of MZ B cells to the follicles is an indication of cell activation. Consistent with this, FTY-P caused an increase in percentage of MZ B cells expressing activation markers CD9, CD1d, and CD24. These results suggest that S1P receptors on MZ B cells are responsible for their mobilization to follicles.

  18. Dipentaerythritol penta-acrylate phosphate - an alternative phosphate ester monomer for bonding of methacrylates to zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Tay, Franklin R.; Lu, Zhicen; Chen, Chen; Qian, Mengke; Zhang, Huaiqin; Tian, Fucong; Xie, Haifeng

    2016-12-01

    The present work examined the effects of dipentaerythritol penta-acrylate phosphate (PENTA) as an alternative phosphate ester monomer for bonding of methacrylate-based resins to yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) and further investigated the potential bonding mechanism involved. Shear bond strength testing was performed to evaluate the efficacy of experimental PENTA-containing primers (5, 10, 15, 20 or 30 wt% PENTA in acetone) in improving resin-Y-TZP bond strength. Bonding without the use of a PENTA-containing served as the negative control, and a Methacryloyloxidecyl dihydrogenphosphate(MDP)-containing primer was used as the positive control. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to investigate the potential existence of chemical affinity between PENTA and Y-TZP. Shear bond strengths were significant higher in the 15 and 20 wt% PENTA groups. The ICP-MS, XPS and FTIR data indicated that the P content on the Y-TZP surface increased as the concentration of PENTA increased in the experimental primers, via the formation of Zr–O–P bond. Taken together, the results attest that PENTA improves resin bonding of Y-TZP through chemical reaction with Y-TZP. Increasing the concentration of PENTA augments its binding affinity but not its bonding efficacy with zirconia.

  19. Sintering of calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, E

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics have become of prime importance for biological applications in the field of bone tissue engineering. This paper reviews the sintering behaviour of these bioceramics. Conventional pressureless sintering of hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, a reference compound, has been extensively studied. Its physico-chemistry is detailed. It can be seen as a competition between two thermally activated phenomena that proceed by solid-state diffusion of matter: densification and grain growth. Usually, the objective is to promote the first and prevent the second. Literature data are analysed from sintering maps (i.e. grain growth vs. densification). Sintering trajectories of hydroxyapatite produced by conventional pressureless sintering and non-conventional techniques, including two-step sintering, liquid phase sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, ultrahigh pressure, microwave and spark plasma sintering, are presented. Whatever the sintering technique may be, grain growth occurs mainly during the last step of sintering, when the relative bulk density reaches 95% of the maximum value. Though often considered very advantageous, most assisted sintering techniques do not appear very superior to conventional pressureless sintering. Sintering of tricalcium phosphate or biphasic calcium phosphates is also discussed. The chemical composition of calcium phosphate influences the behaviour. Similarly, ionic substitutions in hydroxyapatite or in tricalcium phosphate create lattice defects that modify the sintering rate. Depending on their nature, they can either accelerate or slow down the sintering rate. The thermal stability of compounds at the sintering temperature must also be taken into account. Controlled atmospheres may be required to prevent thermal decomposition, and flash sintering techniques, which allow consolidation at low temperature, can be helpful.

  20. Phosphate based oil well cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Ramkumar

    The main application of the cement in an oil well is to stabilize the steel casing in the borehole and protect it from corrosion. The cement is pumped through the borehole and is pushed upwards through the annulus between the casing and the formation. The cement will be exposed to temperature and pressure gradients of the borehole. Modified Portland cement that is being used presently has several shortcomings for borehole sealant. The setting of the Portland cement in permafrost regions is poor because the water in it will freeze even before the cement sets and because of high porosity and calcium oxide, a major ingredient it gets easily affected by the down hole gases such as carbon dioxide. The concept of phosphate bonded cements was born out of considerable work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on their use in stabilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Novel cements were synthesized by an acid base reaction between a metal oxide and acid phosphate solution. The major objective of this research is to develop phosphate based oil well cements. We have used thermodynamics along with solution chemistry principles to select calcined magnesium oxide as candidate metal oxide for temperatures up to 200°F (93.3°C) and alumina for temperatures greater than 200°F (93.3°C). Solution chemistry helped us in selecting mono potassium phosphate as the acid component for temperatures less than 200°F (93.3°C) and phosphoric acid solution greater than 200°F (93.3°C). These phosphate cements have performance superior to common Portland well cements in providing suitable thickening time, better mechanical and physical properties.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  2. SODIUM POLYPRENYL PHOSPHATE (PHOSPRENYL EXERTS AN IL-2-DEPENDENT RESTORATIVE EFFECT UPON IN VIVO DTH INHIBITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Sobolev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. We have shown that polyprenyl phosphate (phosprenyl competes with interleukin 2 for binding with serum γ-globulin. It was also demonstrated that phosprenyl restores delayed type hypersensitivity induced by Listeria monocytogenes, after its inhibition with a γ-globulin which binds to IL-2 and blocks its activity. A role of serum γ-globulin and Phosprenyl in regulation of IL-2-dependent processes is discussed.

  3. Tribology in Gaseous Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawae, Yoshinori; Sugimura, Joich

    Hydrogen is expected as a clean and renewable energy carrier for future environment-friendly society. Many machine elements in hydrogen energy systems should be operating within hydrogen gas and tribological behavior, such as friction and wear, of bearings and seals are affected by the hydrogen environment through some interactions between material surfaces and gaseous hydrogen, i.e., physisorption of hydrogen molecules and following chemisorptions of dissociated atoms on metal surfaces, formation of metal hydride and reduction of metal oxide layer by hydrogen atoms diffused into bulk. Therefore, friction and wear characteristics of tribomaterials in the hydrogen environment should be appropriately understood to establish a design guideline for reliable hydrogen utilizing systems. This paper reviews the current knowledge about the effect of hydrogen on friction and wear of materials, and then describes our recent progress of hydrogen research in the tribology field.

  4. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  7. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.5778 Section 582.5778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  10. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.5217 Section 582.5217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  12. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5995 - Polyalkyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyalkyl phosphate. 721.5995 Section... Substances § 721.5995 Polyalkyl phosphate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyalkyl phosphate (PMN P-95-1772)...

  14. 21 CFR 582.6285 - Dipotassium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dipotassium phosphate. 582.6285 Section 582.6285 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Dipotassium phosphate. (a) Product. Dipotassium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  15. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  17. 21 CFR 582.6290 - Disodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disodium phosphate. 582.6290 Section 582.6290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Disodium phosphate. (a) Product. Disodium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  18. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  20. 21 CFR 182.6285 - Dipotassium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dipotassium phosphate. 182.6285 Section 182.6285 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Dipotassium phosphate. (a) Product. Dipotassium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  1. 21 CFR 182.6290 - Disodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Disodium phosphate. 182.6290 Section 182.6290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Disodium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  2. Molecular mechanisms of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocondi, Jennifer L.; El-Dasher, Bassem S.; Nancollas, George H.; Orme, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    The biomineral calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO4·2H2O), known as brushite, is a malleable material that both grows and dissolves faster than most other calcium minerals, including other calcium phosphate phases, calcium carbonates and calcium oxalates. Within the body, this ready formation and dissolution can play a role in certain diseases, such as kidney stone and plaque formation. However, these same properties, along with brushite’s excellent biocompatibility, can be used to great benefit in making resorbable biomedical cements. To optimize cements, additives are commonly used to control crystallization kinetics and phase transformation. This paper describes the use of in situ scanning probe microscopy to investigate the role of several solution parameters and additives in brushite atomic step motion. Surprisingly, this work demonstrates that the activation barrier for phosphate (rather than calcium) incorporation limits growth kinetics and that additives such as magnesium, citrate and bisphosphonates each influence step motion in distinctly different ways. Our findings provide details of how, and where, molecules inhibit or accelerate kinetics. These insights have the potential to aid in designing molecules to target specific steps and to guide synergistic combinations of additives. PMID:20308110

  3. Molecular mechanisms of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocondi, Jennifer L; El-Dasher, Bassem S; Nancollas, George H; Orme, Christine A

    2010-04-28

    The biomineral calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO(4).2H(2)O), known as brushite, is a malleable material that both grows and dissolves faster than most other calcium minerals, including other calcium phosphate phases, calcium carbonates and calcium oxalates. Within the body, this ready formation and dissolution can play a role in certain diseases, such as kidney stone and plaque formation. However, these same properties, along with brushite's excellent biocompatibility, can be used to great benefit in making resorbable biomedical cements. To optimize cements, additives are commonly used to control crystallization kinetics and phase transformation. This paper describes the use of in situ scanning probe microscopy to investigate the role of several solution parameters and additives in brushite atomic step motion. Surprisingly, this work demonstrates that the activation barrier for phosphate (rather than calcium) incorporation limits growth kinetics and that additives such as magnesium, citrate and bisphosphonates each influence step motion in distinctly different ways. Our findings provide details of how, and where, molecules inhibit or accelerate kinetics. These insights have the potential to aid in designing molecules to target specific steps and to guide synergistic combinations of additives.

  4. Injectability and mechanical properties of magnesium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseke, Claus; Saratsis, Vasileios; Gbureck, Uwe

    2011-12-01

    Up to now magnesium phosphate cements are mainly being utilized in wastewater treatment due to their adsorptive properties. Recently they also have been shown to have a high potential as degradable biocements for application as replacement materials for bone defects. In comparison to degradable calcium phosphate cements they have the advantage of setting at neutral pH, which is favorable in biological environment. In this study two parameters of the cement composition, namely powder-to-liquid ratio (PLR) and citrate content, were varied in order to optimize the injectability properties of the cement paste and the mechanical properties of the reaction product. These properties were determined by means of testing setting time and temperature, paste viscosity, and injectability as well as phase composition and compressive strength of the set cements. Best results were obtained, when the cements were prepared with a PLR of 2.5 and a binder liquid consisting of an aqueous solution of 3 mol/l diammonium hydrogen phosphate and 0.5 mol/l diammonium citrate.

  5. Novel vanadium phosphate phases as catalysts for selective oxidation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arunabha Datta; Monika Agarwal; Soumen Dasgupta

    2002-08-01

    In our effort to induce novel modifications in the structure of some important vanadium phosphate phases used as selective oxidation catalysts, it has been observed that metal ions such as Zn2+, Ni2+, Pd2+ can be incorporated into the vanadyl hydrogen phosphate VOHPO4$\\cdot$0.5H2O phase in very different ways depending upon the medium of preparation. It has been found that the metal ions are either substituted into the lattice with retention of structure of the parent compound or intercalated between the layers of a new mixed-valent phase. These new metalincorporated phases are catalytically active and the palladium incorporated compound in particular displays shape selective catalysis for different oxidation and reduction reactions. In another approach, the preparation of VOHPO4$\\cdot$0.5H2O has been modified to give a novel crystalline phase containing mixed-valent vanadium and having NH3 species bound to the lattice. This phase could be a potential catalyst for ammoxidation reactions. In addition, novel mesostructured vanadium phosphate phases have been prepared using a long-chain amine as the templating agent involving a ligand templating mechanism of formation.

  6. Reactive phosphate esters as affinity labels for enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, F. C.; Norton, I. L.; Stringer, C. D.; Schloss, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    Many enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism have an affinity for small organic anions. An attempt was made to exploit the common binding specificities of enzymes, whose substrates are phosphate esters, in the design and use of affinity labels. The basic premise is that small phosphate esters that contain chemically reactive substituents will be active-site-specific probes for some enzymes with affinities for phosphate esters. This paper describes three recent endeavors: (1) an attempt to design an affinity label for the catalytic group of triosephosphate isomerase that polarizes the substrate carbonyl, (2) the use of N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate (BrAcNHEtOP) as an affinity label for rabbit and chicken phosphoglycerate mutase, and (3) the use of BrAcNHEtOP as an affinity label for D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase.

  7. Hydrogen local vibrational modes in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCluskey, Matthew D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    Following, a review of experimental techniques, theory, and previous work, the results of local vibrational mode (LVM) spectroscopy on hydrogen-related complexes in several different semiconductors are discussed. Hydrogen is introduced either by annealing in a hydrogen ambient. exposure to a hydrogen plasma, or during growth. The hydrogen passivates donors and acceptors in semiconductors, forming neutral complexes. When deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. the frequency of the LVM decreases by approximately the square root of two. By varying the temperature and pressure of the samples, the microscopic structures of hydrogen-related complexes are determined. For group II acceptor-hydrogen complexes in GaAs, InP, and GaP, hydrogen binds to the host anion in a bond-centered orientation, along the [111] direction, adjacent to the acceptor. The temperature dependent shift of the LVMs are proportional to the lattice thermal energy U(T), a consequence of anharmonic coupling between the LVM and acoustical phonons. In the wide band gap semiconductor ZnSe, epilayers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD) and doped with As form As-H complexes. The hydrogen assumes a bond-centered orientation, adjacent to a host Zn. In AlSb, the DX centers Se and Te are passivated by hydrogen. The second, third, and fourth harmonics of the wag modes are observed. Although the Se-D complex has only one stretch mode, the Se-H stretch mode splits into three peaks. The anomalous splitting is explained by a new interaction between the stretch LVM and multi-phonon modes of the lattice. As the temperature or pressure is varied, and anti-crossing is observed between LVM and phonon modes.

  8. Mineral phosphate solubilizing bacterial community in agro-ecosystem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... patterns. Four insoluble phosphate sources; purulia rock phosphate (PRP), mussourie rock phosphate .... phosphate in gradient soils, there might be changes in ..... resistance properties, fatty acid profiling and nucleic acid.

  9. Calcium phosphate cements: study of the beta-tricalcium phosphate--monocalcium phosphate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtchi, A A; Lemaitre, J; Terao, N

    1989-09-01

    The possibility of making cements based on beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), a promising bone graft material, was investigated. Upon admixture with water, beta-TCP/monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) mixtures were found to set and harden like conventional hydraulic cements. Beta-TCP powders with larger particle size, obtained by sintering at higher temperatures, increased the ultimate strength of the cement. Results show that setting occurs after dissolution of MCPM, as a result of the precipitation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) in the paste. The ultimate tensile strength of the hardened cement is proportional to the amount of DCPD formed. Upon ageing above 40 degrees C, DCPD transforms progressively into anhydrous dicalcium phosphate (DCP), thereby decreasing the strength. Ageing of the pastes in 100% r.h. results in a decay of the mechanical properties. This can be ascribed to an intergranular dissolution of the beta-TCP aggregates as a result of the pH lowering brought about by the MCPM to DCPD conversion.

  10. [Sucroferric oxyhydroxide, a novel iron-based phosphate binder. Which current use in dialysis patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Pierre; Delattre, Vincent; Daroux, Maité

    2017-04-01

    International guidelines suggest lowering elevated phosphorus level to the normal range in patients on dialysis. Among the phosphate-lowering strategies, phosphate binder is frequently used in addition to dietary phosphate restriction and an adequate dialysis strategy. However, serum phosphate concentration higher than 1.78mmol/L is observed in more than 40% of patients justifying the quest for new drugs. Sucroferric oxyhydroxide is one of the new iron-based agents and is available in France since May 2016. A recent international multicentre study showed this new drug to be as efficacious and non-inferior to sevelamer carbonate in magnitude of serum phosphate control. The serum phosphorus-lowering effect was maintained over 1year. When compared to carbonate sevelamer, the pill-burden was half with sucroferric oxyhydroxide because of its high phosphate binding capacity. As previously shown by experimental studies, no risk of iron accumulation was observed since iron absorption is negligible. Discolored feces and diarrhea were fairly frequent side effects. When diarrhea subsides, the tolerability of this new phosphate binder is excellent on a long-term basis. Copyright © 2017 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Linear Free Energy Relationship Analysis of Transition State Mimicry by 3-Deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate (DAHP) Oxime, a DAHP Synthase Inhibitor and Phosphate Mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Naresh; To, Frederick; Berti, Paul J

    2017-01-31

    3-Deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase catalyzes an aldol-like reaction of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) with erythrose 4-phosphate (E4P) to form DAHP in the first step of the shikimate biosynthetic pathway. DAHP oxime, in which an oxime replaces the ketone, is a potent inhibitor, with Ki = 1.5 μM. Linear free energy relationship (LFER) analysis of DAHP oxime inhibition using DAHP synthase mutants revealed an excellent correlation between transition state stabilization and inhibition. The equations of LFER analysis were rederived to formalize the possibility of proportional, rather than equal, changes in the free energies of transition state stabilization and inhibitor binding, in accord with the fact that the majority of LFER analyses in the literature demonstrate nonunity slopes. A slope of unity, m = 1, indicates that catalysis and inhibitor binding are equally sensitive to perturbations such as mutations or modified inhibitor/substrate structures. Slopes 1 indicate that inhibitor binding is less sensitive or more sensitive, respectively, to perturbations than is catalysis. LFER analysis using the tetramolecular specificity constant, that is, plotting log(KM,MnKM,PEPKM,E4P/kcat) versus log(Ki), revealed a slope, m, of 0.34, with r(2) = 0.93. This provides evidence that DAHP oxime is mimicking the first irreversible transition state of the DAHP synthase reaction, presumably phosphate departure from the tetrahedral intermediate. This is evidence that the oxime group can act as a functional, as well as structural, mimic of phosphate groups.

  12. Phosphate fertilizer affected rhizospheric soils: speciation of cadmium and phytoremediation by Chlorophytum comosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youbao; Zhu, Chengfeng; Yang, Hongfei; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2017-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of phosphate fertilization on chemical speciation of cadmium (Cd) in the rhizospheric soil of Chlorophytum comosum, a potential cadmium hyperaccumulator. The results revealed that when 200 mg kg(-1) phosphate was applied into the soil, the Cd contents in the exchangeable fraction (EXC), carbonate-binding fraction (CA), and Fe-Mn oxides-binding fraction (Fe-Mn) were the highest, and the Cd content in the residual fraction (RES) was the lowest. Phosphate fertilization could enhance Cd conversion from RES into CA and weak RES, thereby improving the bioavailability of Cd and enhancing Cd enrichment and adsorption by C. comosum. The total Cd content in the soil was reduced by 10.15 mg kg(-1) in the planted group, which was significantly different from the control group (p soil by C. comosum.

  13. Ti-MOFs for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Q.; Li, S.; Wang, Q.; Jena, P.

    2007-03-01

    Recently, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted considerable interest as hydrogen storage materials owing to their unique properties. Among MOFs, MOF-5 (Zn-MOF) is superior because of its high thermal stability, large surface area, and extra high porosity, which is ideal for gas storage applications. Can we improve the hydrogen uptake in MOF-5 by replacing Zn with different metal atoms? Experimentally, Cu-MOFs have already shown higher hydrogen uptake at low pressures compared with Zn-MOFs, which makes Cu-MOFs promising candidates for hydrogen storage. By means of first principles calculations, we have replaced Zn with Cu and Ti. Ti doping has already been introduced in C60 and carbon-nanotubes to improve hydrogen uptake. By comparing Zn, Cu and Ti, we found that Ti substitution presents the highest binding energy to H2 molecule, while Cu and Zn show similar binding energy to H2 molecule. Therefore, Ti-MOFs can be prospective materials for hydrogen storage applications.

  14. Conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate to D-xylulose 5-phosphate : new insights from structural and biochemical studies on human RPE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, W.; Ouyang, S.; Shaw, N.; Joachimiak, A.; Zhang, R.; Liu, Z.; Biosciences Division; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2011-02-01

    The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) confers protection against oxidative stress by supplying NADPH necessary for the regeneration of glutathione, which detoxifies H{sub 2}O{sub 2} into H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. RPE functions in the PPP, catalyzing the reversible conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate to D-xylulose 5-phosphate and is an important enzyme for cellular response against oxidative stress. Here, using structural, biochemical, and functional studies, we show that human D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (hRPE) uses Fe{sup 2+} for catalysis. Structures of the binary complexes of hRPE with D-ribulose 5-phosphate and D-xylulose 5-phosphate provide the first detailed molecular insights into the binding mode of physiological ligands and reveal an octahedrally coordinated Fe{sup 2+} ion buried deep inside the active site. Human RPE folds into a typical ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel with a loop regulating access to the active site. Two aspartic acids are well positioned to carry out the proton transfers in an acid-base type of reaction mechanism. Interestingly, mutating Ser-10 to alanine almost abolished the enzymatic activity, while L12A and M72A mutations resulted in an almost 50% decrease in the activity. The binary complexes of hRPE reported here will aid in the design of small molecules for modulating the activity of the enzyme and altering flux through the PPP.

  15. Conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate to D-xylulose 5-phosphate: new insights from structural and biochemical studies on human RPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenguang; Ouyang, Songying; Shaw, Neil; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Zhang, Rongguang; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2011-02-01

    The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) confers protection against oxidative stress by supplying NADPH necessary for the regeneration of glutathione, which detoxifies H(2)O(2) into H(2)O and O(2). RPE functions in the PPP, catalyzing the reversible conversion of D-ribulose 5-phosphate to D-xylulose 5-phosphate and is an important enzyme for cellular response against oxidative stress. Here, using structural, biochemical, and functional studies, we show that human D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (hRPE) uses Fe(2+) for catalysis. Structures of the binary complexes of hRPE with D-ribulose 5-phosphate and D-xylulose 5-phosphate provide the first detailed molecular insights into the binding mode of physiological ligands and reveal an octahedrally coordinated Fe(2+) ion buried deep inside the active site. Human RPE folds into a typical (β/α)(8) triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel with a loop regulating access to the active site. Two aspartic acids are well positioned to carry out the proton transfers in an acid-base type of reaction mechanism. Interestingly, mutating Ser-10 to alanine almost abolished the enzymatic activity, while L12A and M72A mutations resulted in an almost 50% decrease in the activity. The binary complexes of hRPE reported here will aid in the design of small molecules for modulating the activity of the enzyme and altering flux through the PPP.

  16. Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent catalytic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatikova, Svetlana; Mouratou, Barbara; Stetefeld, Jörg; Mehta, Perdeep K; Christen, Philipp

    2002-11-01

    Strategies for expanding the catalytic scope of antibodies include the incorporation of inorganic or organic cofactors into their binding sites. An obvious choice is pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP), which is probably the most versatile organic cofactor of enzymes. Monoclonal antibodies against the hapten N(alpha)-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)-L-lysine, a stable analog of the covalent coenzyme-substrate adducts were screened by a competition ELISA for binding of the PLP-amino acid Schiff base adduct. The Schiff base with its C4'-N alpha double bond is, in contrast to the hapten, a planar compound and is an obligatory intermediate in all PLP-dependent reactions of amino acids. This highly discriminating screening step eliminated all but 5 of 24 hapten-binding antibodies. The five remaining antibodies were tested for catalysis of the PLP-dependent alpha,beta-elimination reaction of beta-chloroalanine. Antibody 15A9 complied with this selection criterion and catalyzed in addition the cofactor-dependent transamination reaction of hydrophobic D-amino acids and oxo acids (k(cat)'=0.42 min(-1) with D-alanine at 25 degrees C). Homology modeling together with alanine scanning yielded a 3D model of Fab 15A9. The striking analogy between antibody 15A9 and PLP-dependent enzymes includes the following features: (1) The binding sites accommodate the planar coenzyme-amino acid adduct. (2) The bond at C alpha to be broken lies together with the C alpha-N bond in a plane orthogonal to the plane of coenzyme and imine bond. (3) The alpha-carboxylate group of the substrate is bound by an arginine residue. (4) The coenzyme-substrate adduct assumes a cisoid conformation. (5) PLP markedly contributes to catalytic efficiency, being a 10(4) times more efficient amino group acceptor than pyruvate. The protein moiety, however, ensures reaction as well as substrate specificity, and further accelerates the reaction (in 15A9 k(cat (Ab x PLP))'/k(cat (PLP))'=5 x 10(3)). The analogies of antibody 15A9 with

  17. Clinical pharmacokinetics of the phosphate binder lanthanum carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damment, Stephen J P; Pennick, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Lanthanum carbonate is considered to be the most potent of a new generation of noncalcium phosphate binders used to treat hyperphosphataemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD), a condition associated with progressive bone and cardiovascular pathology and a markedly elevated risk of death. Its phosphate-binding action involves ionic binding and precipitation of insoluble complexes within the lumen of the intestine, thereby preventing absorption of dietary phosphate. While pharmacokinetics have little relevance to the efficacy of lanthanum carbonate, they are of fundamental importance when it comes to evaluating safety. When administered as lanthanum carbonate, the oral bioavailability of lanthanum is low (approximately 0.001%). The small absorbed fraction is excreted predominantly in bile, with less than 2% being eliminated by the kidneys. Predictably, therefore, plasma exposure and pharmacokinetics have been shown to be similar in healthy human volunteers and CKD stage 5 patients. With almost complete plasma protein binding, free lanthanum concentrations in patients at steady state are carbonate has a low propensity to cause systemic drug interactions due to its poor absorption. However, the higher concentrations present in the gastrointestinal tract can form chelates with some drugs, such as fluoroquinolones, and reduce their absorption. The improved understanding of the pharmacokinetics of lanthanum that has emerged in recent years has helped to explain why the myriad of calcium-like effects described in vitro for lanthanum have little if any relevance in vivo. The pharmacokinetic investigations of lanthanum carbonate formed an important part of the stringent premarketing safety assessment process and have been influential in reassuring both regulators and physicians that the agent can be used safely and effectively in this vulnerable dialysis population.

  18. Liquid hydrogen in protonic chabazite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecchina, Adriano; Bordiga, Silvia; Vitillo, Jenny G; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Lamberti, Carlo; Spoto, Giuseppe; Bjørgen, Morten; Lillerud, Karl Petter

    2005-05-04

    Due to its fully reversible nature, H(2) storage by molecular adsorption could represent an advantage with respect to dissociative processes, where kinetic effects during the charging and discharging processes are present. A drawback of this strategy is represented by the extremely weak interactions that require low temperature and high pressure. High surface area materials hosting polarizing sites can represent a viable way toward more favorable working conditions. Of these, in this contribution, we have studied hydrogen adsorption in a series of zeolites using volumetric techniques and infrared spectroscopy at 15 K. We have found that in H-SSZ-13 zeolite the cooperative role played by high surface area, internal wall topology, and presence of high binding energy sites (protons) allows hydrogen to densify inside the nanopores at favorable temperature and pressure conditions.

  19. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept

  20. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept b

  1. a Theoretical Investigation on 10-12 Potential of Hydrogen-Hydrogen Covalent Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneri, Sencer

    2013-05-01

    This is an analytical investigation of well-known 10-12 potential of hydrogen-hydrogen covalent bond. In this research, we will make an elaboration of the well-known 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential in case of this type of bond. Though the results are illustrated in many text books and literature, an analytical analysis for these potentials is missing almost everywhere. The power laws are valid for small radial distances, which are calculated to some extent. The internuclear separation as well as the binding energy of the hydrogen molecule are evaluated with success.

  2. [Phosphate sensing and parathyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Masahide; Suzuki, Taihei

    2012-10-01

    In the latter 1990s, phosphate, as well as calcium, has been shown to have a direct action on parathyroid function. Since then although many researchers have tried to detect the phosphate sensor in parathyroid gland, none has found it yet. In 2000s, the importance of FGF23 was revealed in patients with autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets and then investigating the role of FGF23 in mineral metabolism has spread. FGF23 target organs comprise those that express coreceptor Klotho, such as kidney and parathyroid glands. While associations of calcium sensing receptor or vitamin D receptor with parathyroid function have been mainly investigated for parathyroid dysfunction, many efforts recently have made to study the effects of FGF23 on parathyroid glands.

  3. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian

    Oftentimes caries lesions develop in protected sites that are difficult to access by self-performed mechanical tooth cleaning. At present, there is a growing interest in chemical adjuncts to mechanical procedures of oral hygiene that aim at biofilm control rather than biofilm eradication. Calcium......-phosphate-osteopontin particles are a new promising therapeutic approach to caries control. They are designed to bind to dental biofilms and interfere with biofilm build-up, lowering the bacterial burden on the tooth surface without affecting bacterial viability in the oral cavity. Moreover, they dissolve when pH in the biofilm...

  4. Calcium phosphate polymer hybrid materials

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) is of strong interest to the medical field because of its potential for bone repair, gene transfection, etc.1-3 Nowadays, the majority of the commercially available materials are fabricated via “classical” materials science approaches, i.e. via high temperature or high pressure approaches, from rather poorly defined slurries, or from organic solvents.3,4 Precipitation of inorganics with (polymeric) additives from aqueous solution on the other hand enables the synthesis...

  5. Effects of phosphates on microstructure and bioactivity of micro-arc oxidized calcium phosphate coatings on Mg-Zn-Zr magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y K; Chen, C Z; Wang, D G; Zhao, T G

    2013-09-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings were prepared on Mg-Zn-Zr magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in electrolyte containing calcium acetate monohydrate (CH3COO)2Ca·H2O) and different phosphates (i.e. disodium hydrogen phosphate dodecahydrate (Na2HPO4·12H2O), sodium phosphate (Na3PO4·H2O) and sodium hexametaphosphate((NaPO3)6)). Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) were employed to characterize the microstructure, elemental distribution and phase composition of the CaP coatings. Simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion test was used to evaluate the coating bioactivity and degradability. Systemic toxicity test was used to evaluate the coating biocompatibility. Fluoride ion selective electrode (ISE) was used to measure F(-) ions concentration during 30 days SBF immersion. The CaP coatings effectively reduced the corrosion rate and the surfaces of CaP coatings were covered by a new layer formed of numerous needle-like and scale-like apatites. The formation of these calcium phosphate apatites indicates that the coatings have excellent bioactivity. The coatings formed in (NaPO3)6-containging electrolyte exhibit thicker thickness, higher adhesive strength, slower degradation rate, better apatite-inducing ability and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydrogen isotope geochemistry of lherzolitic shergottite in Martian meteorite GRV99027 from the Grove Mountains in Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Henan; HSU Weibiao; GUAN Yunbin; LIANG Ying

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopic composition was measured using an ion microprobe for lherzolitic shergottite in Martian meteorite GRV 99027 from the Grove Mountains in Antarctica. The D/H ratios of phosphate whitlockites were analyzed and water concentrations of tested points were calculated. The result show that their δD values vary from +1300‰ to +4700‰, and water contents from 0.04 wt% to 0.43 wt%. Comparing the results with the hydrogen isotopic compositions of whole rock, hydrous minerals and phosphates in SNC meteorites indicates that water highly enriched in deuterium is a unique feature of Martian meteorites, especially the phosphates prominent. It is interpreted as the result of isotopic exchange between magmatic water and Martian crustal fluids. The high D/H ratios observed in GRV 99027 phosphates indicate that they have hydrogen isotopic compositions similar to those of apatite in other Martian meteorites. The results further confirmed the association of GRV 99027 with the Martian meteorite group.

  7. Theoretical Studies of Hydrogen Storage Alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Hannes

    2012-03-22

    Theoretical calculations were carried out to search for lightweight alloys that can be used to reversibly store hydrogen in mobile applications, such as automobiles. Our primary focus was on magnesium based alloys. While MgH{sub 2} is in many respects a promising hydrogen storage material, there are two serious problems which need to be solved in order to make it useful: (i) the binding energy of the hydrogen atoms in the hydride is too large, causing the release temperature to be too high, and (ii) the diffusion of hydrogen through the hydride is so slow that loading of hydrogen into the metal takes much too long. In the first year of the project, we found that the addition of ca. 15% of aluminum decreases the binding energy to the hydrogen to the target value of 0.25 eV which corresponds to release of 1 bar hydrogen gas at 100 degrees C. Also, the addition of ca. 15% of transition metal atoms, such as Ti or V, reduces the formation energy of interstitial H-atoms making the diffusion of H-atoms through the hydride more than ten orders of magnitude faster at room temperature. In the second year of the project, several calculations of alloys of magnesium with various other transition metals were carried out and systematic trends in stability, hydrogen binding energy and diffusivity established. Some calculations of ternary alloys and their hydrides were also carried out, for example of Mg{sub 6}AlTiH{sub 16}. It was found that the binding energy reduction due to the addition of aluminum and increased diffusivity due to the addition of a transition metal are both effective at the same time. This material would in principle work well for hydrogen storage but it is, unfortunately, unstable with respect to phase separation. A search was made for a ternary alloy of this type where both the alloy and the corresponding hydride are stable. Promising results were obtained by including Zn in the alloy.

  8. Metallacarboranes: Towards promising hydrogen storage metal organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Sadrzadeh, Arta; Yakobson, Boris

    2011-03-01

    Using first principles calculations we show the high hydrogen storage capacity of metallacarboranes, where the transition metal (TM) atoms bind hydrogen via Kubas interaction. The average binding energy of ~ 0.3 eV/H favorably lies within the reversible adsorption range The Sc and Ti are found to be the optimum metal atoms maximizing the number of stored H2 molecules. Depending upon the structure, metallacarboranes can adsorb up to 8 wt% of hydrogen, which exceeds DOE goal for 2015. Being integral part of the cage, TMs do not suffer from the aggregation problem. Furthermore, the presence of carbon atom in the cages permits linking the metallacarboranes to form metal organic frameworks (MOF), thus able to adsorb hydrogen via Kubas interaction, in addition to van der Waals physisorption. A. K. Singh, A. Sadrzadeh, and B. I. Yakobson, Metallacarboranes: Toward Promising Hydrogen Storage Metal Organic Frameworks, JACS 132,14126 (2010).

  9. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  10. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  11. Two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides and oxides for hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibilities of hydrogen evolution by basal planes of 2D metal dichalcogenides and oxides in the 2H and 1T class of structures using the hydrogen binding energy as a computational activity descriptor. For some groups of systems like the Ti, Zr, and Hf dichalcogenides the hydrogen...... of the two phases will be active for the hydrogen evolution reaction; however, in most cases the two phases are very close in formation energy, opening up the possibility for stabilizing the active phase. The study points to many new possible 2D HER materials beyond the few that are already known....

  12. Conformational Variability of Organophosphorus Hydrolase upon Soman and Paraoxon Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Diego Eb; Lins, Roberto D.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Lei, Chenghong; Soares, Thereza A.

    2011-12-31

    The bacterial enzyme organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) exhibits both catalytic and substrate promiscuity. It hydrolyzes bonds in a variety of phosphotriester (P-O), phosphonothioate (P-S), phosphofluoridate (P-F) and phosphonocyanate (F-CN) compounds. However, its catalytic efficiency varies markedly for different substrates, limiting the broad-range application of OPH as catalyst in the bioremediation of pesticides and chemical war agents. In the present study, pK{sub a} calculations and multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to characterize and contrast the structural dynamics of OPH bound to two substrates hydrolyzed with very distinct catalytic efficiencies: the nerve agent soman (O-pinacolyl-methyl-phosphonofluoridate) and the pesticide paraoxon (diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate). pK{sub a} calculations for the substrate-bound and unbound enzyme showed a significant pK{sub a} shift from standard values ({Delta}pK{sub a} = {+-} 3 units) for residues 254His and 275Arg. MD simulations of the doubly protonated 254His revealed a dynamic hydrogen bond network connecting the catalytic residue 301Asp via 254His to 232Asp, 233Asp, 275Arg and 235Asp, and is consistent with a previously postulated proton relay mechanism to ferry protons away from the active site with substrates that do not require activation of the leaving group. Hydrogen bonds between 301Asp and 254His were persistent in the OPH-paraoxon complex but not in the OPH-soman one, suggesting a potential role for such interaction in the more efficient hydrolysis of paraoxon over soman by OPH. These results are in line with previous mutational studies of residue 254His, which led to an increase of the catalytic efficiency of OPH over soman yet decreased its efficiency for paraoxon. In addition, comparative analysis of the molecular trajectories for OPH bound to soman and paraoxon suggests that binding of the latter facilitates the conformational transition of OPH from the

  13. Hexa-kis-(3-chloro-2-methyl-anilinium) cyclo-hexa-phosphate dihydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bel Haj Salah, Raoudha; Khederi, Lamia; Rzaigui, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In the organic/inorganic salt hydrate, 6C7H9ClN(+)·P6O18 (6-)·2H2O, the cyclo-hexa-phosphate anion resides on an inversion centre. The asymmetric unit consists of three cations, one half-anion and a water mol-ecule. In the crystal, the water mol-ecules and the [P6O18](6-) anions are linked by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating infinite layers parallel to the ab plane. These layers are inter-connected by the organic cations through N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  14. Water structure and dynamics in phosphate fluorosurfactant based reverse micelle: A computer simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, Sanjib; Berkowitz, Max L.

    2003-01-01

    We performed a molecular dynamics simulation on a system containing a water pool inside the reverse micelle made up of an assembly of phosphate fluorosurfactant molecules dissolved in supercritical carbon dioxide. The water molecules in the first solvation shell of the headgroup lose the water to water tetrahedral hydrogen bonded network but are strongly bonded to the surfactant headgroups. This change in inter-water hydrogen bonding in connection with the confined geometry of the reverse micelle slows down the translational and especially the rotational dynamics of water.

  15. Characterization of feline serum-cobalt binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, Amy N; Barger, Anne M; MacNeill, Amy L; Mitchell, Mark M; Solter, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress inhibits albumin's ability to complex with cobalt. Feline serum-cobalt binding has not been described. The objective was to develop a cobalt binding test for use with feline serum, and correlate the results with other biochemical and cellular constituents in blood, and with clinical diseases of cats. A colorimetric test of cobalt binding, based on the oxidation-reduction reaction of Co(+2) and dithiothreitol, was developed using feline serum. The test was used to measure cobalt binding in stored serum from 176 cats presented to the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital for a variety of disease conditions. Time-matched hematology and biochemical data, and clinical information, were obtained from the medical record of each cat and correlated with the serum-cobalt binding results. Serial dilution of feline serum with phosphate-buffered saline resulted in a highly linear decrease in serum-cobalt binding (r(2)  = .9984). Serum-cobalt binding of the clinical samples also correlated with albumin concentrations in a stepwise linear regression model (r(2)  = .425), and both cobalt binding and albumin were significantly decreased in cases of inflammation. Albumin and cobalt binding also shared significant correlations with several erythron variables, and serum concentration of total calcium and bilirubin. The correlation of cobalt binding measured by a colorimetric test with albumin concentration in the clinical samples and with serum dilution is consistent with feline albumin-cobalt complex formation. Hypoalbuminemia is the likely cause of reduced serum-cobalt binding in inflammation and the correlations observed between cobalt binding and other variables. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  16. Phosphate: are we squandering a scarce commodity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Charles J; Ritz, Eberhard; Townend, Jonathan N

    2015-02-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element for life but is a rare element in the universe. On Earth, it occurs mostly in the form of phosphates that are widespread but predominantly at very low concentration. This relative rarity has resulted in a survival advantage, in evolutionary terms, to organisms that conserve phosphate. When phosphate is made available in excess it becomes a cause for disease, perhaps best recognized as a potential cardiovascular and renal risk factor. As a reaction to the emerging public health issue caused by phosphate additives to food items, there have been calls for a public education programme and regulation to bring about a reduction of phosphate additives to food. During the Paleoproterzoic era, an increase in the bioavailability of phosphate is thought to have contributed significantly to the oxygenation of our atmosphere and a dramatic increase in the evolution of new species. Currently, phosphate is used poorly and often wasted with phosphate fertilizers washing this scarce commodity into water bodies causing eutrophication and algal blooms. Ironically, this is leading to the extinction of hundreds of species. The unchecked exploitation of phosphate rock, which is an increasingly rare natural resource, and our dependence on it for agriculture may lead to a strange situation in which phosphate might become a commodity to be fought over whilst at the same time, health and environmental experts are likely to recommend reductions in its use.

  17. Applications and functions of food-grade phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampila, Lucina E

    2013-10-01

    Food-grade phosphates are used in the production of foods to function as buffers, sequestrants, acidulants, bases, flavors, cryoprotectants, gel accelerants, dispersants, nutrients, precipitants, and as free-flow (anticaking) or ion-exchange agents. The actions of phosphates affect the chemical leavening of cakes, cookies, pancakes, muffins, and doughnuts; the even melt of processed cheese; the structure of a frankfurter; the bind and hydration of delicatessen meats; the fluidity of evaporated milk; the distinctive flavor of cola beverages; the free flow of spice blends; the mineral content of isotonic beverages; and the light color of par-fried potato strips. In the United States, food-grade phosphates are generally recognized as safe, but use levels have been defined for some foods by the Code of Federal Regulations, specifically Titles 9 and 21 for foods regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), respectively. Standards for food purity are defined nationally and internationally in sources such as the Food Chemicals Codex and the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) Expert Committee on Food Additives.

  18. Zinc phosphate as versatile material for potential biomedical applications Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschke, L; Lieberwirth, I; Wegner, G

    2006-01-01

    Surface chemical reactivity of two modifications of synthetic zinc phosphate tetrahydrate (alpha - and beta -form of Hopeite, alpha -,beta -ZPT) has been studied by selective chemical and e-beam etching in presence of diluted phosphoric acid and ammonia by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and microelectrophoresis (zeta potential measurements) in correlation with the corresponding bulk properties and crystal size distributions. The subtitle crystallographic differences between alpha -and beta -ZPT originating from a unique hydrogen bonding pattern, induce drastic variations of both surface potential and surface charge. Biogenic Hydroxyapatite (HAP) and one of its metastable precursors, a calcium dihydrogen phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) or Brushite were used to underline this resulting variation of chemical reactivity in zinc phosphates. In-situ monitoring of the transformation of Brushite in Hydroxyapatite is also reported.

  19. Methyllithium-Doped Naphthyl-Containing Conjugated Microporous Polymer with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan; Sun, Lei; Li, Gang; Shang, Jin; Yang, Rui-Xia; Deng, Wei-Qiao

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen storage is a primary challenge for using hydrogen as a fuel. With ideal hydrogen storage kinetics, the weak binding strength of hydrogen to sorbents is the key barrier to obtain decent hydrogen storage performance. Here, we reported the rational synthesis of a methyllithium-doped naphthyl-containing conjugated microporous polymer with exceptional binding strength of hydrogen to the polymer guided by theoretical simulations. Meanwhile, the experimental results showed that isosteric heat can reach up to 8.4 kJ mol(-1) and the methyllithium-doped naphthyl-containing conjugated microporous polymer exhibited an enhanced hydrogen storage performance with 150 % enhancement compared with its counterpart naphthyl-containing conjugated microporous polymer. These results indicate that this strategy provides a direction for design and synthesis of new materials that meet the US Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen storage target.

  20. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  1. Density measurements of potassium phosphate buffer from 4 to 45 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiel, John E; Hage, David S

    2005-01-30

    Potassium phosphate buffer is often used in methods such as equilibrium dialysis, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) for characterizing the binding of drugs and hormones with proteins or other ligands within the body. In these experiments, the buffer density is often approximated to be that of water and the concentrations of all reagents are assumed to be constant with temperature. However, some difference in density between phosphate buffer and water would be expected, and variations in this density could lead to significant changes in the concentrations of dissolved solutes with temperature. This, in turn, could affect the binding observed for a solute-ligand system in such a buffer. In this study, the densities of potassium phosphate buffers with concentrations up to 0.10M were measured at or near physiological pH for temperatures ranging from 4-45 degrees C. The general change in density versus temperature followed a quadratic equation, while the changes in density with concentration and pH followed a linear response. The results were used to formulate a general equation that could be used to calculate the density of potassium phosphate buffer at any pH, temperature, and concentration within the tested range. This equation and more specialized relationships developed in the temperature, concentration, and pH studies were found to give much greater accuracy in describing the density of these buffers versus a previous relationship developed for solutions containing only potassium dihydrogen phosphate.

  2. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  3. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  4. Sensing of aqueous phosphates by polymers with dual modes of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldakov, Dmitry; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2004-04-21

    A new approach to sensing of aqueous phosphate-related anions based on chromogenic conductive polymers is demonstrated. This method utilizes synergy between low-level p-doping in a polythiophene polymer and hydrogen bonding to increase anion-sensor affinity. These chromogenic conductive polymers show anion-specific changes both in color and in conductivity upon increasing concentration of anions, thus providing two independent modes of signal transduction.

  5. Phosphate adsorption onto hematite: an in situ ATR-FTIR investigation of the effects of pH and loading level on the mode of phosphate surface complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzinga, Evert J; Sparks, Donald L

    2007-04-01

    Phosphate adsorption on hematite was characterized as a function of pH (3.5-8.9) and phosphate concentration (5-500 microM) by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Under most conditions a mixture of different (inner-sphere) phosphate complexes existed at the hematite surface, with the relative importance of these complexes varying with pH and surface coverage. Experiments using D(2)O and H(2)O indicated the presence of two protonated phosphate surface complexes at pH/pD=3.5-7.0. Comparison to spectra of protonated aqueous phosphate species suggested that these surface complexes are monoprotonated. The difference in the IR spectra of these complexes is tentatively interpreted to result from a different surface coordination, with one surface complex coordinated in a monodentate binuclear (bridging) fashion, and the second as a monodentate mononuclear complex. Alternatively, the bridging complex may be a (protonated) monodentate mononuclear complex exhibiting strong hydrogen bonding to an adjacent surface site, and the second species a monodentate complex exhibiting limited hydrogen bonding. Formation of the bridging complex is favored at lower pH values and higher surface loadings in the 3.5-7.0 pH range. At the highest pH values studied (8.5-9.0) a third complex, interpreted to be a nonprotonated monodentate mononuclear complex, is present along with the monodentate monoprotonated surface species. The importance of the nonprotonated monodentate complex increases with increasing surface coverage at these high pH values.

  6. Infinite-basis calculations of binding energies for the hydrogen bonded and stacked tetramers of formic acid and formamide and their use for validation of hybrid DFT and ab initio methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G

    2005-08-04

    Benchmark stabilization energies for planar H-bonded and stacked structures of formic acid tetramers and formamide tetramers were determined as the sum of the infinite basis set limit of MP2 energies and a CCSD(T) correction term evaluated with the 6-31G*(0.25) basis set. The infinite basis (IB) set limit of MP2 energies was determined by two-point extrapolation using the aug-cc-pVXZ basis sets for X = D and T and separate extrapolation of the Hartree-Fock and correlation energies with new IB parameters for augmented basis sets determined here. Final stabilization energies (kcal/mol) for the tetramer studied are in the range of 4.6 to approximately 6.7 kcal/mol and they were used as reference data to test 14 density functionals. Among the tested DFT methods, PWB6K gives the best performance with an average error equal to only 30% of the average binding energy. In contrast, the popular B3LYP functional has an average error of 85%. We recommend the PWB6K method for exploring the potential energy surfaces of organic complexes and clusters and supramolecular assemblies.

  7. Calcium phosphate coating on magnesium alloy by biomimetic method :Investigation of morphology ,composition and formation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Magnesium alloy has similar mechanical properties with natural bone and can degrade via corrosion in the electrolytic environment of the human body.Calcium phosphate has been proven to possess bioactivity and bone inductivity.In order to integrate both advantages,calcium phosphate coating was fabricated on magnesium alloy by a biomimetic method.Supersaturated calcification solutions (SCSs) with different Ca/P ratio and C1- concentration were used as mimetic solutions.The morphology,composition and formation process of the coating were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM),energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS),Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The results show that a uniform calcium phosphate coating was observed on magnesium alloy,the properties of which could be adjusted by the SCSs with different Ca/P ratio.The formation process of the coating was explored by immersing magnesium alloy in SCSs with different Cl- concentration which could adjust the hydrogen production.According to SEM results,the hydrogen bubbles were associated with the formation of grass-like and flower-like coating morphologies.In conclusion,the biomimetic method was effective to form calcium phosphate coating on magnesium alloy and the morphology and composition of the coating could be accommodated by the Ca/P ratio and Cl- concentration in SCSs.

  8. Characterization of a Mannose-6-Phosphate Isomerase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Its Application in Fructose-6-Phosphate Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujan Sigdel

    Full Text Available The BaM6PI gene encoding a mannose-6-phosphate isomerase (M6PI, EC 5.3.1.8 was cloned from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM7 and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme activity of BaM6PI was optimal at pH and temperature of 7.5 and 70°C, respectively, with a kcat/Km of 13,900 s-1 mM-1 for mannose-6-phosphate (M6P. The purified BaM6PI demonstrated the highest catalytic efficiency of all characterized M6PIs. Although M6PIs have been characterized from several other sources, BaM6PI is distinguished from other M6PIs by its wide pH range and high catalytic efficiency for M6P. The binding orientation of the substrate M6P in the active site of BaM6PI shed light on the molecular basis of its unusually high activity. BaM6PI showed 97% substrate conversion from M6P to fructose-6-phosphate demonstrating the potential for using BaM6PI in industrial applications.

  9. Pressure effects on the interactions of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium transport enzyme with calcium and dinitrophenyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, W

    1988-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of dinitrophenyl phosphate by the sarcoplasmic calcium transport enzyme has been studied. The magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate complex is the true substrate of the enzyme (K = 7000 M-1) by which it is hydrolyzed at 20 degrees C with a turnover rate of 4 s-1. Activation by calcium ions occurs between 0.1 and 1 microM as observed for ATP hydrolysis. The activation volume of the enzyme saturated with both ligands exhibits pronounced pressure-dependence, rising from 25 ml/mol at atmospheric pressure to 80 ml/mol at 100 MPa. The apparent binding volumes for magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate and calcium are likewise pressure-dependent. The volume changes connected with the binding of magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate is quite small approaching zero at 100 MPa. The apparent binding volume for calcium greatly increases with pressure from 35 ml/mol at atmospheric pressure to 150 ml/mol at 70 MPa. A nearly constant binding volume of approximately 40 ml/mol results if the effect of pressure on the respective rate constants that contribute to the apparent binding constant, is taken into account. The pressure-dependence of enzyme activity at subsaturating calcium concentrations yields an activation volume of 250 ml/mol related to the rate of calcium binding indicating the occurrence of a transient large volume expansion of the enzyme complex. The volume changes observed for the calcium-dependent interaction of the enzyme with magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate well agree with that found for magnesium p-nitrophenyl phosphate (W. Hasselbach and L. Stephan,Z. Naturforsch. 42 c, 641-652 (1987)) indicating that the found volume changes are intrinsic properties of the transport enzyme, independent of the respective energy donor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Can Phosphate Salts Recovered from Manure Replace Conventional Phosphate Fertilizer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ehmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pig farming produces more manure than can reasonably be spread onto surrounding fields, particularly in regions with high livestock densities and limited land availability. Nutrient recycling offers an attractive solution for dealing with manure excesses and is one main objective of the European commission-funded project “BioEcoSIM”. Phosphate salts (“P-Salt” were recovered from the separated liquid manure fraction. The solid fraction was dried and carbonized to biochar. This study compared the fertilizing performance of P-Salt and conventional phosphate fertilizer and determined whether additional biochar application further increased biomass yields. The fertilizers and biochar were tested in pot experiments with spring barley and faba beans using two nutrient-poor soils. The crops were fertilized with P-Salt at three levels and biochar in two concentrations. Biomass yield was determined after six weeks. Plant and soil samples were analysed for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium contents. The P-Salt had similar or even better effects than mineral fertilizer on growth in both crops and soils. Slow release of nutrients can prevent leaching, rendering P-Salt a particularly suitable fertilizer for light sandy soils. Biochar can enhance its fertilizing effect, but the underlying mechanisms need further investigation. These novel products are concluded to be promising candidates for efficient fertilization strategies.

  11. Tetracalcium phosphate: Synthesis, properties and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseke, C; Gbureck, U

    2010-10-01

    Monoclinic tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP, Ca(4)(PO(4))(2)O), also known by the mineral name hilgenstockite, is formed in the (CaO-P(2)O(5)) system at temperatures>1300 degrees C. TTCP is the only calcium phosphate with a Ca/P ratio greater than hydroxyapatite (HA). It appears as a by-product in plasma-sprayed HA coatings and shows moderate reactivity and concurrent solubility when combined with acidic calcium phosphates such as dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA, monetite) or dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD, brushite). Therefore it is widely used in self-setting calcium phosphate bone cements, which form HA under physiological conditions. This paper aims to review the synthesis and properties of TTCP in biomaterials applications such as cements, sintered ceramics and coatings on implant metals.

  12. Insight into biological phosphate recovery from sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuanyao; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Xinbo; Guo, Jianbo; Ni, Bing-Jie; Chang, Soon Woong; Nguyen, Dinh Duc

    2016-10-01

    The world's increasing population means that more food production is required. A more sustainable supply of fertilizers mainly consisting of phosphate is needed. Due to the rising consumption of scarce resources and limited natural supply of phosphate, the recovery of phosphate and their re-use has potentially high market value. Sewage has high potential to recover a large amount of phosphate in a circular economy approach. This paper focuses on utilization of biological process integrated with various subsequent processes to concentrate and recycle phosphate which are derived from liquid and sludge phases. The phosphate accumulation and recovery are discussed in terms of mechanism and governing parameters, recovery efficiency, application at plant-scale and economy.

  13. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  14. Iron-based phosphate binders--a new element in management of hyperphosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Amy Barton; Jang, Soo Min; Wegrzyn, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Management of serum phosphorus in patients with chronic kidney disease remains a significant clinical challenge. A pivotal component of the clinical approach to maintaining serum phosphorus concentrations towards the normal range is the use of phosphate binding agents in addition to comprehensive dietary counseling. The available agents work similarly by capitalizing on a cation within the agent to bind negatively charged phosphorus, forming an insoluble complex and reducing ingested phosphorus absorption. Despite several effective options for phosphate binder therapies, patient adherence remains an issue, mainly due to adverse effect profiles and large daily pill burdens. Two new iron-based phosphate binder therapies have recently become available in the United States, sucroferric oxyhydroxide and ferric citrate. These agents have both been shown to effectively reduce serum phosphorus comparably to widely used calcium-based binders and sevelamer salts. The two new iron-based binders differ substantially with regard to phosphate binding chemistry and iron absorption profiles. Their place in therapy is still evolving and the impact of pill burden, gastrointestinal adverse effect profiles, potential cost reduction of anemia therapies and physiologic effects of long-term iron exposure need to be further evaluated.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic study of the phosphate mineral kryzhanovskite and in comparison with reddingite-implications for the molecular structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L.; Scholz, Ricardo; Wang, Lina

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the phosphate mineral kryzhanovskite (Fe3+,Mn2+)3(PO4)2(OH,H2O) which is a member of the phosphoferrite mineral group using a combination of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy and Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Chemical analysis shows the presence of P, Mn and Fe and confirms the formula given above. The presence of hydroxyl units in the structure is indicative of ferric iron in the formula that is an oxidised product. Raman spectroscopy coupled with infrared spectroscopy supports the concept of phosphate, hydrogen phosphate and dihydrogen phosphate units in the structure of kryzhanovskite -phosphoferrite. Infrared and Raman bands attributed to water and hydroxyl stretching modes are identified. Vibrational spectroscopy adds useful information to the molecular structure of kryzhanovskite -phosphoferrite.

  16. Preferable removal of phosphate from water using hydrous zirconium oxide-based nanocomposite of high stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Zhao, Xin; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Weixian; Hua, Ming; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Weiming

    2015-03-02

    In this study, we employed a new nanocomposite adsorbent HZO-201, which featured high stability under varying solution chemistry, for preferable removal of phosphate from synthetic solution and a real effluent. An anion exchange resin (D-201) was employed as the host of HZO-201, where nano-hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO) was encapsulated as the active species. D-201 binds phosphate through nonspecific electrostatic affinity, whereas the loaded HZO nanoparticles capture phosphate through formation of the inner-sphere complexes. Quantitative contribution of both species to phosphate adsorption was predicted based on the double-Langmuir model. Preferable removal of phosphate by HZO-201 was observed in the presence of the competing anions at higher levels (Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), HCO3(-)). Fixed-bed adsorption indicated that the effective volume capacity of a synthetic water (2.0 mg P-PO4(3-)/L) by using HZO-201 was ∼1600 BV in the first run (<0.5mg P-PO4(3-)/L), comparable to Fe(III)-based nanocomposite HFO-201 (∼1500 BV) and much larger than D-201 (<250 BV). The exhausted HZO-201 can be in situ regenerated by using a binary NaOH-NaCl solution for cyclic runs, whether fed with the synthetic solution or real effluent. In general, HZO-201 is a promising alternative to Fe(III)-based adsorbents for trace phosphate removal from effluent particularly at acidic pH.

  17. Matrix Extracellular Phosphoglycoprotein Inhibits Phosphate Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, J; Churchill, L J; Debnam, E. S.; Unwin, R J

    2008-01-01

    The role of putative humoral factors, known as phosphatonins, in phosphate homeostasis and the relationship between phosphate handling by the kidney and gastrointestinal tract are incompletely understood. Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE), one of several candidate phosphatonins, promotes phosphaturia, but whether it also affects intestinal phosphate absorption is unknown. Here, using the in situ intestinal loop technique, we demonstrated that short-term infusion of MEPE inhibits...

  18. Comparative study of hydrogenated and lithiated superhalogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Na; Li, Ying; Liu, Jia-Yuan; Wu, Di; Sun, Yan-Bo; Li, Zhi-Ru

    2016-09-01

    The structural features, properties and stability of two kinds of representative superhalogen compounds, namely hydrogenated superhalogens and lithiated superhalogens, are theoretically studied in detail, providing further insight into the behavior of superhalogens. According to topological analysis of the electron localization function, most of superhalogen clusters as a whole combine with Li atom through ionic bond(s). In contrast, the H atom tends to bind with superhalogen by covalent bond although a portion of superhalogens are broken upon hydrogenation. In addition, the electric properties of these superhalogen compounds are also obtained and compared with those of traditional acid and salt molecules.

  19. Hydrogen storage in engineered carbon nanospaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burress, Jacob; Kraus, Michael; Beckner, Matt; Cepel, Raina; Suppes, Galen; Wexler, Carlos; Pfeifer, Peter

    2009-05-20

    It is shown how appropriately engineered nanoporous carbons provide materials for reversible hydrogen storage, based on physisorption, with exceptional storage capacities (approximately 80 g H2/kg carbon, approximately 50 g H2/liter carbon, at 50 bar and 77 K). Nanopores generate high storage capacities (a) by having high surface area to volume ratios, and (b) by hosting deep potential wells through overlapping substrate potentials from opposite pore walls, giving rise to a binding energy nearly twice the binding energy in wide pores. Experimental case studies are presented with surface areas as high as 3100 m(2) g(-1), in which 40% of all surface sites reside in pores of width approximately 0.7 nm and binding energy approximately 9 kJ mol(-1), and 60% of sites in pores of width>1.0 nm and binding energy approximately 5 kJ mol(-1). The findings, including the prevalence of just two distinct binding energies, are in excellent agreement with results from molecular dynamics simulations. It is also shown, from statistical mechanical models, that one can experimentally distinguish between the situation in which molecules do (mobile adsorption) and do not (localized adsorption) move parallel to the surface, how such lateral dynamics affects the hydrogen storage capacity, and how the two situations are controlled by the vibrational frequencies of adsorbed hydrogen molecules parallel and perpendicular to the surface: in the samples presented, adsorption is mobile at 293 K, and localized at 77 K. These findings make a strong case for it being possible to significantly increase hydrogen storage capacities in nanoporous carbons by suitable engineering of the nanopore space.

  20. Distrontium trimanganese(II) bis-(hydro-gen-phosphate) bis-(ortho-phosphate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmiyas, Jamal; Assani, Abderrazzak; Saadi, Mohamed; El Ammari, Lahcen

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, Sr2Mn3(HPO4)2(PO4)2, was synthesized under hydro-thermal conditions. In the structure, one of two Mn atoms is located on an inversion centre, whereas all others atoms are located in general positions. The framework structure is built up from two types of MnO6 octa-hedra (one almost undistorted, one considerably distorted), one PO3OH and one PO4 tetra-hedron. The centrosymmetric MnO6 octa-hedron is linked to two other MnO6 octa-hedra by edge-sharing, forming infinite zigzag chains parallel to [010]. The PO3OH and PO4 tetra-hedra connect these chains through common vertices or edges, resulting in the formation of sheets parallel to (100). The Sr(2+) cation is located in the inter-layer space and is bonded to nine O atoms in form of a distorted polyhedron and enhances the cohesion of the layers. Additional stabilization is achieved by a strong inter-layer O-H⋯O hydrogen bond between the PO3OH and PO4 units. The structure of the title phosphate is isotypic to that of Pb2Mn3(HPO4)2(PO4)2.

  1. Crystal structure of hydrazine iron(III) phosphate, the first transition metal phosphate containing hydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Renald

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, poly[(μ2-hydrazine)(μ4-phosphato)iron(III)], [Fe(PO4)(N2H4)] n , was prepared under hydro-thermal conditions. Its asymmetric unit contains one Fe(III) atom located on an inversion centre, one P atom located on a twofold rotation axis, and two O, one N and two H atoms located on general positions. The Fe(III) atom is bound to four O atoms of symmetry-related PO4 tetra-hedra and to two N atoms of two symmetry-related hydrazine ligands, resulting in a slightly distorted FeO4N2 octa-hedron. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional hydrazine/iron phoshate framework whereby each PO4 tetra-hedron bridges four Fe(III) atoms and each hydrazine ligand bridges two Fe(III) atoms. The H atoms of the hydrazine ligands are also involved in moderate N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding with phosphate O atoms. The crystal structure is isotypic with the sulfates [Co(SO4)(N2H4)] and [Mn(SO4)(N2H4)].

  2. Crystal structure of hydrazine iron(III phosphate, the first transition metal phosphate containing hydrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renald David

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, poly[(μ2-hydrazine(μ4-phosphatoiron(III], [Fe(PO4(N2H4]n, was prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Its asymmetric unit contains one FeIII atom located on an inversion centre, one P atom located on a twofold rotation axis, and two O, one N and two H atoms located on general positions. The FeIII atom is bound to four O atoms of symmetry-related PO4 tetrahedra and to two N atoms of two symmetry-related hydrazine ligands, resulting in a slightly distorted FeO4N2 octahedron. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional hydrazine/iron phoshate framework whereby each PO4 tetrahedron bridges four FeIII atoms and each hydrazine ligand bridges two FeIII atoms. The H atoms of the hydrazine ligands are also involved in moderate N—H...O hydrogen bonding with phosphate O atoms. The crystal structure is isotypic with the sulfates [Co(SO4(N2H4] and [Mn(SO4(N2H4].

  3. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranber Singh; S Prakash

    2003-07-01

    The problem of hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is studied semiclassically. It is found that the local hydrogen concentration fluctuations-induced extra potential wells, if intense enough, lead to the localized electronic states in a-Si:H. These localized states are metastable. The trapping of electrons and holes in these states leads to the electrical degradation of the material. These states also act as recombination centers for photo-generated carriers (electrons and holes) which in turn may excite a hydrogen atom from a nearby Si–H bond and breaks the weak (strained) Si–Si bond thereby apparently enhancing the hydrogen diffusion and increasing the light-induced dangling bonds.

  4. Phosphate and arsenate removal efficiency by thermostable ferritin enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus using radioisotopes

    KAUST Repository

    Sevcenco, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-13

    Oxo-anion binding properties of the thermostable enzyme ferritin from Pyrococcus furiosus were characterized with radiography. Radioisotopes 32P and 76As present as oxoanions were used to measure the extent and the rate of their absorption by the ferritin. Thermostable ferritin proved to be an excellent system for rapid phosphate and arsenate removal from aqueous solutions down to residual concentrations at the picomolar level. These very low concentrations make thermostable ferritin a potential tool to considerably mitigate industrial biofouling by phosphate limitation or to remove arsenate from drinking water.

  5. Hydrogen transport membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  6. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  7. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  8. Computational Analysis of the Binding Specificities of PH Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleckstrin homology (PH domains share low sequence identities but extremely conserved structures. They have been found in many proteins for cellular signal-dependent membrane targeting by binding inositol phosphates to perform different physiological functions. In order to understand the sequence-structure relationship and binding specificities of PH domains, quantum mechanical (QM calculations and sequence-based combined with structure-based binding analysis were employed in our research. In the structural aspect, the binding specificities were shown to correlate with the hydropathy characteristics of PH domains and electrostatic properties of the bound inositol phosphates. By comparing these structure properties with sequence-based profiles of physicochemical properties, PH domains can be classified into four functional subgroups according to their binding specificities and affinities to inositol phosphates. The method not only provides a simple and practical paradigm to predict binding specificities for functional genomic research but also gives new insight into the understanding of the basis of diseases with respect to PH domain structures.

  9. Preparation of porous lanthanum phosphate with templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoda, Hiroaki, E-mail: onoda@kpu.ac.jp [Department of Informatics and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, 1-5, Shimogamo Nakaragi-cyo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan); Ishima, Yuya [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Takenaka, Atsushi [Department of Materials Science, Yonago National College of Technology, 4448, Hikona-cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8502 (Japan); Tanaka, Isao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-08-05

    Malonic acid, propionic acid, glycine, n-butylamine, and urea were added to the preparation of lanthanum phosphate from lanthanum nitrate and phosphoric acid solutions. All additives were taken into lanthanum phosphate particles. The additives that have a basic site were easy to contain in precipitates. The addition of templates improved the specific surface area of lanthanum phosphate. The amount of pore, with radius smaller than 4 nm, increased with the addition of templates. The remained additives had influence on the acidic properties of lanthanum phosphate.

  10. Mineral induced formation of sugar phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsch, S.; Eschenmoser, A.; Gedulin, B.; Hui, S.; Arrhenius, G.

    1995-01-01

    Glycolaldehyde phosphate, sorbed from highly dilute, weakly alkaline solution into the interlayer of common expanding sheet structure metal hydroxide minerals, condenses extensively to racemic aldotetrose-2, 4-diphophates, and aldohexose-2, 4, 6-triphosphates. The reaction proceeds mainly through racemic erythrose-2, 4-phosphate, and terminates with a large fraction of racemic altrose-2, 4, 6-phosphate. In the absence of an inductive mineral phase, no detectable homogeneous reaction takes place in the concentration- and pH range used. The reactant glycolaldehyde phosphate is practically completely sorbed within an hour from solutions with concentrations as low as 50 micron; the half-time for conversion to hexose phosphates is of the order of two days at room temperature and pH 9.5. Total production of sugar phosphates in the mineral interlayer is largely independent of the glycolaldehyde phosphate concentration in the external solution, but is determined by the total amount of GAP offered for sorption up to the capacity of the mineral. In the presence of equimolar amounts of rac-glyceraldehyde-2-phosphate, but under otherwise similar conditions, aldopentose-2, 4, -diphosphates also form, but only as a small fraction of the hexose-2, 4, 6-phosphates.

  11. Study of Viability of Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria in Phosphate granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hajar rajabi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: sustainable development and the environment are interconnected. Sustainable agriculture is continuous utilization of a farm with respect to various aspects of environmental conditions by using fewer inputs (other than Bio-fertilizers. Phosphorus is one of the essential elements for the plants. Management of soil is possible by using biological fertilizers pillar of sustainable agriculture and providing some of the phosphorus needed by plants via bio-fertilizers. Phosphorus deficiency is extremely effective on the plant growth and productivity. The application of phosphorus fertilizers is expensive and dangerous. In addition, phosphorus in the soilmay become insoluble and will be unavailable to the plants. Studies showed that phosphate solubilizing bacteria in the soil rhizosphere are active and by root exudates solve insoluble phosphates such as tricalcium phosphate, and form absorbable P for plant. Consequently, the use of microbial fertilizers could reduce excessive use of chemical fertilizers and lead to decrease their harmful effects and protect the environment and conservation of available resources. The biological phosphate fertilizer industry uses sugar beet molasses as a binder and drying granules at high temperatures. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the durability of the bacteria in molasses at high temperature. Materials and Methods: This study was designed as completely randomized design in a factorial arrangement.10 isolates were selected and the ratios of 50%, 25%, 15% and 10% of the apatite, organic matter, sulfur and soluble granule (ratio 1: 1 and 2: 1 bacteria and molasses, respectively, for each isolate was prepared. The final product was dried at 28 and 40 °C and remained for 4 months and population counted at first day and 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days after the preparing. The population was counted by the serial dilution technique and cultured at Sperber media. Results and Discussion:Comparing the

  12. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  13. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen...... evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...... sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively....

  14. Effects of phosphate addition on methane fermentation in the batch and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sho; Shintani, Masaki; Sanchez, Zoe Kuizon; Kimura, Kohei; Numata, Mitsuru; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia inhibition of methane fermentation is one of the leading causes of failure of anaerobic digestion reactors. In a batch anaerobic digestion reactor with 429 mM NH3-N/L of ammonia, the addition of 25 mM phosphate resulted in an increase in methane production rate. Similar results were obtained with the addition of disodium phosphate in continuous anaerobic digestion using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. While methane content and production rate decreased in the presence of more than 143 mM NH3-N/L of ammonium chloride in UASB, the addition of 5 mM disodium phosphate suppressed ammonia inhibition at 214 mM NH3-N/L of ammonium chloride. The addition prevented acetate/propionate accumulation, which might be one of the effects of the phosphate on the ammonia inhibition. The effects on the microbial community in the UASB reactor was also assessed, which was composed of Bacteria involved in hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis, and dehydrogenation, as well as Archaea carrying out methanogenesis. The change in the microbial community was observed by ammonia inhibition and the addition of phosphate. The change indicates that the suppression of ammonia inhibition by disodium phosphate addition could stimulate the activity of methanogens, reduce shift in bacterial community, and enhance hydrogen-producing bacteria. The addition of phosphate will be an important treatment for future studies of methane fermentation.

  15. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  16. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Y. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  17. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  18. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    H molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise

  19. Carbonated ferric green rust as a new material for efficient phosphate removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthélémy, K; Naille, S; Despas, C; Ruby, C; Mallet, M

    2012-10-15

    Phosphate uptake from aqueous solutions by a recently discovered ferric oxyhydroxide is investigated. Carbonated ferric green rust {GR(CO(3)(2-))*} is prepared by varying two synthesis parameters, which are (1) the aging period after the ferrous-ferric green rust {GR(CO(3)(2-))} synthesis step and (2) the rate of the hydrogen peroxide addition to oxidize GR(CO(3)(2-)) into GR(CO(3)(2-))*. These two parameters permit the control of the size, morphology and cristallinity of the synthesized particles. As prepared GR* samples are then evaluated, in batch experiments, as possible low-cost efficient phosphate removal materials. Firstly, kinetic experiments reveal that a fast sorption step initially occurs and equilibrium is reached at ~500 min. The adsorption kinetics data at pH=7 can be adequately fitted to a pseudo-second order model. Secondly, the Freundlich model provides the best correlation and effectively describes phosphate sorption isotherms for all GR(CO(3)(2-))* samples synthesized. Finally, the phosphate adsorption capacity decreases when pH increases. The highest adsorption capacity is 64.8 mg g(-1) at pH=4 and corresponds to the GR(CO(3)(2-))* sample displaying the smallest and least crystallized particles thus reflecting the importance of the synthesis conditions. Overall, all sorption capacities are higher than the main iron oxide minerals, making GR(CO(3)(2-))* a potentially attractive phosphate adsorbent.

  20. On the Pressure-Induced Loss of Crystallinity in Zinc- and Calcium-Phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakhvorostov, D.; Mosey, N; Munoz-Paniagua, D; Pereira, G; Song, Y; Kasrai, M; Norton, P; Müser, M

    2008-01-01

    A recently suggested mechanism for the stress memory of various metal phosphates is investigated experimentally. Based on first-principles simulations [N. J. Mosey et al., Science 307, 1612 (2005)], it had been argued that atoms with flexible coordination, such as zinc or heavy-metal cations, act as network-forming agents, undergoing irreversible pressure-induced changes in bonding that lead to increased connectivity between phosphate anions. In the present study, orthophosphates of zinc and calcium were exposed to high pressures on surfaces and in diamond anvil cells. An additional set of first-principles simulations was accomplished on ?-orthophosphate of zinc, which suggested that this material was already cross-linked before compression but that it nevertheless underwent a reversible coordination change under pressure in agreement with the experimental results presented here. Raman spectra indicate an irreversible, pressure-induced loss of long-range crystallinity. The pressures required to induce these changes are around 7 GPa for the zinc phosphates, while they are close to 21 GPa for the calcium phosphates. Hydrogenation of the metal phosphate lowers the threshold pressure by approximately 2-3 GPa in both cases. Moreover, ?-orthophosphate of zinc could be partially amorphisized under nonisotropic pressure on copper foils.

  1. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  2. Antiwear and antioxidant studies of cardanol phosphate ester additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzetto, S.E.; Oliveira, L.D.M.; Lomonaco, D.; Veloso, P.A., E-mail: selma@ufc.br [Lab. de Produtos e Tecnologia em Processos (LPT), Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    In the search for new applications and products derived from Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL), we report herein the synthesis and characterization (GC/MS and {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 31}P NMR) of four phosphate esters derived from hydrogenated cardanol, including their applications as antiwear additives for diesel (S500) and as antioxidant additives for mineral oils, evaluated through the HFRR test and oxidative stability analyses, respectively. The results obtained showed very good to excellent performances promoted by the bioadditives evaluated, especially for the thiophosphorylated derivative, which notably reduced the sludge residue and the acidity index of the oxidized oil (0.52 mg NaOH/g sample) and also improved the diesel lubricity, reducing the wear of metal parts by more than 50% (330 {Mu}m). Keywords: Cardanol; Antiwear; Antioxidant; Diesel; Mineral oil. (author)

  3. Antiwear and antioxidant studies of cardanol phosphate ester additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Mazzetto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the search for new applications and products derived from Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL, we report herein the synthesis and characterization (GC/MS and ¹H, 13C, and 31P NMR of four phosphate esters derived from hydrogenated cardanol, including their applications as antiwear additives for diesel (S500 and as antioxidant additives for mineral oils, evaluated through the HFRR test and oxidative stability analyses, respectively. The results obtained showed very good to excellent performances promoted by the bio-additives evaluated, especially for the thiophosphorylated derivative, which notably reduced the sludge residue and the acidity index of the oxidized oil (0.52 mg NaOH/g sample and also improved the diesel lubricity, reducing the wear of metal parts by more than 50% (330 μm.

  4. Materials for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Züttel

    2003-09-01

    The goal is to pack hydrogen as close as possible, i.e. to reach the highest volumetric density by using as little additional material as possible. Hydrogen storage implies the reduction of an enormous volume of hydrogen gas. At ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure, 1 kg of the gas has a volume of 11 m3. To increase hydrogen density, work must either be applied to compress the gas, the temperature decreased below the critical temperature, or the repulsion reduced by the interaction of hydrogen with another material.

  5. Solar Hydrogen Reaching Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongé Jan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly vast research efforts are devoted to the development of materials and processes for solar hydrogen production by light-driven dissociation of water into oxygen and hydrogen. Storage of solar energy in chemical bonds resolves the issues associated with the intermittent nature of sunlight, by decoupling energy generation and consumption. This paper investigates recent advances and prospects in solar hydrogen processes that are reaching market readiness. Future energy scenarios involving solar hydrogen are proposed and a case is made for systems producing hydrogen from water vapor present in air, supported by advanced modeling.

  6. Drug-pyridoxal phosphate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, M; Gessert, C F; Al-Sayegh, A

    1982-01-01

    phosphate. Some interesting relationships are pointed out between vitamin B6, picolinic acid, and zinc. It is postulated that the intestinal absorption of zinc is facilitated by picolinic acid, a metabolite of tryptophan. The derivation of picolinic acid from tryptophan depends on the action of the enzyme kynureninase, which is dependent on pyridoxal phosphate; therefore, the adequate absorption of zinc is indirectly dependent on an adequate supply of vitamin B6. The formation of pyridoxal phosphate, on the other hand, appears to be indirectly dependent on Zn2++ which activates pyridoxal kinase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  7. Calcium-binding capacity of organic and inorganic ortho- and polyphosphates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, de E.J.P.; Minor, M.; Snoeren, T.H.M.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.; Linden, van der E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the calcium-binding capacity of inorganic and organic ortho- and polyphosphates. This calcium-binding capacity can be used to influence the stability of, for example, casein micelles in dairy systems. Four phosphates were selected: disodium uridine

  8. Hydrogen energy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzano, F J; Braun, C [eds.

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to define the near term and long term prospects for the use of hydrogen as an energy delivery medium. Possible applications of hydrogen are defined along with the associated technologies required for implementation. A major focus in the near term is on industrial uses of hydrogen for special applications. The major source of hydrogen in the near term is expected to be from coal, with hydrogen from electric sources supplying a smaller fraction. A number of potential applications for hydrogen in the long term are identified and the level of demand estimated. The results of a cost benefit study for R and D work on coal gasification to hydrogen and electrolytic production of hydrogen are presented in order to aid in defining approximate levels of R and D funding. A considerable amount of data is presented on the cost of producing hydrogen from various energy resources. A key conclusion of the study is that in time hydrogen is likely to play a role in the energy system; however, hydrogen is not yet competitive for most applications when compared to the cost of energy from petroleum and natural gas.

  9. Phosphate recycling in the phosphorus industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, W.J.; Klapwijk, A.; Potjer, A.; Rulkens, W.H.; Temmink, B.G.; Kiestra, F.D.G.; Lijmbach, A.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of phosphate recycling in the white phosphorus production process is discussed. Several types of materials may be recycled, provided they are dry inorganic materials, low in iron, copper and zinc. Sewage sludge ash may be used if no iron is used for phosphate precipitation in the tre

  10. Phosphate recycling in the phosphorus industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, W.J.; Klapwijk, A.; Potjer, B.; Rulkens, W.H.; Temmink, B.G.; Kiestra, F.D.G.; Lijmbach, A.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The article describes the potential and limitations for recovery of phosphate from secondary materials in the production process for white phosphorus. This thermal process involves the feeding of phosphate rock, cokes and pebbles to a furnace. The reducing conditions in the furnace promote the forma

  11. Stable Development of Phosphate Fertilizer Sector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The rapid growth of China's economy in recent years gave rise to a sound external environment for the development of the phosphate fertilizer industry. With quite a few state agricultural incentives, the initiative of farmers in grain production is much higher, and consumption of phosphate fertilizers has increased constantly.

  12. Electrochemical phosphate recovery from nanofiltration concentrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappel, C.; Yasadi, K.; Temmink, B.G.; Metz, S.J.; Kemperman, A.J.B.; Nijmeijer, K.; Zwijnenburg, A.; Witkamp, G.J.; Rijnaarts, H.

    2013-01-01

    The high total phosphorus content of raw domestic wastewater with its significant eutrophication potential offers an excellent possibility for phosphate recovery. Continuous recirculation of NF concentrate to an MBR and simultaneous phosphate recovery from the NF concentrate can be applied to produc

  13. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other means... chickens—(i) Amount. 0.500 gram per gallon. (ii) Indications for use. As an aid in the control of...

  14. Adsorption of Phosphate on Variable Charge Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUGUO-SONG; ZHUZU-XIANG; 等

    1992-01-01

    The study about the adsorption of phosphate on four variable charge soils and some minerals revealed that two stage adsorption appeared in the adsorption isothems of phosphate on 4 soils and there was a maximum adsorption on Al-oxide-typed surfaces between pH 3.5 to pH 5.5 as suspension pH changed from 2 to 9,but the adsorption amount of phosphate decreased continually as pH rose on Fe-oxide typed surfaces.The adsorption amount of phosphate and the maximum phosphate adsorption pH decreased in the order of yellow-red soil> lateritic red soil> red soil> paddy soil,which was coincided with the content order of amorphous Al oxide.The removement of organic matter and Fe oxide made the maximum phosphate adsorption pH rise from 4.0 to 5.0 and 4.5,respectively.The desorption curves with pH of four soils showed that phosphate desorbed least at pH 5.Generally the desorption was contrary to the adsorption with pH changing.There was a good accordance between adsorption or desorption and the concentration of Al in the suspension.The possible mechanisms of phosphate adsorption are discussed.

  15. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  16. Photobiological hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Y; Miyake, J

    1999-01-01

    The principles and recent progress in the research and development of photobiological hydrogen production are reviewed. Cyanobacteria produce hydrogen gas using nitrogenase and/or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenases in cyanobacteria occurs under in the dark under anaerobic conditions by degradation of intracellular glycogen. In vitro and in vivo coupling of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic system with a clostridial hydrogenase via cyanobacterial ferredoxin was demonstrated in the presence of light. Genetic transformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum was successful; the active enzyme was expressed in PCC7942. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Coculture of Rhodobacter and Clostriudium was applied for hydrogen production from glucose. A mutant strain of Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV whose light-harvesting proteins were altered was obtained by UV irradiation. Hydrogen productivity by the mutant was improved when irradiated with monochromatic light of some wavelengths. The development of photobioreactors for hydrogen production is also reviewed.

  17. Effects of Microbial and Phosphate Amendments on the Bioavailability of Lead (Pb) in Shooting Range Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, Robin; Wilson, Christina; Knox, Anna; Seaman, John; Smith, Garriet

    2005-06-16

    Heavy metals including lead (Pb) are released continually into the environment as a result of industrial, recreational, and military activities. Lead ranked number two on the CERCLA Priority List of Hazardous Substances and was identified as a major hazardous chemical found on 47% of USEPA's National Priorities List sites (Hettiarachchi and Pierzynski 2004). In-situ remediation of lead (Pb) contaminated soils may be accomplished by changing the soil chemistry and structure with the application of microbial and phosphate amendments. Soil contaminated with lead bullets was collected from the surface of the berm at Savannah River Site (SRS) Small Arms Training Academy (SATA) in Aiken, SC. While uncontaminated soils typically have Pb levels ranging from 2 to 200 mg/kg (Berti et al. 1998), previous analysis show Pb levels of the SATA berm to reach 8,673 mg/kg. Biosurfactants are surface-active compounds naturally produced by soil bacteria that can bind metals. Biosurfactants have a wide variety of chemical structures that reduce interfacial surface tensions (Jennings and Tanner 2000) and have demonstrated efficient metal complexion (Lin 1996). Biosurfactants also have the potential to change the availability of natural organic matter (Strong-Gunderson 1995). Two types of bacteria, Alcaligenes piechaudii and Pseudomonas putida, were employed as amendments based on their ability to produce biosurfactants and survive in metal-contaminated soils. Apatites (calcium phosphate compounds) are important in the formation of Pb phosphates. Pb phosphates form rapidly when phosphate is available and are the most stable environmental form of lead in soil (Ruby et al.1998). Pyromorphites in particular remain insoluble under a wide range of environmental conditions (Zhang et al. 1998). The three apatites evaluated in the current study were North Carolina apatite (NCA), Florida apatite (FA), and biological apatite (BA). BA is ground fish bone that has few impurities such as As, Cr

  18. Enantioselective Brønsted acid catalyzed transfer hydrogenation: organocatalytic reduction of imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueping, Magnus; Sugiono, Erli; Azap, Cengiz; Theissmann, Thomas; Bolte, Michael

    2005-08-18

    The first enantioselective Brønsted acid catalyzed reduction of imines has been developed. This new organocatalytic transfer hydrogenation of ketimines with Hantzsch dihydropyridine as the hydrogen source offers a mild method to various chiral amines with high enantioselectivity. The stereochemistry of the chiral amines can be rationalized by a stereochemical model derived from an X-ray crystal structure of a chiral BINOL phosphate catalyst. [reaction: see text

  19. Phosphate Biomineralization of Cambrian Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, David S.; Rozanov, Alexei Yu.; Hoover, Richard B.; Westall, Frances

    1998-01-01

    As part of a long term study of biological markers (biomarkers), we are documenting a variety of features which reflect the previous presence of living organisms. As we study meteorites and samples returned from Mars, our main clue to recognizing possible microbial material may be the presence of biomarkers rather than the organisms themselves. One class of biomarkers consists of biominerals which have either been precipitated directly by microorganisms, or whose precipitation has been influenced by the organisms. Such microbe-mediated mineral formation may include important clues to the size, shape, and environment of the microorganisms. The process of fossilization or mineralization can cause major changes in morphologies and textures of the original organisms. The study of fossilized terrestrial organisms can help provide insight into the interpretation of mineral biomarkers. This paper describes the results of investigations of microfossils in Cambrian phosphate-rich rocks (phosphorites) that were found in Khubsugul, Northern Mongolia.

  20. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    H molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise

  1. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste -- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Stone; Michael Benson; Christopher Orme; Thomas Luther; Eric Peterson

    2005-09-01

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB, characterized by the presence of carbon-carbon triple bonds. Carbon may, in the presence of suitable precious metal catalysts such as palladium, irreversibly react with and bind hydrogen. In the presence of oxygen, the precious metal may also eliminate hydrogen by catalyzing the formation of water. This reaction is called catalytic recombination. DEB has the needed binding rate and capacity for hydrogen that potentially could be generated in the TRUPACT II. Phases 1 and 2 of this project showed that uncoated DEB performed satisfactorily in lab scale tests. Based upon these results, Phase 3, the final project phase, included larger scale testing. Test vessels were scaled to replicate the ratio between void space in the inner containment vessel of a TRUPACT-II container and a payload of seven 55-gallon drums. The tests were run with an atmosphere of air for 63.9 days at ambient temperature (15-27°C) and a scaled hydrogen generation rate of 2.60E-07 moles per second (0.35 cc/min). A second type of getter known as VEI, a proprietary polymer hydrogen getter characterized by carbon-carbon double bonds, was also tested in Phase 3. Hydrogen was successfully “gettered” by both getter systems. Hydrogen concentrations remained below 5 vol% (in

  2. Structure of cellobiose phosphorylase from Clostridium thermocellum in complex with phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Fox, Brian G.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-03-27

    Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome-producing bacterium that is able to efficiently degrade and utilize cellulose as a sole carbon source. Cellobiose phosphorylase (CBP) plays a critical role in cellulose degradation by catalyzing the reversible phosphate-dependent hydrolysis of cellobiose, the major product of cellulose degradation, into -D-glucose 1-phosphate and D-glucose. CBP from C. thermocellum is a modular enzyme composed of four domains [N-terminal domain, helical linker, (/)6-barrel domain and C-terminal domain] and is a member of glycoside hydrolase family 94. The 2.4 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of C. thermocellum CBP reveals the residues involved in coordinating the catalytic phosphate as well as the residues that are likely to be involved in substrate binding and discrimination.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy is a condition that involves seizures beginning soon ...

  4. Potential Application of Biohydrogen Production Liquid Waste as Phosphate Solubilizing Agent-A Study Using Soybean Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Brar, Satinder Kaur; LeBihan, Yann; Buelna, Gerardo

    2016-03-01

    With CO2 free emission and a gravimetric energy density higher than gasoline, diesel, biodiesel, and bioethanol, biohydrogen is a promising green renewable energy carrier. During fermentative hydrogen production, 60-70 % of the feedstock is converted to different by-products, dominated by organic acids. In the present investigation, a simple approach for value addition of hydrogen production liquid waste (HPLW) containing these compounds has been demonstrated. In soil, organic acids produced by phosphate solubilizing bacteria chelate the cations of insoluble inorganic phosphates (e.g., Ca3 (PO4)2) and make the phosphorus available to the plants. Organic acid-rich HPLW, therefore, has been evaluated as soil phosphate solubilizer. Application of HPLW as soil phosphate solubilizer was found to improve the phosphorus uptake of soybean plants by 2.18- to 2.74-folds. Additionally, 33-100 % increase in seed germination rate was also observed. Therefore, HPLW has the potential to be an alternative for phosphate solubilizing biofertilizers available in the market. Moreover, the strategy can be useful for phytoremediation of phosphorus-rich soil.

  5. Hydrolysis of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate to hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, M T; Brown, P W

    1998-04-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was hydrolysed in water and in 1 M Na2HPO4 solution at temperatures from 25-60 degrees C. Hydrolysis was incomplete in water. At 25 degrees C, DCPD partially hydrolysed to hydroxyapatite (HAp). Formation of HAp is indicative of incongruent DCPD dissolution. At the higher temperatures, hydrolysis to HAp was more extensive and was accompanied by the formation of anhydrous dicalcium phosphate (DCP). Both of these processes are endothermic. When hydrolysis was carried out in 1 M Na2HPO4 solution, heat absorption was greater at any given temperature than for hydrolysis in water. Complete hydrolysis to HAp occurred in this solution. The hydrolysis of DCPD to HAp in sodium phosphate solution was also endothermic. The complete conversion of DCPD to HAp in sodium phosphate solution would not be expected if the only effect of this solution was to cause DCPD dissolution to become congruent. Because of the buffering capacity of a dibasic sodium phosphate solution, DCPD hydrolysed completely to HAp. Complete conversion to HAp was accompanied by the conversion of dibasic sodium phosphate to monobasic sodium phosphate. The formation of DCP was not observed indicating that the sodium phosphate solution precluded the DCPD-to-DCP dehydration reaction. In addition to affecting the extent of hydrolysis, reaction in the sodium phosphate solution also caused a morphological change in the HAp which formed. HAp formed by hydrolysis in water was needle-like to globular while that formed in the sodium phosphate solution exhibited a florette-like morphology.

  6. Hydrogen Storage in Microporous Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, Nathaniel L.; Eckert, Juergen; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Vodak, David T.; Kim, Jaheon; O'Keeffe, Michael; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2003-05-01

    Metal-organic framework-5 (MOF-5) of composition Zn4O(BDC)3 (BDC = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate) with a cubic three-dimensional extended porous structure adsorbed hydrogen up to 4.5 weight percent (17.2 hydrogen molecules per formula unit) at 78 kelvin and 1.0 weight percent at room temperature and pressure of 20 bar. Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy of the rotational transitions of the adsorbed hydrogen molecules indicates the presence of two well-defined binding sites (termed I and II), which we associate with hydrogen binding to zinc and the BDC linker, respectively. Preliminary studies on topologically similar isoreticular metal-organic framework-6 and -8 (IRMOF-6 and -8) having cyclobutylbenzene and naphthalene linkers, respectively, gave approximately double and quadruple (2.0 weight percent) the uptake found for MOF-5 at room temperature and 10 bar.

  7. Study of the degree of deuteration on the microhardness of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baoan Liu; Shaotao Sun; Bo Wang; Xun Sun; Zhengping Wang; Xinguang Xu

    2015-08-01

    A series of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) crystals with different degrees of deuteration are grown from aqueous solution by the point-seed technique. The microhardness of (100), (001) and so-called ‘tripler’ faces for these DKDP crystals were measured. Initially the hardness number of (001) face for each crystal increases with the increase of the applied load until it reaches 25 g. With further increase in load, the hardness number decreases gradually. The hardness numbers decline with the increase in deuterium content. These composition dependences are expected since the bond strength is weakened by the substitution of deuterium for hydrogen. The hydrogen bond is considered to play the key role in effecting the crystal’s hardness. The visible hardness anisotropy of the different faces is attributed to the inhomogeneous distribution of the oxygen–hydrogen bond on these faces.

  8. Identification of an RNA-binding protein that is phosphorylated by PTH and potentially mediates PTH-induced destabilization of Npt2a mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rebecca D; Merchant, Michael L; Hardin, Ericka; Clark, Barbara; Khundmiri, Syed J; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2016-02-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of the expression and function of the type IIa sodium-phosphate cotransporter (Npt2a), the protein responsible for regulated renal phosphate reabsorption. We previously showed that PTH induces rapid decay of Npt2a mRNA through posttranscriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that PTH-induced changes in RNA-binding protein (RBP) activity mediate the degradation of Npt2a mRNA. To address this aim, we treated opossum kidney (OK) cells, a PTH-sensitive proximal tubule cell culture model, with 100 nM PTH for 30 min and 2 h, followed by mass spectrometry characterization of the PTH-stimulated phosphoproteome. We identified 1,182 proteins differentially phosphorylated in response to PTH, including 68 RBPs. Preliminary analysis identified a phospho-RBP, hnRNPK-homology-type-splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), with predicted binding sites for the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of Npt2a mRNA. Western blot analysis confirmed expression of KSRP in OK cells and showed PTH-dependent translocation to the nucleus. Immunoprecipitation of KSRP from control and PTH-treated cells followed by RNA isolation and RT-quantitative PCR analysis identified Npt2a mRNA from both control and PTH-treated KSRP pulldowns. Knockdown of KSRP followed by PTH treatment showed that KSRP is required for mediating PTH-stimulated reduction in sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 mRNA, but not Npt2a mRNA. We conclude that 1) PTH is a major regulator of both transcription and translation, and 2) KSRP binds Npt2a mRNA but its role in PTH regulation of Npt2a mRNA is not clear.

  9. Dominant oceanic bacteria secure phosphate using a large extracellular buffer

    OpenAIRE

    M. V. Zubkov; Martin, A. P.; Hartmann, M.; Grob, C.; Scanlan, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria manage to maintain a sufficient supply of phosphate in phosphate-poor surface waters of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. Furthermore, it seems that their phosphate uptake may counter-intuitively be lower in more productive tropical waters, as if their cellular demand for phosphate decreases there. By flow sorting 33P-phosphate-pulsed 32P-phosphate-chased cells, we demonstrate that both Prochlorococcus and SAR11 cells exploit an extracellul...

  10. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  11. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  12. How Native and Alien Metal Cations Bind ATP: Implications for Lithium as a Therapeutic Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Grauffel, Cédric; Lim, Carmay

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy currency of the cell, exists in solution mostly as ATP-Mg. Recent experiments suggest that Mg2+ interacts with the highly charged ATP triphosphate group and Li+ can co-bind with the native Mg2+ to form ATP-Mg-Li and modulate the neuronal purine receptor response. However, it is unclear how the negatively charged ATP triphosphate group binds Mg2+ and Li+ (i.e. which phosphate group(s) bind Mg2+/Li+) and how the ATP solution conformation depends on the type of metal cation and the metal-binding mode. Here, we reveal the preferred ATP-binding mode of Mg2+/Li+ alone and combined: Mg2+ prefers to bind ATP tridentately to each of the three phosphate groups, but Li+ prefers to bind bidentately to the terminal two phosphates. We show that the solution ATP conformation depends on the cation and its binding site/mode, but it does not change significantly when Li+ binds to Mg2+-loaded ATP. Hence, ATP-Mg-Li, like Mg2+-ATP, can fit in the ATP-binding site of the host enzyme/receptor, activating specific signaling pathways.

  13. How Native and Alien Metal Cations Bind ATP: Implications for Lithium as a Therapeutic Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudev, Todor; Grauffel, Cédric; Lim, Carmay

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the major energy currency of the cell, exists in solution mostly as ATP-Mg. Recent experiments suggest that Mg2+ interacts with the highly charged ATP triphosphate group and Li+ can co-bind with the native Mg2+ to form ATP-Mg-Li and modulate the neuronal purine receptor response. However, it is unclear how the negatively charged ATP triphosphate group binds Mg2+ and Li+ (i.e. which phosphate group(s) bind Mg2+/Li+) and how the ATP solution conformation depends on the type of metal cation and the metal-binding mode. Here, we reveal the preferred ATP-binding mode of Mg2+/Li+ alone and combined: Mg2+ prefers to bind ATP tridentately to each of the three phosphate groups, but Li+ prefers to bind bidentately to the terminal two phosphates. We show that the solution ATP conformation depends on the cation and its binding site/mode, but it does not change significantly when Li+ binds to Mg2+-loaded ATP. Hence, ATP-Mg-Li, like Mg2+-ATP, can fit in the ATP-binding site of the host enzyme/receptor, activating specific signaling pathways. PMID:28195155

  14. Interaction of Hydrogen with MOF-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordiga, Silvia; Vitillo, Jenny G; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Regli, Laura; Cocina, Donato; Zecchina, Adriano; Arstad, Bjørnar; Bjørgen, Morten; Hafizovic, Jasmina; Lillerud, Karl Petter

    2005-10-06

    Hydrogen storage is among the most demanding challenges in the hydrogen-based energy cycle. One proposed strategy for hydrogen storage is based on physisorption on high surface area solids such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Within this class of materials, MOF-5 has been the first structure studied for hydrogen storage. The IR spectroscopy of adsorbed H2 performed at 15 K and ab initio calculations show that the adsorptive properties of this material are mainly due to dispersive interactions with the internal wall structure and to weak electrostatic forces associated with O13Zn4 clusters. Calculated and measured binding enthalpies are between 2.26 and 3.5 kJ/mol, in agreement with the H2 rotational barriers reported in the literature. A minority of binding sites with higher adsorption enthalpy (7.4 kJ/mol) is also observed. These species are probably associated with OH groups on the external surfaces present as termini of the microcrystals.

  15. Solvent induced cooperativity of Zn(II) complexes cleaving a phosphate diester RNA analog in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mark F; Sánchez-Lombardo, Irma; Neverov, Alexei A; Brown, R Stan

    2012-01-21

    The kinetics of cyclization of 2-hydroxypropyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (1) promoted by two mononuclear Zn(II) catalytic complexes of bis(2-pyridylmethyl)benzylamine (4) and bis(2-methyl 6-pyridylmethyl)benzylamine (5) in methanol were studied under (s)(s)pH-controlled conditions (where (s)(s)pH refers to [H(+)] activity in methanol). Potentiometric titrations of the ligands in the absence and presence of Zn(2+) and a non-reactive model for 1 (2-hydroxylpropyl isopropyl phosphate (HPIPP, 6)) indicate that the phosphate is bound tightly to the 4:Zn(II) and 5:Zn(II) complexes as L:Zn(II):6(-), and that each of these undergoes an additional ionization to produce L:Zn(II):6(-):((-)OCH(3)) or a bound deprotonated form of the phosphate, L:Zn(II):6(2-). Kinetic studies as a function of [L:Zn(II)] indicate that the rate is linear in [L:Zn(II)] at concentrations well above those required for complete binding of the substrate. Plots of the second order rate constants (defined as the gradient of the rate constant vs. [complex] plot) vs. (s)(s)pH in methanol are bell-shaped with rate maxima of 23 dm mol(-1) s(-1) and 146 dm mol(-1) s(-1) for 4:Zn(II) and 5:Zn(II), respectively, at their (s)(s)pH maxima of 10.5 and 10. A mechanism is proposed that involves binding of one molecule of complex to the phosphate to yield a poorly reactive 1 : 1 complex, which associates with a second molecule of complex to produce a transient cooperative 2 : 1 complex within which the cyclization of 1 is rapid. The observations support an effect of the reduced polarity solvent that encourages the cooperative association of phosphate and two independent mononuclear complexes to give a reactive entity.

  16. Ultrafast phosphate hydration dynamics in bulk H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costard, Rene, E-mail: costard@mbi-berlin.de; Tyborski, Tobias; Fingerhut, Benjamin P., E-mail: fingerhut@mbi-berlin.de; Elsaesser, Thomas [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    Phosphate vibrations serve as local probes of hydrogen bonding and structural fluctuations of hydration shells around ions. Interactions of H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup −} ions and their aqueous environment are studied combining femtosecond 2D infrared spectroscopy, ab-initio calculations, and hybrid quantum-classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two-dimensional infrared spectra of the symmetric (ν{sub S}(PO{sub 2}{sup −})) and asymmetric (ν{sub AS}(PO{sub 2}{sup −})) PO{sub 2}{sup −} stretching vibrations display nearly homogeneous lineshapes and pronounced anharmonic couplings between the two modes and with the δ(P-(OH){sub 2}) bending modes. The frequency-time correlation function derived from the 2D spectra consists of a predominant 50 fs decay and a weak constant component accounting for a residual inhomogeneous broadening. MD simulations show that the fluctuating electric field of the aqueous environment induces strong fluctuations of the ν{sub S}(PO{sub 2}{sup −}) and ν{sub AS}(PO{sub 2}{sup −}) transition frequencies with larger frequency excursions for ν{sub AS}(PO{sub 2}{sup −}). The calculated frequency-time correlation function is in good agreement with the experiment. The ν(PO{sub 2}{sup −}) frequencies are mainly determined by polarization contributions induced by electrostatic phosphate-water interactions. H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup −}/H{sub 2}O cluster calculations reveal substantial frequency shifts and mode mixing with increasing hydration. Predicted phosphate-water hydrogen bond (HB) lifetimes have values on the order of 10 ps, substantially longer than water-water HB lifetimes. The ultrafast phosphate-water interactions observed here are in marked contrast to hydration dynamics of phospholipids where a quasi-static inhomogeneous broadening of phosphate vibrations suggests minor structural fluctuations of interfacial water.

  17. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  18. Anion Binding of One-, Two-, and Three-Armed Thiourea Receptors Examined via Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Quantum Computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beletskiy, Evgeny V.; Wang, Xue-Bin; Kass, Steven R.

    2016-10-27

    A benzene ring substituted with 1–3 thiourea containing arms (1–3) were examined by photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory computations. Their conjugate bases and chloride, acetate and dihydrogen phosphate anion clusters are reported. The resulting vertical and adiabatic detachment energies span from 3.93 – 5.82 eV (VDE) and 3.65 – 5.10 (ADE) for the deprotonated species and 4.88 – 5.97 eV (VDE) and 4.45 – 5.60 eV (ADE) for the anion complexes. These results reveal the stabilizing effects of multiple hydrogen bonds and anionic host-guest interactions in the gas phase. Previously measured equilibrium binding constants in aqueous dimethyl sulfoxide for all three thioureas (Org. Biolmol. Chem. 2015, 13, 2170-2176) are compared to the present results and cooperative binding is uniformly observed in the gas phase but only for one case (i.e., 3 • H2PO4–) in solution.

  19. Application of Potential Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacteria and Organic Acids on Phosphate Solubilization from Phosphate Rock in Aerobic Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Qurban Ali Panhwar; Shamshuddin Jusop; Umme Aminun Naher; Radziah Othman; Mohd Ismail Razi

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted at Universiti Putra Malaysia to determine the effect of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and organic acids (oxalic & malic) on phosphate (P) solubilization from phosphate rock (PR) and growth of aerobic rice. Four rates of each organic acid (0, 10, 20, and 30 mM), and PSB strain (Bacillus sp.) were applied to aerobic rice. Total bacterial populations, amount of P solubilization, P uptake, soil pH, and root morphology were determined. The results of the study showed ...

  20. A PHD in histone language: on the role of histone methylation in plant responses to phosphate deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrika, Nulu Naga Prafulla; Sundaravelpandian, Kalaipandian; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    Post-translational modifications of core histones are important for various DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. We recently reported that the ALFIN LIKE 6 (AL6) gene, identified in a forward genetic screen, is critical for phosphate deficiency-induced root hair formation and several other processes associated with the regulation of cellular phosphate homeostasis. AL6 contains a Plant Homeo Domain (PHD) finger that can bind to trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3). Homozygous mutants defective in AL6 expression form very short root hairs under phosphate-deficient conditions, presumably caused by altered expression of putative primary and secondary down-stream targets of AL6. In this Addendum, we speculate about possible roles of AL6, H3K4 trimethylation and other chromatin modifications in the adaptation of plants to low phosphate availability.