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Sample records for hydrogen peroxide bleaching

  1. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents

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    Mohammad E. Rokaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n=27 according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n=9 according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide, group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide, group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture, and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture. Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide.

  2. Durability of bleaching results achieved with 15% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide in vitro.

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    Knösel, Michael; Reus, Monika; Rosenberger, Albert; Attin, Thomas; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the durability of bleaching results achieved with (1) 15% carbamide peroxide home bleaching and (2) 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching. A total of 231 extracted anterior teeth were randomly divided into three groups (n = 77 in each group) with comparable mean baseline L*-values (68.24 ± 0.8): a non-bleached control group A, a 15% carbamide peroxide group B (5 bleaching intervals of 8 hours), and a 38% hydrogen peroxide group C (3 intervals of 15 minutes). Durability of bleaching was assessed by comparing CIE-L*a*b* data after intervals of 2, 4, 12, and 26 weeks from baseline. Both bleaching regimes initially produced a highly significant increase in lightness parameter L*, with no significant difference between the respective bleaching regimes (B: 68.23 / 72.48; C: 68.32 / 73.25). Six months after starting the trial, L*-values for group B yielded no significant differences compared to baseline (69.55), whereas L*-values for group C were still significantly raised (69.91), despite a highly significant decrease when compared to initial bleaching results. In both treatment groups, there was a lasting response to bleaching in terms of CIE-a* and -b* value decreases. Results for both home- and in-practice regimes were found to be similar for about 12 weeks. However, in-office results were longer lasting, despite the shorter treatment intervals. Summarized bleaching effects, in terms of delta E values, revealed no significant differences between treatment groups and the control group after 6 months, indicating an abatement of the bleaching results achieved.

  3. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF CMP PULP USING MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE

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    Farhad Zeinaly

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional bleaching of hardwood CMP pulp with magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH2 show significant benefits over bleaching with sodium hydroxide (NaOH under various conditions. Magnesium hydroxide bleaching generate higher optical properties, higher pulp yield and lower effluent COD at the same chemical charge, but the physical properties were found to be similar for both processes. The initial freeness of the bleached pulps and refining value to reach a target freeness (about 350 ml. CSF were more for the Mg(OH2-based process. The residual peroxide of filtrate from the Mg(OH2-based process was very high as compared to conventional bleaching.

  4. MODIFIED OPAL:A NOVEL STABILIZER FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF PULPS

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    Xueren Qian; Xianhui An; Wenbo Liu; Gang Yu; Zhanqian Song

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of modified opal as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching was investigated. The results showed that the modified opal in place of sodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching is feasible. At the same dosage, above 3% ISO can be increased for both wheat straw pulp and deinked pulp. The stabilizing ability of the modified opal to hydrogen peroxide bleaching of pulp is improved markedly. It is favorable for bleaching to increase temperature and time within a permissive extent. The suitable process conditions are 10% of pulp consistency, 3% of hydrogen peroxide, 1.5% of sodium hydroxide, 3% of the modified opal, 70℃ and 60 min when the modified opal is used as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. At these conditions, the brightness gain can reach about 16% ISO for wheat straw pulp. In addition, it is favorable for bleaching to add a little magnesium sulfate when the modified opal is used as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching, the brightness of pulp can increase I%ISO if0.05% of magnesium sulfate is added. The cost analysis indicated that the modified opal is superior to sodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching in economical aspect and has further the potential of market development.

  5. MODIFIED OPAL: A NOVEL STABILIZER FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF PULPS

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    XuerenQian; XianhuiAn; WenboLiu; GangYu; ZhanqianSong

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of modified opal as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching was investigated. Theresults showed that the modified opal in place ofsodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxidebleaching is feasible. At the same dosage, above 3%ISO can be increased for both wheat straw pulp anddeinked pulp. The stabilizing ability of the modifiedopal to hydrogen peroxide bleaching of pulp isimproved markedly. It is favorable for bleaching toincrease temperature and time within a permissiveextent. The suitable process conditions are I0% ofpulp consistency, 3% of hydrogen peroxide, 1.5% ofsodium hydroxide, 3% of the modified opal, 70~"and 60 min when the modified opal is used as thestabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. At theseconditions, the brightness gain can reach about 16%ISO for wheat straw pulp. In addition, it is favorablefor bleaching to add a little magnesium sulfate whenthe modified opal is used as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching, the brightness of pulpcan increase 1%ISO if0.05% of magnesium sulfate isadded. The cost analysis indicated that the modifiedopal is superior to sodium silicate as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching in economical aspectand has further the potential of market development.

  6. A comparison of the bleaching effectiveness of chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide on dental composite.

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    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Gill, Karanjot S; Singhal, Deepak; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Dash, Sambit; Pedrazzi, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to verify if composites could be bleached using chlorine dioxide as compared with hydrogen peroxide. 3M ESPE Filtek Z350 Universal Restorative discs were prepared (n=40), with dimensions 5 mm diameter x 2 mm thickness. The discs were divided into 4 groups of 10 discs each. Color assessment was performed by CIEDE2000. The discs were stained with coffee, tea, wine and distilled water (control) solutions for 14 days, 5 hours daily. Color assessment was repeated on stained discs and followed by bleaching of 5 discs from each group using chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in-office systems. Finally, a last color assessment was performed and compared statistically. DE2000 after bleaching was very close to baseline for both the bleaching agents, although chlorine dioxide showed better results than hydrogen peroxide. After staining, there was a clinically significant discoloration (∆E2000≥3.43) for the tea, coffee and wine groups, and discoloration (∆E2000) was seen more in the wine group as compared to tea and coffee. Overall, the control group (distilled water) had the least color change in the three intervals. After bleaching, the color in all specimens returned close to the baseline. The color differences between bleaching and baseline were less than 3.43 for all groups. The obtained results show that chlorine dioxide is slightly superior to hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching of composites, while maintaining the shade of the composite close to the baseline.

  7. Enamel susceptibility to red wine staining after 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching

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    Sandrine Bittencourt Berger

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Concern has been expressed regarding the staining of enamel surface by different beverages after bleaching. This study investigated the influence of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on enamel surface stained with wine after whitening treatments. Flat and polished bovine enamel surfaces were submitted to two commercially available 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents or kept in 100% humidity, as a control group (n = 10. Specimens of all groups were immersed in red wine for 48 h at 37°C, immediately, 24 h or 1 week after treatments. All specimens were ground into powder and prepared for the spectrophotometric analysis. Data were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's PLSD test at 5% significance level. The amount of wine pigments uptake by enamel submitted to bleaching treatments was statistically higher than that of control group, independently of the evaluation time. Results suggested that wine staining susceptibility was increased by bleaching treatments.

  8. Quantification of peroxide ion passage in dentin, enamel, and cementum after internal bleaching with hydrogen peroxide.

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    Palo, R M; Bonetti-Filho, I; Valera, M C; Camargo, C H R; Camargo, Sea; Moura-Netto, C; Pameijer, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of peroxide passage from the pulp chamber to the external enamel surface during the internal bleaching technique. Fifty bovine teeth were sectioned transversally 5 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), and the remaining part of the root was sealed with a 2-mm layer of glass ionomer cement. The external surface of the samples was coated with nail varnish, with the exception of standardized circular areas (6-mm diameter) located on the enamel, exposed dentin, or cementum surface of the tooth. The teeth were divided into three experimental groups according to exposed areas close to the CEJ and into two control groups (n=10/group), as follows: GE, enamel exposure area; GC, cementum exposed area; GD, dentin exposed area; Negative control, no presence of internal bleaching agent and uncoated surface; and Positive control, pulp chamber filled with bleaching agent and external surface totally coated with nail varnish. The pulp chamber was filled with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Endo, Ultradent). Each sample was placed inside of individual flasks with 1000 μL of acetate buffer solution, 2 M (pH 4.5). After seven days, the buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube, in which 100 μL of leuco-crystal violet and 50 μL of horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn-Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). All experimental groups presented passage of peroxide to the external surface that was statistically different from that observed in the control groups. It was verified that the passage of peroxide was higher in GD than in GE (pperoxide passage than did GD and GE (pperoxide placed into the pulp chamber passed through the dental hard tissues, reaching the external surface and the periodontal tissue. The cementum surface

  9. HE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-IRON ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yumeng Zhao; Shuhui Yang; Liang Sheng; Yonghao Ni

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide bleaching has been extensively used in high-yield pulp bleaching. Unfortunately,hydrogen peroxide can be decomposed under alkaline condition, especially when transition metal ions exit. Experiments show that the valence of transition metal ion is also responsible for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.Iron ions are present in two oxidation states, Fe2+ and Fe3+. They are both catalytically active to hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Because Fe3+ is brown, it can affect the brightness of pulp directly, it can also combine with phenol, forming complexes which not only are stable structures and are difficult to be removed from pulp, but also significantly affect the brightness of pulp because of their color.Sodium silicate and magnesium sulfate, when used together, can greatly decrease hydrogen peroxide decomposition. The optimum dosage of sodium silicate is about 0.1% (on solution) for Fe2+ and 0.25% (on solution) for Fe3+. Adding chelants such as DTPA or EDTA with stabilizers simultaneously can obviously improve pulp brightness. For iron ions, the chelate effect of DTPA is better than that of EDTA.Under acidic conditions, sodium hyposulfite and cellulose can reduce Fe3+ to Fe2+ effectively, and pulp brightness is improved greatly. Adding sodium thiosulfate simultaneously with magnesium sulfate,sodium silicate, and DTPA to alkaline peroxide solution can result in higher brightness of pulp.pH is a key parameter during hydrogen peroxide bleaching, the optimum pH value should be 10.5-12.

  10. The application of catalase for the elimination of hydrogen peroxide residues after bleaching of cotton fabrics

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    AMORIM ALEXANDRA M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of dyeing of cotton fabrics with a bifunctional reactive dye were significantly improved when the fabric after bleaching with hydrogen peroxide was treated with catalase for the elimination of hydrogen peroxide residues from the fabrics. Compared to processes with a varying number of washing steps, with and without commercial reducing agents, the consumption of water could be significantly reduced, without altering the final color shade.

  11. Shear Bond Strength of Resin Bonded to Bleached Enamel Using Different Modified 35% Hydrogen Peroxides

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    Moosavi H

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Bleaching systems with different concentrations and applications are widely used to improve the visual appearance of the teeth, but one of the complications of these materials is reduction of bond strength for immediately bonding to the bleached enamel. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of using different modified hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to the bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight sound extracted premolar teeth were collected, sectioned 1 mm below the CEJ to detach the root. The proximal surfaces of the teeth were flattened using diamond disks and silicon carbide papers to achieve flat homogeneous enamel surfaces without exposure to the dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups as follows (n = 12: group 1: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel; group 2: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel contained (casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP; group 3: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel combined with fluoride; and group 4: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide applying one week before resin restoration placement. Composite resin, Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan, was bonded on each tooth in the mould (4 mm diameter × 3 mm height using Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan. After 24 hours of storage and 1000 cycles of thermocycling, the shear bond strength of the specimens at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min was measured in MPa. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test. Results: The minimum and maximum mean shear bond strength values were observed in groups 2 (15.82 ± 4.41 and 4 (21.00 ± 3.90, respectively. Multiple comparisons of groups revealed no significant differences among the groups except between group 4 and all the other groups. The most common type of failure was adhesive. Conclusions: Using modified bleaching agents decreased the bond

  12. Evaluation of cotton-fabric bleaching using hydrogen peroxide and Blue LED

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    de Oliveira, Bruno P.; Moriyama, Lilian T.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The raw cotton production requires multiple steps being one of them the removal of impurities acquired during previous processes. This procedure is widely used by textile industries around the world and is called bleaching. The raw cotton is composed by cellulosic and non-cellulosic materials like waxes, pectins and oils, which are responsible for its characteristic yellowish color. The bleaching process aims to remove the non-cellulosic materials concentration in the fabric, increasing its whiteness degree. The most used bleaching method utilizes a bath in an alkali solution of hydrogen peroxide, stabilizers and buffer solutions under high temperature. In the present study we evaluated the possibility of using a blue illumination for the bleaching process. We used blue LEDs (450 nm) to illuminate an acid hydrogen peroxide solution at room temperature. The samples treated by this method were compared with the conventional bleaching process through a colorimetric analysis and by a multiple comparison visual inspection by volunteers. The samples were also studied by a tensile test in order to verify the integrity of the cloth after bleaching. The results of fabric visual inspection and colorimetric analysis showed a small advantage for the sample treated by the standard method. The tensile test showed an increasing on the yield strength of the cloth after blue light bleaching. The presented method has great applicability potential due to the similar results compared to the standard method, with relative low cost and reduced production of chemical waste.

  13. Study of the hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent effects on bovine enamel using X-ray fluorescence

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    Moreira, Ruda F.; Calazans, Fernanda S.; Miranda, Mauro S.; Santos, Ramon S.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Assis, Joaquim T. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen Peroxide's a bleaching agent capable of oxidizing a wide range of colored organic, causing discoloration and hence bleaching of the substrate, but some authors related the occurrence of side effects related to bleaching of the tooth structure, such as changes in morphology superficial. It was used 6 bovine incisors, each tooth was initially evaluated six times in different areas to obtain the count of elements phosphorus and calcium using X-Ray Fluorescence. The teeth were randomly divided in two groups: both groups were submitted to bleaching in office with hydrogen peroxide 38%, once a week during three weeks. Group 1 was stored in distilled water and group 2 in artificial saliva, between the sessions. The measurements were repeated every seven days before the bleaching treatment. Besides that, changes in mineral levels were always assessed in the same area and using the same procedure. It was observed that the bleaching was not able to demineralize the tooth enamel studied. (author)

  14. Influence of time on bond strength after bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide.

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    Barbosa, Cinthia Maria; Sasaki, Robson Tetsuo; Florio, Flavia Martao; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of time after treatment with a 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength between composite resin and sound enamel and dentin. Eighty dental slabs - 40 enamel (E) slabs and 40 dentin (D) slabs - were embedded, flatted, and divided into four groups (n=10). In G1 the E and D slabs were kept in artificial saliva for 14 days. For the G2, G3, and G4 groups the E and D slabs were submitted to bleaching treatment with a 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent. At different times after bleaching treatments (G2=immediate; G3=seven days; G4= fourteen days), composite resin cylinders were made using an adhesive system. Tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min to obtain the values in MPa. For enamel, the Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn Method showed G1 differed significantly from G2 (G1=13.40 a; G2=6.64 b; G3=16.76 a; G4=11.64 ab). For dentin, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests showed that G1 differed significantly from G2 and G3 (G1=12.11 a; G2=4.97 b; G3=8.67 c; G4=11.86 ac). It is recommended adhesive restorative procedures in enamel be delayed for seven days post-bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide, while restorations in dentin should be delayed for 14 days following bleaching treatment.

  15. Sonochemical and hydrodynamic cavitation reactors for laccase/hydrogen peroxide cotton bleaching.

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    Gonçalves, Idalina; Martins, Madalena; Loureiro, Ana; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Silva, Carla

    2014-03-01

    The main goal of this work is to develop a novel and environmental-friendly technology for cotton bleaching with reduced processing costs. This work exploits a combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide process assisted by ultrasound. For this purpose, specific reactors were studied, namely ultrasonic power generator type K8 (850 kHz) and ultrasonic bath equipment Ultrasonic cleaner USC600TH (45 kHz). The optimal operating conditions for bleaching were chosen considering the highest levels of hydroxyl radical production and the lowest energy input. The capacity to produce hydroxyl radicals by hydrodynamic cavitation was also assessed in two homogenizers, EmulsiFlex®-C3 and APV-2000. Laccase nanoemulsions were produced by high pressure homogenization using BSA (bovine serum albumin) as emulsifier. The bleaching efficiency of these formulations was tested and the results showed higher whiteness values when compared to free laccase. The combination of laccase-hydrogen peroxide process with ultrasound energy produced higher whiteness levels than those obtained by conventional methods. The amount of hydrogen peroxide was reduced 50% as well as the energy consumption in terms of temperature (reduction of 40 °C) and operating time (reduction of 90 min).

  16. MODELING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF SODA PULP FROM OIL-PALM EMPTY FRUIT BUNCHES

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    Ana Ferrer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the variables soda (0.5-3.0%, hydrogen peroxide (1.0-6.0% and time (1-5 h in the bleaching of soda pulp of empty fruit bunches (EFB from oil-palm, on the properties of bleached pulps, was studied. Polynomial and neural fuzzy models reproduced the results of brightness, kappa number, and viscosity of the pulps with errors less than 10%. By the simulation of the bleaching of pulp, using the polynomial and neural fuzzy models, it was possible to find optimal values of operating variables, so that the properties of bleached pulps differed only slightly from their best values and yet it was possible to save chemical reagents, energy, and plant size, operating with lower values of operating variables. Thus, operating with 1.13% soda concentration and 2.25% hydrogen peroxide concentration for 3 hours, a pulp with a brightness of 75.1% (8.1% below the maximum and a viscosity of 740 mL/g (10.4% less than the maximum value, was obtained.

  17. THE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-IRON ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YumengZhao; ShuhuiYang; LiangSheng; YonghaoNi

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide bleaching has been extensivelyused in high-yield pulp bleaching. Unfortunately,hydrogen peroxide can be decomposed underalkaline condition, especially when transition metalions exit. Experiments show that the valence oftransition metal ion is also responsible for thedecomposition of hydrogen peroxide.Iron ions are present in two oxidation states, Fe2+ andFe3+. They are both catalytically active to hydrogenperoxide decomposition. Because Fe3+ is brown, itcan affect the brightness of pulp directly, it can alsocombine with phenol, forming complexes which notonly are stable structures and are difficult to beremoved from pulp, but also significantly affect thebrightness of pulp because of their color.Sodium silicate and magnesium sulfate, when usedtogether, can greatly decrease hydrogen peroxidedecomposition. The optimum dosage of sodiumsilicate is about 0.1% (on solution) for Fe2~ and0.25% (on solution) for Fe3~. Adding chelants such asDTPA or EDTA with stabilizers simultaneously canobviously improve pulp brightness. For iron ions, thechelate effect of DTPA is better than that of EDTA.Under acidic conditions, sodium hyposulfite andcellulose can reduce Fe3+ to Fez+ effectively, and pulpbrightness is improved greatly. Adding sodiumthiosulfate simultaneously with magnesium sulfate,sodium silicate, and DTPA to alkaline peroxidesolution can result in higher brightness of pulp.pH is a key parameter during hydrogen peroxidebleaching, the optimum pH value should be 10.5-12.

  18. Pulpal inflammation after vital tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide

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    Ardiny Andriani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In-office vital tooth bleaching is a treatment to remove tooth stains. Tooth sensitivity is one of side effect commonly complained by patients receiving this treatment. Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine histological inflammatory cells infiltration of dental pulp after application of 38% H2O2 as a vital tooth bleaching agent. Methods: Under informed consent, a total of 15 premolars from 8 healthy subjects scheduled for orthodontic extraction were used in this study. Thirty eight percent H2O2 was applied on the buccal surface of the treated group. The treated teeth were extracted after 1 hour, 5, 8, and 15 days. All specimens were embedded in paraffin wax, sectioned serially and stained with Hematoxyllin Eosin. Histological specimens were then observed under a light microscope. Results: All treated groups showed a slight disorganization of odontoblasts layer and slight inflammation in the pulp tissue adjacent to the 38% H2O2 application site. The number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN had increased significantly 1 hour after application of 38% H2O2 (p<0.05, while macrophages had significantly increased 5 days after the application (p<0.05. The most intense PMN and macrophages infiltration was found 5 days after the application and gradually decreased 8 days after application of38% H2O2. Conclusion: Application of 38% H2O2 as a vital tooth bleaching agent induces acute inflammation in human dental pulp; however, the inflammation will decrease 8 days after the application.Latar belakang: Perawatan pemutihan gigi vital metode in-office merupakan tindakan untuk menghilangkan pewarnaan pada gigi. Salah satu efek samping yang sering dikeluhkan oleh pasien yang menjalani perawatan ini adalah sensitivitas gigi. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengamati infiltrasi sel inflamasi pada pulpa gigi setelah aplikasi H2O2 38% sebagai bahan pemutih gigi. Metode: Sampel penelitian ini berupa 15 gigi premolar yang berasal dari 8

  19. PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF LOW-FREENESS TMP

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    ZhongLiu; Y.Ni; Z.Li,G.Court

    2004-01-01

    Peroxide bleaching is an essential unit operation toproduce value-added mechanical pulp-based papergrade. In this paper, we presented the results fromperoxide bleaching of low-freeness TMP for theproduction of SC paper. Two aspects wereaddressed; the effect of pulp strength and theformation of anionic trashes. The strength properties,such as tensile, burst and zero-span tensile, areimproved after the peroxide bleaching process. Theamount of anionic trashes formed is almostproportional to the hydrogen peroxide charge.

  20. Mechanistic insights into the bleaching of melanin by alkaline hydrogen peroxide.

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    Smith, R A W; Garrett, B; Naqvi, K R; Fülöp, A; Godfrey, S P; Marsh, J M; Chechik, V

    2017-07-01

    This work aims to determine the roles of reactive oxygen species HO∙ and HO2(-) in the bleaching of melanins by alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Experiments using melanosomes isolated from human hair indicated that the HO∙ radical generated in the outside solution does not contribute significantly to bleaching. However, studies using soluble Sepia melanin demonstrated that both HO2(-) and HO∙ will individually bleach melanin. Additionally, when both oxidants are present, bleaching is increased dramatically in both rate and extent. Careful experimental design enabled the separation of the roles and effects of these key reactive species, HO∙ and HO2(-). Rationalisation of the results presented, and review of previous literature, allowed the postulation of a simplified general scheme whereby the strong oxidant HO∙ is able to pre-oxidise melanin units to o-quinones enabling more facile ring opening by the more nucleophilic HO2(-). In this manner the efficiency of the roles of both species is maximised. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF LOW-FREENESS TMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Liu; Y. Ni; Z. Li; G. Court

    2004-01-01

    Peroxide bleaching is an essential unit operation to produce value-added mechanical pulp-based paper grade. In this paper, we presented the results from peroxide bleaching of low-freeness TMP for the production of SC paper. Two aspects were addressed; the effect of pulp strength and the formation of anionic trashes. The strength properties,such as tensile, burst and zero-span tensile, are improved after the peroxide bleaching process. The amount of anionic trashes formed is almost proportional to the hydrogen peroxide charge.

  2. Catalase and sodium fluoride mediated rehabilitation of enamel bleached with 37% hydrogen peroxide

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    Ruchi Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching agents bring about a range of unwanted changes in the physical structure of enamel which needs to be restored qualitatively and timely. Catalase being an antioxidant ensures the effective removal of free radicals and improvement in fluoride mediated remineralization from the enamel microstructure which if retained may harm the integrity and affect the hardness of enamel. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted incisors were sectioned to 6 slabs which were divided into 5 groups: Group A, control; Group B, treatment with 37% hydrogen peroxide (HP; Group C, treatment with 37% HP and catalase, Group D, treatment with 37% HP and 5% sodium fluoride application, Group E, treatment with 37% HP followed by catalase and 5% sodium fluoride. Scanning electron microscope and microhardness analysis were done for all slabs. One-way ANOVA test was applied among different groups. Results: Vicker′s microhardness number (VHN of Group B and C was significantly lower. No significant difference between VHN of Group B and C. VHN of Group D was significantly higher than Group A, B, and C; but significantly lower than Group E. VHN of Group E was significantly higher than any other experimental group. One-way ANOVA revealed a highly significant P value (P = 0.0001 and so Tukey′s post-hoc Test for the group comparisons was employed. Conclusion: Subsequent treatment of bleached enamel with catalase and fluoride varnish separately results in repairing and significantly increasing the microhardness.

  3. Evaluation of the influence of dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide in orthodontic bracket shear bond strength

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    Marcus Vinicius Neiva Nunes do Rego

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the bond strength of brackets bonded to premolars previously subjected to bleaching with a 35% hydrogen peroxide. METHODS: Twenty one healthy premolars were selected and randomly divided into three groups (n = 7. Group I (G1 included teeth that were not submitted to bleaching. The enamel surfaces of Groups II (G2 and III (G3 were submitted to a bleaching process with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP Maxx. On Group II (G2, after bleaching, the teeth were stored for 24 hours in distilled water at 98.6 ºF, and then, premolar metallic brackets were bonded using Transbond XT (3M resin. Group III (G3 was submitted to the same procedure seven days after bleaching. After bonding, all teeth were stored in distilled water at 98.6 ºF for 24 hours. All groups were submitted to a traction test using an EMIC DL2000 universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The bracket resistance to debonding was compared between the groups by the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test (p < 0.05 and it was verified that the bleaching agent significantly reduced bracket adhesion when bonded 24 hours after bleaching. However, seven days after bleaching, there was no significant difference on the resistance to debonding among groups G1 (19,52 kgf and G3 (18,44 kgf, meaning that it is necessary to wait longer after bleaching to bond brackets.

  4. Micromorphology and microhardness of enamel after treatment with home-use bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide and 7.5% hydrogen peroxide

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    Robson Tetsuo Sasaki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of home-use bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide and 7.5% hydrogen peroxide on enamel microhardness and surface micromorphology. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Enamel slabs (n=10 received the bleaching agents for 1 h/day and remained in artificial saliva solution for 23 h/day, during a total period of 21 days. Control group was composed of enamel slabs that were not subjected to treatment with the agents and were maintained in artificial saliva solution. Microhardness tests were performed before treatment application, 21 days of treatment and 14 days after the end of treatment. Scanning electron microscopy analyses were performed after 14 days after the end of bleaching treatment by 3 calibrated observers who attributed scores. RESULTS: The Tukey's test (α=0.05 showed no significant differences in microhardness values among bleaching agents, at 21 days of treatment and a significant increase in microhardness for different agents after 14 days from the end of treatment. Fisher's exact test showed differences in micromorphology of enamel between control and experimental groups (p=0.0342. CONCLUSIONS: Bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide and 7.5% hydrogen peroxide may change surface micromorphology of enamel, although no changes in microhardness were observed.

  5. Effect of 10% sodium bicarbonate on bond strength of enamel and dentin after bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Medeiros Darzé

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroductionBy-products of hydrogen peroxide degradation released during dental bleaching influence the polymerization of adhesive systems and composite resins, causing a reduction in shear bond strength to the tooth.Objectivethe aim of this article was to evaluate the effect of 10% sodium bicarbonate (SB, applied for different lengths of time, on the shear bond strength to enamel and dentin after bleaching.Material and methodEnamel and dentin blocks were divided into groups (n=10: (1 control: no bleaching; (2 immediate: bleaching immediately followed by restoration; (3 14-day: bleaching, restoration 14 days later; (4 SB for 10 minutes: bleaching, SB gel for 10 minutes, immediately followed by restoration; (5 SB for 20 minutes: bleaching, SB gel for 20 minutes, immediately followed by restoration. A 38% hydrogen peroxide gel (Opalescence Boost/Ultradent was used. After application of the adhesive system, composite resin cylinders were mounted on the surface of the substrates in order to test shear bond strength. Result: ANOVA and Tukey tests showed significantly higher mean enamel bond strength values for the 14-day follow-up group and without significant differences for control group. Mean bond strength values obtained for the other groups were intermediate. When testing dentin, the Tukey test revealed a significantly higher mean bond strength value for the 14-day follow-up group when compared with application of SB for 20 minutes.ConclusionSB gel applied was unable to reverse the low bond strength to enamel and dentin after bleaching treatment.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide and caustic soda: Dancing with a dragon while bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter W. Hart; Carl Houtman; Kolby Hirth

    2013-01-01

    When hydrogen peroxide is mixed with caustic soda, an auto-accelerating reaction can lead to generation of significant amounts of heat and oxygen. On the basis of experiments using typical pulp mill process concentration and temperatures, a relatively simple kinetic model has been developed. Evaluation of these model results reveals that hydrogen peroxide-caustic soda...

  7. THE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-MANGANESE ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhui Yang; Yumeng Zhao; Baoku Wen; Yonghao Ni

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, the catalytic activities of Mn(Ⅱ),Mn(Ⅲ) and Mn(Ⅳ) towards decomposing hydrogen peroxide were compared. Among Mn (Ⅱ), Mn (Ⅲ)and Mn (Ⅳ), Mn (Ⅱ) is not catalytically active in decomposing hydrogen peroxide. However, both Mn (Ⅲ) and Mn (Ⅳ) are, and Mn (Ⅲ) has a stronger effect than Mn(Ⅳ).In addition, we also studied the practical methods to decrease the Mn-induced decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The results showed that sodium silicate and magnesium sulfite in combination can effectively decrease the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.The optimum dosage of sodium silicate was about 0.5% (on solution). Adding chelants such as DTPA or EDTA simultaneously with stabilizers can decrease hydrogen peroxide decomposition. For Mn (Ⅳ), the EDTA is more effective than DTPA.Adding sodium thiosulfate simultaneously with magnesium sulfate, sodium silicate and DTPA to alkaline peroxide solution can result in more residual hydrogen peroxide, and a higher pulp brightness.

  8. THE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-MANGANESE ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShuhuiYang; YumengZhao; BaokuWen; YonghaoNi

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, the catalytic activities of Mn(II),Mn(III) and Mn(IV) towards decomposing hydrogenperoxide were compared. Among Mn (II), Mn (III)and Mn (IV), Mn (II) is not catalytically active indecomposing hydrogen peroxide. However, both Mn(113) and Mn (IV) are, and Mn (III) has a strongereffect than Mn(IV).In addition, we also studied the practical methods todecrease the Mn-induced decomposition of hydrogenperoxide. The results showed that sodium silicate andmagnesium sulfite in combination can effectivelydecrease the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.The optimum dosage of sodium silicate was about0.5% (on solution). Adding chelants such as DTPAor EDTA simultaneously with stabilizers candecrease hydrogen peroxide decomposition. For Mn(IV), the EDTA is more effective than DTPA.Adding sodium thiosulfate simultaneously withmagnesium sulfate, sodium silicate and DTPA toalkaline peroxide solution can result in more residualhydrogen peroxide, and a higher pulp brightness.

  9. Analysis of shade, temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration during dental bleaching: in vitro study with the KTP and diode lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, C; Lagori, G; Merigo, E; Meleti, M; Manfredi, M; Guidotti, R; Serraj, A; Vescovi, P

    2013-01-01

    Many dental bleaching techniques are now available, several of them using a laser source. However, the literature on the exact role of coherent light in the biochemical reaction of the whitening process is very discordant. The aims of this in vitro study were: (1) to compare two different laser sources, a KTP laser with a wavelength of 532 nm and a diode laser with a wavelength of 808 nm, during dental bleaching, and (2) to investigate the relationships among changes in gel temperature, tooth shade and hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentration during laser irradiation. Altogether, 116 bovine teeth were bleached using a 30% HP gel, some of them with gel only and others with gel plus one of the two lasers (532 or 808 nm) at two different powers (2 and 4 W). The KTP laser produced a significant shade variation with a minimal temperature increase. The diode laser led to a higher temperature increase with a greater reduction in HP concentration, but the change in shade was only statistically significant with a power of 4 W. At a power of 2 W, the KTP laser caused a greater change in shade than the diode laser. No significant correlations were found among temperature, HP concentration and shade variation. The KTP laser appears to provide better results with less dangerous thermal increases than the diode laser. This might call into question most of the literature affirming that the action of laser bleaching is by increasing the gel temperature and, consequently, the speed of the redox reaction. Further study is required to investigate the correlations between the parameters investigated and efficacy of the bleaching process.

  10. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela Baptista PAULA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed.Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals.Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa.Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group.Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized.

  11. The differences of tooth density changes in the applications of 45% carbamide peroxide PF and 38% hydrogen peroxide PF as dental bleaching agents and after the application of 1.2% acidulated phosphoric fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devriza Jurnalis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The changes of tooth density is caused by the dissolutions of mineral enamel (demineralization by bleaching agent. The purpose of this research was intended to know tooth density changes after the application of bleaching agent using 45% carbamide peroxide potassium fluoride (PF and 38% hydrogen peroxide potassium fluoride (PF and after the application of 1.2% acidulated phosphoric fluoride (APF.This research was true experimental in-vitro. Sample taking was by random sampling. The sample consisted of 32 maxillary central incisive permanent teeth. The tooth density was measured using RVG (Radiovisiography. The research results were analyzed and tested in a pair and in a pair of two sample for means using t student method. The conclusion of the research was a decrease of tooth density after the application of bleaching agent with 45% carbamide peroxide PF and 38% hydrogen peroxide PF with statistically significant. After the application of 1.2% APF the density increased significantly but the density was lower than original density. There was no significant difference between bleached with 45% carbamide peroxide potassium fluoride and 38% hydrogen peroxide potassium fluoride.

  12. Bleaching of olive mill wastewater by clay in the presence of hydrogen peroxide; Decoloration d'effluents liquides des huileries d'olives par des sols argileux en presence du peroxyde d'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oukili, O.; Chaouch, M.; Rafiq, M. [Faculte des Sciences, Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux et de l' Environnement, Fes (Morocco); Hadji, M. [Laboratoire de Controle des Eaux, R.A.D.E.E.F., Fes (Morocco); Hamdi, M. [INSAT, Lab. de Microbiologie de l' Environnement, Fes (Morocco); Benlemlih, M. [Faculte des Sciences, Lab. de Microbiologie de l' Environnement, Fes (Morocco)

    2001-04-01

    Treatment of olive mill wastewater (OMW) with clayey soils in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) allows the elimination of phenolic compounds responsible for the black-brownish color of this industrial effluent. The aim of this research was to define optimal physicochemical parameters for the bleaching of OMW with clay in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Two clayey soil powders were tested (A and B) and the results obtained indicate that high bleaching could be reached after 24 hours exposure of OMW to 7 % (W/V) clay material A in the presence of 0.5 % (V/V) hydrogen peroxide. Under these conditions, the bleaching led to about 87 % decrease of polyphenols (PF) and a 66 % decrease of the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). The structure of clay and its concentration in iron salts have an effective adsorbent and catalytic effect on the removal of the majority of polyphenols. (authors)

  13. High-performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide present or released in teeth bleaching kits and hair cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Pascal; Bousquet, Claudine; Lassu, Nelly; Maggio, Annie-Françoise; Civade, Corinne; Brenier, Charlotte; Lempereur, Laurent

    2015-03-25

    This manuscript presents an HPLC/UV method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide present or released in teeth bleaching products and hair products. The method is based on an oxidation of triphenylphosphine into triphenylphosphine oxide by hydrogen peroxide. Triphenylphosphine oxide formed is quantified by HPLC/UV. Validation data were obtained using the ISO 12787 standard approach, particularly adapted when it is not possible to make reconstituted sample matrices. For comparative purpose, hydrogen peroxide was also determined using ceric sulfate titrimetry for both types of products. For hair products, a cross validation of both ceric titrimetric method and HPLC/UV method using the cosmetic 82/434/EEC directive (official iodometric titration method) was performed. Results obtained for 6 commercialized teeth whitening products and 5 hair products point out similar hydrogen peroxide contain using either the HPLC/UV method or ceric sulfate titrimetric method. For hair products, results were similar to the hydrogen peroxide content using the cosmetic 82/434/EEC directive method and for the HPLC/UV method, mean recoveries obtained on spiked samples, using the ISO 12787 standard, ranges from 100% to 110% with a RSDbleaching products during a market survey and highlight for 5 products, hydrogen peroxide contents higher than the regulated limit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth submitted to bleaching treatment with hydrogen peroxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles photoactivated by LED-laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Cristina JORDÃO-BASSO

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth after bleaching treatment using 15% hydrogen peroxide plus titanium dioxide nanoparticles (15HPTiO2 photoactivated by LED-laser, in comparison with protocols using 35% hydrogen peroxide (35HP, 37% carbamide peroxide (37CP or sodium perborate (SP. Material and method: After endodontic treatment, fifty bovine extracted incisors were divided into five groups (n = 10: G1- without bleaching; G2- 35HP; G3- 37CP; G4- 15HPTiO2 photoactivated by LED-laser and G5- SP. In G2 and G4, the bleaching protocol was applied in 4 sessions, with a 7 day interval between each session. In G3 and G5, the materials were kept in the pulp chamber for 21 days, but replaced every 7 days. After 21 days, the crowns were subjected to compressive load at a cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min, applied at 135° to the long axis of the root using an eletromechanical testing machine, until fracture. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p = 0.05. Result: The bleaching treatment in endodontically-treated teeth with 15HP plus TiO2 nanoparticles and photoactivated by LED-laser caused reduction of the fracture resistance similarly provided by 35HP, 37CP or SP (p>0.05. All bleaching treatments reduced the fracture resistance compared to unbleached teeth (p<0.05. Conclusion: All bleaching protocols reduced the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth, but there were no differences between each other.

  15. Clinical comparative study of the effectiveness of and tooth sensitivity to 10% and 20% carbamide peroxide home-use and 35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching materials containing desensitizing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basting, R T; Amaral, F L B; França, F M G; Flório, F M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of and tooth sensitivity to 10% and 20% carbamide peroxide (CP) home-use bleaching agents and 35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP) in-office bleaching agents, all of which contain desensitizing agents, in a clinical trial. Four agents were evaluated: 10% CP and 20% CP (Opalescence PF 10% and Opalescence PF 20%, Ultradent, both with 0.5% potassium nitrate and 0.11% fluoride ions), 38% HP (Opalescence Boost PF, Ultradent, with 3% potassium nitrate and 1.1% fluoride ions), and 35% HP (Pola Office, SDI, with potassium nitrate). The initial screening procedure included 100 volunteers, aged 18 to 42, with no previous sensitivity or bleaching treatment and with any tooth shade. Volunteers were randomly assigned among the technique/bleaching agent groups. A run-in period was performed 1 week before the beginning of the bleaching treatment. For the home-use bleaching technique, each volunteer was instructed to dispense gel (10% CP or 20% CP) into the trays and then insert them into his or her mouth for at least two hours per night for three weeks. For the in-office bleaching technique, the bleaching agents (38% HP or 35% HP) were prepared and used following the manufacturer's instructions, with three applications performed in each session. Three sessions were carried out with an interval of seven days between each session. The participants were evaluated before, at one week, two weeks, and three weeks after the beginning of the bleaching treatment, and again one and two weeks after the bleaching treatment ended. A shade guide (Vita Classical, Vita) was used by a blinded examiner to perform shade evaluations before bleaching and two weeks after the end of bleaching. At the time of the shade evaluations, tooth sensitivity was also recorded by asking the volunteers to classify the sensitivity during bleaching treatment as absent, mild, moderate, or severe. The present study found that 13.8% of the volunteers withdrew from

  16. The Effect of Preheating Treatment and non-simultaneous Addition of Chemicals on the Efficiency of Hydrogen Peroxide Bleaching of Chemi-mechanical pulp(CMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi Behrooz

    2011-12-01

    Results obtained from measuring optical and physical properties of handsheets showed that in all treatments at the same peroxide charge, non-simultaneous addition of chemicalswithpretreatment (process 3 caused better improvement in brightness and density of the paper. Also opacity، yellowness and caliper were lower in this process than the others. To reach a given brightness, hydrogen peroxide can be decreased. Therefore, by using the modified bleaching process we can economize on consumption of chemicals, by decreasing peroxide and alkali consumption at 1% and 23.8% to reach a given brightness. Also, COD load in this process at both levels of peroxide was lower than the other processes and therefore, it may decrease environmental contamination and effluent treatment requirement.

  17. The corrosion of titanium and some other construction materials during hydrogen peroxide bleaching according to the field measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyoekyvirta, O.; Pohjanne, P.; Heinaevaara, A. [Oy METSA-BOTNIA Ab, Kaskinen' s mill, 64260 Kaskinen (Finland); Hirvonen, J. [VTT Automation, Industrial Automation, P.O. Box 1301, FIN-02044 (Finland); Lewenstam, A. [Center for Process Analytical Chemistry and Sensor Technology ' ProSens' Abo Akademi University, 20500 Abo (Finland)

    1999-07-01

    In a Finnish pulp mill, the field measurements of different materials were performed in different stages of peroxide bleaching: P{sub 1} and P{sub 2}. The field measurements were performed with three different sensors. The sensors were designed in co-operation with Valmet Automation Kajaani Oy. Each sensor measured the corrosion potential, the redox potential and the weight losses of three different materials. Simultaneously, the data of the most important parameters of bleaching, i.e. temperature, pH, peroxide flow rate and concentration, mass flow, consistency, residuals, flow rate and concentration of alkaline, were collected in the data logger by a dedicated program. The results proved that the corrosion of different materials (stainless steel S31654, nickel-based alloy N10276 and titanium Gr. 5) could be estimated with field experiments. The uniform corrosion of titanium occurred in a certain bleaching situation. The field measurements gave a good estimation of whether the material dissolved during process operation or process disorders. Our results clearly show that the mixing of the chemicals can be reliably estimated, and thus advantageous for a pulp mill. The materials studied withstood the bleaching significantly better if the chemicals were mixed directly with a pulp. Usually the chemicals are mixed with alkaline and then added to the pulp. The field measurements could also be applied in ozone and in the peracetic acid bleaching stage. The sensors can be utilized as tools during process monitoring or diagnostics. With the aid of monitoring it is possible to clarify how the different process operation models affect the corrosion of materials. (author)

  18. Effects of catalase, 2% chlorhexidine gel and 1% sodium hypochlorite on the microtensile bond strength of teeth bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ferreira

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Dental bleaching is an effective, relatively simple and noninvasive technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of catalase, 2% chlorhexidine gel, and 1% sodium hypochlorite on the microtensile bond strength to enamel of bovine teeth submitted to internal and external bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Material and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were used. They had their debris removed, washed in tap water and stored frozen. The samples were divided into five experimental groups according to the treatment applied after bleaching (n = 12: 1 − control/no bleaching (C; 2 − catalase (CA; 3 − 2% chlorhexidine gel (CG; 4 − 1% sodium hypochlorite (SH; 5 − distilled water (DW. For microtensile test, samples were prepared into blocks of enamel/resin, which were sectioned to obtain hourglass-like specimens. Bond strength was calculated in MPa and data analyzed statistically by Anova (p < 0.05. Results: Microtensile bond strength means decreased in comparison to control group, but no statistically significant difference between groups was found. Conclusion: The substances used after dental bleaching did not result in statistically significant microtensile bond strength means of the tested groups.

  19. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  20. 过氧化氢漂白对开心果中花青素的影响%Effect of hydrogen peroxide bleaching on anthocyanidin in roasted pistachio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玳; 方明; 杜磊; 孙贵朋; 戴玉婷; 谢静莉

    2011-01-01

    目的 考察漂白剂过氧化氢及碱液漂白对开心果中花青素的影响,并对漂白工艺的必要性进行探讨.方法 用带有二极管阵列检测器的高效液相色谱仪检测漂白过的开心果果衣中矢车菊素-3-O-葡萄糖苷和矢车菊素-3-O-半乳糖苷含量;对开心果的硬外壳、果衣及果仁的外观进行对比.结果开心果中2种花青素含量对H2O2很敏感.用0.1%过氧化氢漂白30 min,就可使花青素含量减少约60%.当H202浓度为5%以上时,开心果中矢车菊素-3-0-葡萄糖苷含量减少至检测不出,而矢车菊素-3-O-半乳糖苷含量损失达到90%.漂白的动力学过程也指出,反应发生迅速、直接,渗透过程不是反应的限速步骤.碱液与过氧化氢的协同漂白可使开心果外壳漂得更洁白,但果仁中花青素含量损失更多.检测了5种市售漂白过的开心果和2种市售未漂白的开心果,漂白过的开心果中2种花青素均未检出,而未漂白开心果中花青素均有保留.结论 漂白过程破坏了食用部分中的花青素,因而这一工艺步骤是否有必要,值得结合《中华人民共和国食品安全法》和《食品添加剂使用卫生标准》进一步讨论.%Objective To investigate the effect of bleaching agent hydrogen peroxide and alkali on anthocyanidin in pistachio and the necessity of bleaching techniques. Methods High performance liquid chromatography ( HPLC) with diode array detector (DAD) was used to determinate the content of cyanidin-3-0-glucoside and cyanidin-3-O-galactoside in pistachio. The appearances of hard shell, kernel skin and kernel of raw, natural and bleached pistachio were compared. Results Anthocyanidins were rather sensitive to hydrogen peroxide. The content of anthocyanidins in pistachio treated by 0. 1% H2O2wa8 reduced 60% . As the concentration of H,O2 was increased to more than 5% , the content of cyanidin-3-0-glucoside was not able to be detected while the content of cyanidin

  1. Application of chicken feather protein auxiliary in hydrogen peroxide bleaching%鸡毛蛋白助剂在棉织物双氧水漂白中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔雀; 王雪燕; 赵后阳

    2012-01-01

    探讨在双氧水漂液中加入适量鸡毛蛋白助剂,减少硅酸钠用量,进一步提高棉织物的白度、毛效及断裂强度.将单独硅酸钠、单独鸡毛蛋白助剂及其联合使用对双氧水漂白棉织物白度、毛效及断裂强度的影响,优化复配助剂的漂白工艺条件,评价鸡毛蛋白助剂在双氧水漂白棉织物中的应用效果.结果表明,蛋白助剂有利于改善双氧水漂白效果.%Adding appropriate amount of chicken feather protein additives to the hydrogen peroxide bleaching solution was discussed. In order to make the dosages of sodium silicate could be reduced and the whiteness. capillary effect and the breaking strength of cotton fabrics was further improve. The effect of sodium silicate alone, the chicken feather protein auxiliary alone, and combination of them on the whiteness,capillarity effect and breaking strength of the cotton fabrics bleaching with hydrogen peroxide was studied. Optimization of the bleaching agent mixed conditions. The application effect of chicken feather protein additives in hydrogen peroxide bleaching was evaluated. The result shows that the protein additive is benefit to improve the bleaching effect of hydrogen peroxide.

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F.

    2007-01-01

    A relatively simple and economical process and apparatus for concentrating hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution at the point of use have been invented. The heart of the apparatus is a vessel comprising an outer shell containing tubular membranes made of a polymer that is significantly more permeable by water than by hydrogen peroxide. The aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to be concentrated is fed through the interstitial spaces between the tubular membranes. An initially dry sweep gas is pumped through the interiors of the tubular membranes. Water diffuses through the membranes and is carried away as water vapor mixed into the sweep gas. Because of the removal of water, the hydrogen peroxide solution flowing from the vessel at the outlet end is more concentrated than that fed into the vessel at the inlet end. The sweep gas can be air, nitrogen, or any other gas that can be conveniently supplied in dry form and does not react chemically with hydrogen peroxide.

  3. Recognizing a limitation of the TBLC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenhua; Wang, Lun; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jingjing; Sun, Chang; Xu, Changhai

    2016-04-20

    In this study, cotton was bleached at low temperatures with an activated peroxide system which was established by incorporating a bleach activator, namely, N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]caprolactam chloride (TBCC) into an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Experimental results showed that the bleaching performance was unexpectedly diminished as the TBCC concentration was increased over the range of 25-100g/L. Kinetic adsorption experiment indicated that this was most likely ascribed to the adsorptive interactions of TBCC and the in situ-generated compounds with cotton fibers. Such a limitation was especially fatal to cold pad-batch bleaching process of cotton in which a high TBCC concentration was often required. The results of this study may stimulate further research to avoid or overcome the limitation of the TBCC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching.

  4. Fragmentation of the gastrodermis and detachment of zooxanthellae in symbiotic cnidarians: a role for hydrogen peroxide and Ca2+ in coral bleaching and algal density control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M Sandeman

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching involves the detachment of zooxanthellae and the simultaneous fragmentation of the gastrodermis. Results obtained with a cell permeant fluorescent probe for calcium ions (Ca2+ indicates that "thermal" bleaching is the result of a temperature related breakdown of the Ca2+ exclusion system. "Solar" bleaching, which takes place at lower temperatures and is driven by light, is the result of a build-up of photo-synthetically produced hydrogen peroxide in the tissues. Gastrodermal tissue with its symbionts, scraped from between septa of corals, was observed under controlled conditions of high light and temperature. Pieces of gastrodermis round off, zooxanthellae move to the surface, protrude from the surface and after a delay, detach, surrounded by a thin layer of host cytoplasm, inclusions and plasma membrane. The higher the temperature and light level the shorter the delay and higher the rate of algal detachment. Fragmentation by the ballooning-out and detachment of small spheres of cytoplasm (bleb formation takes place simultaneously. This is likely to be due to oxidation, by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, of -SH groups on the cytoskeleton and its attachment to the plasma membrane. Ground, polished and stained thin acrylic resin sections reveal similar processes taking place in artificially bleached corals. Isolated zooxanthellae and whole corals are shown to release H2O2 in the light. This process of algal detachment and fragmentation that takes place at normal sea temperatures may underlie the mechanism limiting algal populations in the gastrodermis and may be localized to areas with a concentration of algae near the membrane. At above-normal temperatures under the synergistic effect of light and temperature, the rate of production of H2O2 exceeds the rate at which can it be lost by diffusion or destroyed and H2O2 accumulates. This results in damage to the calcium exclusion system, detachment of zooxanthellae into the coelenteron and

  5. New Technology of Refiner Bleaching with Magnesium Hydroxide and Hydrogen Peroxide%磨浆过程中添加氢氧化镁和过氧化氢进行漂白的新技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚光裕

    2012-01-01

    Conventional bleaching of mechanical pulp with magnesium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide shows significant economic benefits over bleaching with caustic soda, sodium silicate and hydrogen per oxide, using magnesium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide bleaching mechanical pulp generates lower effluent COD/BOD,higher pulp yield, solvesed oxalate scaling and so on. North pacific has developed this bleaching new technology into production thermo mechanical pulp. The excellent mixing,high temperature and high consistency of the refining environment solubi lize the magnesium hydroxide and provide an excellent bleach reactor with addition of hydrogen perox ide. Addition magnesium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide into the refining system,refiner energy de mand is reduced by 100~200kW ·h/t · pulp and pulp strength is improved by 5~10%.%由氢氧化钠+过氧化氢+硅酸钠转变成氢氧化镁+过氧化氢漂白机械浆具有明显的经济效益。采用氢氧化镁+过氧化氢漂白预热木片磨木浆产生废水COD/BOD负荷较低、纸浆得率较高和解决了草酸盐结垢等等。North pacific造纸公司研制出这种漂白新技术已用于生产预热木片磨木浆工厂。由于在磨浆过程中添加氢氧化镁+过氧化氢,在高温和高浓度下使浆料和漂白化学品很好混和,提供过氧化氢极佳的漂白反应,添加氢氧化镁+过氧化氢到磨浆系统,使磨浆所需能量降低100~200kW·h/t浆,并可提高纸浆强度5%~10%。

  6. Peroxide dental bleaching via laser microchannels and tooth color measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Gregory; Belikov, Andrey; Skrypnik, Alexei; Feldchtein, Felix; Pushkareva, Alexandra; Shatilova, Ksenia; Cernavin, Igor; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use microchannels drilled by an Er:YAG laser into a human tooth through the enamel into the dentin for direct injection of hydrogen peroxide (HP) to produce a minimally invasive, rapid, tooth bleaching effect. The experiments were conducted in vitro. Five microchannels with a diameter of ˜200 μm and a depth of ˜2 mm were drilled through the palatal side of a human tooth crown using the microbeam of an Er:YAG-laser with a wavelength of 2.94 μm. After injection of an aqueous solution of 31%-HP through the microchannels, the tooth color was evaluated using a VITA shade guide and International Commission on Illumination L*ab color parameters. A tooth model used for the evaluation of the distribution of HP concentration was created and the amount of HP which can be injected into tooth dentin to bleach it safely was estimated. Injection of 1.5±0.1 mm3 of 31%-HP into the tooth led to noticeable bleaching within 3 h and significant improvement of tooth color within 24 h.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  8. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  9. Comparison of Radicular Peroxide Leakage from four Commonly used Bleaching agents following Intracoronal Bleaching in Endodontically treated teeth - An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, Ks; Hegde, Swaroop; Mathew, Sylvia; Lata, DA; Bhandi, Shilpa H; N, Shruthi

    2013-08-01

    Non vital bleaching is simple, conservative procedure for esthetic correction of discolored endodontically treated teeth. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the amount of peroxide leakage from four different bleaching agents i.e superoxol, sodium perborate, combination of superoxol & sodium perborate and carbamide peroxide during intracoronal bleaching, as the safe and effective bleaching is the need of the hour. 50 extracted maxillary centrals were selected for the study. Following standardized protocol access, cleaning and shaping by step back technique and obturation was done using guttapercha and AH plus sealer. Access was sealed with Cavit G and outer root surface was coated with wax and nail varnish. The teeth were separated into crown and root and the root portion was placed in plastic tube containing distilled water for 7days.After incubation, 3mm of gutta-percha was removed below CEJ and 2mm glass ionomer cement base was placed. Grouped into five categories based on the bleaching agent placed in pulp chamber as -group1 (control)-distilled water, group 2-sodium perborate with distilled water , group 3- 30% hydrogen peroxide ,group 4-mixture of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide and group 5-10% carbamide peroxide gel. Peroxide leakage was measured after 24hrs using ferrothiocyanate method and optical density using spectrophotometer. Statistical analysis of the data was conducted using ANOVA and multiple comparisons within the groups was done using BONFERRONI method (Post-Hoc tests). The results showed highest peroxide penetration from 30% hydrogen peroxide followed by mixture of sodium perborate with 30% hydrogen peroxide, mixture of sodium perborate with distilled water and least penetration from 10% carbamide peroxide gel. The results were statistically significant. Radicular peroxide leakage in 10% carbamide peroxide was significantly lower than the other tested bleaching agents making it a very safe alternative for intracoronal

  10. Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

  11. Peroxide bleaching agent effects on enamel surface microhardness, roughness and morphology

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness, microhardness and morphology of human enamel exposed to six bleaching agents (at baseline and post-treatment). Human dental enamel samples were obtained from human third molars and randomly divided into seven groups (n = 11): control, Whiteness Perfect - 10% carbamide peroxide (10% CP), Colgate Platinum - 10% CP, Day White 2Z - 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (7.5% HP), Whiteness Super - 37% CP, Opalescence Quick - 35% CP and Whiteness HP - ...

  12. Decoloración de alginato de sodio extraído de las algas pardas marinas del género Sargassum con el uso de peróxido de hidrógeno Bleaching of sodium alginate from the brown seaweeds Sargassum with hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik L. Regalado

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide bleaching of sodium alginate from seaweeds oh the Sargassum genus was studied. The influence of H2O2 concentration (percentage of H2O2 on a dry weight alginate basis, w/w and NaOH/H2O2 ratio (% NaOH/% H2O2, both referred to a dry weight alginate basis, w/w on the molecular weight, color removal and content of Fe3+ ions of bleached alginate samples was investigated by UV and IR spectroscopies, colorimetric determination of Fe3+ ions and vapor pressure osmometry. Higher yield, purity and molecular weight of alginate were obtained using 3% (or less of hydrogen peroxide and a NaOH/H2O2 ratio of 1.2 for bleaching.

  13. 过氧化氢酶去除漂白残留过氧化氢工艺的研究%Study on Removal of Residual Hydrogen Peroxide from Bleaching Process with Catalase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王岚; 吴建国

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the residual hydrogen peroxide from bleaching process of cotton knitted fabric were removed with catalase. Based on the research of single factor experiments, the optimum conditions for the removal of hydrogen peroxide with catalase were as follows: pH value 7~ 8, dosage of catalase 0.1 g/L, temperature 20℃, enzyme processing time 15 min, bath ratio 1∶15.%本文采用过氧化氢酶去除过氧化氢漂白棉针织物时残留的过氧化氢,通过单因素实验分析,确定影响过氧化氢酶去除残留过氧化氢工艺的最适条件为:pH值7~8,过氧化氢酶用量0.1 g/L,温度20℃,处理15 min,浴比1∶15。

  14. Effects of different concentrations of carbamide peroxide and bleaching periods on the roughness of dental ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Augusto Morey Ourique

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The wide use of dental bleaching treatment has brought concern about the possible effects of hydrogen peroxide on dental tissue and restorative materials. The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of nightguard bleaching on the surface roughness of dental ceramics after different periods of bleaching treatment. Fifteen specimens of 5 × 3 × 1 mm were created with three dental ceramics following the manufacturers' instructions: IPS Classic (Ivoclar-Vivadent; IPS d.Sign (Ivoclar-Vivadent; and VMK-95 (Vita. A profilometer was used to evaluate baseline surface roughness (Ra values of all ceramics by five parallel measurements with five 0.25 mm cut off (Λc at 0.1 mm/s. Afterwards, all specimens were submitted to 6-h daily bleaching treatments with 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide (Whiteness- FGM for 21 days, while control groups from each ceramic system were stored in artificial saliva. The surface roughness of all groups was evaluated after 18 h, 42 h, 84 h, and 126 h of bleaching treatment. The surface roughness of each specimen (n = 5 was based on the mean value of five parallel measurements in each time and all data were submitted to two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05. No significant differences in ceramic surface roughness were observed between untreated and bleached ceramic surfaces, regardless of bleaching intervals or bleaching treatments. This study provided evidence that at-home bleaching systems do not cause detrimental effects on surface roughness of dental ceramics.

  15. ALKALINE PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF HOT WATER TREATED WHEAT STRAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Mustajoki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibilities for chemical consumption reduction in P-P-Paa-P bleaching (P alkaline peroxide stage, Paa peracetic stage of hot water treated straw and the effect of the wheat straw variability on the process. Papermaking fibre production from wheat straw using such a process could be implemented on a small scale if chemical consumption was low enough to eliminate the need for chemical recovery. The pulp properties obtained with this process are equal to or even superior to the properties of wheat straw soda pulp. The possibility of enhancing the first peroxide stage with oxygen and pressure was studied. The possibility for substitution of sodium hydroxide partially with sodium carbonate was also investigated. The objective was to achieve International Standardization Organization (ISO brightness of 75%, with minimal sodium hydroxide consumption, whilst maintaining the pulp properties. The optimization of the peroxide bleaching is challenging if the final brightness target cannot be reduced. Results indicate that up to 25% of the sodium hydroxide could be substituted with sodium carbonate without losing brightness or affecting pulp properties. Another possibility is a mild alkali treatment between the hot water treatment and the bleaching sequence.

  16. 过氧化氢对亚麻的超声漂白与染色%Hydrogen Peroxide to Flax Ultrasonic Bleaching and Dyeing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐淑娟; 高云岭; 王明

    2001-01-01

    The findings indicate that ultrasound applying to flax bleaching can not only reduce reacting temperature but also improve on capability of dyeing and stiffness of flax.%实验表明,采用超声波漂白亚麻可以降低反应温度、增加柔软性能和上染速率及上染百分率。

  17. Progress toward hydrogen peroxide micropulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C; Dittman, M D; Ledebuhr, A G

    1999-07-08

    A new self-pressurizing propulsion system has liquid thrusters and gas jet attitude control without heavy gas storage vessels. A pump boosts the pressure of a small fraction of the hydrogen peroxide, so that reacted propellant can controllably pressurize its own source tank. The warm decomposition gas also powers the pump and is supplied to the attitude control jets. The system has been incorporated into a prototype microsatellite for terrestrial maneuvering tests. Additional progress includes preliminary testing of a bipropellant thruster, and storage of unstabilized hydrogen peroxide in small sealed tanks.

  18. ALKALI DARKENING AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF MECHANICAL PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhibin He; Yonghao Ni; Eric Zhang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of alkalinity, transition metals and oxygen on alkali darkening of mechanical pulp, and its relations to subsequent peroxide bleaching were investigated. The chromophores generated under mild conditions of an alkaline treatment can be destroyed in a subsequent peroxide stage.Peroxide-resistant chromophores are generated only under severe conditions. The results also show that a short alkaline pretreatment can improve the performance of a peroxide bleaching stage.

  19. ALKALI DARKENING AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF MECHANICAL PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhibinHe; Yon2haoNi; EricZhang_

    2004-01-01

    The effect of alkalinity, transition metals and oxygen on alkali darkening of mechanical pulp, and its relations to subsequent peroxide bleaching were investigated. The chromophores generated under mild conditions of an alkaline treatment can be destroyed in a subsequent peroxide stage. Peroxide-resistant chromophores are generated only under severe conditions. The results also show that a short alkaline pretreatment can improve the performance of a peroxide bleaching stage.

  20. Comparing the Effect of Different Bleaching Regims of Carbamide Peroxide on Microhardness of Z250 Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Esmaeili

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bleaching products with oxidizing mechanism can exert side effects on the restorative materials existing in the oral cavity. Since bleaching agents are applied in different concentrations, the present study aimed to compare the effect of different bleaching regims of carbamide peroxide on microhardness of Z250 microhybride composite. Methods: In this in vitro study , 32 specimens of micro hybride composite (Z250 were made which were randomly divided into 4 subgroups (n=8: G1: bleached with10% carbamide peroxide 4 hours a day for 2 weeks G2: bleached with 16%carbamide peroxide 3 hours a day for 2 weeks G3: bleached with 22%carbamide peroxide 1hour a day for 2 weeks G4: the control subgroup stored in distilled water at 37◦c for 2 weeks. Microhardness of specimens was measured before and after bleaching using Vickers hardness testing machine. Moreover, the study data were analyzed statistically applying Anova and t-test (&alpha= 0.05. Results: This study findings revealed that using bleaching agent significantly decreased the  microhardness of composite resin in the bleaching groups compared to the control group, though the concentration of carbamide peroxide produced no significant effect on the microhardness value. (p>0.13 Conclusion: Bleaching therapy can cause a reduction in microhardness of Z250 composite and different concentrations of carbamide peroxide can reduce microhardness of Z250 to the same value.

  1. High level extracellular production of a recombinant alkaline catalase in E. coli BL21 under ethanol stress and its application in hydrogen peroxide removal after cotton fabrics bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenxiao; Zheng, Hongchen; Zhao, Xingya; Li, Shufang; Xu, Jianyong; Song, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The effects of induction parameters, osmolytes and ethanol stress on the productivity of the recombinant alkaline catalase (KatA) in Escherichia coli BL21 (pET26b-KatA) were investigated. The yield of soluble KatA was significantly enhanced by 2% ethanol stress. And a certain amount of Triton X-100 supplementation could markedly improved extracellular ratio of KatA. A total soluble catalase activity of 78,762U/mL with the extracellular ratio of 92.5% was achieved by fed-batch fermentation in a 10L fermentor, which was the highest yield so far. The purified KatA showed high stability at 50°C and pH 6-10. Application of KatA for elimination of H2O2 after cotton fabrics bleaching led to less consumption of water, steam and electric power by 25%, 12% and 16.7% respectively without productivity and quality losing of cotton fabrics. Thus, the recombinant KatA is a promising candidate for industrial production and applications.

  2. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  3. Accidental Ingestion of 35% Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Pritchett

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide is a commonly used oxidizing agent with a variety of uses depending on its concentration. Ingestion of hydrogen peroxide is not an uncommon source of poisoning, and results in morbidity through three main mechanisms: direct caustic injury, oxygen gas formation and lipid peroxidation. A case of a 39-year-old man who inadvertently ingested 250 mL of unlabelled 35% hydrogen peroxide intended for natural health use is presented. Hydrogen peroxide has purported benefits ranging from HIV treatment to cancer treatment. Its use in the natural health industry represents an emerging source for accidental poisonings.

  4. A Study for Tooth Bleaching via Carbamide Peroxide-Loaded Hollow Calcium Phosphate Spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Qin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate if a prolonged bleaching effect of carbamide peroxide-loaded hollow calcium phosphate spheres (HCPS can be achieved. HCPS was synthesized via a hydrothermal reaction method. Carbamide peroxide (CP was-loaded into HCPS by mixing with distilled water as solvent. We developed two bleaching gels containing CP-loaded HCPS: one gel with low HP concentration as at-home bleaching gel, and one with high HP concentration as in-office gel. Their bleaching effects on stained human permanent posterior teeth were investigated by measuring the color difference before and after bleaching. The effect of gels on rhodamine B degradation was also studied. To investigate the potential effect of remineralization of using HCPS, bleached teeth were soaked in phosphate buffer solution (PBS containing calcium and magnesium ions. Both bleaching gels had a prolonged whitening effect, and showed a strong ability to degrade rhodamine B. After soaking in PBS for 3 days, remineralization was observed at the sites where HCPS attached to the teeth surface. CP-loaded HCPS could prolong the HP release behavior and improve the bleaching effect. HCPS was effective in increasing the whitening effect of carbamide peroxide and improving remineralization after bleaching process.

  5. Coating for components requiring hydrogen peroxide compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefiani, Ali (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a heretofore-unknown use for zirconium nitride as a hydrogen peroxide compatible protective coating that was discovered to be useful to protect components that catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide or corrode when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. A zirconium nitride coating of the invention may be applied to a variety of substrates (e.g., metals) using art-recognized techniques, such as plasma vapor deposition. The present invention further provides components and articles of manufacture having hydrogen peroxide compatibility, particularly components for use in aerospace and industrial manufacturing applications. The zirconium nitride barrier coating of the invention provides protection from corrosion by reaction with hydrogen peroxide, as well as prevention of hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R.W.; Anderson, M.S.; Johnson, R.E.; Smythe, W.D.; Hendrix, A.R.; Barth, C.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Hansen, G.B.; McCord, T.B.; Dalton, J.B.; Clark, R.N.; Shirley, J.H.; Ocampo, A.C.; Matson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Spatially resolved infrared and ultraviolet wavelength spectra of Europa's leading, anti-jovian quadrant observed from the Galileo spacecraft show absorption features resulting from hydrogen peroxide. Comparisons with laboratory measurements indicate surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations of about 0.13 percent, by number, relative to water ice. The inferred abundance is consistent with radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide by intense energetic particle bombardment and demonstrates that Europa's surface chemistry is dominated by radiolysis.

  7. USING Mg(OH2 IN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF WHEAT STRAW SODA-AQ PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlan Liu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The peroxide bleaching of high yield pulps from wood with Mg(OH2 has been developing recently in the pulp and paper industry. However, there is still a lack of data on the application of Mg(OH2 in peroxide bleaching of non-wood fibres. In this work, our purpose was to study the effect of Mg(OH2 on peroxide bleaching of wheat straw soda-AQ pulp. The results showed that Mg(OH2 significantly improved peroxide bleaching efficiency (expressed as the ratio between the brightness gain and the H2O2 consumption and selectivity (expressed as the ratio between the brightness gain and the viscosity losses of wheat straw soda-AQ pulp. The brightness, viscosity, and yield of bleached pulp can be significantly enhanced by increasing the replacement ratio of Mg(OH2. However, at 100% replacement of NaOH with Mg(OH2, the brightness of bleached pulp was much lower than that of the bleached pulp with NaOH as the sole alkaline source. When 24 to 73% of the NaOH was replaced with Mg(OH2, the COD of the bleaching filtrate was 11 to 38% lower than that of the NaOH as the sole alkaline source. The lower solubility and alkalinity of Mg(OH2, as well as the reduction of Cu ion content in bleached pulp were proposed as accounting for the favorable effect of Mg(OH2 on peroxide bleaching of wheat straw soda-AQ pulp.

  8. Study on removal of residual hydrogen peroxide from bleaching process with catalase by response surface methodology%响应面法优化过氧化氢酶去除漂白残留过氧化氢工艺的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王岚; 吴建国

    2015-01-01

    采用过氧化氢酶去除棉针织物煮漂后残留的过氧化氢残液,用响应面分析法确定最适过氧化氢酶去除棉针织物上残留过氧化氢工艺为:过氧化氢酶用量0.144 g/L、处理时间16 min、处理温度27℃、pH=7、浴比1∶15.在此条件下,过氧化氢去除率提高到97.69%.%The residual hydrogen peroxide solution was removed from bleaching process of cotton knitted fabric by catalase. The optimum conditions for removal the residual hydrogen peroxide of cotton knitted fabric with catalase by response surface methodology were as fol ows: amount of catalase 0.144 g/L, enzyme pro⁃cessing time 16 min, temperature 27 ℃, pH=7, bath ratio 1∶15. Under the optimum conditions, the removal rate of residual hydrogen peroxide was increased to 97.69%.

  9. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen... group. Eggs: Some strains of rainbow trout eggs are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide treatment at a time...

  10. Hydrogen peroxide enteritis: the "snow white" sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, J J; Waye, J D

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a useful disinfectant that has achieved widespread utility in varied clinical settings. We report an epidemic of hydrogen peroxide enteritis that developed in seven patients in our gastrointestinal endoscopy unit during a 2-week period in early 1988. During endoscopy, using recently sterilized endoscopes that were flushed with 3% hydrogen peroxide after the glutaraldehyde cycle, instantaneous blanching (the "snow white" sign) and effervescence were noted on the mucosal surfaces when the water button was depressed. No patient subsequently suffered morbidity or mortality associated with this peroxide enteritis, and the biopsy specimens revealed nonspecific inflammation. The toxicity of hydrogen peroxide when used in enema form is reviewed, as well as the pathogenesis of peroxide enteritis.

  11. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  12. Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide Sterilization Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack

    For interplanetary missions landing on a planet of potential biological interest, United States NASA planetary protection currently requires that the flight system must be assembled, tested and ultimately launched with the intent of minimizing the bioload taken to and deposited on the planet. Currently the only NASA approved microbial reduction method is dry heat sterilization process. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements. The VHP sterilization technology is widely used by the medical industry, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal of our study is determine the minimum VHP process conditions for PP acceptable microbial reduction levels. A series of experiments were conducted using Geobacillus stearothermophilus to determine VHP process parameters that provided significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters -hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of pulses, and exposure duration -the investigation also considered the possible effect of environmental pa-rameters. Temperature, relative humidity, and material substrate effects on lethality were also studied. Based on the results, a most conservative D value was recommended. This recom-mended D value was also validated using VHP "hardy" strains that were isolated from clean-rooms and environmental populations collected from spacecraft relevant areas. The efficiency of VHP at ambient condition as well as VHP material compatibility will also be

  13. Effect of carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide on enamel surface: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouassi, Thaer; Wolkewitz, Martin; Hahn, Petra

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate changes in the micromorphologyl and microhardness of the enamel surface after bleaching with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) and carbamide peroxide (CP). Bovine enamel samples were embedded in resin blocks, and polished. Specimens in the experimental groups (n = 10) were treated with bleaching gels containing 10% CP, 35% CP, 3.6% HP, and 10% HP, respectively, for 2 h every second day over a period of 2 weeks. The gels had the identical composition and pH and differed only in their HP or CP content. The roughness and morphology of the enamel surface were analyzed using laser profilometry and SEM. Microhardness was measured using a Knoop hardness tester. The data were evaluated statistically. Specimens in the 10% HP group showed significantly higher roughness after bleaching compared to the control group (ΔRa, p = 0.01). Bleaching with 35% CP showed only a tendency to increase roughness (ΔRa, p = 0.06). Application of 10% CP or 3.6% HP had no significant influence on Ra. Enamel microhardness was significantly higher after application of 10% HP compared to the control (ΔMic = 8 KHN, p = 0.0002) and 35% CP (ΔMic = 20KHN, p = 0.01) groups. In summary, application of CP and HP showed only small quantitative and qualitative differences. In addition, the influence of bleaching procedure on the morphology and hardness of the enamel surface depended on the concentration of the active ingredients.

  14. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  15. An Effective Ostrich Oil Bleaching Technique Using Peroxide Value as an Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Seng Chiew

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ostrich oil has been used extensively in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. However, rancidity causes undesirable chemical changes in flavour, colour, odour and nutritional value. Bleaching is an important process in refining ostrich oil. Bleaching refers to the removal of certain minor constituents (colour pigments, free fatty acid, peroxides, odour and non-fatty materials from crude fats and oils to yield purified glycerides. There is a need to optimize the bleaching process of crude ostrich oil prior to its use for therapeutic purposes. The objective of our study was to establish an effective method to bleach ostrich oil using peroxide value as an indicator of refinement. In our study, we showed that natural earth clay was better than bentonite and acid-activated clay to bleach ostrich oil. It was also found that 1 hour incubation at a 150 °C was suitable to lower peroxide value by 90%. In addition, the nitrogen trap technique in the bleaching process was as effective as the continuous nitrogen flow technique and as such would be the recommended technique due to its cost effectiveness.

  16. Membrane transport of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd P; Schjoerring, Jan K; Jahn, Thomas P

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) belongs to the reactive oxygen species (ROS), known as oxidants that can react with various cellular targets thereby causing cell damage or even cell death. On the other hand, recent work has demonstrated that H2O2 also functions as a signalling molecule controlling different essential processes in plants and mammals. Because of these opposing functions the cellular level of H2O2 is likely to be subjected to tight regulation via processes involved in production, distribution and removal. Substantial progress has been made exploring the formation and scavenging of H2O2, whereas little is known about how this signal molecule is transported from its site of origin to the place of action or detoxification. From work in yeast and bacteria it is clear that the diffusion of H2O2 across membranes is limited. We have now obtained direct evidence that selected aquaporin homologues from plants and mammals have the capacity to channel H2O2 across membranes. The main focus of this review is (i) to summarize the most recent evidence for a signalling role of H2O2 in various pathways in plants and mammals and (ii) to discuss the relevance of specific transport of H2O2.

  17. Detection of interstellar hydrogen peroxide

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, P; Liseau, R; Larsson, B; Olofsson, H; Menten, K M; Güsten, R

    2011-01-01

    The molecular species hydrogen peroxide, HOOH, is likely to be a key ingredient in the oxygen and water chemistry in the interstellar medium. Our aim with this investigation is to determine how abundant HOOH is in the cloud core {\\rho} Oph A. By observing several transitions of HOOH in the (sub)millimeter regime we seek to identify the molecule and also to determine the excitation conditions through a multilevel excitation analysis. We have detected three spectral lines toward the SM1 position of {\\rho} Oph A at velocity-corrected frequencies that coincide very closely with those measured from laboratory spectroscopy of HOOH. A fourth line was detected at the 4{\\sigma} level. We also found through mapping observations that the HOOH emission extends (about 0.05 pc) over the densest part of the {\\rho} Oph A cloud core. We derive an abundance of HOOH relative to that of H_2 in the SM1 core of about 1\\times10^(-10). To our knowledge, this is the first reported detection of HOOH in the interstellar medium.

  18. Effect of hydrogen peroxide topical application on the enamel and composite resin surfaces and interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutra Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the present study was to analyze the superficial roughness and the interface between enamel and composite resin restorations after dental bleaching procedure. Materials and Methods: Black′s class V cavities were made and restored with composite resin, and the whole set, enamel-restorative material, was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Seven procedures of 30 min each were performed. A profilometric assessment was carried out before and after the treatment of each sample, and roughness scores were obtained. Treated and untreated samples were analyzed under scanning electronic microscope and images of their surface were obtained. Results and Conclusion: The treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide caused no alteration in the interface between enamel and composite resin, Tetric Ceram, fillings and the topical application of 35% hydrogen peroxide on enamel and composite resin, Tetric Ceram, caused an alteration of their surface topography, featuring a predominance of depressions after the bleaching treatment.

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2012-11-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  20. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells. PMID:23457415

  1. Isothermal Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide Dihydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method of growing pure solid hydrogen peroxide in an ultra high vacuum environment and apply it to determine thermal stability of the dihydrate compound that forms when water and hydrogen peroxide are mixed at low temperatures. Using infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, we quantified the isothermal decomposition of the metastable dihydrate at 151.6 K. This decomposition occurs by fractional distillation through the preferential sublimation of water, which leads to the formation of pure hydrogen peroxide. The results imply that in an astronomical environment where condensed mixtures of H2O2 and H2O are shielded from radiolytic decomposition and warmed to temperatures where sublimation is significant, highly concentrated or even pure hydrogen peroxide may form.

  2. Low temperature peroxide bleaching of cotton fabric activated with monoacetyl guanidine%棉织物双氧水/乙酰胍低温活化漂白

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏; 曹机良

    2011-01-01

    采用双氧水/乙酰胍(ACG)活化体系替代传统工艺对棉织物进行漂白.通过考察活化剂种类、ACG的用量、漂白温度和时间,以及漂白pH值对漂白效果的影响,并与双氧水、双氧水/TAED漂白体系进行比较.结果显示,在30%双氧水3 g/L、ACG用量1.6 g/L、pH值约为8和温度60℃的条件下处理60 min,可获得很好的漂白效果.%Bleaching of cotton fabric is carried out with hydrogen peroxide/acetylguanidine ( ACG) activation system.Factors of activator types, ACG dosage, bleaching temperature and time as well as pH value on bleaching effects are investigated, and compared to those with hydrogen peroxide or hydrogen peroxide/tetraacetylethylenedianime ( TAED) systems.Results show that cotton fabric treated at 60 ℃ for 60 min with hydrogen peroxide ( 30% )3 g/L, ACG 1.6 g/L, pH value about 8, features high whiteness.

  3. Efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique with carbamide peroxides modified by CPP-ACP and its effect on the microhardness of bleached enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, B C D; Borges, J S; de Melo, C D; Pinheiro, I V A; Santos, A J S Dos; Braz, R; Montes, M A J R

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate in vitro the efficacy of a novel at-home bleaching technique using 10% or 16% carbamide peroxide modified by casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) and its influence on the microhardness of bleached enamel. A total of 40 bovine incisors were divided into four groups (n=10) according to the bleaching agent used: 10% carbamide peroxide only; a blend of 10% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste; 16% carbamide peroxide only; and a blend of 16% carbamide peroxide and a CPP-ACP paste. During the 14-day bleaching regimen, the samples were stored in artificial saliva. The Vickers microhardness and color of the teeth were assessed at baseline (T0) and immediately after the bleaching regimen (T14) using a microhardness tester and a spectrophotometer, respectively. The degree of color change was determined by the Commission Internationale de l'Eclariage (CIE) L*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) and Vita shade guide parameters. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance and the Tukey test (pmicrohardness values at T14 compared with T0, whereas the samples that were bleached with peroxide only did not show any differences in their microhardness values. All of the bleaching agents were effective at whitening the teeth and did not show a statistically significant difference using the CIEL*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL*, Δa*, and Δb*) or the Vita shade guide parameters. The use of a CPP-ACP paste with carbamide peroxide bleaching agents increased the bleached enamel's microhardness and did not have an influence on whitening efficacy.

  4. Effectiveness of different carbamide peroxide concentrations used for tooth bleaching: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Saeger Meireles

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This in vitro study evaluated the effectiveness of three carbamide peroxide concentrations used for tooth bleaching treatments. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty bovine dental slabs (6x6x3 mm were obtained, sequentially polished, submitted to artificial staining (baseline and randomized into four groups (n=15, according to the bleaching agent concentration: distilled water (control, 10% (CP10, 16% (CP16 or 37% (CP37 carbamide peroxide. CP10 and CP16 were covered with 0.2 mL of the respective bleaching gels, which were applied on enamel surface for 4 h/day during two weeks. Samples of CP37 were covered with 0.2 mL of the bleaching gel for 20 min. The gel was light activated by two 40-s applications spaced by 10-min intervals. The gel was renewed and applied 3 times per clinical session. This cycle was repeated at 3 sessions with 5 days of interval between them. Tooth shade evaluations were done with a digital spectrophotometer at T0 (baseline, T1 (after 1-week of treatment and T2 (1-week post-bleaching. Tooth shade means were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman's tests and color parameters were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p0.05. CONCLUSIONS: One week after the end of the treatment, all carbamide peroxide concentrations tested produced similar tooth color improvement.

  5. Effect of postoperative peroxide bleaching on the stability of composite to enamel and dentin bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, M; Roubickova, A; Comba, L; Housova, D; Bradna, P

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of peroxide bleaching gel on the durability of the adhesive bond between composite material, enamel, and dentin created with the etch-and-rinse adhesive Gluma Comfort Bond (GLU) and with the self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (CLE), Adper Prompt (ADP), and iBond (IBO). The adhesives were applied to flattened enamel and dentin of extracted human molars and built up with a microhybrid composite (Charisma). After 25 eight-hour cycles of bleaching with a 20% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel (Opalescence PF 20), the shear bond strength was measured and compared with one-day and two-month control specimens stored in water. The data were analyzed using nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis statistics (pIBO and markedly affected a fracture pattern of ADP specimens at the periphery of their bonded area. The results of our study indicate that the durability of adhesive restorations can be detrimentally influenced by carbamide peroxide bleaching and that different adhesives show varying sensitivity levels to the bleaching gel.

  6. Effect of hydrogen peroxide treatment on the properties of wool fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Shen, Xiaolin; Xu, Weilin

    2012-10-01

    In this study, hydrogen peroxide treatment was applied to improve the surface wettability, moisture transfer properties and other related properties of wool fabric. SEM images showed the tip of wool scale was smoothened and parts of the scale were peeled off after hydrogen peroxide treatment. The time for a water droplet to sink into the fabric could decrease to less than 1 s and the wicking properties of wool fabrics were dramatically improved after hydrogen peroxide treatment. Shrinkage and whiteness of the fabric were improved due to the modification of scale and the bleaching effect of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The fabrics became weaker and ductile with less than 4% weight loss. This study would benefit further application of wool fiber in summer clothing in which the surface wettability and moisture transfer properties are essential and determinative.

  7. Ion release from a composite resin after exposure to different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Plá Rizzolo Bueno

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This in vitro study evaluated the influence of two 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents - a commercial product (Opalescence PF; Ultradent Products, Inc. and a bleaching agent prepared in a compounding pharmacy - on the chemical degradation of a light-activated composite resin by determining its release of ions before and after exposure to the agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty composite resin (Filtek Z250; 3M/ESPE samples were divided into three groups: group I (exposed to Opalescence PF commercial bleaching agent, group II (exposed to a compounded bleaching agent and group III (control - Milli-Q water. After 14 days of exposure, with a protocol of 8 h of daily exposure to the bleaching agents and 16 h of immersion in Milli-Q water, the analysis of ion release was carried out using a HP 8453 spectrophotometer. The values were analyzed statistically by ANOVA, Tukey's test and the paired t-tests. The significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: After 14 days of the experiment, statistically significant difference was found between group II and groups I and III, with greater ion release from the composite resin in group II. CONCLUSIONS: The compounded bleaching agent had a more aggressive effect on the composite resin after 14 days of exposure than the commercial product and the control (no bleaching.

  8. Clinical performance of topical sodium fluoride when supplementing carbamide peroxide at-home bleaching gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, Daphne Camara; Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; da Silva, Melissa Aline; Pleffken, Patricia Rondon; Valera, Marcia Carneiro

    2015-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the use of 0.11% topical sodium fluoride (SF) desensitizing agent to treat tooth sensitivity during a nightguard tooth whitening procedure. Thirty-two subjects bleached their teeth with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel using an at-home bleaching technique with custom trays. During bleaching treatment, subjects were divided into 2 groups (n = 16). The subjects in Group 1 received a topical gel containing 0.11% SF; the subjects in Group 2 received a placebo gel (PG). Each subject was instructed to place the gel in his/her bleaching tray for 30 min every day following bleaching treatment. Results showed the use of SF did not affect the whitening efficacy of the 10% CP gel. Subjects who received the PG had significantly higher tooth sensitivity when compared with subjects who received SF (P < 0.00). The use of daily 0.11% SF after 10% CP bleaching gel reduced tooth sensitivity during the bleaching treatment.

  9. Effects of 15% carbamide peroxide and 40% hydrogen peroxide on the microhardness and color change of composite resins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Sadat Hashemi Kamangar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 40% hydrogen peroxide and 15% carbamide peroxide on microhardness and color change of a silorane-based composite resin in comparison with two methacrylate-based composites.Fifty-four disc-shaped specimens (A3 shade were fabricated of Filtek P90 (P90, Filtek Z350XT Enamel (Z350 and Filtek Z250 (Z250 (3MESPE (n=18. The samples of each composite were randomly divided into three subgroups of 6. The control subgroups were immersed in distilled water; the test groups were exposed to Opalescence Boost (OB once; and Opalescence PF (OP (Ultradent for two weeks. Vickers microhardness testing and a spectrophotometric analysis of the color of samples were performed before and after each intervention.The baseline microhardness of P90 was significantly lower than that of the other two composites (P=0.001, but no difference was found between Z250 and Z350 in this respect (P=0.293. Bleaching treatments significantly decreased the microhardness of Z250 and Z350 (P 0.05. No significant difference was detected between the two types of bleaching (P>0.05. After bleaching with OB, ΔE value was measured to be 3.12(1.97, 3.31(1.84 and 3.7(2.11 for P90, Z250 and Z350, respectively. These values were 5.98(2.42, 4.66(2.85 and 4.90(2.78 after bleaching with OP with no significant difference.Bleaching decreased the microhardness of methacrylate-based but not silorane-based composites. Although no significant differences were found in ΔE of composites, ΔE of all groups did not remain in the clinically acceptable range after bleaching except for P90 after bleaching with 40% H2O2 (ΔE < 3.3.

  10. Mouthwashes with hydrogen peroxide are carcinogenic, but are freely indicated on the internet: warn your patients!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It all began in Ancient Egypt where people used to bleach their teeth with antiseptic mouthwashes made of urea from human urine. Teeth harmony is promoted by expression of feelings, communication, a real window of the brain and its content! Tooth bleaching products are medicines, not cosmetics! Mouth washing with hydrogen peroxide is an illogical and dangerous procedure! Hydrogen peroxide must be used in one's mouth only when employed by a dentist who has been properly instructed to protect the mucosa, preventing it from receiving these products. How and for how long these products are going to be used require caution in order to avoid or decrease any adverse effects on the tissues. Many websites instruct people on how to purchase and prepare hydrogen peroxide so that it is used as an antiseptic mouthwash and tooth bleaching agent. Some websites even refer to dentists as "exploiters", accusing them of not instructing patients properly. In this article, we aim at providing evidence and information upon which dentists and assistants may base their thinking as well as their opinion and procedures regarding "the indiscriminate and free use of hydrogen peroxide in the mouth, on teeth and oral mucosa". Those websites, blogs and social network profiles trespass the limits of public trust and should be immediately sued by the government for committing a crime against public health.

  11. The bleaching efficiency and the effect on enamel surface:low concentration hydrogen peroxide assisted by cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma micro-jet%大气压低温等离子体辅助低浓度过氧化氢漂白牙齿的效果及对釉质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王争; 潘洁

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the tooth bleaching efficiency and effect on enamel with low concentration hy-drogen peroxide(H2O2) assisted by cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma micro-jet(PMJ). Methods Thirty premolars were divided randomly into three groups (n=10), 6% H2O2+PMJ, 35% H2O2 only, and gas only. The treatment time was 20 minutes. The bleaching efficiency and stability were evaluated by spectrophotometer. The microhardness and rough-ness of enamel surface were investigated under different treatment. Results 6% H2O2+PMJ has the best bleaching effi-ciency (ΔE*=4.96), which is better than 35%H2O2 group (ΔE*=1.86) and gas only group (ΔE*=0.4)(P 0.05). Conclusion Tooth bleaching with low concentration hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) assisted by cold atmospheric-pressure air plasma micro-jet has ideal whitening efficiency with accepted enamel surface change. Plasma could be a new tooth bleaching method in the near future.%目的:观察大气压低温等离子体协同低浓度过氧化氢漂白牙齿的效果和对釉质的影响。方法将30颗因正畸需要拔除的前磨牙随机分为3组,每组10颗:低温等离子体与6%过氧化氢凝胶联合处理组、35%过氧化氢凝胶处理组和空白气体组,处理时间均为20 min,使用Crestaleye比色仪评价各组牙齿漂白的即刻效果和1年后的效果;同时分析不同处理条件下釉质表面显微硬度和粗糙度的变化。结果低温等离子体辅助6%过氧化氢组处理20 min后ΔE*=4.96,优于35%过氧化氢凝胶处理组(ΔE*=1.86)和空白气体组(ΔE*=0.44)(P0.05),与空白气体组及35%过氧化氢凝胶处理组变化量相比,其差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论低温等离子体辅助低浓度(6%)过氧化氢进行牙齿美白效果显著稳定,对釉质表面结构无不良影响,为牙齿美白提供了新的思路。

  12. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  13. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... facilitated by microbial enzyme activity. The model describes how the hydrogen peroxide removal declines and eventually stops at relatively low chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations. It is hypothesized that this is due to an enzyme deficit because it is destructed due to the reactive radicals created...

  14. The Influence of Chemical Surface Modification of Kenaf Fiber using Hydrogen Peroxide on the Mechanical Properties of Biodegradable Kenaf Fiber/Poly(Lactic Acid) Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Inani Abdul Razak; Nor Azowa Ibrahim; Norhazlin Zainuddin; Marwah Rayung; Wan Zuhainis Saad

    2014-01-01

    Bleaching treatment of kenaf fiber was performed in alkaline medium containing hydrogen peroxide solution maintained at pH 11 and 80 °C for 60 min. The bleached kenaf fiber was analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The bleached kenaf fiber was then compounded with poly-(lactic acid) (PLA) via a melt blending method. The mechanical (tensile, flexural and impact) performance of the product was tested. The fiber treatment improved the mechanical p...

  15. Genotoxic potential of 10% and 16% carbamide peroxide in dental bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Aline Ferreira de; Torre, Eliana do Nascimento; Selayaran, Maicon Dos Santos; Leite, Fábio Renato Manzolli; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Etges, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Dental bleaching has become one of the most frequently requested esthetic treatments in dental offices. Despite the high clinical success observed with this procedure, some adverse effects have been reported, including a potential for developing premalignant lesions, root resorption and tooth sensitivity, especially when misused. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic response using a micronucleus (MN) assay, after the application of two concentrations of carbamide peroxide. Thirty-seven patients were divided into two groups and randomly received either a 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) (19) or a 16% carbamide peroxide (18) concentration for 21 days in individual dental trays. Gingival margin cells were collected immediately before the first use (baseline), and then 15 and 45 days after baseline. The cells were placed on a histological slide, stained by the Feulgen technique, and evaluated by an experienced blinded examiner. One thousand cells per slide were counted, and the MN rate was determined. The two groups were analyzed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test. A slight increase in MN was observed for both groups, in comparison with the baseline, at 15 days. However, no difference was observed between the two groups (10% and 16%), at either 15 or 45 days (p = 0.90). When bleaching is not prolonged or not performed very frequently, bleaching agents containing carbamide peroxide alone will not cause mutagenic stress on gingival epithelial cells.

  16. Genotoxic potential of 10% and 16% Carbamide Peroxide in dental bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Ferreira de ALMEIDA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental bleaching has become one of the most frequently requested esthetic treatments in dental offices. Despite the high clinical success observed with this procedure, some adverse effects have been reported, including a potential for developing premalignant lesions, root resorption and tooth sensitivity, especially when misused. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic response using a micronucleus (MN assay, after the application of two concentrations of carbamide peroxide. Thirty-seven patients were divided into two groups and randomly received either a 10% carbamide peroxide (CP (19 or a 16% carbamide peroxide (18 concentration for 21 days in individual dental trays. Gingival margin cells were collected immediately before the first use (baseline, and then 15 and 45 days after baseline. The cells were placed on a histological slide, stained by the Feulgen technique, and evaluated by an experienced blinded examiner. One thousand cells per slide were counted, and the MN rate was determined. The two groups were analyzed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Kruskal-Wallis equality-of-populations rank test. A slight increase in MN was observed for both groups, in comparison with the baseline, at 15 days. However, no difference was observed between the two groups (10% and 16%, at either 15 or 45 days (p = 0.90. When bleaching is not prolonged or not performed very frequently, bleaching agents containing carbamide peroxide alone will not cause mutagenic stress on gingival epithelial cells.

  17. Virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.; Terpstra, P.; Koopmans, M.; Duizer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Viral contamination of surfaces is thought to be important in transmission. Chemical disinfection can be an effective means of intervention, but little is known about the virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) against enteric and respiratory viruses. Aim: To measure the

  18. Virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.; Terpstra, P.; Koopmans, M.; Duizer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Viral contamination of surfaces is thought to be important in transmission. Chemical disinfection can be an effective means of intervention, but little is known about the virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) against enteric and respiratory viruses. Aim: To measure the vir

  19. Fluorimetric analysis of hydrogen peroxide with automated measurement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, W.J.C van; Bosch, M.J. van den; Janssen, W.C.; Smeenk, F.W.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Harff, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    In the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) oxidative stress plays an important role, which can be determined by measuring hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide can be measured fluorimetrically in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), however, not standardized. The objective of

  20. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  1. Kraft pulp bleaching with molybdenum activated acid peroxide (P{sub Mo} stage); Branqueamento de polpa celulosica kraft de eucalipto com peroxido acido ativado por molibdenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, Marcos Sousa [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Lauro de Freitas, BA (Brazil). Dept. Regional da Bahia; Silva, Vanessa Lopes; Barros, Denise Pires de; Colodette, Jorge Luiz [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Florestal; Sacon, Vera Maria; Silva, Marcelo Rodrigues da [Votorantim Celulose e Papel, Jacarei, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Optimum conditions to run the P{sub Mo} stage for bleaching eucalyptus kraft pulp were 90 deg C, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/t Mo and 5 kg/t H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The P{sub Mo} stage efficiency increased with decreasing pH (1.5-5.5) and increasing temperature (75-90 deg C), time (2-4 h), and hydrogen peroxide (3-10 kg/t) and molybdenum concentration (0.1-0.4 kg/t). The implementation of the P{sub Mo} stage, as replacement for the A stage, decreased total active chlorine demand of the OAZDP sequence by 6 kg/t to reach 90% ISO, both in laboratory and mill scale. Such practice resulted in decreased bleaching chemical costs to produce fully bleached pulp of 90% ISO. (author)

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the ...

  3. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  4. Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide using in-situ selective layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.; Zunita, M.; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is used in broad range of application such as oxidation, bleaching, and wastewater treatment. Conventionally, hydrogen peroxide is synthesized using reduction oxidation cycle of anthraquinones from hydrogen and oxygen. This process is rather complex and requires considerable amount of energy. Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide is one attractive approach to said problems. However, activity and selectivity is the main problem of direct synthesis since the reactants form explosive mixture. Dilution of gasses is commonly used to solve said problem but limit the amount of reactants in the liquid solvent. Membrane reactor can separate pure reactant gases and also constantly feed them over the length of reaction channel. Pd-Ag alloy membrane can be used both as a catalyst and hydrogen dosage. There are some studies that investigate the use of Pd based membrane reactor but still no commercial application. This paper will bring basic concept of Pd based membrane reactor for direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide. Special attention will be given to current hurdles and their possible solutions that lead to facile production of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, recent trends towards utilization of micro reactor will also be discussed.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide reactions on cocaine in hair using imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Eva; Flinders, Bryn; Bosman, Ingrid J; Lusthof, Klaas J; Van Asten, Arian C; Tytgat, Jan; Heeren, Ron M A

    2014-09-01

    Today, forensic hair analysis is considered to be a standard method for identifying chronic drug users since information about drug use stored and located in hair can cover several months to even years. When interpreting these results, one should be aware of all kind of pitfalls. External factors such as bleaching might influence the analytical result. Although the effect of hydrogen peroxide on cocaine in a solution was described before, it was never investigated whether the described reaction products (ecgonine methylester, benzoylecgonine, hydroxynorcocaine and dihydroxycocaine) are indeed found on contaminated or user hair. Since it is of great importance in forensic hair analysis to know whether cocaine and/or reaction products are detectable in hair after bleaching, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) was used to study the effect of hydrogen peroxide treatment on incorporated cocaine in hairs. Cocaine oxidation products were identified in a solution based on MS/MS spectra and spatial distribution of these products in hair was explored using MALDI TOF-MS. All images were accomplished by spraying α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) as a MALDI-matrix. Images revealed a loss of detectability of cocaine and its reaction products in hairs already after a short bleaching period. Since all compounds of interest are found in the hydrogen peroxide and wash solution, these findings indicate that all evidence of cocaine use might be lost after a hair bleaching treatment. Therefore, forensic toxicologists should take into consideration whether hair samples were bleached before making any conclusions from hair analysis results.

  6. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  7. Functionalized Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between two biosensors for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The first biosensor was developed by the immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP enzyme on thiol-modified gold electrode. The second biosensor was developed by the immobilization of cysteamine functionalizing palladium nanoparticles on modified gold surface. The amino groups can be activated with glutaraldehyde for horseradish peroxidase immobilization. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS for both biosensors using the cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. The results show that the limit detection depends on the large surface-to-volume ratio attained with palladium nanoparticles. The second biosensor presents a better detection limit of 7.5 μM in comparison with the first one which is equal to 75 μM.

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion for Smaller Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehead, John

    1998-01-01

    As satellite designs shrink, providing maneuvering and control capability falls outside the realm of available propulsion technology. While cold gas has been used on the smallest satellites, hydrogen peroxide propellant is suggested as the next step in performance and cost before hydrazine. Minimal toxicity and a small scale enable bench top propellant preparation and development testing. Progress toward low-cost thrusters and self-pressurizing tank systems is described.

  9. Inactivation of human myeloperoxidase by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumann-Page, Martina; Furtmüller, Paul G; Hofbauer, Stefan; Paton, Louise N; Obinger, Christian; Kettle, Anthony J

    2013-11-01

    Human myeloperoxidase (MPO) uses hydrogen peroxide generated by the oxidative burst of neutrophils to produce an array of antimicrobial oxidants. During this process MPO is irreversibly inactivated. This study focused on the unknown role of hydrogen peroxide in this process. When treated with low concentrations of H2O2 in the absence of reducing substrates, there was a rapid loss of up to 35% of its peroxidase activity. Inactivation is proposed to occur via oxidation reactions of Compound I with the prosthetic group or amino acid residues. At higher concentrations hydrogen peroxide acts as a suicide substrate with a rate constant of inactivation of 3.9 × 10(-3) s(-1). Treatment of MPO with high H2O2 concentrations resulted in complete inactivation, Compound III formation, destruction of the heme groups, release of their iron, and detachment of the small polypeptide chain of MPO. Ten of the protein's methionine residues were oxidized and the thermal stability of the protein decreased. Inactivation by high concentrations of H2O2 is proposed to occur via the generation of reactive oxidants when H2O2 reacts with Compound III. These mechanisms of inactivation may occur inside neutrophil phagosomes when reducing substrates for MPO become limiting and could be exploited when designing pharmacological inhibitors.

  10. The Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide 35% on Surface Roughness of Silorane and Methacrylate Based Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rezaei Sofi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objectives: Surface roughness affects beauty, hygiene, plaque retention and health of the gingival adjacent to the composite restoration. Many people use bleaching agents to beautify their teeth that may lead to changes in surface roughness. This study was designed to compare the silorane and methacrylate-based composites in bleached teeth. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study 48 composite resin disks were prepared and divided into 4 groups: P90, Z250, Z250XT and Z350XT (n=12. To determine the surface roughness, surface profile measurement of the samples was performed using profilometer. Samples of each diet group underwent 35% hydrogen peroxide in office whitening (Hpmax in three 45-minute sessions one week apart. The secondary instances of surface profile was then measured. The data collected by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, one-way ANOVA, Tukey test and paired t- test at a significance level of 0.05 were analyzed using spss16. Results: There was a significant difference (P<0.05 in the surface roughness after bleaching on composite Z350XT with P90 and Z350XT with Z250. The surface roughness of all groups before and after bleaching showed a significant difference (P<0.05. Conclusion: The use of hydrogen peroxide 35% causes a significant increase in the surface roughness of composite P90, Z250, Z250XT and Z350XT. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2015; 22 (1:23-29

  11. Efficacy of Mouthwashes Containing Hydrogen Peroxide on Tooth Whitening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Karadas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of mouthwashes containing hydrogen peroxide compared with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP gel. Fifty enamel-dentin samples were obtained from bovine incisors and then stained in a tea solution. The stained samples were randomly divided into five groups according to the whitening product applied (n=10: AS: no whitening (negative control, with the samples stored in artificial saliva; CR: Crest 3D White mouthwash; LS: Listerine Whitening mouthwash; SC: Scope White mouthwash; and OP group: 10% CP Opalescence PF (positive control. Color measurements were carried out with a spectrophotometer before staining, after staining, and on the 7th, 28th, and 56th day of the whitening period. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance followed by a Tukey post hoc test. The color change (ΔE was significantly greater in all the groups compared to that of the AS group. After 56 days, no significant differences were found among the mouthwash products with respect to color change (P>0.05. The whiteness of the teeth treated with the mouthwashes increased significantly over time. Nevertheless, the color change achieved with the mouthwashes was significantly lower than that achieved with the 10% CP at-home bleaching gel.

  12. The influence of chemical surface modification of kenaf fiber using hydrogen peroxide on the mechanical properties of biodegradable kenaf fiber/poly(lactic acid) composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Nur Inani Abdul; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Zainuddin, Norhazlin; Rayung, Marwah; Saad, Wan Zuhainis

    2014-03-07

    Bleaching treatment of kenaf fiber was performed in alkaline medium containing hydrogen peroxide solution maintained at pH 11 and 80 °C for 60 min. The bleached kenaf fiber was analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The bleached kenaf fiber was then compounded with poly-(lactic acid) (PLA) via a melt blending method. The mechanical (tensile, flexural and impact) performance of the product was tested. The fiber treatment improved the mechanical properties of PLA/bleached kenaf fiber composites. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) morphological analysis showed improvement of the interfacial adhesion between the fiber surface and polymer matrix.

  13. The Influence of Chemical Surface Modification of Kenaf Fiber using Hydrogen Peroxide on the Mechanical Properties of Biodegradable Kenaf Fiber/Poly(Lactic Acid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Inani Abdul Razak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bleaching treatment of kenaf fiber was performed in alkaline medium containing hydrogen peroxide solution maintained at pH 11 and 80 °C for 60 min. The bleached kenaf fiber was analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR and X-ray Diffraction (XRD analysis. The bleached kenaf fiber was then compounded with poly-(lactic acid (PLA via a melt blending method. The mechanical (tensile, flexural and impact performance of the product was tested. The fiber treatment improved the mechanical properties of PLA/bleached kenaf fiber composites. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM morphological analysis showed improvement of the interfacial adhesion between the fiber surface and polymer matrix.

  14. Effect of temperature and concentration on benzoyl peroxide bleaching efficacy and benzoic acid levels in whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2015-11-01

    Much of the fluid whey produced in the United States is a by-product of Cheddar cheese manufacture and must be bleached. Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is currently 1 of only 2 legal chemical bleaching agents for fluid whey in the United States, but benzoic acid is an unavoidable by-product of BP bleaching. Benzoyl peroxide is typically a powder, but new liquid BP dispersions are available. A greater understanding of the bleaching characteristics of BP is necessary. The objective of the study was to compare norbixin destruction, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences between liquid whey and 80% whey protein concentrates (WPC80) bleached at different temperatures with 2 different benzoyl peroxides (soluble and insoluble). Two experiments were conducted in this study. For experiment 1, 3 factors (temperature, bleach type, bleach concentration) were evaluated for norbixin destruction using a response surface model-central composite design in liquid whey. For experiment 2, norbixin concentration, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences were explored in WPC80 from whey bleached by the 2 commercially available BP (soluble and insoluble) at 5 mg/kg. In liquid whey, soluble BP bleached more norbixin than insoluble BP, especially at lower concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) at both cold (4°C) and hot (50°C) temperatures. The WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 50°C had lower norbixin concentration, benzoic acid levels, cardboard flavor, and aldehyde levels than WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 4°C. Regardless of temperature, soluble BP destroyed more norbixin at lower concentrations than insoluble BP. The WPC80 from soluble-BP-bleached wheys had lower cardboard flavor and lower aldehyde levels than WPC80 from insoluble-BP-bleached whey. This study suggests that new, soluble (liquid) BP can be used at lower concentrations than insoluble BP to achieve equivalent bleaching and that less residual benzoic acid remains in WPC80 powder from liquid whey

  15. Hydrogen peroxide stabilization in one-dimensional flow columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jeremy T.; Ahmad, Mushtaque; Teel, Amy L.; Watts, Richard J.

    2011-09-01

    Rapid hydrogen peroxide decomposition is the primary limitation of catalyzed H 2O 2 propagations in situ chemical oxidation (CHP ISCO) remediation of the subsurface. Two stabilizers of hydrogen peroxide, citrate and phytate, were investigated for their effectiveness in one-dimensional columns of iron oxide-coated and manganese oxide-coated sand. Hydrogen peroxide (5%) with and without 25 mM citrate or phytate was applied to the columns and samples were collected at 8 ports spaced 13 cm apart. Citrate was not an effective stabilizer for hydrogen peroxide in iron-coated sand; however, phytate was highly effective, increasing hydrogen peroxide residuals two orders of magnitude over unstabilized hydrogen peroxide. Both citrate and phytate were effective stabilizers for manganese-coated sand, increasing hydrogen peroxide residuals by four-fold over unstabilized hydrogen peroxide. Phytate and citrate did not degrade and were not retarded in the sand columns; furthermore, the addition of the stabilizers increased column flow rates relative to unstabilized columns. These results demonstrate that citrate and phytate are effective stabilizers of hydrogen peroxide under the dynamic conditions of one-dimensional columns, and suggest that citrate and phytate can be added to hydrogen peroxide before injection to the subsurface as an effective means for increasing the radius of influence of CHP ISCO.

  16. Evaluation of the biological efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination in wards of an Australian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H-T; White, P; Sheorey, H; Cocks, J; Waters, M-J

    2011-10-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of a 'dry' hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination in an Australian hospital via a two-armed study. The in vivo arm examined the baseline bacterial counts in high-touch zones within wards and evaluated the efficacy of cleaning with a neutral detergent followed by either hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination, or a manual terminal clean with bleach or Det-Sol 500. The in vitro arm examined the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination on a variety of different surfaces commonly found in the wards of an Australian hospital, deliberately seeded with a known concentration of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). All bacterial counts were evaluated by a protocol of contact plate method. In the in vivo arm, 33.3% of the high-touch areas assessed had aerobic bacterial count below the detection limit (i.e. no bacteria recoverable) post hydrogen peroxide decontamination, and in all circumstances the highest microbial density was ≤3 cfu/cm(2), while in the in vitro arm there was at least a reduction in bacterial load by a factor of 10 at all surfaces investigated. These results showed that dry hydrogen peroxide vapour room decontamination is highly effective on a range of surfaces, although the cleanliness data obtained by these methods cannot be easily compared among the different surfaces as recovery of organisms is affected by the nature of the surface.

  17. Reactive extraction for preparation of hydrogen peroxide under pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongxi CHENG; Hongtao LI; Shuxiang L(U); Li WANG

    2008-01-01

    The preparation of hydrogen peroxide from anthrahydroquinone by reactive extraction was investi-gated.The integration process of oxidation of anthrahydro-quinone by air and extraction of hydrogen peroxide from the organic phase with water was carried out in a sieve plate column under'pressure.The conversion of anthrahydroqui-none increased with increasing pressure resulting in an increase of hydrogen peroxide concentration in the aqueous phase.However,no change in extraction efficiency of hydrogen peroxide was observed.A mathematical model for gas-liquid-liquid reactive extraction was established.In the model,the effects of pressure and gas superficial velocity on reaction were considered.With increasing gas superficial velocity,the conversion of anthrahydroquinone increased,and the fraction of hydrogen peroxide extracted reached a plateau with a maximum of 72.94%.However,both the conversion of anthrahydroquinone and the traction of hydrogen peroxide extracted decreased with increasing organic phase superficial velocity.

  18. Effect of postoperative peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubickova, A; Dudek, M; Comba, L; Housova, D; Bradna, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with several adhesive systems. Combined cylindrical Class V cavities located half in enamel and half in dentin were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molars. The cavities were bonded with the self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE-Bond (CLF), Adper Prompt (ADP), and iBond (IBO) and an etch-and-rinse adhesive Gluma Comfort Bond (GLU) and restored with a microhybrid composite Charisma. Experimental groups were treated 25 times for eight hours per day with a peroxide bleaching gel Opalescence PF 20, while the control groups were stored in distilled water for two months and then subjected to a microleakage test using a dye penetration method. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the etching and penetration abilities of the adhesives and morphology of debonded restoration-enamel interfaces after the microleakage tests. Statistical analyses were performed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests at p=0.05. The microleakage of all GLU groups was low and not significantly affected by peroxide bleaching. Low microleakage was recorded for CLF control groups, but after bleaching, a small but significant increase in microleakage at the enamel margin indicated its sensitivity to peroxide bleaching. For ADP and IBO control groups, the microleakage at the enamel margins was significantly higher than for GLU and CLF and exceeded that at the dentin margins. Bleaching did not induce any significant changes in the microleakage. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that in our experimental setup, decreased adhesion and mechanical resistance of the ADP- and IBO-enamel interfaces could be more important than the chemical degradation effects induced by the peroxide bleaching gel.

  19. FRACTURE RESISTANCE AND FAILURE PATTERN OF TEETH SUBMITTED TO INTERNAL BLEACHING WITH 37% CARBAMIDE PEROXIDE, WITH APPLICATION OF DIFFERENT RESTORATIVE PROCEDURES

    OpenAIRE

    Gerson Bonfante; Osvaldo Bazzan Kaizer; Luiz Fernando Pegoraro; Accácio Lins do Valle

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the compressive fracture strength and failure pattern in premolars submitted to endodontic treatment and internal bleaching with 37% carbamide peroxide for 21 days, with application of different restorative procedures. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six groups were employed (n = 10): 1) non-bleached teeth and pulp chamber sealed with IRM; 2) bleached teeth and pulp chamber sealed with IRM; 3) bleached teeth and pulp chamber filled with light cured composite resin; 4)...

  20. Nitroxide free radicals protect macular carotenoids against chemical destruction (bleaching) during lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareba, M; Widomska, J; Burke, J M; Subczynski, W K

    2016-12-01

    Macular xanthophylls (MXs) lutein and zeaxanthin are dietary carotenoids that are selectively concentrated in the human eye retina, where they are thought to protect against age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by multiple mechanisms, including filtration of phototoxic blue light and quenching of singlet oxygen and triplet states of photosensitizers. These physical protective mechanisms require that MXs be in their intact structure. Here, we investigated the protection of the intact structure of zeaxanthin incorporated into model membranes subjected to oxidative modification by water- and/or membrane-soluble small nitroxide free radicals. Model membranes were formed from saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines (PCs). Oxidative modification involved autoxidation, iron-mediated, and singlet oxygen-mediated lipid peroxidation. The extent of chemical destruction (bleaching) of zeaxanthin was evaluated from its absorption spectra and compared with the extent of lipid peroxidation evaluated using the thiobarbituric acid assay. Nitroxide free radicals with different polarity (membrane/water partition coefficients) were used. The extent of zeaxanthin bleaching increased with membrane unsaturation and correlated with the rate of PC oxidation. Protection of the intact structure of zeaxanthin by membrane-soluble nitroxides was much stronger than that by water-soluble nitroxides. The combination of zeaxanthin and lipid-soluble nitroxides exerted strong synergistic protection against singlet oxygen-induced lipid peroxidation. The synergistic effect may be explained in terms of protection of the intact zeaxanthin structure by effective scavenging of free radicals by nitroxides, therefore allowing zeaxanthin to quench the primary oxidant, singlet oxygen, effectively by the physical protective mechanism. The redox state of nitroxides was monitored using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Both nitroxide free radicals and their reduced form

  1. Simple, field portable colorimetric detection device for organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoria, Philip F.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; Whipple, Richard E.; Carman, M. Leslie; Reynolds, John G.; Nunes, Peter; Shields, Sharon J.

    2010-11-09

    A simple and effective system for the colorimetric determination of organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide. A peroxide pen utilizing a swipe material attached to a polyethylene tube contains two crushable vials. The two crushable vials contain a colorimetric reagent separated into dry ingredients and liquid ingredients. After swiping a suspected substance or surface the vials are broken, the reagent is mixed thoroughly and the reagent is allowed to wick into the swipe material. The presence of organic peroxides or hydrogen peroxide is confirmed by a deep blue color.

  2. BLEACHING EUCALYPTUS PULPS WITH SHORT SEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaviana Reis Milagres

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp, due to its high content of hexenuronic acids, is quite easy to bleach. Therefore, investigations have been made attempting to decrease the number of stages in the bleaching process in order to minimize capital costs. This study focused on the evaluation of short ECF (Elemental Chlorine Free and TCF (Totally Chlorine Free sequences for bleaching oxygen delignified Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp to 90% ISO brightness: PMoDP (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoD/P (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, without washing PMoD(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and pressurized peroxide, D(EPODP (chlorine dioxide, extraction oxidative with oxygen and peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoQ(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide, and XPMoQ(PO (Enzyme, molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide. Uncommon pulp treatments, such as molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide (PMo and xylanase (X bleaching stages, were used. Among the ECF alternatives, the two-stage PMoD/P sequence proved highly cost-effective without affecting pulp quality in relation to the traditional D(EPODP sequence and produced better quality effluent in relation to the reference. However, a four stage sequence, XPMoQ(PO, was required to achieve full brightness using the TCF technology. This sequence was highly cost-effective although it only produced pulp of acceptable quality.

  3. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anh, Dam T.V.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.; Berg, van den A.

    2004-01-01

    An increase in produced hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase

  4. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anh, Dam Thi Van; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.

    2005-01-01

    An increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to the lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase toge

  5. Short communication: The influence of solids concentration and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and flavor of sweet whey powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, M G; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effect of bleaching conditions and bleaching agent on flavor and functional properties of whey protein ingredients. Solids concentration at bleaching significantly affected bleaching efficacy and flavor effects of different bleaching agents. It is not known if these parameters influence quality of sweet whey powder (SWP). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of solids concentration and bleaching agent on the flavor and bleaching efficacy of SWP. Colored cheddar whey was manufactured, fat separated, and pasteurized. Subsequently, the whey (6.7% solids) was bleached, concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) to 14% solids, and then spray dried, or whey was concentrated before bleaching and then spray dried. Bleaching treatments included a control (no bleaching, 50 °C, 60 min), hydrogen peroxide (HP; 250 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), benzoyl peroxide (50 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), lactoperoxidase (20 mg/kg of HP, 50 °C, 30 min), and external peroxidase (MaxiBright, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands; 2 dairy bleaching units/mL, 50 °C, 30 min). The experiment was repeated in triplicate. Sensory properties and volatile compounds of SWP were evaluated by a trained panel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Bleaching efficacy (norbixin destruction) and benzoic acid were measured by HPLC. Differences in bleaching efficacy, sensory and volatile compound profiles, and benzoic acid were observed with different bleaching agents, consistent with previous studies. Solids concentration affected bleaching efficacy of HP, but not other bleaching agents. The SWP from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase following RO had increased cardboard and fatty flavors and higher concentrations of lipid oxidation compounds compared with SWP from whey bleached before RO. The SWP bleached with benzoyl peroxide after RO contained less benzoic acid than SWP from whey bleached before RO. These results indicate that

  6. Hydrogen Peroxide Storage in Small Sealed Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J.

    1999-10-20

    Unstabilized hydrogen peroxide of 85% concentration has been prepared in laboratory quantities for testing material compatibility and long term storage on a small scale. Vessels made of candidate tank and liner materials ranged in volume from 1 cc to 2540 cc. Numerous metals and plastics were tried at the smallest scales, while promising ones were used to fabricate larger vessels and liners. An aluminum alloy (6061-T6) performed poorly, including increasing homogeneous decay due to alloying elements entering solution. The decay rate in this high strength aluminum was greatly reduced by anodizing. Better results were obtained with polymers, particularly polyvinylidene fluoride. Data reported herein include ullage pressures as a function of time with changing decay rates, and contamination analysis results.

  7. Locating bomb factories by detecting hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romolo, Francesco Saverio; Connell, Samantha; Ferrari, Carlotta; Suarez, Guillaume; Sauvain, Jean-Jacques; Hopf, Nancy B

    2016-11-01

    The analytical capability to detect hydrogen peroxide vapour can play a key role in localizing a site where a H2O2 based Improvised Explosive (IE) is manufactured. In security activities it is very important to obtain information in a short time. For this reason, an analytical method to be used in security activity needs portable devices. The authors have developed the first analytical method based on a portable luminometer, specifically designed and validated to locate IE manufacturing sites using quantitative on-site vapour analysis for H2O2. The method was tested both indoor and outdoor. The results demonstrate that the detection of H2O2 vapours could allow police forces to locate the site, while terrorists are preparing an attack. The collected data are also very important in developing new sensors, able to give an early alarm if located at a proper distance from a site where an H2O2 based IE is prepared.

  8. Unusual hydrogen peroxide decomposition on stoichiometric insulating oxide ultrathin films

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Zhenjun

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide dissociation on MgO(001) films deposited on Mo(001) surface is investigated by employing periodic density-functional theory methods. The pristine MgO(001) surface showing chemical inertness prefers the weak adsorbing molecular configuration and is extremely difficult to react with hydrogen peroxide. As far as we know, energetically favorable decomposition state of hydrogen peroxide has never been obtained on MgO(001) surface. In this work the hydrogen peroxide is successfully dissociated on perfect stoichiometric MgO(001) films by depositing on transition metal substrate, without any activation barrier. The spontaneous dissociation of hydrogen peroxide on metal supported oxide films is rationalized by characterizing the geometric structures and electronic structures.

  9. Significant damage of the skin and hair following hair bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Mi-Sook; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Won-Ji; Kim, Seong-Jin; Lee, Ki-Young

    2010-10-01

    Scalp burns can be caused by hair bleaching with excess procedures such as unnecessary heating and excessive treatment with bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological and histological changes of the hair and skin after bleaching. Ammonium persulfate and hydrogen peroxide (6% or 9%) solution mixed at a ratio of 1:2 (weight ratio) were sufficiently applied to human hairs and rat skin. The bleached hairs were brightened up to yellow by increasing the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and time of bleach treatment. After bleaching, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe that the cuticle scales of the hairs were irregular and lifted. The mechanical properties of the bleached hairs, such as tensile strength and elongation, were slightly different than the untreated hairs. The tested rat skin showed severe swelling after treatment of the bleaching agent (9% hydrogen peroxide). The rat skin bleached with 9% hydrogen peroxide exhibited epidermal thinning and subepidermal vesicle formation. The extracellular matrix of the skin was seriously disrupted after bleaching. Therefore, the use of only suitable bleaching procedures is suggested in order to avoid injuries. © 2010 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  10. Mineral loss and morphological changes in dental enamel induced by a 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Hebling, Josimeri; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel and a 10% CP gel on mineralized enamel content and morphology. Enamel blocks from bovine incisors were subjected to a 14-day treatment (8 h/day) with 10% or 16% CP gels. Knoop microhardness was evaluated before bleaching and at 1, 7 or 14 days after this treatment (50 g/15 s). Mineral content (energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy), surface roughness and topography (atomic force microscopy) were evaluated at the 14-day period. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Significant microhardness reduction was observed at the 7 th and 14 th days for 10% CP gel, and for all bleaching times for 16% CP gel (proughness (penamel alterations were more intense for 16% CP gel. It was concluded that both CP-based gels promoted loss of mineral structure from enamel, resulting in a rough and porous surface. However, 16% CP gel caused the most intense adverse effects on enamel.

  11. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen...... evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...... sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively....

  12. Influence of Concentration and Activation on Hydrogen Peroxide Diffusion through Dental Tissues In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. G. Torres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of physical and chemical activation on the diffusion time of different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP bleaching agents through enamel and dentin. One hundred and twenty bovine cylindrical specimens were divided into six groups (n=20: 20% HP ; 20% HP with light activation; 20% HP with manganese gluconate; 35% HP; 35% HP with light activation; and 35% HP with manganese gluconate. The specimens were fixed over transparent epoxy wells with internal cavities to simulate a pulpal chamber. This chamber was filled with an enzymatic reagent to simulate pulpal fluid. The bleaching gels were applied on enamel surface and the image of the pulpal fluid was captured by a video camera to monitor the time of peroxide penetration in each specimen. ANOVA analysis showed that concentration and type of activation of bleaching gel significantly influenced the diffusion time of HP (P<0.05. 35% HP showed the lowest diffusion times compared to the groups with 20% HP gel. The light activation of HP decreased significantly the diffusion time compared to chemical activation. The highest diffusion time was obtained with 20% HP chemically activated. The diffusion time of HP was dependent on activation and concentration of HP. The higher concentration of HP diffused through dental tissues more quickly.

  13. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  14. Effects of combination of ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, native microbial loads, and quality of button mushrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushrooms are prone to microbial spoilage and browning during growing and processing. Ultraviolet light (UV-C) has been used as an alternative technology to chemical sanitizers for food products. Hydrogen peroxide is classified as generally recognized as safe for use in foods as a bleaching and ant...

  15. Lab-scale hydrogen peroxide data from ECBC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from small lab scale tests conducted at ECBC. It contains efficacy data as well as data on env conditions such as temperature, RH, and hydrogen peroxide vapor...

  16. [Risks of hydrogen peroxide irrigation in military surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïssy, J M; Guignard, B; Pats, B; Lenoir, B; Rouvier, B

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of severe complications due to injection of hydrogen peroxide under pressure into areas of muscular attrition in war wounds are reported. In both cases the administration of hydrogen peroxide was associated with tachypnoea, with major arterial desaturation and a precordial "mill-wheel" murmur was heard. In one case, these symptoms were followed by hemiplegia caused by paradoxical arterial gas embolism, and in the other case by a pulmonary oedema confirmed by computerized tomography. Both patients recovered under hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The release of gaseous oxygen under the effect of tissue catalase and the membrane peroxydasic activity of hydrogen peroxide initiate such complications. The injection of hydrogen peroxide under pressure into a closed or partially closed cavity should therefore be strictly prohibited.

  17. A Novel Fluorescent Reagent for Analysis of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董素英; 苏美红; 聂丽华; 马会民

    2003-01-01

    8-(4,6-Dichloro-1,3,5-trazinoxy)quinoline(DTQ) was evaluated as a new fluorescent reagent for determining hydrogen peroxide.It was found that the fluorescence intensity of DTQ in alkaline medium could be dramatically enhanced upon addition of H2O2.Based on this effect,a simple and selective method for the spectrofluorimetric determination of hydrogen peroxide was estabhlished.The relative standard deviation of the method was found to be 1.1?for 9 replicate determinations of a 4.6×10-6mol/L hydrogen peroxide solution.The linear range was 2.3×10-7-2.3×10-5mol/L with a detection limit of 2.2×10-8mol/L(S/N=3).The ,method was attempted to determine hydrogen peroxide in synthetic human serum samples with satisfactory results.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide in breath condensate during a common cold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rijn Q. Jöbsis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in exhaled air condensate is elevated in inflammatory disorders of the lower respiratory tract. It is unknown whether viral colds contribute to exhaled H2O2.

  19. Assessment of hydrogen peroxide in breath condensate as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    resulting in the production of reactive oxygen species, such as hydrogen peroxide 2. ... inflammation and oxidative stress in asthmatic patients. Keywords: ... cough sedatives, oral theophylline]. - Allergic ... PC for statistical analysis. Quantitative ...

  20. Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Water Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electrochemical cell is proposed for the efficient generation of 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in pure water using only power, oxygen and water. H2O2 is an...

  1. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  2. Sodium Borohydride/Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells For Space Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Deelo, M. E.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation examines Sodium Borohydride and Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cells as they are applied to space applications. The topics include: 1) Motivation; 2) The Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell; 3) Sodium Borohydride Fuel Cell Test Stands; 4) Fuel Cell Comparisons; 5) MEA Performance; 6) Anode Polarization; and 7) Electrode Analysis. The benefits of hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and benefits of sodium borohydride as a fuel are also addressed.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide deposition and decomposition in rain and dew waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Vicky; Angélica Rubio, M.; Lissi, Eduardo A.

    Peroxides and hydrogen peroxide were determined by a fluorometric method in dew and rain collected in the atmosphere of Santiago of Chile city. The measured peroxides comprise hydrogen peroxide (the main component) and peroxides not decomposed by catalase. The collected natural peroxides readily decompose in the natural matrix, rendering difficult an estimation of the values present in real-time. In order to establish the kinetics of the process and the factors that condition their decomposition, the kinetics of the decay at several pHs and/or the presence of metal chelators were followed. The kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the water matrix was evaluated employing the natural peroxides or hydrogen peroxide externally added. First-order kinetics was followed, with half decay times ranging from 80 to 2300 min. The addition of Fe(II) in the micromolar range increases the decomposition rate, while lowering the pH (<3) notably reduces the rate of the process. The contribution of metals to the decomposition of the peroxides in the natural waters was confirmed by the reduction in decomposition rate elicited by its treatment with Chelex-100. Dew and rain waters were collected in pre-acidified collectors, rendering values considerably higher than those measured in non-treated collectors. This indicates that acidification can be proposed as an easy procedure to stabilize the samples, reducing its decomposition during collection time and the time elapsed between collection and analysis. The weighted average concentration for total peroxides measured in pre-treated collectors was 5.4 μM in rains and 2.2 μM in dews.

  4. In vitro evaluation of human dental enamel surface roughness bleached with 35% carbamide peroxide and submitted to abrasive dentifrice brushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worschech, Claudia Cia; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness of human enamel bleached with 35% carbamide peroxide at different times and submitted to different superficial cleaning treatments: G1 - not brushed; G2 - brushed with fluoride abrasive dentifrice; G3 - brushed with a non-fluoride abrasive dentifrice; G4 - brushed without dentifrice. Sixty fragments of human molar teeth with 4 x 4 mm were obtained using a diamond disc. The specimens were polished with sandpaper and abrasive pastes. A perfilometer was used to measure roughness average (Ra) values of the initial surface roughness and at each 7-day-interval after the beginning of treatment. The bleaching was performed on the surface of the fragments for 1 hour a week, and the surface cleaning treatment for 3 minutes daily. The samples were stored in individual receptacles with artificial saliva. Analysis of variance and the Tukey test revealed significant differences in surface roughness values for G2 and G3, which showed an increase in roughness over time; G1 and G4 showed no significant roughness differences. The bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide did not alter the enamel surface roughness, but when the bleaching treatment was performed combined with brushing with abrasive dentifrices, there was a significant increase in roughness values.

  5. In vitro evaluation of human dental enamel surface roughness bleached with 35% carbamide peroxide and submitted to abrasive dentifrice brushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worschech Claudia Cia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness of human enamel bleached with 35% carbamide peroxide at different times and submitted to different superficial cleaning treatments: G1 - not brushed; G2 - brushed with fluoride abrasive dentifrice; G3 - brushed with a non-fluoride abrasive dentifrice; G4 - brushed without dentifrice. Sixty fragments of human molar teeth with 4 x 4 mm were obtained using a diamond disc. The specimens were polished with sandpaper and abrasive pastes. A perfilometer was used to measure roughness average (Ra values of the initial surface roughness and at each 7-day-interval after the beginning of treatment. The bleaching was performed on the surface of the fragments for 1 hour a week, and the surface cleaning treatment for 3 minutes daily. The samples were stored in individual receptacles with artificial saliva. Analysis of variance and the Tukey test revealed significant differences in surface roughness values for G2 and G3, which showed an increase in roughness over time; G1 and G4 showed no significant roughness differences. The bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide did not alter the enamel surface roughness, but when the bleaching treatment was performed combined with brushing with abrasive dentifrices, there was a significant increase in roughness values.

  6. Branqueamento de polpa celulósica kraft de eucalipto com peróxido ácido ativado por molibdênio Kraft pulp bleaching with molybdenum activated acid peroxide (P Mo stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Sousa Rabelo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum conditions to run the P Mo stage for bleaching eucalyptus kraft pulp were 90 ºC, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/t Mo and 5 kg/t H2O2. The P Mo stage efficiency increased with decreasing pH (1.5-5.5 and increasing temperature (75-90 ºC, time (2-4 h, and hydrogen peroxide (3-10 kg/t and molybdenum concentration (0.1-0.4 kg/t. The implementation of the P Mo stage, as replacement for the A stage, decreased total active chlorine demand of the OAZDP sequence by 6 kg/t to reach 90% ISO, both in laboratory and mill scale. Such practice resulted in decreased bleaching chemical costs to produce fully bleached pulp of 90% ISO.

  7. Recent Development in Hydrogen Peroxide Pumped Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledebuhr, A G; Antelman, D R; Dobie, D W; Gorman, T S; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; McMahon, D H; Ng, L C; Nielsen, D P; Ormsby, A E; Pittenger, L C; Robinson, J A; Skulina, K M; Taylor, W G; Urone, D A; Wilson, B A

    2004-03-22

    This paper describes the development of a lightweight high performance pump-fed divert and attitude control system (DACS). Increased kinetic Kill Vehicles (KV) capabilities (higher .v and acceleration capability) will especially be needed for boost phase engagements where a lower mass KV DACS enables smaller overall interceptors. To increase KV performance while reducing the total DACS dry mass (<10 kg), requires a design approach that more closely emulates those found in large launch vehicles, where pump-fed propulsion enables high propellant-mass-fraction systems. Miniaturized reciprocating pumps, on a scale compatible with KV applications, offer the potential of a lightweight DACS with both high {Delta}v and acceleration capability, while still enabling the rapid pulsing of the divert thrusters needed in the end-game fly-in. Pumped propulsion uses lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks, as the main vehicle structure and eliminates the need for high-pressure gas bottles, reducing mass and increasing the relative propellant load. Prior work used hydrazine and demonstrated a propellant mass fraction >0.8 and a vehicle propulsion dry mass of {approx}3 kg. Our current approach uses the non-toxic propellants 90% hydrogen peroxide and kerosene. This approach enables faster development at lower costs due to the ease of handling. In operational systems these non-toxic propellants can simplify the logistics for manned environments including shipboard applications. This DACS design configuration is expected to achieve sufficient mass flows to support divert thrusters in the 1200 N to 1330 N (270 lbf to 300 lbf) range. The DACS design incorporates two pairs of reciprocating differential piston pumps (oxidizer and fuel), a warm-gas drive system, compatible bi-propellant thrusters, lightweight valves, and lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks. This paper summarizes the current development status and plans.

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide in Groundwater at Rifle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X.; Nico, P. S.; Williams, K. H.; Hobson, C.; Davis, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as a reactive transient presenting ubiquitously in natural surface waters, can react with a large suite of biologically important and redox-sensitive trace elements. The dominant source of H2O2 in natural waters has long been thought to be photo-oxidation of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by molecular oxygen to produce superoxide radical, which then proceeds via dismutation to generate H2O2. However, recent studies have indicated that dark production of H2O2 in deep seawater, principally by biological production, is potentially on par with photochemical generation. Here, we present evidence for abiotic dark generation of H2O2 in groundwater in an alluvial aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River near Rifle, CO. Background H2O2 concentrations were determined in situ using a sensitive chemiluminescence-based method. Our results suggest H2O2 concentrations ranged from lower than the detection limit (1 nM) to 54 nM in different monitoring wells at the site, and the concentrations exhibited close correlations with profiles of dissolved oxygen and iron concentrations in the wells, indicating a possible metal redox cycling mechanism. In addition, dissolved natural organic matter, which could potentially coordinate the interconversion of ferric and ferrous species, might also play an important role in H2O2 formation. While biologically mediated activities have been recognized as the major sink of H2O2, the detected H2O2 pattern in groundwater suggests the existence of a balance between H2O2 source and decay, which potentially involves a cascade of biogeochemically significant processes, including the interconversion of ferrous/ferric species, the generation of more reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl radical, the depletion of dissolved oxygen and further transformation of natural organic matter and other chemical pollutants.

  9. BLEACHING OF SULFONATED CMP FROM BIO-TREATED WHEAT STRAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongYu; MenghuaQin; XuemeiLu; YinboQu; PeijiGao

    2004-01-01

    Wheat straw chemi-mechanical pulp was pretreated with a crude xylanase which was secreted by white rot fungus Phanerochaete Chrysosporium prior to hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The process of xylanase pretreatment and hydrogen peroxide bleaching was optimized. The xylanase treated pulp achieved a brightness gain of 5.8% ISO over the untreated pulp. The xylanase treatment was found to liberate reducing sugars and facilitating lignin removal. Fiber morphology of pulp treated with xylanase was also studied by SEM.

  10. [Determination of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater by fluorometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yan-Fen; Huang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Guang-Fu; Li, Rui-Ping

    2008-04-01

    The present paper introduces a new method using spectrofluorimetric analysis to determine the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater. In this method, an oxidation reaction is conducted between o-phenylenediamine (OPDA) and hydrogen peroxide in the buffer medium of NaAc-HAc at pH 4. 48 to form a new product 2,3-diaminophenazine (DAPN). Then the fluorescence intensity of DAPN is measured and 426 and 554 nm are chosen as the excitation and emission wavelengths. Therefore, with the foreknown concentration of input hydrogen peroxide, a series of fluorescence intensities of DAPN are acquired according to a series of different concentration of hydrogen peroxide as input, greatly improving the selectivity and sensibility of the system. A relationship between the input concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the fluorescence intensity of DAPN is then obtained using a linear regression. Results show that fluorescence intensity of DAPN is in proportion to the increase in the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the range of 9.0 x 10(-7) -3.56 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1) almost linearly. The linear equation is F = 1.15c (micromol x L(-1))+398.6 (r = 0.999 1) and the detection limit is 2.7 x10(-7) mol x L(-1) (n = 11). The relative standard deviation of 11 parallel measurements with the concentration of H2O2 at 7.5 x 10(-6) and 3.0 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1), is 2.2 and 1.0%, respectively. Results from DPD method was used to verify this method. The interference of foreign iron was studied. Compared to the traditional methods, this binary system has a simplified operation and high sensitivity. The proposed method has been successfully applied to determine the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide potentiates organophosphate toxicosis in chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banan K. Al-Baggou

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of hydrogen peroxide(H2O2 on the acute toxicity of organophosphate insecticides dichlorvos and diazinon and their inhibitoryactions on plasma, brain and liver cholinesterase activities. Material and Methods: H2O2 was given indrinking water (0.5% v/v for 2 weeks in unsexed day old chicks, a regimen known to induce oxidativestress in this species. A control group received drinking tap water. All experiments were conducted onthe chicks at the age of 15 days after exposure to H2O2. The acute (24 h oral LD50 values of dichlorvosand diazinon in the insecticidal preparations as determined by the up-and-down method in the controlchicks were 9.4 and 15.6 mg/kg, respectively. Results: The poisoned chicks manifested signs ofcholinergic toxicosis within one hour after the dosing including salivation, lacrimation, gasping, frequentdefecation, drooping of wings, tremors, convulsions and recumbency. The acute (24 h oral LD50 valuesof dichlorvos and diazinon in chicks provided with H2O2 were reduced to 3.5 and 6.5 mg/kg, by 63 and58%, respectively when compared to respective control LD50 values. The intoxicated chicks also showedcholinergic signs of toxicosis as described above. Plasma, brain and liver cholinesterase activities of thechicks exposed to H2O2 were significantly lower than their respective control (H2O values by 25, 28 and27%, respectively. Oral dosing of chicks with dichlorvos at 3 mg/kg significantly inhibited cholinesteraseactivities in the plasma, brain and liver of both control (42-67% and H2O2-treated (15-59% chicks.Diazinon at 5 mg/kg, orally also inhibited cholinesterase activities in the plasma, brain and liver of bothcontrol (36-66% and H2O2-treated (15-30% chicks. In the H2O2 groups, dichlorvos inhibition of livercholinesterase activity and diazinon inhibition of liver and brain cholinesterase activities weresignificantly lesser than those of the respective values of

  12. Release of hydrogen peroxide and antioxidants by the coral Stylophora pistillata to its external milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoza-Zvuloni, R.; Shaked, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a common reactive oxygen species, plays multiple roles in coral health and disease. Elevated H2O2 production by the symbiotic algae during stress may result in symbiosis breakdown and bleaching of the coral. We have recently reported that various Red Sea corals release H2O2 and antioxidants to their external milieu, and can influence the H2O2 dynamics in the reef. Here, we present a laboratory characterization of H2O2 and antioxidant activity release kinetics by intact, non-stressed Stylophora pistillata. Experimenting with bleached and non-bleached corals and different stirring speeds, we explored the sources and modes of H2O2 and antioxidant release. Since H2O2 is produced and degraded simultaneously, we developed a methodology for resolving the actual H2O2 concentrations released by the corals. H2O2 and antioxidant activity steadily increased in the water surrounding the coral over short periods of 1-2 h. Over longer periods of 5-7 h, the antioxidant activity kept increasing with time, while H2O2 concentrations were stabilized at ~ 1 μM by 1-3 h, and then gradually declined. Solving for H2O2 release, corals were found to release H2O2 at increasing rates over 2-4 h, and then to slow down and stop by 5-7 h. Stirring was shown to induce the release of H2O2, possibly since the flow reduces the thickness of the diffusive boundary layer of the coral, and thus increases H2O2 mass flux. Antioxidant activity was released at similar rates by bleached and non-bleached corals, suggesting that the antioxidants did not originate from the symbiotic algae. H2O2, however, was not released from bleached corals, implying that the symbiotic algae are the source of the released H2O2. The observed flow-induced H2O2 release may aid corals in removing some of the internal H2O2 produced by their symbiotic algae, and may possibly assist in preventing coral bleaching under conditions of elevated temperature and irradiance.

  13. Multistage Extractive Reaction for Hydrogen Peroxide Production by Anthraquinone Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; L(U) Shuxiang; WANG Yaquan; MI Zhentao

    2005-01-01

    The extractive reaction process of oxygen-working solution-water three-phase system for the production of hydrogen peroxide by the anthraquinone method was investigated in a sieve plate column of 50 mm in internal diameter. The oxidation reaction of anthrahydroquinone in the working solution with oxygen and the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from the working solution into aqueous phase occurred simultaneously in the countercurrent mode. The agitating effect caused by gaseous phase made the droplets of the dispersed phase become smaller, thus, increasing the liquid-liquid interfacial contact areas and resulting in the improvement of the mass transfer velocity. Results showed that the gas-agitation had a beneficial effect on the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from the working solution into the aqueous phase; the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the raffinate decreased with the increase of the gaseous superficial velocities; and the concentration of H2O2 in the raffinate increased with the increase of the dispersed phase superficial velocity at the same superficial velocity of the gaseous phase. In the G-L-L extractive reaction process, with the increase of the gaseous superficial velocities, both the conversion of the anthrahydroquinone oxidation and the extraction efficiency of hydrogen peroxide first increased significantly, then increased gradually.

  14. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H2O2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  15. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonios, George [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Dimou, Aikaterini [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Galaris, Dimitrios [Laboratory of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2008-01-07

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  16. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning......: 2h); G3- four 2-hour exposures to 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure: 8h); G4- two applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide, which was light-activated with halogen lamp at 700mW/cm² during 7min and remained in contact with enamel for 20min (total exposure: 40min). All bleaching treatments adopted...... analysis performing gold sputter coating under vacuum and were examined using 15kV at 500x and 2000x magnification. Results: Morphological alterations on the enamel surface were similarly detected after bleaching with either 35% carbamide peroxide or 35% hydrogen peroxide. Surface porosities were...

  17. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A; Nørskov, Jens K

    2015-11-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.

  18. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Nørskov, Jens K

    2015-01-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet, over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. Present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH$^*$ can be used as a descriptor to screen for selectivity trends between the 2e$^-$ water oxidation to H$_2$O$_2$ and the 4e$^-$ oxidation to O$_2$. We show that materials that bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO$_2$, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rati...

  19. New insights into the physicochemical effects of ammonia/peroxide bleaching of hair and Sepia melanins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prem, Padmaja; Dube, Katherine J; Madison, Stephen A; Bartolone, John

    2003-01-01

    Chemically unaltered melanosomes from black hair were isolated using a mild enzymatic procedure reported by Novellino et al. involving sequential treatment of a homogenized hair sample with different protease enzymes. Time-dependent fluorescence studies show, under identical conditions, that the rate of bleaching upon NH3/H2O2 treatment of hair melanosomes is twice that of Sepia melanosomes. The structure and morphology of hair melanosomes are compared to Sepia eumelanin using ESEM and TEM imaging studies. Black hair melanosomes are aggregates of rice-shaped ellipsoidal particles (0.8-1.0 microm in length and 0.2-0.6 microm in width) surrounded by an amorphous material suspected to be made of non-proteinacious materials. Sepia eumelanin aggregates are larger (2-5 microm) particles with a "doughnut" shape comprised of 100-150-nm spherical particles. Time-dependent TEM imaging studies of ammonia-treated (pH 10) hair melanosomes showed an initial breakdown of melanosomal aggregates followed by rupture of the melanosomal membrane, releasing melanin nanoparticles and leaving a ghost membrane behind. After prolonged treatment with aqueous NH3, a total loss of characteristic melanosome morphology was observed leading to an amorphous material. By contrast, Sepia melanosomes under identical conditions of ammonia treatment did not show such changes, probably due to different surface properties and aggregation behavior. Sodium hydroxide or sodium carbonate at identical pH did not show similar changes to ammonia, suggesting that the changes are not merely due to alkaline pH, but, rather, are specific to ammonia. Co-treatment with ammonia and peroxide induced a faster disintegration of the melanosomes, resulting in a complete dissolution and discoloration of melanin in 30 minutes. The data suggest that ammonia helps to release melanin nanoparticles out of melanosomes, making them more susceptible to oxidative attack by H2O2.

  20. Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

  1. Catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of a petrochemical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente, M I; Melero, J A; Martínez, F; Botas, J A; Gallego, A I

    2010-01-01

    Continuous Catalytic Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation (CWHPO) for the treatment of a petrochemical industry wastewater has been studied on a pilot plant scale process. The installation, based on a catalytic fixed bed reactor (FBR) coupled with a stirred tank reactor (STR), shows an interesting alternative for the intensification of a continuous CWHPO treatment. Agglomerated SBA-15 silica-supported iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)/SBA-15) was used as Fenton-like catalyst. Several variables such as the temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration, as well as the capacity of the pilot plant for the treatment of inlet polluted streams with different dilution degrees were studied. Remarkable results in terms of TOC reduction and increased biodegradability were achieved using 160 degrees C and moderate hydrogen peroxide initial concentration. Additionally, a good stability of the catalyst was evidenced for 8 hours of treatment with low iron leaching (less than 1 mg/L) under the best operating conditions.

  2. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p 3.3). PMID:27034897

  3. Potential of desensitizing toothpastes to reduce the hydrogen peroxide diffusion in teeth with cervical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-Sánchez, Andrés; Montenegro, Andrés Fernando; Alfonso, Arana-Gordillo; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the occlusive potential of four toothpastes by atomic force microscopy (AFM) before and after bleaching and quantify the hydrogen peroxide (HP) diffusion into the pulp chamber after application of desensitizing toothpastes in teeth with cervical lesions. In 52 human extracted premolars, 2-mm deep artificial cervical lesions (ACL) were prepared and rinsed with EDTA for 10 seconds. Then teeth were adapted in a brushing machine and brushed with one of the following toothpastes [Regular toothpaste with no occlusive compounds Colgate Cavity Protection (CP), Oral-B Pro Health (OB), Colgate ProRelief (PR) and Sensodyne Rapid Relief (RR)] under constant loading (250 g; 4.5 cycles/seconds; 3 minutes). In 13 teeth (control group), no artificial cervical lesion was prepared. After that, the teeth were bleached with 35% HP with three 15-minute applications. The HP diffusion was measured spectrophotometrically as a stable red product based on HP reaction with 4-aminoanthipyrine and phenol in presence of peroxidase, at a wavelength of 510 nm and the dentin surfaces of ACL were evaluated before and after bleaching by AFM. Data was statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 0.05). In the AFM images, some modifications of the dentin surface were observed after application of OB and RR. However, only for RR the formation of a surface deposit was produced, which occluded the majority of the dentin tubules. Also, only for RR, this deposit was not modified/removed by bleaching. Despite this, all groups with ACL showed higher HP penetration than sound teeth, regardless of the toothpaste used (P < 0.001).

  4. Bleaching augments lipid peroxidation products in pistachio oil and its cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistachio consumption is associated with reductions in serum cholesterol and oxidative stress due to their constituents of unsaturated fats, phytosterols, fiber, and antioxidants. Bleaching has been applied to whiten nut shells for antifungal and cosmetic purposes. However, the impact of bleaching o...

  5. Salinity-gradient energy driven microbial electrosynthesis of hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a strong oxidant, is widely used in various chemical industries and environmental remediation processes. In this study, we developed an innovative method for cost-effective production of H2O2 by using a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC). In the......Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a strong oxidant, is widely used in various chemical industries and environmental remediation processes. In this study, we developed an innovative method for cost-effective production of H2O2 by using a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... 7722-84-1) is also referred to as hydrogen dioxide. It is made by the electrolytic oxidation of... acid; by hydrogen reduction of 2-ethylanthraquinone, followed by oxidation with air, to regenerate the... sufficient for the purpose do. Wine do Oxidizing and reducing agent as defined in § 170.3 (o)(22) of this...

  7. Applications of hydrogen peroxide in electrochemical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Gallegos, Alberto Armando

    1998-12-01

    It is demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide can be produced with a current efficiency of 40-70% by the cathodic reduction of oxygen at a reticulated vitreous carbon electrode in a divided flow-cell using catholytes consisting of aqueous chloride or sulphate media, pH >>{sub 2}. The supporting electrolyte does not influence either the current efficiency for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or its rate of production. The current efficiency for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not a strong function of the potential and this suggests that 2e- and 4e- reduction of oxygen occurs in parallel at different sites on the carbon surface. Voltammetry experiments showed that (a) the I-E response for oxygen reduction at pH >>{sub 2} is a function of the electrode surface and/or the supporting electrolyte; (b) both H{sub 2} evolution and oxygen reduction are retarded on carbon with increasing ionic strength; (c) the presence of ferrous ions lead to the homogeneous decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} away from the cathode surface but their effectiveness as a catalyst for this decomposition depends on their speciation in solution which changes during an electrolysis. The use of a three-dimensional electrode fabricated from reticulated vitreous carbon allows Fenton`s reagent to be electroproduced at a practical rate which makes possible the removal of organics in slightly acidic aqueous media. A wide range of highly toxic organic molecules (phenol, catechol, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, oxalic acid, aniline, cresol and amaranth) have been oxidised in mild conditions and a significant fraction of the organic carbon is evolved as CO{sub 2}. In all cases studied the initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) was depleted to levels higher than 85%, indicating a complete mineralisation of the organic pollutants. The life-time of the reticulated vitreous carbon cathode was demonstrated to be over 1000 hours during two and a half years of experiments. During this time the cathode performance was very good, leading to

  8. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Beijing K.; Sikes, Hadley D.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies. PMID:25460730

  9. Quantifying intracellular hydrogen peroxide perturbations in terms of concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beijing K. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular level, mechanistic understanding of the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS in a variety of pathological conditions is hindered by the difficulties associated with determining the concentration of various ROS species. Here, we present an approach that converts fold-change in the signal from an intracellular sensor of hydrogen peroxide into changes in absolute concentration. The method uses extracellular additions of peroxide and an improved biochemical measurement of the gradient between extracellular and intracellular peroxide concentrations to calibrate the intracellular sensor. By measuring peroxiredoxin activity, we found that this gradient is 650-fold rather than the 7–10-fold that is widely cited. The resulting calibration is important for understanding the mass-action kinetics of complex networks of redox reactions, and it enables meaningful characterization and comparison of outputs from endogenous peroxide generating tools and therapeutics across studies.

  10. The basic chemistry and photochemistry behind hydrogen peroxide tooth whitening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, N.D.; Fairley, P.D.; Mohan, V.; Jumeaux, C.

    2013-01-01

    Tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide gel formulation is a complexprocess which involves both chemistry and physics, and there is still some controversy about the efficiency of whitening processes, particularly with respect to the roles of temperature and irradiation with light. In this work we av

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance J coupling constant polarizabilities of hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Hanna; Nielsen, Monia R.; Pagola, Gabriel I.

    2012-01-01

    approximation for the small molecule hydrogen peroxide, which allowed us to carry out calculations with the largest available basis sets optimized for the calculation of NMR coupling constants. We ¿nd a systematic but rather slow convergence with the one-electron basis set and that augmentation functions...

  12. Enzymatic generation of hydrogen peroxide shows promising antifouling effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, J.B.; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Laursen, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    The antifouling (AF) potential of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced enzymatically in a coating containing starch, glucoamylase, and hexose oxidase was evaluated in a series of laboratory tests and in-sea field trials. Dissolved H2O2 inhibited bacterial biofilm formation by eight of nine marine...

  13. Natural manganese deposits as catalyst for decomposing hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, A.H.; Lekkerkerker-Teunissen, K.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking water companies (are intending to) implement advanced oxidation processes (AOP) in their treatment schemes to increase the barrier against organic micropollutants (OMPs). It is necessary to decompose the excessive hydrogen peroxide after applying AOP to avoid negative effects in the

  14. Hydrogen peroxide evolution during V-UV photolysis of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azrague, Kamal; Bonnefille, Eric; Pradines, Vincent; Pimienta, Véronique; Oliveros, Esther; Maurette, Marie-Thérèse; Benoit-Marquié, Florence

    2005-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide evolution during the vacuum-ultraviolet (V-UV, 172 nm) photolysis of water is considerably affected by the presence of oxalic acid (employed as a model water pollutant) and striking differences are observed in the absence and in the presence of dioxygen.

  15. The design of organic catalysis for epoxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Alder, Roger W.; Davis, Anthony P

    2005-01-01

    The potential of various organic species to catalyze epoxidation of ethene by hydrogen peroxide is explored with B3LYP/6-31G* DFT calculations. Electronic Supplementary Materials Supplementary material is available for this article at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00894-005-0044-4.

  16. Computer Data Processing of the Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余逸男; 胡良剑

    2003-01-01

    Two methods of computer data processing, linear fitting and nonlinear fitting, are applied to compute the rate constant for hydrogen peroxide decomposition reaction. The results indicate that not only the new methods work with no necessity to measure the final oxygen volume, but also the fitting errors decrease evidently.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide in breath condensate during a common cold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.Q. Jöbsis (Rijn); S.L. Schellekens; A. Fakkel-Kroesbergen (Anoeska); R.H. Raatgeep (Rolien); J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in exhaled air condensate is elevated in inflammatory disorders of the lower respiratory tract. It is unknown whether viral colds contribute to exhaled H2O2. Aim: To assess exhaled H2O2during and after a common cold. Methods: We examined H2O2in the br

  18. Polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide inhibit proteoglycan synthesis of human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhner, Eric; Hoff, Paula; Winkler, Tobias; von Roth, Philipp; Seeger, Jörn Bengt; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-03-01

    The use of local antiseptics is a common method in septic joint surgery. We tested polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide, two of the most frequently used antiseptics with high efficacy and low toxicity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of both antiseptics on the extracellular cartilaginous matrix synthesis of human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were isolated from donated human knee joints, embedded in alginate beads, and incubated for 10 and 30 minutes with polyhexanide (0.04%), hydrogen peroxide (3%), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for control. Cartilaginous matrix production was quantified through light microscopic analysis of Alcian blue staining. Cell number and morphology were detected by histological analysis. Chondrocytes showed a decreased intensity of blue colouring after antiseptic treatment versus PBS. In contrast to that, neither the cell number per view field nor the cell morphology differed between the groups. Polyhexanide has more toxic potential than hydrogen peroxide. Based on the fact that the cell number and morphology was not altered by the substances at the examined concentrations, the lower intensity of Alcian blue staining of treated chondrocytes indicates a decreased cartilage-specific matrix synthesis by polyhexanide more than by hydrogen peroxide and control.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide oxidant fuel cell systems for ultra-portable applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will address the issues of using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant fuel in a miniature DMFC system. Cell performance for DMFC based fuel cells operating on hydrogen peroxide will be presented and discussed.

  20. 78 FR 73697 - New Animal Drugs; Hyaluronate Sodium; Hydrogen Peroxide; Imidacloprid and Moxidectin; Change of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ...; Hyaluronate Sodium; Hydrogen Peroxide; Imidacloprid and Moxidectin; Change of Sponsor AGENCY: Food and Drug... interest in, NADA 141-255 for PEROX-AID (hydrogen peroxide) 35% Solution to Western Chemical, Inc.,...

  1. Hydrogen peroxide oxidant fuel cell systems for ultra-portable applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will address the issues of using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant fuel in a miniature DMFC system. Cell performance for DMFC based fuel cells operating on hydrogen peroxide will be presented and discussed.

  2. In vitro evaluation of the effect of delaying toothbrushing with toothpaste on enamel microhardness subsequent to bleaching the teeth with 15% carbamide peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navimipour, E J; Kimyai, S; Nikazar, S; Ghojazadeh, M

    2012-01-01

    Changes in enamel surface microhardness as a result of bleaching with carbamide peroxide in various in vitro conditions have been reported. The present study evaluated the effect of oral hygiene procedures on enamel microhardness at three time intervals following bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide. Although this was an in vitro study, the purpose was to address whether or not a patient's toothbrushing following at-home bleaching might affect surface changes in tooth enamel. Eighty enamel slabs were prepared from impacted human third molars that had been extracted surgically. Subsequent to placing the specimens in acrylic resin, their surfaces were smoothed, and they were randomly divided into four equal groups. The specimens were initially evaluated for microhardness by Vickers test. The bleaching procedure was carried out for 21 days for 6 hours daily. In each group, the surfaces of specimens were brushed with toothpaste immediately, 1 hour, and 2 hours after bleaching except for the control group. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva. Enamel microhardness was again measured at the end of the bleaching period. Then the differences in enamel microhardness between the two periods were calculated. Data were analyzed with a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test at a significance level of pmicrohardness values before and after intervention between the groups were not significant (p=0.59). Daily oral hygiene procedures either immediately or 1 or 2 hours after daily bleaching procedures and exposing the specimens to artificial saliva during the study period produced no significant differences in enamel microhardness values.

  3. Hydrogen Peroxide: A Key Chemical for Today's Sustainable Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriminna, Rosaria; Albanese, Lorenzo; Meneguzzo, Francesco; Pagliaro, Mario

    2016-12-20

    The global utilization of hydrogen peroxide, a green oxidant that decomposes in water and oxygen, has gone from 0.5 million tonnes per year three decades ago to 4.5 million tonnes per year in 2014, and is still climbing. With the aim of expanding the utilization of this eminent green chemical across different industrial and civil sectors, the production and use of hydrogen peroxide as a green industrial oxidant is reviewed herein to provide an overview of the explosive growth of its industrial use over the last three decades and of the state of the art in its industrial manufacture, with important details of what determines the viability of the direct production from oxygen and hydrogen compared with the traditional auto-oxidation process. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Catalytic hydrogen peroxide decomposition on La1-xSrxCo03-d perovskite oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, Van-Ahn. T.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.; Berg, van den A.

    2005-01-01

    Lanthanide perovskite oxides are mentioned as material for hydrogen peroxide sensor because they can catalytically decompose hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous medium. The catalytic properties of these perovskite oxides to hydrogen peroxide are suggested due to their oxygen vacancies influenced by the

  5. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  7. 21 CFR 172.167 - Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.167 Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution. An aqueous solution containing a mixture of silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide may be safely...

  8. The effect of two bleaching agents on the phosphate concentration of the enamel evaluated by Raman spectroscopy: An ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokkalingam Mothilal Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the effect of in-office bleaching agents,-35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide containing bleaching agents, on the phosphate concentration of the enamel evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. Materials and Methods : Forty noncarious, craze-free human maxillary incisors, extracted for periodontal reasons, were used in this study. Baseline Raman spectra from each specimen were obtained before the application of the bleaching agent to assess the phosphate content present in the teeth. The teeth were divided into two groups: Group A - bleached with pola office bleach (35% hydrogen peroxide, potassium nitrate (light activated. Group B - bleached with opalescence Xtra bleach (38% hydrogen peroxide potassium nitrate and fluoride (chemical activated. After the bleaching procedure, the treated specimens were taken to obtain Raman spectra to assess the phosphate loss after bleaching treatment. Results : The results showed that the chemically activated bleaching agent showed less phosphate loss when compared with the light activated bleaching agent. Conclusion : Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the chemically activated bleaching agent showed minimal phosphate loss when compared to light activated bleaching agent. The chemically activated bleaching agent was better than the light activated bleaching agent when values were evaluated statistically.

  9. Effects of 45S5 bioglass on surface properties of dental enamel subjected to 35%hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Deng; Hai-Lin Wen; Xiao-Li Dong; Feng Li; Xin Xu; Hong Li; Ji-Yao Li; Xue-Dong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Tooth bleaching agents may weaken the tooth structure. Therefore, it is important to minimize any risks of tooth hard tissue damage caused by bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of applying 45S5 bioglass (BG) before, after, and during 35%hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching on whitening efficacy, physicochemical properties and microstructures of bovine enamel. Seventy-two bovine enamel blocks were prepared and randomly divided into six groups:distilled deionized water (DDW), BG, HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. Colorimetric and microhardness tests were performed before and after the treatment procedure. Representative specimens from each group were selected for morphology investigation after the final tests. A significant color change was observed in group HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. The microhardness loss was in the following order:group HP.BG before HP, BG after HP.BG during HP.DDW, BG. The most obvious morphological alteration of was observed on enamel surfaces in group HP, and a slight morphological alteration was also detected in group BG before HP and BG after HP. Our findings suggest that the combination use of BG and HP could not impede the tooth whitening efficacy. Using BG during HP brought better protective effect than pre/post-bleaching use of BG, as it could more effectively reduce the mineral loss as well as retain the surface integrity of enamel. BG may serve as a promising biomimetic adjunct for bleaching therapy to prevent/restore the enamel damage induced by bleaching agents.

  10. Effects of 45S5 bioglass on surface properties of dental enamel subjected to 35% hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng; Wen, Hai-Lin; Dong, Xiao-Li; Li, Feng; Xu, Xin; Li, Hong; Li, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Tooth bleaching agents may weaken the tooth structure. Therefore, it is important to minimize any risks of tooth hard tissue damage caused by bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of applying 45S5 bioglass (BG) before, after, and during 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching on whitening efficacy, physicochemical properties and microstructures of bovine enamel. Seventy-two bovine enamel blocks were prepared and randomly divided into six groups: distilled deionized water (DDW), BG, HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. Colorimetric and microhardness tests were performed before and after the treatment procedure. Representative specimens from each group were selected for morphology investigation after the final tests. A significant color change was observed in group HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. The microhardness loss was in the following order: group HP>BG before HP, BG after HP>BG during HP>DDW, BG. The most obvious morphological alteration of was observed on enamel surfaces in group HP, and a slight morphological alteration was also detected in group BG before HP and BG after HP. Our findings suggest that the combination use of BG and HP could not impede the tooth whitening efficacy. Using BG during HP brought better protective effect than pre/post-bleaching use of BG, as it could more effectively reduce the mineral loss as well as retain the surface integrity of enamel. BG may serve as a promising biomimetic adjunct for bleaching therapy to prevent/restore the enamel damage induced by bleaching agents.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide modified sodium titanates with improved sorption capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, May D.; Hobbs, David T.

    2009-02-24

    The sorption capabilities (e.g., kinetics, selectivity, capacity) of the baseline monosodium titanate (MST) sorbent material currently being used to sequester Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radioisotopes at the Savannah River Site are significantly improved when treated with hydrogen peroxide; either during the original synthesis of MST, or, as a post-treatment step after the MST has been synthesized. It is expected that these peroxide-modified MST sorbent materials will have significantly improved sorption capabilities for non-radioactive cations found in industrial processes and waste streams.

  12. Degradation of the ethyl glucuronide content in hair by hydrogen peroxide and a non-destructive assay for oxidative hair treatment using infra-red spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Dominic; Becker, Roland; Kohl, Anka; Hänisch, Jessica; Nehls, Irene

    2014-11-01

    The assessment of quantification results of the alcohol abuse marker ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in hair in comparison to the cut-off values for the drinking behavior may be complicated by cosmetic hair bleaching. Thus, the impact of increasing exposure to hydrogen peroxide on the EtG content of hair was investigated. Simultaneously, the change of absorbance in the range of 1000-1100 cm(-1) indicative for the oxidation of cystine was investigated non-destructively by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) using pulverized portions of the respective hair samples. Hair samples treated with hydrogen peroxide consistently displayed a significantly increased absorbance at 1040 cm(-1) associated with the formation of cysteic acid. The EtG content decreased significantly if the hair was treated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide as during cosmetic bleaching. It could be shown that ATR-FTIR is capable of detecting an exposure to hydrogen peroxide when still no brightening was visible and already before the EtG content deteriorated significantly. Thus, hair samples suspected of having been exposed to oxidative treatment may be checked non-destructively by a readily available technique. This assay is also possible retrospectively after EtG extraction and using archived samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in an unbiased solar photoelectrochemical cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Xu; Chen, Hongjun; Seger, Brian

    2014-01-01

    A solar-to-chemical conversion process is demonstrated using a photoelectrochemical cell without external bias for selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sulfur (S). The process integrates two redox couples anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone and I−/I3...

  14. Preparation of water soluble chitosan by hydrolysis using hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhenqiang; Wu, Shengjun; Chen, Jinhua

    2013-08-01

    Chitosan is not soluble in water, which limits its wide application particularly in the medicine and food industry. In the present study, water soluble chitosan (WSC) was prepared by hydrolyzing chitosan using hydrogen peroxide under the catalysis of phosphotungstic acid in homogeneous phase. Factors affecting hydrolysis were investigated and the optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined. The WSC structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The resulting products were composed of chitooligosaccharides of DP 2-9. The WSC content of the product and the yield were 94.7% and 92.3% (w/w), respectively. The results indicate that WSC can be effectively prepared by hydrolysis of chitosan using hydrogen peroxide under the catalysis of phosphotungstic acid.

  15. Chemiluminometric hydrogen peroxide sensor for flow injection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preuschoff, F. (Inst. fuer Biotechnologie, Halle Univ. (Germany)); Spohn, U. (Inst. fuer Biotechnologie, Halle Univ. (Germany)); Blankenstein, G. (Inst. fuer Enzymtechnologie am Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Duesseldorf Univ., Juelich (Germany)); Mohr, K.H. (Inst. fuer Biotechnologie, Halle Univ. (Germany)); Kula, M.R. (Inst. fuer Enzymtechnologie am Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Duesseldorf Univ., Juelich (Germany))

    1993-08-01

    A chemiluminometric hydrogen peroxide sensor was developed for fast flow injection analysis. Different peroxidases were covalently immobilized on affinity membranes and compared with respect to the catalytic luminol oxidation. A photomultiplier tube is connected with a fibre bundle to the flow cell. The small cell volume of 5-10 [mu]l allows sampling rates between 90 and 200/h, depending on the flow rate. The highest sensitivity and the best longterm stability can be achieved with microbial peroxidase. Hydrogen peroxide can be determined in the range between 10[sup -3] and 10[sup -8] mol/l with a precision of < 3% (n=6, [alpha] = 0.05). The operational stability of the sensor is longer than 10 weeks. (orig.)

  16. Ultrasonic degradation of Rhodamine B in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and some metal oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrdad, Abbas; Hashemzadeh, Robab

    2010-01-01

    In this research, degradation of Rodamine B in the presence of (hydrogen peroxide), (hydrogen peroxide+ultrasound), (hydrogen peroxide+aluminum oxide), (hydrogen peroxide+aluminum oxide+ultrasound with different ultrasound power), (hydrogen peroxide+iron oxide) and (hydrogen peroxide+iron oxide+ultrasound with different ultrasound power) were investigated at 25 degrees C. The apparent rate constants for the examined systems were calculated by pseudo-first-order kinetics. The results indicate that the rate of degradation was accelerated by ultrasound. The rate of degradation was increased by increasing power ultrasound. The efficiency of the (hydrogen peroxide+iron oxide+ultrasound) system for degradation of Rodamine B was higher than the others examined.

  17. Determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Bodiroga Milanka; Ognjanović Jasminka

    2002-01-01

    Iodometric and permanganometric titrations were used for determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the mixture. Two procedures were described and compared. Titrations could be done in only one vessel, in the same reaction mixture, when iodometric titration of peracetic acid was continued after the permanganometric titration of H2O2, (procedure A). Peracetic acid and H2O2, as oxidizing agents, reacted with potassium iodide in an acid medium, evolving iodine. This reaction...

  18. Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites (SSC98-VIII-1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C

    1998-07-13

    As satellite designs shrink, providing maneuvering and control capability falls outside the realm of available propulsion technology. While cold gas has been used on the smallest satellites, hydrogen peroxide propellant is suggested as the next step in performance and cost before hydrazine. Minimal toxicity and a small scale enable benchtop propellant preparation and development testing. Progress toward low-cost thrusters and self-pressurizing tank systems is described.

  19. Efficiency of hydrogen peroxide in improving disinfection of ICU rooms

    OpenAIRE

    Blazejewski, Caroline; Wallet, Frédéric; Rouzé, Anahita; Le Guern, Rémi; Ponthieux, Sylvie; Salleron, Julia; Nseir, Saad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The primary objective of this study was to determine the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) techniques in disinfection of ICU rooms contaminated with multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) after patient discharge. Secondary objectives included comparison of the efficiency of a vaporizator (HPV, Bioquell®) and an aerosolizer using H2O2, and peracetic acid (aHPP, Anios®) in MDRO environmental disinfection, and assessment of toxicity of these techniques. Methods This prospective c...

  20. Polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide inhibit proteoglycan synthesis of human chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Röhner, Eric; Hoff, Paula; Winkler, Tobias; von Roth, Philipp; Seeger, Jörn Bengt; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The use of local antiseptics is a common method in septic joint surgery. We tested polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide, two of the most frequently used antiseptics with high efficacy and low toxicity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of both antiseptics on the extracellular cartilaginous matrix synthesis of human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were isolated from donated human knee joints, embedded in alginate beads, and incubated for 10 and 30 minutes with polyhexanide (0.04%)...

  1. Effect of carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide on the surface morphology and zinc oxide levels of IRM fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostein, I; Cohenca, N; Mor, C; Moshonov, J; Stabholz, A

    1995-12-01

    The effect of 10% carbamide peroxide or 10% hydrogen peroxide on the surface morphology and zinc oxide levels of IRM fillings was tested. Ninety IRM samples were treated with either 10% carbamide peroxide, 10% hydrogen peroxide or phosphate buffer which served as control. Treatment consisted of placing the samples in a dry incubator at 37 degrees C for 1, 3 or 7 days. At each time point, the samples were removed from the test solutions, dried and prepared for surface scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometric analysis. After 3 days, 10% carbamide peroxide significantly reduced the zinc oxide levels as compared to the 10% hydrogen peroxide group (IRM fillings, but their modes of action differed.

  2. DETOXIFICATION OF CYANIDE IN GOLD PROCESSING WASTEWATER BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khodadadi, M. Abdolahi and P. Teimoury

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing cyanide compounds in mining and chemical industry is one of the most important environmental issues due to the acute toxic properties of many cyanide compounds to humans and aquatic life. Cyanide tends to react readily with most other chemical elements, producing a wide variety of toxic, cyanide related compounds. This research was aimed at investigating a feasible and economical technique for the detoxification of cyanide from the tailing effluent of Muteh gold mine in Isfahan, Iran. In this research cyanide detoxification was achieved through the oxidation of cyanide by hydrogen peroxide using various hydrogen peroxide solutions at pH levels between 7-13 and temperatures between 12-65 °C using copper sulfate as a catalyst. The optimum pH and dose of hydrogen peroxide for complete cyanide removal in the presence of 30 mg/L copper sulfate as a catalyst were determined as 9.7 and 9.98 g/L, respectively. At high temperatures > 35°C, cyanide was completely removed perfectly at constant pH = 9.7 which was mainly due to cyanide evaporation in the form of HCN.

  3. Heterogeneous Uptake of Hydrogen Peroxide on Mineral Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-gang Wang; Mao-fa Ge; Qiao Sun

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of mineral oxides (α-Al2O3,MgO,Fe2O3,and SiO2) with hydrogen peroxide was investigated using the Knudsen cell reactor.The initial reactive uptake coefficients for the commercially available powders are measured as (1.00+0.11)×l0-4 for α-Al2O3,(1.66+0.23) ×10-4 for MgO,(9.70+1.95)×10-5 for Fe2O3,and (5.22+0.9)×10-5 for SiO2.These metal oxide powders exhibit some catalytic behavior toward the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide excluding SiO2.H2O2 can be destroyed on Fe2O3 surface and O2 is formed.The experimental results suggest that the heterogeneous loss on mineral surface can represent an important sink of hydrogen peroxide.

  4. Effectiveness of nano-calcium phosphate paste on sensitivity during and after bleaching: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; Lidia Yileng TAY; HERRERA,Daniel Rodrigo; Bauer,Jose; Reis, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of in-office bleaching and associated tooth sensitivity on application of nano-calcium phosphate paste as desensitizing agent. Bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel in 40 patients who were randomly divided into placebo and nano-calcium phosphate paste groups. Bleaching efficacy (BE) was evaluated using a value-oriented Vita shade guide. Tooth sensitivity was recorded using a numeric rating scale (0–4) during bleaching and up...

  5. Influence of remineralizing gels on bleached enamel microhardness in different time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Yui, Karen Cristina Kazue; D'Avila, Thaís Corrêa; Takahashi, Camila Lurie; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Borges, Alexandre Luis Souto

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of bleaching gel pH, the effect of applying remineralizing gels after bleaching and the effect of artificial saliva on enamel microhardness. Seventy bovine incisors were divided into three groups: Group 1 (n=10) received no bleaching procedure (control); Group 2 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide neutral gel (n=30) and Group 3 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide acid gel (n=30). Each experimental group was subdivided into three groups (n=10) according to the post-bleaching treatment: storage in artificial saliva, application of a fluoride gel and application of a combination of calcium and fluoride gel. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 7, 15 and 30 days and enamel microhardness was evaluated. The Vickers microhardness data were analyzed by three-way RM ANOVA, which revealed a significant difference only for treatment factor. The Tukey's test showed that the groups bleached followed by no additional treatment exhibited microhardness means significantly lower than the bleached groups treated with remineralizing gels. The Dunnet's test showed a significant difference only for the group bleached with acid gel without remineralizing treatment compared to the control group measured immediately after bleaching. It was concluded that acid bleaching gel significantly reduced enamel microhardness and that use of remineralizing gels after bleaching can significantly enhance the microhardness of bleached enamel.

  6. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrel, L. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPNS, CEN Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chopin, J. [Laboratoire d`Electrochimie Inorganique, ENSSPICAM, Marseille (France)

    1996-12-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40{sup o}C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H{sup +} ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I{sub 2}], [IO{sub 3}{sup -}], [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] and [H{sup +}]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs.

  7. Effect of In-Office Carbamide Peroxide-Based Tooth Bleaching System on Wear Resistance of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Dental Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoumeh; Sheikhzadeh, Sedigheh; Ghasemi Monfared Rad, Hamidreza; Beygi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Several studies have assessed the characteristics and properties of silorane-based composites and adhesive systems. Considering the extensive application of tooth-whitening agents, possible deteriorative effects of tooth bleaching agents on these restorative materials must be studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an in-office carbamide peroxide-based tooth bleaching agent on the wear resistance of a silorane-based and a conventional microhybrid dimethyl methacrylate-based dental composite with two different application times. Materials and Methods: Thirty cylindrical specimens were made of Z250 and P90 dental composite resins (n=15 for each composite). Samples made of each composite were divided into three groups (n=5) for immersion in an in-office bleaching agent (Opalescence® Quick 45%) for either three or eight hours or saline solution (control). Wear tests were conducted after bleaching using a pin-on disk apparatus under the load of 40N at a constant sliding speed of 0.5 ms−1 for a sliding distance of 300 m. The samples were weighed before and after the wear test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the obtained data (α=0.05). Results: There was a significant decrease in the weight of samples after the wear test (P0.05). Conclusion: Bleaching for three or eight hours using 45% carbamide peroxide had no deteriorative effect on the wear resistance of Z250 and P90 composites. PMID:27123014

  8. Bleaching of the discolored traumatized tooth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jon E.; Kopperud, Siemen E.; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the treatment of discolored traumatized teeth, most of them being non-vital and subsequently, endodontically treated. Tooth bleaching based upon hydrogen peroxide as the active agent, applied directly or produced in a chemical reaction from sodium perborate or carbamide...

  9. Effect of bleaching on the shear bond strength of the enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Arruda

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of dental bleaching on the shear bond strength of enamel. Methods: Fifty molars were selected and divided into five groups (n=10; G1-without bleaching (control; G2-bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide and restored 24h later; G3-bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide and restored seven days later; G4-bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored a 35% and restored 24h later; G5-bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored a 35% and restored seven days later. During the 24h and 7-day intervals the test specimens remained stored in artificial saliva, after which the restorative procedures were performed on the enamel. Results: The microshear bond strength test indicated the following results in MPa (ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc: G1-43.15 a (±5.19; G2-31.34 ab (± 4.41; G3-36.66 ab (± 3.11; G4-22.87 c (±3.76 and G5-35.67 ab (± 4.64. Conclusion: Groups G1, G2, G3 and G5 showed no statistical difference and Group G4 (bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and restored 24h later showed diminished bond strength between the bleached enamel and resin composite.

  10. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 10{sup 5} and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA)

  11. A Clinical Study of the Effectiveness of Two Different 10% Carbamide Peroxide Bleaching Products: A 6-Month Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Grobler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of two different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching products just after treatment and after a 6-month follow-up period. Methods. Two 10% carbamide peroxide products (Opalescence PF and Nite White ACP were applied nightly for 14 days, according to the manufacturers' instructions. The color of teeth 11 and 21 of thirty-four subjects having A2 or darker teeth were measured with a spectrophotometer (L∗;a∗;b∗ before treatment, just after treatment (14 days and after 6 months. Results and Conclusions. Both products produced significant whitening of teeth with total color change (ΔEab∗ of approximately 5.20 units. There was a significant improvement in all 3 color coordinates (L*,a*, and b∗ for up to 6 months postbleaching (P<.05. Nite White showed a higher degree of relapse (27% than Opalescence (18% over the 6-month period. It is suggested that rebleaching after 6 months is not necessary.

  12. The Effect of 3% Phosphate Ascorbyl Gel on Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Enamel treated with 35% Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Milena de Fátima Schalcher; Silva, Alice Carvalho; Franco, Marcela Mayana Pereira; Silva, Ana Paula Brito; Bramante, Fausto da Silva; da Silva, Monica Barros; Lima, Darlon Martins; Pereira, Adriana de Fátima Vasconcelos

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel (PA) in different times onto the microshear bond strength of composite resin (CR) to bovine enamel treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP). Thirty enamel blocks of bovine incisors were made and divided into 5 groups (n = 6) with three specimens per group (n = 18), according to treatment: G1= No bleaching + CR; G2 = HP + CR after 15d; G3 = HP + CR after 24 hours; G4 = HP + PA (15 min) + CR after 24 hours; G5 = HP + PA (2 hours) + CR after 24 hours. The resin cylinders were made by Tygon matrices. Microshear bond strength test was performed using universal testing machine with a 50N load at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fracture modes were assessed by a stereomicroscope 40 ×. Microshear bond strength values were submitted to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) one-way and Tukey test (p 0.05). Failure modes were categorized into adhesive (90%) and mixed (10%). The use of 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel for 15 minutes was able to improve bond strength of composite resin to bleached bovine enamel, but when 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel was applied during 40 minutes it negatively interfered in the adhesion of the resin to bleached bovine enamel.

  13. BIOSORPTION OF CONGO RED BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE TREATED TENDU WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Nagda ، V. S. Ghole

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Solid wastes from agro-industrial operations can be recycled as non-conventional adsorbents if they are inert and harmless and reduce the cost of wastewater treatment. Tendu leaf Diospyros melanoxylon is the second largest forest product in India after timber and is exclusively used in making local cigarette called Bidi. Waste leaf cutting remaining after making cigarette was used in present study as a biosorbent for the removal of Congo red dye from aqueous solution. It was treated with hydrogen peroxide to obtain biosorbent with increased adsorption capacity. Batch type experiments were conducted to study the influence of different parameters such as pH, initial dye concentration and dosage of adsorbent on biosorption evaluated. The adsorption occured very fast initially and attains equilibrium within 60 min at pH= 6.2 and the equilibrium attained faster after hydrogen peroxide modification. Kinetic studies showed that the biosorption of Congo red on tendu waste followed pseudo-second-order rate equation. The data fitted well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Comparison was done on the extent of biosorption between untreated and treated forms of the tendu waste. The maximum adsorption capacity for untreated tendu waste was found to be 46.95 mg/g, which was enhanced by 2.8 times after hydrogen peroxide treatment and was found to be 134.4 mg/g. The adsorption process was in conformity with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms for Congo red adsorption from aqueous solution. The study demonstrated use of milder chemical treatment of tendu waste to obtain a biosorbent with enhanced dye removal capacity.

  14. Vapor hydrogen peroxide as alternative to dry heat microbial reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, S.; Kern, R.; Koukol, R.; Barengoltz, J.; Cash, H.

    2008-09-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), in conjunction with the NASA Planetary Protection Officer, has selected vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VHP) sterilization process for continued development as a NASA approved sterilization technique for spacecraft subsystems and systems. The goal was to include this technique, with an appropriate specification, in NASA Procedural Requirements 8020.12 as a low-temperature complementary technique to the dry heat sterilization process. The VHP process is widely used by the medical industry to sterilize surgical instruments and biomedical devices, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal for this study was to determine the minimum VHP process conditions for planetary protection acceptable microbial reduction levels. Experiments were conducted by the STERIS Corporation, under contract to JPL, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor hydrogen peroxide for the inactivation of the standard spore challenge, Geobacillus stearothermophilus. VHP process parameters were determined that provide significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters of interest: hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of injection cycles, and exposure duration, the investigation also considered the possible effect on lethality of environmental parameters: temperature, absolute humidity, and material substrate. This study delineated a range of test sterilizer process conditions: VHP concentration, process duration, a process temperature range for which the worst case D-value may be imposed, a process humidity range for which the worst case D-value may be imposed, and the dependence on selected spacecraft material substrates. The derivation of D-values from the lethality data permitted conservative planetary protection recommendations.

  15. Efficacy of hydrogen peroxide for treating saprolegniasis in channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, G.E.; Gingerich, W.H.; Dawson, V.K.; Olson, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Hatchery-reared fish and their eggs are commonly afflicted with saprolegniasis, a fungal disease that can cause significant losses in production. Fish culturists need safe and effective fungicides to minimize losses and meet production demands. The efficacy of hydrogen peroxide was evaluated for preventing or controlling mortality associated with saprolegniasis in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Saprolegniasis was systematically induced in channel catfish so various therapies could be evaluated in a controlled laboratory environment. Both prophylactic and therapeutic hydrogen peroxide bath treatments of 50, 100, and 150 ??L/L for 1 h were administered every other day for seven total treatments. All untreated positive control fish died of saprolegniasis during the prophylactic and therapeutic tests. Hydrogen peroxide treatments of 150 ??L/L were harmful (relative to lower concentrations) to test fish and resulted in 73-95% mortality. Mortality was attributed to a combination of abrasion, temperature, chemical treatment, and disease stressors. Treatments of 100 ??L/L were less harmful (relatively) but also appeared to contribute to mortality (60-79%). These treatments, however, significantly reduced the incidence of mortality and infection compared with those observed for fish of the positive control or 150-??L/L treatment groups. Overall, treatments of 50 ??L/L were found to be the most safe and effective of those tested. Mortality with this concentration ranged from 16% in therapeutic tests to 41% in prophylactic tests. The statistical model employed estimated that the optimum treatment concentration for preventing or controlling mortality, reducing the incidence of infections, and enhancing the recovery of infected fish was 75 ??L H2O2/L.

  16. Oxidative status imbalance in patients with metabolic syndrome: role of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Lucas José Sá; Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Guedes, Glaucevane da Silva; Schettino-Silva, Glauber; Mota-Gomes, Marco Antônio; Rabelo, Luíza Antas

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the cardiometabolic and redox balance profiles in patients with Metabolic Syndrome compared to apparently healthy individuals, and the participation of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis in systemic lipid peroxidation. Twenty-four patients with Metabolic Syndrome and eighteen controls underwent a full clinical assessment. Venous blood samples were collected for general biochemical dosages, as well as for the oxidative stress analyses (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and arginase activities; and lipid peroxidation, myeloperoxidase activity, nitrite, and hydrogen peroxide concentrations in plasma). Arterial stiffness was assessed by radial artery applanation tonometry. Plasma lipid peroxidation, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity, myeloperoxidase activity, and hydrogen peroxide concentrations were shown to be increased in Metabolic Syndrome patients, without significant differences for the other enzymes, plasma nitrite concentrations, and arterial stiffness. Linear regression analysis revealed a positive and significant correlation between lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase and also between this enzyme and hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, such correlation was not observed between lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide. In summary, Metabolic Syndrome patients exhibited evident systemic redox imbalance compared to controls, with the possible participation of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis as a contributor in lipid peroxidation.

  17. Effect of temperature and bleaching agent on bleaching of liquid Cheddar whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Barbano, D M; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2012-01-01

    The use of whey protein as an ingredient in foods and beverages is increasing, and thus demand for colorless and mild-tasting whey protein is rising. Bleaching is commonly applied to fluid colored cheese whey to decrease color, and different temperatures and bleach concentrations are used. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of hot and cold bleaching, the point of bleaching (before or after fat separation), and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and volatile components of liquid colored and uncolored Cheddar whey. First, Cheddar whey was manufactured, pasteurized, fat-separated, and subjected to one of a number of hot (68°C) or cold (4°C) bleaching applications [hydrogen peroxide (HP) 50 to 500 mg/kg; benzoyl peroxide (BP) 25 to 100 mg/kg] followed by measurement of residual norbixin and color by reflectance. Bleaching agent concentrations were then selected for the second trial. Liquid colored Cheddar whey was manufactured in triplicate and pasteurized. Part of the whey was collected (no separation, NSE) and the rest was subjected to fat separation (FSE). The NSE and FSE wheys were then subdivided and bleaching treatments (BP 50 or 100 mg/kg and HP 250 or 500 mg/kg) at 68°C for 30 min or 4°C for 16 h were applied. Control NSE and FSE with no added bleach were also subjected to each time-temperature combination. Volatile compounds from wheys were evaluated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and norbixin (annatto) was extracted and quantified to compare bleaching efficacy. Proximate analysis, including total solids, protein, and fat contents, was also conducted. Liquid whey subjected to hot bleaching at both concentrations of HP or at 100mg/kg BP had greater lipid oxidation products (aldehydes) compared with unbleached wheys, 50mg/kg BP hot-bleached whey, or cold-bleached wheys. No effect was detected between NSE and FSE liquid Cheddar whey on the relative abundance of volatile lipid oxidation products. Wheys bleached with BP had

  18. Hydrogen peroxide-based propulsion and power systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melof, Brian Matthew; Keese, David L.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Ruffner, Judith Alison; Escapule, William Rusty

    2004-04-01

    Less toxic, storable, hypergolic propellants are desired to replace nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and hydrazine in certain applications. Hydrogen peroxide is a very attractive replacement oxidizer, but finding acceptable replacement fuels is more challenging. The focus of this investigation is to find fuels that have short hypergolic ignition delays, high specific impulse, and desirable storage properties. The resulting hypergolic fuel/oxidizer combination would be highly desirable for virtually any high energy-density applications such as small but powerful gas generating systems, attitude control motors, or main propulsion. These systems would be implemented on platforms ranging from guided bombs to replacement of environmentally unfriendly existing systems to manned space vehicles.

  19. Petroleum Contaminated Soil Treatment Using Surfactant and Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilza Lobo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of washing soil with surfactants, sodium lauryl ether sulphate (LESS and sodium lauryl sulphate (SDS was combined with chemical oxidation using hydrogen peroxide, with a view to in situ remediation of clay soil contaminated with hydrocarbons oil. The evaluation of the efficiency of the procedure was the removal of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and the comparison of physical and chemical characteristics of contaminated soil and uncontaminated from the same region. The combination of these two techniques, soil washing and application of an oxidizing agent, presented as a process of effective remediation for soils contaminated with petroleum products in subtropical regions.

  20. Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from plasma-water interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Jiandi Liu; Bangbang He; Qiang Chen; Junshuai Li; Qing Xiong; Guanghui Yue; Xianhui Zhang; Size Yang; Hai Liu; Qing Huo Liu

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is usually considered to be an important reagent in green chemistry since water is the only by-product in H2O2 involved oxidation reactions. Early studies show that direct synthesis of H2O2 by plasma-water interactions is possible, while the factors affecting the H2O2 production in this method remain unclear. Herein, we present a study on the H2O2 synthesis by atmospheric pressure plasma-water interactions. The results indicate that the most important factors for the ...

  1. Detection of hydrogen peroxide by lactoperoxidase-mediated dityrosine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkó, Agnes; Orient, Anna; Szabó, Pál T; Németh, Gábor; Vántus, Tibor; Kéri, György; Orfi, László; Hunyady, László; Buday, László; Geiszt, Miklós

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the dityrosine-forming activity of lactoperoxidase (LPO) and its potential application for measuring hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). It was observed that LPO was able to form dityrosine at low H2O2 concentrations. Since dityrosine concentration could be measured in a simple fluorimetric reaction, this activity of the enzyme was utilized for the measurement of H2O2 production in different systems. These experiments successfully measured the activity of NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) by this method. It was concluded that LPO-mediated dityrosine formation offers a simple way for H2O2 measurement.

  2. Historical Survey: German Research on Hydrogen Peroxide/Alcohol Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmeter, John E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Discussion of HP/fuel explosives in the scientific literature dates back to at least 1927. A paper was published that year in a German journal entitled On Hydrogen Peroxide Explosives [Bamberger and Nussbaum 1927]. The paper dealt with HP/cotton/Vaseline formulations, specifically HP89/cotton/Vaseline (76/15/9) and (70/8.5/12.5). The authors performed experiments with charge masses of 250-750 g and charge diameters of 35-45 mm. This short paper provides brief discussion on the observed qualitative effects of detonations but does not report detonation velocities.

  3. Effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate on the flexural strength of enamel-dentin complex following extracoronal bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diatri Nari Ratih

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching can affect the mechanical properties of enamel-dentin complex, such as flexural strength. Casein phosphopeptide-amorphus calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP is often used following bleaching treatment to reduce hypersensitivity and to increase demineralization of tooth. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of CPP-ACP on the flexural strength of enamel-dentin complex following extracoronal bleaching. Methods: Forty-eight enamel-dentin plates (size 8 x 2 x 3 mm were randomly assigned into 6 groups, each consisted of 8 samples. Group 1, no bleaching and immersed in artificial saliva. Group 2, no bleaching, CPP-ACP application only. Group 3, bleaching using 15% carbamide peroxide. Group 4, similar to group 3, except application of CPP-ACP for the times between bleaching. Group 5, bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide. Group 6, similar to group 5, except application of CPP-ACP for the times between bleaching. Flexural strength of each enamel-dentin plate was tested by threepoint bending test using universal testing machine. Results: The results showed that 15% carbamide peroxide and 40% hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced flexural strength of enamel-dentin (216.25±26.44 MPa and 206.67±32.07 MPa respectively. Conversely, application of CPP-ACP following both bleachings increased flexural strength (266.75± 28.27MPa and 254.58±36.59 MPa respectively. A two-way Anova revealed that extracoronal bleaching agents significantly reduced flexural strength (p<0.05. Conclusion: Extracoronal bleaching agents reduce flexural strength, whereas application of CPP-ACP following bleaching either with 15% carbamide peroxide or 40% hydrogen peroxide can increase the flexural strength of enamel-dentin complex.

  4. The combination of sodium perborate and water as intracoronal teeth bleaching agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananta Tantri Budi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The color change on post-endodontic treated teeth can be overcome by intracoronal tooth bleaching using walking bleach. Some agents used in walking bleach are combination of sodium peroxide and hydrogen peroxide, and combination of sodium perborate and water. Purpose: The objective of this review is to provide information and consideration of using safe and effective bleaching agents in the field of dentistry. Reviews: On one side, the use of sodium perborate and water combination does not cause the reduction of dentin hardness, enamel decay, and root resorbtion. On the other side, the use of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide combination indicates that it takes longer time in yielding the proper color of teeth. Conclusion: The use of sodium perborate and water combination as bleaching agents is effective and safe.

  5. Comparison of the bleaching efficacy of three different agents used for intracoronal bleaching of discolored primary teeth: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyone wants whiter teeth to make them feel younger and to provide beautiful smiles with the accompanying increase in self-esteem. Bleaching is an established, simple, cost-effective and conservative method for improving the color of the discolored teeth. Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the bleaching efficacy of 10% carbamide peroxide, 10% hydrogen peroxide and 2g sodium perborate as bleaching agents on the artificially discolored human primary maxillary central incisors. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human primary central incisors with intact crowns were selected for the study. Pulpectomy was performed and each tooth was artificially stained with 2 ml of fresh human blood and centrifuged. --The teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups of 10 teeth each and the baseline color evaluation was performed. 0.04 ml of the bleaching agent is syringed into the access cavity of the tooth and, in the control group, 0.04 ml of distilled water was syringed into the access cavity and it was sealed with IRM and placed at 37°C in an incubator throughout the experiment. The color of the bleached teeth was determined at 0, 7 and 14 days. The data obtained were analyzed using ANOVA and Turkey′s test. Results: There was statistical significance (P = 0.00 among the carbamide peroxide, sodium perborate, hydrogen peroxide and control groups after 7 and 14 days and a significance of P = 0.013 among the carbamide peroxide, sodium perborate and hydrogen peroxide after two bleaching sessions (day 14 was seen. Conclusions: The bleaching efficacy of 10% hydrogen peroxide gel was more effective than 10% carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate in bleaching the artificially discolored primary teeth.

  6. An Investigation into the Effect of Stabiliser Content on the Minimum Characteristic Chamber Length for Homogeneously-Catalysed Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    rate. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Hydrogen peroxide, high test peroxide, HTP , rocket grade hydrogen peroxide, RGHP, stabilized hydrogen...homogeneous catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (often referred to as ’high test peroxide’, or HTP - here used in a general sense to...207< Tc < 516 deg C, depending on the HTP concentration. 3. THE TEST RIG DELTACAT Ltd runs a small test -site in Hampshire, England. Recently

  7. Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide on the Antibacterial Substantivity of Chlorhexidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Shahriari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the antibacterial substantivity of chlorhexidine (CHX. Seventy-five dentine tubes prepared from human maxillary central and lateral incisor teeth were used. After contamination with Enterococcus faecalis for 14 days, the specimens were divided into five groups as follows: CHX, H2O2, CHX + H2O2, infected dentine tubes (positive control, and sterile dentine tubes (negative control. Dentine chips were collected with round burs into tryptic soy broth, and after culturing, the number of colony-forming units (CFU was counted. The number of CFU was minimum in the first cultures in all experimental groups, and the results obtained were significantly different from each other at any time period (<.05. At the first culture, the number of CFU in the CHX + H2O2 group was lower than other two groups. At the other experimental periods, the CHX group showed the most effective antibacterial action (<.05. Hydrogen peroxide group showed the worst result at all periods. In each group, the number of CFU increased significantly by time lapse (<.05. In conclusion, H2O2 had no additive effect on the residual antibacterial activity of CHX.

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Transport in the Lung and Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shlyonsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal and lung epithelial cells are exposed to some significant concentrations of H2O2. In urine it may reach 100 μM, while in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung it is estimated to be in micromolar to tens-micromolar range. Hydrogen peroxide has a stimulatory action on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC single-channel activity. It also increases stability of the channel at the membrane and slows down the transcription of the ENaC subunits. The expression and the activity of the channel may be inhibited in some other, likely higher, oxidative states of the cell. This review discusses the role and the origin of H2O2 in the lung and kidney. Concentration-dependent effects of hydrogen peroxide on ENaC and the mechanisms of its action have been summarized. This review also describes outlooks for future investigations linking oxidative stress, epithelial sodium transport, and lung and kidney function.

  9. Photodecomposition of hydrogen peroxide in highly saline aqueous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Luna

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The photodecomposition of hydrogen peroxide was performed in highly saline aqueous medium (60 g.L-1 of NaCl. The Fe3+/H2O2/NaCl/UV system was tested at temperatures from 20 to 50 ºC, while the intervals of concentration of Fe3+ and H2O2 were 1 to 2.5 mM and 230 to 630 mM, respectively. It is known from the literature that chloride is an inhibitor of the oxidation of organic compound in aqueous medium, but this effect has not been observed to be expressive for hydrogen peroxide. Despite this result, experiments were conducted in presence of high concentration of salt (60 g.L-1, emulating the agrochemical process condition. The series of measurements has been evaluated and correlated. Thermal and photochemical dependencies were described satisfactorily by a simplified kinetic model. The apparent activation energy was estimated to be 27.6 kJ.mol-1.

  10. Effect of titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide with 405-nm diode laser irradiation on bonding of resin to pulp chamber dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, A.; Kato, J.; Kameyama, A.; Hirai, Y.; Oda, Y.

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide on bonding of resin to pulp chamber dentin. Extracted bovine anterior teeth were allocated to three groups of ten teeth each. The coronal labial pulp chamber dentin was exposed and bleached with 3.5% hydrogen peroxide with titanium dioxide with 405-nm diode laser irradiation for 15 min (Group 1); 30% hydrogen peroxide with halogen lamp irradiation for 15 min (Group 2); and distilled water for 15 min (Group 3). After bleaching, the pulp chamber dentin was prepared for composite resin bonding and the interface between the resin and dentin was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and failure patterns were determined. The μTBS values (mean ± SD) were: 17.28 ± 5.79 MPa ( n = 36), 0 MPa, and 26.50 ± 9.83 MPa ( n = 36) in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The μTBS in Group 3 was significantly higher than that in Group 1 ( P < 0.05). Hybrid layers and resin tags were clearly observed at the interface in Groups 1 and 3, but not in Group 2. Adhesive failure was mainly observed in Group 1, whereas dentin failure was the main failure pattern in Group 3.

  11. Inflammatory response of human dental pulp to at-home and in-office tooth bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa Magalhães Vaz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Tooth bleaching is a technique of choice to obtain a harmonious smile, but bleaching agents may damage the dental pulp. Objective: This study evaluated the inflammatory responses of human dental pulp after the use of two bleaching techniques. Material and Methods: Pulp samples were collected from human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into three groups: control - no tooth bleaching (CG (n=7; at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide (AH (n = 10, and in-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide (IO (n=12. Pulps were removed and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for microscopic analysis of inflammation intensity, collagen degradation, and pulp tissue organization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect mast cells (tryptase+, blood vessels (CD31+, and macrophages (CD68+. Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p0.05. No mast cells were found in the pulp samples analyzed. Conclusion: In-office bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide resulted in more intense inflammation, higher macrophages migration, and greater pulp damage then at-home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide, however, these bleaching techniques did not induce migration of mast cells and increased the number of blood vessels.

  12. Influence of post-bleaching time intervals on dentin bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported that bond strength of resin to tooth structure can be reduced when the bonding procedure is carried out immediately after the bleaching treatment. This study evaluated the effect of bleaching of non-vital teeth bleaching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite resin/bovine dentin interface and the influence of delaying the bonding procedures for different time intervals following internal bleaching. According to a randomized block design, composite resin cylinders (Z100/Single bond - 3M) were bonded to the flattened dentin surface of two hundred and fifty-six teeth which had previously been subjected to four different treatments: SPH - sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide; SPW - sodium perborate + distilled water; CP - 37% carbamide peroxide; and CON - distilled water (control), each one followed by storage in artificial saliva for 0 (baseline), 7, 14, and 21 days after bleaching (n = 16). The bleaching agents in the pulp chambers were replaced every 7 days, over 4 weeks. The SBS test of the blocks was done using a universal testing machine. The ANOVA showed that there was no significant interaction between time and bleaching agents, and that the factor time was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). For the factor bleaching treatment, the Student's t-test showed that [CON = CP] > [SPW = SPH]. The bleaching of non-vital teeth affected the resin/dentin SBS values when sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide or water was used, independently of the elapsed time following the bleaching treatment.

  13. Effect of 16% Carbamide Peroxide Bleaching Gel on Enamel and Dentin Surface Micromorphology and Roughness of Uremic Patients: An Atomic Force Microscopic Study

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel on surface micromorphology and roughness of enamel and root dentin of uremic patients receiving hemodialysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: A total of 20 sound molars were collected from healthy individuals (n=10) and uremic patients (n=10). The roots were separated from their crowns at the cemento-enamel junction. Dental slabs (3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm) were obtained from the buccal surface for enamel slab...

  14. Photoluminescence of MoS2 quantum dots quenched by hydrogen peroxide: A fluorescent sensor for hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhixing; Gui, Qingfeng; Shan, Yun; Pan, Pengfei; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Lifa

    2016-09-01

    By cutting MoS2 microcrystals to quantum dots (QDs) of sizes below 10 nm, the photoluminescence (PL) at ca. 450 nm can be detected easily due to the quantum confinement effects across the 2D planes. The PL is stable under continuous irradiation of UV light but gradually quenches when treated with an increasing concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Time-resolved PL and Raman spectra imply that H2O2 causes the partial oxidation of MoS2 QDs. First-principles calculations reveal that the MoS2 QDs with oxygen impurity are of indirect bandgap structures showing no notable PL. And absorption spectra verify that the PL of MoS2 QDs quenched by H2O2 is attributed to the oxidation. The integrated PL intensity and H2O2 concentration show an exponential relationship in the range of 2-20 μM, suggesting that MoS2 QDs are potential fluorescent probes for hydrogen peroxide sensing in a physiological environment.

  15. Peroxide bleaching agent effects on enamel surface microhardness, roughness and morphology Efeitos de agentes clareadores à base de peróxidos na microdureza, rugosidade e morfologia superficial do esmalte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Franco Pinto

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness, microhardness and morphology of human enamel exposed to six bleaching agents (at baseline and post-treatment. Human dental enamel samples were obtained from human third molars and randomly divided into seven groups (n = 11: control, Whiteness Perfect - 10% carbamide peroxide (10% CP, Colgate Platinum - 10% CP, Day White 2Z - 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (7.5% HP, Whiteness Super - 37% CP, Opalescence Quick - 35% CP and Whiteness HP - 35% HP. Bleaching agents were applied according to manufacturers' instructions. The control group remained not treated and stored in artificial saliva. Microhardness testing was performed with a Knoop indentor and surface roughness was analyzed with a profilometer. Morphologic observations were carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results were statistically analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%, and revealed a significant decrease in microhardness values and a significant increase in surface roughness post-bleaching. Changes in enamel morphology after bleaching were observed under SEM. It was concluded that bleaching agents can alter the microhardness, roughness and morphology of dental enamel surface.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a rugosidade, microdureza e morfologia superficial do esmalte dental humano tratado com seis agentes clareadores (antes e depois do tratamento. Amostras de esmalte dental humano foram obtidas de terceiros molares e aleatoriamente distribuídas em sete grupos (n = 11: controle, Whiteness Perfect - peróxido de carbamida a 10% (PC 10%, Colgate Platinum - PC 10%, Day White 2Z - peróxido de hidrogênio a 7,5% (PH 7,5%, Whiteness Super - PC 37%, Opalescence Quick - PC 35% e Whiteness HP - PH 35%. Os agentes clareadores foram aplicados de acordo com as instruções dos fabricantes. O grupo controle permaneceu sem tratamento e armazenado em saliva artificial. O teste de microdureza foi realizado

  16. Effectiveness of improved hydrogen peroxide in decontaminating privacy curtains contaminated with multidrug-resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, William A; Gergen, Maria F; Sickbert-Bennett, Emily E; Williams, David A; Weber, David J

    2014-04-01

    We tested the ability of an improved hydrogen peroxide solution to decontaminate privacy curtains in inpatient and outpatient areas. The microbial contamination of the curtains was assessed before and after the curtains were sprayed with improved hydrogen peroxide. The disinfectant reduced the microbial load on the privacy curtains by 96.8% in 37 patient rooms.

  17. Role of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical in pyrite oxidation by molecular oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Martin A. A.; Harrington, Andrea D.; Laffers, Richard; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2010-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical are readily formed during the oxidation of pyrite with molecular oxygen over a wide range of pH conditions. However, pretreatment of the pyrite surface influences how much of the intermediates are formed and their fate. Acid-washed pyrite produces significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical when suspended in air-saturated water. However, the hydrogen peroxide concentration shows an exponential decrease with time. Suspensions made with partially oxidized pyrite yield significantly lower amounts of hydrogen peroxide product. The presence of Fe(III)-oxide or Fe(III)-hydroxide patches facilitates the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. Hence, the degree to which a pyrite surface is covered with patches of Fe(III)-oxide or Fe(III)-hydroxide patches is an important control on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in solution. Hydrogen peroxide appears to be an important intermediate in the four-electron transfer from pyrite to molecular oxygen. Addition of catalase, an enzyme that decomposes hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, to a pyrite suspension reduces the oxidation rate by 40%. By contrast, hydroxyl radical does not appear to play a significant role in the oxidation mechanism. It is estimated on the basis of a molecular oxygen and sulfate mass balance that 5-6% of the molecular oxygen is consumed without forming sulfate.

  18. Contact Lens Solutions With Hydrogen Peroxide: To Avoid Injury, Follow All Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should never put hydrogen peroxide directly into your eyes or on your contact lenses,” Lepri says. That’s because this kind of solution ... for Solutions With Hydrogen Peroxide Talk to your eye-care provider ... for your contact lenses. Never change your lens-care system before consulting ...

  19. Quantifying hydrogen peroxide in iron-containing solutions using leuco crystal violet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoonen Martin A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide is present in many natural waters and wastewaters. In the presence of Fe(II, this species decomposes to form hydroxyl radicals, that are extremely reactive. Hence, in the presence of Fe(II, hydrogen peroxide is difficult to detect because of its short lifetime. Here, we show an expanded use of a hydrogen peroxide quantification technique using leuco crystal violet (LCV for solutions of varying pH and iron concentration. In the presence of the biocatalyst peroxidase, LCV is oxidized by hydrogen peroxide, forming a colored crystal violet ion (CV+, which is stable for days. The LCV method uses standard equipment and allows for detection at the low microM concentration level. Results show strong pH dependence with maximum LCV oxidation at pH 4.23. By chelating dissolved Fe(II with EDTA, hydrogen peroxide can be stabilized for analysis. Results are presented for hydrogen peroxide quantification in pyrite–water slurries. Pyrite–water slurries show surface area dependent generation of hydrogen peroxide only in the presence of EDTA, which chelates dissolved Fe(II. Given the stability of CV+, this method is particularly useful for field work that involves the detection of hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide as a new defensive compound in "benzoyl cyanide" producing polydesmid millipedes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Yasumasa; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Ichiki, Yayoi; Tanabe, Tsutomu; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was newly and simultaneously demonstrated with well-known hydrogen cyanide as a component of defensive secretions of "benzoyl cyanide" producing polydesmid millipedes. Presence of hydrogen peroxide was successively evidenced by Trinder reagent's spray with colorless as well as oily smears of defensive secretions containing benzoyl cyanide and hydrogen cyanide by alkaline picrate paper treatment. Linear correlation was demonstrated between quantities of hydrogen peroxide and benzoyl cyanide. By qualitative assay, seven benzoyl cyanide containing polydesmidans (six species of adults and one species of a nymph at stadium I) tested positive to Trinder reagent, indicative of the presence of hydrogen peroxide (together with hydrogen cyanide), while two cyanogenic species without benzoyl cyanide exhibited negative responses to the reagent. Two types of millipedes were elucidated as species of cyanogenic Polydesmida.

  1. Determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodiroga Milanka

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodometric and permanganometric titrations were used for determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in the mixture. Two procedures were described and compared. Titrations could be done in only one vessel, in the same reaction mixture, when iodometric titration of peracetic acid was continued after the permanganometric titration of H2O2, (procedure A. Peracetic acid and H2O2, as oxidizing agents, reacted with potassium iodide in an acid medium, evolving iodine. This reaction was used for the quantitative iodometric determination of total peroxide in procedure B. H2O2 reacted with potassium permanganate in acid medium, but peracetic acid did not react under the same conditions. That made possible the selective permanganometric determination of H2O2 in the presence of peracetic acid. The procedure B was performed in two titration vessels (KV=3.4% for peracetic acid, 0.6% for H2O2. The procedure A for iodometric determination of peracetic acid in one titration vessel after permanganometric titration of H2O2 was recommended (KV=2,5% for peracetic acid, 0,45% for H2O2.

  2. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-03-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  3. Degradation of ethyl xanthate in flotation residues by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兴华; 胡岳华; 彭宏; 曹学锋

    2015-01-01

    The degradation behavior of ethyl xanthate (EX) salt was the most widely used collector in sulfide mineral flotation and emission of flotation tailings with residual EX was harmful to environment. In this work, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV/Vis) at different pH values from 3 to 12. For pH value from 5 to 12, EX was oxidized into ethyl per xanthate (EPX) by H2O2. Then EPX was further oxidized into thiosulfate (TS) salt rather than ethyl thiocarbonate (ETC) and this step was the reaction-limited step. Then depending on pH values, TS was degraded into sulphate and carbonate salts (pH>7) or elemental sulfur (pH3.0 during test time.

  4. Gold-catalyzed oxidation of substituted phenols by hydrogen peroxide

    KAUST Repository

    Cheneviere, Yohan

    2010-10-20

    Gold nanoparticles deposited on inorganic supports are efficient catalysts for the oxidation of various substituted phenols (2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol and 2,3,6-trimethyl phenol) with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. By contrast to more conventional catalysts such as Ti-containing mesoporous silicas, which convert phenols to the corresponding benzoquinones, gold nanoparticles are very selective to biaryl compounds (3,3′,5,5′-tetra-tert-butyl diphenoquinone and 2,2′,3,3′,5,5′-hexamethyl-4,4′- biphenol, respectively). Products yields and selectivities depend on the solvent used, the best results being obtained in methanol with yields >98%. Au offers the possibility to completely change the selectivity in the oxidation of substituted phenols and opens interesting perspectives in the clean synthesis of biaryl compounds for pharmaceutical applications. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from plasma-water interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiandi; He, Bangbang; Chen, Qiang; Li, Junshuai; Xiong, Qing; Yue, Guanghui; Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Size; Liu, Hai; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is usually considered to be an important reagent in green chemistry since water is the only by-product in H2O2 involved oxidation reactions. Early studies show that direct synthesis of H2O2 by plasma-water interactions is possible, while the factors affecting the H2O2 production in this method remain unclear. Herein, we present a study on the H2O2 synthesis by atmospheric pressure plasma-water interactions. The results indicate that the most important factors for the H2O2 production are the processes taking place at the plasma-water interface, including sputtering, electric field induced hydrated ion emission, and evaporation. The H2O2 production rate reaches ~1200 μmol/h when the liquid cathode is purified water or an aqueous solution of NaCl with an initial conductivity of 10500 μS cm‑1.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide room disinfection--ready for prime time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttner, Benedikt D; Harbarth, Stephan

    2015-05-08

    Non-manual techniques for terminal disinfection of hospital rooms have gained increasing interest in recent years as means to reduce transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). A prospective crossover study by Blazejewski and colleagues in five ICUs of a French academic hospital with a high prevalence of MDRO carriers showed that two different hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-based non-touch disinfection techniques reduced environmental contamination with MDROs after routine cleaning. This study provides further evidence of the 'in use' bioburden reduction offered by these techniques. Before H2O2-based non-touch disinfection can be recommended for routine clinical use outside specific outbreak situations, further studies need to show whether the environmental contamination reduction provided by these techniques is clinically relevant and results in reduced cross-infections with MDROs.

  7. Chemiluminescent Nanomicelles for Imaging Hydrogen Peroxide and Self-Therapy in Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide is a signal molecule of the tumor, and its overproduction makes a higher concentration in tumor tissue compared to normal tissue. Based on the fact that peroxalates can make chemiluminescence with a high efficiency in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, we developed nanomicelles composed of peroxalate ester oligomers and fluorescent dyes, called peroxalate nanomicelles (POMs, which could image hydrogen peroxide with high sensitivity and stability. The potential application of the POMs in photodynamic therapy (PDT for cancer was also investigated. It was found that the PDT-drug-loaded POMs were sensitive to hydrogen peroxide, and the PDT drug could be stimulated by the chemiluminescence from the reaction between POMs and hydrogen peroxide, which carried on a self-therapy of the tumor without the additional laser light resource.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of two chloroplastic peroxidases, ascorbate peroxidase and 2-cys peroxiredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Sakihito

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, are generated by the photosystems because photoexcited electrons are often generated in excess of requirements for CO2 fixation and used for reducing molecular oxygen, even under normal environmental conditions. Moreover, ROS generation is increased in chloroplasts if plants are subjected to stresses, such as drought, high salinity and chilling. Chloroplast-localized isoforms of ascorbate peroxidase and possibly peroxiredoxins assume the principal role of scavenging hydrogen peroxide. However, in vitro studies revealed that both types of peroxidases are easily damaged by hydrogen peroxide and lose their catalytic activities. This is one contributing factor for cellular damage that occurs under severe oxidative stress. In this review, I describe mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of these two enzymes and discuss a reason why they became susceptible to damage by hydrogen peroxide.

  9. Effects of resveratrol on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in embryonic neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sibel Konyalioglu; Guliz Armagan; Ayfer Yalcin; Cigdem Atalayin; Taner Dagci

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural phenolic compound, has been shown to prevent cardiovascular diseases and cancer and exhibit neuroprotective effects. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide in embryonic neural stem cells. Hydrogen peroxide treatment alone increased catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities but did not change superoxide dismutase levels compared with hydrogen peroxide + resveratrol treatment. Nitric oxide synthase activity and concomitant nitric oxide levels increased in response to hydrogen peroxide treatment. Conversely, resveratrol treatment decreased nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide levels. Resveratrol also attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced nuclear or mitochondrial DNA damage. We propose that resveratrol may be a promising agent for protecting embryonic neural stem cells because of its potential to decrease oxidative stress by inducing higher activity of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing nitric oxide production and nitric oxide synthase activity, and alleviating both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage.

  10. Natural manganese deposits as catalyst for decomposing hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Knol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Drinking water companies more and more implement Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOP in their treatment schemes to increase the barrier against organic micropollutants (OMPs. It is necessary to decompose the excessive hydrogen peroxide after applying AOP to avoid negative effects in the following, often biological, treatment steps. A drinking water company in the western part of the Netherlands investigated decomposition of about 5.75 mg L−1 hydrogen peroxide in pre-treated Meuse river water with different catalysts on pilot scale. In down flow operation, the necessary reactor Empty Bed Contact Time (EBCT with the commonly used Granulated Activated Carbon (GAC and waste ground water filter gravel (MCFgw were the same with 149 s, corresponding with a conversion rate constant r of 0.021 s−1. The EBCT of the fine coating of ground water filter gravel (MC was significantly shorter with a little more than 10 s (r = 0.30 s−1. In up flow operation, with a flow rate of 20 m h−1, the EBCT of coating MC increased till about 100 s (r = 0.031 s−1, from which can be concluded, that the performance of this waste material is better compared with GAC, in both up and down flow operation. The necessary EBCT at average filtration rate of full scale dual layer filter material (MCFsw amounted to 209 s (r = 0.015 s−1. Regarding the average residence time in the full scale filters of 700 s, applying AOP in front of the filters could be an interesting alternative which makes a separate decomposition installation superfluous, on the condition that the primary functions of the filters are not affected.

  11. Development of hydrogen peroxide technique for bioburden reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schwartz, L.; Stabekis, P.; Barengoltz, J.

    In order to meet the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Planetary Protection microbial reduction requirements for Mars in-situ life detection and sample return missions, entire planetary spacecraft (including planetary entry probes and planetary landing capsules) may have to be exposed to a qualified sterilization process. Presently, dry heat is the only NASA approved sterilization technique available for spacecraft application. However, with the increasing use of various man-made materials, highly sophisticated electronic circuit boards, and sensors in a modern spacecraft, compatibility issues may render this process unacceptable to design engineers and thus impractical to achieve terminal sterilization of the entire spacecraft. An alternative vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process, which is currently used in various industries, has been selected for further development. Strategic Technology Enterprises, Incorporated (STE), a subsidiary of STERIS Corporation, under a contract from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is developing systems and methodologies to decontaminate spacecraft using vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP) technology. The VHP technology provides an effective, rapid and low temperature means for inactivation of spores, mycobacteria, fungi, viruses and other microorganisms. The VHP application is a dry process affording excellent material compatibility with many of the components found in spacecraft such as polymers, paints and electronic systems. Furthermore, the VHP process has innocuous residuals as it decomposes to water vapor and oxygen. This paper will discuss the approach that is being used to develop this technique and will present lethality data that have been collected to establish deep vacuum VHP sterilization cycles. In addition, the application of this technique to meet planetary protection requirements will be addressed.

  12. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agent, Group 3 - fluoride containing bleaching agent, and Group 4 - fluoride free bleaching agent followed by anticay application. The samples were subjected to indentation to test the microhardness using Vicker's hardness analyzer. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness significantly increased in samples where anticay was used after the application of bleaching agent.

  13. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor ePuerto-Galán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs, thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen- and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  14. SIMULTANEOUS REACTION AND LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION IN THE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuxiang L(u); Li Wang; Zhentao Mi; Yaquan Wang

    2004-01-01

    The gas-liquid-liquid reactive extraction system for preparing hydrogen peroxide via anthraquinone was investigated. The oxidation reaction of hydrogenated working solution was combined with the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from working solution in a sieve plate column. The reaction of 2-ethylanthrahydroquionone with oxygen and the liquid-liquid extraction of hydrogen peroxide take place simultaneously. The oxygen was introduced with hydrogenated working solution through a nozzle in the bottom of the column, which worked as agitated air as well as oxidation reagent. The results showed the oxidation and extraction do not hamper each other, on the contrary, the presence of oxidation gas in the column can promote the transfer of hydrogen peroxide from organic phase to aqueous phase, thus the reaction efficiency and extraction efficiency increased with increasing gas superficial velocity. Furthermore, the oxidation efficiency is almost 100% and the extraction efficiency is higher than 90% in this process.

  15. SIMULTANEOUS REACTION AND LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION IN THE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShuxiangLǖ; LiWang; ZhentaoMi; YaquanWang

    2004-01-01

    The gas-liquid-liquid reactive extraction system for preparing hydrogen peroxide via anthraquinone was investigated. The oxidation reaction of hydrogenated working solution was combined with the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from working solution in a sieve plate column. The reaction of 2-ethylanthrahydroquionone with oxygen and the liquid-liquid extraction of hydrogen peroxide take place simultaneously. The oxygen was introduced with hydrogenated working solution through a nozzle in the bottom of the column, which worked as agitated air as well as oxidation reagent. The results showed the oxidation and extraction do not hamper each other, on the contrary, the presence of oxidation gas in the column can promote the transfer of hydrogen peroxide fi'om organic phase to aqueous phase, thus the reaction efficiency and extraction efficiency increased with increasing gas superficial velocity. Furthermore, the oxidation efficiency is almost 100% and the extraction efficiency is higher than 90% in this process.

  16. Comparative study of the effects of two bleaching agents on oral microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkmin, Yara Tardelli; Sartorelli, Renata; Flório, Flávia Martão; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the in vivo effects of bleaching agents containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Platinum/Colgate) or 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (Day White 2Z/Discus Dental) on mutans Streptococcus during dental bleaching. The products were applied on 30 volunteers who needed dental bleaching. In each volunteer, one of the two bleaching agents was used on both dental arches one hour a day for three weeks. Analysis of the bacterial counts was made by collecting saliva before (baseline values), during (7 and 21 days) bleaching treatments and 14 days posttreatment. The Friedman non-parametric analysis (alpha=0.05) found no differences in microorganism counts at different times for each group for both agents (p>0.05). The Mann Whitney nonparametric test (alpha=0.05) showed no differences in micro-organism counts for both agents (p>0.05). Different bleaching agents did not change the oral cavity mutans Streptococcus counts.

  17. Induction of Low-Level Hydrogen Peroxide Generation by Unbleached Cotton Nonwovens as Potential Wound Dressing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J Vincent; Prevost, Nicolette T; Nam, Sunghyun; Hinchliffe, Doug; Condon, Brian; Yager, Dorne

    2017-03-06

    Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) generation during cotton fiber development. Traditionally, the processing of cotton into gauze involves scouring and bleaching processes that remove the components in the cuticle and primary cell wall. The use of unbleached, greige cotton fibers in dressings, has been relatively unexplored. We have recently determined that greige cotton can generate low levels of H₂O₂ (5-50 micromolar). Because this may provide advantages for the use of greige cotton-based wound dressings, we have begun to examine this in more detail. Both brown and white cotton varieties were examined in this study. Brown cotton was found to have a relatively higher hydrogen peroxide generation and demonstrated different capacities for H₂O₂ generation, varying from 1 to 35 micromolar. The H₂O₂ generation capacities of white and brown nonwoven greige cottons were also examined at different process stages with varying chronology and source parameters, from field to nonwoven fiber. The primary cell wall of nonwoven brown cotton appeared very intact, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, and possessed higher pectin levels. The levels of pectin, SOD, and polyphenolics, correlated with H₂O₂ generation.

  18. Induction of Low-Level Hydrogen Peroxide Generation by Unbleached Cotton Nonwovens as Potential Wound Dressing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vincent Edwards

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generation during cotton fiber development. Traditionally, the processing of cotton into gauze involves scouring and bleaching processes that remove the components in the cuticle and primary cell wall. The use of unbleached, greige cotton fibers in dressings, has been relatively unexplored. We have recently determined that greige cotton can generate low levels of H2O2 (5–50 micromolar. Because this may provide advantages for the use of greige cotton-based wound dressings, we have begun to examine this in more detail. Both brown and white cotton varieties were examined in this study. Brown cotton was found to have a relatively higher hydrogen peroxide generation and demonstrated different capacities for H2O2 generation, varying from 1 to 35 micromolar. The H2O2 generation capacities of white and brown nonwoven greige cottons were also examined at different process stages with varying chronology and source parameters, from field to nonwoven fiber. The primary cell wall of nonwoven brown cotton appeared very intact, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, and possessed higher pectin levels. The levels of pectin, SOD, and polyphenolics, correlated with H2O2 generation.

  19. 阳离子明胶蛋白助剂对双氧水分解率的影响%Effect of cationic gelatin protein on hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐俊玲; 王雪燕

    2016-01-01

    For the purpose of improving the control of the hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate, the prediction of the bleaching results, and the optimization of cotton fabric bleaching process, a self-made cationic gelatin protein agent was used in cotton hydrogen peroxide bleaching and hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate was calculated. The influence of self-made cationic gelatin protein agent, stabilizing agent sodium silicate and activator TAED on the hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate was compared. The results showed that cationic gelatin protein could promote the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide effectively and the decomposition rate was closed to TAED under low temperature and low alkali. The cationic gelatin protein acted as an activator in bleaching process. It provided a theoretical basis for the cationic gelatin protein agent application in hydrogen peroxide bleaching with low temperature and low alkali.%为提高对棉织物漂白过程中双氧水分解速率的控制、漂白效果的预测及漂白工艺优化的理论指导作用,将自制的阳离子明胶蛋白助剂应用于棉织物双氧水漂白工艺中,计算双氧水分解速率,并与传统稳定剂硅酸钠及活化剂TAED对双氧水分解速率的影响对比。结果表明,在低温低碱条件下,阳离子明胶蛋白能有效促进双氧水的分解,分解率与TAED相近,说明阳离子明胶蛋白助剂在双氧水漂白过程中起到活化剂的作用,从而为阳离子明胶蛋白助剂在双氧水低温低碱漂白中的应用提供理论依据。

  20. An ICT-based approach to ratiometric fluorescence imaging of hydrogen peroxide produced in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikun, Duangkhae; Miller, Evan W; Domaille, Dylan W; Chang, Christopher J

    2008-04-09

    We present the synthesis, properties, and biological applications of Peroxy Lucifer 1 (PL1), a new fluorescent probe for imaging hydrogen peroxide produced in living cells by a ratiometric response. PL1 utilizes a chemoselective boronate-based switch to detect hydrogen peroxide by modulation of internal charge transfer (ICT) within a 1,8-naphthalimide dye. PL1 features high selectivity for hydrogen peroxide over similar reactive oxygen species, including superoxide, and nitric oxide, and a 65 nm shift in emission from blue-colored fluorescence to green-colored fluorescence upon reaction with peroxide. Two-photon confocal microscopy experiments in live macrophages show that PL1 can ratiometrically visualize localized hydrogen peroxide bursts generated in living cells at immune response levels.

  1. Impact of hydrogen peroxide activated by lighting-emitting diode/laser system on enamel color and microhardness: An in situ design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiola, Ana Bárbara Araújo; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Scatolin, Renata Siqueira; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hydrogen peroxide (HP) at lower concentration can provide less alteration on enamel surface and when combined with laser therapy, could decrease tooth sensitivity. This in situ study evaluated the influence of 15% and 35% HP gel activated by lighting-emitting diode (LED)/laser light for in-office tooth bleaching. Materials and Methods: Forty-four bovine enamel slabs were polished and subjected to surface microhardness (load of 25 g for 5 s). The specimens were placed in intraoral palatal devices of 11 volunteers (n = 11). Sample was randomly distributed into four groups according to the bleaching protocol: 15% HP, 15% HP activated by LED/laser, 35% HP, and 35% HP activated by LED/laser. The experimental phase comprised 15 days and bleaching protocols were performed on the 2nd and 9th days. Surface microhardness (KHN) and color changes were measured and data were analyzed by ANOVA (α = 0.05). Results: There were no significant differences in microhardness values neither in color alteration of enamel treated with 15% HP and 35% HP activated or not by LED/laser system (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Both concentrations of HP (15 or 35%), regardless of activated by an LED/laser light, did not affect the surface microhardness and had the same effectiveness in enamel bleaching. PMID:27630493

  2. Impact of hydrogen peroxide activated by lighting-emitting diode/laser system on enamel color and microhardness: An in situ design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Barbara Araujo Loiola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydrogen peroxide (HP at lower concentration can provide less alteration on enamel surface and when combined with laser therapy, could decrease tooth sensitivity. This in situ study evaluated the influence of 15% and 35% HP gel activated by lighting-emitting diode (LED/laser light for in-office tooth bleaching. Materials and Methods: Forty-four bovine enamel slabs were polished and subjected to surface microhardness (load of 25 g for 5 s. The specimens were placed in intraoral palatal devices of 11 volunteers (n = 11. Sample was randomly distributed into four groups according to the bleaching protocol: 15% HP, 15% HP activated by LED/laser, 35% HP, and 35% HP activated by LED/laser. The experimental phase comprised 15 days and bleaching protocols were performed on the 2 nd and 9 th days. Surface microhardness (KHN and color changes were measured and data were analyzed by ANOVA (α = 0.05. Results: There were no significant differences in microhardness values neither in color alteration of enamel treated with 15% HP and 35% HP activated or not by LED/laser system (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Both concentrations of HP (15 or 35%, regardless of activated by an LED/laser light, did not affect the surface microhardness and had the same effectiveness in enamel bleaching.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensate: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Nagaraja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the ongoing inflammatory process of lung in healthy individuals with risk factors and comparing with that of a known diseased condition. To study the inflammatory response to treatment. Background: Morbidity and mortality of respiratory diseases are raising in trend due to increased smokers, urbanization and air pollution, the diagnosis of these conditions during early stage and management can improve patient′s lifestyle and morbidity. Materials and Methods: One hundred subjects were studied from July 2010 to September 2010; the level of hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath condensate was measured using Ecocheck. Results: Of the 100 subjects studied, 23 were healthy individuals with risk factors (smoking, exposure to air pollution, and urbanization; the values of hydrogen peroxide in smokers were 200-2220 nmol/l and in non-smokers 340-760 nmol/l. In people residing in rural areas values were 20-140 nmol/l in non-smokers and 180 nmol/l in smokers. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease cases, during acute exacerbations values were 540-3040 nmol/l and 240-480 nmol/l following treatment. In acute exacerbations of bronchial asthma, values were 400-1140 nmol/l and 100-320 nmol/l following treatment. In cases of bronchiectasis, values were 300-340 nmol/l and 200-280 nmol/l following treatment. In diagnosed pneumonia cases values were 1060-11800 nmol/l and 540-700 nmol/l following treatment. In interstitial lung diseases, values ranged from 220-720 nmol/l and 210-510 nmol/l following treatment. Conclusion: Exhaled breath condensate provides a non-invasive means of sampling the lower respiratory tract. Collection of exhaled breath condensate might be useful to detect the oxidative destruction of the lung as well as early inflammation of the airways in a healthy individual with risk factors and comparing the inflammatory response to treatment.

  4. Preliminary study of a novel in-office bleaching therapy modified with a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; Pinheiro, Mônica Heloisa Morais; Feitosa, Diala Aretha De Sousa; Correia, Tereza Cristina; Braz, Rodivan; Montes, Marcos Antônio Japiassú Resende; Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira De Assunção

    2012-11-01

    Although in-office bleaching has been proven successful for bleaching teeth, controversy exists from morphological alterations in enamel morphology due to mineral loss and tooth sensitivity. This preliminary study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel in-office tooth bleaching technique modified with a casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste (MI paste-MI) and its effect on the enamel morphology and tooth sensitivity. Three patients received a 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP-HP) dental bleaching system. HP was prepared and applied on the teeth on one of the hemiarches, whilst teeth on the other hemiarch were bleached with a mixture of HP and MI. Tooth color, epoxy resin replicas, and sensitivity levels were evaluated in the upper incisors. The results were analyzed descriptively. Right and left incisors showed similar color change after bleaching. Incisors bleached with the mixture of HP and MI presented unaltered enamel surfaces and lower sensitivity levels. The currently tested tooth bleaching technique did not reduce the gel effectiveness while decreasing hypersensitivity levels and protecting the enamel against surface alterations caused by the high-concentration bleaching peroxide tested. The concomitant use of MI Paste and high-concentration hydrogen peroxide might be a successful method for decreasing tooth sensitivity and limiting changes in the enamel morphology during in-office bleaching.

  5. Can a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine demonstrate the same bleaching as conventional techniques? An in vitro, randomized and blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Abi Rached DANTAS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of a bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine vs. conventional tooth bleaching techniques using peroxides (both in-office and at-home. Material and Methods Samples were randomly distributed into five experimental groups (n=15: C - Control; BC – Bleaching toothpaste containing Blue Covarine; WBC – Bleaching toothpaste without Blue Covarine; HP35 - In-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide; and CP10 – At-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide. The dental bleaching efficacy was determined by the color difference (ΔE, luminosity (ΔL, green-red axis (Δa, and blue-yellow axis (Δb. The CIELab coordinates were recorded with reflectance spectroscopy at different times: T0 - baseline, T1 – immediately after bleaching, T2 - 7 days, T3 - 14 days, and T4 - 21 days after the end of treatments. Data were analyzed by a repeated measures mixed ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni test, with a significance level of 5%. Results No significant differences were found between the treatment groups C, BC, and WBC. The groups HP35 and CP10 showed significantly higher whitening efficacy than groups C, BC, and WBC. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the whitening efficacy between a Blue Covarine containing toothpaste, a standard whitening toothpaste, and a control. Neither of the whitening toothpastes tested were as effective as in-office or at-home bleaching treatments.

  6. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching.

  7. Improved eradication of Clostridium difficile spores from toilets of hospitalized patients using an accelerated hydrogen peroxide as the cleaning agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dueck Christine

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C. difficle spores in the environment of patients with C. difficile associated disease (CDAD are difficult to eliminate. Bleach (5000 ppm has been advocated as an effective disinfectant for the environmental surfaces of patients with CDAD. Few alternatives to bleach for non-outbreak conditions have been evaluated in controlled healthcare studies. Methods This study was a prospective clinical comparison during non-outbreak conditions of the efficacy of an accelerated hydrogen peroxide cleaner (0.5% AHP to the currently used stabilized hydrogen peroxide cleaner (0.05% SHP at manufacturer recommended use-dilution with respect to spore removal from toilets in a tertiary care facility. The toilets used by patients who had diarrhea with and without C. difficile associated disease (CDAD were cultured for C. difficile and were monitored using an ultraviolet mark (UVM to assess cleaning compliance on a daily basis 5 days per week. A total of 243 patients and 714 samples were analysed. The culture results were included in the analysis only if the UVM audit from the same day confirmed that the toilet had been cleaned. Results Our data demonstrated that the efficacy of spore killing is formulation specific and cannot be generalized. The OxivirTB® AHP formulation resulted in statistically significantly (p = 0.0023 lower levels of toxigenic C. difficile spores in toilets of patients with CDAD compared to the SHP formulation that was routinely being used (28% vs 45% culture positive. The background level of toxigenic C. difficile spores was 10% in toilets of patients with diarrhea not due to CDAD. The UVM audit indicated that despite the enhanced twice-daily cleaning protocol for CDAD patients cleaning was not achieved on approximately 30 - 40% of the days tested. Conclusion Our data indicate that the AHP formulation evaluated that has some sporicidal activity was significantly better than the currently used SHP formulation. This AHP

  8. Susceptibility to Coffee Staining during Enamel Remineralization Following the In-Office Bleaching Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Aline Akemi; Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess in situ the enamel mineralization level and susceptibility to coffee staining after in-office bleaching. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six human dental fragments assembled into intraoral devices were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide and treated as follows: (group 1) no contact...... with coffee; (group 2) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 7 days, starting 1 week after bleaching; and (group 3) immersion in a coffee solution for 30 minutes daily for 14 days, starting immediately after bleaching. Enamel mineralization and color were assessed before bleaching (T1......), immediately after bleaching (T2), and after 7 (T3) and 14 days (T4). The CIE whiteness index (W*) and closeness to white (ΔW*) following bleaching and/or immersion in coffee were calculated. Data were analyzed with Friedman and Wilcoxon tests or Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α = 0.05). RESULTS...

  9. Randomized controlled trial of sealed in-office bleaching effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Mário Artur Pereira; Nahsan, Flávia Pardo Salata; Oliveira, Alaíde Hermínia de Aguiar; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Faria-e-Silva, André Luis

    2014-01-01

    Regardless of the high success rate, patients commonly report the occurrence of tooth sensitivity during the in-office bleaching procedures. Recently, it has been demonstrated that using a customized tray (called sealed in-office bleaching technique) reduces peroxide penetration. The aim of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate tooth sensitivity and bleaching efficacy of sealed bleaching, in comparison with a conventional in-office technique. Twenty patients were randomized allocated in two groups in which 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was used in a single 45-min application. For the sealed technique, a customized bleaching tray was fabricated and carefully positioned over the bleaching agent during the session. The color was recorded at a baseline, 7 and 28 days after the bleaching session, using Vita Easy Shade spectrophotometer. Tooth sensitivity was recorded during (20 and 40 min) and immediately after the treatment using a visual analogue scale. The bleaching efficacy was evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVA, while the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity and its intensity were evaluated by Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α=0.05). No significant difference on bleaching efficacy was observed between the conventional (7.4 and 8.1 ΔE) and sealed techniques (7.8 and 8.3 ΔE) at both evaluation periods. No significant difference was observed regarding the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity (p=0.15). Sealed technique showed a significant decrease of sensitivity intensity after 40 min (p=0.03). Sealed bleaching technique was able to reduce the sensitivity intensity during the bleaching procedure, without jeopardizing the bleaching efficacy.

  10. Specific aquaporins facilitate the diffusion of hydrogen peroxide across membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd P; Møller, Anders L B; Kristiansen, Kim A; Schulz, Alexander; Møller, Ian M; Schjoerring, Jan K; Jahn, Thomas P

    2007-01-12

    The metabolism of aerobic organisms continuously produces reactive oxygen species. Although potentially toxic, these compounds also function in signaling. One important feature of signaling compounds is their ability to move between different compartments, e.g. to cross membranes. Here we present evidence that aquaporins can channel hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Twenty-four aquaporins from plants and mammals were screened in five yeast strains differing in sensitivity toward oxidative stress. Expression of human AQP8 and plant Arabidopsis TIP1;1 and TIP1;2 in yeast decreased growth and survival in the presence of H2O2. Further evidence for aquaporin-mediated H2O2 diffusion was obtained by a fluorescence assay with intact yeast cells using an intracellular reactive oxygen species-sensitive fluorescent dye. Application of silver ions (Ag+), which block aquaporin-mediated water diffusion in a fast kinetics swelling assay, also reversed both the aquaporin-dependent growth repression and the H2O2-induced fluorescence. Our results present the first molecular genetic evidence for the diffusion of H2O2 through specific members of the aquaporin family.

  11. Salidroside inhibits endogenous hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingyu; Jin, Lianhai; Shen, Nan; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Zhengli

    2013-01-01

    Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., shows potent antioxidant property. Herein, we investigated the protective effects of salidroside against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in human endothelial cells (EVC-304). EVC-304 cells were incubated in the presence or absence of low steady states of H2O2 (3-4 µM) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX) with or without salidroside. 3(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) assays were performed, together with Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometric analysis using Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) label. The results indicated that salidroside pretreatment attenuated endogenous H2O2 induced apoptotic cell death in EVC-304 cells in a dose-dependent pattern. Furthermore, Western blot data revealed that salidroside inhibited activation of caspase-3, 9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) induced by endogenous H2O2. It also decreased the expression of Bax and rescued the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. All these results demonstrated that salidroside may present a potential therapy for oxidative stress in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

  12. Electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Patra; N Munichandraiah

    2009-09-01

    Electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide is studied on a sand-blasted stainless steel (SSS) electrode in an aqueous solution of NaClO4. The cyclic voltammetric reduction of H2O2 at low concentrations is characterized by a cathodic peak at -0.40 V versus standard calomel electrode (SCE). Cyclic voltammetry is studied by varying the concentration of H2O2 in the range from 0.2 mM to 20 mM and the sweep rate in the range from 2 to 100 mV s-1. Voltammograms at concentrations of H2O2 higher than 2 mM or at high sweep rates consist of an additional current peak, which may be due to the reduction of adsorbed species formed during the reduction of H2O2. Amperometric determination of H2O2 at -0.50 V vs SCE provides the detection limit of 5 M H2O2. A plot of current density versus concentration has two segments suggesting a change in the mechanism of H2O2 reduction at concentrations of H2O2 ≥ 2 mM. From the rotating disc electrode study, diffusion co-efficient of H2O2 and rate constant for reduction of H2O2 are evaluated.

  13. Mobile gene silencing in Arabidopsis is regulated by hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacheng Liang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In plants and nematodes, RNAi can spread from cells from which it is initiated to other cells in the organism. The underlying mechanism controlling the mobility of RNAi signals is not known, especially in the case of plants. A genetic screen designed to recover plants impaired in the movement but not the production or effectiveness of the RNAi signal identified RCI3, which encodes a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-producing type III peroxidase, as a key regulator of silencing mobility in Arabidopsis thaliana. Silencing initiated in the roots of rci3 plants failed to spread into leaf tissue or floral tissue. Application of exogenous H2O2 reinstated the spread in rci3 plants and accelerated it in wild-type plants. The addition of catalase or MnO2, which breaks down H2O2, slowed the spread of silencing in wild-type plants. We propose that endogenous H2O2, under the control of peroxidases, regulates the spread of gene silencing by altering plasmodesmata permeability through remodelling of local cell wall structure, and may play a role in regulating systemic viral defence.

  14. Taro Tube Flour Modification via Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Sri Budiyati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Colocasia esculentum (L Schott known as “Talas bogor” in Indonesian language is easily grown in every island in Indonesia. It proved to have high content of carbohydrate as it can be utilize for wheat flour replacement in addition to prior modification using hydrogen peroxide. The objective of this research was to improve the quality of taro flour by assessing the effect of several parameter such as ratio of slurry, oxidation agent concentration, oxidation time and temperature. The result shows that using ratio of slurry 20% with 2% of H2O2 concentration in temperature of oxidation process 30oC and 60 min operation time can produced good quality of modified taro tube flour in terms of swelling power and water solubility with 7.2 g/g and 6.93% respectively. This condition has chosen by taking the technical and economic feasibility as consideration. This result also can be used as proof of evidence that using H2O2 as an oxidizing agent in the process of taro tube flour modification can improve the functional properties of the flour. As the swelling power and water solubility of original taro tube flour were 3.7 g/g and 1.8% respectively.

  15. Solvothermal method to prepare graphene quantum dots by hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Renbing; Zhong, Suting; Wu, Juan; Jiang, Wei; Shen, Yewen; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Tianhe

    2016-10-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been synthesized by different chemical methods in recent years. For conventional chemical methods, it is inevitable to introduce a large amount of impurities in the preparation process. Long time of dialysis process increases the time cost extremely. Herein, we report a one-step solvothermal method for synthesizing GQDs with the application of hydrogen peroxide in N, N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) environment, which completely avoids the use of concentrated sulphuric acid and nitric acid to treat raw material and introduces no impurity in whole preparation process simultaneously for the first time. Pure GQDs can be obtained after evaporation/redissolution and filtration process with a strong blue emission at 15% quantum yield. This solvothermal method, not requiring dialysis process and complicated equipments, exhibits simple, eco-friendly and low time-cost properties. Besides high quantum yields, the as-prepared GQDs also show good photoluminescence stability in different pH conditions. The optical properties, morphology and structure of GQDs were studied by various equipments, implying potential application in biomedical fields and electronic device.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide thermochemical oscillator as driver for primordial RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Rowena; Brindley, John

    2014-06-06

    This paper presents and tests a previously unrecognized mechanism for driving a replicating molecular system on the prebiotic earth. It is proposed that cell-free RNA replication in the primordial soup may have been driven by self-sustained oscillatory thermochemical reactions. To test this hypothesis, a well-characterized hydrogen peroxide oscillator was chosen as the driver and complementary RNA strands with known association and melting kinetics were used as the substrate. An open flow system model for the self-consistent, coupled evolution of the temperature and concentrations in a simple autocatalytic scheme is solved numerically, and it is shown that thermochemical cycling drives replication of the RNA strands. For the (justifiably realistic) values of parameters chosen for the simulated example system, the mean amount of replicant produced at steady state is 6.56 times the input amount, given a constant supply of substrate species. The spontaneous onset of sustained thermochemical oscillations via slowly drifting parameters is demonstrated, and a scheme is given for prebiotic production of complementary RNA strands on rock surfaces.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide regulates cell adhesion through the redox sensor RPSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Bagulho, Ana; Tenente, Rita; Teixeira, Vitor H; Martins, Gabriel; da Costa, Gonçalo; Jerónimo, Ana; Cordeiro, Carlos; Machuqueiro, Miguel; Real, Carla

    2016-01-01

    To become metastatic, a tumor cell must acquire new adhesion properties that allow migration into the surrounding connective tissue, transmigration across endothelial cells to reach the blood stream and, at the site of metastasis, adhesion to endothelial cells and transmigration to colonize a new tissue. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a redox signaling molecule produced in tumor cell microenvironment with high relevance for tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms regulated by H2O2 in tumor cells are still poorly known. The identification of H2O2-target proteins in tumor cells and the understanding of their role in tumor cell adhesion are essential for the development of novel redox-based therapies for cancer. In this paper, we identified Ribosomal Protein SA (RPSA) as a target of H2O2 and showed that RPSA in the oxidized state accumulates in clusters that contain specific adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we showed that RPSA oxidation improves cell adhesion efficiency to laminin in vitro and promotes cell extravasation in vivo. Our results unravel a new mechanism for H2O2-dependent modulation of cell adhesion properties and identify RPSA as the H2O2 sensor in this process. This work indicates that high levels of RPSA expression might confer a selective advantage to tumor cells in an oxidative environment.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide: a Jekyll and Hyde signalling molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, D R; Cotter, T G

    2011-10-06

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a group of molecules produced in the cell through metabolism of oxygen. Endogenous ROS such as hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) have long been recognised as destructive molecules. The well-established roles they have in the phagosome and genomic instability has led to the characterisation of these molecules as non-specific agents of destruction. Interestingly, there is a growing body of literature suggesting a less sinister role for this Jekyll and Hyde molecule. It is now evident that at lower physiological levels, H₂O₂ can act as a classical intracellular signalling molecule regulating kinase-driven pathways. The newly discovered biological functions attributed to ROS include proliferation, migration, anoikis, survival and autophagy. Furthermore, recent advances in detection and quantification of ROS-family members have revealed that the diverse functions of ROS can be determined by the subcellular source, location and duration of these molecules within the cell. In light of this confounding paradox, we will examine the factors and circumstances that determine whether H₂O₂ acts in a pro-survival or deleterious manner.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide sensing based on carbon quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Cheng-Shane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, carbon quantum dots (CQDs have been synthesized by one step hydrothermal method to detect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. The optical H2O2 sensors were based on the fluorescent quenching of the carbon quantum dots. The optical H2O2 sensors demonstrate capable of detecting H2O2 over the range of 0-88.2 mM and 0-60 mM. The H2O2 sensitivities of wavelength shift to changes in the H2O2 concentration were found to be 0.18 nm/mM and 0.26 nm/mM. These results of the optical sensors showed that the method can be used in practice detection of H2O2 and could offer a new approach for developing a new optical biosensor. The CQDs exhibit good emission property and high stability, as well as excitation-independent emission behavior. Moreover, it is attractive that CQDs can be used as an effective fluorescent probe for the detection of H2O2 with linear Stern-Volmer plot and wavelength shift in an aqueous solution.

  20. Simultaneous electroanalysis of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, M I; Harnoode, C; Tokuda, K; Ohsaka, T

    2001-04-15

    The electrochemical behavior of peroxyacetic acid (PAA) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry and hydrodynamic techniques [rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) voltammetry]. The results have been analyzed aiming at simultaneous electroanalysis of both species. Glassy carbon and gold electrodes were used for this investigation. It was found that the reduction of PAA, as well as H2O2, is highly sensitive to the electrode material; for example, at 100 mV s-1, the reduction peak potentials of PAA were 0.2 and -1.1 V at gold and glassy carbon electrodes, respectively. The well-separated steady-state limiting currents were obtained using a gold electrode for the reduction of both PAA and H2O2 and also a well-defined one for the oxidation of H2O2. On the basis of the RDE experiments, good calibration curves were obtained for both species over a wide range of their concentrations, for PAA and H2O2 in the range of 0.36 to 110 and 0.11 to 34 mM, respectively. The simultaneous and selective electroanalysis of PAA and H2O2 in their coexistence is demonstrated for the first time.

  1. Toxic DNA Damage by Hydrogen Peroxide through the Fenton Reaction in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imlay, James A.; Chin, Sherman M.; Linn, Stuart

    1988-04-01

    Exposure of Escherichia coli to low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide results in DNA damage that causes mutagenesis and kills the bacteria, whereas higher concentrations of peroxide reduce the amount of such damage. Earlier studies indicated that the direct DNA oxidant is a derivative of hydrogen peroxide whose formation is dependent on cell metabolism. The generation of this oxidant depends on the availability of both reducing equivalents and an iron species, which together mediate a Fenton reaction in which ferrous iron reduces hydrogen peroxide to a reactive radical. An in vitro Fenton system was established that generates DNA strand breaks and inactivates bacteriophage and that also reproduces the suppression of DNA damage by high concentrations of peroxide. The direct DNA oxidant both in vivo and in this in vitro system exhibits reactivity unlike that of a free hydroxyl radical and may instead be a ferryl radical.

  2. In vitro evaluation of the whitening effect of mouth rinses containing hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Garcia Lima

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the bleaching effect of two mouth rinses containing hydrogen peroxide. Thirty premolars were randomly divided into two groups (n = 15: Listerine Whitening (LW and Colgate Plax Whitening (PW. The teeth were fixed on a wax plate and with acrylic resin, at a distance of 5 mm between each other, exposing the buccal surfaces. All teeth were stored in artificial saliva for 45 days, being removed twice a day to be immersed for 1 min in each mouthwash, followed by 10-second washing in tap water. The pH of each product was measured. Digital images of each tooth were captured under standardized conditions. These images were cut in areas previously demarcated and analyzed in Adobe Photoshop 7.0 using the CIEL*a*b* color space system. Data were statistically analyzed by a paired t test and an independent samples t test (p < 0.05. The pH values were 5.6 and 3.4 for LW and PW, respectively. Both treatment groups showed a decrease in the b* parameter (p < 0.01, but a decrease of a* was observed only for PW (p < 0.01. While the LW group showed an improvement in lightness (L* (p = 0.03, the PW group had a decrease in the L* parameter (p = 0.02. Within the limitations of this study, it is possible to conclude that both products caused some degree of whitening; however, extreme care should be taken when using Colgate Plax Whitening, since its decline in luminosity might be due to its lower pH.

  3. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on infections of cryptosporidium parvum in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)on Cryptosporidium parvum infection in vitro were studied in this paper, using an oocyst excystation assay, a cell culture model, and a free radical inhibition technique. H2O2 treatment at 500 and 1 000 μmol/L significantly inhibited excystation of bleach-treated oocysts (P<0.01). Concentrations of H2O2 at 500 and 750 μmol/L resulted in a significant decrease in C. Parvum infection at 35.77% and 58.16% respectively, when compared with the untreated control at 48 hours postinoculation. Surprisingly, C. parvum infection were significantly increased by 22.21% to 39.33% following treatment with 50 (P<0.01), 100 (P<0.01) or 200 (P<0.05) μmol/L H2O2, respectively. Stimulatory effect with treatment of 100 μmol/L H2O2 was most obvious, compared with the untreated control at 48 hours postinoculation. Effects of H2O2 on C. parvum at 24, 48 and 96 hours postinoculation were similar, the highest infection being infection at 48 hours postinoculation, with the maximum inhibitory effect being seen at 96 hours postinoculation. The stimulatory and inhibitory effects of H2O2 treatment on C. parvum infection were, to a certain extent, abolished in the presence of free radical scavengers, reduced glutathione or mannitol. These observations indicate that reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as H2O2, may play a role in the course of C. parvum infection. This is the first time to demonstrate a significant action of ROS in C. parvum infection in vitro.

  4. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Fernanda Alves Rodrigues; Lucato, Adriana Simoni; Valdrighi, Heloisa Cristina; Vedovello, Sílvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. Group 5 (29.33 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa), Group 2 (20.59 MPa) and Group 4 (23.25 MPa), but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel.

  5. Ground-based Infrared Observations of Water Vapor and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Bitner, M.; Kruger, A.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lefevre, F.; Forget, F.; Atreya, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    Ground-based observations of water vapor and hydrogen peroxide have been obtained in the thermal infrared range, using the TEXES instrument at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, for different times of the seasonal cycle.

  6. Wind-eroded silicate as a source of hydrogen peroxide on Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Ebbe Norskov; Merrison, Jonathan P.; Jensen, Svend Knak

    soil. Methods: We simulated wind-erosion of silicates by tumbling quartz sand in sealed quartz ampoules with defined atmospheres. The eroded sand was suspended in water and the hydrogen peroxide concentration was followed using a sco-poletin/horseradish peroxidase assay. Results: The simulated wind......-erosion effectively eroded the sand over weeks of tumbling and we saw a clear correlation between an increase in surface area and the release of hydrogen peroxide. The production of hydrogen peroxide depended on the presence of atmospheric oxygen and was inhibited by atmospheric carbon dioxide. Nevertheless, taking...... into account the high surface area of Martian soil and the atmospheric oxygen and carbon dioxide content, wind-eroded sili-cate could result in the formation of at least 7 to 31 nmol hydrogen peroxide per cm3 soil, which could explain the amount of 14CO2 released in the Labelled Release Experiments [6...

  7. SnFe2 O4 Nanocrystals as Highly Efficient Catalysts for Hydrogen-Peroxide Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuan-Ting; Liu, Dai-Ming; Lu, Shih-Yuan

    2016-07-25

    SnFe2 O4 nanocrystals (NC), prepared with a simple one-step carrier-solvent-assisted interfacial reaction process, were developed as highly efficient catalysts for hydrogen peroxide sensing. These NCs, with a size of around 7 nm, served as the sensing catalyst and were decorated onto the pore surfaces of a porous fluorine-doped tin oxide (PFTO) host electrode, prepared from commercial FTO glass with a simple anodic treatment, to form the sensing electrode for hydrogen peroxide. The SnFe2 O4 NCs-loaded PFTO electrode exhibited an ultra-high sensitivity of 1027 mA m(-1)  cm(-2) toward hydrogen peroxide, outperforming Pt NCs-loaded PFTO electrodes. The SnFe2 O4 NCs-loaded PFTO electrode proved a promising relatively low cost, high performance sensing electrode for hydrogen peroxide.

  8. MICROWAVE-EXPEDITED OLEFIN EPOXIDATION OVER HYDROTALCITES USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND ACETONITRILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    An efficient microwave-assisted expoxidation of olefins is described over hydrotalcite catalysts in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and acetonitrile. This general and selective protocol is extremely fast and is applicable to a wide variety of subtrates.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide and ferulic acid-mediated oxidative cross-linking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... Oxidative cross-linked casein mediated by hydrogen peroxide and ferulic acid was prepared at ... functional properties of food proteins treated (Motoki and. Seguro, 1998 ..... Team of Northeast Agricultural University (No.

  10. Molecular nature of sulfhydryl modification by hydrogen peroxide on type 1 ryanodine receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-mei HAN; Ri-sheng WEI; Anthony F LAI; Chang-cheng YIN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To elucidate the molecular nature of sulfhydryl modification by hydrogen peroxide on type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyRl). Methods: Rabbit skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum was treated with hydrogen peroxide, then RyRl complex was isolated. The proteins in the complex were analysed by electrophoresis, Western blot and electron microscopy. Results: (1) Hydrogen peroxide induces inter-subunit cross-linking within the tetrameric RyR1 molecule; (2) in parallel to inter-subunit cross-linking, the RyR1 molecule changes morphology; (3) the chemical and morphological changes are reversible: upon reduction by reducing agents, the RyR1 molecule regains its original state. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the molecular mechanism of RyR1 channe1 activity in sarcoplasmic reticulum regulated by hydrogen peroxide is through inter-subunit cross-linking within the tetrameric RyR1 molecule, which in turn induces structural changes of RyR1.

  11. Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of ketones with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by Sn-aniline complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Hua Zhang; Shou Feng Wang; Zi Qiang Lei

    2007-01-01

    Sn-aniline complex was prepared by a simple procedure. Cyclic and acyclic ketones were oxidized into lactones or esters with very high selectivity and yield with 30% hydrogen peroxide in the presence of Sn-aniline complex.

  12. Use of hydrogen peroxide vapour & plasma irradiation in combination for quick decontamination of closed chambers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mourya, DevendraT; Shahani, HamishC; Yadav, PragyaD; Barde, PradipV

    2016-01-01

    .... However, being extremely corrosive in nature generating very irritating fumes and difficulty in maintaining a high level of gas concentration, many laboratories prefer the vaporization of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) as an alternative...

  13. Oxidative aromatization of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines by aqueous hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for the oxidative aromatization of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines to the corresponding pyridines is achieved by using hydrogen peroxide as green oxidant and acetic acid as catalyst in aqueous solution.

  14. An Innovative Approach to Treat Incisors Hypomineralization (MIH): A Combined Use of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Hydrogen Peroxide-A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroberardino, Stefano; Campus, Guglielmo; Strohmenger, Laura; Villa, Alessandro; Cagetti, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is characterized by a developmentally derived deficiency in mineral enamel. Affected teeth present demarcated enamel opacities, ranging from white to brown; also hypoplasia can be associated. Patient frequently claims aesthetic discomfort if anterior teeth are involved. This problem leads patients to request a bleaching treatment to improve aestheticconditions.Nevertheless, hydrogen peroxide can produce serious side-effects, resulting from further mineral loss. Microabrasion and/or a composite restoration are the treatments of choice in teeth with mild/moderate MIH, but they also need enamel loss. Recently, a new remineralizing agent based on Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) has been proposed to be effective in hypomineralized enamel, improving also aesthetic conditions. The present paper presents a case report of a young man with white opacities on incisors treated with a combined use of CPP-ACP mousse and hydrogen peroxide gel to correct the aesthetic defect. The patient was instructed to use CPP-ACP for two hours per day for three months in order to obtain enamel remineralization followed by a combined use of CPP-ACP and bleaching agent for further two months. At the end of this five-month treatment, a noticeable aesthetic improvement of the opacities was observed.

  15. Effect of Exogenous Application of Hydrogen Peroxide on Drought Tolerance of Glob Amaranth (Gomphrena globosa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Goldani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the important environmental stresses that reduce the crop growth. Oxidative stress is a secondary stress due to drought and other abiotic stresses. In order to study the effect of exogenous application of hydrogen peroxide on drought tolerance of glob amaranth (Gomphrena globosa L., an experiment was conducted in greenhouse conditions. This study was designed as factorial based on completely randomized design with 3 replications. Different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (0, 2.5 and 5 mM and three levels of irrigation intervals (after 4, 7 and 10 days were treated in this study. The results showed that foliar application of hydrogen peroxide can improve shoot and root dry weight and alleviate adverse effects of drought stress. With increasing drought stress stomatal conductance, flower number, total chlorophyll and root volume decreased significantly. So that the lowest of these characterestics was in the irrigation after 10 days. Interaction effects of drought and hydrogen peroxide in shoot dry weight was significantly different in 5% level and in electrolyte leakage, relative water content, free proline and total root length was significantly different in 1% level. In control (4 day irrigation interval with increasing hydrogen peroxide of 2.5 mM, shoot dry weight and total root length increased 20% and 91%, respectively. In control, with increasing hydrogen peroxide to 5 mM total chlorophyll was increased 30.8% compared to 0 mM hydrogen peroxide application (control. The final result showed that foliar application of hydrogen peroxide decreased the adverse effects of drought stress.

  16. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on mitochondrial gene expression of intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ming Li; Qian Cai; Hong Zhou; Guang-Xia Xiao

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of hydrogen peroxide on mitochondrial gene expression of intestinal epithelial cells in in vitro model of hydrogen peroxide-stimulated SW-480 cells.METHODS: RNA of hydrogen peroxide-induced SW-480 cells was isolated, and reverse-transcriptional polymerase chain reaction was performed to study gene expression of ATPase subunit 6, ATPase subunit 8, cytochrome c oxidase subunit Ⅰ (COⅠ), cytochrome coxidase subuit Ⅱ (COⅡ) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit Ⅲ (COⅢ). Mitochondria were isolated and activities of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase were also measured simultaneously.RESULTS: Hydrogen peroxide led to differential expression of mitochondrial genes with some genes up-regulated or down-regulated in a dose dependent manner. Differences were very obvious in expressions of mitochondrial genes of cells treated with hydrogen peroxide in a concentration of 400 μmol/L or 4 mmol/L. In general, differential expression of mitochondrial genes was characterized by up-regulation of mitochondrial genes in the concentration of 400 μmol/L and down-regulation in the concentration of 4 mmol/L. In consistence with changes in mitochondrial gene expressions, hydrogen peroxide resulted in decreased activities of cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase.CONCLUSIONS: The differential expression of mitochondrial genes encoding cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase is involved in apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells by affecting activities of cytochorme c oxidase and ATPase.

  17. In situ oxidation remediation technologies: kinetic of hydrogen peroxide decomposition on soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Arturo; Santos, Aurora; Vicente, Fernando; Rodriguez, Sergio; Lafuente, A Lopez

    2009-10-30

    Rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition were investigated in soils slurries. The interaction soil-hydrogen peroxide was studied using a slurry system at 20 degrees C and pH 7. To determine the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, several experiments were carried out with two soils with different SOM content (S1=15.1%, S2=10%). The influence of the oxidant dosage ([H2O2](o) from 10 to 30 g L(-1) and soil weight to liquid phase volume ratio=500 g L(-1)) was investigated using the two calcareous loamy sand soil samples. The results showed a rate dependency on both SOM and hydrogen peroxide concentration being the H2O2 decomposition rate over soil surface described by a second-order kinetic expression r(H2O2) = -dn(H2O2) / W(SOM) dt = kC(H2O2) C(SOM). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to evaluate the effect caused by the application of this oxidant on the SOM content. It was found a slightly increase of SOM content after treatment with hydrogen peroxide, probably due to the incorporation of oxygen from the oxidant (hydrogen peroxide).

  18. Enhanced stability of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of subsurface solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard J.; Finn, Dennis D.; Cutler, Lynn M.; Schmidt, Jeremy T.; Teel, Amy L.

    2007-05-01

    The stabilization of hydrogen peroxide was investigated as a basis for enhancing its downgradient transport and contact with contaminants during catalyzed H 2O 2 propagations (CHP) in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Stabilization of hydrogen peroxide was investigated in slurries containing four characterized subsurface solids using phytate, citrate, and malonate as stabilizing agents after screening ten potential stabilizers. The extent of hydrogen peroxide stabilization and the most effective stabilizer were solid-specific; however, phytate was usually the most effective stabilizer, increasing the hydrogen peroxide half-life to as much as 50 times. The degree of stabilization was nearly as effective at 10 mM concentrations as at 250 mM or 1 M concentrations. The effect of stabilization on relative rates of hydroxyl radical activity varied between the subsurface solids, but citrate and malonate generally had a greater positive effect than phytate. The effect of phytate, citrate, and malonate on the relative rates of superoxide generation was minimal to somewhat negative, depending on the solid. The results of this research demonstrate that the stabilizers phytate, citrate, and malonate can significantly increase the half-life of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of subsurface solids during CHP reactions while maintaining a significant portion of the reactive oxygen species activity. Use of these stabilizers in the field will likely improve the delivery of hydrogen peroxide and downgradient treatment during CHP ISCO.

  19. Shock initiation studies on high concentration hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gibson, L. Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. TV cameras are attached to the target so the cell filling can be monitored. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; initiation has been observed in some experiments that shows homogeneous shock initiation behavior. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these measurements, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot information, times (distances) to detonation (Pop-plot points) that indicate low sensitivity, and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions that agree with earlier estimates.

  20. Salinity-gradient energy driven microbial electrosynthesis of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohu; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a strong oxidant, is widely used in various chemical industries and environmental remediation processes. In this study, we developed an innovative method for cost-effective production of H2O2 by using a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC). In the MREC, electrical potential generated by the exoelectrogens and the salinity-gradient between salt and fresh water were utilized to drive the high-rate H2O2 production. Operational parameters such as air flow rate, pH, cathodic potential, flow rate of salt and fresh water were investigated. The optimal H2O2 production was observed at salt and fresh water flow rate of 0.5 mL min-1, air flow rate of 12-20 mL min-1, cathode potential of -0.485 ± 0.025 V (vs Ag/AgCl). The maximum H2O2 accumulated concentration of 778 ± 11 mg L-1 was obtained at corresponding production rate of 11.5 ± 0.5 mg L-1 h-1. The overall energy input for the synthesis process was 0.45 ± 0.03 kWh kg-1 H2O2. Cathode potential was the key factor for H2O2 production, which was mainly affected by the air flow rate. This work for the first time proved the potential of MREC as an efficient platform technology for simultaneous electrosynthesis of valuable chemicals and utilization of salinity-gradient energy.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide regulated photosynthesis in C4-pepc transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, C G; Li, X; Liu, X L; Wei, X D; Dai, C C

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the photosynthetic physiological basis in 'PC' transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.), showing high-level expression of the gene encoding C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (pepc), by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The C4-PEPC gene (pepc) from maize in the transgenic rice plants was checked by PCR. Comparison of yield components and photosynthetic indices between PC and untransformed wild-type (WT) plants indicated that increased yield in PC was associated with higher net photosynthetic rate and higher activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Both PC and WT plants were treated with 1 mmol L(-1) abscisic acid (ABA), 0.04% 1-butanol (BA), 2 mmol L(-1) neomycin (NS), or 2 mmol L(-1) diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) to investigate the relationship between photosynthesis and levels of H2O2 and phosphatidic acid. In both PC and WT, ABA induced H2O2 generation and simultaneous decrease in stomatal conductance (g(s)). PC plants treated with BA showed decreased H2O2 content and strongly increased g(s) within 2 h of treatment. Similar results were observed in response to DPI treatment in PC. However, WT did not observe the decrease of H2O2 during the treatments of BA and DPI. The reduced H2O2 content in PC caused by BA treatment differed to that induced by DPI because BA did not inhibit NADPH oxidase activities. While BA induced a larger PEPC activity in PC, and higher catalase activity as well. These results indicated that the regulation of endogenous H2O2 metabolism of PC could be helpful for enhancing photosynthetic capability.

  2. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Coral Photosynthesis and Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, T.; Fujimura, H.; Arakaki, T.; Oomori, T.

    2007-12-01

    The widely-observed decline of coral reefs is considered to be caused by changes in the environment by natural and anthropogenic activities. As one important factor, the run-off of various matters from human activities to the coastal seawater poses stresses to the corals by degrading the quality of the seawater. In Okinawa, Japan, red- soil running off from the developed land has been a major environmental issue since 1980s. Hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), a strong active oxygen species, is one of the photochemically formed chemicals in the red-soil-polluted seawater. Recent photochemical studies of seawater showed that HOOH photo-formation was faster in the red- soil-polluted seawater than clean seawater. We studied the effects of HOOH on corals by studying the changes in coral carbon metabolisms such as photosynthesis and calcification, which are indicators of the physiological state of a coral colony. The corals were exposed to various concentrations of HOOH (0, 0.3, 3 μM). Two massive coral species of Porites sp. and Goniastrea aspera and one branch coral of Galaxea facicularis were used for the exposure experiments. The control experiments showed that when no HOOH was added, metabolisms of each coral colony were relatively stable. On the other hand, when HOOH was added to the seawater, we observed obvious changes in the coral metabolisms in all the coral species. When 0.3 μM HOOH was added, photosynthesis decreased by 14% and calcification decreased by 17% within 3 days, compared with the control. When 3 μM HOOH was added, photosynthesis decreased by 21% and calcification decreased by 41% within 3 days, compared with the control. Our study showed that higher concentrations of HOOH posed more stress to the coral colonies.

  3. Shock initiation studies on high concentration hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gibson, L. Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. TV cameras are attached to the target so the cell filling can be monitored. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; initiation has been observed in some experiments that shows homogeneous shock initiation behavior. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these measurements, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot information, times (distances) to detonation (Pop-plot points) that indicate low sensitivity, and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions that agree with earlier estimates.

  4. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage "Chicha Morada" in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Eric Dario; Delgado-Cotrina, Leyla; Rumiche, Francisco Aurelio; Tay, Lidia Yileng

    2016-01-01

    During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada), green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n = 5): purple corn (P), purple corn + bleaching (PB), green tea (T), green tea + bleaching (TB), distilled water (W), and distilled water + bleaching (WB). In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p composite resin regardless of the bleaching procedure. However, purple corn was the only beverage that caused a perceptible color change (ΔE > 3.3).

  5. Considerations for Storage of High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Utilizing Non-Metal Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robin E.; Scott, Joseph P.; Wise, Harry

    2005-01-01

    When working with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, it is critical that the storage container be constructed of the proper materials, those which will not degrade to the extent that container breakdown or dangerous decomposition occurs. It has been suggested that the only materials that will safely contain the peroxide for a significant period of time are metals of stainless steel construction or aluminum use as High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Containers. The stability and decomposition of HTP will be also discussed as well as various means suggested in the literature to minimize these problems. The dangers of excess oxygen generation are also touched upon.

  6. Low temperature bleaching of cotton cheese with peroxide activator TAED%纯棉筒子纱的低温活化氧漂处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    师文钊; 邢建伟; 任支刚; 徐成书; 刘瑾姝

    2013-01-01

    针对纯棉筒子纱传统高温煮漂前处理工艺存在能耗大和纤维损伤等问题,采用氧漂活化剂四乙酰乙二胺(TAED)对筒子纱进行低温前处理.考察了双氧水和TAED用量、氢氧化钠用量和处理温度及时间对纱线白度、毛效和强力的影响,并与传统前处理工艺进行比较.结果表明,纯棉筒子纱低温前处理优化工艺为:NaOH 2 g/L,H2O2 (30%)6 g/L,TAED 6 g/L,升温至60℃处理10 min,再升温至80℃处理30 m in.采用优化工艺处理后,纱线的断裂强力明显高于传统前处理工艺,白度和毛效相当,而工艺时间和流程大幅缩短.%Aiming at the high energy consumption and fiber damage in traditional high-temperature scouring and bleaching pre-treatment of cotton cheese, low-temperature pretreatment process with tetra acetyl ethylene diamine(TAED) is introduced. The effect of dosages of hydrogen peroxide and TAED, caustic soda, temperature and time on whiteness, capillary effect and tensile strength is ciscussed and compared with that of traditional process. The results show that the optimal process conditions are NaOH 2 g/L, H2O2(30%) 6 g/L, TAED 6 g/L, treating at 60 ℃ for 10 min, and then holding at 80 ℃ for 30 min. The yarns pretreated wth optimal process feature higher breaking strength, similar whiteness and capillary effect, shortened process time and procedure.

  7. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage by Carica papaya leaf extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tebekeme Okoko; Diepreye Ere

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in vitro antioxidant potential of Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract and its effect on hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage assessed by haemolysis and lipid peroxidation. Methods: Hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, hydrogen ion scavenging activity, metal chelating activity, and the ferrous ion reducing ability were assessed as antioxidant indices. In the other experiment, human erythrocytes were treated with hydrogen peroxide to induce erythrocyte damage. The extract (at various concentrations) was subsequently incubated with the erythrocytes and later analysed for haemolysis and lipid peroxidation as indices for erythrocyte damage. Results:Preliminary investigation of the extract showed that the leaf possessed significant antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities using in vitro models in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.05). The extract also reduced hydrogen peroxide induced erythrocyte haemolysis and lipid peroxidation significantly when compared with ascorbic acid (P<0.05). The IC50 values were 7.33 mg/mL and 1.58 mg/mL for inhibition of haemolysis and lipid peroxidation, respectively. In all cases, ascorbic acid (the reference antioxidant) possessed higher activity than the extract. Conclusions:The findings show that C. papaya leaves possess significant bioactive potential which is attributed to the phytochemicals which act in synergy. Thus, the leaves can be exploited for pharmaceutical and nutritional purposes.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  9. Mechanism of electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on copper in acidic sulfate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Karen L; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2007-09-11

    Hydrogen peroxide is a commonly used oxidizer component in chemical mechanical planarization slurries, used in the processing of Cu metallization in microelectronics applications. We studied the electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on Cu in 0.1 M H2SO4 solutions using methods including cyclic voltammetry, rotating disk electrode experiments, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The spectroscopy reveals that the hydrogen peroxide molecule is reduced at negative potentials to form a Cu-OH surface species in acidic solutions, a result consistent with the insight from Tafel slope measurements. DFT calculations support the instability of peroxide relative to the surface-coordinated hydroxide on both Cu(111) and Cu(100) surfaces.

  10. The Effect of Fiber Bleaching Treatment on the Properties of Poly(lactic acid)/Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Marwah Rayung; Nor Azowa Ibrahim; Norhazlin Zainuddin; Wan Zuhainis Saad; Nur Inani Abdul Razak; Buong Woei Chieng

    2014-01-01

    In this work, biodegradable composites from poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber were prepared by melt blending method. Prior to mixing, the fiber was modified through bleaching treatment using hydrogen peroxide. Bleached fiber composite showed an improvement in mechanical properties as compared to untreated fiber composite due to the enhanced fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion. Interestingly, fiber bleaching treatment also improved the physical appearance of th...

  11. Products of binary complex compounds thermolysis: Catalysts for hydrogen peroxide decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domonov, D. P.; Pechenyuk, S. I.; Gosteva, A. N.

    2014-06-01

    Samples are obtained via the thermolysis of binary complex compounds in a hydrogen atmosphere. Their catalytic activity in hydrogen peroxide decomposition is studied. The values of the rate constants and activation energies for the catalytic reaction are estimated. The correlation between catalytic activity, composition, specific surface area ( S sp), and particle size of the samples is analyzed.

  12. Prediction of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia using cord blood hydrogen peroxide: a prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chieh Chou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that cord blood hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 could be utilized to predict the severity of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled term or near-term healthy neonates. Cord blood and capillary blood at three days of age were measured for hydrogen peroxide and bilirubin concentrations. For newborns with hyperbilirubinemia, further blood samples were obtained at five and seven days of age. Newborns were divided into severe or less severe hyperbilirubinemic groups (peak bilirubin ≥17 mg/dL or not. The sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values were determined. RESULTS: There were 158 neonates enrolled. The incidence of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia was 30.5% for a concentration ≥15 mg/dl. The rising patterns were similar among bilirubin concentrations and hydrogen peroxide levels during the first few days of life. There was a strong positive correlation between bilirubin concentrations and hydrogen peroxide levels after correlation analysis. The rate of severe hyperbilirubinemia was 13.3%. It revealed that a cord blood hydrogen peroxide signal level of 2500 counts/10 seconds was an appropriate cut-off for predicting severe hyperbilirubinemia. Sensitivity and the negative predictive value were 76.2% and 93.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings confirm that hydrogen peroxide levels and bilirubin concentrations in cord and neonatal blood are closely related. A cord blood hydrogen peroxide level above 2500 counts/10 seconds associated with a high predictive value for severe hyperbilirubinemia. This method provides information about which neonate should be closely followed after discharge from the nursery.

  13. Effects of 3% sodium ascorbyl phosphate on the hardness and bond strength of human enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ana Paula Brito; Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Cavalcanti, Andrea Nobrega; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2010-01-01

    For this study, 120 fragments obtained from human third molars were randomly separated into 12 groups (n = 10). Four groups were used for measuring the Knoop hardness number (KHN) of enamel, while the other eight were used for testing the microtensile bond strength (muTBS) of two adhesive systems (Single Bond and Prime & Bond NT). All groups presented statistically similar KHN values. According to bond strength results, bleached enamel without antioxidant application demonstrated the lowest values of all groups. Based on these results, it could be concluded that the bleaching agents used in the present study (with or without sodium ascorbyl phosphate) did not affect human enamel hardness and that sodium ascorbyl phosphate is able to reverse the compromised bonding in bleached human enamel.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  15. Responses of rabbit pulmonary arteries to hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, J.A.; Gugino, S.F.; Giese, E.C. (State Univ. of New York, Buffalo (United States))

    1991-03-15

    The effects of hydrogen peroxide on isolated rabbit intrapulmonary arteries were investigated using tissue bath techniques. Exposure of resting vessels to 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}5} M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} caused concentration-dependent contractions that were blocked by 10{sup {minus}5} M indomethacin, 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M SQ 29548 or by removal of the endothelium. Addition of a single concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to resting vessels incubated with 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M SQ 29548 caused slowly developing contractions that attained approximately 80% of the response to 118mM KCL. Late phase contractions were highly resistance to the inhibitory effects of 10{sup {minus}8}-10{sup {minus}5} M isoproterenol or 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}5} M sodium nitroprusside and they persisted in calcium-free media, in vessels incubated with 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M verapamil, and after removal of the endothelium. Pulmonary arteries incubated with 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M SQ 29548 and contracted by 10{sup {minus}7} M phenylephrine relaxed in response to 10{sup {minus}7}-10{sup {minus}5} M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced relaxations were unaffected by 10{sup {minus}4} M N{omega}-nitro-L-arginine or 10{sup {minus}5}M indomethacin but were partially depressed by removal of the endothelium. The authors conclude that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} causes: an early phase contraction via release of thromboxane A2 from endothelial cells; a late-phase contraction that is endothelium-independent and probably results from the release of calcium from intracellular stores in smooth muscle cells; and an early phase relaxation that may be due to both endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent mechanisms. The endothelium-derived relaxing factor does not appear to be nitric oxide or a dilator prostaglandin.

  16. DISY. The direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide, a bridge for innovative applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzzoni, R.; Perego, C. [Eni S.p.A., Novara (Italy). Research Center for Non-Conventional Energies

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is largely recognized as the green oxidant of choice for future sustainable processes. The current industrial production still goes through the old anthraquinone process, a complex, two-step process suffering from a low specific productivity. Following the development of TS-1/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} based selective oxidation processes e.g. propylene epoxidation, cyclohexanone ammoximation and the new benzene direct oxidation to phenol, there has been an incentive for the development of a new technology, simpler and with better economics. DISY process, based on direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from hydrogen and oxygen, is highly suitable to the design of integrated selective oxidation processes as well as for production of commercial-grade high concentration aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. Catalyst and process development up to pilot scale are described. (orig.)

  17. Protection against hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative damage in rat erythrocytes by Mangifera indica L. peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajila, C M; Prasada Rao, U J S

    2008-01-01

    Phytochemicals such as polyphenols and carotenoids are gaining importance because of their contribution to human health and their multiple biological effects such as antioxidant, antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic and cytoprotective activities and other therapeutic properties. Mango peel is a major by-product in pulp industry and it contains various bioactive compounds like polyphenols, carotenoids and others. In the present study, the protective effect of peel extracts of unripe and ripe mango fruits of two varieties namely, Raspuri and Badami on hydrogen peroxide induced hemolysis, lipid peroxidation, degradation of membrane proteins and its morphological changes are reported. The oxidative hemolysis of rat erythrocytes by hydrogen peroxide was inhibited by mango peel extract in a dose dependent manner. The IC(50) value for lipid peroxidation inhibition on erythrocyte ghost membrane was found to be in the range of 4.5-19.3 microg gallic acid equivalents. The mango peel extract showed protection against membrane protein degradation caused by hydrogen peroxide. Morphological changes to erythrocyte membrane caused by hydrogen peroxide were protected by mango peel extract. The results demonstrated that mango peel extracts protected erythrocytes against oxidative stress and may impart health benefits and it could be used as a valuable food ingredient or a nutraceutical product.

  18. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listiyani, M A D; Campbell, R E; Miracle, R E; Dean, L O; Drake, M A

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations in dried whey products. No legal limit exists in the United States for BP use in whey, but international concerns exist. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) or BP bleaching on the flavor of 34% WPC (WPC34) and to evaluate residual BA in commercial and experimental WPC bleached with and without BP. Cheddar whey was manufactured in duplicate. Pasteurized fat-separated whey was subjected to hot bleaching with either HP at 500 mg/kg, BP at 50 or 100 mg/kg, or no bleach. Whey was ultrafiltered and spray dried into WPC34. Color [L*(lightness), a* (red-green), and b* (yellow-blue)] measurements and norbixin extractions were conducted to compare bleaching efficacy. Descriptive sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were used to evaluate bleaching effects on flavor. Benzoic acid was extracted from experimental and commercial WPC34 and 80% WPC (WPC80) and quantified by HPLC. The b* value and norbixin concentration of BP-bleached WPC34 were lower than HP-bleached and control WPC34. Hydrogen peroxide-bleached WPC34 displayed higher cardboard flavor and had higher volatile lipid oxidation products than BP-bleached or control WPC34. Benzoyl peroxide-bleached WPC34 had higher BA concentrations than unbleached and HP-bleached WPC34 and BA concentrations were also higher in BP-bleached WPC80 compared with unbleached and HP-bleached WPC80, with smaller differences than those observed in WPC34. Benzoic acid extraction from permeate showed that WPC80 permeate contained more BA than did WPC34 permeate. Benzoyl peroxide is more effective in color removal of whey and results in fewer flavor side effects compared with HP and residual BA is

  19. Tentative Research of Short Process of Jute Degumming and Bleaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-ming; WANG Feng; CAI Zai-sheng; YU Jian-yong

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of combination process of jute degumming and bleaching with alkali-hydrogen peroxide in one-step-one-bath was discussed.The combination process basically has the similar function as the traditional two-step-two-bath method.The factors such as hydrogen peroxide concentration.CBI concentration, sodium hydroxide concentration, treatment time and temperature were studied respectively, and then an orthogonal experiment was designed to study the interactions among the hydrogen peroxide concentration, CBI concentration, sodium hydroxide concentration.After the designed experiments, the optimum treatment conditions were obtained as follows: hydrogen peroxide of 12 g/L, sodium hydroxide of 4 g/L, CBI of 4 g/L, JFC of 1 g/L, treatment time of 60 min and temperature of 75℃

  20. Evaluation and comparison of bond strength to 10% carbamide peroxide bleached enamel following the application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol solutions: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Thapa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate and compare composite bond strength to carbamide peroxide bleached enamel following the application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol solutions. Materials and Methods: Sixty premolars were divided into six groups. Groups I and VI served as unbleached and bleached controls respectively. Groups II, III, IV and V served as the experimental groups and were subjected to 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching followed by 10 min application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and 10% and 25% alpha-tocopherol solutions, respectively. Following composite bonding, shear bond strength was determined and the results were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey highest significant difference test. Results: Only Group IV showed significantly lower bond strength when compared to Group I (unbleached control. When compared to Group VI (bleached control, except Group IV, groups II, III and V showed significantly higher bond strength. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the experimental groups corresponding to 10% and 25% and similar concentrations of sodium ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol solutions. Conclusion: Following 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching, except 10% alpha tocopherol, 10 min application of 10% and 25% sodium ascorbate and 25% alpha-tocopherol solutions significantly improves the shear bond strength of composite resin to enamel.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide protects HUVECs against hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Dan Wen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hydrogen sulfide (H₂S has been shown to have cytoprotective effects in models of hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion and Alzheimer's disease. However, little is known about its effects or mechanisms of action in atherosclerosis. Therefore, in the current study we evaluated the pharmacological effects of H₂S on antioxidant defenses and mitochondria protection against hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂ induced endothelial cells damage. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: H₂S, at non-cytotoxic levels, exerts a concentration dependent protective effect in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs exposed to H₂O₂. Analysis of ATP synthesis, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm and cytochrome c release from mitochondria indicated that mitochondrial function was preserved by pretreatment with H₂S. In contrast, in H₂O₂ exposed endothelial cells mitochondria appeared swollen or ruptured. In additional experiments, H₂S was also found to preserve the activities and protein expressions levels of the antioxidants enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase in H₂O₂ exposed cells. ROS and lipid peroxidation, as assessed by measuring H₂DCFDA, dihydroethidium (DHE, diphenyl-l-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP and malonaldehyde (MDA levels, were also inhibited by H₂S treatment. Interestingly, in the current model, D, L-propargylglycine (PAG, a selective inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, abolished the protective effects of H₂S donors. INNOVATION: This study is the first to show that H₂S can inhibit H₂O₂ mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in human endothelial cells by preserving antioxidant defences. SIGNIFICANCE: H₂S may protect against atherosclerosis by preventing H₂O₂ induced injury to endothelial cells. These effects appear to be mediated via the preservation of mitochondrial function and by reducing the deleterious effects of oxidative stress.

  2. The effect of home-use and in-office bleaching treatments combined with experimental desensitizing agents on enamel and dentin

    OpenAIRE

    PINTADO-PALOMINO,Karen; Camila TIRAPELLI

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to evaluate in vitro the effect of formulations containing Biosilicate to treat enamel and dentin bovine samples exposed to dental bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: On enamel and dentin bleached with commercial gels containing 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) (14 days/4 h) or 35% hydrogen peroxide (single session/45 min), desensitizing dentifrices (Sensodyne?; experimental dentifrice of Biosilicate?; Odontis RX?; Sorriso?) were applied along 14 days and desensiti...

  3. Hydrogen peroxide and polyamines act as double edged swords in plant abiotic stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Gupta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The specific genetic changes through which plants adapt to the multitude of environmental stresses are possible because of the molecular regulations in the system. These intricate regulatory mechanisms once unveiled will surely raise interesting questions. Polyamines and hydrogen peroxide have been suggested to be important signalling molecules during biotic and abiotic stresses. Hydrogen peroxide plays a versatile role from orchestrating physiological processes to stress response. It helps to achieve acclimatization and tolerance to stress by coordinating intra-cellular and systemic signalling systems. Polyamines, on the other hand, are low molecular weight polycationic aliphatic amines, which have been implicated in various stress responses. It is quite interesting to note that both hydrogen peroxide and polyamines have a fine line of inter-relation between them since the catabolic pathways of the latter releases hydrogen peroxide. In this review we have tried to illustrate the roles and their multifaceted functions of these two important signalling molecules based on current literature. This review also highlights the fact that over accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and polyamines can be detrimental for plant cells leading to toxicity and pre-mature cell death.

  4. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ming Li; Hong Zhou; Qian Cai; Guang-Xia Xiao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.METHODS: Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human intestinal epithelial cell line SW-480 was established. Cell apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V and PI doublestained flow cytometry and DNA gel electrophoresis.Morphological changes were examined with light and electron microscopy. For other observations, mitochondrial function,cytochrome c release, mitochondrial translocation and membrane potential were determined simultaneously.RESULTS: Percentage of apoptotic cells induced with 400μ mol/L hydrogen peroxide increased significantly at I h or 3h after stimulation and recovered rapidly. Meanwhile percentage of apoptotic cells induced with 4 mmol/L hydrogen peroxide increased with time. In accordance with these changes, we observed decreased mitochondrial function in 400 μmol/L H2O2-stimualted cells at 1 h or 3 h and in 4 mmol/L H2O2-stimualted cells at times examined.Correspondingly, swelling cristae and vacuole-like mitochondria were noted. Release of cytochrome c,decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial translocation were also found to be the early signs of apoptosis.CONCLUSION: Dysfunctional mitochondria play a role in the apoptosis of SW-480 cell line induced by hydrogen peroxide.

  5. The hydrogen peroxide impact on larval settlement and metamorphosis of abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta is an important economic mollusk. The settlement and metamorphosis are two critical stages during its development period, which has direct influence on abalone survival and production. The influence of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) on abalone embryo and juvenile development were examined in this study. Larvae of Haliotis diversicolor supertexta were induced to settlement and metamorphose by exposure to seawater supplemented with hydrogen peroxide. They had the best performance at 800 μmol/L. The concentration of 1 000 μmol/L or higher was toxic to the larvae, as the larvae could settle down only at benthic diatom plates without complete metamorphosis. In addition, H2O2 adding time was critical to the larval performance. 24h after two-day post-fertilization was proved to be the optimal adding time. In this paper, two action mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide are discussed: (1) hydrogen peroxide has direct toxicity to ciliated cells, thus cause apoptosis; (2) hydrogen peroxide, as a product from catecholamines' autoxidation process in vivo, can reverse this process to produce neuro-transmitters to induce abalone metamorphosis.

  6. Toxicity of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide on human chondrocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhner, Eric; Seeger, Joern B; Hoff, Paula; Dähn-Wollenberg, Stephanie; Perka, Carsten; Matziolis, Georg

    2011-07-07

    The treatment of acute joint infections has an important impact on long-term outcome and remains an unsolved problem. The most frequent bacteria are staphylococci, streptococci, and gram-negative bacteria. In septic surgery, polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide are the most frequently used local antiseptics. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that antiseptics induce cell death of human chondrocytes after a short incubation time.Human chondrocytes were treated with different concentrations of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide. Toxicity analysis was determined by visualization of cell structure using light microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release, and determination of living and total cell numbers after addition of polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide. Light microscopic data revealed a defect cell structure after addition of both antiseptics. Lactate dehydrogenase activity showed a significant increase of enzyme expression after a short incubation with polyhexanide. The determination of vital chondrocytes showed a significant decrease of vital and total cell numbers after addition with polyhexanide and hydrogen peroxide.Both antiseptic solutions induce significant cell death of human chondrocytes after a short incubation time. Polyhexanide possibly has more toxic potential than hydrogen peroxide against human chondrocytes after an application >15 minutes. Therefore, both substances should only be applied for a short time (<15 minutes) and the joint irrigated to wash out the antiseptic substance prior to wound closure. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Combined Application of Natural Sunlight and Hydrogen peroxide on the Removal of Harmful Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D. H.; Li, L.; Zhu, C. W.; Wang, Z. Y.; Xie, P.

    2017-08-01

    This study provides an efficient and environmentally friendly advanced oxidation technique involving the combined application of natural sunlight and hydrogen peroxide for the removal of harmful cyanobacteria from lakes and reservoirs. In this paper, we collected water samples from Taihu Lake (Wuxi, China) in August 2016 when cyanobacterial blooms had occurred and then performed an outdoor experiment. Hydrogen peroxide at 0.6 mM had no obvious effect on the cyanobacterial inactivation in the dark, even stimulating cyanobacterial growth to some extent. Cyanobacteria were inactivated by higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (1.0 mM) in the dark, as well as 0.4 mM hydrogen peroxide under sunlight irradiation, indicating that natural sunlight significantly enhanced the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the removal of cyanobacteria. An experiment involving Pseudanabaena sp. (a harmful species) led to similar conclusions as the study using algae attained from Taihu Lake. This study provides a practical and effective method for controlling harmful cyanobacteria in natural water bodies.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA3 on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA3 may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  9. In-office bleaching effects on the pulp flow and tooth sensitivity – case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe CARTAGENA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF is a noninvasive method capable of evaluating variations in pulp blood flow (PBF and pulp vitality. This method has thus far not been used to assess changes in blood flow after in-office bleaching. The aim of this case series report was to measure changes in PBF by LDF in the upper central incisor of three patients submitted to in-office bleaching. The buccal surfaces of the upper arch were bleached with a single session of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with three 15-min applications. The color was recorded using a value-oriented Vita shade guide before in-office bleaching and one week after the procedure. The tooth sensitivity (TS in a verbal scale was reported, and PBF was assessed by LDF before, immediately, and one week after the bleaching session. The lower arch was submitted to dental bleaching but not used for data assessment. A whitening degree of 3 to 4 shade guide units was detected. All participants experienced moderate to considerable TS after the procedure. The PBF readings reduced 20% to 40% immediately after bleaching. One week post-bleaching, TS and PBF were shown to be equal to baseline values. A reversible decrease of PBF was detected immediately after bleaching, which recovered to the baseline values or showed a slight increase sooner than one week post-bleaching. The LDF method allows detection of pulp blood changes in teeth submitted to in-office bleaching, but further studies are still required.

  10. Effect of the Purple Corn Beverage “Chicha Morada” in Composite Resin during Dental Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dario Acuña

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During dental bleaching the staining potential of the surface would increase. This study aims to evaluate the staining susceptibility of one bleached composite resin after the exposure to three different beverages: Peruvian purple corn based beverage (chicha morada, green tea, and distilled water. Thirty disk-shaped specimens of one nanofill composite resin were prepared. The specimens were then divided into six groups (n=5: purple corn (P, purple corn + bleaching (PB, green tea (T, green tea + bleaching (TB, distilled water (W, and distilled water + bleaching (WB. In groups that received bleaching, two sessions of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide were done. Following bleaching, specimens were exposed to each liquid thirty minutes daily. Color was measured with a digital spectrophotometer. For statistical analysis, color measurement differences between the obtained results were used: during bleaching, after bleaching, and during + after bleaching. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare the color changes in the resins of all groups (p3.3.

  11. In-office bleaching effects on the pulp flow and tooth sensitivity - case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena, Andrés Felipe; Parreiras, Sibelli Olivieri; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra; Campanha, Nara Hellen

    2015-01-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive method capable of evaluating variations in pulp blood flow (PBF) and pulp vitality. This method has thus far not been used to assess changes in blood flow after in-office bleaching. The aim of this case series report was to measure changes in PBF by LDF in the upper central incisor of three patients submitted to in-office bleaching. The buccal surfaces of the upper arch were bleached with a single session of 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with three 15-min applications. The color was recorded using a value-oriented Vita shade guide before in-office bleaching and one week after the procedure. The tooth sensitivity (TS) in a verbal scale was reported, and PBF was assessed by LDF before, immediately, and one week after the bleaching session. The lower arch was submitted to dental bleaching but not used for data assessment. A whitening degree of 3 to 4 shade guide units was detected. All participants experienced moderate to considerable TS after the procedure. The PBF readings reduced 20% to 40% immediately after bleaching. One week post-bleaching, TS and PBF were shown to be equal to baseline values. A reversible decrease of PBF was detected immediately after bleaching, which recovered to the baseline values or showed a slight increase sooner than one week post-bleaching. The LDF method allows detection of pulp blood changes in teeth submitted to in-office bleaching, but further studies are still required.

  12. Clinical trial evaluating color change and tooth sensitivity throughout and following in-office bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Lucas Silveira; de Oliveira, Fernanda Garcia; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundefeld, Maria Lúcia Marçal Mazza; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the color alteration and sensitivity of teeth throughout and following in-office bleaching. Twenty-two volunteers participated in this clinical trial of bleaching treatment (35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel and placebo) applied on maxillary incisors and canines. According to a split-mouth design, the volunteers' maxillary hemi-arches received either the bleaching or placebo agent, applied four times, at 1-week intervals. Color alteration and tooth sensitivity were assessed throughout and following bleaching. Statistical calculations were performed using gamma distribution and repeated-measures ANOVA. There was a statistically significant difference between teeth submitted to a bleaching agent and placebo (P < .001). At the end of the first, second, third, and fourth sessions, the bleached teeth presented color scores statistically lower than those observed immediately before bleaching. There was no difference in the color scale scores of the bleached teeth between bleaching sessions. The sensitivity data test showed a significant difference among treatments (P < .0001). Color alteration and dental sensitivity were altered by the bleaching agent.

  13. Effect of different bleaching strategies on microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mohammadi, Narmin; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Godrati, Mostafa; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dentists’ awareness of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface and mechanical properties of restorative materials is of utmost importance. Therefore, this in vitro study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different bleaching strategies on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin. Methods. Eighty samples of a silorane-based composite resin (measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared within acrylic molds. The samples were polished and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=20). Group 1 (controls) were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks. The samples in group 2 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide for two weeks two hours daily. The samples in group 3 were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide twice 5 days apart for 30 minutes each time. The samples in group 4 underwent a bleaching procedure with light-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide under LED light once for 40 minutes. Then the microhardness of the samples was determined using Vickers method. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P 0.05). Conclusion. Bleaching agents decreased microhardness of silorane-based composite resin restorations, the magnitude of which depending on the bleaching strategy used. PMID:28096946

  14. Chemiluminescence behavior of sodium hydrogen carbonate in the potassium permanganate-hydrogen peroxide reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Chemiluminescence (CL) phenomenon of hydrogen peroxide with potassium permanganate in the presence of sodium hydrogen carbonate was reported.Effects of the surfactant on the CL system were investigated.Nonionic surfactants could effectively increase the CL signal.Radical scavengers and organic reagents such as nitro blue tetrazolium chloride (NBT),cytochrome c,sodium azide,ascorbic acid,thiourea,tert-butanol and dimethyl sulphoxide were used to study the emitting species.CL emission spectrum was recorded and the results showed that the maximal emission wavelengths of NaHCO3-H2O2-KMnO4 system were 440 and 634 nm.The mechanism was discussed based on electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra,fluorescence spectra and UV-vis absorption spectra.The addition of rhodamine B or uranine into this CL system enhanced the CL signal.It was due to part of the energy transfer from singlet oxygen and excited triplet dimers of two CO2 molecules to rhodamine B or uranine.The CL could be induced by excited rhodamine B or uranine.

  15. Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, W; Kaiser, R I; Zheng, Weijun; Jewitt, David; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2006-01-01

    Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the ...

  16. Study on bleaching process of hemp fabric with peracetic acid%过氧乙酸漂白大麻织物的工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏玉娟; 李瑞

    2011-01-01

    对比了过氧乙酸单漂、双氧水单漂、过氧乙酸与双氧水复漂及其次序组合对大麻织物的漂白效果,通过分析大麻织物的一些性能和木质素含量得出:过氧乙酸单漂(过氧乙酸10 g/60℃,pH=5.5)、双氧水单漂(双氧水10 g/L)、过氧乙酸初漂与双氧水复漂后大麻织物中木质素含量分别为4.02%、4.53%和3.63%.使用优选的过氧乙酸初漂与双氧水复漂结合进行,在保持一定强力前提下,可使大麻织物获得较好的白度.%The bleaching effect of peracetic acid single bleaching, hydrogen peroxide single bleaching, the second bleaching and the order were compared.Through analyzing some performances of hemp fabric and content of lignin, it was concluded that the lignin content of hemp fabric using peracetic acid sirigle bleaching with peracetic acid 10 g/L reacting at 60 ℃ under pH = 5.5, hydrogen peroxide single bleaching with hydrgen peroxide 10 g/L and peracetic acid first bleaching, hydrogen peroxide second bleaching was 4.02%, 4.53% and 3.63%, respectively, peracetic acid first bleaching, hydrogen peroxide second bleaching could endow hemp fabric with good whiteness under certain strength.

  17. In Situ and In Vitro Effects of Two Bleaching Treatments on Human Enamel Hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn-Donassollo, Sandrina; Fabris, Cristiane; Gagiolla, Morgana; Kerber, Ícaro; Caetano, Vinícius; Carboni, Vitor; Salas, Mabel Miluska Suca; Donassollo, Tiago Aurélio; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in situ the effects of two bleaching treatments on human enamel surface microhardness. Sixty enamel slabs from recently extracted thirty molars were used. The specimens were polished with sandpapers under water-cooling. The enamel samples were randomly divided in four groups, treated with 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP) or Whitening Strips (WS) containing 10% hydrogen peroxide and using two conditions: in vitro or in situ model. For in situ condition, six volunteers wore an intra-oral appliance containing enamel slabs, while for in vitro condition the specimens were kept in deionized water after the bleaching protocols. The bleaching treatments were applied one-hour daily for 14 days. Similar amounts of bleaching agents were used in both conditions. Before and after bleaching treatments, microhardness was measured. Statistical analysis (ANOVA and Tukey test) showed that in the in situ condition there was no statistically significant microhardness reduction in the bleached enamel (p>0.05). Significant decrease in hardness was observed for enamel slabs bleached with both treatments in the in vitro condition (phardness value. It could be concluded that there was no deleterious effect on enamel produced by any of the bleaching protocols used in the in situ model. The reduction of hardness was only observed in vitro.

  18. Polarographic Studies on Associations of Midecamycin and Chloroquine with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; SONG Jun-feng; XU Mao-tian; ZHANG Ya

    2005-01-01

    The associations of each of midecamycin and chloroquine phosphate to hydrogen peroxide were studied by using linear-potential scan polarography. In a 0.15 mol/L KH2PO4-NaOH(pH 7.4) buffer, the association ratio of the association complex of midecamycin to hydrogen peroxide is 1∶1, and the apparent association constant is 7.18. While in a 0.04 mol/L NH3·H2O-NH4Cl(pH 9.5) buffer, the association ratio and the apparent association constant of the association complex of chloroquine phosphate to hydrogen peroxide are 1∶1 and 45.4, respectively. The formation of the association complexes stabilizes H2O2 and results in the accumulation of H2O2, which is baneful to human body.

  19. Hispidin produced from Phellinus linteus protects pancreatic beta-cells from damage by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae Soon; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Jung Hyun; Kwon, Duck Soo; Lee, Keun Eok; Lee, Shin Young; Hong, Eock Kee

    2010-06-01

    Phellinus linteus, which is a traditional medicinal mushroom used in Asian countries for the treatment of various diseases, has attracted a lot of attention due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenicity, and cell-mediated immunity properties in addition to its ability to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. However, the antidiabetic efficacy of P. linteus has not yet been examined. In this study, hispidin from P. linteus exhibited quenching effects against DPPH radicals, superoxide radicals, and hydrogen peroxide in a dose-dependent manner. Intracellular reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of hispidin was approximately 55% at a concentration of 30 microM. In addition, hispidin was shown to inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and increased insulin secretion in hydrogen peroxide-treated cells. These combined results indicate that hispidin may act as an antidiabetic and that this property occurs through preventing beta-cells from the toxic action of reactive oxygen species in diabetes.

  20. Efficient hydrogen peroxide decomposition to oxygen and water catalysed by a ruthenium pincer complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide decomposition is a major issue in medicine, energy, and environmental sciences. For example, findings could lead to the development of efficient H2O2 removal systems to clean wastewaters. Here I tested several homogeneous catalysts for H2O2 decomposition. I found that a dihydride...... are necessary, further enhancing the potential scope of this system. By the use of the homogeneous catalyst Ru(H)2(PNPiPr)CO, it is possible to obtain turnover frequencies reaching 180,000 h−1 and turnover numbers more than 14,000 in a neutral hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution at 25 °C. Overall, findings...... reveal an efficient and stable system for hydrogen peroxide decomposition to oxygen and water under mild conditions....

  1. Thermally stable and hydrogen peroxide tolerant manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Lenzites betulinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Fumihiko; Kajino, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Hidehiko; Asami, Osamu; Takahashi, Haruo

    2002-10-23

    A thermally stable and hydrogen peroxide tolerant manganese peroxidase (MnP) was purified from the culture medium of Lenzites betulinus by ion exchange chromatography, gel filtration and isoelectric focusing chromatography. The MnP purified from L. betulinus (L-MnP) has a molecular mass of 40 kDa and its isoelectric point was determined to be 6.2. The first 19 amino acids at the N-terminal end of the L-MnP sequence were found to exhibit 74% identity with those of a Phlebia radiata MnP. L-MnP was proved to have the highest hydrogen peroxide tolerance among MnPs reported so far. It retained more than 60% of the initial activity after thermal treatment at 60 degrees C for 60 min, and also retained more than 60% of the initial activity after exposure to 10 mM hydrogen peroxide for 5 min at 37 degrees C.

  2. Chemiluminescence assay for catechin based on generation of hydrogen peroxide in basic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Kanemitsu, Mahina; Tajima, Noriko; Maeda, Masako

    2002-11-20

    We have determined that the catechin group in basic solution efficiently produces hydrogen peroxide; moreover, a highly sensitive analysis methodology was developed to measure catechin employing a peroxalate chemiluminescence detection system. Identification of hydrogen peroxide generated by catechin was determined by ESR as well as peroxalate chemiluminescence using catalase and SOD. As a result, catechin-generated superoxide by electron reduction to dissolved oxygen in basic solution, followed by production of hydrogen peroxide through dismutation reaction. This method could measure several tea catechins, (+)-catechin (CC), (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) and gallic acid, with measurement range from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -3} mol/l and sensitivity of 10{sup -8} mol/l. This method was also applied to the determination of total catechin levels in green tea, black tea and roasted green tea.

  3. Solar-Driven Hydrogen Peroxide Production Using Polymer-Supported Carbon Dots as Heterogeneous Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Satyabrat; Karak, Niranjan

    2017-10-01

    Safe, sustainable, and green production of hydrogen peroxide is an exciting proposition due to the role of hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant and energy carrier for fuel cells. The current work reports the development of carbon dot-impregnated waterborne hyperbranched polyurethane as a heterogeneous photo-catalyst for solar-driven production of hydrogen peroxide. The results reveal that the carbon dots possess a suitable band-gap of 2.98 eV, which facilitates effective splitting of both water and ethanol under solar irradiation. Inclusion of the carbon dots within the eco-friendly polymeric material ensures their catalytic activity and also provides a facile route for easy catalyst separation, especially from a solubilizing medium. The overall process was performed in accordance with the principles of green chemistry using bio-based precursors and aqueous medium. This work highlights the potential of carbon dots as an effective photo-catalyst.

  4. Erythrocyte membrane stability to hydrogen peroxide is decreased in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilca, Marilena; Lixandru, Daniela; Gaman, Laura; Vîrgolici, Bogdana; Atanasiu, Valeriu; Stoian, Irina

    2014-01-01

    The brain and erythrocytes have similar susceptibility toward free radicals. Therefore, erythrocyte abnormalities might indicate the progression of the oxidative damage in Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this study was to investigate erythrocyte membrane stability and plasma antioxidant status in AD. Fasting blood samples (from 17 patients with AD and 14 healthy controls) were obtained and erythrocyte membrane stability against hydrogen peroxide and 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), serum Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), residual antioxidant activity or gap (GAP), erythrocyte catalase activity (CAT), erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, erythrocyte nonproteic thiols, and total plasma thiols were determined. A significant decrease in erythrocyte membrane stability to hydrogen peroxide was found in AD patients when compared with controls (Perythrocyte membrane stability to hydrogen peroxide. Reduced erythrocyte membrane stability may be further evaluated as a potential peripheral marker for oxidative damage in AD.

  5. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusai Baroudi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system. Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching.

  6. How hydrogen peroxide is metabolized by oxidized cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancura, Daniel; Stanicova, Jana; Palmer, Graham; Fabian, Marian

    2014-06-10

    In the absence of external electron donors, oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) exhibits the ability to decompose excess H2O2. Depending on the concentration of peroxide, two mechanisms of degradation were identified. At submillimolar peroxide concentrations, decomposition proceeds with virtually no production of superoxide and oxygen. In contrast, in the millimolar H2O2 concentration range, CcO generates superoxide from peroxide. At submillimolar concentrations, the decomposition of H2O2 occurs at least at two sites. One is the catalytic heme a3-CuB center where H2O2 is reduced to water. During the interaction of the enzyme with H2O2, this center cycles back to oxidized CcO via the intermediate presence of two oxoferryl states. We show that at pH 8.0 two molecules of H2O2 react with the catalytic center accomplishing one cycle. In addition, the reactions at the heme a3-CuB center generate the surface-exposed lipid-based radical(s) that participates in the decomposition of peroxide. It is also found that the irreversible decline of the catalytic activity of the enzyme treated with submillimolar H2O2 concentrations results specifically from the decrease in the rate of electron transfer from heme a to the heme a3-CuB center during the reductive phase of the catalytic cycle. The rates of electron transfer from ferrocytochrome c to heme a and the kinetics of the oxidation of the fully reduced CcO with O2 were not affected in the peroxide-modified CcO.

  7. Manganese rescues adverse effects on lifespan and development in Podospora anserina challenged by excess hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Carolin; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2015-03-01

    For biological systems, balancing cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is of great importance because ROS are both, essential for cellular signaling and dangerous in causing molecular damage. Cellular ROS abundance is controlled by a delicate network of molecular pathways. Within this network, superoxide dismutases (SODs) are active in disproportion of the superoxide anion leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. The fungal aging model Podospora anserina encodes at least three SODs. One of these is the mitochondrial PaSOD3 isoform containing manganese as a cofactor. Previous work resulted in the selection of strains in which PaSod3 is strongly overexpressed. These strains display impairments in growth and lifespan. A computational model suggests a series of events to occur in Sod3 overexpressing strains leading to adverse effects due to elevated hydrogen peroxide levels. In an attempt to validate this model and to obtain more detailed information about the cellular responses involved in ROS balancing, we further investigated the PaSod3 overexpressing strains. Here we show that hydrogen peroxide levels are indeed strongly increased in the mutant strain. Surprisingly, this phenotype can be rescued by the addition of manganese to the growth medium. Strikingly, while we obtained no evidence for an antioxidant effect of manganese, we found that the metal is required for induction of components of the ROS scavenging network and lowers the hydrogen peroxide level of the mutant. A similar effect of manganese on lifespan reversion was obtained in wild-type strains challenged with exogenous hydrogen peroxide. It appears that manganese is limited under high hydrogen peroxide and suggests that a manganese-dependent activity leads to the induction of ROS scavenging components.

  8. Three-month evaluation of vital tooth bleaching using light units-a randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polydorou, O; Wirsching, M; Wokewitz, M; Hahn, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the color stability of vital bleaching using a halogen unit, laser, or only chemical activation up to three months after treatment. A total of 60 patients were divided into three groups, and their teeth were bleached with 38% hydrogen peroxide using three methods: acceleration of the bleaching process with halogen (eight minutes), laser (30 seconds), or chemical activation only. All teeth were bleached a maximum of four times (4 × 15 minutes) until a change of six shade tabs took place. The color was evaluated both visually and with a spectrophotometer before bleaching, immediately after bleaching, and one and three months after bleaching. Directly after bleaching, the use of halogen showed better results than laser (p≤0.05). One and three months after bleaching, no significant difference was found between the tested methods relative to the shade change, independent of the method of shade evaluation (p>0.05). As far as the color stability is concerned, bleaching with halogen resulted in stable color throughout the three months (p>0.05), whereas the other two methods resulted in whiter teeth after one and three months compared with the color directly after bleaching (p≤0.05). Bleaching with laser needed more time than halogen for the desired shade change (p≤0.05). Although directly after treatment bleaching with halogen resulted in better results, one and three months after bleaching the kind of acceleration used in the bleaching process did not have any effect on the esthetic results.

  9. Hydroxylation of benzene with hydrogen peroxide under phase-transfer conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakhanov, E.A.; Narin, S.Yu.; Filippova, T.Yu.; Dedov, A.G.

    1987-09-01

    The authors developed a method for the selective hydroxylation of benzene to phenol with hydrogen peroxide in a two-phase water-benzene system in the presence of ions of transition metals and phase-transfer catalysts. As phase-transfer catalysts they used cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, tetrabutyl-ammonium bromide, tetrabutylammonium chloride, tetrabutylammonium iodide, benzyltriethylammonium chloride, dibenzo-18-crown-6, benzo-15-crown-5, N-cetylpyridinium bromide, potassium didodecylsebacinate ..cap alpha..-sulfonate, and polyethylene glycols of various molecular weight. They were able to find the optimal conditions for the selective hydroxylation of benzene with hydrogen peroxide under phase-transfer catalysis conditions.

  10. Formation of water-soluble soybean polysaccharides from spent flakes by hydrogen peroxide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wichmann, Jesper; Tran, Tam H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel chemical process for the generation of water-soluble polysaccharides from soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry. This process entails treatment of spent flake with hydrogen peroxide at an elevated temperature, resulting in the release of more than...... 70% of the original insoluble material as high molar mass soluble polysaccharides. A design of experiment was used to quantify the effects of pH, reaction time, and hydrogen peroxide concentration on the reaction yield, average molar mass, and free monosaccharides generated. The resulting product...

  11. Electrochemical synthesis of macroporous zinc oxide layers by employing hydrogen peroxide as oxygen precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Daniel [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique (UMR CNRS 7575), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP) (France); Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Bartlett, Philip; Abdelsalam, Mamdouh [School of Chemistry, University of Southampton (United Kingdom); Gomez, Humberto [Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Lincot, Daniel [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique (UMR CNRS 7575), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP) (France)

    2008-10-15

    Two- and three-dimensional ordered porous zinc oxide (ZnO) films were prepared by electrodeposition on Indium Tin Oxide coated glass, using two- and three-dimensional poly(styrene) opal templates. The oxide was formed by electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous zinc perchlorate solution. Scanning electron microscopy measurements showed well ordered inverse opal structures for macroporous ZnO. At high hydrogen peroxide concentration, dense inner conformal filling was achieved for 2D and 3D structures. The formation of nanocrystalline ZnO was checked by X-ray diffraction. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Process Development and Design of Chlorine Dioxide Production Based on Hydrogen Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈赟; 江燕斌; 钱宇

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a process development and design of chlorine dioxide production based on hydrogen peroxide. The process is characterized by cleaner production, high efficiency, and waste minimization. Optimization of process conditions, selection of equipment, and experiment of recycle of waste acid are carried out. The process design is realized in consideration of several aspects such as operation, material, equipment design and safety. An industrialized process flowsheet is developed according to experiment. A pilot testing is carried out to confirm the lab results. Process design of chlorine dioxide production based on hydrogen peroxide is realized.

  13. Power generation in fuel cells using liquid methanol and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is directed to an encapsulated fuel cell including a methanol source that feeds liquid methanol (CH.sub.3 OH) to an anode. The anode is electrical communication with a load that provides electrical power. The fuel cell also includes a hydrogen peroxide source that feeds liquid hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2 O.sub.2) to the cathode. The cathode is also in communication with the electrical load. The anode and cathode are in contact with and separated by a proton-conducting polymer electrolyte membrane.

  14. Cell-death-mode switch from necrosis to apoptosis in hydrogen peroxide treated macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Cell death is typically defined either as apoptosis or necrosis. Because the consequences of apoptosis and necrosis are quite different for an entire organism, the investigation of the cell-death-mode switch has considerable clinical significance. The existence of a necrosis-to-apoptosis switch induced by hydrogen peroxide in macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cells was confirmed by using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. With the help of computational simulations, this study predicted that negative feedbacks between NF-κB and MAPKs are implicated in converting necrosis into apoptosis in macrophages exposed to hydrogen peroxide, which has significant implications.

  15. A new process for preparing dialdehyde by catalytic oxidation of cyclic olefins with aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU, Hong-Kun; PANG, Zhen; HUANG, Zu-En; CAI, Rui-Fang

    2000-01-01

    A novel peroxo-nioboplosphate was synthesized for the first time and used as a catalyst in the oxidation reaction of cyclic olefins with aqueous hydrogen peroxide to prepare dialdehydes. The catalyst was characterized by elemental analysis,thermographic analyses, IR, UV/vis, 31P NMR and XPS ~ as [ π-C5H5N(CH2)i3CH3 ]2 [Nb406 (O2)2 (PO4)2] ·6H20 (PTNP). It showed high selectivity to glutaraldehyde in the catalytic oxidation of cyclopentene with aqueous hydrogen peroxide in ethanol.

  16. Artificial photosynthesis for production of hydrogen peroxide and its fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-05-01

    The reducing power released from photosystem I (PSI) via ferredoxin enables the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH, which is essential in the Calvin-Benson cycle to make sugars in photosynthesis. Alternatively, PSI can reduce O2 to produce hydrogen peroxide as a fuel. This article describes the artificial version of the photocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from water and O2 using solar energy. Hydrogen peroxide is used as a fuel in hydrogen peroxide fuel cells to make electricity. The combination of the photocatalytic H2O2 production from water and O2 using solar energy with one-compartment H2O2 fuel cells provides on-site production and usage of H2O2 as a more useful and promising solar fuel than hydrogen. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--The design and engineering of electronc transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  17. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Common Aviation Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    peroxide has been used for years as a disinfectant in the medical community and is under consideration in the dilute vapor form as a decontaminant... disinfectant /sterilant for transportation vehicles like aircraft, buses, subway trains, ambulances, etc. Although the biological efficacy of STERIS...10-min dip in 35% liquid H2O2 . 13 (a) (b) Figure 15. (a) Vertical and (b) horizontal flammability test results for nylon. 14 (a) (b) Figure 16. (a

  18. Influence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pre-hydrolysis on the isolation of microcrystalline cellulose from oil palm fronds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Abdulwahab F; Haafiz, M K Mohamad; Hossain, Md Sohrab; Hussin, M Hazwan; Fazita, M R Nurul

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was isolated from oil palm fronds (OPF) using chemo-mechanical process. Wherein, alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) was utilized to extract OPF fibre at different AHP concentrations. The OPF pulp fibre was then bleached with acidified sodium chlorite solution followed by the acid hydrolysis using hydrochloric acid. Several analytical methods were conducted to determine the influence of AHP concentration on thermal properties, morphological properties, microscopic and crystalline behaviour of isolated MCC. Results showed that the MCC extracted from OPF fibres had fibre diameters of 7.55-9.11nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses revealed that the obtained microcrystalline fibre had both celluloses I and cellulose II polymorphs structure, depending on the AHP concentrations. The Fourier transmission infrared (FTIR) analyses showed that the AHP pre-hydrolysis was successfully removed hemicelluloses and lignin from the OPF fibre. The crystallinity of the MCC was increased with the AHP concentrations. The degradation temperature of MCC was about 300°C. The finding of the present study showed that pre-treatment process potentially influenced the quality of the isolation of MCC from oil palm fronds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid Hydrogen Peroxide release from the coral Stylophora pistillata during feeding and in response to chemical and physical stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoza-Zvuloni, Rachel; Schneider, Avi; Sher, Daniel; Shaked, Yeala

    2016-02-15

    Corals make use of different chemical compounds during interactions with prey, predators and aggressors. Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) is produced and released by a wide range of organisms as part of their defense against grazers or pathogens. In coral reefs, the large fluxes and relatively long half-life of H2O2, make it a potentially important info-chemical or defense molecule. Here we describe a previously unstudied phenomenon of rapid H2O2 release from the reef-building coral Stylophora pistillata during feeding on zooplankton and in response to chemical and physical stimuli. Following stimuli, both symbiotic and bleached corals were found to rapidly release H2O2 to the surrounding water for a short period of time (few minutes). The H2O2 release was restricted to the site of stimulus, and an increase in physical stress and chemical stimuli concentration resulted in elevated H2O2 release. Omission of calcium (a key regulator of exocytotic processes) from the experimental medium inhibited H2O2 release. Hence we suggest that H2O2 is actively released in response to stimuli, rather than leaking passively from the coral tissue. We estimate that at the site of stimulus H2O2 can reach concentrations potentially high enough to deter predators or motile, potentially pathogenic, bacteria.

  20. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia Soares

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10, each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL or diode laser/violet LED (VHL (experimental: Control (C; 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL; 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL; 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL; 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL; and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental (EXP10VHL. pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm. ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05. Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups.

  1. Introduction of Hydrogen Peroxide as an Oxidant in Flow Injection Analysis: Speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was used as an oxidant in Flow Injection Analysis (FIA). The formation of gaseous components during the analysis was suppressed by maintaining a concentration lower than 0.15% of hydrogen peroxide in 0.1 M NaOH. By this method Cr(III) was oxidised on-line to Cr(VI) which...

  2. Efficient Method for the Determination of the Activation Energy of the Iodide-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, William; Lee, James; Abid, Nauman; DeMeo, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    An experiment is described that determines the activation energy (E[subscript a]) of the iodide-catalyzed decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide in a much more efficient manner than previously reported in the literature. Hydrogen peroxide, spontaneously or with a catalyst, decomposes to oxygen and water. Because the decomposition reaction is…

  3. Influence of Growth Medium on Hydrogen Peroxide and Bacteriocin Production of Lactobacillus Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edina Németh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the inhibitory effect of bacteriocin and the production of hydrogen peroxide by four non-starter lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus plantarum 2142, Lactobacillus curvatus 2770, Lactobacillus curvatus 2775, Lactobacillus casei subsp. pseudoplantarum 2750 and the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota, propagated in de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS and tomato juice (TJ broth. The methods were a commonly used agar diffusion technique and a microtiter assay method. The best peroxide-producing Lactobacillus strain was selected for screening the inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli and the activity of bacteriocins against Lactobacillus sakei and Candida glabrata. All of the investigated lactic acid bacteria (LAB strains grown in MRS broth produced the highest concentration of hydrogen peroxide ranging from 2–6 g/mL after 72 h of storage. L. plantarum 2142 produced enough hydrogen peroxide already after 24 h at 5 °C in phosphate buffer to inhibit the growth of L. monocytogenes and B. cereus. Crude bacteriocin suspension from the investigated LAB inhibited only slightly the growth of L. sakei, however, the same suspension from MRS completely inhibited the 6-fold diluted yeast suspension. The concentrated bacteriocin suspensions from the both broths inhibited the growth of L. sakei completely. Among the strains, L. plantarum 2142 seemed to be the best peroxide and bacteriocin producer, and the antimicrobial metabolite production was better in MRS than in TJ broth.

  4. Use of hydrogen peroxide treatment and crystal violet agar plates for selective recovery of bacteriophages from natural environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asghari, A.; Farrah, S.R.; Bitton, G. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide inactivated bacteriophages and bacteria at different rates. A concentration of 0.1% hydrogen peroxide reduced the numbers of several bacteria by an average of 94% but caused an average of 25% inactivation in the numbers of bacteriophages tested. Treating natural samples with hydrogen peroxide selectively reduced the indigenous bacterial flora and permitted better visualization of plaques of lawns of Escherichia coli C-3000. In some cases indigenous gram-positive bacteria were relatively resistant to hydrogen peroxide, but their growth could be limited by incorporation of crystal violet into the bottom agar used for plaque assays. The use of hydrogen peroxide treatment and crystal violet-containing plates permitted recovery of more phages from natural samples than did other procedures, such as chloroform pretreatment or the use of selective plating agar such as EC medium.

  5. Rational Design of an α-Ketoamide-Based Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probe Specific for Hydrogen Peroxide in Living Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xilei; Yang, Xiu'e; Wu, Tianhong; Li, Yong; Li, Mengmeng; Tan, Qi; Wang, Xu; Tang, Bo

    2016-08-16

    Hydrogen peroxide, an important biomolecule, receives earnest attention because of its physiological and pathological functions. In this Article, we present the rational design, characterization, and biological application of a mitochondria-targetable NIR fluorescent sensor, Mito-NIRHP, for hydrogen peroxide visualization. Mito-NIRHP utilizes a unique reaction switch, α-ketoamide moiety, to turn on a highly specific, sensitive, and rapid fluorescence response toward hydrogen peroxide coupled with the intramolecular charge transfer strategy. Mito-NIRHP is competent to track endogenously produced hydrogen peroxide in both living cells and living animals. In addition, utilizing Mito-NIRHP, overgeneration of hydrogen peroxide during ischemia-reperfusion injury was directly visualized at both cell and organ levels.

  6. Combustion Characteristics of Nanoaluminum, Liquid Water, and Hydrogen Peroxide Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    test peroxide ( HTP , 85% H2O2) as the oxidizer [22– 26]. Problems with the use of H2O2 systems include its sensitivity to shock and its tendency to...reported that the mix- ture would not self-deflagrate without the addition of the thickening agent into the mixture. At their maximum test pressure, 7...A pycnometer test determined particle density to be 3.205 g/cm3, which is inclusive of the oxide passiva- tion layer (∼3.97 g/cm3), which explains

  7. Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide Photogenerating from a Hypocrellin B Derivative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘光艳; 马江华

    2003-01-01

    In order to further improve the photosensitizing activity of hypocrellin B (HB), the complex of 5,8-diBr-HB with Al3 + was designed and synthesized in high yield. The complex of aluminium ion with 5,8-di-Br-HB is a new water-soluble perylenequinonoid derivative with enhanced absorption over HB in the phototherapeutic window (600-900 nm). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurement and 9,10-diphenyl-anthracene bleaching methods were used to investigate the photosensitizing activity of [ Al2 ( 5,8-di-Br-HB ) Cl4 ]n in the presence of oxygen. Singlet oxygen, superoxide anion radical, hydroxyl radical can be generated by [ Al2 (5,8-di-Br-HB) Cl4 ]n photosensitization. The results showed that the production of hydroxyl radical (*OH) by [ Al2 (5,8-di-Br-HB) Cl4 ] n photosensitization comes from the Fenton Haber-Weiss reaction and the decomposition of DMPO-1O2 adduct. Formation of H2 O2 as one of main intermediates in the photogeneration of hydroxyl radical was detected by using the catalyzed oxidation of the DPD reagent by the POD enzyme method. Moreover, the experiments of EPR spin trap and catalase enzyme excluded the effect of organoperoxide on DPD oxidization. These results further support the proposed mechanism of *OH formation.

  8. Flow injection analysis of organic peroxide explosives using acid degradation and chemiluminescent detection of released hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Parvez; Zakaria, Philip; Guijt, Rosanne; Macka, Mirek; Dicinoski, Greg; Breadmore, Michael; Nesterenko, Pavel N

    2015-10-01

    The applicability of acid degradation of organic peroxides into hydrogen peroxide in a pneumatically driven flow injection system with chemiluminescence reaction with luminol and Cu(2+) as a catalyst (FIA-CL) was investigated for the fast and sensitive detection of organic peroxide explosives (OPEs). The target OPEs included hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and methylethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP). Under optimised conditions maximum degradations of 70% and 54% for TATP and HMTD, respectively were achieved at 162 µL min(-1), and 9% degradation for MEKP at 180 µL min(-1). Flow rates were precisely controlled in this single source pneumatic pressure driven multi-channel FIA system by model experiments on mixing of easily detectable component solutions. The linear range for detection of TATP, HMTD and H2O2 was 1-200 µM (r(2)=0.98-0.99) at both flow rates, while that for MEKP was 20-200 µM (r(2)=0.97) at 180 µL min(-1). The detection limits (LODs) obtained were 0.5 µM for TATP, HMTD and H2O2 and 10 µM for MEKP. The detection times varied from 1.5 to 3 min in this FIA-CL system. Whilst the LOD for H2O2 was comparable with those reported by other investigators, the LODs and analysis times for TATP and HMTD were superior, and significantly, this is the first time the detection of MEKP has been reported by FIA-CL.

  9. Portal venous gas emboli after accidental ingestion of concentrated hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Rebekah A; Schmidt, Suzanne M

    2013-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a common household product. It is clear and odorless making it easy to confuse with water, especially when improperly stored. Concentrated formulations are also available for consumer purchase. We report a case of hydrogen peroxide ingestion in a child and discuss the potential consequences and treatment of such an exposure. A 12-year-old boy accidentally ingested a sip of concentrated hydrogen peroxide. He rapidly developed hematemesis and presented to the Emergency Department. His initial work-up was unremarkable, and his symptoms resolved quickly. However, diffuse gas emboli were found within the portal system on abdominal computed tomography. The child was treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy and later found to have gastric irritation as well as an ulcer on endoscopy. He recovered fully from the incident. We present this case to increase awareness of the dangers of hydrogen peroxide ingestion in children. Fortunately, the child in this case recovered fully, but emergency physicians should be aware of the potential consequences and therapeutic options. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a sterilizing in-place application for a production machine using Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, T; Hartmann, V; Burmeister, J; Langguth, P; Häusler, H

    2004-01-01

    The use of steam in sterilization processes is limited by the implementation of heat-sensitive components inside the machines to be sterilized. Alternative low-temperature sterilization methods need to be found and their suitability evaluated. Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) technology was adapted for a production machine consisting of highly sensitive pressure sensors and thermo-labile air tube systems. This new kind of "cold" surface sterilization, known from the Barrier Isolator Technology, is based on the controlled release of hydrogen peroxide vapour into sealed enclosures. A mobile VHP generator was used to generate the hydrogen peroxide vapour. The unit was combined with the air conduction system of the production machine. Terminal vacuum pumps were installed to distribute the gas within the production machine and for its elimination. In order to control the sterilization process, different physical process monitors were incorporated. The validation of the process was based on biological indicators (Geobacillus stearothermophilus). The Limited Spearman Karber Method (LSKM) was used to statistically evaluate the sterilization process. The results show that it is possible to sterilize surfaces in a complex tube system with the use of gaseous hydrogen peroxide. A total microbial reduction of 6 log units was reached.

  11. Evaluation of a sporicidal peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide-based daily disinfectant cleaner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Mana, Thriveen S C; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Jencson, Annette C; Sitzlar, Brett; Fertelli, Dennis; Hurless, Kelly; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Donskey, Curtis J

    2014-11-01

    OxyCide Daily Disinfectant Cleaner, a novel peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide-based sporicidal disinfectant, was as effective as sodium hypochlorite for in vitro killing of Clostridium difficile spores, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomcyin-resistant enterococci. OxyCide was minimally affected by organic load and was effective in reducing pathogen contamination in isolation rooms.

  12. First Principles Modeling of the Performance of a Hydrogen-Peroxide-Driven Chem-E-Car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Maryam; Azadi, Pooya; Zarinpanjeh, Nima

    2009-01-01

    In this study, performance of a hydrogen-peroxide-driven car has been simulated using basic conservation laws and a few numbers of auxiliary equations. A numerical method was implemented to solve sets of highly non-linear ordinary differential equations. Transient pressure and the corresponding traveled distance for three different car weights are…

  13. Optimization study on the hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and production of bioethanol from seaweed Ulva prolifera biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinping; Cui, Jiefen; Zhang, Gaoli; Liu, Zhengkun; Guan, Huashi; Hwang, Hueymin; Aker, Winfred G; Wang, Peng

    2016-08-01

    The seaweed Ulva prolifera, distributed in inter-tidal zones worldwide, contains a large percentage of cellulosic materials. The technical feasibility of using U. prolifera residue (UPR) obtained after extraction of polysaccharides as a renewable energy resource was investigated. An environment-friendly and economical pretreatment process was conducted using hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide pretreatment improved the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. The resulting yield of reducing sugar reached a maximum of 0.42g/g UPR under the optimal pretreatment condition (hydrogen peroxide 0.2%, 50°C, pH 4.0, 12h). The rate of conversion of reducing sugar in the concentrated hydrolysates to bioethanol reached 31.4% by Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation, which corresponds to 61.7% of the theoretical maximum yield. Compared with other reported traditional processes on Ulva biomass, the reducing sugar and bioethanol yield are substantially higher. Thus, hydrogen peroxide pretreatment is an effective enhancement of the process of bioethanol production from the seaweed U. prolifera.

  14. Efficacy of improved hydrogen peroxide against important healthcare-associated pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, William A; Gergen, Maria F; Weber, David J

    2012-11-01

    This study was designed to test in vitro efficacy of 2 improved hydrogen peroxide (HP) products against 3 standard HP products and 1 quaternary ammonium compound. Improved HP is significantly superior to standard HP at the same concentration and can be used for disinfection of environmental surfaces or noncritical patient care items.

  15. Povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide mixture soaked gauze pack: a novel hemostatic technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arakeri, G.; Brennan, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent oozing of blood is a common occurrence in maxillofacial surgery, and occasionally it hampers visibility and delays or even prevents continuation of the procedure. This report describes a novel method of controlling blood ooze using swabs soaked with povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide (

  16. Degradation and effect of hydrogen peroxide in small-scale recirculation aquaculture system biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Sune; Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2010-01-01

    From an environmental point of view, hydrogen peroxide (HP) has beneficial attributes compared with other disinfectants in terms of its ready degradation and neutral by-products. The rapid degradation of HP can, however, cause difficulties with regard to safe and efficient water treatment when...

  17. Evidence for the importance of hydrogen peroxide in wheat infected by the hemibiotrophic pathogen Septoria triciti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shetty, Nandini Prasad; Jensen, Jens Due; Mehrabi, Rahim

    infection is the oxidative burst, which leads to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS have been found to inhibit biotrophic pathogens whereas necrotrophic pathogens are generally believed to benefit or even stimulate ROS production. We studied the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in defence...

  18. Salinity-Gradient Energy Driven Microbial Electrosynthesis of Hydrogen Peroxide from Oxygen Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is widely used in various chemical industries and environmental remediation. Recently, bioelectrochemical systems (BES) have gained increasing attention for synthesizing H2O2 with simultaneous wastewater treatment[1]. However, in order to get high-yield H2O2 requires...

  19. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca(2+) ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...

  20. Epoxidation of Alkenes with Aqueous Hydrogen Peroxide and Quaternary Ammonium Bicarbonate Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Kegnæs, Søren

    2013-01-01

    A range of solid and liquid catalysts containing bicarbonate anions were synthesised and tested for the epoxidation of alkenes with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. The combination of bicarbonate anions and quaternary ammonium cations opens up for new catalytic systems that can help to overcome...

  1. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes with Gold Nanoparticles to Fabricate a Sensor for Hydrogen Peroxide Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halimeh Rajabzade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive electrode was prepared based on gold nanoparticles/nanotubes/ionic liquid for measurement of Hydrogen peroxide. Gold nanoparticles of 20–25 nm were synthesized on a nanotube carbon paste electrode by cyclic voltammetry technique while the coverage was controlled by applied potential and time. The gold nanoparticles were modified to form a monolayer on CNT, followed by decoration with ionic liquid for determination of hydrogen peroxide. The experimental conditions, applied potential and pH, for hydrogen peroxide monitoring were optimized, and hydrogen peroxide was determined amperometrically at 0.3 V vs. SCE at pH 7.0. Electrocatalytic effects of gold deposited CNT were observed with respect to unmodified one. The sensitivity obtained was 5 times higher for modified one. The presence of Au particles in the matrix of CNTs provides an environment for the enhanced electrocatalytic activities. The sensor has a high sensitivity, quickly response to H2O2 and good stability. The synergistic influence of MWNT, Au particles and IL contributes to the excellent performance for the sensor. The sensor responds to H2O2 in the linear range from 0.02 µM to 0.3 mM. The detection limit was down to 0.4 µM when the signal to noise ratio is 3.

  2. Low-dose hydrogen peroxide application in closed recirculating aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Good, C.; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to simulate water treatment practices with hydrogen peroxide (HP) in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). Six identical 1,700-L pilot-scale RAS were divided into two experimental groups based on daily feed allocation and operated under constant conditions...

  3. Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide on Immersion Challenge of Rainbow Trout Fry with Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maya Maria Mihályi; Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2013-01-01

    and produce high levels of mortality attempts to establish a reproducible immersion model have been less successful. Various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were evaluated before being used as a pre-treatment stressor prior to immersion exposure to F. psychrophilum. H2O2 accelerated the onset...

  4. A passive apparatus for controlled-flux delivery of biocides: hydrogen peroxide as an example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stefan Møller; Pedersen, L.T.; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    A new test method has been developed to estimate the required release rate of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to prevent marine biofouling. The technique exploits a well-defined concentration gradient of biocide across a cellulose acetate membrane. A controlled flux of H2O2, an environmentally friendly...

  5. Natural manganese deposits as catalyst for decomposing hydrogen peroxide (discussion paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, A.H.; Lekkerkerker-Teunissen, K.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking water companies more and more implement Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOP) in their treatment schemes to increase the barrier against organic micropollutants (OMPs). It is necessary to decompose the excessive hydrogen peroxide after applying AOP to avoid negative effects in the following,

  6. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above.

  7. Using hydrogen peroxide as a bladder irrigation solution for clot evacuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Bagheri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gross hematuria or macroscopic hematuria is a high risk urologic condition that might occur in different settings. In the case of continued gross hematuria, blood clot size may grow and lead to complete obstruction of urinary outflow. Placement of three-way catheter, continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline, and cystoscopy are conventional treatments. Here we introduce a case with urinary obstruction who did not respond to conventional therapies. A subject of Hodgkin lymphoma with urinary obstruction caused by heavy gross hematuria was presented to emergency department. Three-way catheter was inserted to facilitate urination. However, there was no urinary drainage and bladder was distended. Consequently, 100 ml solution of hydrogen peroxide 0.15% was prepared and administered into the bladder to irrigate and evacuate the clots. A single intravesical infusion of hydrogen peroxide rapidly resolved urinary obstruction and improved patient distress. After administration of hydrogen peroxide solution, blood clots and bloody urine were evacuated successfully. These findings suggest that an intravesical injection of hydrogen peroxide can induce dissolution of blood clots and may be a simple and efficient therapy for urinary obstruction due to gross hematuria.

  8. Solvent-dependent regioselective oxidation of trans-chalcones using aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Wang; Jiabin, Yang; Lushen, Li, E-mail: jimin@seu.edu.cn [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering; Jin, Cai; Chunlong, Sun; Min, Ji [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2013-03-15

    A novel method for regioselective oxidation of trans-chalcones with hydrogen peroxide in acetonitrile to afford cinnamic acids is reported. Only trans-b-arylacrylic acids were observed. A wide range of functionalized products can be effectively produced from various chalcones in good to excellent yields. (author)

  9. Low-level hydrogen peroxide generation by unbleached cotton nonwovens: implications for wound healing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation during cotton fiber development. The compon...

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the prevention of arterial gas embolism in food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Stephen M; Menth, Nicholas L; Westgard, Bjorn C; Cole, Jon B; Walter, Joseph W; Masters, Thomas C; Logue, Christopher J

    2016-12-14

    Food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion is a relatively rare presentation to the emergency department. There are no defined guidelines at this time regarding the treatment of such exposures, and providers may not be familiar with the potential complications associated with high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestions. In this case series, we describe four patients who consumed 35% hydrogen peroxide, presented to the emergency department, and were treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Two of the four patients were critically ill requiring intubation. All four patients had evidence on CT or ultrasound of venous gas emboli and intubated patients were treated as if they had an arterial gas embolism since an exam could not be followed. After hyperbaric oxygen therapy each patient was discharged from the hospital neurologically intact with no other associated organ injuries related to vascular gas emboli. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is an effective treatment for patients with vascular gas emboli after high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestion. It is the treatment of choice for any impending, suspected, or diagnosed arterial gas embolism. Further research is needed to determine which patients with portal venous gas emboli should be treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

  11. Several pathways of hydrogen peroxide action that damage the E. coli genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Ribeiro Asad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide is an important reactive oxygen species (ROS that arises either during the aerobic respiration process or as a by-product of water radiolysis after exposure to ionizing radiation. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with transition metals imposes on cells an oxidative stress condition that can result in damage to cell components such as proteins, lipids and principally to DNA, leading to mutagenesis and cell death. Escherichia coli cells are able to deal with these adverse events via DNA repair mechanisms, which enable them to recover their genome integrity. These include base excision repair (BER, nucleotide excision repair (NER and recombinational repair. Other important defense mechanisms present in Escherichia coli are OxyR and SosRS anti-oxidant inducible pathways, which are elicited by cells to avoid the introduction of oxidative lesions by hydrogen peroxide. This review summarizes the phenomena of lethal synergism between UV irradiation (254 nm and H2O2, the cross-adaptive response between different classes of genotoxic agents and hydrogen peroxide, and the role of copper ions in the lethal response to H2O2 under low-iron conditions.

  12. Nectar defense and hydrogen peroxide in floral nectar of Cucurbita pepo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Nocentini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate some similarities between the nectaries of Nicotiana sp. and Cucurbita pepo, such as starch accumulation in the nectary parenchyma, changes in nectary color during maturation, and the production of a large quantity of sucrose-dominant nectar. The concentration of hydrogen peroxide in C. pepo floral nectar was determined in order to verify the presence of a defense mechanism similar to that found in Nicotiana sp. which protects nectar from yeast and bacteria proliferation. We also tested the eventual accumulation of antioxidants in the nectary of C. pepo as a protection against oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide. The level of hydrogen peroxide found in the floral nectar of C. pepo was much lower than that found in Nicotiana sp. and the male flowers of Cucurbita had a higher concentration than the female flowers. The low oxidative stress induced by this level of hydrogen peroxide caused the accumulation of a low amount of lutein inside the plastoglobules which were contained in amyloplasts. Plastids of the C. pepo nectary are specialized in the accumulation of starch rather than antioxidants.

  13. Inorganic compounds and materials as catalysts for oxidations with aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nardello, veronique; Aubry, Jean-Marie; De Vos, Dirk E.; Neumann, Ronny; Adam, Waldemar; Zhang, Rui; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Witte, Peter T.; Alsters, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews our work on oxidations with aqueous hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by inorganic catalysts devoid of organic ligands. In the first part of the review, the use of the [WZn3(ZnW9O34)2]12− “sandwich” polyoxometalate as a multi-purpose oxidation catalyst is described. Attention is paid to

  14. MINERALIZATION OF A SORBED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON IN TWO SOILS USING CATALYZED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. (R826163)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) catalyzed by soluble iron or naturally occurring soil minerals, (i.e., modified Fenton's reagent) was investigated as a basis for mineralizing sorbed and NAPL-phase benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a hydrophobic and toxic polycyclic a...

  15. Catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide on anthraquinonecyanine and phthalocyanine metal complexes in acid and alkaline electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pobedinskiy, S.N.; Trofimenko, A.A.; Zharnikova, M.A.

    1985-12-01

    A study of octaoxyanthraquinonecyanines (OOATsM) and phthalocyanines (FTs) of cobalt, iron, and manganese determined their catalytic activity in the hydrogen peroxide decomposition reaction. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition on OOATsM and FTs of the metals studied follows the kinetic mechanisms of a reaction of the first order regardless of the central ion of the metal. Complexes with a central atom of iron are most active in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Catalytic activity of FTsFe exceeds that of FTsCo more than 10-fold. FTs are 10-fold greater than OOATsM in catalytic activity. Change from an acid to an alkali medium did not affect the kinetic mechanisms of the decomposition reaction but the reaction rate on both a carrier and on metal complexes is higher in an alkaline medium than in an acid medium. The affect of an alkaline medium on the hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate is greater for FTS complexes than for anthraquinone-cyanines. 5 references, 2 figures.

  16. FIELD STUDY: IN SITU OXIDATION OF 1,4-DIOXANE WITH OZONE AND HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot-scale field evaluation is underway to assess the effectiveness of in situ oxidation (using ozone with and without hydrogen peroxide) for remediation of 1,4-dioxane and chlorinated volatile organic compounds in groundwater at the Cooper Drum Company Superfund Site located ...

  17. Inorganic compounds and materials as catalysts for oxidations with aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nardello, veronique; Aubry, Jean-Marie; Vos, De Dirk E.; Neumann, Ronny; Adam, Waldemar; Zhang, Rui; Elshof, ten Johan E.; Witte, Peter T.; Alsters, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews our work on oxidations with aqueous hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by inorganic catalysts devoid of organic ligands. In the first part of the review, the use of the [WZn3(ZnW9O34)2]12− “sandwich” polyoxometalate as a multi-purpose oxidation catalyst is described. Attention is paid to

  18. Simultaneous in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction over Pd-Fe catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Contreras, Sandra; Llorca Piqué, Jordi; Domínguez Escalante, Montserrat; Sueiras, Jesús; Medina, Francesc

    2010-01-01

    High mineralization degree of organic compounds can be achieved by a novel environmentally-friendly full heterogeneous Pd–Fe catalytic system, which involves in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide from formic acid and oxygen, and oxidation of organic compounds by Fenton process in a one-pot reaction.

  19. Stabilization of hydrogen peroxide using tartaric acids in Fenton and fenton-like oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Hyung Suk; Kim, Jeong-Jin; Kim, Young-Hun [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The stabilization of hydrogen peroxide is a key factor in the efficiency of a Fenton reaction. The stability of hydrogen peroxide was evaluated in a Fenton reaction and Fenton-like reactions in the presence of tartaric acid as a stabilizer. The interactions between ferrous or ferric iron and tartaric acid were observed through spectroscopic monitoring at variable pH around pKa{sub 1} and pKa{sub 2} of the stabilizer. Ferric iron had a strong interaction with the stabilizer, and the strong interaction was dominant above pKa{sub 2}. At a low pH, below pKa{sub 1}, the stabilizing effect was at its maximum and the prolonged life-time of hydrogen peroxide gave a higher efficiency to the oxidative degradation of nitrobenzene. In Fenton-like reactions with hematite, the acidic conditions caused dissolution of iron from an iron oxide, and an increase in iron species was the result. Tartaric acid showed a stabilizing effect on hydrogen peroxide in the Fentonlike system. The stabilization by tartaric acid might be due to an inhibition of catalytic activity of dissolved iron, and the stabilization strongly depends on the ionization state of the stabilizer.

  20. Major Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide on Bacterioplankton Metabolism in the Northeast Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltar, F.; Reinthaler, T.; Herndl, G.J.; Pinhassi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide have the potential to alter metabolic rates of marine prokaryotes, ultimately impacting the cycling and bioavailability of nutrients and carbon. We studied the influence of H2O2 on prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP) and extracellular enzymati

  1. First Principles Modeling of the Performance of a Hydrogen-Peroxide-Driven Chem-E-Car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Maryam; Azadi, Pooya; Zarinpanjeh, Nima

    2009-01-01

    In this study, performance of a hydrogen-peroxide-driven car has been simulated using basic conservation laws and a few numbers of auxiliary equations. A numerical method was implemented to solve sets of highly non-linear ordinary differential equations. Transient pressure and the corresponding traveled distance for three different car weights are…

  2. THREE SHRUBS WOOD PULPS PREPARED BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE -ALKALINE (PA) COOKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xu; RunCang Sun; huaiyu Zhan

    2004-01-01

    The physical, chemical and fiber characteristics of Caragana Korshinskii, Salix psammophila and Hedysarum scoparium fischer Mey were assessed for their suitability for papermaking. Nonsulfur cooking of hydrogen peroxide-alkaline (PA) was carried out.It is shown from the results that all these three shrubs are good raw materials for pulping and papermaking.The unbleached pulps have high mechanical strengthes.

  3. THREE SHRUBS WOOD PULPS PREPARED BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE -ALKALINE (PA) COOKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengXu; RunCangSun; huaiyuZhan

    2004-01-01

    The physical, chemical and fiber characteristics ofCaragana Korshinskii, Salix psammophila andHedysarum scoparium fischet Mey were assessed fortheir suitability for papermaking. Nonsulfur cookingof hydrogen peroxide-alkaline (PA) was carried out.It is shown from the results that all these three shrubsare good raw materials for pulping and papermaking.The unbleached pulps have high mechanicalstren~hes.

  4. An efficient and reproducible method for measuring hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, W.J.C van; Harff, G.A.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Bosch, M.J. van den; Creemers, J.P.H.M.; Smeenk, F.J.M.W.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the sensitivity and reproducibility of a test procedure for measuring hydrogen peroxide (H202) in exhaled breath condensate and the effect of storage of the condensate on the H2O2 concentration, and compared the results to previous studies.Twenty stable COPD patients breathed into ou

  5. Quantitative analysis of 8-isoprostane and hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoydonck, P.G.A.; Wuyts, W.A.; Vanaudenaerde, B.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Dupont, I.J.; Temme, E.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) provides a noninvasive means of sampling the lower respiratory tract. Collection of EBC might be useful in the assessment of airway oxidative stress in smokers. The aim of this study was to determine 8-isoprostane and hydrogen peroxide levels in EBC, and, in addition,

  6. Electroactive gate materials for a hydrogen peroxide sensitive E-MOSFET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anh, Dam T.V.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the detection principle of a hydrogen peroxide sensor based on the electrolyte metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (EMOSFET) and possibilities of using different types of redox materials as the gate material for the sensor with respect to the sensitivity and detection limit.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide in exhaled air is increased in stable asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Jobsis (Quirijn); H.C. Raatgeep (Rolien); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractExhaled air condensate provides a noninvasive means of obtaining samples from the lower respiratory tract. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in exhaled air has been proposed as a marker of airway inflammation. We hypothesized that in stable asthmatic children the H2O

  8. Hydrogen peroxide in exhaled air is increased in stable asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Jobsis (Quirijn); R.H. Raatgeep (Rolien); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractExhaled air condensate provides a noninvasive means of obtaining samples from the lower respiratory tract. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in exhaled air has been proposed as a marker of airway inflammation. We hypothesized that in stable asthmatic children the H2O

  9. Explodability and detonability of mixtures of hydrogen peroxide and organic matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, A.H.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    1995-01-01

    The explosive properties of mixtures of hydrogen peroxide and isopropanol were determined The mixtures appear to detonate in a well-defined range of concentrations and show extremely fast reactions in an adjacent range of concentrations if initiated by shock wave stimuli. The upper boundary of organ

  10. Role of hydrogen peroxide during the interaction between the hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Septoria tritici and wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shetty, N.P.; Mehrabi, R.; Lütken, H.; Haldrup, A.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is reported to inhibit biotrophic but benefit necrotrophic pathogens. Infection by necrotrophs can result in a massive accumulation of H2O2 in hosts. Little is known of how pathogens with both growth types are affected (hemibiotrophs). The hemibiotroph, Septoria tritici, inf

  11. Solvent-dependent regioselective oxidation of trans-chalcones using aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for regioselective oxidation of trans-chalcones with hydrogen peroxide in acetonitrile to afford cinnamic acids is reported. Only trans-b-arylacrylic acids were observed. A wide range of functionalized products can be effectively produced from various chalcones in good to excellent yields.

  12. Major Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide on Bacterioplankton Metabolism in the Northeast Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltar, F.; Reinthaler, T.; Herndl, G.J.; Pinhassi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide have the potential to alter metabolic rates of marine prokaryotes, ultimately impacting the cycling and bioavailability of nutrients and carbon. We studied the influence of H2O2 on prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP) and extracellular

  13. Lung edema due to hydrogen peroxide is independent of cyclooxygenase products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burghuber, O.; Mathias, M.M.; McMurtry, I.F.; Reeves, J.T.; Voelkel, N.F.

    1984-01-01

    Active oxygen species can cause lung injury. Although a direct action on endothelial cells is proposed, the possibility exists that they might cause injury via mediators. We considered that active oxygen species would stimulate the generation of cyclooxygenase metabolites, which then alter pulmonary vasoreactivity and cause edema. We chemically produced hydrogen peroxide by adding glucose oxidase to a plasma- and cell-free, but ..beta..-D-glucose-containing, solution, which perfused isolated rat lungs. Addition of glucose oxidase to the perfusate caused a marked decrease in pulmonary vasoreactivity, accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of prostacyclin, thromboxane A/sub 2/, and prostaglandin F/sub 2..cap alpha../. Pretreatment with catalase, a specific scavenger of hydrogen peroxide, preserved pulomonary vasoreactivity, inhibited the increase of the concentration of the measured prostaglandins, and prevented edema formation. Indomethacin effectively blocked lung prostaglandin production but neither prevented the decrease in vasoreactivity nor inhibited edema formation. From these data we conclude the hydrogen peroxide impaired pulmonary vasoreactivity and subsequently caused edema. Depsite the fact that hydrogen peroxide stimulated lung prostaglandin production, cyclooxygenase-derived products neither caused the decrease in vasoreactivity nor the development of edema.

  14. Baicalein Decreases Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Damage to NG108-15 Cells via Upregulation of Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chao-Hung; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Liu, Pei-Shan; Kuo, Jung-Kuei; Chueh, Sheau-Huei

    2015-08-01

    Baicalein is a flavonoid inhibitor of 12-lipoxygenase. Here, we investigated its effect on hydrogen peroxide-induced damage to NG108-15 cells. Hydrogen peroxide activated the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, decreased Nrf2 expression, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, reduced viability, and increased cell death after 2-24 h treatment of NG108-15 cells. Co-treatment with hydrogen peroxide and baicalein completely suppressed the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by upregulating Nrf2 expression and reducing ROS stress and partially inhibited the effects on cell viability and cell death. Silencing of 12-lipoxygenase had a similar protective effect to baicalein on hydrogen peroxide-induced damage by blocking the hydrogen peroxide-induced decrease in Nrf2 expression and increase in ROS levels. Neither protective effect was altered by addition of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, the product of 12-lipoxygenase, suggesting that hydrogen peroxide induced damage via 12-lipoxygenase by another, as yet unknown, mechanism, rather than activating it. Co-treatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide and N-acetylcysteine or the Nrf2 inducer sulforaphane reduced hydrogen peroxide-induced damage in a similar fashion to baicalein, while the Nrf2 inhibitor retinoic acid blocked the protective effect of baicalein. Silencing Nrf2 also inhibited the protective effects of baicalein, sulforaphane, and N-acetylcysteine and resulted in high ROS levels, suggesting ROS elimination was mediated by Nrf2. Taken together our results suggest that baicalein protects cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by upregulating Nrf2 and inhibiting 12-lipoxygenase to block the increase in ROS levels. Hydrogen peroxide also activates a second mitochondrial dysfunction independent death pathway which is resistant to baicalein.

  15. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina, E-mail: anacarolfreitas@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Espejo, Luciana, E-mail: luespejo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brossi Botta, Sergio, E-mail: sbbotta@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de, E-mail: nandast@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A., E-mail: maacluz@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garone-Netto, Narciso, E-mail: ngarone@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bona Matos, Adriana, E-mail: bona@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia, E-mail: mcsalva@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 {mu}m x 15 {mu}m area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  16. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Espejo, Luciana Cardoso; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda de Sa; Luz, Maria Aparecida A. Cerqueira; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Matos, Adriana Bona; Salvadori, Maria Cecilia Barbosa da Silveira

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm × 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  17. Lens Endogenous Peptide αA66-80 Generates Hydrogen Peroxide and Induces Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Murugesan; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Sharma, K Krishna

    2017-02-01

    In previous studies, we reported the presence of a large number of low-molecular-weight (LMW) peptides in aged and cataract human lens tissues. Among the LMW peptides, a peptide derived from αA-crystallin, αA66-80, was found in higher concentration in aged and cataract lenses. Additional characterization of the αA66-80 peptide showed beta sheet signature, and it formed well-defined unbranched fibrils. Further experimental data showed that αA66-80 peptide binds α-crystallin, impairs its chaperone function, and attracts additional crystallin proteins to the peptide α-crystallin complex, leading to the formation of larger light scattering aggregates. It is well established that Aβ peptide exhibits cell toxicity by the generation of hydrogen peroxide. The αA66-80 peptide shares the principal properties of Aβ peptide. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine whether the fibril-forming peptide αA66-80 has the ability to generate hydrogen peroxide. The results show that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide, in the amount of 1.2 nM H2O2 per µg of αA66-80 peptide by incubation at 37°C for 4h. We also observed cytotoxicity and apoptotic cell death in αA66-80 peptide-transduced Cos7 cells. As evident, we found more TUNEL-positive cells in αA66-80 peptide transduced Cos7 cells than in control cells, suggesting peptide-mediated cell apoptosis. Additional immunohistochemistry analysis showed the active form of caspase-3, suggesting activation of the caspase-dependent pathway during peptide-induced cell apoptosis. These results confirm that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide and promotes hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell apoptosis.

  18. Reinvestigation of the Henry's law constant for hydrogen peroxide with temperature and acidity variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Daoming; Chen, Zhongming

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is not only an important oxidant in itself; it also serves as both sink and temporary reservoir for other important oxidants including HOx (OH and HO2) radicals and O3 in the atmosphere. Its partitioning between gas and aqueous phases in the atmosphere, usually described by its Henry's law constant (K(H)), significantly influences its role in atmospheric processes. Large discrepancies between the K(H) values reported in previous work, however, have created uncertainty for atmospheric modelers. Based on our newly developed online instrumentation, we have re-determined the temperature and acidity dependence of K(H) for hydrogen peroxide at an air pressure of (0.960 +/- 0.013) atm (1 atm = 1.01325 x 10(5) Pa). The results indicated that the temperature dependence of K(H) for hydrogen peroxide fits to the Van't Hoff equation form, expressed as lnK(H) = a/T - b, and a = -deltaH/R, where K(H) is in M/atm (M is mol/L), T is in degrees Kelvin, R is the ideal gas constant, and deltaH is the standard heat of solution. For acidity dependence, results demonstrated that the K(H) value of hydrogen peroxide appeared to have no obvious dependence on decreasing pH level (from pH 7 to pH 1). Combining the dependence of both temperature and acidity, the obtained a and b were 7024 +/- 138 and 11.97 +/- 0.48, respectively, deltaH was (58.40 +/- 1.15) kJ/(K x mol), and the uncertainties represent sigma. Our determined K(H) values for hydrogen peroxide will therefore be of great use in atmospheric models.

  19. Role of airway lactoperoxidase in scavenging of hydrogen peroxide damage in asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Obaidi Amina Hamed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 that is mainly generated by neutrophils and eosinophils in asthma is known to be damaging to the airway and to contribute to airway inflammation. The purpose of the present study was to determine the contribution and the role of lactoperoxidase in scavenging airway hydrogen peroxide, in order to propose a therapeutic approach for asthma. The study was an open clinical trial. Twenty-five nonsmoking asthmatic patients were included in the study. Of them, 16 patients (64% were male and 9 (36% were female, with age ranging from 29 to 48 years (45.13 ± 4.6. Of the 25 patients included in the study, only 16 patients completed the study; and they were eligible for analyses. Exhaled breath condensate was collected from all patients at the time of entering the study; and 2, 4 and 8 weeks later. All patients received dapson as a lactoperoxidase inhibitor at a dose of 50 mg daily for 8 weeks. The study was conducted during the period from January 2006 to end of October 2006. H 2 O 2 concentration was determined by an enzymatic assay. Determination of exhaled breath condensate for hydrogen peroxide concentration after 8 weeks of dapson usage indicated an increase (1.05 ± 0.36 µM; 95% CI, 0.89-1.21 as compared to that at baseline ( P < 0.0001, 2 weeks ( P < 0.001 and 4 weeks ( P > 0.05. The increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath condensate after inhibition of lactoperoxidase by dapson advocates a potential role for lactoperoxidase in scavenging of hydrogen peroxide in asthmatic airway.

  20. Effect of laser-assisted bleaching with Nd:YAG and diode lasers on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhashemi, Amirhossein; Emadian Razavi, Elham Sadat; Behboodi, Sara; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser-assisted bleaching with neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. One hundred and four extracted human premolars were randomly divided into four groups: group 1: No bleaching applied (control group); group 2: Teeth bleached with 40 % hydrogen peroxide; group 3: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 2.5 W, 25 Hz, pulse duration of 100 μs, 6 mm distance); and group 4: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with diode laser (810 nm, 1 W, CW, 6 mm distance). Equal numbers of teeth in groups 2, 3, and 4 were bonded at start, 1 h, 24 h, and 1 week after bleaching. A universal testing machine measured the SBS of the samples 24 h after bonding. After bracket debonding, the amount of residual adhesive on the enamel surface was observed under a stereomicroscope to determine the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. The SBS in the unbleached group was significantly higher than that in the bleached groups bonded immediately and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching (P laser-assisted bleaching, the SBS was found to be significantly lower than that in the control group. Significant differences in the ARI scores existed among groups as well. The SBS of brackets seems to increase quickly within an hour after laser-assisted bleaching and 24 h after conventional bleaching. Thus, this protocol can be recommended if it is necessary to bond the brackets on the same day of bleaching.

  1. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor by hydrogen peroxide in human colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wei Zhu; Bao-Ming Yu; Yu-Bao Ji; Ming-Hua Zheng; Dong-Hua Li

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of reactive oxygen species suchas hydrogen peroxide on the progression of human coloncancer.METHODS: Human colon carcinoma cell lines, LS174T andHCT8, were treated respectively with 10- 5,10- 7 or 10- 9 mol@L- 1 hydrogen peroxide for 24h, and co-cultured with humanendothelial cell line ECV-304. The migration of ECV-304induced by cancer cells was calculated and the expressionlevel of vascular endothelial growth factor in cancer cellswas determined by RT-PCR analysis and ELISA.Dactinomycin of 1.5mg@ L-1 which could block transcriptionof cancer cells was applied to observe the effects of H2O2 ontranscriptional activity and the relative half-life of VEGFmRNA. Finally, to evaluate the effect H2O2 on NF-κB activityin colon cancer cells, NF-κB in cytoplasm and nucleus of thecells were detected with FITC-tagged antibody and itspresence in the nucleus (Fn ) Vs cytoplasm ( Fc ) wasmonitored by measuring the green fluorescence integratedover the nucleus by laser scanning cytometry(LSC).RESULTS: Exogenouse hydrogen peroxide of lowconcentration increased the migration of endothelial cellsinduced by colon cancer cells. When cancer cells weretreated with 10-5 mol@ L-1 H2O2, the migration number ofendothelial cells induced by LS174T cells was 203 ± 70, andthe number induced by HCT8 cells was 145 ± 65. The twovalues were significantly higher than those treated with otherconcentrations of h2O2 ( P < 0.01 ). The expression ofvascular endothelial growth factor in cancer cells, whichcould be blocked by dactinomycin, were increased to acertain degree, while the relative half-life of VEGF mRNAwas not prolonged after treatment with hydrogen peroxide.The activity of NF-κB in colon cells rose after the cells wereexposed to hydrogen peroxide for 24h. The Fn values inHCT8 cells were 91 ± 13 (0 mol@ L- 1 h2O2) and 149 ± 40( 10-5mol@L-1 h2O2) ( P< 0.05), in LS174T cells were 127 ± 35(0mol@L-1 H2O2) and 192± 11(10-5 mol@L-1 h2O2) (P< 0.05).lt is similar

  2. Analysis of the Chemical Modification of Dental Enamel Submitted to 35% Hydrogen Peroxide “In-Office” Whitening, with or without Calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudá França Moreira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in calcium and phosphorus content in dental enamel when subjected to “in-office” whitening for an extended time by using a 35% hydrogen peroxide solution, with and without calcium. Materials and Methods. 10 human teeth, from which the roots had been removed, were embedded in epoxy resin, and their surfaces were smoothed. The specimens were divided into two groups; in group 1, a whitening solution without calcium was used, while in group 2, the solution included calcium. Each specimen was evaluated at 6 different points before the bleaching treatment, and these points were reassessed after each session. A total of five sessions were carried out. Concentrations of calcium and phosphorus were measured by using the technique of X-ray fluorescence. Results. After performing a statistical analysis, it was found that there was no statistically significant loss of calcium and phosphorus during the whitening treatment, and the groups showed no statistical differences. Conclusion. Excessive use of hydrogen peroxide, with or without calcium, causes no loss of calcium and phosphorus.

  3. Ternary Composite of Hemin, Gold Nanoparticles and Graphene for Highly Efficient Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xincong; Weng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    A ternary composite of hemin, gold nanoparticles and graphene is prepared by a two-step process. Firstly, graphene-hemin composite is synthesized through π-π interaction and then hydrogen tetracholoroauric acid is reduced in situ by ascorbic acid. This ternary composite shows a higher catalytic activity for decomposition of hydrogen peroxide than that of three components alone or the mixture of three components. The Michaelis constant of this composite is 5.82 times lower and the maximal reaction velocity is 1.81 times higher than those of horseradish peroxidase, respectively. This composite also shows lower apparent activation energy than that of other catalysts. The excellently catalytic performance could be attributed to the fast electron transfer on the surface of graphene and the synergistic interaction of three components, which is further confirmed by electrochemical characterization. The ternary composite has been used to determine hydrogen peroxide in three real water samples with satisfactory results.

  4. The influence of hair bleach on the ultrastructure of human hair with special reference to hair damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takehito

    2011-05-01

    The influence of human hair bleaching agents with different bleaching strength on the ultrastructure of human hair was studied using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer equipped with TEM (EDS-TEM). Two kinds of bleaching agents were used: a lightener agent with a weak bleaching effect and a powder-bleach with a stronger bleaching effect. From the comparison of the bleaching properties obtained by the electronic staining of black and white hair samples, it was suggested that the permeability of hair was increased by bleaching, and there was an increase of the stainability of hair subjected to electronic staining. The bleaching action provoked the decomposition of melanin granules and the flow out of granular contents into the intermacrofibrillar matrix. Some metal elements were detected in the melanin granular matrix by EDS-TEM. As a result, the diffusion of metal elements into the intermacrofibrillar matrix promoted further damage to the hair by catalytic action with the hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching agents outside the melanin granules. Further study will lead us to the edge of the development of a new bleaching agent, which reacts only with melanin granules and causes the minimum of damage to outside the melanin granules.

  5. Is It Necessary to Prepare the Enamel before Dental Bleaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Erika Michele dos Santos; Garone-Netto, Narciso

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the influence of distinct surface treatments on the microhardness and color of enamel that will be bleached. Surface treatments are tested, accordingly: G1, no treatment; G2, 2% sodium fluoride; G3, casein phosphopeptide paste; G4, 2% fluoride+Nd:YAG laser. Forty blocks from bovine teeth composed the sample that were tested in Knoop microhardness (n = 10) and in color change (n = 10). After 24 h, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was performed for 45 min. Microhardness and color changes (using parameters ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb) were assessed before and after bleaching. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p microhardness occurred immediately after bleaching in all groups, being greater in G1. Enamel color changed in all groups. Immediately after bleaching, there was a decrease on enamel microhardness. However, after 7 days, some of those specimens previously treated before bleaching significantly recovered their initial microhardness without influencing the esthetic results of bleaching. PMID:28280508

  6. Effect of Four Bleaching Regimens on Color Changes and Microhardness of Dental Nanofilled Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei Salvador Bagnato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the color changes and microhardness of a nanocomposite after four bleaching regimens. Materials. Twenty-five specimens (n=25 were made with a nanocomposite resin (Filtek Supreme XT. The specimens were divided into five groups equally (n=5: bleaching groups and control group, as follows: G1: artificial saliva at 37∘C; (control G2: hydrogen peroxide (HP at 7%; G3: hydrogen peroxide (HP at 35%; G4: carbamide peroxide (CP at 10%; G5: carbamide peroxide (CP 35%. Color measurements were made with spectrophotometer using CIELAB color scale. The Vickers hardness (VHN measurements were performed at the top surface. The data were analyzed with two-way Analysis of Variance. Results. ΔE and VHN mean values into the groups were not statistically different, however, the VHN mean values before and after storage and bleaching showed statistically significant differences. Conclusion. Nanocomposite samples showed no significant alteration (color and microhardness after bleaching. Thus, no replacement of restorations is required after bleaching.

  7. Electrocatalytic synthesis of hydrogen peroxide on Au-Pd nanoparticles: From fundamentals to continuous production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzutilo, Enrico; Kasian, Olga; Choi, Chang Hyuck; Cherevko, Serhiy; Hutchings, Graham J.; Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.; Freakley, Simon J.

    2017-09-01

    The electrochemical synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) represents a promising alternative to the anthraquinone process, as it combines on-site chemical and electrical production. The design of selective electrocatalysts is challenging and is commonly based on the alloying of elements to generate a synergistic effect and increase activity. In the present work, we report the electrochemical activity of Au-Pd nanoparticles immobilized directly onto an electrode as a model to study H2O2 electrochemical synthesis from fundamentals to continuous production. The impact of composition on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the selectivity, as well as the peroxide reduction and oxidation reactions (PROR) are studied.

  8. Recent Advances in Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Test Capability at NASA's Stennis Space Center E-Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacks, Thomas E.; Beisler, Michele

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the rocket propulsion test capability at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center's (SSC) E-Complex has been enhanced to include facilitization for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based ground testing. In particular, the E-3 test stand has conducted numerous test projects that have been reported in the open literature. These include combustion devices as simple as small-scale catalyst beds, and larger devices such as ablative thrust chambers and a flight-type engine (AR2-3). Consequently, the NASA SSC test engineering and operations knowledge base and infrastructure have grown considerably in order to conduct safe H2O2 test operations with a variety of test articles at the component and engine level. Currently, the E-Complex has a test requirement for a hydrogen peroxide based stage test. This new development, with its unique set of requirements, has motivated the facilitization for hydrogen peroxide propellant use at the E-2 Cell 2 test position in addition to E-3. Since the E-2 Cell 2 test position was not originally designed as a hydrogen peroxide test stand, a facility modernization-improvement project was planned and implemented in FY 2002-03 to enable this vertical engine test stand to accomodate H2O2. This paper discusses the ongoing enhancement of E-Complex ground test capability, specifically at the E-3 stand (Cell 1 and Cell 2) and E-2 Cell 2 stand, that enable current and future customers considerable test flexibility and operability in conducting their peroxide based rocket R&D efforts.

  9. Expanding Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Test Capability at NASA's Stennis Space Center E-Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacks, Thomas E.; Beisler, Michele

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the rocket propulsion test capability at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center's (SSC) E-Complex has been enhanced to include facilitization for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based ground testing. In particular, the E-3 test stand has conducted numerous test projects that have been reported in the open literature. These include combustion devices as simple at small-scale catalyst beds, and larger devices such as ablative thrust chambers and a flight-type engine (AR2-3). Consequently, the NASA SSC test engineering and operations knowledge base and infrastructure have grown considerably in order to conduct safe H2O2 test operations with a variety of test articles at the component and engine level. Currently, the E-Complex has a test requirement for a hydrogen peroxide based stage test. This new development, with its unique set of requirements, has motivated the facilitization for hydrogen peroxide propellant use at the E-2 Cell 2 test position in addition to E-3. Since the E-2 Cell 2 test position was not originally designed as a hydrogen peroxide test stand, a facility modernization- improvement project was planned and implemented in FY 2002-03 to enable this vertical engine test stand to accommodate H2O2. This paper discusses the ongoing enhancement of E-Complex ground test capability, specifically at the E-3 stand (Cell 1 and Cell 2) and E-2 Cell 2 stand, that enable current and future customers considerable test flexibility and operability in conducting their peroxide based rocket R&D efforts.

  10. Facile one-step electrochemical deposition of copper nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide as nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moozarm Nia, Pooria; Woi, Pei Meng; Alias, Yatimah

    2017-08-01

    For several decades, hydrogen peroxide has exhibited to be an extremely significant analyte as an intermediate in several biological devices as well as in many industrial systems. A straightforward and novel one-step technique was employed to develop a sensitive non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor by simultaneous electrodeposition of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The electroreduction performance of the CuNPs-rGO for hydrogen peroxide detection was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (AMP) methods The CuNPs-rGO showed a synergistic effect of reduced graphene oxide and copper nanoparticles towards the electroreduction of hydrogen peroxide, indicating high reduction current. At detection potential of -0.2 V, the CuNPs-rGO sensor demonstrated a wide linear range up to 18 mM with a detection limit of 0.601 mM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, with addition of hydrogen peroxide, the sensor responded very quickly (<3 s). The CuNPs-rGO presents high selectivity, sensitivity, stability and fast amperometric sensing towards hydrogen peroxide which makes it favorable for the development of non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor.

  11. Partial oxidation of n-hexadecane through decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in supercritical water

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. This work reports the experimental analysis of partial oxidation of n-hexadecane under supercritical water conditions. A novel reactor flow system was developed which allows for total decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in a separate reactor followed partial oxidation of n-hexadecane in a gasification reactor instead of having both reactions in one reactor. The kinetics of hydrothermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was studied in order to confirm its full conversion into water and oxygen under the desired partial oxidation conditions, and the kinetic data were found in a good agreement with previously reported literature. The gas yield and gasification efficiency were investigated under different operating parameters. Furthermore, the profile of C-C/C=C ratio was studied which showed the favourable conditions for maximising yields of n-alkanes via hydrogenation of their corresponding 1-alkenes. Enhanced hydrogenation of 1-alkenes was observed at higher O/C ratios and higher residence times, shown by the increase in the C-C/C=C ratio to more than unity, while increasing the temperature has shown much less effect on the C-C/C=C ratio at the current experimental conditions. In addition, GC-MS analysis of liquid samples revealed the formation of heavy oxygenated compounds which may suggest a new addition reaction to account for their formation under the current experimental conditions. Results show new promising routes for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogenation of heavy hydrocarbons in a supercritical water reactor.

  12. Sterilization of hydrogen peroxide resistant bacterial spores with stabilized chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedline, Anthony; Zachariah, Malcolm; Middaugh, Amy; Heiser, Matt; Khanna, Neeraj; Vaishampayan, Parag; Rice, Charles V

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores isolated from a clean room environment are known to exhibit enhanced resistance to peroxide, desiccation, UV radiation and chemical disinfection than other spore-forming bacteria. The survival of B. pumilus SAFR-032 spores to standard clean room sterilization practices requires development of more stringent disinfection agents. Here, we report the effects of a stabilized chlorine dioxide-based biocidal agent against spores of B. pumilus SAFR-032 and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051. Viability was determined via CFU measurement after exposure. Chlorine dioxide demonstrated efficacy towards sterilization of spores of B. pumilus SAFR-032 equivalent or better than exposure to hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate efficacy of chlorine dioxide delivered through a stabilized chlorine dioxide product as a means of sterilization of peroxide- and UV-resistant spores.

  13. Antibacterial Properties and Mechanism of Activity of a Novel Silver-Stabilized Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy L Martin

    Full Text Available Huwa-San peroxide (hydrogen peroxide; HSP is a NSF Standard 60 (maximum 8 mg/L(-1 new generation peroxide stabilized with ionic silver suitable for continuous disinfection of potable water. Experiments were undertaken to examine the mechanism of HSP against planktonic and biofilm cultures of indicator bacterial strains. Contact/kill time (CT relationships that achieve effective control were explored to determine the potential utility in primary disinfection. Inhibitory assays were conducted using both nutrient rich media and a medium based on synthetic wastewater. Assays were compared for exposures to three disinfectants (HSP, laboratory grade hydrogen peroxide (HP and sodium hypochlorite at concentrations of 20 ppm (therefore at 2.5 and 5 times the NSF limit for HP and sodium hypochlorite, respectively and at pH 7.0 and 8.5 in dechlorinated tap water. HSP was found to be more or equally effective as hypochlorite or HP. Results from CT assays comparing HSP and HP at different bacterial concentrations with neutralization of residual peroxide with catalase suggested that at a high bacterial concentration HSP, but not HP, was protected from catalase degradation possibly through sequestration by bacterial cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, at a low bacterial cell density residual HSP was more effectively neutralized as less HSP was associated with bacteria and therefore accessible to catalase. Silver in HSP may facilitate this association through electrostatic interactions at the cell surface. This was supported by experiments where the addition of mono (K(+ and divalent (Ca(+2 cations (0.005-0.05M reduced the killing efficacy of HSP but not HP. Experiments designed to distinguish any inhibitory effect of silver from that of peroxide in HSP were carried out by monitoring the metabolic activity of established P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Concentrations of 70-500 ppm HSP had a pronounced effect on metabolic activity while the equivalent

  14. In vitro evaluation of the chemical and morphological changes of the enamel surface using different bleaching techniques; Avaliacao in vitro das alteracoes quimica e morfologica da superficie do esmalte utilizando diferentes tecnicas de clareamento dental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Alessandra de Siervi

    2003-07-01

    'In vitro' evaluation through MEV and EDS of the morphological and chemical changes, respectively, of the bovine enamel, submitted to different bleaching techniques. For the MEV evaluation eighteen apical thirds were pigmented and divided into two parts. One half of each sample was the control and the other half was bleached according to the protocol of each test group (n= 6). Group I - home bleaching with a 10% carbamide peroxide; group II bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and LED; group III - bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with diode laser bleaching. The same procedure was done with the eighteen samples which were analyzed through EDS and which had their buccal surface grinded and polished before the bleaching procedure in order to obtain more precise values of the fraction of calcium and phosphorus. The results showed no morphological changes among the analyzed control halves and the bleached halves. There was not a statistical significant difference about Ca and P values, among the control halves and the bleached halves regarding the chemical components (p< 0,05). (author)

  15. Mathematical modeling of static layer crystallization for propellant grade hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lin; Chen, Xinghua; Sun, Yaozhou; Liu, Yangyang; Li, Shuai; Zhang, Mengqian

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important raw material widely used in many fields. In this work a mathematical model of heat conduction with a moving boundary was proposed to study the melt crystallization process of hydrogen peroxide which was carried out outside a cylindrical crystallizer. Considering the effects of the temperature of the cooling fluid on the thermal conductivity of crude crystal, the model is an improvement of Guardani's research and can be solved by analytic iteration method. An experiment was designed to measure the thickness of crystal layer with time under different conditions. A series of analysis, including the effects of different refrigerant temperature on crystal growth rate, the effects of different cooling rates on crystal layer growth rate, the effects of crystallization temperature on heat transfer and the model's application scope were conducted based on the comparison between experimental results and simulation results of the model.

  16. Compatibility Studies of Hydrogen Peroxide and a New Hypergolic Fuel Blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Jennifer; Villegas, Yvonne

    2002-01-01

    Several preliminary materials compatibility studies have been conducted to determine the practicality of a new hypergolic fuel system. Hypergolic fuel ignites spontaneously as the oxidizer decomposes and releases energy in the presence of the fuel. The bipropellant system tested consists of high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) and a liquid fuel blend consisting of a hydrocarbon fuel, an ignition enhancer and a transition metal catalyst. In order for further testing of the new fuel blend to take place, some basic materials compatibility and HTP decomposition studies must be accomplished. The thermal decomposition rate of HTP was tested using gas evolution and isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC). Materials were analyzed for compatibility with hydrogen peroxide including a study of the affect welding has on stainless steel elemental composition and its relation to HTP decomposition. Compatibility studies of valve materials in the fuel blend were performed to determine the corrosion resistance of the materials.

  17. Kinetics study on photochemical oxidation of polyacrylamide by ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Guang-meng; SUN De-zhi; CHUNG Jong Shik

    2006-01-01

    An investigation on the process of ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet radiation has been carried out in order to establish the kinetics for photochemical oxidation of polyacrylamide (PAM) in aqueous solution. Effects of operating parameters, including initial PAM concentration, dosages of ozone and hydrogen peroxide, UV radiation and pH value on the photochemical oxidation of PAM, have been studied. There was an increase in photochemical oxidation rate of PAM with increasing of dosages of O3, H2O2 and ultraviolet radiation. Upon increasing of the initial PAM concentration, the photochemical oxidation rate of PAM decreased. Slight effect of pH value on the photochemical oxidation rate of PAM was observed in the experiments. The kinetics equation for the photochemical oxidation of PAM by the system has been established.

  18. Electrochemiluminescent Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide via Some Luminol Imide Derivatives with Different Substituent Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tifeng Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some luminol imide derivatives with different substituent groups have been designed and synthesized. Their electrochemiluminescence properties have been measured with a view to developing new biosensors. The ECL response to hydrogen peroxide in the presence of these luminescent derivatives has been investigated taking into account crucial factors such as the applied potential value, injection volume of hydrogen peroxide, and the substituent groups in molecular structures. The experimental data demonstrated that the substituent groups in these imide derivatives can have a profound effect upon the ECL abilities of these studied compounds. The present research work affords new and useful exploration for the design and development of new soft matter for ECL biosensors with luminol functional groups.

  19. Formation of water-soluble soybean polysaccharides from spent flakes by hydrogen peroxide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brian C; Wichmann, Jesper; Tran, Tam H; Cheetamun, Roshan; Bacic, Antony; Meyer, Anne S

    2016-06-25

    In this paper we propose a novel chemical process for the generation of water-soluble polysaccharides from soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry. This process entails treatment of spent flake with hydrogen peroxide at an elevated temperature, resulting in the release of more than 70% of the original insoluble material as high molar mass soluble polysaccharides. A design of experiment was used to quantify the effects of pH, reaction time, and hydrogen peroxide concentration on the reaction yield, average molar mass, and free monosaccharides generated. The resulting product is low in protein, fat, and minerals and contains predominantly water-soluble polysaccharides of high molar mass, including arabinan, type I arabinogalactan, homogalacturonan, xyloglucan, rhamnogalacturonan, and (glucurono)arabinoxylan. This treatment provides a straightforward approach for generation of soluble soy polysaccharides and opens a new range of opportunities for this abundant and underutilized material in future research and industrial applications.

  20. Non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Co3O4 nanocubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guang Sheng Cao; Lei Wang; Pengfei Yuan; Chao Gao; Xiaojuan Liu; Tong Li; Tianmin Li

    2014-10-01

    The Co3O4 nanocubes were prepared by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidant, Co(NO3)2. 6H2O as a cobalt source. The products were characterized in detail by multiform techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The prepared Co3O4 nanocubes were applied to study the electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in 0.01 M pH 7.0 phosphate buffer medium. The Co3O4 nanocubes exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic activity for H2O2 reduction. Furthermore, the obtained Co3O4 nanocubes have been employed as electrode materials for electrochemical sensing H2O2.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on electrodeposition of zinc oxide nanoflowers onto carbon nanotubes film electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Ping Bai; Xu Xiao Lu; Guang Ming Yang; Yun Hui Yang

    2008-01-01

    A new amperometric biosensor for hydrogen peroxide was developed based on adsorption of horseradish peroxidase at the glassy carbon electrode modified with zinc oxide nanoflowers produced by electrodeposition onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) firm. The morphology of the MWNTs/nano-ZnO electrode has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the electrochemical performance of the electrode has also been studied by amperometric method. The resulting electrode offered an excellent detection for hydrogen peroxide at -0.11 V with a linear response range of 9.9 × 10(-7) to 2.9 × 10(-3) mol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.991, and response time <5 s. The biosensor displays rapid response and expanded linear response range, and excellent stability.

  2. Bioconversion of paper mill sludge to bioethanol in the presence of accelerants or hydrogen peroxide pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurram, Raghu Nandan; Al-Shannag, Mohammad; Lecher, Nicholas Joshua; Duncan, Shona M; Singsaas, Eric Lawrence; Alkasrawi, Malek

    2015-09-01

    In this study we investigated the technical feasibility of convert paper mill sludge into fuel ethanol. This involved the removal of mineral fillers by using either chemical pretreatment or mechanical fractionation to determine their effects on cellulose hydrolysis and fermentation to ethanol. In addition, we studied the effect of cationic polyelectrolyte (as accelerant) addition and hydrogen peroxide pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. We present results showing that removing the fillers content (ash and calcium carbonate) from the paper mill sludge increases the enzymatic hydrolysis performance dramatically with higher cellulose conversion at faster rates. The addition of accelerant and hydrogen peroxide pretreatment further improved the hydrolysis yields by 16% and 25% (g glucose / g cellulose), respectively with the de-ashed sludge. The fermentation process of produced sugars achieved up to 95% of the maximum theoretical ethanol yield and higher ethanol productivities within 9h of fermentation.

  3. Methods and apparatus for the on-site production of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Wayne E. (Inventor); James, Patrick I. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods, apparatus, and applications for the on-site production of hydrogen peroxide are described. An embodiment of the apparatus comprises at least one anolyte chamber coupled to at least one anode, at least one catholyte chamber, wherein the at least one catholyte chamber is coupled to at least one cathode, at least one anode membrane and at least one cathode membrane, wherein the anode membrane is adjacent to the at least one anode, wherein the cathode membrane is adjacent to the at least one cathode, at least one central chamber disposed between the at least one anolyte chamber and the at least one catholyte chamber. Hydrogen peroxide is produced by reduction of an oxygen-containing gas at the cathode.

  4. Electrochemical behavior of hydrogen peroxide sensor based on new methylene blue as mediator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jie; WU Hai; ZHU Yaqi

    2007-01-01

    A novel amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor was proposed by co-immobilizing new methylene blue (NMB) and Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on glassy carbon electrode through covalent binding.The electrochemical behavior of the sensor was studied extensively in 0.1 mol/L phosphate buffering solution (pH = 7.0).The experiments showed NMB could effectively transfer electrons between hydrogen peroxide and glassy carbon electrode.The electron transfer coefficient and apparent reaction rate constant were determined to be 0.861 and 1.27 s-1.The kinetic characteristics and responses of sensor on HzO2 were investigated.The Michaelis constant is 8.27 mol/L and the linear dependence of current on H2O2 is in the range of 2.5-100 μmol/L.At the same time,the effects of solution pH,buffer capacity,and temperature on the sensor were examined.

  5. The Life Story of Hydrogen Peroxide III: Chirality and Physical Effects at the Dawn of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Rowena; Brindley, John

    2016-03-01

    It is a remarkable observed fact that all life on Earth is homochiral, its biology using exclusively the D-enantiomer of ribose, the sugar moiety of the ribonucleic acids, and the L-enantiomers of the chiral amino acids. Motivated by concurrent work that elaborates further the role of hydrogen peroxide in providing an oscillatory drive for the RNA world (Ball & Brindley 2015a, J. R. Soc. Interface 12, 20150366, and Ball & Brindley 2015b, this journal, in press), we reappraise the structure and physical properties of this small molecule within this context. Hydrogen peroxide is the smallest, simplest molecule to exist as a pair of non-superimposable mirror images, or enantiomers, a fact which leads us to develop the hypothesis that its enantiospecific interactions with ribonucleic acids led to enantioselective outcomes. We propose a mechanism by which these chiral interactions may have led to amplification of D-ribonucleic acids and extinction of L-ribonucleic acids.

  6. Uranium- and thorium-doped graphene for efficient oxygen and hydrogen peroxide reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Jankovský, Ondřej; Šimek, Petr; Klímová, Kateřina; Macková, Anna; Pumera, Martin

    2014-07-22

    Oxygen reduction and hydrogen peroxide reduction are technologically important reactions in the fields of energy generation and sensing. Metal-doped graphenes, where metal serves as the catalytic center and graphene as the high area conductor, have been used as electrocatalysts for such applications. In this paper, we investigated the use of uranium-graphene and thorium-graphene hybrids prepared by a simple and scalable method. The hybrids were synthesized by the thermal exfoliation of either uranium- or thorium-doped graphene oxide in various atmospheres. The synthesized graphene hybrids were characterized by high-resolution XPS, SEM, SEM-EDS, combustible elemental analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The influence of dopant and exfoliation atmosphere on electrocatalytic activity was determined by electrochemical measurements. Both hybrids exhibited excellent electrocatalytic properties toward oxygen and hydrogen peroxide reduction, suggesting that actinide-based graphene hybrids have enormous potential for use in energy conversion and sensing devices.

  7. Methane formation by oxidation of ascorbic acid using iron minerals and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Frederik; Jugold, Alke; Keppler, Frank

    2010-06-01

    The possibility of methane formation in an oxidative environment has been intensely debated, especially since the discovery of methane generation by living plants. However, recent studies with animal tissue suggested that under specific conditions aerobic methane formation is also possible. Here, we investigated the generation of methane in an abiotic model system using bioavailable substances. We show formation of methane in a highly oxidative media, using ascorbic acid, ferrihydrite and hydrogen peroxide as reagents. Methane production was shown to be related to reagent ratio, reaction volume and pH. A 2:1 ratio of hydrogen peroxide to ascorbic acid, catalytic amounts of ferrihydrite and acidic conditions (pH 3) enhanced formation of methane. We further show that gaseous oxygen has a strong influence with higher levels found to inhibit methane formation. This study is a first step towards providing an insight for the reaction mechanism of methane formation that would be applicable to aerobic environments.

  8. Electrocatalysis of hydrogen peroxide reactions on perovskite oxides: experiment versus kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poux, T; Bonnefont, A; Ryabova, A; Kéranguéven, G; Tsirlina, G A; Savinova, E R

    2014-07-21

    Hydrogen peroxide has been identified as a stable intermediate of the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction on various electrodes including metal, metal oxide and carbon materials. In this article we study the hydrogen peroxide oxidation and reduction reactions in alkaline medium using a rotating disc electrode (RDE) method on oxides of the perovskite family (LaCoO3, LaMnO3 and La0.8Sr0.2MnO3) which are considered as promising electrocatalytic materials for the cathode of liquid and solid alkaline fuel cells. The experimental findings, such as the higher activity of Mn-compared to that of Co-perovskites, the shape of RDE curves, and the influence of the H2O2 concentration, are rationalized with the help of a microkinetic model.

  9. Influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate on the reaction between Nile Blue A and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANA A. JANKOVIC

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate on the rate of the reaction between the cationic form of Nile Blue A and hydrogen peroxide was investigated in the pH range from 5 to 8.5. A retardation of the oxidation of Nile Blue A with hydrogen peroxide of three orders of magnitude was observed at pH 8.5 in the presence of anionic micelles compared to the kinetic data in water. The retardation effect was less pronounced at lower pH values. These effects were explained by the electrostatic interaction of the species involved in the reaction with the negatively charged micellar surface and their effective separation in the vicinity of the micellar surface.

  10. STUDY OF AZOSPIRILLUM LECTINS INFLUENCE ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCTION IN WHEAT-ROOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alen’kina S.A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available It was found that two cell-surface lectins isolated from the nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and from its mutant defective in lectin activity, A. brasilense Sp7.2.3 can stimulate rapid formation of hydrogen peroxide, associated with an increase in the activities of oxalate oxidase and peroxidase in the roots of wheat seedlings. The most advantageous and most rapidly induced pathway of hydrogen peroxide formation was the oxidation of oxalic acid by oxalate oxidase because in this case, a 10-min treatment of the roots with the lectins at 10 µg ml-1 was sufficient. The data from this study attest that the Azospirillum lectins can act as inducers of adaptation processes in the roots of wheat seedlings.

  11. Novel Applications of the Methyltrioxorhenium/Hydrogen Peroxide Catalytic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, Sasa [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-09-12

    Methylrhenium trioxide (MTO), CH3Re03, was first prepared in 1979. An improved synthetic route to MTO was devised from dirhenium heptoxide and tetramethyltin in the presence of hexafluoro glutaric anhydride was reported by Herrmann in 1992. During the course of research on this dissertation we uncovered other reactions where the presence or absence of pyridine can, in some cases dramatically, affect the reaction outcome. This dissertation consists of four chapters. The first two chapters deal with the ,oxidation of water sensitive olefinic compounds with the hydrogen perox’ide/MTO system. Chapters 111 and IV focus on the oxidation of hydrazones with the same catalytic system. Chapter I has been published in The Journal of Organic Chemistry and Chapter III in Chemical Communications. Chapters II and IV have been submitted for publication in The Journal of Organic Chemistry. Each section is selfcontained with its own equations, tables, figures and references. All of the work in this dissertation was performed by this author.

  12. Low-Temperature Decontamination with Hydrogen Peroxide or Chlorine Dioxide for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macken, S.; Giri, K.; Walker, J. T.; Bennett, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The currently used microbial decontamination method for spacecraft and components uses dry-heat microbial reduction at temperatures of >110°C for extended periods to prevent the contamination of extraplanetary destinations. This process is effective and reproducible, but it is also long and costly and precludes the use of heat-labile materials. The need for an alternative to dry-heat microbial reduction has been identified by space agencies. Investigations assessing the biological efficacy of two gaseous decontamination technologies, vapor hydrogen peroxide (Steris) and chlorine dioxide (ClorDiSys), were undertaken in a 20-m3 exposure chamber. Five spore-forming Bacillus spp. were exposed on stainless steel coupons to vaporized hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide gas. Exposure for 20 min to vapor hydrogen peroxide resulted in 6- and 5-log reductions in the recovery of Bacillus atrophaeus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus, respectively. However, in comparison, chlorine dioxide required an exposure period of 60 min to reduce both B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus by 5 logs. Of the three other Bacillus spp. tested, Bacillus thuringiensis proved the most resistant to hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide with D values of 175.4 s and 6.6 h, respectively. Both low-temperature decontamination technologies proved effective at reducing the Bacillus spp. tested within the exposure ranges by over 5 logs, with the exception of B. thuringiensis, which was more resistant to both technologies. These results indicate that a review of the indicator organism choice and loading could provide a more appropriate and realistic challenge for the sterilization procedures used in the space industry. PMID:22492450

  13. In vivo levels of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide increase with age in mtDNA mutator mice

    OpenAIRE

    Logan, Angela; Shabalina, Irina G.; Prime, Tracy A.; Rogatti, Sebastian; Kalinovich, Anastasia V.; Hartley, R. C.; Budd, Ralph C.; Cannon, Barbara; Murphy, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    In mtDNA mutator mice, mtDNA mutations accumulate leading to a rapidly aging phenotype. However, there is little evidence of oxidative damage to tissues, and when analyzed ex vivo, no change in production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by mitochondria has been reported, undermining the mitochondrial oxidative damage theory of aging. Paradoxically, interventions that decrease mitochondrial ROS levels in vivo delay onset of aging. To reconcile these findin...

  14. Inactivating Influenza Viruses on Surfaces Using Hydrogen Peroxide or Triethylene Glycol at Low Vapor Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Inactvaton of avan nfluenza vruses by chemcal agents and physcal condtons: a revew. Zoonoses - Public - Health , 54(2), 51-68. EPA (2005a...Research Harvard School of Public Health Boston, MA 02115 April 2009 Final Report Inactivating Influenza Viruses on Surfaces Using Hydrogen Peroxide or...Transportation Center of Excellence for Airliner Cabin Environment Research Harvard School of Public Health 665 Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02115 12

  15. Assessment of The Compatibility of Composite Materials With High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Griffin, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The compatibility of composite materials with high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) was assessed using various chemical and mechanical techniques. Methods included classical schemes combining concentration assay with accelerated aging by means of a heated water bath. Exothermic reactivity was observed using Isothermal Microcalorimetry. Mechanical Properties testing determined degradation of the composite material. Photoacoustic Infrared Spectroscopy was used to monitor chemical alteration of the resin matrix. Other materials were examined including some polymers and metals.

  16. Using Isothermal Microcalorimetry to Determine Compatibility of Structural Materials with High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Villegas, Yvonne; Nwosisi, Genne

    2003-01-01

    High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) propellant (greater than or equal to 70%) offers many advantages in space launch applications; however, materials used in construction of propulsion systems must be shown to be compatible with HTP. Isothermal Microcalorimetry (IMC) was used to determine the compatibility of several metallic and non-metallic materials with 90% HTP. The results of these experiments agreed with those from immersion bath tests when the values were converted to %Active Oxygen Loss per week (%AOL/wk).

  17. Detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the Martian atmosphere with MEX / PFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, S.; Kasaba, Y.; Giuranna, M.; Geminale, A.; Sindoni, G.; Nakagawa, H.; Kasai, Y.; Murata, I.; Grassi, D.; Formisano, V.

    2011-10-01

    We first derived the long-term averaged abundance of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the Martian atmosphere with data sets of Planetary Fourier Spectroscopy (PFS) onboard Mars Express (MEX). The total averaged amounts of H2O2 at three Martian years were 45 ± 21 ppb and 25 ± 18 ppb in the forward/reverse pendulum direction, respectively. It could not explain the observed short lifetime of CH4 in the Martian atmosphere.

  18. Low-temperature decontamination with hydrogen peroxide or chlorine dioxide for space applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottage, T; Macken, S; Giri, K; Walker, J T; Bennett, A M

    2012-06-01

    The currently used microbial decontamination method for spacecraft and components uses dry-heat microbial reduction at temperatures of >110°C for extended periods to prevent the contamination of extraplanetary destinations. This process is effective and reproducible, but it is also long and costly and precludes the use of heat-labile materials. The need for an alternative to dry-heat microbial reduction has been identified by space agencies. Investigations assessing the biological efficacy of two gaseous decontamination technologies, vapor hydrogen peroxide (Steris) and chlorine dioxide (ClorDiSys), were undertaken in a 20-m(3) exposure chamber. Five spore-forming Bacillus spp. were exposed on stainless steel coupons to vaporized hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide gas. Exposure for 20 min to vapor hydrogen peroxide resulted in 6- and 5-log reductions in the recovery of Bacillus atrophaeus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus, respectively. However, in comparison, chlorine dioxide required an exposure period of 60 min to reduce both B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus by 5 logs. Of the three other Bacillus spp. tested, Bacillus thuringiensis proved the most resistant to hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide with D values of 175.4 s and 6.6 h, respectively. Both low-temperature decontamination technologies proved effective at reducing the Bacillus spp. tested within the exposure ranges by over 5 logs, with the exception of B. thuringiensis, which was more resistant to both technologies. These results indicate that a review of the indicator organism choice and loading could provide a more appropriate and realistic challenge for the sterilization procedures used in the space industry.

  19. Gardenia jasminoides extract-capped gold nanoparticles reverse hydrogen peroxide-induced premature senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Seon Yeong; Park, Sun Young; Park, Jin Oh; Lee, Kyu Jin; Park, Geuntae

    2016-11-01

    This study reports a green approach for synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Gardenia jasminoides extract, and specifically, can potentially enhance anti senescence activity. Biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles is ecofriendly and effective for the development of environmentally sustainable nanoparticles compared with existing methods. Here, we developed a simple, fast, efficient, and ecofriendly approach to the synthesis of gold nanoparticles by means of a Gardenia jasminoides extract. These G. jasminoides extract-capped gold nanoparticles (GJ-GNPs) were characterized by UV-vis, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Furrier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The synthesized GJ-GNPs turned red and showed maximal absorbance at 540nm. Thus, GJ-GNPs were synthesized successfully. We hypothesized that GJ-GNPs would protect ARPE19 cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced premature senescence. SA-β-gal activity was elevated in hydrogen peroxide-treated cells, however, this effect was attenuated by GJ-GNP treatment. Moreover, compared with the normal control, hydrogen peroxide treatment significantly increased lysosome content of the cells and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GJ-GNPs effectively attenuated the increase in lysosome content and ROS production in these senescent cells. According to cell cycle analysis, G2/M arrest was promoted by hydrogen peroxide treatment in ARPE19 cells, however, this change was reversed by GJ-GNPs. Western blot analysis showed that treatment with GJ-GNPs increased the expression of p53, p21, SIRT3, HO-1, and NQO1 in senescent cells. Our findings should advance the understanding of premature senescence and may lead to therapeutic use of GJ-GNPs in retina-related regenerative medicine.

  20. Oxidation of chlorophenols catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase with in situ production of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Fabio; Okrasa, Krzysztof; Therisod, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP) was accomplished by oxidation catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. Immobilization of the enzyme in a polyacrylamide matrix enhanced DCP oxidation. Hydrogen peroxide, peroxidase's natural substrate, was produced enzymatically in situ to avoid peroxidase inactivation by its too high concentration. In the case of larger scale utilization, the method would also avoid direct handling of this hazardous reagent.

  1. Cystine antagonism of the antibacterial action of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide on Streptococcus agalactiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Mickelson, M. N.; Anderson, A J

    1984-01-01

    Cystine reduction in Streptococcus agalactiae, resulting in sulfhydryl formation, may account for antagonism of the antibacterial effect of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide when cystine is present in excess of the amount needed for maximum growth. Accumulation of cystine by S. agalactiae and its reduction to form sulfhydryl compounds were demonstrated. The reduction of cystine appeared to occur by a couple reaction between glutathione reductase and glutathione-disulfide transhydr...

  2. Presence of hydrogen peroxide, a source of hydroxyl radicals, in acid electrolyzed water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mokudai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acid electrolyzed water (AEW, which is produced through the electrolysis of dilute sodium chloride (NaCl or potassium chloride solution, is used as a disinfectant in various fields because of its potent antimicrobial activity. The hydroxyl radical, an oxygen radical species, is often suggested as a putative active ingredient for AEW antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of the present study is to detect hydroxyl radicals in AEW. The hydroxyl radicals in AEW prepared under different conditions were determined using an electron spin resonance (ESR technique. A signal from 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO-OH, an adduct of DMPO and the hydroxyl radical, was detected in AEW prepared by double or triple electrolyses of 1% NaCl but not of 0.1% NaCl solution. Then the presence of hydrogen peroxide as a proposed source of hydroxyl radicals was examined using a combination of ESR and a Fenton reaction. The DMPO-OH signal was clearly detected, even in AEW prepared by single electrolysis of 0.1% NaCl solution, when ferrous sulfate was added to induce a Fenton reaction, indicating the presence of hydrogen peroxide in the AEW. Since sodium formate, a hydroxyl radical scavenger, did not affect the bactericidal activity of AEW, it is concluded that the radical is unlikely to contribute to the antimicrobial activity of AEW, although a small amount of the radical is produced from hydrogen peroxide. Dimethyl sulfoxide, the other hydroxyl radical scavenger used in the present study, canceled the bactericidal activity of AEW, accompanied by complete depletion of free available chlorine, suggesting that hypochlorous acid is probably a major contributor to the antimicrobial activity. CONCLUSIONS: It is strongly suggested that although hydrogen peroxide is present in AEW as a source of hydroxyl radicals, the antimicrobial activity of AEW does not depend on these radicals.

  3. New Nanomaterials and Luminescent Optical Sensors for Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia A. Burmistrova; Olga A. Kolontaeva; Axel Duerkop

    2015-01-01

    Accurate methods that can continuously detect low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have a huge application potential in biological, pharmaceutical, clinical and environmental analysis. Luminescent probes and nanomaterials are used for fabrication of sensors for H2O2 that can be applied for these purposes. In contrast to previous reviews focusing on the chemical design of molecular probes for H2O2, this mini-review highlights the latest luminescent nanoparticular materials and new lu...

  4. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    OpenAIRE

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-01-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, eri...

  5. Disinfection by hydrogen peroxide nebulization increases susceptibility to avian pathogenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterik, Leon; Tuntufye, Huruma Nelwike; Janssens, Steven; Butaye, Patrick; Goddeeris, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Background: Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are the major cause of economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. Traditionally, antibiotics are used to treat and prevent colibacillosis in broilers. Due to resistance development other ways of preventing/treating the disease have to be found. Therefore during this study the nebulization of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was tested in the presence of chickens to lower pathogenicity of APEC. Results: Significantly...

  6. Oat hulls treated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide associated with extrusion as fiber source in cookies

    OpenAIRE

    Galdeano,Melícia Cintia; Grossmann,Maria Victória Eiras

    2006-01-01

    Cookies were prepared with the replacement of 20% of wheat flour by chemically (alkaline hydrogen peroxide) and physically (extrusion) treated oat hulls, with the objective to investigate the possibility of use of this modified material. Cookies elaborated with the untreated hulls were used as control. Cookies were evaluated for their physical (spread ratio, specific volume and color) and sensory characteristics, and no difference was detected (p

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells restore frataxin expression and increase hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes in Friedreich ataxia fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kemp

    Full Text Available Dramatic advances in recent decades in understanding the genetics of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA--a GAA triplet expansion causing greatly reduced expression of the mitochondrial protein frataxin--have thus far yielded no therapeutic dividend, since there remain no effective treatments that prevent or even slow the inevitable progressive disability in affected individuals. Clinical interventions that restore frataxin expression are attractive therapeutic approaches, as, in theory, it may be possible to re-establish normal function in frataxin deficient cells if frataxin levels are increased above a specific threshold. With this in mind several drugs and cytokines have been tested for their ability to increase frataxin levels. Cell transplantation strategies may provide an alternative approach to this therapeutic aim, and may also offer more widespread cellular protective roles in FRDA. Here we show a direct link between frataxin expression in fibroblasts derived from FRDA patients with both decreased expression of hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes and increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. We demonstrate that normal human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs induce both an increase in frataxin gene and protein expression in FRDA fibroblasts via secretion of soluble factors. Finally, we show that exposure to factors produced by human MSCs increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity in FRDA fibroblasts through, at least in part, restoring the expression of the hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase 1. These findings suggest, for the first time, that stem cells may increase frataxin levels in FRDA and transplantation of MSCs may offer an effective treatment for these patients.

  8. Effectiveness of ultraviolet devices and hydrogen peroxide systems for terminal room decontamination: Focus on clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David J; Rutala, William A; Anderson, Deverick J; Chen, Luke F; Sickbert-Bennett, Emily E; Boyce, John M

    2016-05-02

    Over the last decade, substantial scientific evidence has accumulated that indicates contamination of environmental surfaces in hospital rooms plays an important role in the transmission of key health care-associated pathogens (eg, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Clostridium difficile, Acinetobacter spp). For example, a patient admitted to a room previously occupied by a patient colonized or infected with one of these pathogens has a higher risk for acquiring one of these pathogens than a patient admitted to a room whose previous occupant was not colonized or infected. This risk is not surprising because multiple studies have demonstrated that surfaces in hospital rooms are poorly cleaned during terminal cleaning. To reduce surface contamination after terminal cleaning, no touch methods of room disinfection have been developed. This article will review the no touch methods, ultraviolet light devices, and hydrogen peroxide systems, with a focus on clinical trials which have used patient colonization or infection as an outcome. Multiple studies have demonstrated that ultraviolet light devices and hydrogen peroxide systems have been shown to inactivate microbes experimentally plated on carrier materials and placed in hospital rooms and to decontaminate surfaces in hospital rooms naturally contaminated with multidrug-resistant pathogens. A growing number of clinical studies have demonstrated that ultraviolet devices and hydrogen peroxide systems when used for terminal disinfection can reduce colonization or health care-associated infections in patients admitted to these hospital rooms.

  9. Toxicity of abiotic stressors to Fusarium species: differences in hydrogen peroxide and fungicide tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagygyörgy, Emese D; Kovács, Barbara; Leiter, Eva; Miskei, Márton; Pócsi, István; Hornok, László; Adám, Attila L

    2014-06-01

    Stress sensitivity of three related phytopathogenic Fusarium species (Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium verticillioides) to different oxidative, osmotic, cell wall, membrane, fungicide stressors and an antifungal protein (PAF) were studied in vitro. The most prominent and significant differences were found in oxidative stress tolerance: all the three F. graminearum strains showed much higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and, to a lesser extent, to menadione than the other two species. High sensitivity of F. verticillioides strains was also detectable to an azole drug, Ketoconazole. Surprisingly, no or limited differences were observed in response to other oxidative, osmotic and cell wall stressors. These results indicate that fungal oxidative stress response and especially the response to hydrogen peroxide (this compound is involved in a wide range of plant-fungus interactions) might be modified on niche-specific manner in these phylogenetically related Fusarium species depending on their pathogenic strategy. Supporting the increased hydrogen peroxide sensitivity of F. graminearum, genome-wide analysis of stress signal transduction pathways revealed the absence one CatC-type catalase gene in F. graminearum in comparison to the other two species.

  10. Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on Carbon Nanotubes/β-Ni(OH)2 Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小俊; 黄燕; 顾爱侠; 王广凤; 方宾; 吴华强

    2012-01-01

    Ni(OH)2 nanoflowers were synthesized by a simple and energy-efficient wet chemistry method. The product was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Then Ni(OH)2 nanoflowers attached multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) were proposed (MWCNTs/Ni(OH)2/GCE) to use as electrochemical sensor to detect hydrogen peroxide. The results showed that the synergistic effect was obtained on the MWCNTs/Ni(OH)2/GCE whose sensitivity was better than that of Ni(OH)2/GCE. The linear range is from 0.2 to 22 mmol/L, the detection limit is 0.066 mmol/L, and the re- sponse time is 〈5 s. Satisfyingly, the MWCNTs/Ni(OH)2/GCE was not only successfully employed to eliminate the interferences from uric acid (UA), acid ascorbic (AA), dopamine (DA), glucose (GO) but also NO2 during the detection. The MWCNTs/Ni(OH)z/GCE allows highly sensitive, excellently selective and fast amperometric sensing of hydrogen peroxide and thus is promising for the future development of hydrogen peroxide sensors.

  11. Numerical and experimental analysis of heat transfer in injector plate of hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guobiao; Li, Chengen; Tian, Hui

    2016-11-01

    This paper is aimed to analyze heat transfer in injector plate of hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor by two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations and full-scale firing tests. Long-time working, which is an advantage of hybrid rocket motor over conventional solid rocket motor, puts forward new challenges for thermal protection. Thermal environments of full-scale hybrid rocket motors designed for long-time firing tests are studied through steady-state coupled numerical simulations of flow field and heat transfer in chamber head. The motor adopts 98% hydrogen peroxide (98HP) oxidizer and hydroxyl-terminated poly-butadiene (HTPB) based fuel as the propellants. Simulation results reveal that flowing liquid 98HP in head oxidizer chamber could cool the injector plate of the motor. The cooling of 98HP is similar to the regenerative cooling in liquid rocket engines. However, the temperature of the 98HP in periphery portion of the head oxidizer chamber is higher than its boiling point. In order to prevent the liquid 98HP from unexpected decomposition, a thermal protection method for chamber head utilizing silica-phenolics annular insulating board is proposed. The simulation results show that the annular insulating board could effectively decrease the temperature of the 98HP in head oxidizer chamber. Besides, the thermal protection method for long-time working hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor is verified through full-scale firing tests. The ablation of the insulating board in oxygen-rich environment is also analyzed.

  12. Superoxide-hydrogen peroxide imbalance interferes with colorectal cancer cells viability, proliferation and oxaliplatin response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzolin, Verônica Farina; Cadoná, Francine Carla; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Berto, Maiquidieli Dal; Barbisan, Fernanda; Dornelles, Eduardo Bortoluzzi; Glanzner, Werner Giehl; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard; Bica, Claudia Giugliano; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2016-04-01

    The role of superoxide dismutase manganese dependent enzyme (SOD2) in colorectal cancer is presently insufficiently understood. Some studies suggest that high SOD2 levels found in cancer tissues are associated with cancer progression. However, thus far, the role of colorectal cancer superoxide-hydrogen peroxide imbalance has not yet been studied. Thus, in order to address this gap in extant literature, we performed an in vitro analysis using HT-29 colorectal cell line exposed to paraquat, which generates high superoxide levels, and porphyrin, a SOD2 mimic molecule. The effect of these drugs on colorectal cancer cell response to oxaliplatin was evaluated. At 0.1 μM concentration, both drugs exhibited cytotoxic and antiproliferative effect on colorectal cancer cells. However, this effect was more pronounced in cells exposed to paraquat. Paraquat also augmented the oxaliplatin cytotoxic and antiproliferative effects by increasing the number of apoptosis events, thus causing the cell cycle arrest in the S and M/G2 phases. The treatments were also able to differentially modulate genes related to apoptosis, cell proliferation and antioxidant enzyme system. However, the effects were highly variable and the results obtained were inconclusive. Nonetheless, our findings support the hypothesis that imbalance caused by increased hydrogen peroxide levels could be beneficial to cancer cell biology. Therefore, the use of therapeutic strategies to decrease hydrogen peroxide levels mainly during oxaliplatin chemotherapy could be clinically important to the outcomes of colorectal cancer treatment.

  13. Electrodeposition of Silver Nanoparticles on MWCNT Film Electrodes for Hydrogen Peroxide Sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING,Yan-Feng; JIN,Guan-Ping; YIN,Jun-Guang

    2007-01-01

    Silver (Ag) nanoparticles were directly electrodeposited on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in AgNO3/LiNO3 containing EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid). The structure and nature of the resulting Ag/MWNT composite were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the distribution shape of Ag nanoparticles was found to be dependent on the presence of EDTA. The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity to redox reaction of hydrogen peroxide and the mechanism of hydrogen peroxide was partly reversible procession with oxidation and reduction peaks at 0.77 and -0.83 V, respectively. The oxidation and reduction peak currents were linearly related to hydrogen peroxide concentration in the range of 1×10-6-3×10-4 and 1×10-8-7×10-4 mol·L-1 with correlation coefficients of 0.996 and 0.986, and 3s-detection limit of 9 × 10-7 and 7 × 10-9 mol·L-1.

  14. Lignin isolation process from rice husk by alkaline hydrogen peroxide: Lignin and silica extracted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma'ruf, Anwar; Pramudono, Bambang; Aryanti, Nita

    2017-03-01

    Biomass is one of abundance resources in the world. Biomass consists of three main materials such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin. Therefore, biomass can be referred to lignocellulosic material. Both the cellulose and hemicelluloses fractions are polymers of sugars, and thereby a potential source of fermentable sugars, or other processes that convert sugars into products. Lignin is a polymer compound which contains of phenolic compounds. Rice husk is one of biomass, which has high contain of lignin. Rice husk has special characteristics because of silica content. The aim of this paper is to analyze lignin and silica extracted during lignin isolation process of rice husk using alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Three main variables such as solvent/solid ratio, concentration of hydrogen peroxide and pH of the mixture are studied. The optimum conditions for lignin isolation are at solvent/solid ratio 9:1 ml/gr, hydrogen peroxide concentration of 1.5%v and pH of the mixture of 11.

  15. Protective effects of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharide against hydrogen peroxide-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Na Liu; Qi-Bing Mei; Li Liu; Feng Zhang; Zhen-Guo Liu; Zhi-Peng Wang; Ru-Tao Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To describe the effect of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharide (RTP) on hydrogen peroxide-induced human intestinal epithelial cell injury.METHODS: Hydrogen peroxide (100 μmol/L) was introduced to induce human intestinal epithelial cell injury.Cells were pretreated with RTP (30,100,300 μg/mL) for 24 h before exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Cell viability was detected by MTr assay and morphological observation.Acridine orange staining and flow cytometry were performed to assess cell apoptosis. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by spectrophotometry with corresponding assay kits.RESULTS: Following exposure to H2O2, a marked decrease in cell survival and SOD activity, increased production of MDA, LDH leakage and cell apoptosis were found.Pretreatment of the cells with RTP could significantly elevate cell survival, SOD activity and decrease the level of MDA, LDH activity and cell apoptosis.CONCLUSION: RTP may have cytoprotective and antioxidant effects against H2O2-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury by inhibiting cell apoptosis and necrosis. This might be one of the possible mechanisms of RTP for the treatment of ulcerative colitis in rats.

  16. Antifouling effect of hydrogen peroxide release from enzymatic marine coatings: Exposure testing under equatorial and Mediterranean conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, S.M.; Kristensen, J.B.; Laursen, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be considered an environmentally friendly antifouling alternative to common biocides such as Cu2O and various organic compounds. In this work, the efficiency of antifouling coatings releasing hydrogen peroxide via enzyme-mediated conversion of starch, under...... Mediterranean and equatorial climatic conditions, is investigated. During seawater exposure of the coatings, starch is first converted to glucose by glucoamylase (rate-controlling step) and subsequently glucose is rapidly oxidised by hexose oxidase in a reaction producing hydrogen peroxide. The coatings...... laboratory assays, the transient hydrogen peroxide release rate from the coatings at different temperatures has been measured. The investigations are used to evaluate the ocean performance of the antifouling coatings. Coatings can be formulated with starch/enzyme 'pigments' in considerable amounts and yet...

  17. Effects of Extracts from Tropical Seaweeds on DPPH Radicals and Caco-2 Cells Treated with Hydrogen Peroxide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GUNJI, Satoko; SANTOSO, Joko; YOSHIE-STARK, Yumiko; SUZUKI, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    .... These extracts also had the highest concentrations of total phenol and flavonoid. Both the ethanol and acetone extracts of the 6 Indonesian seaweeds decreased Caco-2 cell viability when such cells were treated with 600μM hydrogen peroxide...

  18. A new cathode using CeO2/MWNT for hydrogen peroxide synthesis through a fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Fuyuan; SONG Tianshun; XU Yuan; CHEN Yingwen; ZHU Shemin; SHEN Shubao

    2009-01-01

    Catalyst using CeO2/MWNT (multi-walled carbon nanotube) was prepared by chemical deposition method and was applied to prepare the cathode of fuel cell for hydrogen peroxide synthesis. Effect of catalyst loading, flow rate of aqueous solution, and KOH concentration on hydrogen peroxide synthesis were investigated. Experimental results indicated that hydrogen peroxide concentration approached 275 mmol/L given 25% of CeO2/MWNT, 18 ml/h of aqueous solution, and 5 mol/L of KOH concentration. Moreover, the reaction mechanism was further discussed. The results indicated that MWNT and cerium oxide were the synergism to produce hydrogen peroxide. Increase of KOH concentration not only reduced the apparent cell resistance but also increased the open-circuit voltage.

  19. Massive gas embolism secondary in the use of intraoperative hydrogen peroxide: still use to lavage with this liquid?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benali, Zine El Abidine; Abdedaim, Hatim; Omari, Driss

    2013-01-01

    .... The alternative use of saline seems very reasonable. The widespread use of hydrogen peroxide by practitioners is explained mainly by its antiseptic effect associated with effervescent backlash visual and auditory, but sometimes the liquid hiding behind...

  20. Controlled Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Oxidant Source with a Microreactor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    microchannel reactor for hydrogen peroxide decomposition is being developed for integration with fuel cell systems that can power undersea vehicles...the subunits of a microchemical reactor system. The basis of the present model is a microchannel reactor . The model description, governing equations...the 2007 COMSOL Users Conference Boston, 4-6 Oct, Newton. MA 14. ABSTRACT A microchannel reactor for hydrogen peroxide decomposition is being

  1. A Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor Combined HRP Doped Polypyrrole with Ferrocene Modified Sol-gel Derived Composite Carbon Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A novel amperometric biosensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide is described.The biosensor was constructed by electrodepositing HRP/PPy membrane on the surface of ferrocenecarboxylic acid mediated sol-gel derived composite carbon electrode. The biosensor gives response to hydrogen peroxide in a few seconds with detection limit of 5×l0-7 mol · L-1(based on signal: noise=3). Linear range is up to 0.2 mmol · L-1.

  2. Effect of bleaching whey on sensory and functional properties of 80% whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, S; Campbell, R; Wojciechowski, K L; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2012-06-01

    Whey is a highly functional food that has found widespread use in a variety of food and beverage applications. A large amount of the whey proteins produced in the United States is derived from annatto-colored Cheddar cheese. Color from annatto is undesirable in whey and must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare 2 commercially approved bleaching agents, benzoyl peroxide (BP) and hydrogen peroxide (HP), and their effects on the flavor and functionality of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80). Colored and uncolored liquid wheys were bleached with BP or HP, and then ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried; WPC80 from unbleached colored and uncolored Cheddar whey were manufactured as controls. All treatments were manufactured in triplicate. The WPC80 were then assessed by sensory, instrumental, functionality, color, and proximate analysis techniques. The HP-bleached WPC80 were higher in lipid oxidation compounds (specifically hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, decanal, dimethyl disulfide, and 1-octen-3-one) and had higher fatty and cardboard flavors compared with the other unbleached and BP-bleached WPC80. The WPC80 bleached with BP had lower norbixin concentrations compared with WPC80 bleached with HP. The WPC powders differed in Hunter color values (L, a, b), with bleached powders being more white, less red, and less yellow than unbleached powders. Bleaching with BP under the conditions used in this study resulted in larger reductions in yellowness of the powders made from whey with annatto color than did bleaching with HP. Functionality testing demonstrated that whey bleached with HP treatments had more soluble protein after 10 min of heating at 90°C at pH 4.6 and pH 7 than the no-bleach and BP treatments, regardless of additional color. Overall, HP bleaching caused more lipid oxidation products and subsequent off-flavors compared with BP bleaching. However, heat stability of WPC80 was enhanced by HP bleaching compared with control or BP-bleached

  3. Intrapulpal temperature variation during bleaching with various activation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Masae de Araujo Michida

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intrapulpal temperature variation after bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide using different sources of activation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-four human teeth were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction providing 48 specimens, and were divided into 4 groups (n=12: (G1 Control - Bleaching gel without light activation, (G2 Bleaching gel + halogen light, (G3 Bleaching gel + LED, (G4 Bleaching gel + Nd:YAG Laser. The temperatures were recorded using a digital thermometer at 4 time points: before bleaching gel application, 1 min after bleaching gel application, during activation of the bleaching gel, and after the bleaching agent turned from a dark-red into a clear gel. Data were analyzed statistically by the Dunnet's test, ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. RESULTS: The mean intrapulpal temperature values (ºC in the groups were: G1: 0.617 ± 0.41; G2: 1.800 ± 0.68; G3: 0.975 ± 0.51; and G4: 4.325 ± 1.09. The mean maximum temperature variation (MTV values were: 1.5ºC (G1, 2.9ºC (G2, 1.7ºC (G3 and 6.9ºC (G4. When comparing the experimental groups to the control group, G3 was not statistically different from G1 (p>0.05, but G2 and G4 presented significantly higher (p<0.05 intrapulpal temperatures and MTV. The three experimental groups differed significantly (p<0.05 from each other. CONCLUSIONS: The Nd:YAG laser was the activation method that presented the highest values of intrapulpal temperature variation when compared with LED and halogen light. The group activated by LED light presented the lowest values of temperature variation, which were similar to that of the control group.

  4. Evaluation of the hydrogen peroxide and special colorant effects under irradiation by argon and diode laser on tooth-whitening in vitro; Avaliacao do efeito de corantes especiais e peroxido de hidrogenio irradiados por laser de argonio e laser de diodo no clareamento dental 'in vitro'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaspar, Jose Antonio

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if there is any interaction between special colorant found on bleaching agents that have 35 % of hydrogen peroxide on its composition, and argon or diode laser. The first part of the study was to characterize the extrinsic stain obtained through a staining solution containing products present on the day by day diet of the general population. Thirty-two inferior human extracted incisors, free of caries and without filling material were selected for the study. The laser devices employed were Argon laser (AccuCure 3000 TM - Lasermed), wave length 488 nm, with a 200 mW/cm{sup 2} for 30 seconds in continuos mode; and diode laser (L 808 Medical Laser - Lasering do Brasil), wave length 808 {+-} 10 nm, with 1,6 W/cm{sup 2} for 30 seconds in continuos mode. The application mode done by a scanning movement over the buccal surface. The bleaching agents used were: Opalescence Extra (OE) - Ultradent Products USA, hydrogen peroxide 35%, gel with Carotene to convert light into heat; Pola Office (PO) - SDI - USA single doses of hydrogen peroxide; Whiteness HP (WHP) - FGM - Brasil, hydrogen peroxide 35%; Opus White (OW) - Sharplan - Israel, hydrogen peroxide 35%. The temperature rise measurement was performed with a thermocouple model 120-202-AJ, Fenwal, inserted into the pulpar chamber. The bleaching material was applied on the tooth surface with 2 mm thickness and then the irradiation was perform. The thirty two teeth were randomized in four groups, two for each laser device. The obtain data demonstrated a superior performance of the Argon laser on tooth whitening and also better results concerning the temperature rise. The alteration on tooth coloration was verified through digital spectrophotometer (Shade-Eye EX - Shofu) and quantitative analyses showed statistical differences among the groups. The bleaching results for Argon laser combined with OE and WHP were superior for the other groups. The mean variation of the temperature rise

  5. The Inhibitory Effect of PIK-75 on Inflammatory Mediator Response Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Feline Esophageal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yeong Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoform-selective inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K activation have an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing proinflammatory cytokines. Cultured feline esophageal epithelial cells (EEC of passages 3~4 were treated with hydrogen peroxide and PIK-75. The cell viability was measured by a MTT incorporation assay. The distribution of PI3K isoforms, p-Akt, IL-1β, and IL-8 was inferred from Western blots. The release of IL-6 was determined by ELISA. The cell morphology was not considerably different from nontreated cells if the cells were pretreated with PIK-75 and treated with 300 μM hydrogen peroxide. The density of p110α of PI3K was increased, but that of other types was not affected after the treatment with hydrogen peroxide. The density of p-Akt, when the cells were exposed to PIK-75 and hydrogen peroxide, was diminished dose dependently more than that of hydrogen peroxide treatment only. The decrease of p-Akt showed an inhibition of PI3K by PIK-75. PIK-75 dose dependently reduced the expression of IL-1β, IL-8, and the level of IL-6 compared with hydrogen peroxide treatment only. These results suggest evidence that p110α mediates esophageal inflammation and that PIK-75 has an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing proinflammatory cytokines on feline esophageal epithelial cultured cells.

  6. Simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewater by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Tokumura, Masahiro; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The zero-valent iron (ZVI) wastewater treatment has been applied to simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewaters. The simultaneous removal occurs by the reactions performed due to the sequential transformation of ZVI under the acidic condition. Fortunately the solution pH of semiconductor acidic wastewaters is low which is effective for the sequential transformation of ZVI. Firstly the reduction of nitrate is taken place by electrons generated by the corrosion of ZVI under acidic conditions. Secondly the ferrous ion generated by the corrosion of ZVI reacts with hydrogen peroxide and generates ·OH radical (Fenton reaction). The Fenton reaction consists of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and the generation of ferric ion. Finally phosphate precipitates out with iron ions. In the simultaneous removal process, 1.6 mM nitrate, 9.0 mM hydrogen peroxide and 1.0 mM phosphate were completely removed by ZVI within 100, 15 and 15 min, respectively. The synergy among the reactions for the removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate was found. In the individual pollutant removal experiment, the removal of phosphate by ZVI was limited to 80% after 300 min. Its removal rate was considerably improved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and the complete removal of phosphate was achieved after 15 min.

  7. Formation of studtite during the oxidative dissolution of UO2 by hydrogen peroxide: a SFM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarens, F; de Pablo, J; Díez-Pérez, I; Casas, I; Giménez, J; Rovira, M

    2004-12-15

    Understanding the formation of alteration phases on the surface of spent nuclear fuel, such as those observed during leaching experiments, is necessary in order to predict the concentration of radionuclides in the near-field of a final repository. Hydrogen peroxide has been identified as one of the oxidants formed by the radiolysis of water in the presence of spent nuclear fuel; especially due to alpha activity. The presence of this species in solution can contribute to the formation of uranium peroxide secondary phases. In this work, we have studied the oxidative dissolution of synthetic UO2 disks in hydrogen peroxide solutions of two different concentrations (5 x 10(-4) and 5 x 10(-6) mol dm(-3)), both at pH 5.8 +/- 0.1. The solid surface evolution of the disks has been followed by means of ex-situ scanning force microscope (SFM) measurements, and uranium concentration in solution has been determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. During the first stage of the experiment, SFM images indicate that only UO2 dissolution is occurring. After 142 h, a secondary phase is observed on the surface of the solid at 5 x 10(-4) mol dm(-3) hydrogen peroxide concentration. This secondary phase has been identified by X-ray diffraction as studtite (UO4 x 4H2O). From the analysis of SFM topographic profiles at different elapsed times, a precipitation rate for the studtite has been estimated to be in the range of (8-32) x 10(-10) mol m(-2) s(-1).

  8. Bleaching induced tooth sensitivity: do the existing enamel craze lines increase sensitivity? A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Abdin, Sam; Sipahi, Cumhur

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate whether or not an association exists between the presence of enamel craze lines and the prevalence of tooth sensitivity (TS) after in-office bleaching. Subjects that met the inclusion criteria (N = 23) were screened to detect the existence of enamel craze lines. In total, 460 teeth were subjected to bleaching where 49% of them presented enamel craze lines. After bleaching (15% hydrogen peroxide), the subjects were asked to rate the level of TS by answering a self-administered questionnaire. The majority of subjects (91%) experienced TS at the first day of bleaching. The TS prevalence decreased gradually to 22% at second day, to 17% at third day, and to 9% at fourth day. After the fourth day, no subject reported TS. While 15% of teeth with craze lines presented TS, 11% of teeth with no craze lines also showed TS. A positive but weak correlation (r = 0.214) was found between the existence of enamel craze lines and TS. In this clinical study, higher incidence of TS was found with the use of 15% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent compared to the previous studies. Patients who would undergo in-office bleaching should be informed that tooth sensitivity is a very often side effect but it may disappear within 1 week.

  9. Clinical trial of tooth desensitization prior to in-office bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Deepak; Venkata, Suresh; Naganath, Meena; LingaReddy, Usha; Ishihata, Hiroshi; Finger, Werner J

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to compare tooth sensitivity during and after bleaching with hydrogen peroxide gel following application of GLUMA Desensitizer PowerGel or placebo. Forty-six subjects with sound maxillary incisors and canines were enrolled. Tooth shades were determined by comparison with a Vitapan Classic Shade guide. GLUMA Desensitizer PowerGel and placebo were randomly applied to the labial surfaces of the left or right anterior teeth for 1 min, which were then rinsed and dried. Then, Opalescence Boost PF 40% gel was applied onto labial enamel for 15 min. Sensitivity scores [recorded on a 10-point visual-analog scale (VAS)] were determined before, at 5, 10, and 15 min during, and 1, 24, 48 h and 1 wk after, the bleaching treatment. Shades were determined postbleaching and after 1 wk. Prebleaching application of GLUMA Desensitizer PowerGel significantly reduced tooth sensitivity during and after bleaching when compared with treatment with placebo. The whitening effects immediately and 1 wk after bleaching were significant when compared with the prebleaching shades. In conclusion, tooth pretreatment with GLUMA Desensitizer PowerGel for 1 min prior to 15 min of in-office bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide gel was highly effective in reducing tooth sensitivity during and after bleaching.

  10. Effect of tooth-bleaching on the carbonate concentration in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Background There are not many studies evaluating the effects of surface treatments at the molecular level. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the concentration of carbonate molecules in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy after the application of in-office and home whitening agents. Material and Methods Sixty human teeth were randomly divided into six groups and exposed to three different home bleaching gels (Day White) and three in-office whitening agents (Zoom! Whitespeed and PolaOffice) according to the manufacturer´s instructions. The concentration of carbonate molecules in enamel was measured prior to and during the treatment by means of Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance (p≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Results At home bleaching agents depicted a decrease in the carbonate molecule. This decrease was statistically significant for the bleaching gel with the highest hydrogen peroxide concentration (p≤0,05). In-office whitening agents caused an increase in carbonate, which was significant for all three groups (p≤0,05). Conclusions In-office bleaching gels seem to cause a gain in carbonate of the enamel structure, whilst at-home whitening gels caused a loss in carbonate. Key words:Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, carbonate.

  11. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarquinio SBC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Flávio Fernando Demarco1, Sônia Saeger Meireles2, Hugo Ramalho Sarmento1, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes Dantas1, Tatiana Botero3, Sandra Beatriz Chaves Tarquinio11Graduate Program in Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil; 2Department of Operative Dentistry, Federal University of Paraíba, Brazil; 3Cariology, Restorative Science, and Endodontics Department, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, MI, USAAbstract: This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled.Keywords: peroxide, tooth bleaching, enamel, dentin, erosion, abrasion

  12. Assessment of Ca and P content variation in enamel during an eight-week bleaching protocol using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorozini, M.; Dos Santos, R. S.; Silva, E. M.; Dos Anjos, M. J.; Perez, C. R.

    2017-05-01

    Tooth bleaching is a simple technique performed with gels based on hydrogen peroxide molecules responsible for removing the tooth structure's pigmentation. The effects of the overuse of these agents on the tooth structure are not well established. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) can be employed to analyze objects of biological origin as bone and tooth. It is very suitable analytical technique to detect demineralization processes in these tissues. The objective of this study was to use x-ray fluorescence to evaluate the effects on mineral content of enamel submitted to eight-week protocols of home bleaching gels (10% carbamide peroxide and 9.5% hydrogen peroxide), as well as bleaching strips. Four enamel fragments obtained from five teeth were subjected to bleaching for 8 weeks: Group 1- artificial saliva; Group 2-10% carbamide peroxide gel, 6 h daily; Group 3-9.5% hydrogen peroxide gel, two 30-minute applications; and Group 4-bleaching strips, twice daily for 30 min. The change in mineral content was assessed weekly using X-ray fluorescence (Artax 200). Differences were basically found in Group 4 for the concentrations of Ca and P after treatment with bleaching strips containing 10% hydrogen peroxide. For the Ca/P ratio, the differences were found in Group 2-15% carbamide peroxide (p < 0.05). X-ray fluorescence proved to be a suitable method for the evaluation of the mineral content, presenting the advantage of being able to evaluate the same area at different stages of the methodology.

  13. Use of hydrogen peroxide in scrubbing towers for odor removal in wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, I; Féliers, C; Couvert, A; Laplanche, A; Patria, L; Requieme, B

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work was to replace sodium hypochlorite (NaCIO) with hydrogen peroxide (H202) in chemical scrubbing towers, in order to avoid the formation of chlorinated species, harmful for human health. Some previous studies have already shown the ability of H2O2 to treat the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) pollution. However, an important decomposition of the oxidant was observed in the scrubbing solution (carbonates, transition metal and high pH are responsible for this decomposition) leading to high reactant consumption. Consequently, this study first focused on research into a compound able to reduce the hydrogen peroxide degradation. Experiments were conducted on a pilot unit (3,000 m3 h(-1)) in a wastewater treatment plant. The sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) proved to be a good scrubbing solution stabilizer. A very good removal of hydrogen sulfide (up to 98%) was also obtained. Finally, the study resulted in the determination of the best operating conditions to achieve both an efficient and economical process.

  14. Efficacy and cytotoxicity of a bleaching gel after short application times on dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; da Silveira Vargas, Fernanda; Hebling, Josimeri; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate and correlate the efficacy and cytotoxicity of a 35 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gel after different application times on dental enamel. Enamel/dentin disks in artificial pulp chambers were placed in wells containing culture medium. The following groups were formed: G1, control (no bleaching); G2 and G3, three or one 15-min bleaching applications, respectively; and G4 and G5, three or one 5-min bleaching applications, respectively. Extracts (culture medium with bleaching gel components) were applied for 60 min on cultured odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells. Cell metabolism (methyl tetrazolium assay) (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 5 %) and cell morphology (scanning electron microscopy) were analyzed immediately after the bleaching procedures and the trans-enamel and trans-dentinal HP diffusion quantified (one-way analysis of variance/Tukey's test; α = 5 %). The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was evaluated 24 h after the contact time of the extracts with the cells (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 5 %). Tooth color was analyzed before and 24 h after bleaching using a spectrophotometer according to the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage L*a*b* system (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 0.05). Significant difference (p 0.05). The lowest amount of HP diffusion was observed in G5 (p 0.05). HP diffusion through dental tissues and its cytotoxic effects were proportional to the contact time of the bleaching gel with enamel. However, shorter bleaching times reduced bleaching efficacy. Shortening the in-office tooth bleaching time could be an alternative to minimize the cytotoxic effects of this clinical procedure to pulp tissue. However, the reduced time of bleaching agent application on enamel may not provide adequate esthetic outcome.

  15. An In Vitro Evaluation of Human Enamel Surfaces Subjected to Erosive Challenge After Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Carvalho Vasconcelos, Maria; Fonseca-Gonçalves, Andréa; de França, Adílis Kalina Alexandria; de Medeiros, Urubatan Vieira; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Queiroz, Celso Silva

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether tooth enamel bleached with hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) is more susceptible to erosion when compared with unbleached tooth enamel; and whether the presence of calcium (Ca) in the bleaching gel influenced this process. Enamel blocks were prepared from human molars, and submitted to surface microhardness analysis (baseline). Blocks were prepared and randomly divided into four treatment groups (n = 20): G1 and G2-bleached with 7.5% H2 O2 , with and without Ca, respectively; G3 and G4-bleached with 35% H2 O2 , with and without Ca, respectively. After bleaching, these groups were submitted to an erosive challenge with 1% citric acid. G5 and G6 (n = 20, each) were the negative (without bleaching) and positive controls (without bleaching, but with erosion), respectively. The percentage of surface hardness loss (%SHL), the 3D non-contact profilometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analyses were performed. G2 showed the highest %SHL after bleaching. G1 presented the lowest %SHL in comparison with G2, G3, G4, and G6 after erosion (p < 0.05), which was confirmed only by the SEM analysis. It is suggested that low concentration of H2 O2 with calcium can be recommended for at-home bleaching agents, which may avoid the mineral loss of bleached enamel after an erosive challenge. Low concentration of H2 02 with calcium can be recommended for at-home bleaching agents, which may avoid the mineral loss of bleached enamel after an erosive challenge. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:128-136, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF PEROXYDISUCCINIC ACID, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND THEIR MIXTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blazheyevskiy M.Ye.,

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It is known that reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in vivo by cell aerobic metabolism cause multiple damage in different cell organelles and kill not only obligate anaerobes and microaerophilles, but also aerobes. ROS generated by phagocytes and representatives of normal microflora are an important component of macroorganism defense from most pathogens, which is explained by their ability to damage different biological structures. ROS have high reactivity and let us use them in vitro as effective biocides. Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in many industries, in particular, in medicine and veterinary as antiseptic and disinfectant agent due to its safety for environment and broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity including spore-forming bacteria. However, in the recent years certain decrease of background sensitivity of microorganisms to hydrogen peroxide and occurrence of resistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms to this agent has been noted. The aim of this work is to carry out a comparative study of antimicrobial activity of hydrogen peroxide, peroxydisuccinic acid (PDSA, monoperoxysuccinic acid (MPSA, and mixture of PDSA and hydrogen peroxide (Н2О2. Materials and methods. The substances of peroxydisuccinic acid (PDSA and monoperoxysuccinic acid (MPSA were prepared by well known methods. The following test-strains were used to assess antimicrobial activity of the agents: Staphylococcus aureus АТСС 25923, Escherichia coli АТСС 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa АТСС 27853, Pseudomonas aeruginosa АТСС 9027, Basillus сereus АТСС 10702, Basillus сereus АТСС 96, Basillus subtilis АТСС 6633, Proteus vulgaris ATCC 4636, Candida albicans АТСС 885/653, and Candida albicans АТСС 10231. All disinfectant agents were diluted in distilled water at 40 ºС and stirred. The microbial burden was 2∙109 CFU/ml of the medium, and for kinetic studies 105 CFU/ml of the medium, it was standardizing

  17. Effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on ultrastructure and mineral content of dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Maleknejad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ultrastructural changes of dentin induced after exposure to different intracoronal tooth bleaching agents. Materials and Methods: Dental discs of 1 mm thickness were prepared from coronal dentin of sixty-four human maxillary premolars. Experimental specimens were divided into four subgroups: 45% carbamide peroxide, 35% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate + water. The specimens were then evaluated under scanning electron microscope to determine diameter of dentinal tubules and chemical analysis. Results: There was significant difference between dentinal tubule diameter of all test and control groups with the exception of sodium perborate + water. Chemical analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between experimental subgroups regarding calcium and sulfur wt%. Conclusions: All bleaching agents increased dentinal tubule diameter and promote alterations in mineral content of dentin with the exception of Sodium perborate mixed with water.

  18. Brushing with a potassium nitrate dentifrice to reduce bleaching sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Van B; Cordero, Rafael; Wright, Kellie; Gendreau, Linda; Rupp, Ronald; Kotler, Mitchell; Littlejohn, Sonya; Fabyanski, Joyce; Smith, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    This research systematically evaluated the use of a clinically proven desensitizing dentifrice prior to a bleaching regimen in a randomized, multi-center, parallel group, open label clinical study following Good Clinical Practice guidelines. Fourteen dental offices in West Palm Beach, Florida participated in the study during April/May 2004. Fourteen days prior to bleaching, impressions and oral soft tissue assessments were performed, and patients were randomized to either a KNO3 plus fluoride dentifrice (Sensodyne Fresh Mint), or a standard fluoride dentifrice (Crest Regular), brushing 2x per day. On Day 14, patients returned to the dental office for their custom tray and the dispensation of a bleaching kit (Day White Excel 3; 9.5% hydrogen peroxide and KNO3). This was used daily according to the manufacturer's instructions for 30 minutes, and normal oral hygiene continued to be performed using the assigned toothbrush and dentifrice, brushing 2x per day. At the end of each bleaching day, patients answered diary questions about the occurrence and intensity of sensitivity. At the conclusion of the 14-day bleaching period (Day 28), patients returned to their dental office for re-examination, returning all products and diaries. Within seven days of completing the study, patients answered a telephone patient satisfaction survey. A total of 202 patients in fourteen (14) dental offices completed all aspects of the study and were used for the analysis. The professionally dispensed bleaching product provided an improvement of approximately 4.4 Vita shades, regardless of whether it was used with the KNO3 plus fluoride (Sensodyne) or a standard fluoride (Crest) dentifrice. The patient perception of increased sensitivity caused by the bleaching treatment was low but measurable. In the first week of the bleaching, significantly more patients using the KNO3 plus fluoride dentifrice were free from sensitivity (58%) than the standard fluoride dentifrice group (42%). During the 14

  19. The use of lactoperoxidase for the bleaching of fluid whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R E; Kang, E J; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2012-06-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LP) is the second most abundant enzyme in bovine milk and has been used in conjunction with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and thiocyanate (SCN⁻) to work as an antimicrobial in raw milk where pasteurization is not feasible. Thiocyanate is naturally present and the lactoperoxidase system purportedly can be used to bleach dairy products, such as whey, with the addition of very little H₂O₂ to the system. This study had 3 objectives: 1) to quantify the amount of H₂O₂ necessary for bleaching of fluid whey using the LP system, 2) to monitor LP activity from raw milk through manufacture of liquid whey, and 3) to compare the flavor of whey protein concentrate 80% (WPC80) bleached by the LP system to that bleached by traditional H₂O₂ bleaching. Cheddar cheese whey with annatto (15 mL of annatto/454 kg of milk, annatto with 3% wt/vol norbixin content) was manufactured using a standard Cheddar cheesemaking procedure. Various levels of H₂O₂ (5-100 mg/kg) were added to fluid whey to determine the optimum concentration of H₂O₂ for LP activity, which was measured using an established colorimetric method. In subsequent experiments, fat-separated whey was bleached for 1h with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg (traditional) or 20 mg of H₂O₂/kg (LP system). The WPC80 was manufactured from whey bleached with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg or 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. All samples were subjected to color analysis (Hunter color values and norbixin extraction) and proximate analysis (fat, protein, and moisture). Sensory and instrumental volatile analyses were conducted on WPC80. Optimal LP bleaching in fluid whey occurred with the addition of 20mg of H₂O₂/kg. Bleaching of fluid whey at either 35 or 50°C for 1 h with LP resulted in > 99% norbixin destruction compared with 32 or 47% destruction from bleaching with 250 mg of H₂O₂/kg, at 35 or 50°C for 1 h, respectively. Higher aroma intensity and increased lipid oxidation compounds were documented in WPC80 from

  20. Chemo-enzymatic epoxidation of olefins by carboxylic acid esters and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruesch gen. Klaas, M.; Warwel, S. [Inst. for Biochemistry and Technology of Lipids, H.P. Kaufmanm-Inst., Federal Centre for Cereal, Potato and Lipid Research, Muenster (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Ethylen and, recently, butadiene can be epoxidized directly with oxygen and for the epoxidation of propylene, the use of heterogeneous transition metals and organic peroxides (Halcon-Process) is the major player. But, beside from those notable exceptions, all other epoxidations, including large ones like the epoxidation of plant oils as PVC-stabilizers (about 200.000 t/year), are carried out with peroxy acids. Because mcpba is far to expensive for most applications, short chain peracids like peracetic acid are used. Being much less stable than mcpba and thus risky handled in large amounts and high concentrations, these peroxy acids were preferably prepared in-situ. However, conventional in-situ formation of peracids has the serious drawback, that a strong acid is necessary to catalyze peroxy acid formation from the carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide. The presence of a strong acid in the reaction mixture often results in decreased selectivity because of the formation of undesired by-products by opening of the oxirane ring. Therefore, we propose a new method for epoxidation based on the in-situ preparation of percarboxylic acids from carboxylic acid esters and hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by a commercial, immobilized lipase. (orig.)