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Sample records for hydrogen kinetic investigation

  1. Kinetic investigation of hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of SnO and Zn solar nanopowders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambon, Marc; Abanades, Stephane; Flamant, Gilles [Processes, Materials and Solar Energy Laboratory (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, 66120 Font-Romeu (France)

    2009-07-15

    The hydrolysis reaction of the two-step ZnO/Zn and SnO{sub 2}/SnO thermochemical cycles was kinetically investigated for solar hydrogen production. Nanoparticles of Zn and SnO were synthesized by solar thermal reduction of the oxides and neutral gas quenching of the vapors. They were then hydrolyzed to quantify and compare the H{sub 2} yields and the kinetic rate laws in fixed-bed. The hydrolysis of Zn nanoparticles reached only up to 55% of H{sub 2} yield, whereas SnO hydrolysis was almost complete. In contrast, Zn hydrolysis was much faster than SnO hydrolysis, but Zn deactivation occurred suddenly. Models of solid-gas reactions were applied to identify the controlling mechanisms and the associated kinetic parameters. The kinetic models were fitted to both isothermal and non-isothermal (temperature ramp) hydrolysis experimental data. Activation energies and reaction orders were found to be 122 {+-} 13 kJ/mol and 2.0 {+-} 0.3 for SnO, and 87 {+-} 7 kJ/mol and 3.5 {+-} 0.5 for Zn, respectively. Finally, a shrinking core approach was applied to the case of SnO to account for the reaction-controlling mechanisms. (author)

  2. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  3. The kinetics of the hydrogen chloride oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Martinez Isai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen chloride (HCl oxidation has been investigated on technical membrane electrode assemblies in a cyclone flow cell. Influence of Nafion loading, temperature and hydrogen chloride mole fraction in the gas phase has been studied. The apparent kinetic parameters like reaction order with respect to HCl, Tafel slope and activation energy have been determined from polarization data. The apparent kinetic parameters suggest that the recombination of adsorbed Cl intermediate is the rate determining step.

  4. Adsorption of hydrogen fluoride onto activated carbon under vacuum conditions: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Bahrami Hussein; Safdari Jaber; Moosavian Ali Mohammad; Torab-Mostaedi Meisam

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the adsorption of HF gas by three types of activated carbon has been investigated under vacuum condition. The effects of experimental parameters such as initial pressure of the HF gas, contact time and temperature on adsorption process have been investigated. The results showed that the adsorption of the HF gas onto activated carbon increased by increasing initial pressure of gas, while it decreased with increase in temperature. The Freundlich isotherm model fitted the eq...

  5. Kinetics investigation of the hydrogen abstraction reaction between CH3SS and CN radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liu; Wenliang, Wang; Zhongwen, Liu; Hongjiang, Ren

    2016-01-01

    The reaction mechanisms and rates for the H abstraction reactions between CH3SS and CN radicals in the gas phase were investigated with density functional theory (DFT) methods. The geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and energies of all stationary points were obtained at B3PW91/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. Relationships between the reactants, intermediates, transition states and products were confirmed, with the frequency and the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) analysis at the same theoretical level. High accurate energy information was provided by the G3(MP2) method combined with the standard statistical thermodynamics. Gibbs free energies at 298.15 K for all of the reaction steps were reported, and were used to describe the profile diagrams of the potential energy surface. The rate constants were evaluated with both the classical transition state theory and the canonical variational transition state theory, in which the small-curvature tunneling correction was included. A total number of 9 intermediates (IMs) and 17 transition states (TSs) were obtained. It is shown that IM1 is the most stable intermediate by the largest energy release, and the channel of CH3SS + CN → IM3 → TS10  → P1(CH2SS + HCN) is the dominant reaction with the lowest energy barrier of 144.7 kJ mol(-1). The fitted Arrhenius expressions of the calculated CVT/SCT rate constants for the rate-determining step of the favorable channel is k =7.73 × 10(6)  T (1.40)exp(-14,423.8/T) s(-1) in the temperature range of 200-2000 K. The apparent activation energy E a(app.) for the main channel is -102.5 kJ mol(-1), which is comparable with the G3(MP2) energy barrier of -91.8 kJ mol(-1) of TS10 (relative to the reactants).

  6. Kinetic study of the 7-endo selective radical cyclization of N-tert-butyl-o-bromobenzylmethacryl amides: kinetic investigation of the cyclization and 1,7-hydrogen transfer of aromatic radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Akio; Kotake, Tomoko; Ishihara, Yuriko; So, Masahiro; Hayashi, Takahiro

    2013-04-19

    A kinetic investigation of the radical cyclization of N-tert-butyl-o-bromobenzylmethacryl amides to give 2-benzazepines via 7-endo selective cyclization was undertaken. The aryl radical generated from the amide precursor by treatment with Bu3SnH gave the three compounds, which are a 7-endo cyclized adduct, a 6-exocyclized adduct, and a reduced product. The cyclization reactions under various Bu3SnH concentrations were traced by GC analysis. The 7-endo/6-exo selectivity was constant irrespective of variation in Bu3SnH concentration. These results revealed that regioselectivity is controlled in a kinetic manner and that there is no possibility of a neophyl rearrangement. The use of Bu3SnD revealed that 1,7-hydrogen transfer, in which an aryl radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the methallylic methyl group, occurs during the reaction. Hydrogen abstraction from toluene, the reaction solvent, was also observed. The 1,7-transfer rate depended on the Bu3SnX (X = H or D), and the reaction kinetics was examined. The k(H)/k(D) value for the hydrogen abstraction of aryl radical from Bu3SnX (X = H or D) was estimated using 4-bromoanisol. The utilization of these values revealed the overall reaction kinetics and relative rates for the cyclization and reduction by Bu3SnX (X = H or D). Kinetic parameters for hydrogen abstraction from toluene by aryl radicals were also estimated.

  7. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrogen Combustion Limits

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    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2008-04-02

    A detailed chemical kinetic model is used to explore the flammability and detonability of hydrogen mixtures. In the case of flammability, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for hydrogen is coupled to the CHEMKIN Premix code to compute premixed, laminar flame speeds. The detailed chemical kinetic model reproduces flame speeds in the literature over a range of equivalence ratios, pressures and reactant temperatures. A series of calculation were performed to assess the key parameters determining the flammability of hydrogen mixtures. Increased reactant temperature was found to greatly increase the flame speed and the flammability of the mixture. The effect of added diluents was assessed. Addition of water and carbon dioxide were found to reduce the flame speed and thus the flammability of a hydrogen mixture approximately equally well and much more than the addition of nitrogen. The detailed chemical kinetic model was used to explore the detonability of hydrogen mixtures. A Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) detonation model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics was used to model the detonation. The effectiveness on different diluents was assessed in reducing the detonability of a hydrogen mixture. Carbon dioxide was found to be most effective in reducing the detonability followed by water and nitrogen. The chemical action of chemical inhibitors on reducing the flammability of hydrogen mixtures is discussed. Bromine and organophosphorus inhibitors act through catalytic cycles that recombine H and OH radicals in the flame. The reduction in H and OH radicals reduces chain branching in the flame through the H + O{sub 2} = OH + O chain branching reaction. The reduction in chain branching and radical production reduces the flame speed and thus the flammability of the hydrogen mixture.

  8. MODELING STYRENE HYDROGENATION KINETICS USING PALLADIUM CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Justino

    Full Text Available Abstract The high octane number of pyrolysis gasoline (PYGAS explains its insertion in the gasoline pool. However, its use is troublesome due to the presence of gum-forming chemicals which, in turn, can be removed via hydrogenation. The use of Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic models was evaluated for hydrogenation of styrene, a typical gum monomer, using Pd/9%Nb2O5-Al2O3 as catalyst. Kinetic models accounting for hydrogen dissociative and non-dissociative adsorption were considered. The availability of one or two kinds of catalytic sites was analyzed. Experiments were carried out in a semi-batch reactor at constant temperature and pressure in the absence of transport limitations. The conditions used in each experiment varied between 16 - 56 bar and 60 - 100 ºC for pressure and temperature, respectively. The kinetic models were evaluated using MATLAB and EMSO software. Models using adsorption of hydrogen and organic molecules on the same type of site fitted the data best.

  9. Kinetic reduction of mill scale via hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaballah N.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mill scale is very attractive industrial waste since it is rich in iron (about = 72 % Fe and it is suiTab. for direct recycling to the blast furnace via sintering plant. In this paper the characterizations of raw materials were studied by different methods of analyses. The produced briquettes were reduced with different amounts of hydrogen at varying temperatures, and the reduction kinetics was determined. Two models were applied and the energy of activation was calculated.

  10. Stereoselective thymol hydrogenation. I. Kinetics of thymol hydrogenation on charcoal-supported platinum catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, M.; Bullivant, L.; Nicolaus, N.; Gallezot, P. (Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse-CNRS, Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-03-01

    The kinetics of thymol hydrogenation on a well-characterized supported platinum catalyst have been investigated in cyclohexane at temperatures between 313 and 373 K and under 3 MPa of hydrogen pressure. The relative rate constants of the different reaction pathways (hydrogenation via menthone or isomenthone, and direct hydrogenation to the four menthol diastereoisomers) were determined from the changes in composition of the reaction medium during the reaction process. It has been shown that hydrogenation via the menthone intermediates is the major route, the formation of the cis isomer (isomenthone) being favored. The configuration of the menthols, produced from direct hydrogenation or from the ketone intermediates, is controlled by the geometry of adsorption of the precursors on the metal surface, so that neoisomenthol with all substituents in the cis position is by far the most abundant steroisomer produced. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish ...... in RAS by addressing disinfection demand and identify efficient and safe water treatment routines.......Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... reared or the nitrifying bacteria in the biofilters at concentrations required to eliminating pathogens. This calls for quantitative insight into the fate of the disinfectant residuals during water treatment. This paper presents a kinetic model that describes the HP decomposition in aquaculture water...

  12. Hydrogen kinetics in a-Si:H and a-SiC:H thin films investigated by real-time ERD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halindintwali, S., E-mail: shalindintwali@uwc.ac.za [Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Khoele, J. [Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Nemroaui, O. [Department of Mechatronics, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, P.O. Box 1906, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Comrie, C.M. [Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Theron, C.C. [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa)

    2015-04-15

    Hydrogen effusion from hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si{sub 1−x}C{sub x}:H) thin films during a temperature ramp between RT and 600 °C was studied by in situ real-time elastic recoil detection analysis. Point to point contour maps show the hydrogen depth profile and its evolution with the ramped temperature. This paper proposes a diffusion limited evolution model to study H kinetic properties from total retained H contents recorded in a single ramp. In a compact a-Si:H layer where H predominantly effuses at high temperatures between 500 and 600 °C, an activation energy value of ∼1.50 eV and a diffusion pre-factor of 0.41 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 2}/s were obtained. Applied to an non-stoichiometric a-Si{sub 1−x}C{sub x}:H film in the same range of temperature, the model led to reduced values of activation energy and diffusion prefactor of ∼0.33 eV and 0.59 × 10{sup −11} cm{sup 2}/s, respectively.

  13. Transport kinetics of hydrogen permeable lanthanum tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenstein, Andreas

    2017-01-24

    The electrical conductivity relaxation technique is a widely used method to determine the oxygen transport parameters of mixed ionic-electronic conductors. In recent years, it has been modified to investigate the hydration behavior of proton conducting mixed conductors, giving access to up to four transport parameters in a single relaxation experiment, the diffusion coefficients and surface reaction rates of hydrogen and oxygen. In this work, the transport properties of the fluorite type protonic conductor lanthanum tungstate have been investigated by means of electrical conductivity relaxation. The experiments were performed in a temperature range from 650 C to 950 C, in a pO{sub 2} range from 3 mbar to 100 mbar and in a pH{sub 2}O range from 10 mbar to 100 mbar and in dry atmosphere. At high temperatures, the conductivity relaxation curve follows the expected two-fold non-monotonic behavior upon hydration. At low temperatures, however, the contribution of the fast hydrogen kinetic decreases and by a further decrease of the temperature, the relaxation shows two-fold monotonic behavior. The power factors - the contribution of each single fold relaxation curve to the resulting two-fold relaxation curve, which is a superposition - have been derived to explain the behavior mentioned above. The activation energy of the oxygen incorporation is rather low. Hence, oxidation experiments were performed in dry atmospheres in order to investigate if the origin of the oxygen species is relevant. The results revealed higher activation energies, which was expected, but also higher absolute values of the surface reaction rate and the diffusion coefficient. Oxidation experiments with increasing humidity revealed that the increased diffusivity cannot be attributed to the total concentrations of electron holes and proton interstitials. First experiments using spectroscopic relaxation, which is dependent on the concentration of hydroxy-anions only, were performed. Absorption bands

  14. Chemical kinetic performance losses for a hydrogen laser thermal thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccay, T. D.; Dexter, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Projected requirements for efficient, economical, orbit-raising propulsion systems have generated investigations into several potentially high specific impulse, moderate thrust, advanced systems. One of these systems, laser thermal propulsion, utilizes a high temperature plasma as the enthalpy source. The plasma is sustained by a focused laser beam which maintains the plasma temperature at levels near 20,000 K. Since such temperature levels lead to total dissociation and high ionization, the plasma thruster system potentially has a high specific impulse decrement due to recombination losses. The nozzle flow is expected to be sufficiently nonequilibrium to warrant concern over the achievable specific impluse. This investigation was an attempt at evaluation of those losses. The One-Dimensional Kinetics (ODK) option of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) Computer Program was used with a chemical kinetics rate set obtained from available literature to determine the chemical kinetic energy losses for typical plasma thruster conditions. The rates were varied about the nominal accepted values to band the possible losses. Kinetic losses were shown to be highly significant for a laser thermal thruster using hydrogen. A 30 percent reduction in specific impulse is possible simply due to the inability to completely extract the molecular recombination energy.

  15. Kinetic investigation of wood pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurner, F.; Mann, U.; Beck, S. R.

    1980-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the kinetics of the primary reactions of wood pyrolysis. A new experimental method was developed which enabled us to measure the rate of gas, tar, and char production while taking into account the temperature variations during the wood heating up. The experimental method developed did not require any sophisticated instruments. It facilitated the collection of gas, tar and residue (unreacted wood and char) as well as accurate measurement of the temperature inside the wood sample. Expressions relating the kinetic parameters to the measured variables were derived. The pyrolysis kinetics was investigated in the range of 300 to 400/sup 0/C at atmospheric pressure and under nitrogen atmosphere. Reaction temperature and mass fractions of gas, tar, and residue were measured as a function of time. Assuming first-order reactions, the kinetic parameters were determined using differential method. The measured activation energies of wood pyrolysis to gas, tar, and char were 88.6, 112.7, and 106.5 kJ/mole, respectively. These kinetic data were then used to predict the yield of the various pyrolysis products. It was found that the best prediction was obtained when an integral-mean temperature obtained from the temperature-time curve was used as reaction temperature. The pyrolysis products were analyzed to investigate the influence of the pyrolysis conditions on the composition. The gas consisted mainly of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and C/sub 3//sup +/-compounds. The gas composition depended on reaction time as well as reactor temperature. The tar analysis indicated that the tar consisted of about seven compounds. Its major compound was believed to be levoglucosan. Elemental analysis for the char showed that the carbon content increased with increasing temperature.

  16. Compensation Effect in the Hydrogenation/Dehydrogenation Kinetics of Metal Hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, A.; Vegge, T.; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2005-01-01

    The possible existence of a compensation effect, i.e. concurrent changes in activation energy and prefactor, is investigated for the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation kinetics of metal hydrides, by analyzing a series of reported kinetic studies on Mg and LaNi5 based hydrides. For these systems, we...

  17. Kinetics study of solid ammonia borane hydrogen release--modeling and experimental validation for chemical hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Joon; Rönnebro, Ewa C E; Rassat, Scot; Karkamkar, Abhi; Maupin, Gary; Holladay, Jamie; Simmons, Kevin; Brooks, Kriston

    2014-05-07

    Ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage with 19.6 wt% gravimetric hydrogen capacity of which maximum 16.2 wt% hydrogen can be released via an exothermic thermal decomposition below 200 °C. We have investigated the kinetics of hydrogen release from AB and from an AB-methyl cellulose (AB/MC) composite at temperatures of 160-300 °C using both experiments and modeling. The hydrogen release rate at 300 °C is twice as fast as at 160 °C. The purpose of our study was to show safe hydrogen release without thermal runaway effects and to validate system model kinetics. AB/MC released hydrogen at ∼20 °C lower than neat AB and at a faster release rate in that temperature range. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations were revised to better represent the growth and nucleation process during decomposition of AB. We explored two different reactor concepts; auger and fixed bed. The current auger reactor concept turned out to not be appropriate, however, we demonstrated safe self-propagation of the hydrogen release reaction of solid AB/MC in a fixed bed reactor.

  18. Hydrogen vacancies facilitate hydrogen transport kinetics in sodium hydride nanocrystallites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.; Eijt, S.W.H.

    2008-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations based on density-functional theory, of the vacancy-mediated hydrogen migration energy in bulk NaH and near the NaH(001) surface. The estimated rate of the vacancy mediated hydrogen transport, obtained within a hopping diffusion model, is consistent with the reaction

  19. Kinetics Study of Solid Ammonia Borane Hydrogen Release – Modeling and Experimental Validation for Chemical Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Maupin, Gary D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2014-02-24

    Ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage with 19.6 wt% gravimetric hydrogen capacity of which 16.2 wt% hydrogen can be utilized below 200°C. We have investigated the kinetics of hydrogen release from AB and from an AB-methyl cellulose (AB/MC) composite at temperatures of 160-300°C using both experiments and modeling. The purpose of our study was to show safe hydrogen release without thermal runaway effects and to validate system model kinetics. AB/MC released hydrogen at ~20°C lower than neat AB and at a rate that is two times faster. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations were revised to better represent the growth and nucleation process during decomposition of AB. We explored two different reactor concepts; Auger and fixed bed. The current Auger reactor concept turned out to not be appropriate, however, we demonstrated safe self-propagation of the hydrogen release reaction of solid AB/MC in a fixed bed reactor.

  20. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrel, L. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPNS, CEN Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chopin, J. [Laboratoire d`Electrochimie Inorganique, ENSSPICAM, Marseille (France)

    1996-12-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40{sup o}C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H{sup +} ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I{sub 2}], [IO{sub 3}{sup -}], [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] and [H{sup +}]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs.

  1. Graphene CVD growth on copper and nickel: role of hydrogen in kinetics and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losurdo, Maria; Giangregorio, Maria Michela; Capezzuto, Pio; Bruno, Giovanni

    2011-12-14

    Understanding the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) kinetics of graphene growth is important for advancing graphene processing and achieving better control of graphene thickness and properties. In the perspective of improving large area graphene quality, we have investigated in real-time the CVD kinetics using CH(4)-H(2) precursors on both polycrystalline copper and nickel. We highlighted the role of hydrogen in differentiating the growth kinetics and thickness of graphene on copper and nickel. Specifically, the growth kinetics and mechanism is framed in the competitive dissociative chemisorption of H(2) and dehydrogenating chemisorption of CH(4), and in the competition of the in-diffusion of carbon and hydrogen, being hydrogen in-diffusion faster in copper than nickel, while carbon diffusion is faster in nickel than copper. It is shown that hydrogen acts as an inhibitor for the CH(4) dehydrogenation on copper, contributing to suppress deposition onto the copper substrate, and degrades quality of graphene. Additionally, the evidence of the role of hydrogen in forming C-H out of plane defects in CVD graphene on Cu is also provided. Conversely, resurfacing recombination of hydrogen aids CH(4) decomposition in the case of Ni. Understanding better and providing other elements to the kinetics of graphene growth is helpful to define the optimal CH(4)/H(2) ratio, which ultimately can contribute to improve graphene layer thickness uniformity even on polycrystalline substrates.

  2. Kinetic Studies on State of the Art Solid Oxide Cells – A Comparison between Hydrogen/Steam and Reformate Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Graves, Christopher R.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    /steam and reformate fuels hydrogen/carbon-dioxide and hydrogen/methane/steam. It was found that the kinetics at the fuel electrode were exactly the same in both reformates. The hydrogen/steam fuel displayed slightly faster kinetics than the reformate fuels. Furthermore the gas conversion impedance in the hydrogen...... into a single process as the gas conversion was reduced. The SOC with finer electrode microstructure displayed improved kinetics.......Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigatedhydrogen...

  3. A kinetic and ESR investigation of iron(II) oxalate oxidation by hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen as a source of hydroxyl radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, J S; Wood, P M; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1997-01-01

    with hydrogen peroxide (Fe2+ + H2O2 --> Fe3+ + .OH + OH-) was monitored in continuous flow by ESR with t-butanol as a radical trap. The reaction is much faster than for uncomplexed Fe2+ and a rate constant, k = 1 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) is deduced for Fe(II)(ox). The reaction of Fe(II) oxalate with dioxygen...... is strongly pH dependent in a manner which indicates that the reactive species is Fe(II)(ox)2(2-), for which an apparent second order rate constant, k = 3.6 M(-1) s(-1), is deduced. Taken together, these results provide a mechanism for hydroxyl radical production in aqueous systems containing Fe(II) complexed...

  4. Kinetic Monte Carlo study on the evolution of silicon surface roughness under hydrogen thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Junzhuan; Pan, Lijia; Yu, Linwei; Zheng, Youdou; Shi, Yi, E-mail: yshi@nju.edu.cn

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • The KMC method is adopted to investigate the relationships between surface evolution and hydrogen thermal treatment conditions. • The reduction in surface roughness is divided into two stages at relatively low temperatures, both exhibiting exponential dependence on the time. • The optimized surface structure can be obtained by precisely adjusting thermal treatment temperatures and hydrogen pressures. - Abstract: The evolution of a two-dimensional silicon surface under hydrogen thermal treatment is studied by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, focusing on the dependence of the migration behaviors of surface atoms on both the temperature and hydrogen pressure. We adopt different activation energies to analyze the influence of hydrogen pressure on the evolution of surface morphology at high temperatures. The reduction in surface roughness is divided into two stages, both exhibiting exponential dependence on the equilibrium time. Our results indicate that a high hydrogen pressure is conducive to obtaining optimized surfaces, as a strategy in the applications of three-dimensional devices.

  5. Kinetics of Hydrogen Reduction of Chalcopyrite Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Ritayan; Ghosh, Dinabandhu

    2015-12-01

    A Ghatshila chalcopyrite concentrate (average particle size, 50 μm) containing primarily CuFeS2 and SiO2 (Cu 16 pct) was reduced by a stream of hydrogen in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at selected temperatures [1173 K to 1323 K (900 °C to 1050 °C)], hydrogen flow rates, partial pressures of hydrogen (0.33 × 101.3 to 101.3 kPa), and sample bed heights. The product was a mixture of Cu (26 pct), SiO2, CuFeO2, and Fe. The rate equations for the three typical controlling mechanisms, namely, gas film diffusion (mass transfer), pore diffusion, and interfacial reaction, have been derived for the system geometry under study and applied to identify the rate-controlling steps. The first stage of the reduction, which extended up to the first 13 minutes, was rate controlled by the interfacial reaction. The last stage, which spanned over the last 60 to 120 minutes and accounted for a small percentage of reduction, was controlled by pore diffusion through the built-up Cu (and Fe) layer. The activation energy in the first stage was 101 kJ mol-1 and that in the second stage was 76 kJ mol-1. Subsequent acid leaching with 1 M HCl solution of the reduction product removed all soluble species, leaving a Cu (53.3 pct) + SiO2 mixture, with a small concentration (2.7 pct) of Cu2O in it. This result compares well with the predicted final mixture of Cu (59 pct)-SiO2 based on a mass balance on the starting concentrate. A follow-up heating at 1523 K (1250 °C) produced a sintered Cu-SiO2 composite with spherical copper particles of 400 µm diameter embedded in a silica matrix. Elemental chemical analyses were carried out by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy/atomic absorption spectroscopy. The phase identification and microstructural characterization of Cu-SiO2 mixtures were carried out by X-ray powder diffraction and optical microscopy.

  6. A study of spin isomer conversion kinetics in supercritical fluid hydrogen for cyrogenic fuel storage technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Petitpas, Guillaume; Aceves, Salvador M.

    2011-08-01

    A detailed kinetic study of para-ortho hydrogen conversion under supercritical conditions using rotational Raman scattering is presented. Isochoric measurements of initially low ortho concentrations over temperatures 32 hydrogen fuel tank dormancy performance for hydrogen-power vehicles.

  7. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  8. Kinetics with deactivation of methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation for hydrogen energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, G.; Marin, A.; Wyss, C.; Mueller, S.; Newson, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation step to recycle toluene and release hydrogen is being studied as part of a hydrogen energy storage project. The reaction is performed catalytically in a fixed bed reactor, and the efficiency of this step significantly determines overall system economics. The fresh catalyst kinetics and the deactivation of the catalyst by coke play an important role in the process analysis. The main reaction kinetics were determined from isothermal experiments using a parameter sensitivity analysis for model discrimination. An activation energy for the main reaction of 220{+-}11 kJ/mol was obtained from a two-parameter model. From non-isothermal deactivation in PC-controlled integral reactors, an activation energy for deactivation of 160 kJ/mol was estimated. A model for catalyst coke content of 3-17 weight% was compared with experimental data. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  9. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Phase Transformations in Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-08-31

    The aim of this project is to develop and apply computational materials science tools to determine and predict critical properties of hydrogen storage materials. By better understanding the absorption/desorption mechanisms and characterizing their physical properties it is possible to explore and evaluate new directions for hydrogen storage materials. Particular emphasis is on the determination of the structure and thermodynamics of hydrogen storage materials, the investigation of microscopic mechanisms of hydrogen uptake and release in various materials and the role of catalysts in this process. As a team we have decided to focus on a single material, NaAlH{sub 4}, in order to fully be able to study the many aspects of hydrogen storage. We have focused on phase stability, mass transport and size-dependent reaction mechanisms in this material.

  10. Improved hydrogen sorption kinetics in wet ball milled Mg hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Li

    2011-05-04

    In this work, wet ball milling method is used in order to improve hydrogen sorption behaviour due to its improved microstructure of solid hydrogen materials. Compared to traditional ball milling method, wet ball milling has benefits on improvement of MgH{sub 2} microstructure and further influences on its hydrogen sorption behavior. With the help of solvent tetrahydrofuran (THF), wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder has much smaller particle size and its specific surface area is 7 times as large as that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder. Although after ball milling the grain size is decreased a lot compared to as-received MgH{sub 2} powder, the grain size of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is larger than that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder due to the lubricant effect of solvent THF during wet ball milling. The improved particle size and specific surface area of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is found to be determining its hydrogen sorption kinetics especially at relatively low temperatures. And it also shows good cycling sorption behavior, which decides on its industrial applicability. With three different catalysts MgH{sub 2} powder shows improved hydrogen sorption behavior as well as the cyclic sorption behavior. Among them, the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst is found to be the most effective one in this work. Compared to the wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder, the particle size and specific surface area of the MgH{sub 2} powder with catalysts are similar to the previous ones, while the grain size of the MgH{sub 2} with catalysts is much finer. In this case, two reasons for hydrogen sorption improvement are suggested: one is the reduction of the grain size. The other may be as pointed out in some literatures that formation of new oxidation could enhance the hydrogen sorption kinetics, which is also the reason why its hydrogen capacity is decreased compared to without catalysts. After further ball milling, the specific surface area of wet ball milled Mg

  11. Thermodynamic, kinetic and mechanistic investigations of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 128; Issue 3. Thermodynamic, kinetic and mechanistic investigations of Piperazine oxidation by Diperiodatocuprate(III) complex in aqueous alkaline medium. Vijay P Pattar Prashant A Magdum Deepa G Patil Sharanappa T Nandibewoor. Regular Articles Volume 128 ...

  12. A kinetic study on the adsorption and reaction of hydrogen over silica-supported ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts during the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderWiel, David P. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Although the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide has been a subject of considerable investigation for many years, its increasing economical attractiveness as an industrial source of hydrocarbons has recently led to a search for more active and selective catalysts. A fundamental problem in the development of such catalysts is an incomplete knowledge of the operative surface processes, due in large part to the inability to accurately measure surface concentrations of reactant species during reaction. Specifically, the concentration of surface hydrogen proves difficult to estimate using normally revealing techniques such as transient isotopic exchange due to kinetic isotope effects. Knowledge of such concentrations is essential to the determination of the mechanisms of adsorption and reaction, since many kinetic parameters are concentration dependent. It is the aim of this research to investigate the mechanism and kinetics of the adsorption and reaction of hydrogen on silica-supported ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts during the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. By preadsorbing carbon monoxide onto the surface of ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts, the kinetics of hydrogen adsorption and reaction can be monitored upon exposure of this surface to ambient hydrogen gas. This is accomplished by conducting identical experiments on two separate systems. First, the formation of methane is monitored using mass spectroscopy, and specific reaction rates and apparent activation energies are measured. Next, in situ 1H-NMR is used to monitor the amount of hydrogen present on the catalyst surface during adsorption and reaction. The results for these two sets of experiments are then combined to show a correlation between the rate of reaction and the surface hydrogen concentration. Finally, transition state theory is applied to this system and is used to explain the observed change in the apparent activation energy. The structure sensitivity of hydrogen

  13. Palladium mixed-metal surface-modified AB5-type intermetallides enhance hydrogen sorption kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Denys

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface engineering approaches were adopted in the preparation of advanced hydrogen sorption materials, based on ‘low-temperature’, AB5-type intermetallides. The approaches investigated included micro-encapsulation with palladium and mixed-metal mantles using electroless plating. The influence of micro-encapsulation on the surface morphology and kinetics of hydrogen charging were investigated. It was found that palladium-nickel (Pd-Ni co-deposition by electroless plating significantly improved the kinetics of hydrogen charging of the AB5-type intermetallides at low hydrogen pressure and temperature, after long-term pre-exposure to air. The improvement in the kinetics of hydrogen charging was credited to a synergistic effect between the palladium and nickel atoms in the catalytic mantle and the formation of an ‘interfacial bridge’ for hydrogen diffusion by the nickel atoms in the deposited layer. The developed surface-modified materials may find application in highly selective hydrogen extraction, purification, and storage from impure hydrogen feeds.

  14. Computational investigation of hydrogen adsorption in silicon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    124, No. 1, January 2012, pp. 255–260. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Computational investigation of hydrogen adsorption in silicon-lithium binary clusters. #. NARESH K JENA, K ... room temperature applications.3 Though a large num- ber of materials ... of the cluster systems have been carried out by using the electronic ...

  15. Kinetics of hydrogen molecules in MAGNUM-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baeva, M.; W. J. Goedheer,; Cardozo, N. J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Results from simulations of plasma and neutrals under conditions predictively characterizing the detached plasma regime in the linear machine MAGNUM-PSI are presented. The relaxation of the vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules is investigated in order to establish a relation between their

  16. Elementary Processes and Kinetic Modeling for Hydrogen and Helium Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Celiberto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report cross-sections and rate coefficients for excited states colliding with electrons, heavy particles and walls useful for the description of H 2 /He plasma kinetics under different conditions. In particular, the role of the rotational states in resonant vibrational excitations of the H 2 molecule by electron impact and the calculation of the related cross-sections are illustrated. The theoretical determination of the cross-section for the rovibrational energy exchange and dissociation of H 2 molecule, induced by He atom impact, by using the quasi-classical trajectory method is discussed. Recombination probabilities of H atoms on tungsten and graphite, relevant for the determination of the nascent vibrational distribution, are also presented. An example of a state-to-state plasma kinetic model for the description of shock waves operating in H 2 and He-H 2 mixtures is presented, emphasizing also the role of electronically-excited states in affecting the electron energy distribution function of free electrons. Finally, the thermodynamic properties and the electrical conductivity of non-ideal, high-density hydrogen plasma are finally discussed, in particular focusing on the pressure ionization phenomenon in high-pressure high-temperature plasmas.

  17. Plasma Kinetics in Electrical Discharge in Mixture of Air, Water and Ethanol Vapors for Hydrogen Enriched Syngas Production

    OpenAIRE

    Shchedrin, A. I.; Levko, D. S.; Ryabtsev, A. V.; Chernyak, V. Ya.; Yukhymenko, V. V.; Olszewski, S. V.; Naumov, V. V.; Prysiazhnevych, I. V.; Solomenko, E. V.; Demchina, V. P.; Kudryavtsev, V. S.

    2008-01-01

    The complex theoretical and experimental investigation of plasma kinetics of the electric discharge in the mixture of air and ethanol-water vapors is carried out. The discharge was burning in the cavity, formed by air jets pumping between electrodes, placed in aqueous ethanol solution. It is found out that the hydrogen yield from the discharge is maximal in the case when ethanol and water in the solution are in equal amounts. It is shown that the hydrogen production increases with the dischar...

  18. Investigation of Laser Peening Effects on Hydrogen Charged Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaleski, Tania M. [San Jose State Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-10-30

    Hydrogen-rich environments such as fuel cell reactors can exhibit damage caused by hydrogen permeation in the form of corrosion cracking by lowering tensile strength and decreasing material ductility. Coatings and liners have been investigated, but there were few shot-peening or laser peening studies referenced in the literature with respect to preventing hydrogen embrittlement. The surface compressive residual stress induced by laser peening had shown success in preventing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for stainless steels in power plants. The question arose if the residual stresses induced by laser peening could delay the effects of hydrogen in a material. This study investigated the effect of laser peening on hydrogen penetration into metal alloys. Three areas were studied: laser peening, hydrogenation, and hydrogen detection. This study demonstrated that laser peening does not reduce the hydrogen permeation into a stainless steel surface nor does it prevent hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of laser peening to reduce hydrogen-assisted fatigue was unclear.

  19. An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, Robers [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Dryer, Frederick [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Ju, Yiguang [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2013-09-30

    An integrated and collaborative effort involving experiments and complementary chemical kinetic modeling investigated the effects of significant concentrations of water and CO2 and minor contaminant species (methane [CH4], ethane [C2H6], NOX, etc.) on the ignition and combustion of HHC fuels. The research effort specifically addressed broadening the experimental data base for ignition delay, burning rate, and oxidation kinetics at high pressures, and further refinement of chemical kinetic models so as to develop compositional specifications related to the above major and minor species. The foundation for the chemical kinetic modeling was the well validated mechanism for hydrogen and carbon monoxide developed over the last 25 years by Professor Frederick Dryer and his co-workers at Princeton University. This research furthered advance the understanding needed to develop practical guidelines for realistic composition limits and operating characteristics for HHC fuels. A suite of experiments was utilized that that involved a high-pressure laminar flow reactor, a pressure-release type high-pressure combustion chamber and a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor.

  20. Thermodynamic, kinetic and mechanistic investigations of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    standardized by iodometric titration and gravimetrically by the thiocyanate23 method. 2.3 Kinetic Measurements. Kinetics was followed under pseudo first order con- ditions where [PPZ] > [DPC] at 25 ± 0.1◦C, unless otherwise specified. The reaction was initiated by mix- ing the DPC to PPZ solution, which also contained.

  1. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen defect pairs in SrTiO3 from density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A density functional theory investigation of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen–hydrogen defect interactions in the cubic SrTiO3 perovskite is presented. We find a net attraction between two hydrogen atoms with an optimal separation of ∼2.3 Å. The energy gain is ca. 0.33 e...... agreement with the proposed properties of the double hydrogen defect.......V compared to two non-interacting H defects. The main cause of the net attractive potential is elastic defect interactions through lattice deformation. Two possible diffusion paths for the hydrogen defect pair are investigated and are both determined to be faster than the corresponding diffusion path...

  2. Hydrogen tunneling in adenosylcobalamin-dependent glutamate mutase: evidence from intrinsic kinetic isotope effects measured by intra-molecular competition †

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Miri; Song, Hangtian; Håkansson, Kristina; Marsh, E. Neil G.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen atom transfer reactions between substrate and coenzyme are a key mechanistic feature of all AdoCbl-dependent enzymes. For one of these enzymes, glutamate mutase, we have investigated whether hydrogen tunneling makes a significant contribution to the mechanism by examining the temperature-dependence of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect associated with hydrogen atom transfer from methylaspartate to the coenzyme. To do this we designed a novel intra-molecular competition experiment t...

  3. Ab Initio Kinetics of Hydrogen Abstraction from Methyl Acetate by Hydrogen, Methyl, Oxygen, Hydroxyl, and Hydroperoxy Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ting; Yang, Xueliang; Krauter, Caroline M; Ju, Yiguang; Carter, Emily A

    2015-06-18

    The kinetics of hydrogen abstraction by five radicals (H, O((3)P), OH, CH3, and HO2) from methyl acetate (MA) is investigated theoretically in order to gain further understanding of certain aspects of the combustion chemistry of biodiesels, such as the effect of the ester moiety. We employ ab initio quantum chemistry methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples correction (CCSD(T)) and multireference averaged coupled pair functional theory (MRACPF2), to predict chemically accurate reaction energetics. Overall, MRACPF2 predicts slightly higher barrier heights than CCSD(T) for MA + H/CH3/O/OH, but slightly lower barrier heights for hydrogen abstraction by HO2. Based on the obtained reaction energies, we also report high-pressure-limit rate constants using transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with the separable-hindered-rotor approximation, the variable reaction coordinate TST, and the multi-structure all-structure approach. The fitted modified Arrhenius expressions are provided over a temperature range of 250 to 2000 K. The predictions are in good agreement with available experimental results. Abstractions from both of the methyl groups in MA are expected to contribute to consumption of the fuel as they exhibit similar rate coefficients. The reactions involving the OH radical are predicted to have the highest rates among the five abstracting radicals, while those initiated by HO2 are expected to be the lowest.

  4. Progress in improving thermodynamics and kinetics of new hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li-fang; Jiang, Chun-hong; Liu, Shu-sheng; Jiao, Cheng-li; Si, Xiao-liang; Wang, Shuang; Li, Fen; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Li-xian; Xu, Fen; Huang, Feng-lei

    2011-06-01

    Hydrogen storage material has been much developed recently because of its potential for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell applications. A successful solid-state reversible storage material should meet the requirements of high storage capacity, suitable thermodynamic properties, and fast adsorption and desorption kinetics. Complex hydrides, including boron hydride and alanate, ammonia borane, metal organic frameworks (MOFs), covalent organic frameworks (COFs) and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), are remarkable hydrogen storage materials because of their advantages of high energy density and safety. This feature article focuses mainly on the thermodynamics and kinetics of these hydrogen storage materials in the past few years.

  5. Modeling of hydrogen production methods: Single particle model and kinetics assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The investigation carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is devoted to the modeling of biomass pyrolysis reactors producing an oil vapor (tar) which is a precursor to hydrogen. This is an informal collaboration with NREL whereby JPL uses the experimentally-generated NREL data both as initial and boundary conditions for the calculations, and as a benchmark for model validation. The goal of this investigation is to find drivers of biomass fast-pyrolysis in the low temperature regime. The rationale is that experimental observations produce sparse discrete conditions for model validation, and that numerical simulations produced with a validated model are an economic way to find control parameters and an optimal operation regime, thereby circumventing costly changes in hardware and tests. During this first year of the investigation, a detailed mathematical model has been formulated for the temporal and spatial accurate modeling of solid-fluid reactions in biomass particles. These are porous particles for which volumetric reaction rate data is known a priori and both the porosity and the permeability of the particle are large enough to allow for continuous gas phase flow. The methodology has been applied to the pyrolysis of spherically symmetric biomass particles by considering previously published kinetics schemes for both cellulose and wood. The results show that models which neglect the thermal and species boundary layers exterior to the particle will generally over predict both the pyrolysis rates and experimentally obtainable tar yields. An evaluation of the simulation results through comparisons with experimental data indicates that while the cellulose kinetics is reasonably accurate, the wood pyrolysis kinetics is not accurate; particularly at high reactor temperatures. Current effort in collaboration with NREL is aimed at finding accurate wood kinetics.

  6. Tailoring Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides towards Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state hydrogen storage using various materials is expected to provide the ultimate solution for safe and efficient on-board storage. Complex hydrides have attracted increasing attention over the past two decades due to their high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. In this account, we review studies from our lab on tailoring the thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides, including metal alanates, borohydrides and amides. By changing the material composition and structure, developing feasible preparation methods, doping high-performance catalysts, optimizing multifunctional additives, creating nanostructures and understanding the interaction mechanisms with hydrogen, the operating temperatures for hydrogen storage in metal amides, alanates and borohydrides are remarkably reduced. This temperature reduction is associated with enhanced reaction kinetics and improved reversibility. The examples discussed in this review are expected to provide new inspiration for the development of complex hydrides with high hydrogen capacity and appropriate thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Kinetic analysis on photocatalytic degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide on nanosized porous TiO2 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iis Sopyan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the UV illumination-assisted degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, hydrogen sulfide, and ammonia on highly active nanostructured-anatase and rutile films were investigated. It was found that the anatase film showed a higher photocatalytic activity than the counterpart did, however, the magnitude of difference in the photocatalytic activity of both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide. To elucidate the reasons for the observation, the adsorption characteristics and the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of the three reactants on both films were analyzed. The adsorption analysis examined using a simple Langmuir isotherm, showed that adsorbability on both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide, which can be explained in terms of the decreasing electron-donor capacity. Acetaldehyde and ammonia adsorbed more strongly and with higher coverage on anatase film (1.2 and 5.6 molecules/nm2, respectively than on rutile (0.6 and 4.7 molecules/nm2, respectively. Conversely, hydrogen sulfide molecules adsorbed more strongly on rutile film (0.7 molecules/nm2 than on anatase (0.4 molecules/nm2. Exposure to UV light illumination brought about the photocatalytic oxidation of the three gases in contact with both TiO2 films, and the decrease in concentration were measured, and their kinetics are analyzed in terms of the Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetic model. From the kinetic analysis, it was found that the anatase film showed the photocatalytic activities that were factors of ~8 and ~5 higher than the rutile film for the degradation of gaseous ammonia and acetaldehyde, respectively. However, the activity was only a factor of ~1.5 higher for the photodegradation of hydrogen sulfide. These observations are systematically explained by the charge separation efficiency and the adsorption characteristics of each catalyst as well as by the physical and electrochemical properties of each

  8. Biomass Steam Gasification with In-Situ CO2 Capture for Enriched Hydrogen Gas Production: A Reaction Kinetics Modelling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ibrahim Abdul Mutalib

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to energy and environmental issues, hydrogen has become a more attractive clean fuel. Furthermore, there is high interest in producing hydrogen from biomass with a view to sustainability. The thermochemical process for hydrogen production, i.e. gasification, is the focus of this work. This paper discusses the mathematical modeling of hydrogen production process via biomass steam gasification with calcium oxide as sorbent in a gasifier. A modelling framework consisting of kinetics models for char gasification, methanation, Boudouard, methane reforming, water gas shift and carbonation reactions to represent the gasification and CO2 adsorption in the gasifier, is developed and implemented in MATLAB. The scope of the work includes an investigation of the influence of the temperature, steam/biomass ratio and sorbent/biomass ratio on the amount of hydrogen produced, product gas compositions and carbon conversion. The importance of different reactions involved in the process is also discussed. It is observed that hydrogen production and carbon conversion increase with increasing temperature and steam/biomass ratio. The model predicts a maximum hydrogen mole fraction in the product gas of 0.81 occurring at 950 K, steam/biomass ratio of 3.0 and sorbent/biomass ratio of 1.0. In addition, at sorbent/biomass ratio of 1.52, purity of H2 can be increased to 0.98 mole fraction with all CO2 present in the system adsorbed.

  9. A kinetic investigation of polyurethane polymerization for reactive extrusion purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, VWA; Padsalgikar, AD; Ganzeveld, KJ; Janssen, LPBM

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the reaction conditions on the kinetics of two different polyurethane systems were investigated. To do so, three different kinetic methods were compared: adiabatic temperature rise (ATR), measurement kneader, and high-temperature measurements. For the first polyurethane system,

  10. Detailed kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis of hydrogen iodide decomposition in sulfur-iodine cycle for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Zhou, Junhu; Wang, Zhihua; Cen, Kefa [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2008-01-15

    A new detailed kinetic modeling was developed for homogeneous decomposition of hydrogen iodide (HI) in the sulfur-iodine cycle. Results show the HI decomposition reaction is sensitive to temperature, and the response time of reaction reduces from 1 s to 10 ms as temperature increases from 500 to 800 {sup circle} C. The decomposition is also improved as pressure increased. Kinetic calculations are also compared with the experimental data, and all trends of the experiment can be reproduced by the model. Sensitivity analysis shows that the reactions of HI with HI, H and I play a major role in the hydrogen production process and the hydrogen consumption occurs primarily by reaction of H with I{sub 2} and reaction of I with H{sub 2} to form HI. As temperature increases, different reactions play a dominant role in HI decomposition process. Based on the detailed kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis results, the HI decomposition reaction path diagram was constructed in this paper. (author)

  11. GEOMETRY, HEAT REMOVAL AND KINETICS SCOPING MODELS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B

    2007-11-16

    It is recognized that detailed models of proposed hydrogen storage systems are essential to gain insight into the complex processes occurring during the charging and discharging processes. Such insight is an invaluable asset for both assessing the viability of a particular system and/or for improving its design. The detailed models, however, require time to develop and run. Clearly, it is much more efficient to begin a modeling effort with a good system design and to progress from that point. To facilitate this approach, it is useful to have simplified models that can quickly estimate optimal loading and discharge kinetics, effective hydrogen capacities, system dimensions and heat removal requirements. Parameters obtained from these models can then be input to the detailed models to obtain an accurate assessment of system performance that includes more complete integration of the physical processes. This report describes three scoping models that assess preliminary system design prior to invoking a more detailed finite element analysis. The three models address the kinetics, the scaling and heat removal parameters of the system, respectively. The kinetics model is used to evaluate the effect of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the loading and discharge kinetics. As part of the kinetics calculations, the model also determines the mass of stored hydrogen per mass of hydride (in a particular reference form). As such, the model can determine the optimal loading and discharge rates for a particular hydride and the maximum achievable loading (over an infinite period of time). The kinetics model developed with the Mathcad{reg_sign} solver, runs in a mater of seconds and can quickly be used to identify the optimal temperature and pressure for either the loading or discharge processes. The geometry scoping model is used to calculate the size of the system, the optimal placement of heat transfer elements, and the gravimetric and volumetric capacities for a particular

  12. Spectroscopic determination of hydrogenation rates and intermediates during carbonyl hydrogenation catalyzed by Shvo's hydroxycyclopentadienyl diruthenium hydride agrees with kinetic modeling based on independently measured rates of elementary reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P; Beetner, Sharon E; Johnson, Jeffrey B

    2008-02-20

    The catalytic hydrogenation of benzaldehyde and acetophenone with the Shvo hydrogenation catalysts were monitored by in situ IR spectroscopy in both toluene and THF. The disappearance of organic carbonyl compound and the concentrations of the ruthenium species present throughout the hydrogenation reaction were observed. The dependence of the hydrogenation rate on substrate, H2 pressure, total ruthenium concentration, and solvent were measured. In toluene, bridging diruthenium hydride 1 was the only observable ruthenium species until nearly all of the substrate was consumed. In THF, both 1 and some monoruthenium hydride 2 were observed during the course of the hydrogenation. A full kinetic model of the hydrogenation based on rate constants for individual steps in the catalysis was developed. This kinetic model simulates the rate of carbonyl compound hydrogenation and of the amounts of ruthenium species 1 and 2 present during hydrogenations.

  13. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Elementary Processes and Kinetic Modeling for Hydrogen and Helium Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Celiberto; Mario Capitelli; Gianpiero Colonna; Giuliano D’Ammando; Fabrizio Esposito; Janev, Ratko K.; Vincenzo Laporta; Annarita Laricchiuta; Lucia Daniela Pietanza; Maria Rutigliano; Jogindra M. Wadehra

    2017-01-01

    We report cross-sections and rate coefficients for excited states colliding with electrons, heavy particles and walls useful for the description of H 2 /He plasma kinetics under different conditions. In particular, the role of the rotational states in resonant vibrational excitations of the H 2 molecule by electron impact and the calculation of the related cross-sections are illustrated. The theoretical determination of the cross-section for the rovibrational energy exchange an...

  15. KINETIC, ISOTHERM AND EQUILIBRIUM STUDY OF ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE-WASTEWATER SYSTEM USING MODIFIED EGGSHELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O A Habeeb

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The studies of adsorption equilibrium isotherm and kinetics of hydrogen sulfide-water systems on calcite-based adsorbents prepared from eggshell are undertaken. The effects of operating variables such as contact time and initial concentration on the adsorption capacity of hydrogen sulfide are investigated. The modified eggshells are characterized by using different analytical approaches such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR. The batch mode adsorption process is performed at optimum removal conditions: dosage of 1 g/L, pH level of pH 6, agitation speed of 150 rpm and contact time of 14h for adsorbing hydrogen sulfide with an initial concentration of 100-500 mg/L. In the current study, the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin models are used to predict the adsorption isotherms. Our equilibrium data for hydrogen sulfide adsorption agrees well with those of the Langmuir equation. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity is 150.07 mg/g. Moreover, the kinetics of H2S adsorption by using the modified calcite of eggshell follows a pseudo-second-order model. From the current work, we have found that the calcite eggshell is a suitable adsorbent for H2S embeded inside the waste water. Most importantly, chicken eggshell is a waste and vastly available; hence, it could serve as a practical mean for H2S adsorption.

  16. Effects of pH and ORP on microbial ecology and kinetics for hydrogen production in continuously dark fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiaxiu; An, Dong; Ren, Nanqi; Zhang, Yongming; Chen, Ying

    2011-12-01

    The microbial structure and kinetic characteristics of the hydrogen producing strains in two fermentative continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTRs) were studied by controlling pH and oxidation and reduction potential (ORP). The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests were conducted to investigate the fermentative performance of Clostridium histolyticum (C. histolyticum), Clostridium lituseburense (C. lituseburense) and Enterobacteriaceae. The experimental results showed that in ethanol-type reactor 1#, the relative abundance of the strains was 48%, 30% and 22%. Comparatively, the relative abundance in butyric acid-type reactor 2# was 24%, 55% and 19% with butyric acids and hydrogen as the main products. The kinetic results indicated that the hydrogen yield coefficients YP/X in both reactors were 8.357 and 5.951 l-H2/g, while the coefficients of the cellular yield were 0.0268 and 0.0350 g-Cell/g, respectively. At the same biomass, the hydrogen yield in ethanol-type reactors was more than that in butyric acid reactors. However, the cellular synthesis rate in ethanol-type reactors was low when the same carbon source was used. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Crystallization Kinetics of Fully Hydrogenated Palm Oil in Sunflower Oil Mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloek, W.; Walstra, P.; Vliet, van T.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of mixtures of fully hydrogenated palm oil (HP) in sunflower oil (SF) was studied. The thermal properties and phase behavior of this model system were characterized by means of differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. From the melting enthalpy and clear

  18. Highly improved hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics of the nanocrystalline and amorphous PrMg12-type alloys by mechanical milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. H.; Shang, H. W.; Li, Y. Q.; Yuan, Z. M.; Yang, T.; Zhao, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    Nanocrystalline and amorphous PrMg11Ni + x wt.% Ni (x = 100, 200) alloys were synthesized by mechanical milling. Effects of Ni content and milling duration on the structures, hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics of the as-milled alloys were investigated systematically. The structures were characterized by XRD and HRTEM. The hydrogen desorption activation energy was calculated by using Kissinger method. The results show that increasing Ni content dramatically improves the electrochemical discharge capacity of the as-milled alloys. Furthermore, the variation of milling time has a significant impact on the kinetics of the alloys. As the milling time increased, the high-rate discharge ability (HRD), gaseous hydrogen absorption capacity and hydrogenation rate increased at first but decreased finally, while the dehydrogenation rate always increased.

  19. Investigation on hydrogenation performance of Mg{sub 2}Ni+10 wt.% NbN composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin; Han, Shumin [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhu, Yi [Inner Mongolia Rare Earth Ovonic Metal Hydride Co. Ltd., Baotou 014030 (China); Chen, Xiaocui; Ke, Dandan; Wang, Zhibin; Liu, Ting; Ma, Yufei [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, College of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The Mg{sub 2}Ni+10 wt.% NbN composite was prepared by mechanical milling and its hydrogen absorption/desorption properties and microstructure were systematically investigated. XRD results indicated that NbN was stable during ball milling process while partly decomposed into NbN{sub 0.95} and NbH during hydriding/dehydriding cycles irreversibly. The composite exhibited excellent hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics performance with 2.71 wt.% hydrogen absorbed in 60 s at 423 K and 0.81 wt.% hydrogen released in 2 h at 523 K, respectively. The H diffusion constant of the composite reached 14.98×10{sup −5} s{sup −1} which was more than twice increased than that of pure Mg{sub 2}Ni powder. The superior hydrogen storage properties of the composite were ascribed to the refined grain size and abundant N-defect points provided by NbN and NbN{sub 0.95} in the composite. - Graphical abstract: The Mg{sub 2}Ni+10 wt.% NbN composite displays improvements on particle size distribution as well as hydrogen storage properties compared with that of pure Mg{sub 2}Ni. - Highlights: • NbN is introduced into Mg{sub 2}Ni hydride by Ar protected ball-milling. • Surfaces of the additive NbN particle are reduced by Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}. • Hydrogenation kinetic property at 423 K is double improved. • Dehydrogenation capacity at 523 K of composites is beyond double improved.

  20. In situ hydrogen consumption kinetics as an indicator of subsurface microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S.H.; Smith, R.L.; Suflita, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are few methods available for broadly assessing microbial community metabolism directly within a groundwater environment. In this study, hydrogen consumption rates were estimated from in situ injection/withdrawal tests conducted in two geochemically varying, contaminated aquifers as an approach towards developing such a method. The hydrogen consumption first-order rates varied from 0.002 nM h-1 for an uncontaminated, aerobic site to 2.5 nM h-1 for a contaminated site where sulfate reduction was a predominant process. The method could accommodate the over three orders of magnitude range in rates that existed between subsurface sites. In a denitrifying zone, the hydrogen consumption rate (0.02 nM h-1) was immediately abolished in the presence of air or an antibiotic mixture, suggesting that such measurements may also be sensitive to the effects of environmental perturbations on field microbial activities. Comparable laboratory determinations with sediment slurries exhibited hydrogen consumption kinetics that differed substantially from the field estimates. Because anaerobic degradation of organic matter relies on the rapid consumption of hydrogen and subsequent maintenance at low levels, such in situ measures of hydrogen turnover can serve as a key indicator of the functioning of microbial food webs and may be more reliable than laboratory determinations. ?? 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  1. Investigation into the kinetics of constructed wetland degradation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The RTD was multi-modal – indicating by-pass flow – and showed long tailing due to mixing, diffusive effects and dead zones. Kinetic performance was investigated via monitoring total organic carbon and total nitrogen degradation, with a continual feed of artificial domestic wastewater (110 mg·L−1 COD). 93% reduction in ...

  2. Kinetic, mechanistic and spectral investigation of ruthenium (III ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 117; Issue 1. Kinetic, mechanistic and spectral investigation of ruthenium (III)-catalysed oxidation of atenolol by alkaline permanganate (stopped-flow technique). Rahamatalla M Mulla Gurubasavaraj C Hiremath Sharanappa T Nandibewoor. Full Papers Volume 117 ...

  3. Effect of axiallity of stress state on hydrogen cracking kinetics in metals -- Troiano revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmins, P. [IESCO, San Pedro, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    An experimental study based on the acoustic emission technique was carried out to examine how the axiallity of the stress state, as first postulated by Troiano, influenced the hydrogen cracking kinetics, in terms of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) propagation, using constant K specimens machined from Zr-2.5 wt% Nb pressure tube alloy, of 2 mm, 4 mm and 8 mm thickness. By changing the stress state from plane strain to plane stress at a constant applied stress intensity of 15 MPa{radical}m and a hydrogen level of 50 ppm, the DHC velocity was reduced, in keeping with Troiano`s hypothesis. An explanation of how the observations made on these specimens can be related to other hydrogen cracking mechanisms, is presented.

  4. Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism in a thermophilic, anaerobic, butyrate-degrading triculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahring, B K; Westermann, P

    1987-02-01

    Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism were determined with butyrate-limited, chemostat-grown tricultures of a thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium together with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic rod. Kinetic parameters were determined from progress curves fitted to the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation. The apparent half-saturation constants, K(m), for butyrate, acetate, and dissolved hydrogen were 76 muM, 0.4 mM, and 8.5 muM, respectively. Butyrate and hydrogen were metabolized to a concentration of less than 1 muM, whereas acetate uptake usually ceased at a concentration of 25 to 75 muM, indicating a threshold level for acetate uptake. No significant differences in K(m) values for butyrate degradation were found between chemostat- and batch-grown tricultures, although the maximum growth rate was somewhat higher in the batch cultures in which the medium was supplemented with yeast extract. Acetate utilization was found to be the rate-limiting reaction for complete degradation of butyrate to methane and carbon dioxide in continuous culture. Increasing the dilution rate resulted in a gradual accumulation of acetate. The results explain the low concentrations of butyrate and hydrogen normally found during anaerobic digestion and the observation that acetate is the first volatile fatty acid to accumulate upon a decrease in retention time or increase in organic loading of a digestor.

  5. A feasible kinetic model for the hydrogen oxidation on ruthenium electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, M.S.; Gennero de Chialvo, M.R. [Programa de Electroquimica Aplicada e Ingenieria Electroquimica (PRELINE), Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Chialvo, A.C., E-mail: achialvo@fiq.unl.edu.a [Programa de Electroquimica Aplicada e Ingenieria Electroquimica (PRELINE), Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2010-07-01

    The hydrogen oxidation reaction (hor) was studied on a polycrystalline ruthenium electrode in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution at different rotation rates ({omega}). The experimental polarization curves recorded on steady state show the existence of a maximum current with a non-linear dependence of the current density on {omega}{sup 1/2}. On the basis of the Tafel-Heyrovsky-Volmer kinetic mechanism, coupled with a process of inhibition of active sites by the reversible electroadsorption of hydroxyl species, it was possible to appropriately describe the origin of the maximum current. The corresponding set of kinetic parameters was also calculated from the correlation of the experimental results with the proposed kinetic model.

  6. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies of the [palladium(Ar-bian)]-catalyzed semi-hydrogenation of 4-octyne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluwer, Alexander M; Koblenz, Tehila S; Jonischkeit, Thorsten; Woelk, Klaus; Elsevier, Cornelis J

    2005-11-09

    The kinetics of the stereoselective semi-hydrogenation of 4-octyne in THF by the highly active catalyst [Pd{(m,m'-(CF(3))(2)C(6)H(3))-bian}(ma)] (2) (bian = bis(imino)acenaphthene; ma = maleic anhydride) has been investigated. The rate law under hydrogen-rich conditions is described by r = k[4-octyne](0.65)[Pd][H(2)], showing first order in palladium and dihydrogen and a broken order in substrate. Parahydrogen studies have shown that a pairwise transfer of hydrogen atoms occurs in the rate-limiting step. In agreement with recent theoretical results, the proposed mechanism consists of the consecutive steps: alkyne coordination, heterolytic dihydrogen activation (hydrogenolysis of one Pd-N bond), subsequent hydro-palladation of the alkyne, followed by addition of N-H to palladium, reductive coupling of vinyl and hydride and, finally, substitution of the product alkene by the alkyne substrate. Under hydrogen-limiting conditions, side reactions occur, that is, formation of catalytically inactive palladacycles by oxidative alkyne coupling. Furthermore, it has been shown that (Z)-oct-4-ene is the primary reaction product, from which the minor product (E)-oct-4-ene is formed by an H(2)-assisted, palladium-catalyzed isomerization reaction.

  7. Kinetic aspect of the promoting action of rhenium in hydrogenation of benzene on alumina-platinum catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zharkov, B.B.; Grishchenko, A.V.; Evgrashin, V.M.; Klyuchnikova, Z.S.; Polyakov, A.A.; Rubinov, A.Z.; Fedorov, V.S.

    1987-09-10

    Rhenium is one of the most effective promoters used for the modification of industrial reforming catalysts and has been found to raise the hydrogenating activity of platinum/aluminium dioxide catalysts considerably in the conversion of benzene to cyclohexane. The purpose of this paper is to study this effect from the kinetic standpoint. Test procedures are described. The contribution of rhenium to the reaction kinetics was measured by the desorption rate of hydrogen from the catalysts.

  8. Hydrogen storage thermodynamics and kinetics of LaMg{sub 11}Ni + x wt.% Ni (x = 100, 200) alloys synthesized by mechanical milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanghuan; Jia, Zhichao [Inner Mongolia Univ. of Science and Technology, Baotou (China). Key Lab. of Integrated Exploitation of Baiyun Obo Multi-Metal Resources; Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing (China). Dept. of Functional Material Research; Yuan, Zeming; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Dongliang [Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing (China). Dept. of Functional Material Research; Hou, Zhonghui [Inner Mongolia Univ. of Science and Technology, Baotou (China). Key Lab. of Integrated Exploitation of Baiyun Obo Multi-Metal Resources

    2016-04-15

    LaMg{sub 11}Ni + x wt.% Ni (x = 100, 200) composite hydrogen storage alloys with a nanocrystalline/amorphous structure were synthesized using ball milling technology. The effects of Ni content and milling time on hydrogen storage thermodynamics and dynamics of the alloys were investigated systematically. The hydrogen desorption properties were assessed using a Sieverts apparatus and differential scanning calorimetry. The thermodynamic parameters for the hydrogen absorption and desorption were calculated using the Van't Hoff equation. The hydrogen desorption activation energies of the hydrogenated alloys were also estimated by Arrhenius and Kissinger methods. Results indicate that the amount of Ni added has no effect on the thermodynamics of the alloys, but it significantly improves their absorption and desorption kinetics. Furthermore, the milling time has a great influence on the hydrogen storage properties. To be specific, the hydrogen absorption capacities reach the maximum values with the variation of milling time, and the hydrogen desorption activation energy obviously decreases with increasing milling time.

  9. INVESTIGATIONS ON BIOCHEMICAL PURIFICATION OF GROUND WATER FROM HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sedlukho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems and features of biochemical removal of hydrogen sulfide from ground water. The analysis of existing methods for purification of ground water from hydrogen sulfide has been given in the paper. The paper has established shortcomings of physical and chemical purification of ground water. While using aeration methods for removal of hydrogen sulfide formation of colloidal sulfur that gives muddiness and opalescence to water occurs due to partial chemical air oxidation. In addition to this violation of sulfide-carbonate equilibrium taking place in the process of aeration due to desorption of H2S and CO2, often leads to clogging of degasifier nozzles with formed CaCO3 that causes serious operational problems. Chemical methods require relatively large flow of complex reagent facilities, storage facilities and transportation costs.In terms of hydrogen sulfide ground water purification the greatest interest is given to the biochemical method. Factors deterring widespread application of the biochemical method is its insufficient previous investigation and necessity to execute special research in order to determine optimal process parameters while purifying groundwater of a particular water supply source. Biochemical methods for oxidation of sulfur compounds are based on natural biological processes that ensure natural sulfur cycle. S. Vinogradsky has established a two-stage mechanism for oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with sulfur bacteria (Beggiatoa. The first stage presupposes oxidation of hydrogen sulphide to elemental sulfur which is accumulating in the cytoplasm in the form of globules. During the second stage sulfur bacteria begin to oxidize intracellular sulfur to sulfuric acid due to shortage of hydrogen sulfide.The paper provides the results of technological tests of large-scale pilot plants for biochemical purification of groundwater from hydrogen sulfide in semi-industrial conditions. Dependences of water quality

  10. EFFECT OF DIATOMEAOUS EARTH TREATMENT USING HYDROGEN CHLORIDE AND SULFURIC ACID ON KINETICS OF CADMIUM(II ADSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryono Nuryono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, treatment of diatomaceous earth, Sangiran, Central Java using hydrogen chloride (HCl and sulfuric acid (H2SO4 on kinetics of Cd(II adsorption in aqueous solution has been carried out. The work was conducted by mixing an amount of grounded diatomaceous earth (200 mesh in size with HCl or H2SO4 solution in various concentrations for two hours at temperature range of 100 - 150oC. The mixture was then filtered and washed with water until the filtrate pH is approximately 7 and then the residue was dried for four hours at a temperature of 70oC. The product was used as an adsorbent to adsorb Cd(II in aqueous solution with various concentrations. The Cd(II adsorbed was determined by analyzing the rest of Cd(II in the solution using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The effect of treatment was evaluated from kinetic parameter of adsorption rate constant calculated based on the simple kinetic model. Results showed  that before equilibrium condition reached, adsorpstion of Cd(II occurred through two steps, i.e. a step tends to follow a reaction of irreversible first order  (step I followed by reaction of reversible first order (step II. Treatment with acids, either hydrogen chloride or sulfuric acid, decreased adsorption rate constant for the step I from 15.2/min to a range of 6.4 - 9.4/min.  However, increasing concentration of acid (in a range of concentration investigated did not give significant and constant change of adsorption rate constant. For step II process,  adsorption involved physical interaction with the sufficient low adsorption energy (in a range of 311.3 - 1001 J/mol.     Keywords: adsorption, cdmium, diatomaceous earth, kinetics.

  11. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Allylic Sites by3O2; Implications for Combustion Modeling and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Simmie, John M; Somers, Kieran P; Goldsmith, C Franklin; Curran, Henry J

    2017-03-09

    Hydrogen atom abstraction from allylic C-H bonds by molecular oxygen plays a very important role in determining the reactivity of fuel molecules having allylic hydrogen atoms. Rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction by molecular oxygen from molecules with allylic sites have been calculated. A series of molecules with primary, secondary, tertiary, and super secondary allylic hydrogen atoms of alkene, furan, and alkylbenzene families are taken into consideration. Those molecules include propene, 2-butene, isobutene, 2-methylfuran, and toluene containing the primary allylic hydrogen atom; 1-butene, 1-pentene, 2-ethylfuran, ethylbenzene, and n-propylbenzene containing the secondary allylic hydrogen atom; 3-methyl-1-butene, 2-isopropylfuran, and isopropylbenzene containing tertiary allylic hydrogen atom; and 1-4-pentadiene containing super allylic secondary hydrogen atoms. The M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory was used to optimize the geometries of all of the reactants, transition states, products and also the hinder rotation treatments for lower frequency modes. The G4 level of theory was used to calculate the electronic single point energies for those species to determine the 0 K barriers to reaction. Conventional transition state theory with Eckart tunnelling corrections was used to calculate the rate constants. The comparison between our calculated rate constants with the available experimental results from the literature shows good agreement for the reactions of propene and isobutene with molecular oxygen. The rate constant for toluene with O 2 is about an order magnitude slower than that experimentally derived from a comprehensive model proposed by Oehlschlaeger and coauthors. The results clearly indicate the need for a more detailed investigation of the combustion kinetics of toluene oxidation and its key pyrolysis and oxidation intermediates. Despite this, our computed barriers and rate constants retain an important internal consistency. Rate constants

  12. Computational investigation and design of coordination compounds for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Jens Strabo

    are questionable and should be investigated further. The ab-/desorption cycles of magnesium and calcium ammines were analyzed and the faster kinetics of the magnesium ammines could be explained by a layered structure of magnesium chloride. It was found that doping calcium chloride with iodine could force...

  13. Kinetics of Natural Detoxification of Hydrogen Cyanide Contained In Retted Cassava Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the kinetics of natural detoxification of hydrogen cyanide contained in retted cassava roots. Retting is traditional fermentation of cassava, performed to soften the roots. During retting, cyanide diffuses into water used for the retting. The fresh cassava roots (bitter and sweet varieties used for this experiment were separately retted at ambient 0 temperature of 30 C. The cyanide content and pH were monitored daily. From the analysis of the experimental results, a first order consecutive rate equation is an adequate tool for explaining the mechanism of HCN reduction (or decay in retted cassava roots. The detoxification constants for the bound cyanide in the bitter and sweet cassava roots were 0.378/day and 0.438/day respectively, while that of the free hydrogen cyanide were 0.63/day and 0.74/day for the bitter and sweet varieties respectively. Cassava tubers from different species cannot be fermented with the same retting condition unless they have same or close functional properties. Keywords: Kinetics, Detoxification, Hydrogen Cyanide, Retting, Cassava

  14. Borate-catalyzed reactions of hydrogen peroxide: kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of organic sulfides by peroxoborates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D Martin; Deary, Michael E; Quill, Kieran; Smith, Robert A

    2005-06-06

    The kinetics of the oxidation of substituted phenyl methyl sulfides by hydrogen peroxide in borate/boric acid buffers were investigated as a function of pH, total peroxide concentration, and total boron concentration. Second-order rate constants at 25 degrees C for the reaction of methyl 4-nitrophenyl sulfide and H(2)O(2), monoperoxoborate, HOOB(OH)(3) (-), or diperoxoborate, (HOO)(2)B(OH)(2) (-), are 8.29 x 10(-5), 1.51 x 10(-2) and 1.06 x 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Peroxoboric acid, HOOB(OH)(2), is unreactive. The Hammett rho values for the reactions of a range of substituted phenyl methyl sulfides and hydrogen peroxide, monoperoxoborate or diperoxoborate are -1.50 +/- 0.1, -0.65 +/- 0.07 and -0.48 (two points only), respectively. The rho values for the peroxoborates are of significantly lower magnitude than expected from their reactivity compared to other peroxides. Nevertheless the negative rho values indicate positive charge development on the sulfur atom in the transition state consistent with nucleophilic attack by the organic sulfides on the peroxoborates as with the other peroxides. The kinetic parameters, including the lack of reactivity of peroxoboric acid, are discussed in terms of the differences in the transition state of reactions involving peroxoboron species with respect to those of other peroxides.

  15. Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding Involving Organic Fluorine: NMR Investigations Corroborated by DFT-Based Theoretical Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Mishra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The combined utility of many one and two dimensional NMR methodologies and DFT-based theoretical calculations have been exploited to detect the intramolecular hydrogen bond (HB in number of different organic fluorine-containing derivatives of molecules, viz. benzanilides, hydrazides, imides, benzamides, and diphenyloxamides. The existence of two and three centered hydrogen bonds has been convincingly established in the investigated molecules. The NMR spectral parameters, viz., coupling mediated through hydrogen bond, one-bond NH scalar couplings, physical parameter dependent variation of chemical shifts of NH protons have paved the way for understanding the presence of hydrogen bond involving organic fluorine in all the investigated molecules. The experimental NMR findings are further corroborated by DFT-based theoretical calculations including NCI, QTAIM, MD simulations and NBO analysis. The monitoring of H/D exchange with NMR spectroscopy established the effect of intramolecular HB and the influence of electronegativity of various substituents on the chemical kinetics in the number of organic building blocks. The utility of DQ-SQ technique in determining the information about HB in various fluorine substituted molecules has been convincingly established.

  16. Reduced and Validated Kinetic Mechanisms for Hydrogen-CO-sir Combustion in Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yiguang Ju; Frederick Dryer

    2009-02-07

    Rigorous experimental, theoretical, and numerical investigation of various issues relevant to the development of reduced, validated kinetic mechanisms for synthetic gas combustion in gas turbines was carried out - including the construction of new radiation models for combusting flows, improvement of flame speed measurement techniques, measurements and chemical kinetic analysis of H{sub 2}/CO/CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent mixtures, revision of the H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} kinetic model to improve flame speed prediction capabilities, and development of a multi-time scale algorithm to improve computational efficiency in reacting flow simulations.

  17. Microscopic Observation of Kinetic Molecular Sieving of Hydrogen Isotopes in a Nanoporous Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. X.; Jobic, H.; Bhatia, S. K.

    2010-08-01

    We report quasielastic neutron scattering studies of H2-D2 diffusion in a carbon molecular sieve, demonstrating remarkable quantum effects, with the heavier isotope diffusing faster below 100 K, confirming our recent predictions. Our transition state theory and molecular dynamics calculations show that while it is critical for this effect to have narrow windows of size comparable to the de Broglie wavelength, high flux requires that the energy barrier be reduced through small cages. Such materials will enable novel processes for kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes.

  18. Kinetic study of the selective hydrogenation of styrene over a Pd egg-shell composite catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Betti,Carolina; Badano,Juan; Lederhos,Cecilia; Maccarrone, María; Carrara, Nicolás; Coloma, Fernando; Quiroga, Mónica; Vera, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This is a study on the kinetics of the liquid-phase hydrogenation of styrene to ethylbenzene over a catalyst of palladium supported on an inorganic–organic composite. This support has a better mechanical resistance than other commercial supports, e.g. alumina, and yields catalysts with egg-shell structure and a very thin active Pd layer. Catalytic tests were carried out in a batch reactor by varying temperature, total pressure and styrene initial concentration between 353–393 K, 10–30 bar, an...

  19. Localized hydration in lyophilized myoglobin by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. 2. Exchange kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, Andreas M; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2012-04-02

    Solid-state hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX) is a promising method for characterizing proteins in amorphous solids. Though analysis of HDX kinetics is informative and well-established in solution, application of these methods to solid samples is complicated by possible heterogeneities in the solid. The studies reported here provide a detailed analysis of the kinetics of hydration and ssHDX for equine myoglobin (Mb) in solid matrices containing sucrose or mannitol. Water sorption was rapid relative to ssHDX, indicating that ssHDX kinetics was not limited by bulk water transport. Deuterium uptake in solids was well-characterized by a biexponential model; values for regression parameters provided insight into differences between the two solid matrices. Analysis of the widths of peptide mass envelopes revealed that, in solution, an apparent EX2 mechanism prevails, consistent with native conformation of the protein. In contrast, in mannitol-containing samples, a smaller non-native subpopulation exchanges by an EX1-like mechanism. Together, the results indicate that the analysis of ssHDX kinetic data and of the widths of peptide mass envelopes is useful in screening solid formulations of protein drugs for the presence of non-native species that cannot be detected by amide I FTIR.

  20. Localized Hydration in Lyophilized Myoglobin by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry. 2. Exchange Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophocleous, Andreas M.; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state hydrogen deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX) is a promising method for characterizing proteins in amorphous solids. Though analysis of HDX kinetics is informative and well-established in solution, application of these methods to solid samples is complicated by possible heterogeneities in the solid. The studies reported here provide a detailed analysis of the kinetics of hydration and ssHDX for equine myoglobin (Mb) in solid matrices containing sucrose or mannitol. Water sorption was rapid relative to ssHDX, indicating that ssHDX kinetics was not limited by bulk water transport. Deuterium uptake in solids was well-characterized by a bi-exponential model; values for regression parameters provided insight into differences between the two solid matrices. Analysis of the widths of peptide mass envelopes revealed that in solution, an apparent EX2 mechanism prevails, consistent with native conformation of the protein. In contrast, in mannitol-containing samples, a smaller non-native subpopulation exchanges by an EX1-like mechanism. Together, the results indicate that the analysis of ssHDX kinetic data and the widths of peptide mass envelopes are useful in screening solid formulations of protein drugs for the presence of non-native species that cannot be detected by amide I FTIR. PMID:22352990

  1. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ling-Ling [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Lv, Cun-Qin, E-mail: lcq173@126.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009, Shanxi Province (China); Wang, Gui-Chang, E-mail: wangguichang@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H{sub 2} molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H{sub 2}. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of C−H/C−C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H{sub 2

  2. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ling-Ling; Lv, Cun-Qin; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2017-07-01

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H2 molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H2. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of Csbnd H/Csbnd C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H2 dissociation and

  3. Kinetics of Hydrogen Evolution on Copper Electrode Involving Organic Acids as Proton Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Survila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear potential sweep (LPS voltammetry was applied to study the kinetics of hydrogen evolution in solutions containing glycolic, malic, tartaric, and gluconic acids. The CE mechanism of hydrogen evolution was analyzed invoking the 2nd Fick's law equations supplemented by terms that account for chemical interactions between diffusing particles. Acids are considered as components that are capable of releasing hydrated protons taking part in the charge-transfer step. Current peaks observed on LPS voltammograms are in linear dependence on ν (ν is the potential sweep rate. They obey well-known relationships obtained for simple redox processes, provided that the concentration of oxidant is treated as total concentration of proton donors. Determination of surface concentrations as current density functions makes it possible to transform LPS voltammograms into linear Tafel plots normalized with respect to the surface concentration of hydronium ions. Similar kinetic parameters (α≈0.6 and i0≈ 10 μA cm−2 obtained at pH 3 for all OA solutions indicate that the nature of OA has no noticeable influence on the charge-transfer process.

  4. Kinetic study of the reactions between chloramine disinfectants and hydrogen peroxide: temperature dependence and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Garrett; Sjelin, Brittney; Chagnon, Matthew; Ishida, Kenneth P; Mezyk, Stephen P

    2013-09-01

    The temperature-dependent kinetics for the reaction between hydrogen peroxide and chloramine water disinfectants (NH2Cl, NHCl2, and NCl3) have been determined using stopped flow-UV/Vis spectrophotometry. Rate constants for the mono- and dichloramine-peroxide reaction were on the order of 10(-2)M(-1)s(-1) and 10(-5)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. The reaction of trichloramine with peroxide was negligibly slow compared to its thermal and photolytically-induced decomposition. Arrhenius expressions of ln(kH2O2-NH2Cl)=(17.3±1.5)-(51500±3700)/RT and ln(kH2O2-NHCl2)=(18.2±1.9)-(75800±5100)/RT were obtained for the mono- and dichloramine peroxide reaction over the temperature ranges 11.4-37.9 and 35.0-55.0°C, respectively. Both monochloramine and hydrogen peroxide were first-order in the rate-limiting kinetic step and concomitant measurements made using a chloride ion selective electrode showed that the chloride was produced quantitatively. These data will aid water utilities in predicting chloramine concentrations (and thus disinfection potential) throughout the water distribution system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A kinetic model for quantitative evaluation of the effect of hydrogen and osmolarity on hydrogen production by Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacchi Guido

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus has attracted increased interest as an industrial hydrogen (H2 producer. The aim of the present study was to develop a kinetic growth model for this extreme thermophile. The model is based on Monod kinetics supplemented with the inhibitory effects of H2 and osmotic pressure, as well as the liquid-to-gas mass transfer of H2. Results Mathematical expressions were developed to enable the simulation of microbial growth, substrate consumption and product formation. The model parameters were determined by fitting them to experimental data. The derived model corresponded well with experimental data from batch fermentations in which the stripping rates and substrate concentrations were varied. The model was used to simulate the inhibition of growth by H2 and solute concentrations, giving a critical dissolved H2 concentration of 2.2 mmol/L and an osmolarity of 0.27 to 29 mol/L. The inhibition by H2, being a function of the dissolved H2 concentration, was demonstrated to be mainly dependent on H2 productivity and mass transfer rate. The latter can be improved by increasing the stripping rate, thereby allowing higher H2 productivity. The experimentally determined degree of oversaturation of dissolved H2 was 12 to 34 times the equilibrium concentration and was comparable to the values given by the model. Conclusions The derived model is the first mechanistically based model for fermentative H2 production and provides useful information to improve the understanding of the growth behavior of C. saccharolyticus. The model can be used to determine optimal operating conditions for H2 production regarding the substrate concentration and the stripping rate.

  6. Hydrogen Attack kinetics of 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, T. A.; Lopez, H. F.; Shewmon, P. G.

    1985-06-01

    The kinetics of Hydrogen Attack (HA) of the base metals and the weld metals of two Q&T 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments made by different techniques (SMAW and SAW) were studied in the temperature range 460 to 590°C (860 to 1094 °F) and 10 to 23 MPa of hydrogen. A sensitive dilatometer used to measure the rate of HA showed that the weld metals suffered HA at significantly higher rates than the base metals. The SMAW weld metal was inferior to the SAW weld metal and swelled nearly an order of magnitude faster than the base metal. This behavior is due to a significantly higher bubble density, and a resulting higher contribution of power law creep of the matrix. The SAW behavior was intermediate between those of the base metals and the SMAW. For the same hydrogen pressure the operating limit of the SMAW weld would be roughly 100°C lower than that of the base metals, and that of the SAW roughly 50°C lower.

  7. Efficient hydrogen production on MoNi4 electrocatalysts with fast water dissociation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Tao; Liu, Pan; Liao, Zhongquan; Liu, Shaohua; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Chen, Mingwei; Zschech, Ehrenfried; Feng, Xinliang

    2017-01-01

    Various platinum-free electrocatalysts have been explored for hydrogen evolution reaction in acidic solutions. However, in economical water-alkali electrolysers, sluggish water dissociation kinetics (Volmer step) on platinum-free electrocatalysts results in poor hydrogen-production activities. Here we report a MoNi4 electrocatalyst supported by MoO2 cuboids on nickel foam (MoNi4/MoO2@Ni), which is constructed by controlling the outward diffusion of nickel atoms on annealing precursor NiMoO4 cuboids on nickel foam. Experimental and theoretical results confirm that a rapid Tafel-step-decided hydrogen evolution proceeds on MoNi4 electrocatalyst. As a result, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst exhibits zero onset overpotential, an overpotential of 15 mV at 10 mA cm−2 and a low Tafel slope of 30 mV per decade in 1 M potassium hydroxide electrolyte, which are comparable to the results for platinum and superior to those for state-of-the-art platinum-free electrocatalysts. Benefiting from its scalable preparation and stability, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst is promising for practical water-alkali electrolysers. PMID:28513620

  8. Hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of single protons in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, C.K.; Hilton, B.C.

    1980-10-01

    The exchange kinetics of the slowest exchanging BPTI ..beta..-sheet protons are complex compared to model peptides; the activation energy, E/sub a/, and the pH dependence are temperature dependent. We have measured the exchange kinetics in the range pH 1 to 11, 33 to 71/sup 0/C, particularly the temperature dependence. The data are fit to a model in which exchange of each proton is determined by two discrete dynamical processes, one with E/sub a/ approx. 65 kcal/mol and less than first order dependence on catalyst ion, and one with E/sub a/ 20 to 30 kcal/mol and approaching first order in catalyst ion. The low activation energy process is the mechanism of interest in the native conformation of globular proteins and involves low energy, small amplitude fluctuations; the high activation energy process involves major unfolding. The model is simple, has a precedent in the hydrogen exchange literature, and explains quantitatively the complex feature of the exchange kinetics of single protons in BPTI.

  9. Kinetic study of the hydrolysis of phthalic anhydride and aryl hydrogen phthalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, G O; Granados, A M; de Rossi, R H

    2001-11-16

    The kinetics of the hydrolysis of phthalic anhydride and X-phenyl hydrogen phthalate (X = H, p-Me, m-Cl, and p-Cl) were studied. Several bases accelerate the reaction of phthalic anhydride: acetate, phosphate, N-methyl imidazole, 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane (DABCO), and carbonate. Phosphate, DABCO, and N-methyl imidazole react as nucleophiles, whereas the data do not allow the determination of whether the other bases react in the same way or as general bases catalyzing the water reaction. The rate constants for all of them including water and HO- define a Brönsted plot with beta = 0.46. The kinetics of the hydrolysis of the esters were studied below pH 6.20, and the mechanism involves the formation of phthalic anhydride, which then is hydrolyzed to the phthalic acid. Phenoxide ion has a very high rate constant for the reaction with phthalic anhydride, so above pH 6.20 it competes significantly with the hydrolysis of the anhydride. The reactions of the esters as a function of pH allow the determination of the kinetic pK(a) which are 3.06, 3.02, 2.95, and 2.93 for X = H, p-Me, m-Cl, and p-Cl, respectively. The data also show that the catalysis by the neighboring carboxy group takes place only when it is ionized (i.e., as carboxylate).

  10. Investigation of the diffusion kinetics of borided stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Yusuf

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the kinetics of borides formed on AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels was investigated. Boronizing treatment was carried out using Ekabor-II powders at the processing temperatures of 1123, 1173 and 1223 K for 2, 4 and 6 h. The phases of the boride layers of borided AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels were FeB, Fe2B, CrB and NiB, respectively. The thickness of the boride layer formed on the borided steels ranged from 4.6 to 64 μm depending on the boriding temperature, boriding time and alloying elements of the stainless steels. Depending on the chemical composition, temperature and layer thickness, the activation energies of boron in AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels were found to be 206.161, 234.641 and 222.818 kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetics of growth of the boride layers formed on the AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels and the thickness of the boride layers were investigated.

  11. Kinetics of reduction of a RuO2(110) film on Ru by atomic hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ugur, D.; Storm, A.J.; Verberk, R.; Brouwer, J.C.; Sloof, W.G.

    2013-01-01

    The kinetics and the mechanism of reduction of a RuO2(110) film, grown thermally on a Ru(0001) surface, has been studied in the temperature range of 60-200 °C by using an atomic hydrogen flux of 2 × 1019 at. H m-2 s-1. The reduction kinetics is dominated by the creation of oxygen vacancies at the

  12. The kinetics of Cr layer coated on TiNi films for hydrogen absorption

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of hydrogen absorption on electrical resistance with temperature for TiNi and TiNi–Cr thin films was investigated. The TiNi thin films of thickness 800. Å were deposited at different angles under 10−5 Torr pressure by thermal evaporation on the glass substrate at room temperature. A layer of.

  13. Hydrogen oxidation at high pressure and intermediate temperatures: experiments and kinetic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Gersen, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen oxidation at 50 bar and temperatures of 700–900 K was investigated in a high pressure laminar flow reactor under highly diluted conditions. The experiments provided information about H 2 oxidation at pressures above the third explosion limit. The fuel–air equivalence ratio of the reactants...

  14. Improving the Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Mg(BH4)2 for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brandon [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Klebanoff, Lennie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Stavila, Vitalie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Heo, Tae Wook [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ray, Keith [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lee, Jonathan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, Alex [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kang, ShinYoung [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yu, Hui-Chia [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Thornton, Katsuyo [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-10-31

    The objective of this project is to (1) combine theory, synthesis, and characterization across multiple scales to understand the intrinsic kinetic and thermodynamic limitations in MgB2/Mg(BH4)2; (2) construct and apply a flexible, validated, multiscale theoretical framework for modeling (de)hydrogenation kinetics of the Mg-B-H system and related metal hydrides; and (3) devise strategies for improving kinetics and thermodynamics, particularly through nanostructuring and doping. The project has an emphasis on understanding and improving rehydrogenation of MgB2, which has generally been less explored and is key to enabling practical use.

  15. The hydriding kinetics of Mg-Ni based hydrogen storage alloys: A comparative study on Chou model and Jander model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Qun; An, Xue-Hui; Pan, Yan-Biao; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Jie-Yu.; Li, Qian [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Two kinds of kinetic models, which are Jander model and Chou model, were applied to investigate the hydriding kinetic behavior of Mg-Ni based alloys. By comparing the calculated values with experimental data, it can be seen that both models were successfully used in the diffusion-controlled hydrogen absorption process of Mg-Ni system. However, Chou model was not only convenient for use but also gave a set of physical meaningful explicit analytic expressions. Chou model should be preferentially recommended to deal with the calculation at multi-temperatures and multi-pressures without multistep calculation. The application of Chou model to Mg{sub 20}Ni{sub 8}Cu{sub 2} and Mg{sub 20}Ni{sub 8}Co{sub 2} alloys shows that the calculated results agreed well with the experimental data and it is reasonable to expect that this model will also suitable for other Mg-Ni based alloys if the mechanism is similar. (author)

  16. Thermodynamic and kinetics models of hydrogen absorption bound to phase transformations; Modelisation thermodynamique et cinetiques d'absorption d'hydrogene associees aux transformations de phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondor, G.; Lexcellent, Ch. [Institut FEMTO-ST, Lab. de Mecanique Appliquee R. Chaleat (LMARC), 25 - Besancon (France)

    2007-07-01

    In order to design hydrogen gaseous pressure tanks, the absorption (desorption) of hydrogen has to be described and modelled. The equilibrium state can be described by the 'H{sub 2} gas pressure - H{sub 2} composition in the intermetallic compounds - isotherms' (PCI) curves. Several models of PCI curves already exist. At the beginning of the absorption, the hydrogen atoms and the intermetallic compounds form a solid solution ({alpha} phase). When the hydrogen concentration increases, a phase transformation appears changing the {alpha} solid solution into an hydride ({beta} phase) (solid solution + H{sub 2} {r_reversible} hydride). When all the solid solution has been transformed into hydride, the absorbed hydrogen atoms are in {beta} phase. A new thermodynamic model has been developed in order to take into account this transition phase. The equilibrium state is then given by a relation between the H{sub 2} gas pressure and the H{sub 2} concentration in the intermetallic compound for a fixed external temperature. Two kinetics models have been developed too; at first has been considered that the kinetics depend only of the entire concentration in the intermetallic compound and of the difference between the applied pressure and the equilibrium pressure. Then, has been considered that the hydrogen concentration changes in the metallic matrix. In this last case, for each hydrogenation process, the absorption velocity is calculated to determine the slowest local process which regulates the local evolution of the hydrogen concentration. These two models are based on the preceding thermodynamic model of the PCI curves. (O.M.)

  17. Kinetic modeling of levulinic acid hydrogenation to gamma-valerolactone in water using a carbon supported Ru catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piskun, A.S.; van de Bovenkamp, H.H.; Rasrendra, C.B.; Winkelman, J.G.M.; Heeres, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    gamma-Valerolactone (GVL) is considered a very interesting green, bio-based platform chemical with highapplication potential for the production of both biofuels and biobased chemicals. In this contribution, wereport a kinetic study on the hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) to 4-hydroxypentanoic

  18. On the effect of the underlying ZnO:Al layer on the crystallization kinetics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, K.; Ponomarev, M. V.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, we analyze the thickness effect of the underlying aluminum doped-zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) layers on the structural properties and crystallization kinetics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films. It is shown that the disorder in as-deposited a-Si:H films, as probed by

  19. Investigation of the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shales

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roshan, H; Andersen, M. S; Rutlidge, H; Marjo, C. E; Acworth, R. I

    2016-01-01

    .... This study describes novel hydraulic experiments to quantitatively investigate the kinetics of water uptake into partially saturated shale through investigating the pressure response of injecting fluids...

  20. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Y. [Nuclear Research Center–Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Moreh, R. [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Shchur, Ya. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, 1 Svientsitskii str., L’viv 79011 (Ukraine)

    2016-02-07

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance R{sub OO}, being a measure of the HB strength.

  1. Kinetics of Natural Detoxification of Hydrogen Cyanide Contained In Retted Cassava Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the kinetics of natural detoxification of hydrogen cyanide contained in retted cassava roots. Retting is traditional fermentation of cassava, performed to soften the roots. During retting, cyanide diffuses into water used for the retting. The fresh cassava roots (bitter and sweet varieties used for this experiment were separately retted at ambient 0 temperature of 30 C. The cyanide content and pH were monitored daily. From the analysis of the experimental results, a first order consecutive rate equation is an adequate tool for explaining the mechanism of HCN reduction (or decay in retted cassava roots. The detoxification constants for the bound cyanide in the bitter and sweet cassava roots were 0.378/day and 0.438/day respectively, while that of the free hydrogen cyanide were 0.63/day and 0.74/day for the bitter and sweet varieties respectively. Cassava tubers from different species cannot be fermented with the same retting condition unless they have same or close functional properties.

  2. Understanding the Relationship Between Kinetics and Thermodynamics in CO 2 Hydrogenation Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeletic, Matthew S. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Hulley, Elliott B. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Helm, Monte L. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Mock, Michael T. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Appel, Aaron M. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Wiedner, Eric S. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Linehan, John C. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States

    2017-08-14

    Linear free-energy relationships have been identified that link the kinetic activity for catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to formate with the thermodynamic driving force for the rate-limiting steps of catalysis. Cobalt and rhodium bis(diphosphine) complexes with different hydricities (G°H-), acidities (pKa), and free energies for H2 addition (G°H2) were examined. Catalytic CO2 hydrogenation was studied under 1.8 and 20 atm of pressure (1:1 CO2:H2) at room temperature in tetrahydrofuran with a spread of turnover frequencies (TOF) ranging from 0 to 74,000 h-1. The catalysis was followed by 1H and 31P NMR in real time under all conditions to yield information about the rate determining step. Catalysts exhibiting the highest activities were found to have hydride transfer and hydrogen addition steps that were each downhill by approximately 6 to 7 kcal/mol, and the deprotonation step was thermoneutral. The research by M.S.J., A.M.A., E.S.W., and J.C.L. was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The research by E.B.H., M.L.H., and M.T.M. (X-ray crystallography, synthesis) was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The authors thank Dr. Samantha A. Burgess for assistance in collecting cyclic voltammetry data. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Hydrogenation of xylose to xylitol on sponge nickel catalyst: a study of the process and catalyst deactivation kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkola J.-P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of hydrogenation of xylose to xylitol on a sponge nickel catalyst (commonly referred to as Raney Ni catalyst and of catalyst deactivation were studied. Plausible explanations for the decrease in catalytic activity by means of surface studies, nitrogen adsorption and thermogravimetric analyses of the fresh and spent catalysts are presented. The kinetic parameters of the process were estimated by the use of a semi-competitive model, which allows full competition between the organic species and the hydrogen atoms for the adsorption sites on the catalyst surface (competitive case. In the model, a competitiveness factor (alpha is introduced to take into account that even after complete coverage of the surface by the organic species, interstitial sites remain for the adsorption of the hydrogen atoms.

  4. Numerical investigation on pulsating heat pipes with nitrogen or hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Han, D.; Sun, X.; Gan, Z. H.; Y Luo, R.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Jiao, B.

    2017-12-01

    With flexible structure and excellent performance, pulsating heat pipes (PHP) are regarded as a great solution to distribute cooling power for cryocoolers. The experiments on PHPs with cryogenic fluids have been carried out, indicating their efficient performances in cryogenics. There are large differences in physical properties between the fluids at room and cryogenic temperature, resulting in their different heat transfer and oscillation characteristics. Up to now, the numerical investigations on cryogenic fluids have rarely been carried out. In this paper, the model of the closed-loop PHP with multiple liquid slugs and vapor plugs is performed with nitrogen and hydrogen as working fluids, respectively. The effects of heating wall temperature on the performance of close-looped PHPs are investigated and compared with that of water PHP.

  5. Thermodynamic modelling and kinetics of hydrogen absorption associated with phase transformations; Modelisation thermodynamique et cinetiques d'absorption de l'hydrogene associees aux transformations de phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondor, G.; Lexcellent, Ch. [LMARC FEMTO-ST, 25 - Besancon (France)

    2007-07-01

    The intermetallic are used for hydrogen pressure containers in order to avoid leaks in the case of an hybrid container. The hydrogen atoms are absorbed by the intermetallic which act as a hydrogen sponge. This hydrogen absorption must be modelled for the container design. The Pressure-composition isotherms describe the equilibrium. Out of this equilibrium the kinetics are controlled by different processes, without taking into account the phase transformations. The author presents a new model of the p-c isotherms with the hydrogen absorption kinetics. (A.L.B.)

  6. Symmetry-resolved spectroscopy by detection of a metastable hydrogen atom for investigating the doubly excited states of molecular hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odagiri, Takeshi; Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Tanabe, Takehiko; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Kouchi, Noriyuki [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Suzuki, Isao H, E-mail: joe@chem.titech.ac.j [Photon Factory, IMSS, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2009-11-01

    Symmetry-resolved spectroscopy for investigating the doubly excited states of molecular hydrogen has been newly developed, where a metastable hydrogen atom dissociating in a direction parallel and perpendicular to the electric vector of the linearly polarized incident light is detected.

  7. The kinetics of Cr layer coated on TiNi films for hydrogen absorption

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of hydrogen absorption on electrical resistance with temperature for TiNi and TiNi–Cr thin films was investigated. The TiNi thin films of thickness 800 Å were deposited at different angles ( = 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 75°) under 10−5 Torr pressure by thermal evaporation on the glass substrate at room temperature.

  8. Investigating the Chemical Reactivity for Hydrogen in Siliciclastic Sediments: two Work Packages of the H2STORE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, M.; Pilz, P.

    2014-12-01

    The H2STORE ("Hydrogen to Store") collaborative project, funded by the German government, investigates the feasibility of industrial-scale hydrogen storage from excess wind energy in siliciclastic depleted gas and oil reservoirs or suitable saline aquifers. In particular, two work packages (geochemical experiments and modelling) hosted at the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) focus on the possible impact of hydrogen on formation fluids and on the mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical properties of reservoirs and caprocks. Laboratory experiments expose core samples from several potential reservoirs to pure hydrogen or hydrogen mixtures under site-specific conditions (temperatures up to 200 °C and pressure up to 300 bar). The resulting qualitative and, whereas possible, quantitative data are expected to ameliorate the precision of predictive geochemical and reactive transport modelling, which is also performed within the project. The combination of experiments and models will improve the knowledge about: (1) solubility model and mixing rule for of hydrogen and its gas mixtures in high saline formation fluids; (2) hydrogen reactivity in a broad spectrum of P-T conditions; (3) thermodynamics and kinetics of mineral dissolution or precipitation reactions and redox processes. It is known that under specific P-T conditions reactions between hydrogen and anorganic rock components such as carbonates can occur. However these conditions have never been precisely defined to date. A precise estimation of the hydrogen impact on reservoir behavior of different siliciclastic rock types is crucial for site selection and optimization of storage depth. Enhancing the overall understanding of such systems will benefit the operational reliability, the ecological tolerance, and the economic efficiency of future energy storing plants, crucial aspects for public acceptance and for industrial investors.

  9. Synthesis, structural investigation and kinetic studies of uranyl (VI ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uranyl schiff base complexes; kinetic study; X-ray crystallography; kinetics of thermal decomposition; cyclic voltammetry. ... Chemistry Department, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454, I. R. Iran; Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Praha, Czech Republic; Department of Chemistry, Faculty ...

  10. Field-controlled electron transfer and reaction kinetics of the biological catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongki Choi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Controlled reaction kinetics of the bio-catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide has been achieved using an electrostatic technique. The technique allowed independent control of 1 the thermodynamics of the system using electrochemical setup and 2 the quantum mechanical tunneling at the interface between microperoxidase-11 and the working electrode by applying a gating voltage to the electrode. The cathodic currents of electrodes immobilized with microperoxidase-11 showed a dependence on the gating voltage in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, indicating a controllable reduction reaction. The measured kinetic parameters of the bio-catalytic reduction showed nonlinear dependences on the gating voltage as the result of modified interfacial electron tunnel due to the field induced at the microperoxidase-11-electrode interface. Our results indicate that the kinetics of the reduction of hydrogen peroxide can be controlled by a gating voltage and illustrate the operation of a field-effect bio-catalytic transistor, whose current-generating mechanism is the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water with the current being controlled by the gating voltage.

  11. Investigation and Mitigation of Degradation in Hydrogen Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pratiti

    The ever increasing demand of petroleum in the transport sector has led to depletion of low cost/low risk reserves, increased level of pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions that take a heavy toll on the environment as well as the national economy. There is an urgent need to utilize alternative energy resources along with an efficient and affordable energy conversion system to arrest environmental degradation. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) show great promise in this regard, they use hydrogen gas as a fuel that electrochemically reacts with air to produce electrical energy and water as the by product. In a fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV), these zero tail pipe emission systems offer high efficiency and power density for medium-heavy duty and long range transportation. However, PEFC technology is currently challenged by its limited durability when subjected to harsh and adverse operating conditions and transients that arises during the normal course of vehicle operation. The hydrogen-based fuel cell power train for electric vehicles must achieve high durability while maintaining high power efficiency and fuel economy in order to equal the range and lifetime of an internal-combustion engine vehicle. The technology also needs to meet the cost targets to make FCEVs a commercial success. In this dissertation, one of the degradation phenomena that severely impede the durability of the system has been investigated. In scenarios where the cell becomes locally starved of hydrogen fuel, "cell reversal" occurs, which causes the cell to consume itself through carbon corrosion and eventually fail. Carbon corrosion in the anode disrupts the original structure of the electrode and can cause undesirable outcomes like catalyst particle migration, aggregation, loss of structural and chemical integrity. Through a comprehensive study using advanced electrochemical diagnostics and high resolution 3D imaging, a new understanding to extend PEFC life time and robustness by

  12. Kinetics of Hydrogen Consumption by Rumen Fluid, Anaerobic Digestor Sludge, and Sediment †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joseph A.; Tiedje, James M.

    1982-01-01

    Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for H2 consumption by three methanogenic habitats were determined from progress curve and initial velocity experiments. The influences of mass transfer resistance, endogenous H2 production, and growth on apparent parameter estimates were also investigated. Kinetic parameters could not be determined for undiluted rumen fluid and some digestor sludge from gas-phase measurements of H2, since mass transfer of H2 across the gas-liquid interface was rate limiting. However, accurate values were obtained once the samples were diluted. H2 consumption by digestor sludge with a long retention time and by hypereutrophic lake sediment was not phase transfer limited. The Km values for H2 uptake by these habitats were similar, with means of 5.8, 6.0, and 7.1 μM for rumen fluid, digestor sludge, and sediment, respectively. Vmax estimates suggested a ratio of activity of approximately 100 (rumen fluid):10 (sludge):1 (sediment); their ranges were as follows: rumen fluid, 14 to 28 mM h−1; Holt sludge, 0.7 to 4.3 mM h−1; and Wintergreen sediment, 0.13 to 0.49 mM h−1. The principles of phase transfer limitation, studied here for H2, are the same for all gaseous substrates and products. The limitations and errors associated with gas phase determination of kinetic parameters were evaluated with a mathematical model that combined mass transport and Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Three criteria are described which can be used to evaluate the possibility that a phase transfer limitation exists. If it does not exist, (i) substrate consumption curves are Michaelis-Menten and not first order, (ii) the Km is independent of initial substrate concentration, and (iii) the Km is independent of biomass (Vmax) and remains constant with dilution of sample. Errors in the Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters are caused by endogenously produced H2, but they were digestor sludge. Increases in Vmax during the course of progress curve experiments were not great enough

  13. Kinetics of hydrogen consumption by rumen fluid, anaerobic digestor sludge, and sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J A; Tiedje, J M

    1982-12-01

    Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for H(2) consumption by three methanogenic habitats were determined from progress curve and initial velocity experiments. The influences of mass transfer resistance, endogenous H(2) production, and growth on apparent parameter estimates were also investigated. Kinetic parameters could not be determined for undiluted rumen fluid and some digestor sludge from gas-phase measurements of H(2), since mass transfer of H(2) across the gas-liquid interface was rate limiting. However, accurate values were obtained once the samples were diluted. H(2) consumption by digestor sludge with a long retention time and by hypereutrophic lake sediment was not phase transfer limited. The K(m) values for H(2) uptake by these habitats were similar, with means of 5.8, 6.0, and 7.1 muM for rumen fluid, digestor sludge, and sediment, respectively. V(max) estimates suggested a ratio of activity of approximately 100 (rumen fluid):10 (sludge):1 (sediment); their ranges were as follows: rumen fluid, 14 to 28 mM h; Holt sludge, 0.7 to 4.3 mM h; and Wintergreen sediment, 0.13 to 0.49 mM h. The principles of phase transfer limitation, studied here for H(2), are the same for all gaseous substrates and products. The limitations and errors associated with gas phase determination of kinetic parameters were evaluated with a mathematical model that combined mass transport and Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Three criteria are described which can be used to evaluate the possibility that a phase transfer limitation exists. If it does not exist, (i) substrate consumption curves are Michaelis-Menten and not first order, (ii) the K(m) is independent of initial substrate concentration, and (iii) the K(m) is independent of biomass (V(max)) and remains constant with dilution of sample. Errors in the Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters are caused by endogenously produced H(2), but they were digestor sludge. Increases in V(max) during the course of progress curve experiments were

  14. Kinetic-energy release of fragments from electron-impact dissociation of the molecular hydrogen ion and its isotopologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Liam H.; Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2017-08-01

    We calculate the kinetic-energy release distributions of fragments produced for electron-impact dissociation of the vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen ion H2 + and its isotopologues D2 + and T2 +. Here we apply the adiabatic-nuclei convergent close-coupling method and compare results with several different methods, including the δ approximation. Results are presented for a number of dissociative excitation transitions and dissociative ionization as a function of the initial vibrational state of the molecule. We confirm that the square root approximation is a good approximation for the adiabatic-nuclei kinetic-energy release cross sections of H2 +. Agreement with experiment, where available, is good.

  15. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯ 00 ) surfaces: Kinetics and impact on surface vibrational and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J.; Himmerlich, M.; Krischok, S.; Rink, M.; Kröger, J.; Polyakov, V. M.

    2017-05-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen at nonpolar GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surfaces and its impact on the electronic and vibrational properties is investigated using surface electron spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the surface mediated dissociation of H2 and the subsequent adsorption of H, an energy barrier of 0.55 eV has to be overcome. The calculated kinetic surface phase diagram indicates that the reaction is kinetically hindered at low pressures and low temperatures. At higher temperatures ab initio thermodynamics show, that the H-free surface is energetically favored. To validate these theoretical predictions experiments at room temperature and under ultrahigh vacuum conditions were performed. They reveal that molecular hydrogen does not dissociatively adsorb at the GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface. Only activated atomic hydrogen atoms attach to the surface. At temperatures above 820 K, the attached hydrogen gets desorbed. The adsorbed hydrogen atoms saturate the dangling bonds of the gallium and nitrogen surface atoms and result in an inversion of the Ga-N surface dimer buckling. The signatures of the Ga-H and N-H vibrational modes on the H-covered surface have experimentally been identified and are in good agreement with the DFT calculations of the surface phonon modes. Both theory and experiment show that H adsorption results in a removal of occupied and unoccupied intragap electron states of the clean GaN (1 1 ¯00 ) surface and a reduction of the surface upward band bending by 0.4 eV. The latter mechanism largely reduces surface electron depletion.

  16. Kinetics of hydrogen evolution reaction on Zr0⋅ 5Ti0⋅ 5V0⋅ 6Cr0 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A hydrogen-storage alloy of the composition Zr0.5Ti0.5V0.6Cr0.2Ni1.2 has been investigated for corrosion resistance and hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) in KOH electrolyte of varying concentrations. Activation of the electrode by absorption of hydrogen takes place after prolonged cathodic polarization in the potential ...

  17. The chemical kinetics and thermodynamics of sodium species in oxygen-rich hydrogen flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, A. J.; Steinberg, M.; Schofield, K.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented which, it is claimed, lead to a correction of previous misconceptions over the relative importance and kinetics of NaO2. It is shown that its rapid conversion to NaO and NaOH is such that it can severely perturb the NaOH/Na ratio and produce significant concentration overshoots over that predicted from the balance of the reaction of Na with H2O. This becomes increasingly the case in flames of large O2 concentrations and temperatures below 2500 K; and the corresponding large rate constants for the termolecular formation of the other alkali peroxides imply that similar considerations will be necessary for them. Depending on the rate constants for the exothermic conversions of MO2 to MO or MOH, the steady-state concentrations of MO2 could be more or less significant than for sodium. Owing to numerous reactions that produce these conversions, the MOH species will probably be the dominant species in all cases in oxygen-rich hydrogen or hydrocarbon flames, with MO concentrations at not greater than 1 percent of the bound metal.

  18. Kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and its protein complex by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Antina, E. V.

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study of oxidation reactions of bilirubin and its complex with albumin was carried out in aqueous solutions under the action of hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen at different pH values. Free radical oxidation of the pigment in both free and bound forms at pH 7.4 was shown not to lead to the formation of biliverdin, but to be associated with the decomposition of the tetrapyrrole chromophore into monopyrrolic products. The effective and true rate constants of the reactions under study were determined. It was assumed that one possible mechanism of the oxidation reaction is associated with the interaction of peroxyl radicals and protons of the NH groups of bilirubin molecules at the limiting stage with the formation of a highly reactive radical intermediate. The binding of bilirubin with albumin was found to result in a considerable reduction in the rate of the oxidation reaction associated with the kinetic manifestation of the protein protection effect. It was found that the autoxidation of bilirubin by molecular oxygen with the formation of biliverdin at the intermediate stage can be observed with an increase in the pH of solutions.

  19. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide on Authentic Mineral Dust: Effects of Relative Humidity and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liubin; Zhao, Yue; Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming

    2015-09-15

    Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on mineral dust seems to be an important sink for SO2. However, kinetic data about this reaction on authentic mineral dust are scarce and are mainly limited to low relative humidity (RH) conditions. In addition, little is known about the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in this reaction. Here, we investigated the uptake kinetics of SO2 on three authentic mineral dusts (i.e., Asian mineral dust (AMD), Tengger desert dust (TDD), and Arizona test dust (ATD)) in the absence and presence of H2O2 at different RHs using a filter-based flow reactor, and applied a parameter (effectiveness factor) to the estimation of the effective surface area of particles for the calculation of the corrected uptake coefficient (γc). We found that with increasing RH, the γc decreases on AMD particles, but increases on ATD and TDD particles. This discrepancy is probably due to the different mineralogy compositions and aging extents of these dust samples. Furthermore, the presence of H2O2 can promote the uptake of SO2 on mineral dust at different RHs. The probable explanations are that H2O2 rapidly reacts with SO2 on mineral dust in the presence of adsorbed water, and OH radicals, which can be produced from the heterogeneous decomposition of H2O2 on the mineral dust, immediately react with adsorbed SO2 as well. Our results suggest that the removal of SO2 via the heterogeneous reaction on mineral dust is an important sink for SO2 and has the potential to alter the physicochemical properties (e.g., ice nucleation ability) of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere.

  20. Investigation of nanocrystalline Gd films loaded with hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Hruška, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The present work reports on microstructure studies of hydrogen-loaded nanocrystalline Gd films prepared by cold cathode beam sputtering on sapphire (112¯0) substrates. The Gd films were electrochemically step-by-step charged with hydrogen and the structural development with increasing concentration of absorbed hydrogen was studied by transmission electron microscopy and in-situ   X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The relaxation of hydrogen-induced stresses was examined by acoustic emission measurements. In the low concentration range absorbed hydrogen occupies preferentially vacancy-like defects at GBs typical for nanocrystalline films. With increasing hydrogen concentration hydrogen starts to occupy interstitial sites. At the solid solution limit the grains gradually transform into the ββ-phase (GdH2). Finally at high hydrogen concentrations xH>2.0xH>2.0 H/Gd, the film structure becomes almost completely amorphous. Contrary to bulk Gd specimens, the formation of the γγ-phase (GdH3) was not observed in this work.

  1. Investigation of nickel hydrogen battery technology for the RADARSAT spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccoy, D. A.; Lackner, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The low Earth orbit (LEO) operations of the RADARSAT spacecraft require high performance batteries to provide energy to the payload and platform during eclipse period. Nickel Hydrogen cells are currently competing with the more traditional Nickel Cadmium cells for high performance spacecraft applications at geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) and Leo. Nickel Hydrogen cells appear better suited for high power applications where high currents and high Depths of Discharge are required. Although a number of GEO missions have flown with Nickel Hydrogen batteries, it is not readily apparent that the LEO version of the Nickel Hydrogen cell is able to withstand the extended cycle lifetime (5 years) of the RADARSAT mission. The problems associated with Nickel Hydrogen cells are discussed in the contex of RADARSAT mission and a test program designed to characterize cell performance is presented.

  2. Robust adsorption of Direct Navy Blue-106 from textile industrial effluents by bio-hydrogen fermented waste derived activated carbon: Equilibrium and kinetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kanchi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The developed bio-hydrogen fermented waste activated carbon (BHFW-AC has proven to be a cost effective, highly efficient and eco-friendly adsorbent, an alternative (low cost source of AC for the removal of Direct Navy Blue-106 (DNB-106. This study investigated the feasibility of BHFW at low temperature (100 °C using chemical carbonization treatment with H3PO4 for 24 h. The parameters pH, temperature, initial dye concentration and contact time have been optimized by batch experiments to increase the adsorption efficiency of the BHFW-AC. Interestingly, the batch adsorption equilibrium data followed the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin–Radushkevich models with the Langmuir isotherm providing the best fit to the equilibrium data. On the other hand, the kinetic data followed closely the pseudo-second-order rate kinetic model. Besides, the thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption was a spontaneous endothermic process.

  3. Thermodynamic Driving Force of Hydrogen on Rumen Microbial Metabolism: A Theoretical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lingen, Henk J; Plugge, Caroline M; Fadel, James G; Kebreab, Ermias; Bannink, André; Dijkstra, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen is a key product of rumen fermentation and has been suggested to thermodynamically control the production of the various volatile fatty acids (VFA). Previous studies, however, have not accounted for the fact that only thermodynamic near-equilibrium conditions control the magnitude of reaction rate. Furthermore, the role of NAD, which is affected by hydrogen partial pressure (PH2), has often not been considered. The aim of this study was to quantify the control of PH2 on reaction rates of specific fermentation pathways, methanogenesis and NADH oxidation in rumen microbes. The control of PH2 was quantified using the thermodynamic potential factor (FT), which is a dimensionless factor that corrects a predicted kinetic reaction rate for the thermodynamic control exerted. Unity FT was calculated for all glucose fermentation pathways considered, indicating no inhibition of PH2 on the production of a specific type of VFA (e.g., acetate, propionate and butyrate) in the rumen. For NADH oxidation without ferredoxin oxidation, increasing PH2 within the rumen physiological range decreased FT from unity to zero for different NAD+ to NADH ratios and pH of 6.2 and 7.0, which indicates thermodynamic control of PH2. For NADH oxidation with ferredoxin oxidation, increasing PH2 within the rumen physiological range decreased FT from unity at pH of 7.0 only. For the acetate to propionate conversion, FT increased from 0.65 to unity with increasing PH2, which indicates thermodynamic control. For propionate to acetate and butyrate to acetate conversions, FT decreased to zero below the rumen range of PH2, indicating full thermodynamic suppression. For methanogenesis by archaea without cytochromes, FT differed from unity only below the rumen range of PH2, indicating no thermodynamic control. This theoretical investigation shows that thermodynamic control of PH2 on individual VFA produced and associated yield of hydrogen and methane cannot be explained without considering NADH

  4. Thermodynamic Driving Force of Hydrogen on Rumen Microbial Metabolism: A Theoretical Investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk J van Lingen

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is a key product of rumen fermentation and has been suggested to thermodynamically control the production of the various volatile fatty acids (VFA. Previous studies, however, have not accounted for the fact that only thermodynamic near-equilibrium conditions control the magnitude of reaction rate. Furthermore, the role of NAD, which is affected by hydrogen partial pressure (PH2, has often not been considered. The aim of this study was to quantify the control of PH2 on reaction rates of specific fermentation pathways, methanogenesis and NADH oxidation in rumen microbes. The control of PH2 was quantified using the thermodynamic potential factor (FT, which is a dimensionless factor that corrects a predicted kinetic reaction rate for the thermodynamic control exerted. Unity FT was calculated for all glucose fermentation pathways considered, indicating no inhibition of PH2 on the production of a specific type of VFA (e.g., acetate, propionate and butyrate in the rumen. For NADH oxidation without ferredoxin oxidation, increasing PH2 within the rumen physiological range decreased FT from unity to zero for different NAD+ to NADH ratios and pH of 6.2 and 7.0, which indicates thermodynamic control of PH2. For NADH oxidation with ferredoxin oxidation, increasing PH2 within the rumen physiological range decreased FT from unity at pH of 7.0 only. For the acetate to propionate conversion, FT increased from 0.65 to unity with increasing PH2, which indicates thermodynamic control. For propionate to acetate and butyrate to acetate conversions, FT decreased to zero below the rumen range of PH2, indicating full thermodynamic suppression. For methanogenesis by archaea without cytochromes, FT differed from unity only below the rumen range of PH2, indicating no thermodynamic control. This theoretical investigation shows that thermodynamic control of PH2 on individual VFA produced and associated yield of hydrogen and methane cannot be explained without

  5. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of Bi(III based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenylfluorone by hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOFIJA M. RANČIĆ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A new reaction was suggested and a new kinetic method was elaborated for determination of Bi(III in solution, based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenyl-fluorone (PF by hydrogen peroxide in ammonia buffer. By application of spectrophotometric technique, a limit of quantification (LQ of 128 ng cm-3 was reached, and the limit of detection (LD of 37 ng cm-3 was obtained, where LQ was defined as the ratio signal:noise = 10:1 and LD was defined as signal 3:1 against the blank. The RSD value was found to be in the range 2.8–4.8 % for the investigated concentration range of Bi(III. The influence of some ions upon the reaction rate was tested. The method was confirmed by determining Bi(III in a stomach ulcer drug (“Bicit HP”, Hemofarm A.D.. The obtained results were compared to those obtained by AAS and good agreement of results was obtained.

  6. Kinetics of hydrogen evolution reaction on Zr0⋅5Ti0⋅5V0⋅6Cr0 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2Ni1⋅2 has been investigated for corro- sion resistance and hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) in KOH electrolyte of varying concentrations. Acti- vation of the electrode by absorption of hydrogen takes place after prolonged cathodic polarization ...

  7. First Principles Investigation of Hydrogen Physical Adsorption on Graphynes' layers

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Giorgi, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Graphynes are 2D porous structures deriving from graphene featuring triangular and regularly distributed subnanometer pores, which may be exploited to host small gaseous species. First principles adsorption energies of molecular hydrogen (H2) on graphene, graphdiyne and graphtriyne molecular prototypes are obtained at the MP2C level of theory. First, a single layer is investigated and it is found that graphynes are more suited than graphene for H2 physical adsorption since they provide larger binding energies at equilibrium distances much closer to the 2D plane. In particular, for graphtriyne a flat minimum located right in the geometric center of the pore is identified. A novel graphite composed of graphtriyne stacked sheets is then proposed and an estimation of its 3D arrangement is obtained at the DFT level of theory. In contrast to pristine graphite this new carbon material allow both H2 intercalation and out-of-plane diffusion by exploiting the larger volume provided by its nanopores. Related H2 binding ...

  8. Investigation of low emission combustors using hydrogen lean direct injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert ISAC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the key technology challenges for the use of hydrogen in gas turbine engines is the performance of the combustion system, in particular the fuel injectors. Tests were conducted to measure the nitrogen oxide (NOx emissions and combustion performance at inlet conditions of 588 to 811 K, 0.4 to 1.4 MPa, and equivalence ratios up to 0.48. All the injectors were based on Lean Direct Injection (LDI technology with multiple injection points and quick mixing. One challenge to hydrogen-based premixing combustion systems is flashback since hydrogen has a reaction rate over 7 times that of Jet-A.

  9. Kinetics of the decomposition and the estimation of the stability of 10% aqueous and non-aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zun Maria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the stability of 10% hydrogen peroxide aqueous and non-aqueous solutions with the addition of 6% (w/w of urea was evaluated. The solutions were stored at 20°C, 30°C and 40°C, and the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide proceeded according to first-order kinetics. With the addition of the urea in the solutions, the decomposition rate constant increased and the activation energy decreased. The temperature of storage also affected the decomposition of substance, however, 10% hydrogen peroxide solutions prepared in PEG-300, and stabilized with the addition of 6% (w/w of urea had the best constancy.

  10. Intrinsic Kinetics of Dimethyl Ether Synthesis from Plasma Activation of CO2 Hydrogenation over Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tongming; Zhou, Xinhui; Qin, Zuzeng; Ji, Hongbing

    2017-02-02

    CO2 is activated in a plasma reactor followed by hydrogenation over a Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 catalyst, and the intrinsic kinetics of the plasma catalytic process are studied. Compared with CO2 hydrogenation using Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 alone, the CO2 conversion and the dimethyl ether selectivity for the plasma catalytic process are increased by 16.3 %, and 10.1 %, respectively, indicating that the CO2 was activated by the plasma to promote hydrogenation. A study of the intrinsic kinetics shows that the activation energies of methanol formation, the reverse water-gas shift reaction, and methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether are 149.34, 75.47, and 73.18 kJ mol-1 , respectively, which are lower than if Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 is used without plasma, indicating that the activation of CO2 in the plasma reduces the activation energy of the hydrogenation reaction and improves the yield of dimethyl ether. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A model for oxidation kinetics in air at room temperature of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerofolini, G. F.; Mascolo, D.; Vlad, M. O.

    2006-09-01

    A quantitative model is proposed for the description of the oxidation kinetics in air at room temperature of single crystalline, hydrogen-terminated, (1 0 0) silicon. The theory separates the growth kinetics of the interfacial suboxide from those of the outer stoichiometric oxide. The theory proceeds assuming that the suboxide grows along the surface at the border of oxidized-silicon clusters, while the formation of the stoichiometric oxide takes place on the top of the suboxide at a rate decaying exponentially with the oxide thickness. In these hypotheses the kinetics of suboxide formation are found to depend on the initial concentration of (defective) oxo groups, while the growth of the stoichiometric oxide is described by the Elovich equation both in the short- and long-time limits.

  12. A Kinetics Investigation on the Nitro-Nitrite Rearrangement Mediated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... developed along with CL-20, TNAZ and ADN. DADNE is well-known for its insensitive nature and this has motivated the research in understanding the thermal and explosive decompositionbehaviour of DADNE. We have studied the thermal decomposition kinetics of DADNE employing two isoconversional methods viz., ...

  13. A Kinetics Investigation on the Nitro-Nitrite Rearrangement Mediated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tal reports have been published till date.12 14 A better insight into the decomposition mechanism of DADNE will enable us to understand the decomposition phe- ..... mining step which proceeds through the production of NO and HONO dominates throughout the process. While the kinetic parameters computed using TGA.

  14. Investigation of Chemical Equilibrium Kinetics by the Electromigration Method

    CERN Document Server

    Bozhikov, G A; Bontchev, G D; Maslov, O D; Milanov, M V; Dmitriev, S N

    2002-01-01

    Measurement of the chemical reaction rates for complex formation as well as hydrolysis type reactions by the method of horizontal zone electrophoresis is outlined. The correlation between chemical equilibrium kinetics and electrodiffusion processes in a constant d.c. electric field is described. In model electromigration experiments the reaction rate constant of the complex formation of Hf(IV) and DTPA is determined.

  15. Investigation into the kinetics of constructed wetland degradation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. In this study, biomimetic principles were incorporated into a kinetic study of a pilot-scale, horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland (6.0 m × 1.0 m × 0.5 m) in Leipzig, Germany. The bed contained glacial gravel (4–8 mm) planted with. Phragmites australis. Construction was completed in October 2013 and ...

  16. Indicators for suicide substrate inactivation: A kinetic investigation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suicide substrate kinetic pathway and a proposed set of indicators, some theoretical and a few practical ones, that can decisively conclude enzyme inactivation are considered. Steady-state approximation is assumed not only when a catalytic amount of enzyme is used but also for any substrate-enzyme ratio. In each ...

  17. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations for the reaction of semiquinone radicals to form superoxide and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Buettner, Garry R.

    2010-01-01

    The quinone/semiquinone/hydroquinone triad (Q/SQ•−/H2Q) represents a class of compounds that has great importance in a wide range of biological processes. The half-cell reduction potentials of these redox couples in aqueous solutions at neutral pH, E°′, provide a window to understanding the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of this triad and their associated chemistry and biochemistry in vivo. Substituents on the quinone ring can significantly influence the electron density “on the ring” and thus modify E°′ dramatically. E°′ of the quinone governs the reaction of semiquinone with dioxygen to form superoxide. At near-neutral pH the pKa's of the hydroquinone are outstanding indicators of the electron density in the aromatic ring of the members of these triads (electrophilicity) and thus are excellent tools to predict half-cell reduction potentials for both the one-electron and two-electron couples, which in turn allow estimates of rate constants for the reactions of these triads. For example, the higher the pKa's of H2Q, the lower the reduction potentials and the higher the rate constants for the reaction of SQ•− with dioxygen to form superoxide. However, hydroquinone autoxidation is controlled by the concentration of di-ionized hydroquinone; thus, the lower the pKa's the less stable H2Q to autoxidation. Catalysts, e.g., metals and quinone, can accelerate oxidation processes; by removing superoxide and increasing the rate of formation of quinone, superoxide dismutase can accelerate oxidation of hydroquinones and thereby increase the flux of hydrogen peroxide. The principal reactions of quinones are with nucleophiles via Michael addition, for example, with thiols and amines. The rate constants for these addition reactions are also related to E°′. Thus, pKa's of a hydroquinone and E°′ are central to the chemistry of these triads. PMID:20493944

  18. Distillation Kinetics of Solid Mixtures of Hydrogen Peroxide and Water and the Isolation of Pure Hydrogen Peroxide in Ultrahigh Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teolis, B. D.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    We present results of the growth of thin films of crystalline H2O2 and H2O2.2H2O (dihydrate) in ultrahigh vacuum by distilling an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. We traced the process using infrared reflectance spectroscopy, mass loss on a quartz crystal microbalance, and in a few cases ultraviolet-visible reflectance. We find that the different crystalline phases-water, dihydrate, and hydrogen peroxide-have very different sublimation rates, making distillation efficient to isolate the less volatile component, crystalline H2O2.

  19. Investigation of diffusion kinetics of plasma paste borided AISI 8620 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... diffraction, Vickers micro-hardness tester and the growth kinetics of the boride layers. X-ray diffraction analysis of boride layers on the surface of the steel revealed FeB and Fe2B phases. Depending on temperature and layer thickness, the activation energies of boron in steel were found to be 124.7 kJ/mol for 100% B2O3.

  20. Hydrogen-Induced Adsorption of Carbon Monoxide on the Gold Dimer Cation: A Joint Experimental and DFT Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojkovic, Marin; Rayane, Driss; Antoine, Rodolphe; Broyer, Michel; Allouche, Abdul-Rahman; Mignon, Pierre; Dugourd, Philippe

    2017-06-15

    It is demonstrated, using tandem mass spectrometry and radio frequency ion trap, that the adsorption of a H atom on the gold dimer cation, Au2H+, prevents its dissociation and allows for adsorption of CO. Reaction kinetics are measured by employing a radio frequency ion trap, where Au2+ and CO interact for a given reaction time. The effect of a hydrogen atom is evaluated by comparing reaction rate constants measured for Au2+ and Au2H+. The theoretical results for the adsorption of CO molecules and their reaction characteristics with Au2+ and Au2H+ are found to agree with the experimental findings. The joint investigations provide insights into hydrogen atom adsorption effects and consequent reaction mechanisms.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation into Higher Hydrocarbons and Oxygenates: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Bounds and Progress with Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Gonzalo

    2017-03-22

    Under specific scenarios, the catalytic hydrogenation of CO 2 with renewable hydrogen is considered a suitable route for the chemical recycling of this environmentally harmful and chemically refractory molecule into added-value energy carriers and chemicals. The hydrogenation of CO 2 into C 1 products, such as methane and methanol, can be achieved with high selectivities towards the corresponding hydrogenation product. More challenging, however, is the selective production of high (C 2+ ) hydrocarbons and oxygenates. These products are desired as energy vectors, owing to their higher volumetric energy density and compatibility with the current fuel infrastructure than C 1 compounds, and as entry platform chemicals for existing value chains. The major challenge is the optimal integration of catalytic functionalities for both reductive and chain-growth steps. This Minireview summarizes the progress achieved towards the hydrogenation of CO 2 to C 2+ hydrocarbons and oxygenates, covering both solid and molecular catalysts and processes in the gas and liquid phases. Mechanistic aspects are discussed with emphasis on intrinsic kinetic limitations, in some cases inevitably linked to thermodynamic bounds through the concomitant reverse water-gas-shift reaction, which should be considered in the development of advanced catalysts and processes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Kinetics of CO2 Hydrogenation to Hydrocarbons over Iron-Silica Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Rhodri E; Mattia, Davide; Plucinski, Pawel; Jones, Matthew D

    2017-11-17

    The conversion of CO2 to hydrocarbons is increasingly seen as a potential alternative source of fuel and chemicals, while at the same time contributing to addressing global warming effects. An understanding of kinetics and mass transfer limitations is vital to both optimise catalyst performance and to scale up the whole process. In this work we report on a systematic investigation of the influence of the different process parameters, including pore size, catalyst support particle diameter, reaction temperature, pressure and reactant flow rate on conversion and selectivity of iron nanoparticle -silica catalysts. The results provided on activation energy and mass transfer limitations represent the basis to fully design a reactor system for the effective catalytic conversion of CO2 to hydrocarbons. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Investigating fuel-cell transport limitations using hydrogen limiting current

    OpenAIRE

    Spingler, FB; Phillips, A; Schuler, T; Tucker, MC; Weber, AZ

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 Hydrogen Energy Publications LLC Reducing mass-transport losses in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is essential to increase their power density and reduce overall stack cost. At the same time, cost also motivates the reduction in expensive precious-metal catalysts, which results in higher local transport losses in the catalyst layers. In this paper, we use a hydrogen-pump limiting-current setup to explore the gas-phase transport losses through PEFC catalyst layers and various ga...

  4. Kinetic studies of peroxiredoxin 6 from Arenicola marina: rapid oxidation by hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite but lack of reduction by hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loumaye, Eléonore; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Alvarez, Beatriz; Rees, Jean-François; Clippe, André; Knoops, Bernard; Radi, Rafael; Trujillo, Madia

    2011-10-01

    Arenicola marina lives in marine environments where hydrogen peroxide concentrations reach micromolar levels. The annelid also forms reactive species through metabolic pathways. Its antioxidant systems include a cytosolic peroxiredoxin, peroxiredoxin 6 (AmPrx6 or AmPRDX6) that shows high homology to the mammalian 1-Cys peroxiredoxin. Previous work confirmed the peroxidase activity of AmPrx6 in the presence of dithiotreitol. Herein, we performed an in vitro kinetic characterization of the recombinant enzyme. AmPrx6 reduced hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite with rate constants of 1.1×10(7) and 2×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively, at pH 7.4 and 25°C. Reduction of tert-butyl hydroperoxide was slower. The pK(a) of the peroxidatic thiol of AmPrx6 was determined as 5.1±0.2, indicating that it exists as thiolate, the reactive species, at physiological pH. The reductive part of the catalytic cycle was also explored. Hydrogen sulfide, present in millimolar concentrations in marine sediments where the annelid lives and that is able to reduce the mammalian 1-Cys peroxiredoxin, did not support AmPrx6 peroxidase activity. The enzyme was not reduced by other potential physiological reductants tested. Our data indicate that in this annelid, Prx6 could contribute to peroxide detoxification in the presence of a so far unidentified reducing counterpart. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Theoretical Investigation of Intramolecular Hydrogen Shift Reactions in 3-Methyltetrahydrofuran (3-MTHF) Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Prajakta R; Sakade, Naoki; Sakai, Yasuyuki; Fernandes, Ravi; Heufer, K Alexander

    2015-11-05

    3-Methyltetrahydrofuran (3-MTHF) is proposed to be a promising fuel component among the cyclic oxygenated species. To have detailed insight of its combustion kinetics, intramolecular hydrogen shift reactions for the ROO to QOOH reaction class are studied for eight ROO isomers of 3-MTHF. Rate constants of all possible reaction paths that involve formation of cyclic transition states are computed by employing the CBS-QB3 composite method. A Pitzer-Gwinn-like approximation has been applied for the internal rotations in reactants, products, and transition states for the accurate treatment of hindered rotors. Calculated relative barrier heights highlight that the most favorable reaction channel proceeds via a six membered transition state, which is consistent with the computed rate constants. Comparing total rate constants in ROO isomers of 3-MTHF with the corresponding isomers of methylcyclopentane depicts faster kinetics in 3-MTHF than methylcyclopentane reflecting the effect of ring oxygen on the intramolecular hydrogen shift reactions.

  6. NMR and IR investigations of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of this review, strong hydrogen bonds have been defined on the basis of experimental data, such as OH stretching wavenumbers, vOH, and OH chemical shifts, dOH (in the latter case after correction for ring current effects). Limits for O–H···Y systems are taken as 2800 > vOH > 1800 cm...... been used as a parameter for hydrogen bond strength in O–H···O systems. On a broad scale, a correlation between OH stretching wavenumbers and O···O distances is observed, as demonstrated experimentally as well as theoretically, but for substituted beta-diketone enols this correlation is relatively weak....

  7. Kinetics of Oxidation of Cobalt(III Complexes of a Acids by Hydrogen Peroxide in the Presence of Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide oxidation of pentaamminecobalt(III complexes of α-hydroxy acids at 35°C in micellar medium has been attempted. In this reaction the rate of oxidation shows first order kinetics each in [cobalt(III] and [H2O2]. Hydrogen peroxide induced electron transfer in [(NH35 CoIII-L]2+ complexes of α-hydroxy acids readily yields 100% of cobalt(II with nearly 100% of C-C bond cleavage products suggesting that it behaves mainly as one equivalent oxidant in micellar medium. With unbound ligand also it behaves only as C-C cleavage agent rather than C-H cleavage agent. With increasing micellar concentration an increase in the rate is observed.

  8. Liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen auxiliary power system thruster investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, E. E.; Kusak, L.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and demonstration of a 111 newton (25 lb) thrust, integrated auxiliary propulsion system (IAPS) thruster for use with LH2/LO2 propellants is described. Hydrogen was supplied at a temperature range of 22 to 33 K (40 to 60 R), and oxygen from 89 to 122 K (160 to 220 R). The thruster was designed to operate in both pulse mode and steady-state modes for vehicle attitude control, space maneuvering, and as an abort backup in the event of failure of the main propulsion system. A dual-sleeve, tri-axial injection system was designed that utilizes a primary injector/combustor where 100 percent of the oxygen and 8 percent of the hydrogen is introduced; a secondary injector/combustor where 45 percent of the hydrogen is introduced to mix with the primary combustor gases; and a boundary layer injector that uses the remaining 45 percent of the hydrogen to cool the thrust throat/nozzle design. Hot-fire evaluation of this thruster with a BLC injection distance of 2.79 cm (1.10 in.) indicated that a specific impulse value of 390 sec can be attained using a coated molybdenum thrust chamber. Pulse mode tests indicated that a chamber pressure buildup to 90 percent thrust can be achieved in a time on the order of 48 msec. Some problems were encountered in achieving ignition of each pulse during pulse trains. This was interpreted to indicate that a higher delivered spark energy level ( 100 mJ) would be required to maintain ignition reliability of the plasma torch ignition system under the extra 'cold' conditions resulting during pulsing.

  9. Site-Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Propane: Mass spectrometric methods, equilibrium temperature dependence, and kinetics of exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Ponton, C.; Kitchen, N.; Lloyd, M. K.; Lawson, M.; Formolo, M. J.; Eiler, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Intramolecular isotope ordering can constrain temperatures of synthesis, mechanisms of formation, and/or source substrates of organic compounds. Here we explore site-specific hydrogen isotope variations of propane. Statistical thermodynamic models predict that at equilibrium methylene hydrogen (-CH2-) in propane will be 10's of per mil higher in D/H ratio than methyl hydrogen (-CH3) at geologically relevant temperatures, and that this difference is highly temperature dependent ( 0.5-1 ‰/°C). Chemical-kinetic controls on site-specific D/H in propane could constrain the mechanisms, conditions and extents of propane synthesis or destruction. We have developed a method for measuring the difference in D/H ratio between methylene and methyl hydrogen in propane by gas source mass spectrometry. The data were measured using the Thermo Fisher Double Focusing Sector high resolution mass spectrometer (DFS), and involve comparison of the D/H ratios of molecular ion (C3H8+) and the ethyl fragmental ion (C2H5+). We demonstrate the accuracy and precision of this method through analysis of D-labeled and independently analyzed propanes. In the exchange experiments, propane was heated (100-200 oC) either alone or in the presence of D-enriched water (δD=1,1419 ‰ SMOW), with or without one of several potentially catalytic substrates for hours to weeks. Propane was found to exchange hydrogen with water vigorously at 200 °C in the presence of metal catalysts. In the presence of Ni catalyst, methylene hydrogen exchanges 2.5 times faster than methyl hydrogen. Hydrogen exchange in the presence of Pd catalyst is more effective and can equilibrate hydrogen isotope distribution on propane on the order of 7 days. Isotopic exchange in the presence of natural materials have also been tested, but is only measurable in the methylene group at 200 °C. High catalytic activity of Pd permits attainment of a bracketed, time-invariant equilibrium state that we use to calibrate the site

  10. Improvement of hydrogen storage kinetics in ball-milled magnesium doped with antimony

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír; Roupcová, Pavla

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 9 (2017), s. 6144-6151 ISSN 0360-3199 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Hydrogen * Hydrogen storage * Storage capacity * Magnesium alloys * Antimony Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 3.582, year: 2016

  11. Merging Iron Catalysis and Biocatalysis-Iron Carbonyl Complexes as Efficient Hydrogen Autotransfer Catalysts in Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama

    2016-09-29

    A dual catalytic iron/lipase system has been developed and applied in the dynamic kinetic resolution of benzylic and aliphatic secondary alcohols. A detailed study of the Knölker-type iron complexes demonstrated the hydrogen autotransfer of alcohols to proceed under mild reaction conditions and allowed the combination with the enzymatic resolution. Different racemic alcohols were efficiently converted to chiral acetates in good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  12. Theoretical and kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of unsaturated C6 methyl esters with hydroxyl radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan-De; Ni, Zhong-Hai

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a systematic ab initio and chemical kinetic study of the rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction reactions by hydroxyl radical (OH) on typical isomers of unsaturated C6 methyl esters at the CBS/QB3 level of theory. The high-pressure limit rate constants at different reaction sites for all the methyl esters in the temperature range from 500 to 2000 K are calculated via transition-state theory with the Wigner method for quantum tunneling effect and fitted to the modified three parameters Arrhenius expression using least-squares regression. Further, a branching ratio analysis for each reaction site has been performed.

  13. Synergic catalytic effect of Ti hydride and Nb nanoparticles for improving hydrogenation and dehydrogenation kinetics of Mg-based nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Ma

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Mg-9.3 wt% (TiH1.971-TiH−0.7 wt% Nb nanocomposite has been synthesized by hydrogen plasma-metal reaction (HPMR approach to enhance the hydrogen sorption kinetics of Mg at moderate temperatures by providing nanosizing effect of increasing H “diffusion channels” and adding transition metallic catalysts. The Mg nanoparticles (NPs were in hexagonal shape range from 50 to 350 nm and the average size of the NPs was 177 nm. The small spherical TiH1.971, TiH and Nb NPs of about 25 nm uniformly decorated on the surface of the big Mg NPs. The Mg-TiH1.971-TiH-Nb nanocomposite could quickly absorb 5.6 wt% H2 within 5 min at 573 K and 4.5 wt% H2 within 5 min at 523 K, whereas the pure Mg prepared by HPMR could only absorb 4 and 1.5 wt% H2 at the same temperatures. TiH1.971, TiH and Nb NPs transformed into TiH2 and NbH during hydrogenation and recovered after dehydrogenation process. The apparent activation energies of the nanocomposite for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation were 45.0 and 50.7 kJ mol−1, which are much smaller than those of pure Mg NPs, 123.8 and 127.7 kJ mol−1. The improved sorption kinetics of the Mg-based nanocomposite at moderate temperatures and the small activation energy can be interpreted by the nanostructure of Mg and the synergic catalytic effects of Ti hydrides and Nb NPs.

  14. Mechanism and Kinetics of Methane Combustion, Part I: Thermal Rate Constants for Hydrogen-Abstraction Reaction of CH4 + O(3P).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ya; Jiang, Zhong'an; Chen, Jushi

    2017-03-23

    The mechanism and kinetics of gas-phase hydrogen-abstraction by the O(3P) from methane are investigated using ab initio calculations and dynamical methods. Not only are the electronic structure properties including the optimized geometries, relative energies, and vibrational frequencies of all the stationary points obtained from state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field calculations, but also the single-point energies for all points on the intrinsic reaction coordinate are evaluated using the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction approach with modified optimized cc-pCVDZ basis sets. Our calculations give a fairly accurate description of the regions around the 3A″ transition state in the O(3P) attacking a near-collinear H-CH3 direction with a barrier height of 12.53 kcal/mol, which is lower than those reported before. Subsequently, thermal rate constants for this hydrogen-abstraction are calculated using the canonical unified statistical theory method with the temperature ranging from 298 K to 1000 K. These calculated rate constants are in agreement with experiments. The present work reveals the reaction mechanism of hydrogen-abstraction by the O(3P) from methane, and it is helpful for the understanding of methane combustion.

  15. Investigation of the hydrogen release incident at the AC Transit Emeryville Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Aaron P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); San Marchi, Christopher W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Levin, Jamie [Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District, Oakland, CA (United States); Butler, Dennis [Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes the investigation of the release of approximately 300kg of hydrogen at the AC Transit Facility in Emeryville, CA. The hydrogen release was avoidable in both the root cause and contributing factors. The report highlights the need for communication in all phases of project planning and implementation. Apart from the failed valve, the hydrogen system functioned as designed, venting the hydrogen gas a safe distance above surrounding structures and keeping the subsequent fire away from personnel and equipment. The Emeryville Fire Department responded appropriately given the information provided to the Incident Commander. No injuries or fatalities resulted from the incident.

  16. An investigation into the effects of hydrogen on the fracture and deformation of Alloy X-750

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symons, Douglas M. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1994-11-01

    this study investigated the effect of hydrogen on the fracture of a nickel-base superalloy, Alloy X-750 in the solution treated and aged (HTH) condition. The effect of hydrogen was examined through tensile testing and fracture toughness testing incorporating observations from scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy.

  17. A computational investigation of the red and blue shifts in hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MITRADIP Das

    Abstract. The present work reports results of computational investigations of hydrogen bonding, with regard to the most common red shift in the vibrational frequency, as well as the less common blue shift in several hydrogen bonded systems. A few new correlations of the frequency shifts with the calculated electrostatic ...

  18. A computational investigation of the red and blue shifts in hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The presentwork reports results of computational investigations of hydrogen bonding, with regard to the most common red shift in the vibrational frequency, as well as the less common blue shift in several hydrogen bonded systems. A few new correlations of the frequency shifts with the calculated electrostatic parameters ...

  19. Kinetics on NiZn Bimetallic Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution via Selective Dehydrogenation of Methylcyclohexane to Toluene

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam

    2017-01-18

    Liquid organic chemical hydrides are effective hydrogen storage media for easy and safe transport. The chemical couple of methylcyclohexane (MCH) and toluene (TOL) has been considered one of the feasible cycles for a hydrogen carrier, but the selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL has been reported using only Pt-based noble metal catalysts. This study reports MCH dehydrogenation to TOL using supported NiZn as a selective, non-noble-metal catalyst. A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to provide insight into the site requirements and reaction mechanism for MCH dehydrogenation to TOL, which were compared with those for cyclohexane (CH) dehydrogenation to benzene (BZ). The kinetic measurements carried out at 300-360°C showed an almost zero order with respect to MCH pressure in the high-pressure region (≥10 kPa) and nearly a positive half order with respective to H pressure (≤40 kPa). These kinetic data for the dehydrogenation reaction paradoxically indicate that hydrogenation of a strongly chemisorbed intermediate originating from TOL is the rate-determining step. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation confirms that the dehydrogenated TOL species at the aliphatic (methyl) position group (CHCH) were strongly adsorbed on the surface, which must be hydrogenated to desorb as TOL. This hydrogen-assisted desorption mechanism explains the essential role of excess H present in the feed in maintaining the activity of the metallic surface for hydrogenation. The rate of the CH to BZ reaction was less sensitive to H pressure than that of MCH to TOL, which can be explained by the absence of a methyl group in the structure, which in turn reduces the binding energy of the adsorbed species. DFT suggests that the improved TOL selectivity by adding Zn to Ni was due to Zn atoms preferentially occupying low-coordination sites on the surface (the corner and edge sites), which are likely the unselective sites responsible for the C-C dissociation of the

  20. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Paula; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity towards H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underline the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses.

  1. Investigation of the Alkaline Electrochemical Interface and Development of Composite Metal/Metal-Oxides for Hydrogen and Oxygen Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Michael

    electrolyte. The HER kinetics of numerous binary & ternary Ni-alloys and composite Ni/metal-oxide/C samples were evaluated in aqueous 0.1 M KOH electrolyte. Furthermore a model of the double layer interface is proposed, which helps explain the observed ensemble effect in the presence of AEI. In Chapter 3, Ni-Fe and Ni-Fe-Co mixed-metal-oxide (MMO) films were investigated for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity in 0.1M KOH on high surface area Raney-Nickel supports. During investigations of MMO activity, aniline was identified as a useful "capping agent" for synthesis of high-surface area MMO-polyaniline (PANI) composite materials. A Ni-Fe-Co/PANI-Raney-Ni catalyst was developed which exhibits enhanced mass-activity compared to state-of-the-art Ni-Fe OER electrocatalysts reported to date. The morphology of the MMO catalyst film on PANI/Raney-Ni support provides excellent dispersion of active-sites and should maintain high active-site utilization for catalyst loading on gas-diffusion electrodes. In Chapter 4, the de-activation of reversible-hydrogen electrode catalysts was investigated and the development of a Pt-Ir-Nx/C catalyst is reported, which exhibits significantly increased stability in the HBr/Br 2 electrolyte. In contrast a Pt-Ir/C catalyst exhibited increased tolerance to high-voltage cycling and in particular showed recovery of electrocatalytic activity after reversible de-activation (presumably from bromide adsorption and subsequent oxidative bromide stripping). Under the harshest testing conditions of high-voltage cycling or exposure to Br2 the Pt-based catalyst showed a trend in stability: Pt < Pt-Ir < Pt-Ir-Nx. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  2. NMR and IR Investigations of Strong Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poul Erik Hansen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of this review, strong hydrogen bonds have been defined on the basis of experimental data, such as OH stretching wavenumbers, νOH, and OH chemical shifts, δOH (in the latter case, after correction for ring current effects. Limits for O–H···Y systems are taken as 2800 > νOH > 1800 cm−1, and 19 ppm > δOH > 15 ppm. Recent results as well as an account of theoretical advances are presented for a series of important classes of compounds such as β-diketone enols, β-thioxoketone enols, Mannich bases, proton sponges, quinoline N-oxides and diacid anions. The O···O distance has long been used as a parameter for hydrogen bond strength in O–H···O systems. On a broad scale, a correlation between OH stretching wavenumbers and O···O distances is observed, as demonstrated experimentally as well as theoretically, but for substituted β-diketone enols this correlation is relatively weak.

  3. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  4. Kinetic Models Study of Hydrogenation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Vacuum Gas Oil and Basrah Crude Oil Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzher M. Ibraheem

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available             The aim of this research is to study the kinetic reaction models for catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic content for Basrah crude oil (BCO and vacuum gas oil (VGO derived from Kirkuk crude oil which has the boiling point rang of (611-833K.            This work is performed using a hydrodesulphurization (HDS pilot plant unit located in AL-Basil Company. A commercial (HDS catalyst cobalt-molybdenum (Co-Mo supported in alumina (γ-Al2O3 is used in this work. The feed is supplied by North Refinery Company in Baiji. The reaction temperatures range is (600-675 K over liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV range of (0.7-2hr-1 and hydrogen pressure is 3 MPa with H2/oil ratio of 300 of Basrah Crude oil (BCO, while the corresponding conditions for vacuum gas oil (VGO are (583-643 K, (1.5-3.75 hr-1, 3.5 MPa and 250  respectively .            The results showed that the reaction kinetics is of second order for both types of feed. Activation energies are found to be 30.396, 38.479 kJ/mole for Basrah Crude Oil (BCO and Vacuum Gas Oil (VGO respectively.

  5. Superior effect of Ni-substitution on the hydrogenation kinetics of Mg{sub 6}Pd{sub 1−x}TM{sub x} (TM = Ag, Cu, Ni) pseudo-binary compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponthieu, M. [MIRE-Group, Laboratorio de Física de Materiales de Interés Energético, Dpto Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); ICMPE/CNRS-UPEC, UMR 7182, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Fernández, J.F., E-mail: josefrancisco.fernandez@uam.es [MIRE-Group, Laboratorio de Física de Materiales de Interés Energético, Dpto Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Cuevas, F. [ICMPE/CNRS-UPEC, UMR 7182, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Laversenne, L. [Institut Néel, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Bodega, J.; Ares, J.R.; Sánchez, C. [MIRE-Group, Laboratorio de Física de Materiales de Interés Energético, Dpto Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Kinetics of (de)hydrogenation of Mg{sub 6}(Pd,TM) TM = Ag, Cu and Ni compared. • Faster hydrogenation kinetics for the Ni compound. • Faster H-desorption for the Ni compound due to MgH{sub 2}/Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} synergy. - Abstract: In this investigation, the H-sorption kinetics of Mg{sub 6}Pd and Mg{sub 6}Pd{sub 1−x}TM{sub x} (TM = Ag, Cu, Ni) pseudo-binary compounds at the TM solubility limit have been studied by isothermal hydrogen absorption, thermal desorption spectroscopy and in situ neutron diffraction. Among all studied compounds, the fastest absorption kinetics takes place for the Ni-substituted one. The fit of the absorption curves to established model equations for solid–gas reaction shows that hydrogenation is controlled by diffusion. As for desorption, the peak temperature for the Ni-substituted compound is 90 K below that of MgH{sub 2}/Mg system and is characterised by a low activation energy of 68 kJ/molH{sub 2}. To better understand these results, neutron diffraction experiments during in situ thermal desorption of deuterated Mg{sub 6}Pd and Mg{sub 6}Pd{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 0.75} compounds were carried out. These experiments demonstrate a synergetic effect between MgH{sub 2} and Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} hydrides as responsible for the remarkable kinetics of the Ni-containing compound.

  6. Combined carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation investigations for elucidating benzene biodegradation pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, A.; Herklotz, I.; Herrmann, S.; Thullner, M.; Weelink, S.A.B.; Stams, A.J.M.; Richnow, H.H.; Vogt, C.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, combined carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation investigations have emerged as a powerful tool for the characterization of reaction mechanisms relevant for the removal of organic pollutants. Here, we applied this approach in order to differentiate benzene biodegradation pathways under

  7. Effect of Human and Bovine Serum Albumin on kinetic Chemiluminescence of Mn (III-Tetrakis (4-Sulfonatophenyl Porphyrin-Luminol-Hydrogen Peroxide System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Yahya Kazemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with an attempt to study the effect of human and bovine serum albumin on kinetic parameters of chemiluminescence of luminol-hydrogen peroxide system catalyzed by manganese tetrasulfonatophenyl porphyrin (MnTSPP. The investigated parameters involved pseudo-first-order rise and fall rate constant for the chemiluminescence burst, maximum level intensity, time to reach maximum intensity, total light yield, and values of the intensity at maximum CL which were evaluated by nonlinear least square program KINFIT. Because of interaction of metalloporphyrin with proteins, the CL parameters are drastically affected. The systems resulted in Stern-Volmer plots with values of 3.17×105 and 3.7×105M−1 in the quencher concentration range of 1.5×10−6 to 1.5×10−5 M for human serum albumin (HSA and bovine serum albumin (BSA, respectively.

  8. Investigation of bonded hydrogen defects in nanocrystalline diamond films grown with nitrogen/methane/hydrogen plasma at high power conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C. J.; Hou, Haihong; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Jiang, X. F.; Pinto, J. L.; Ye, H.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of some growth parameters such as high microwave power ranging from 3.0 to 4.0 kW and N2 additive on the incorporation of bonded hydrogen defects in nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films grown through a small amount of pure N2 addition into conventional 4% CH4/H2 plasma using a 5 kW microwave plasma CVD system. Incorporation form and content of hydrogen point defects in the NCD films produced with pure N2 addition was analyzed by employing Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time. A large amount of hydrogen related defects was detected in all the produced NCD films with N2 additive ranging from 29 to 87 μm thick with grain size from 47 nm to 31 nm. Furthermore, a specific new H related sharp absorption peak appears in all the NCD films grown with pure N2/CH4/H2 plasma at high powers and becomes stronger at powers higher than 3.0 kW and is even stronger than the 2920 cm-1 peak, which is commonly found in CVD diamond films. Based on these experimental findings, the role of high power and pure nitrogen addition on the growth of NCD films including hydrogen defect formation is analyzed and discussed.

  9. First principles DFT investigation of yttrium-doped graphene: Electronic structure and hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desnavi, Sameerah, E-mail: sameerah-desnavi@zhcet.ac.in [Department of Electronic Engineering, ZHCET, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The electronic structure and hydrogen storage capability of Yttrium-doped grapheme has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom prefers the hollow site of the hexagonal ring with a binding energy of 1.40 eV. Doping by Y makes the system metallic and magnetic with a magnetic moment of 2.11 μ{sub B}. Y decorated graphene can adsorb up to four hydrogen molecules with an average binding energy of 0.415 eV. All the hydrogen atoms are physisorbed with an average desorption temperature of 530.44 K. The Y atoms can be placed only in alternate hexagons, which imply a wt% of 6.17, close to the DoE criterion for hydrogen storage materials. Thus, this system is potential hydrogen storage medium with 100% recycling capability.

  10. SIMS and TEM investigation of hydrogen trapping on implantation defects in a nickel-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambon, Fanny, E-mail: fanny.jambon@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d' Étude de la Corrosion Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Marchetti, Loïc [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d' Étude de la Corrosion Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, Laboratoire d' étude du Comportement à Long Terme des Matériaux de conditionnement, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Sennour, Mohamed [MINES ParisTech, PSL – Research University – Centre des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 7633, B.P. 87, 91003 Evry (France); Jomard, François [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée (CNRS and University of Versailles Saint Quentin), 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Chêne, Jacques [UMR 8587 CEA/CNRS, Équipe Hydrogène/Matériaux de structure, CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d' Étude de la Corrosion Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2015-11-15

    This study aims at characterizing the interactions of hydrogen with point defects and their clusters in nickel-based superalloys. For this, nickel ion implantation was used to create defects in the sub-surface of alloy 690 coupons. The interaction of hydrogen with these defects was studied thanks to SIMS depth profile analysis performed after deuterium cathodic charging, and different annealing treatment. In parallel, TEM observations were carried out in order to qualify and quantify the defects responsible for the trapping, and to observe their evolution in the presence of hydrogen. All the results exhibit a strong interaction of hydrogen with implantation-defects, up to high temperatures (325 °C). Also, hydrogen is shown to assist defects reorganisation, in a way similar to the effect of temperature. The effect of hydrogen on the alloy atoms as explored by SIMS, combined with the TEM investigation of defects evolution in the presence of hydrogen, allows to suggest that the main mechanism for hydrogen-assisted motion of defects is by lowering the lattice friction, thus decreasing the activation volume for the unfaulting or motion of point defect clusters, up to dislocation loops.

  11. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  12. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D[subscript 2]O and a catalytic amount of H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4]. The resulting labeled product is characterized by [superscript 1]H NMR. Students also…

  13. A Kinetic Study of a Homodienyl-[1,5]-Hydrogen Shift in a Vinylaziridine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, David Ackland; Hussenius, Anita; Somfai, Peter

    1996-01-01

    The thermal rearrangement of an N-substituted vinylaziridine to the corresponding Z-allylic amine, i.e. a homodienyl-[1,5]-hydrogen shift was studied at various temperatures in the reange 40 90 oC, and NMR spectroscopy was used to follow the reactiuon. The activation enthalpiies and entropies mea...

  14. Multi-scale theoretical investigation of hydrogen storage in covalent organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylianakis, Emmanuel; Klontzas, Emmanouel; Froudakis, George E

    2011-03-01

    The quest for efficient hydrogen storage materials has been the limiting step towards the commercialization of hydrogen as an energy carrier and has attracted a lot of attention from the scientific community. Sophisticated multi-scale theoretical techniques have been considered as a valuable tool for the prediction of materials storage properties. Such techniques have also been used for the investigation of hydrogen storage in a novel category of porous materials known as Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs). These framework materials are consisted of light elements and are characterized by exceptional physicochemical properties such as large surface areas and pore volumes. Combinations of ab initio, Molecular Dynamics (MD) and Grand Canonical Monte-Carlo (GCMC) calculations have been performed to investigate the hydrogen adsorption in these ultra-light materials. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the theoretical hydrogen storage studies that have been published after the discovery of COFs. Experimental and theoretical studies have proven that COFs have comparable or better hydrogen storage abilities than other competitive materials such as MOF. The key factors that can lead to the improvement of the hydrogen storage properties of COFs are highlighted, accompanied with some recently presented theoretical multi-scale studies concerning these factors.

  15. Recrystallization kinetics in copper investigated by in situ texture measurements by neutron diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leffers, Torben; Hansen, Niels; Kjems, Jørgen

    1981-01-01

    The potential of neutron-diffraction texture measurement as a tool for accurate investigations of recrystallization kinetics is demonstrated by the application of the method to the recrystallization of heavily rolled copper (99.98% purity). The present investigation demonstrates that this technique...

  16. Investigation of Kinetic and Rheological Properties for the Demulsification Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Al-Sabagh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical demulsification process is the most widely applied method of treating water in crude oil emulsions and involves the use of chemical additives to accelerate the emulsion breaking process. Hence, five demulsifiers were prepared in two steps. In the first step, the nonyl phenol was polymerized with formaldehyde to obtain five different molecular weights polymers. In the second step, the resulting polymers were ethoxylated with 50 ethylene oxide units and propoxylated with 10 propylene oxide units, yielding (D1–D5. The demulsification efficiency of these demulsifiers was investigated. The influence of viscosity on the droplet diameter for water-in-crude oil emulsion with three different ratios; 30:70, 50:50 and 70:30 (v/v w/o emulsions were examined. The results showed that, the viscosity of w/o emulsion was strongly augmented by increasing volume of water before reaching the inversion point. The yield point which is required to start the flow decreases with decreasing water percent. The coalescence rate increases with increasing drop size for D5 as a representative sample. Results show that, the droplet size increases with increasing water content. The efficiency of water separation increases as the molecular weight increase.

  17. FT-IR and NIR spectroscopic investigation of hydrogen bonding in indole-ether systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordić, B.; Kovačević, M.; Sloboda, T.; Vidović, A.; Jović, B.

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports FTIR and NIR spectroscopic study of hydrogen bonding between indole and different ethers in carbon tetrachloride. With increase in ether concentration increase in intensity of red-shifted band, and decrease of intensity of monomer band has been observed. The FTIR and NIR spectroscopic characteristics for N-H⋯O hydrogen bonded complexes and also the equilibrium constants for 1:1 complex formation are given. Influence of structural differences of ethers on hydrogen bonding was investigated using Taft equation. Good correlation has been obtained.

  18. Kinetic modeling of α-hydrogen abstractions from unsaturated and saturated oxygenate compounds by carbon-centered radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevas, Paschalis D; Sabbe, Maarten K; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Papayannakos, Nikos; Marin, Guy B

    2014-06-23

    Hydrogen abstractions are important elementary reactions in a variety of reacting media at high temperatures in which oxygenates and hydrocarbon radicals are present. Accurate kinetic data are obtained from CBS-QB3 ab initio (AI) calculations by using conventional transition-state theory within the high-pressure limit, including corrections for hindered rotation and tunneling. From the obtained results, a group-additive (GA) model is developed that allows the Arrhenius parameters and rate coefficients for abstraction of the α-hydrogen from a wide range of oxygenate compounds to be predicted at temperatures ranging from 300 to 1500 K. From a training set of 60 hydrogen abstractions from oxygenates by carbon-centered radicals, 15 GA values (ΔGAV°s) are obtained for both the forward and reverse reactions. Among them, four ΔGAV°s refer to primary contributions, and the remaining 11 ΔGAV°s refer to secondary ones. The accuracy of the model is further improved by introducing seven corrections for cross-resonance stabilization of the transition state from an additional set of 43 reactions. The determined ΔGAV°s are validated upon a test set of AI data for 17 reactions. The mean absolute deviation of the pre-exponential factors (log A) and activation energies (E(a)) for the forward reaction at 300 K are 0.238 log(m(3)  mol(-1)  s(-1)) and 1.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively, whereas the mean factor of deviation between the GA-predicted and the AI-calculated rate coefficients is 1.6. In comparison with a compilation of 33 experimental rate coefficients, the between the GA-predicted values and these experimental values is only 2.2. Hence, the constructed GA model can be reliably used in the prediction of the kinetics of α-hydrogen-abstraction reactions between a broad range of oxygenates and oxygenate radicals. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Panayotounakos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the construction of the general solutions concerning the one-dimensional (1D fully dynamic nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs, for the erosion kinetics. After an uncoupling procedure of the above mentioned equations a second–order nonlinear PDE of the Monge type governing the porosity is derived, the general solution of which is constructed in the sense that a full complement of arbitrary functions (as many as the order is introduced. Afterwards, we specify the above solution according to convenient initial conditions.

  20. [An investigation of an accident of occupational acute hydrogen sulfide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z C; Liu, J L; Jian, X D; Wang, K

    2017-07-20

    Objective: To investigate an accident of occupational acute hydrogen sulfide poisoning, and to analyze related clinical data. Methods: An investigation was performed for an accident of occupational acute hydrogen sulfide poisoning in a place in Shandong, China, in July 2016, and related clinical data were summarized. Results: This was a typical accident of occupational acute hydrogen sulfide poisoning, and a lack of occupational protection and illegal operation were the major causes of this accident. Of all five patients, four experienced coma, toxic encephalopathy, and respiratory failure and were cured at last, and one had cortical syndrome after long-term treatment and died of pulmonary infection seven months later. Conclusions: In case of occupational acute hydrogen sulfide poisoning, rescuers should help the persons who are poisoned reasonably and meanwhile ensure their own safety.

  1. Kinetics of Gas Emission from Heated Moulding Sands Together with the On-line Assessment of H2 and O2 Fractions - New Investigation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocek J.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The new investigation method of the kinetics of the gas emission from moulding sands used for moulds and cores is presented in this paper. The gas evolution rate is presented not only as a function of heating time but also as a function of instantaneous temperatures. In relation to the time and heating temperature the oxygen and hydrogen contents in evolving gases was also measured. This method was developed in the Laboratory of Foundry Moulds Technology, Faculty of Foundry Engineering, AGH. Gas amounts which are emitted from the moulding sand at the given temperature recalculated to the time unit (kinetics are obtained in investigations. Results of investigations of moulding sand with furan resin are presented - as an example - in the paper.

  2. Investigation of muonic hydrogen isotopes scattering from H{sub 2} molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Mulhauser, F. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland); Adamczak, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Olin, A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Bystritsky, V.M.; Stolupin, V.A. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Czaplinski, W.; Filipowicz, M.; Wozniak, J. [Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Technology; Fujiwara, M.C. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Kammel, P. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Markushin, V.E. [Rossijskij Nauchnyj Tsentr ``Kurchatovskij Inst.``, Moscow (Russian Federation); Marshall, G.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility; Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Rivkis, L.A. [VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Inorg. Mat.; Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-10-01

    Knowledge of the cross sections for scattering of {mu}H, {mu}D and {mu}T on molecules of hydrogen isotopes is necessary not only for checking the algorithmic solution of the Coulomb three-body problem but also for a general and correct description of the kinetics of muonic and molecular processes in mixtures of hydrogen isotopes. We plan to measure the scattering cross-section energy dependence of the reactions {mu}x + H{sub 2} {yields} {mu}x + H{sub 2} (x = d, t) in the energy collision range from 0.1 to 45 eV, using a multilayered target system recently developed at TRIUMF. (orig.). 33 refs.

  3. Hydrogen atom vs electron transfer in catecholase-mimetic oxidations by superoxometal complexes. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simándi, Tatiana M; May, Zoltán; Szigyártó, Imola Cs; Simándi, László I

    2005-01-21

    Dioximato-cobalt(II), -iron(II) and -manganese(II) complexes (1)-(6), acting as functional catecholase and phenoxazinone synthase models, exhibit a deuterium kinetic isotope effect predicted by theory (k4H/k4D < or = 3) in the catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol and 2-aminophenol by O2. KIEs in the range of (k4H/k4D approximately 1.79-3.51) are observed with (1) and (2) as catalysts, pointing to hydrogen atom transfer in the rate-determining step from the substrate hydroxy group to the metal-bound superoxo ligand. Less significant KIEs (1.06-1.20) are exhibited by catalysts systems (3)-(6), indicating that proton-coupled electron transfer is the preferred route in those cases.

  4. Electrocatalysis of hydrogen peroxide reactions on perovskite oxides: experiment versus kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poux, T; Bonnefont, A; Ryabova, A; Kéranguéven, G; Tsirlina, G A; Savinova, E R

    2014-07-21

    Hydrogen peroxide has been identified as a stable intermediate of the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction on various electrodes including metal, metal oxide and carbon materials. In this article we study the hydrogen peroxide oxidation and reduction reactions in alkaline medium using a rotating disc electrode (RDE) method on oxides of the perovskite family (LaCoO3, LaMnO3 and La0.8Sr0.2MnO3) which are considered as promising electrocatalytic materials for the cathode of liquid and solid alkaline fuel cells. The experimental findings, such as the higher activity of Mn-compared to that of Co-perovskites, the shape of RDE curves, and the influence of the H2O2 concentration, are rationalized with the help of a microkinetic model.

  5. Coupling between Molecular Mobility and Kinetics of Crystal Growth in a Hydrogen-Bonded Liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Alejandro; Niss, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    rate. The coupling between dynamic properties, such as dielectric α relaxation time, viscosity, and self-diffusion coefficient, and the characteristic crystal growth time is analyzed. We find that the crystal growth time scales with the glycerol’s self-diffusion coefficient as taucryst ∝ D−0......Our aim here is to gain new insight into the nature of the crystalline phase formed in supercooled glycerol near the glass transition temperature and to establish the interrelationship between the kinetics of crystal growth and fundamental dynamic properties. The liquid’s dynamics...... of the crystalline phase from preexisting nuclei, in such a way that the observed kinetics is dominated by the crystal growth step. Our experimental results are discussed in terms of the classical theory of crystallization which predicts a significant correlation between the liquid’s diffusion and the crystal growth...

  6. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  7. Application of a two-state kinetic model to the heterogeneous kinetics of reaction between cysteine and hydrogen peroxide in amorphous lyophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dayong; Anderson, Bradley D

    2008-09-01

    The bimolecular reaction between cysteine (CSH) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in amorphous PVP and trehalose lyophiles has been examined at different reactant and excipient concentrations and at varying pH and temperature. Initial rates of product formation and complete reactant and product concentration-time profiles were generated by HPLC analyses of reconstituted solutions of lyophiles stored for various periods of time. While only cystine (CSSC) forms in aqueous solutions, cysteine sulfinic (CSO(2)H) and sulfonic (CSO(3)H) acids are significant degradants in amorphous solids. The formation of alternative degradants was consistent with the solution reaction mechanism, which involves a reactive sulfenic acid (CSOH) intermediate, coupled with the restricted mobility in the amorphous solid-state, which favors reaction of CSOH with the smaller, mobility-advantaged H(2)O(2) over its reaction with cysteine. Complex rate laws (i.e., deviations from 1st order for each reactant) observed in initial rate studies and biphasic concentration-time profiles in PVP were successfully fitted by a two-state kinetic model assuming two reactant populations with different reactivities. The highly reactive population forms CSSC preferentially while the less reactive population generates primarily sulfinic and sulfonic acids. Reactions in trehalose could be described by a simple one-state model. In contrast to the reaction in aqueous solutions, the 'pH' effect was minimal in amorphous solids, suggesting a change in the rate-determining step to diffusion control for the model reaction occurring in amorphous lyophiles.

  8. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented.

  9. Kinetic measurements and in situ Raman spectroscopy study of the formation of TBAF semi-hydrates with hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trueba, A.T.; Radović, I.R.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Peters, C.J.; Kroon, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The kinetics of formation of semi-clathrate hydrates of tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride (TBAF) with hydrogen (H2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were studied in order to elucidate their potential for H 2 storage as well as for CO2 sequestration. The influence of pressure, TBAF concentration (1.8 mol% and

  10. High-yield hydrogen production from biomass by in vitro metabolic engineering: Mixed sugars coutilization and kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A.; Martin del Campo, Julia; Myung, Suwan; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Bakovic, Allison; Castro, Roberto; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W. W.; Senger, Ryan S.; Zhang, Y.-H. Percival

    2015-01-01

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a fuel offers enhanced energy conversion efficiency and tremendous potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, but producing it in a distributed, carbon-neutral, low-cost manner requires new technologies. Herein we demonstrate the complete conversion of glucose and xylose from plant biomass to H2 and CO2 based on an in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway. Glucose and xylose were simultaneously converted to H2 with a yield of two H2 per carbon, the maximum possible yield. Parameters of a nonlinear kinetic model were fitted with experimental data using a genetic algorithm, and a global sensitivity analysis was used to identify the enzymes that have the greatest impact on reaction rate and yield. After optimizing enzyme loadings using this model, volumetric H2 productivity was increased 3-fold to 32 mmol H2⋅L−1⋅h−1. The productivity was further enhanced to 54 mmol H2⋅L−1⋅h−1 by increasing reaction temperature, substrate, and enzyme concentrations—an increase of 67-fold compared with the initial studies using this method. The production of hydrogen from locally produced biomass is a promising means to achieve global green energy production. PMID:25848015

  11. Effect of admixing different carbon structural variants on the decomposition and hydrogen sorption kinetics of magnesium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Raghubanshi, Himanshu; Pandey, Sunil Kumar; Srivastava, O.N. [Hydrogen Energy Centre and Unit on Nano Science and Technology, Physics Department, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, U.P. (India)

    2010-05-15

    The effect of admixing catalysts comprised of carbon nanostructures, specifically planar, helical and twisted carbon nanofibers, spherical carbon particles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, on the hydrogen storage properties of magnesium hydride has been investigated. Optimum results were achieved with the mixture containing twisted carbon nanofibers (TCNF) synthesized by Ni catalyst derived by oxidative dissociation of catalyst precursor LaNi{sub 5}. The desorption temperature of 2 wt.% TCNF admixed MgH{sub 2} is {proportional_to}65 K lower than that of pristine MgH{sub 2} milled for the same duration. The enhancement in hydrogen absorption capacity of MgH{sub 2} admixed with 2 wt.% TCNF has been found to be two-fold in the first 10 minutes at 573 K and under a hydrogen pressure of 2 MPa, i.e. 4.8wt% as compared to 2.5 wt% for MgH{sub 2} alone. The increase in capacity by a factor of about two within the first 10 minutes as a result of the catalytic activity of TCNF is one of the exciting results obtained for hydrogen absorption in catalyzed MgH{sub 2}. (author)

  12. Investigation on CO catalytic oxidation reaction kinetics of faceted perovskite nanostructures loaded with Pt

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, S. M.

    2017-01-18

    Perovskite lead titanate nanostructures with specific {111}, {100} and {001} facets exposed, have been employed as supports to investigate the crystal facet effect on the growth and CO catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles. The size, distribution and surface chemical states of Pt on the perovskite supports have been significantly modified, leading to a tailored conversion temperature and catalytic kinetics towards CO catalytic oxidation.

  13. Kinetic investigation of the oxidation of N-alkyl anilines by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 112; Issue 6. Kinetic investigation of the oxidation of N-alkyl anilines by peroxomonophosphoric acid in anionic surfactant sodium lauryl sulphate. G P Panigrahi Jagannath Panda. Physical and Theoretical Volume 112 Issue 6 December 2000 pp 615-622 ...

  14. An investigation of the structure and function of antistaphylococcal endolysins using kinetic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peculiarities of the structures and functions of phage phi11 and phi80a antistaphylococcal endolysins were investigated by kinetic measurements. In spite of the high level of homology in their primary structures, both enzymes possess some differences in their optimal conditions for functioning. As...

  15. Investigating High-School Chemical Kinetics: The Greek Chemistry Textbook and Students' Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegios, Theodoros; Salta, Katerina; Koinis, Spyros

    2017-01-01

    In this study we present an analysis of how the structure and content of the Greek school textbook approaches the concepts of chemical kinetics, and an investigation of the difficulties that 11th grade Greek students face regarding these concepts. Based on the structure and content of the Greek textbook, a tool was developed and applied to…

  16. Doping kinetics of organic semiconductors investigated by field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maddalena, F.; Meijer, E.J.; Asadi, K.; Leeuw, D.M. de; Blom, P.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of acid doping of the semiconductor regioregular poly-3-hexylthiophene with vaporized chlorosilane have been investigated using field-effect transistors. The dopant density has been derived as a function of temperature and exposure time from the shift in the pinch-off voltage, being the

  17. Ultrafine Nanocrystalline CeO2@C-Containing NaAlH4 with Fast Kinetics and Good Reversibility for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Ke; Li, You; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2015-12-21

    A nanocrystalline CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite is successfully synthesized in situ by hydrogenating a NaH-Al mixture doped with CeO2@C. Compared with NaAlH4 , the as-prepared CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite, with a minor amount of excess Al, exhibits significantly improved hydrogen storage properties. The dehydrogenation onset temperature of the hydrogenated [NaH-Al-7 wt % CeO2@C]-0.04Al sample is 77 °C lower than that of the pristine sample because of a reduced kinetic barrier. More importantly, the dehydrogenated sample absorbs ∼4.7 wt % hydrogen within 35 min at 100°C and 10 MPa of hydrogen. Compositional and structural analyses reveal that CeO2 is converted to CeH2 during ball milling and that the newly formed CeH2 works with the excess of Al to synergistically improve the hydrogen storage properties of NaAlH4. Our findings will aid in the rational design of novel catalyst-doped complex hydride systems with low operating temperatures, fast kinetics, and long-term cyclability. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  19. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    OpenAIRE

    T. Lupascu; M. Ciobanu; V. Botan; T. Gromovoy; S. Cibotaru

    2013-01-01

    The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground ...

  20. Kinetic investigation of the immobilization of chromotropic acid derivatives onto anion exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Jasmina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption kinetics of pyrazol- (РАСА and imidazol-azo-chromo-tropic acid (IACA onto Dowex 1-X8 resin, as a function of the dye concentration and temperature were investigated at pH 4.5. The pseudo-first- and second-order kinetic models and intraparticle diffusion model were used to describe the obtained kinetic data. The adsorption rate constants were found to be in the order of magnitude 10-2 min-1 for all of the used kinetics models. The adsorption capacity increases with increasing initial dye concentration. The study of adsorption kinetics at different temperatures (in the range from 5 to 25 °C reveals an increase in the rate of adsorption and adsorption capacity with increasing temperature. The activation energy (in the case of РАСА 16.6 kJ/mol, and for IACA 11.3 kJ/mol was determined using the Arrhenius dependence. Electrostatic interactions between the dye and resin beads were shown to be the adsorption mechanism.

  1. Investigation of thermolytic hydrogen generation rate of tank farm simulated and actual waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Howe, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-15

    To support resolution of Potential Inadequacies in the Safety Analysis for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm, Savannah River National Laboratory conducted research to determine the thermolytic hydrogen generation rate (HGR) with simulated and actual waste. Gas chromatography methods were developed and used with air-purged flow systems to quantify hydrogen generation from heated simulated and actual waste at rates applicable to the Tank Farm Documented Safety Analysis (DSA). Initial simulant tests with a simple salt solution plus sodium glycolate demonstrated the behavior of the test apparatus by replicating known HGR kinetics. Additional simulant tests with the simple salt solution excluding organics apart from contaminants provided measurement of the detection and quantification limits for the apparatus with respect to hydrogen generation. Testing included a measurement of HGR on actual SRS tank waste from Tank 38. A final series of measurements examined HGR for a simulant with the most common SRS Tank Farm organics at temperatures up to 140 °C. The following conclusions result from this testing.

  2. Simulation Investigation on Combustion Characteristics in a Four-Point Lean Direct Injection Combustor with Hydrogen/Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the combustion characteristics in multi-point lean direct injection (LDI combustors with hydrogen/air, two swirl–venturi 2 × 2 array four-point LDI combustors were designed. The four-point LDI combustor consists of injector assembly, swirl–venturi array and combustion chamber. The injector, swirler and venturi together govern the rapid mixing of hydrogen and air to form the mixture for combustion. Using clockwise swirlers and anticlockwise swirlers, the co-swirling and count-swirling swirler arrays LDI combustors were achieved. Using Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS code for steady-state reacting flow computations, the four-point LDI combustors with hydrogen/air were simulated with an 11 species and 23 lumped reaction steps H2/Air reaction mechanism. The axial velocity, turbulence kinetic energy, total pressure drop coefficient, outlet temperature, mass fraction of OH and emission of pollutant NO of four-point LDI combustors, with different equivalence ratios, are here presented and discussed. As the equivalence ratios increased, the total pressure drop coefficient became higher because of increasing heat loss. Increasing equivalence ratios also corresponded with the rise in outlet temperature of the four-point LDI combustors, as well as an increase in the emission index of NO EINO in the four-point LDI combustors. Along the axial distance, the EINO always increased and was at maximum at the exit of the dump. Along the chamber, the EINO gradually increased, maximizing at the exit of chamber. The total temperature of four-point LDI combustors with different equivalence ratios was identical to the theoretical equilibrium temperature. The EINO was an exponential function of the equivalence ratio.

  3. Kinetic theory of weakly ionized dilute gas of hydrogen-like atoms of the first principles of quantum statistics and dispersion laws of eigenwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyusarenko, Yurii V.; Sliusarenko, Oleksii Yu.

    2017-11-01

    We develop a microscopic approach to the construction of the kinetic theory of dilute weakly ionized gas of hydrogen-like atoms. The approach is based on the statements of the second quantization method in the presence of bound states of particles. The basis of the derivation of kinetic equations is the method of reduced description of relaxation processes. Within the framework of the proposed approach, a system of common kinetic equations for the Wigner distribution functions of free oppositely charged fermions of two kinds (electrons and cores) and their bound states—hydrogen-like atoms— is obtained. Kinetic equations are used to study the spectra of elementary excitations in the system when all its components are non-degenerate. It is shown that in such a system, in addition to the typical plasma waves, there are longitudinal waves of matter polarization and the transverse ones with a behavior characteristic of plasmon polaritons. The expressions for the dependence of the frequencies and Landau damping coefficients on the wave vector for all branches of the oscillations discovered are obtained. Numerical evaluation of the elementary perturbation parameters in the system on an example of a weakly ionized dilute gas of the 23Na atoms using the D2-line characteristics of the natrium atom is given. We note the possibility of using the results of the developed theory to describe the properties of a Bose condensate of photons in the diluted weakly ionized gas of hydrogen-like atoms.

  4. Hydrogen storage in carbon derived from solid endosperm of coconut

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Viney; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Shahi, R. R.; T.P. Yadav; Srivastava, O.N.

    2014-01-01

    Carbons are being widely investigated as hydrogen storage material owing to their light weight, fast hydrogen adsorption kinetics and cost effectiveness. However, these materials suffer from low hydrogen storage capacity, particularly at room temperature. The aim of the present study is to develop carbon-based material from natural bio-precursor which shows at least moderate hydrogen storage at room temperature. For this purpose, hydrogenation characteristics of carbon derived from solid endo...

  5. Reaction Kinetics of Acetone Peroxide Formation and Structure Investigations Using Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Trane, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    that at 25 degrees C the reaction between acetone and hydrogen peroxide proceeds to form intermediates within one day. Based on the assumption that a likely reaction path involves a sequence of reaction steps between acetone and hydrogen peroxide, calculations of Raman spectra were performed using a density...... products and that the rate determining step is the ring closure. The reaction rate of TATP formation was found to increase with temperature and with sulfuric acid additions to the acetone/hydrogen peroxide mixture. By correlation of the induction time of TATP crystallization against pH it was shown......Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) has been prepared in order to study the effect of pH and temperature on the reaction kinetics. Raman spectra of liquid mixtures of acetone and hydrogen peroxide were recorded versus time throughout the experiments. The spectral data of the liquid phases indicate...

  6. Experimental Investigation of Irradiation-driven Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Analogs of Protoplanetary Hydrous Silicate Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Laurent, Boris; Leroux, Hugues; Remusat, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The origin of hydrogen in chondritic components is poorly understood. Their isotopic composition is heavier than the solar nebula gas. In addition, in most meteorites, hydrous silicates are found to be lighter than the coexisting organic matter. Ionizing irradiation recently emerged as an efficient hydrogen fractionating process in organics, but its effect on H-bearing silicates remains essentially unknown. We report the evolution of the D/H of hydrous silicates experimentally irradiated by electrons. Thin films of amorphous silica, amorphous “serpentine,” and pellets of crystalline muscovite were irradiated at 4 and 30 keV. For all samples, irradiation leads to a large hydrogen loss correlated with a moderate deuterium enrichment of the solid residue. The entire data set can be described by a Rayleigh distillation. The calculated fractionation factor is consistent with a kinetically controlled fractionation during the loss of hydrogen. Furthermore, for a given ionizing condition, the deuteration of the silicate residues is much lower than the deuteration measured on irradiated organic macromolecules. These results provide firm evidence of the limitations of ionizing irradiation as a driving mechanism for D-enrichment of silicate materials. The isotopic composition of the silicate dust cannot rise from a protosolar to a chondritic signature during solar irradiations. More importantly, these results imply that irradiation of the disk naturally induces a strong decoupling of the isotopic signatures of coexisting organics and silicates. This decoupling is consistent with the systematic difference observed between the heavy organic matter and the lighter water typically associated with minerals in the matrix of most carbonaceous chondrites.

  7. Mechanism and kinetics of the electrocatalytic reaction responsible for the high cost of hydrogen fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Goddard, William A; An, Qi; Xiao, Hai; Merinov, Boris; Morozov, Sergey

    2017-01-25

    The sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a major impediment to the economic use of hydrogen fuel cells in transportation. In this work, we report the full ORR reaction mechanism for Pt(111) based on Quantum Mechanics (QM) based Reactive metadynamics (RμD) simulations including explicit water to obtain free energy reaction barriers at 298 K. The lowest energy pathway for 4 e(-) water formation is: first, *OOH formation; second, *OOH reduction to H2O and O*; third, O* hydrolysis using surface water to produce two *OH and finally *OH hydration to water. Water formation is the rate-determining step (RDS) for potentials above 0.87 Volt, the normal operating range. Considering the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism involving protons from the solvent, we predict the free energy reaction barrier at 298 K for water formation to be 0.25 eV for an external potential below U = 0.87 V and 0.41 eV at U = 1.23 V, in good agreement with experimental values of 0.22 eV and 0.44 eV, respectively. With the mechanism now fully understood, we can use this now validated methodology to examine the changes upon alloying and surface modifications to increase the rate by reducing the barrier for water formation.

  8. Vital tooth whitening with a novel hydrogen peroxide strip system: design, kinetics, and clinical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagel, P A; Odioso, L L; McMillan, D A; Gerlach, R W

    2000-01-01

    For many years, at-home whitening has been used with great success and produces some of the most satisfying results of all dental procedures. Historically, the most common procedure used was a custom-fabricated tray loaded with a 10% carbamide peroxide gel that was worn overnight. Today, many manufacturers offer higher concentrations (15% and 20% carbamide peroxide) for faster results. Regardless of the peroxide concentration used, the custom tray delivery system has remained essentially the same. Recently, a trayless whitening system was developed that does not require any prefabrication or gel loading. The new delivery system is a thin, conformable strip precoated with an adhesive hydrogen peroxide gel. Each preloaded strip is presented on a backing liner. To use the strip, it is peeled off of the backing liner and applied to the facial surfaces of the anterior teeth. Each strip is worn for 30 minutes, removed, and discarded. The strip holds the gel in place for sufficient time to allow the peroxide to intrinsically and extrinsically whiten the teeth. The highly flexible strips conform intimately to the tooth surface and provide a uniform, controlled application of the peroxide gel.

  9. Departures of the electron energy distribution from a Maxwellian in hydrogen. I - Formulation and solution of the electron kinetic equation. II - Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoub, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of calculating the steady-state free-electron energy distribution in a hydrogen gas is considered in order to study departures of that distribution from a Maxwellian at sufficiently low degrees of ionization. A model kinetic equation is formulated and solved analytically for the one-particle electron distribution function in a steady-state partially ionized hydrogen gas, and it is shown that the formal solution can be accurately approximated by using the WKB method. The solutions obtained indicate that the high-energy tail of the distribution is susceptible to distortion by imbalanced inelastic collisions for ionization fractions not exceeding about 0.1 and that such departures from a Maxwellian can lead to significant changes in the collisional excitation and ionization rates of ground-state hydrogen atoms. Expressions for the electron-hydrogen collision rates are derived which explicitly display their dependence on the hydrogen departure coefficients. The results are applied in order to compare self-consistent predictions with those based on the a priori assumption of a Maxwellian distribution for models of the thermal ionization equilibrium of hydrogen in the optically thin limit, spectral-line formation by a gas consisting of two-level atoms, and radiative transfer in finite slabs by a gas of four-level hydrogen atoms.

  10. Investigating and modeling the pyrolysis kinetic of leaves and stems of pistachio trees for biofuel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ostad Hoseini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The lignocelluloses materials have high potential for producing various types of biofuels. These materials include various parts of plants, especially leaves and stems that are left without a specific usage after annual pruning. These residues can be used through slow or fast pyrolysis process for production of liquid and gaseous biofuels. The slow pyrolysis is taking place at temperatures below 500°C while fast pyrolysis process takes place at a temperature above 700°C. Various studies on production of biofuels from plant residues have shown that the temperature, heating rate and the resident time of pyrolysis process are the main factors that affect the final product quality. At present time, in Iran, there are more than 360 thousands hectares of pistachio growing fields which annually produce over 215 thousands metric tons residues which are mainly leaves and stems. The main objective of this study was to measure the heating properties of the powders prepared from the leaves and the stem of pistachio trees. These properties include higher heating value (HHV, lower heating value (LHV and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA of the powders. Then the powders were separately pyrolysed and the kinetic of the pyrolysis process for producing charcoal from them was investigated. Materials and Methods In this research, leaves and stems of pistachio trees were initially analyzed to determine their chemical constituents including moisture content, volatile compounds, carbon (C, hydrogen (H, nitrogen (N, sulfur (S and oxygen (O content. Using these constituents the height heating value and low heating value for the leaves and the stems were determined. The thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA of the powders was made to select a proper heating temperature for pyrolysis of the powders. In each experiment about 10 g of powder powders were pyrolyzed to produce char. Based on TGA results, the pyrolysis experiments were performed at 350, 400, 450 and

  11. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  12. A combined deuterium NMR and quantum chemical investigation of inequivalent hydrogen bonds in organic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Renee; Penner, Glenn H

    2012-01-01

    Deuterium magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations are used to investigate organic solids in which inequivalent hydrogen bonds are present. The use of (2)H MAS allows one to measure the chemical shift, δ, quadrupolar coupling constant, C(Q), and asymmetry in the quadrupolar interaction, η(Q), for each type of hydrogen bond present in the system. Quantum chemical calculations of the magnetic shielding (σ, which can be related to δ) and the electric field gradient (EFG, which can be related to C(Q)) are compared to the experimental results and are discussed with respect to the relative strengths of the hydrogen bonds within each system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. On the role of hydrogen filled vacancies on the embrittlement of zirconium: An ab initio investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Pär A.T., E-mail: Par.Olsson@mah.se [Materials Science and Applied Mathematics, Malmö University, SE-205 06 Malmö (Sweden); Kese, Kwadwo; Alvarez Holston, Anna-Maria [Studsvik Nuclear Corporation, Box 556, SE-611 10 Nyköping (Sweden)

    2015-12-15

    In this work we report the results of an ab initio study of the influence of hydrogen filled vacancies on the mechanical properties of zirconium. The modelling shows that hydrogen filled vacancies contribute to a lowering of the surface energy and an increase in the unstable stacking fault energy, which implies a reduction in ductility. The increase in unstable stacking fault energy suggests that the defects promote a change in the dislocation glide mechanism from prismatic to basal slip. To investigate the cleavage energetics, we model the decohesion process. For describing the interplanar interaction we adopt an extended version of Rose's universal binding energy relation, which is found to reproduce the behaviour accurately. The results of the modelling imply that the work of fracture and peak stress decrease as a result of the presence of hydrogen filled vacancies.

  14. "Zwitterionic Proton Sponge" Hydrogen Bonding Investigations on the Basis of Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J

    2015-06-22

    1,8-Bis(dimethylamino)-4,5-dihydroxynaphthalene has been investigated on the basis of static DFT computations and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. The simulations were performed in the gas phase and in the solid state. The studied "zwitterionic proton sponge" possesses two, short intramolecular hydrogen bonds (O-H···O and N-H···N) classified as Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds (LBHBs); therefore, the system studied is strongly anharmonic. In addition, the compound exists as a "zwitterion" in solution and in the solid state, thus the intramolecular hydrogen bonds belong to the class of charge-assisted interactions. The applied quantum-chemical methods enabled investigations of metric and spectroscopic parameters of the molecule. The time-evolution investigations of the H-bonding showed a strong delocalization of the bridge protons and their high mobility, reflected in the low barriers on the free energy surfaces. Frequent proton transfer phenomena were noticed. The power spectra of atomic velocity were computed to analyze the vibrational features associated with O-H and N-H stretching. A broad absorption was indicated for both hydrogen bridges. For the first time, Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics results are reported for the compound, and they indicate a broad, shallow but not barrierless, potential well for each of the bridge protons.

  15. Changing Hydrogen-Bond Structure during an Aqueous Liquid-Liquid Transition Investigated with Time-Resolved and Two-Dimensional Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Jeroen R; van der Loop, Tibert H; Woutersen, Sander

    2016-03-03

    We investigate the putative liquid-liquid phase transition in aqueous glycerol solution, using the OD-stretch mode in dilute OD/OH isotopic mixtures to probe the hydrogen-bond structure. The conversion exhibits Avrami kinetics with an exponent of n = 2.9 ± 0.1 (as opposed to n = 1.7 observed upon inducing ice nucleation and growth in the same sample), which indicates a transition from one liquid phase to another. Two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy shows that the initial and final phases have different hydrogen-bond structures: the former has a single Gaussian distribution of hydrogen-bond lengths, whereas the latter has a bimodal distribution consisting of a broad distribution and a narrower, ice-like distribution. The 2D-IR spectrum of the final phase is identical to that of ice/glycerol at the same temperature. Combined with the kinetic data this suggests that the liquid-liquid transformation is immediately followed by a rapid formation of small (probably nanometer-sized) ice crystals.

  16. An investigation on the catalytic capacity of dolomite in transesterification and the calculation of kinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Sheng-Li; Huo, Meng-Jia; Lu, Chun-Mei; Liu, Meng-Qi; Li, Hui

    2014-04-01

    The catalytic capacity of dolomite in transesterification was investigated and the kinetic parameters were calculated. The activated dolomites as transesterification catalyst were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption and desorption and Hammett indicator method, where the original dolomite was analyzed by thermogravimetric and X-ray fluorescence in advance. Its potential catalytic capacity was validated from aspects of the activated temperature and the reused property, where the reliability of the experimental system was also examined. Then, influences of the catalyst added amount, the mole ratio of methanol to oil, the transesterification temperature and the transesterification time on the catalytic capacity were investigated. Finally, kinetic parameters of the transesterification catalyzed by the activated dolomite were calculated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrogen Uptake of DPB Getter Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Herberg, J L; Saab, A P; Weigle, J; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S; McLean II, W

    2008-05-30

    The physical and chemical properties of 1,4-diphenylbutadiyne (DPB) blended with carbon-supported Pd (DPB-Pd/C) in the form of pellets during hydrogenation were investigated. A thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) was employed to measure the kinetics of the hydrogen uptake by the DPB getter pellets. The kinetics obtained were then used to develop a semi-empirical model, based on gas diffusion into solids, to predict the performance of the getter pellets under various conditions. The accuracy of the prediction model was established by comparing the prediction models with independent experimental data on hydrogen pressure buildup in sealed systems containing DPB getter pellets and subjected to known rates of hydrogen input. The volatility of the hydrogenated DPB products and its effects on the hydrogen uptake kinetics were also analyzed.

  18. Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT) Processes Promoted by the Quinolinimide-N-oxyl Radical. A Kinetic and Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLabio, Gino A; Franchi, Paola; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Lapi, Andrea; Lucarini, Fiorella; Lucarini, Marco; Mazzonna, Marco; Prasad, Viki Kumar; Ticconi, Barbara

    2017-06-16

    A kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from a series of organic compounds to the quinolinimide-N-oxyl radical (QINO) was performed in CH3CN. The HAT rate constants are significantly higher than those observed with the phthalimide-N-oxyl radical (PINO) as a result of enthalpic and polar effects due to the presence of the N-heteroaromatic ring in QINO. The relevance of polar effects is supported by theoretical calculations conducted for the reactions of the two N-oxyl radicals with toluene, which indicate that the HAT process is characterized by a significant degree of charge transfer permitted by the π-stacking that occurs between the toluene and the N-oxyl aromatic rings in the transition state structures. An increase in the HAT reactivity of QINO was observed in the presence of 0.15 M HClO4 and 0.15 M Mg(ClO4)2 due to the protonation or complexation with the Lewis acid of the pyridine nitrogen that leads to a further decrease in the electron density in the N-oxyl radical. These results fully support the use of N-hydroxyquinolinimide as a convenient substitute for N-hydroxyphthalimide in the catalytic aerobic oxidations of aliphatic hydrocarbons characterized by relatively high C-H bond dissociation energies.

  19. Kinetics of exchange between zero-, one-, and two-hydrogen-bonded states of methyl and ethyl acetate in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuntonov, Lev; Pazos, Ileana M; Ma, Jianqiang; Gai, Feng

    2015-03-26

    It has recently been shown that the ester carbonyl stretching vibration can be used as a sensitive probe of local electrostatic field in molecular systems. To further characterize this vibrational probe and extend its potential applications, we studied the kinetics of chemical exchange between differently hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) ester carbonyl groups of methyl acetate (MA) and ethyl acetate (EA) in methanol. We found that, while both MA and EA can form zero, one, or two H-bonds with the solvent, the population of the 2hb state in MA is significantly smaller than that in EA. Using a combination of linear and nonlinear infrared measurements and numerical simulations, we further determined the rate constants for the exchange between these differently H-bonded states. We found that for MA the chemical exchange reaction between the two dominant states (i.e., 0hb and 1hb states) has a relaxation rate constant of 0.14 ps(-1), whereas for EA the three-state chemical exchange reaction occurs in a predominantly sequential manner with the following relaxation rate constants: 0.11 ps(-1) for exchange between 0hb and 1hb states and 0.12 ps(-1) for exchange between 1hb and 2hb states.

  20. Thermochemical hydrogen production via a cycle using barium and sulfur - Reaction between barium sulfide and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, K.; Conger, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction between barium sulfide and water, a reaction found in several sulfur based thermochemical cycles, was investigated kinetically at 653-866 C. Gaseous products were hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. The rate determining step for hydrogen formation was a surface reaction between barium sulfide and water. An expression was derived for the rate of hydrogen formation.

  1. The silver catalyst process for converting methanol to formaldehyde - kinetic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzer, E.; Emig, G. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie 1

    1998-12-31

    In pre-experiments a tubular reactor was checked whether it is suitable for kinetic measurement on the system of the silver-catalysed partial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. Detrimental effects of heat-transfer and mass-transfer on the experimental results were ruled out. Investigations on the characteristics of the reaction showed that it is possible to manipulate the composition of the product mixture by changing the inlet concentration of the reactants. A modified power-law model was established to describe the reaction kinetics. It considers the preadsorption step of oxygen on the catalysts surface and fits the experimental data quite well. During the rapid oxidation the catalysts surface undergoes a drastic change. It gets coarse and has an adsorption capacity of 11 m{sup 2}/g after being exposed to the reaction mixture. (orig.)

  2. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated with the complexation effect on redox potential of iron(III-iron(II redox couple. The selected ligands were found to increase the rate of cysteine iron (III redox reaction in proportion to their stability of iron (II complex (EDTA < terpy < bipy < phen. A kinetic profile and the catalytic role of copper (II ions by means of redox shuttle mechanism for the cysteine iron (III redox reaction in presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen ligand is also reported.

  3. Ab initio investigation on hydrogen adsorption capability in Zn and Cu-based metal organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanuwijaya, V. V., E-mail: viny.veronika@gmail.com [Engineering Physics, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung Jalan Ganeca 10 Gd. T.P. Rachmat, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Hidayat, N. N., E-mail: avantgarde.vee@gmail.com; Agusta, M. K., E-mail: kemal@fti.itb.ac.id; Dipojono, H. K., E-mail: dipojono@tf.itb.ac.id

    2015-09-30

    One of the biggest challenge in material technology for hydrogen storage application is to increase hydrogen uptake in room temperature and pressure. As a class of highly porous material, Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOF) holds great potential with its tunable structure. However, little is known about the effect of metal cluster to its hydrogen storage capability. Investigation on this matter has been carried out carefully on small cluster of Zn and Cu-based MOF using first principles method. The calculation of two distinct building units of MOFs, namely octahedral and paddle-wheel models, have been done with B3LYP density functional method using 6-31G(d,p) and LANL2DZ basis sets. From geometry optimization of Zn-based MOF linked by benzene-dicarboxylate (MOF-5), it is found that hydrogen tends to keep distance from metal cluster group and stays above benzene ring. In the other hand, hydrogen molecule prefers to stay atop of the exposed Cu atom in Cu-based MOF system linked by the same linker group (Cu-bdc). Calculated hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu octahedral cages at ZnO{sub 3} sites are 1.64kJ/mol and 2.73kJ/mol respectively, while hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu paddle-wheel cages calculated on top of metal atoms are found to be at 6.05kJ/mol and 6.10kJ/mol respectively. Major difference between Zn-MOF-5 and Cu-bdc hydrogen uptake performance might be caused by unsaturated metal sites present in Cu-bdc system and the influence of their geometric structures, although a small difference on binding energy in the type of transition metal used is also observed. The comparison between Zn and Cu-based MOF may contribute to a comprehensive understanding of metal clusters and the importance of selecting best transition metal for design and synthesis of metal-organic frameworks.

  4. Ab initio investigation on hydrogen adsorption capability in Zn and Cu-based metal organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanuwijaya, V. V.; Hidayat, N. N.; Agusta, M. K.; Dipojono, H. K.

    2015-09-01

    One of the biggest challenge in material technology for hydrogen storage application is to increase hydrogen uptake in room temperature and pressure. As a class of highly porous material, Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOF) holds great potential with its tunable structure. However, little is known about the effect of metal cluster to its hydrogen storage capability. Investigation on this matter has been carried out carefully on small cluster of Zn and Cu-based MOF using first principles method. The calculation of two distinct building units of MOFs, namely octahedral and paddle-wheel models, have been done with B3LYP density functional method using 6-31G(d,p) and LANL2DZ basis sets. From geometry optimization of Zn-based MOF linked by benzene-dicarboxylate (MOF-5), it is found that hydrogen tends to keep distance from metal cluster group and stays above benzene ring. In the other hand, hydrogen molecule prefers to stay atop of the exposed Cu atom in Cu-based MOF system linked by the same linker group (Cu-bdc). Calculated hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu octahedral cages at ZnO3 sites are 1.64kJ/mol and 2.73kJ/mol respectively, while hydrogen binding enthalpies for Zn and Cu paddle-wheel cages calculated on top of metal atoms are found to be at 6.05kJ/mol and 6.10kJ/mol respectively. Major difference between Zn-MOF-5 and Cu-bdc hydrogen uptake performance might be caused by unsaturated metal sites present in Cu-bdc system and the influence of their geometric structures, although a small difference on binding energy in the type of transition metal used is also observed. The comparison between Zn and Cu-based MOF may contribute to a comprehensive understanding of metal clusters and the importance of selecting best transition metal for design and synthesis of metal-organic frameworks.

  5. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Kinetic Study of 2-Methylfuran and 2,5-Dimethylfuran Hydrogenation over 7 nm Platinum Cubic Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Aliaga, Cesar

    2011-04-28

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements obtained from gas chromatography were used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) over cubic Pt nanoparticles of 7 nm average size, synthesized by colloidal methods and cleaned by ultraviolet light and ozone treatment. Reactions carried out at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range of 20-120 °C produced dihydro and tetrahydro species, as well as ring-opening products (alcohols) and ring-cracking products, showing high selectivity toward ring opening throughout the entire temperature range. The aromatic rings (MF and DMF) adsorbed parallel to the nanoparticle surface. Results yield insight into various surface reaction intermediates and the reason for the significantly lower selectivity for ring cracking in DMF hydrogenation compared to MF hydrogenation. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  6. Kinetic modeling of hydrogen production rate by photoautotrophic cyanobacterium A. variabilis ATCC 29413 as a function of both CO2 concentration and oxygen production rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Siti Fatihah; Kamaruddin, Azlina; Uzir, Mohamad Hekarl; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Shamsuddin, Abdul Halim

    2017-02-07

    Hydrogen production by cyanobacteria could be one of the promising energy resources in the future. However, there is very limited information regarding the kinetic modeling of hydrogen production by cyanobacteria available in the literature. To provide an in-depth understanding of the biological system involved during the process, the Haldane's noncompetitive inhibition equation has been modified to determine the specific hydrogen production rate (HPR) as a function of both dissolved CO2 concentration (CTOT) and oxygen production rate (OPR). The highest HPR of 15 [Formula: see text] was found at xCO2 of 5% vol/vol and the rate consequently decreased when the CTOT and OPR were 0.015 k mol m(-3) and 0.55 mL h(-1), respectively. The model provided a fairly good estimation of the HPR with respect to the experimental data collected.

  7. An assessment of theoretical procedures for predicting the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen abstraction by methyl radical from benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelsoet, Karen; Moran, Damian; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Waroquier, Michel; Radom, Leo

    2006-07-20

    The reaction enthalpy (298 K), barrier (0 K), and activation energy and preexponential factor (600-800 K) have been examined computationally for the abstraction of hydrogen from benzene by the methyl radical, to assess their sensitivity to the applied level of theory. The computational methods considered include high-level composite procedures, including W1, G3-RAD, G3(MP2)-RAD, and CBS-QB3, as well as conventional ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) methods, with the latter two classes employing the 6-31G(d), 6-31+G(d,p) and/or 6-311+G(3df,2p) basis sets, and including ZPVE/thermal corrections obtained from 6-31G(d) or 6-31+G(d,p) calculations. Virtually all the theoretical procedures except UMP2 are found to give geometries that are suitable for subsequent calculation of the reaction enthalpy and barrier. For the reaction enthalpy, W1, G3-RAD, and URCCSD(T) give best agreement with experiment, while the large-basis-set DFT procedures slightly underestimate the endothermicity. The reaction barrier is slightly more sensitive to the choice of basis set and/or correlation level, with URCCSD(T) and the low-cost BMK method providing values in close agreement with the benchmark G3-RAD value. Inspection of the theoretically calculated rate parameters reveals a minor dependence on the level of theory for the preexponential factor. There is more sensitivity for the activation energy, with a reasonable agreement with experiment being obtained for the G3 methods and the hybrid functionals BMK, BB1K, and MPW1K, especially in combination with the 6-311+G(3df,2p) basis set. Overall, the high-level G3-RAD composite procedure, URCCSD(T), and the cost-effective DFT methods BMK, BB1K, and MPW1K give the best results among the methods assessed for calculating the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen abstraction by the methyl radical from benzene.

  8. Investigation of cryogenic hydrogen storage on high surface area activated carbon. Equilibrium and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paggiaro, Ricardo Gaspar

    2008-11-29

    This thesis investigates cryo-adsorptive systems for hydrogen storage for mobile applications. By means of macroscopic and microscopic balance models, an extensive analysis is carried out, including among others the investigation of the thermal effects during high-pressure system filling, venting losses during normal operation and inactivity, time-course of system pressure and temperature and gas delivery under various operating conditions. Model results were compared with experimental data, good agreement was obtained. The analysis also includes a comparison to other storage technologies such as cryo-compressed gas and liquefaction storage. The results show that cryo-adsorptive systems have storage characteristics comparable to compressed gas systems, but at a much lower pressure. They are also energetically more efficient than liquid hydrogen systems. However, the necessity of cryotemperatures and thermal management during operation and filling might limit their application. (orig.)

  9. Kinetic modeling of light limitation and sulfur deprivation effects in the induction of hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Part II: Definition of model-based protocols and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrenne, B; Pruvost, J; Titica, M; Takache, H; Legrand, J

    2011-10-01

    Photosynthetic hydrogen production under light by the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was investigated in a torus-shaped PBR in sulfur-deprived conditions. Culture conditions, represented by the dry biomass concentration of the inoculum, sulfate concentration, and incident photon flux density (PFD), were optimized based on a previously published model (Fouchard et al., 2009. Biotechnol Bioeng 102:232-245). This allowed a strictly autotrophic production, whereas the sulfur-deprived protocol is usually applied in photoheterotrophic conditions. Experimental results combined with additional information from kinetic simulations emphasize effects of sulfur deprivation and light attenuation in the PBR in inducing anoxia and hydrogen production. A broad range of PFD was tested (up to 500 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1) ). Maximum hydrogen productivities were 1.0 ± 0.2 mL H₂ /h/L (or 25 ± 5 mL H₂ /m(2) h) and 3.1 mL ± 0.4 H₂ /h L (or 77.5 ± 10 mL H₂ /m(2) h), at 110 and 500 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1) , respectively. These values approached a maximum specific productivity of approximately 1.9 mL ± 0.4 H₂ /h/g of biomass dry weight, clearly indicative of a limitation in cell capacity to produce hydrogen. The efficiency of the process and further optimizations are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Direct time-resolved spectroscopic investigation of intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer of deoxyblebbistatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-De; Zhu, Ruixue; Lee Phillips, David

    2017-09-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of deoxyblebbistatin was investigated using femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. An ultrafast intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer (IHAT) appears to take place via the first singlet excited state of deoxyblebbistatin within 8 ps. Absorption and fluorescence photochemical results indicate the IHAT process leads to mainly conversion of deoxyblebbistatin into an enol form final product which was observed and characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  11. The interactive effect of fungicide residues and yeast assimilable nitrogen on fermentation kinetics and hydrogen sulfide production during cider fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Thomas F; Peck, Gregory M; O'Keefe, Sean F; Stewart, Amanda C

    2017-01-01

    Fungicide residues on fruit may adversely affect yeast during cider fermentation, leading to sluggish or stuck fermentation or the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S), which is an undesirable aroma compound. This phenomenon has been studied in grape fermentation but not in apple fermentation. Low nitrogen availability, which is characteristic of apples, may further exacerbate the effects of fungicides on yeast during fermentation. The present study explored the effects of three fungicides: elemental sulfur (S(0) ) (known to result in increased H2 S in wine); fenbuconazole (used in orchards but not vineyards); and fludioxonil (used in post-harvest storage of apples). Only S(0) led to increased H2 S production. Fenbuconazole (≥0.2 mg L(-1) ) resulted in a decreased fermentation rate and increased residual sugar. An interactive effect of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentration and fenbuconazole was observed such that increasing the YAN concentration alleviated the negative effects of fenbuconazole on fermentation kinetics. Cidermakers should be aware that residual fenbuconazole (as low as 0.2 mg L(-1) ) in apple juice may lead to stuck fermentation, especially when the YAN concentration is below 250 mg L(-1) . These results indicate that fermentation problems attributed to low YAN may be caused or exacerbated by additional factors such as fungicide residues, which have a greater impact on fermentation performance under low YAN conditions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Time-kill kinetic analysis of antimicrobial chemotherapy based on hydrogen peroxide photolysis against Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirato, Midori; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Lingström, Peter; Niwano, Yoshimi; Örtengren, Ulf

    2017-08-01

    A recently developed antimicrobial technique utilizing hydroxyl radicals generated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) photolysis represents a promising new therapy for preventing and treating dental caries. The present study compared the antimicrobial time-kill kinetics of H2O2 photolysis, conventional antiseptics, and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) against biofilm-forming Streptococcus mutans (cariogenic bacteria) grown on hydroxyapatite disks. H2O2 photolysis was performed by irradiating the biofilm immersed in 3% H2O2 with 365-nm light-emitting diode (LED) light at an irradiance of 1000mW/cm(2) for up to 1.5min. Antiseptic treatments consisted of 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate, 0.5% povidone-iodine, and 3% H2O2. The biofilm was immersed in each antiseptic for up to 4min. aPDT was performed by irradiating the biofilm immersed in 100μM methylene blue or toluidine blue O with 655-nm laser light at 1000mW/cm(2) for up to 4min. Based on the time-kill assay, the decimal reduction value (D-value) of each treatment was determined. With a D-value of 0.06min, H2O2 photolysis exhibited the highest bactericidal effect against biofilm-forming S. mutans. In contrast, antiseptics and aPDT exerted a slower bactericidal effect, with D-values of 0.9-2.7min. In conclusion, the antimicrobial technique based on H2O2 photolysis using 365-nm LED represents a strong adjunctive chemotherapy for dental caries treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Continuous production of biodiesel under supercritical methyl acetate conditions: Experimental investigation and kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farobie, Obie; Matsumura, Yukihiko

    2017-10-01

    In this study, biodiesel production by using supercritical methyl acetate in a continuous flow reactor was investigated for the first time. The aim of this study was to elucidate the reaction kinetics of biodiesel production by using supercritical methyl. Experiments were conducted at various reaction temperatures (300-400°C), residence times (5-30min), oil-to-methyl acetate molar ratio of 1:40, and a fixed pressure of 20MPa. Reaction kinetics of biodiesel production with supercritical methyl acetate was determined. Finally, biodiesel yield obtained from this method was compared to that obtained with supercritical methanol, ethanol, and MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether). The results showed that biodiesel yield with supercritical methyl acetate increased with temperature and time. The developed kinetic model was found to fit the experimental data well. The reactivity of supercritical methyl acetate was the lowest, followed by that of supercritical MTBE, ethanol, and methanol, under the same conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Kinetic and thermodynamic investigation of mancozeb degradation in tomato homogenate during thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certel, Muharrem; Cengiz, Mehmet F; Akçay, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of mancozeb degradation in tomato homogenates under the conditions prevailing in the manufacture of tomato products (at 60-100 °C for 0-60 min) were investigated. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was used to analyse residual mancozeb in tomato homogenate. Ethylenethiourea (ETU), the main toxic degradation product of mancozeb, was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-with photodiode array detector (PDA). The degradation of mancozeb and the formation of ETU in tomato homogenates were adequately described as first-order kinetics. Dependence of the rate constant followed the Arrhenius relationship. Apparent activation energies, temperature coefficients, half time and time to reduce to 90% of the initial value of mancozeb were calculated as kinetic parameters. The thermodynamic parameters of mancozeb were also described as Δg(d) = - 2.440 and 7.074 kJ mol⁻¹; Δh(d) = - 32.555 and - 42.767 kJ mol⁻¹; Δs(d) = - 0.090 and - 0.150 kJ mol⁻¹ K⁻¹; K(e) = 0.414 and 9.797 L g⁻¹ for 333 and 373 K respectively. Current findings may shed light on the reduction of mancozeb residue and its toxic degradation product during thermal processing of tomatoes and may also be valuable in awareness and prevention of potential risks from dietary exposure. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. An investigation of GPU-based stiff chemical kinetics integration methods

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Nicholas J; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2016-01-01

    A fifth-order implicit Runge-Kutta method and two fourth-order exponential integration methods equipped with Krylov subspace approximations were implemented for the GPU and paired with the analytical chemical kinetic Jacobian software pyJac. The performance of each algorithm was evaluated by integrating thermochemical state data sampled from stochastic partially stirred reactor simulations and compared with the commonly used CPU-based implicit integrator CVODE. We estimated that the implicit Runge-Kutta method running on a single GPU is equivalent to CVODE running on 12-38 CPU cores for integration of a single global integration time step of 1e-6 s with hydrogen and methane models. In the stiffest case studied---the methane model with a global integration time step of 1e-4 s---thread divergence and higher memory traffic significantly decreased GPU performance to the equivalent of CVODE running on approximately three CPU cores. The exponential integration algorithms performed more slowly than the implicit inte...

  17. Hydrogen atom abstraction from C-H bonds of benzylamides by the aminoxyl radical BTNO: a kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coniglio, Alessandra; Galli, Carlo; Gentili, Patrizia; Vadalà, Raffaella

    2009-01-07

    The aminoxyl radical BTNO (benzotriazole-N-oxyl; >N-O*) is generated from HBT (1-hydroxybenzotriazole; >N-OH) by oxidation with a Ce(IV) salt. BTNO presents a broad absorption band with lambda(max) 474 nm that lends itself to investigate the kinetics of H-abstraction from H-donor substrates by spectrophotometry. Thus, rate constants (k(H)) of H-abstraction by BTNO from CH(2)-groups alpha to the nitrogen atom in X-substituted-(N-acetyl)benzylamines (X-C(6)H(4)CH(2)NHCOCH(3)) have been determined in MeCN solution at 25 degrees C. Correlation of the k(H)(X) data with the Hammett sigma(+) parameters gives a small value for rho (-0.65) that is compatible with a radical H-abstraction step. The sizeable value (k(H)/k(D)=8.8) of the kinetic isotope effect from a suitably deuteriated amide substrate further confirms H-abstraction as rate-determining. Evidence is acquired for the relevance of stereoelectronic effects that speed up the H-abstraction whenever the scissile C-H bond is co-linear with either the nitrogen lone-pair of the amide moiety or an adjacent aromatic group. An assessment of the dissociation energy value of the benzylic C-H bond in ArCH(2)NHCOMe is accordingly reported.

  18. Hydrogen storage by adsorption on activated carbon: Investigation of the thermal effects during the charging process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermosilla-Lara, G. [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, CNRS UPR 1311-Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Laboratoire des Ecoulements Geophysiques et Industriels, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Momen, G.; Le Neindre, B.; Hassouni, K. [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, CNRS UPR 1311-Universite Paris 13, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Marty, P.H. [Laboratoire des Ecoulements Geophysiques et Industriels, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2007-07-15

    This paper presents an investigation of the thermal effects during high-pressure charging of a packed bed hydrogen storage tank. The studied column is packed with activated IRH3 carbon, which has an average surface area of 2600m{sup 2}g{sup -1} and is fed with hydrogen or helium from an external high-pressure source. The temperature at six locations in the storage tank and the pressure value at the bottom of the tank are recorded during the charging stage. Several experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of the initial flow rate on the temperature field in the reservoir and on the duration of the charging process. A study of the respective contribution of adsorption and mechanical dissipation effects to the thermal phenomena is done in the case of hydrogen. Experimental results are compared to those obtained with the commercial code Fluent. A fair agreement is found when comparing typical pressure and temperature evolutions during the tank filling. (author)

  19. First-principles investigation on hydrogen storage performance of Li, Na and K decorated borophene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lifuzi; Chen, Xianfei; Du, Haiying; Yuan, Yuquan; Qu, Hui; Zou, Miao

    2018-01-01

    Borophene, a new kind of two-dimensional materials, were successfully synthesized in experiment recently with potential applications. In this study, we have investigated the hydrogen storage performances of alkali-metal (Li, Na and K) doped three types of borophene polytypes synthesized on Ag substrate. It is found that strong binding strength exists between alkali-metal atoms and borophene, where metal atoms on borophene with separated distribution are energy more favorable than the formation of metal clusters, avoiding the aggregation problems. Polarization mechanism plays a dominant role in H2 adsorption and the obtained storage capacities are closely related with the configurations of borophene, types of foreign atoms and the electronic interactions therein. The effects of temperature and pressure have also been taken into consideration through modified van't Hoff equation. Our results demonstrate that Na-doped S2 and S3 and Li-doped three types of borophene could be severed as promising candidates for hydrogen storage.

  20. Hydrogen Compressor Reliability Investigation and Improvement. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-514

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terlip, Danny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Diaphragm compressors have become the primary source of on-site hydrogen compression for hydrogen fueling stations around the world. NREL and PDC have undertaken two studies aimed at improving hydrogen compressor operation and reducing the cost contribution to dispensed fuel. The first study identified the failure mechanisms associated with mechanical compression to reduce the maintenance and down-time. The second study will investigate novel station configurations to maximize hydrogen usage and compressor lifetime. This partnership will allow for the simulation of operations in the field and a thorough analysis of the component failure to improve the reliability of diaphragm compression.

  1. Kinetic modeling of hydrogenation and hydro-denitrogenation mechanisms on sulfurated catalysts; Etude par modelisation cinetique des mecanismes d'hydrogenation et d'hydrodesazotation sur catalyseurs sulfures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penet, H.

    1998-10-23

    Toluene hydrogenation on a NiMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied at 350 deg. C as a function of the partial pressures of H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. This experimental study shows the following facts: the effect of the H{sub 2}S partial pressure on the hydrogenation rate is complex. The order with respect to H{sub 2}S varies between -0.05 and -0.5 as the pressure varies between 0.125 and 3 bar; in the presence of NH{sub 3}, the H{sub 2}S inhibiting effect is enhanced. Kinetic modeling was performed with the Chemkin II/Surface Chemkin II software package. On the basis of the effect of contact time and H{sub 2}S on toluene hydrogenation, the adsorption by heterolytic dissociation of H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S was selected. H{sub 2} provides hydride species (H{sup -}) attacking the aromatic ring in a first step. Proton addition during the hydrogenation of the first double bond is the limiting step. In the presence of ammonia. the kinetic modeling shows that the catalyst surface is modified and that the displacement of the H{sub 2}S adsorption equilibrium is expected. The NH{sub 3} adsorption mode could not be clearly discriminated between a simple adsorption through coordination and an adsorption through protonation. This model was applied to the hydro-denitrogenation of 2,6-diethyl-aniline at 350 deg. C on NiMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst and showed that the limitation step is the hydrogenation of the aromatic ring. (author)

  2. Investigation of the RF efficiency of inductively coupled hydrogen plasmas at 1 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, D.; Mattei, S.; Briefi, S.; Fantz, U.; Hatayama, A.; Lettry, J.; Nishida, K.; Tran, M. Q.

    2017-08-01

    The power requirements of RF heated sources for negative hydrogen ions in fusion are substantial, which poses strong demands on the generators and components of the RF circuit. Consequently, an increase of the RF coupling efficiency would be highly beneficial. Fundamental investigations of the RF efficiency in inductively coupled hydrogen and deuterium discharges in cylindrical symmetry are conducted at the lab experiment CHARLIE. The experiment is equipped with several diagnostics including optical emission spectroscopy and a movable floating double probe to monitor the plasma parameters. The presented investigations are performed in hydrogen at a varying pressure between 0.3 and 10 Pa, utilizing a conventional helical ICP coil driven at a frequency of 1 MHz and a fixed power of 520 W for plasma generation. The coupling efficiency is strongly affected by the variation in pressure, reaching up to 85 % between 1 and 3 Pa while dropping down to only 50 % at 0.3 Pa, which is the relevant operating pressure for negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion. Due to the lower power coupling, also the measured electron density at 0.3 Pa is only 5 . 1016 m-3, while it reaches up to 2.5 . 1017 m-3 with increasing coupling efficiency. In order to gain information on the spatially resolved aspects of RF coupling and plasma heating which are not diagnostically accessible, first simulations of the discharge by an electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo collision method have been conducted and are compared to the measurement data. At 1 Pa, the simulated data corresponds well to the results of both axially resolved probe measurements and radially resolved emission profiles obtained via OES. Thereby, information regarding the radial distribution of the electron density and mean energy is provided, revealing a radial distribution of the electron density which is well described by a Bessel profile.

  3. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  4. The investigation of kinetic and isotherm of fluoride adsorption onto functionalize pumice stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Ghorban; Roshani, Babak; Ghanizadeh, Ghader

    2012-05-30

    In this research work, pumice that is functionalized by the cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA), is used as an adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from drinking water. This work was carried out in two parts. The effects of HDTMA loading, pH (3-10), reaction time (5-60 min) and the adsorbent dosage (0.15-2.5 g L(-1)) were investigated on the removal of fluoride as a target contaminate from water through the design of different experimental sets in the first part. The results from this first part revealed that surfactant-modified pumice (SMP) exhibited the best performance at dose 0.5 g L(-1), pH 6, and it adsorbs over 96% of fluoride from a solution containing 10 mg L(-1) fluoride after 30 min of mixing time. The four linear forms of the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms model were applied to determine the best fit of equilibrium expressions. Apart from the regression coefficient (R(2)), four error functions were used to validate the isotherm and kinetics data. The experimental adsorption isotherm complies with Langmuir equation model type 1. The maximum amount of adsorption (Q(max)) was 41 mg g(-1). The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of fluoride best fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic type 1. Thermodynamic parameters evaluation of fluoride adsorption on SMP showed that the adsorption process under the selected conditions was spontaneous and endothermic. The suitability of SMP in defluoridation at field condition was investigated with natural groundwater samples collected from a nearby fluoride endemic area in the second part of this study. Based on this study's results, SMP was shown to be an affordable and a promising option for the removal of fluoride in drinking water. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Numerical investigation of kinetic turbulence in relativistic pair plasmas - I. Turbulence statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Werner, Gregory R.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2018-02-01

    We describe results from particle-in-cell simulations of driven turbulence in collisionless, magnetized, relativistic pair plasma. This physical regime provides a simple setting for investigating the basic properties of kinetic turbulence and is relevant for high-energy astrophysical systems such as pulsar wind nebulae and astrophysical jets. In this paper, we investigate the statistics of turbulent fluctuations in simulations on lattices of up to 10243 cells and containing up to 2 × 1011 particles. Due to the absence of a cooling mechanism in our simulations, turbulent energy dissipation reduces the magnetization parameter to order unity within a few dynamical times, causing turbulent motions to become sub-relativistic. In the developed stage, our results agree with predictions from magnetohydrodynamic turbulence phenomenology at inertial-range scales, including a power-law magnetic energy spectrum with index near -5/3, scale-dependent anisotropy of fluctuations described by critical balance, lognormal distributions for particle density and internal energy density (related by a 4/3 adiabatic index, as predicted for an ultra-relativistic ideal gas), and the presence of intermittency. We also present possible signatures of a kinetic cascade by measuring power-law spectra for the magnetic, electric and density fluctuations at sub-Larmor scales.

  6. Investigation of hydrogen concentration and hardness of ion irradiated organically modified silicate thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Y.; Prenzel, T.; Harriman, T. A.; Wang, Y. Q.; Lucca, D. A.; Williams, D.; Nastasi, M.; Dong, J.; Mehner, A.

    2010-06-01

    A study of the effects of ion irradiation of organically modified silicate thin films on the loss of hydrogen and increase in hardness is presented. NaOH catalyzed SiNa wO xC yH z thin films were synthesized by sol-gel processing from tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) precursors and spin-coated onto Si substrates. After drying at 300 °C, the films were irradiated with 125 keV H + or 250 keV N 2+ at fluences ranging from 1 × 10 14 to 2.5 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) was used to investigate resulting hydrogen concentration as a function of ion fluence and irradiating species. Nanoindentation was used to measure the hardness of the irradiated films. FT-IR spectroscopy was also used to examine resulting changes in chemical bonding. The resulting hydrogen loss and increase in hardness are compared to similarly processed acid catalyzed silicate thin films.

  7. First principle investigations of the physical properties of hydrogen-rich MgH2

    KAUST Repository

    Zarshenas, Mohammed

    2013-11-28

    Hydrogen being a cleaner energy carrier has increased the importance of hydrogen-containing light metal hydrides, in particular those with large gravimetric hydrogen density like magnesium hydride (MgH2). In this study, density functional and density functional perturbation theories are combined to investigate the structural, elastic, thermodynamic, electronic and optical properties of MgH2. Our structural parameters calculated with those proposed by Perdew, Burke and Ernzerof generalized gradient approximation (PBE-GGA) and Wu-Cohen GGA (WC-GGA) are in agreement with experimental measurements, however the underestimated band gap values calculated using PBE-GGA and WC-GGA were greatly improved with the GGA suggested by Engle and Vosko and the modified Becke-Johnson exchange correlation potential by Trans and Blaha. As for the thermodynamic properties the specific heat values at low temperatures were found to obey the T3 rule and at higher temperatures Dulong and Petit\\'s law. Our analysis of the optical properties of MgH2 also points to its potential application in optoelectronics. © 2013 The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Jet-Induced Mixing of a Large Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Vandresar, N. T.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of fluid mixing on the depressurization of a large liquid hydrogen storage tank. The test tank is approximately ellipsoidal, having a volume of 4.89 m(exp 3) and an average wall heat flux of 4.2 W/m(exp 2) due to external heat input. A mixer unit was installed near the bottom of the tank to generate an upward directed axial jet flow normal to the liquid-vapor interface. Mixing tests were initiated after achieving thermally stratified conditions in the tank either by the introduction of hydrogen gas into the tank or by self-pressurization due to ambient heat leak through the tank wall. The subcooled liquid jet directed towards the liquid-vapor interface by the mixer induced vapor condensation and caused a reduction in tank pressure. Tests were conducted at two jet submergence depths for jet Reynolds numbers from 80,000 to 495,000 and Richardson numbers from 0.014 to 0.52. Results show that the rate of tank pressure change is controlled by the competing effects of subcooled jet flow and the free convection boundary layer flow due to external tank wall heating. It is shown that existing correlations for mixing time and vapor condensation rate based on small scale tanks may not be applicable to large scale liquid hydrogen systems.

  9. Estudio cinético de la descomposición catalizada de peróxido de hidrógeno sobre carbón activado Kinetic study of the catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide on activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elihu Paternina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic study of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by activated carbon was carried out. The effect of concentrations of reactants and temperature were experimentally studied. Kinetic data were evaluated using differential method of initial rates of reaction. When a typical kinetic law for reactions in homogeneous phase is used, first order of reaction is obtained for hydrogen peroxide and activated carbon, and activation energy of 27 kJ mol-1 for the reaction was estimated. Experimentally was observed that surface of activated carbon is chemically modified during decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, based on this result a scheme of reaction was proposed and evaluated. Experimental data fits very well to a Langmuir- Hinshelwood kinetic model and activation energy of 40 kJ mol-1 was estimated for reaction in heterogeneous phase.

  10. Hydrogen Absorption in Metal Thin Films and Heterostructures Investigated in Situ with Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J. Callori

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to hydrogen possessing a relatively large neutron scattering length, hydrogen absorption and desorption behaviors in metal thin films can straightforwardly be investigated by neutron reflectometry. However, to further elucidate the chemical structure of the hydrogen absorbing materials, complementary techniques such as high resolution X-ray reflectometry and diffraction remain important too. Examples of work on such systems include Nb- and Pd-based multilayers, where Nb and Pd both have strong affinity to hydrogen. W/Nb and Fe/Nb multilayers were measured in situ with unpolarized and polarized neutron reflectometry under hydrogen gas charging conditions. The gas-pressure/hydrogen-concentration dependence, the hydrogen-induced macroscopic film swelling as well as the increase in crystal lattice plane distances of the films were determined. Ferromagnetic-Co/Pd multilayers were studied with polarized neutron reflectometry and in situ ferromagnetic resonance measurements to understand the effect of hydrogen absorption on the magnetic properties of the system. This electronic effect enables a novel approach for hydrogen sensing using a magnetic readout scheme.

  11. Heavy fuel oil pyrolysis and combustion: kinetics and evolved gases investigated by TGA-FTIR

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2017-08-24

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) obtained from crude oil distillation is a widely used fuel in marine engines and power generation technologies. In the present study, the pyrolysis and combustion of a Saudi Arabian HFO in nitrogen and in air, respectively, were investigated using non-isothermal thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with a Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. TG and DTG (differential thermo-gravimetry) were used for the kinetic analysis and to study the mass loss characteristics due to the thermal degradation of HFO at temperatures up to 1000°C and at various heating rates of 5, 10 and 20°C/min, in air and N2 atmospheres. FTIR analysis was then performed to study the composition of the evolved gases. The TG/DTG curves during HFO combustion show the presence of three distinct stages: the low temperature oxidation (LTO); fuel decomposition (FD); and high temperature oxidation (HTO) stages. The TG/DTG curves obtained during HFO pyrolysis show the presence of two devolatilization stages similar to that seen in the LTO stage of HFO combustion. Apart from this, the TG/DTG curves obtained during HFO combustion and pyrolysis differ significantly. Kinetic analysis was also performed using the distributed activation energy model, and the kinetic parameter (E) was determined for the different stages of HFO combustion and pyrolysis processes, yielding a good agreement with the measured TG profiles. FTIR analysis showed the signal of CO2 as approximately 50 times more compared to the other pollutant gases under combustion conditions. Under pyrolytic conditions, the signal intensity of alkane functional groups was the highest followed by alkenes. The TGA-FTIR results provide new insights into the overall HFO combustion processes, which can be used to improve combustor designs and control emissions.

  12. Equilibrium, thermodynamic and kinetic investigations for biosorption of uranium with green algae (Cladophora hutchinsiae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağda, Esra; Tuzen, Mustafa; Sarı, Ahmet

    2017-09-01

    Removal of toxic chemicals from environmental samples with low-cost methods and materials are very useful approach for especially large-scale applications. Green algae are highly abundant biomaterials which are employed as useful biosorbents in many studies. In the present study, an interesting type of green algae, Cladophora hutchinsiae (C. hutchinsiae) was used for removal of highly toxic chemical such as uranium. The pH, biosorbent concentration, contact time and temperature were optimized as 5.0, 12 g/L, 60 min and 20 °C, respectively. For the equilibrium calculations, three well known isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich) were employed. The maximum biosorption capacity of the biosorbent was calculated as about 152 mg/g under the optimum batch conditions. The mean energy of biosorption was calculated as 8.39 kJ/mol from the D-R biosorption isotherm. The thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of biosorption were also investigated to explain the nature of the process. The kinetic data best fits the pseudo-second-order kinetic model with a regression coefficient of >0.99 for all studied temperatures. The calculated ΔH° and ΔG° values showed that the biosorption process is exothermic and spontaneous for temperatures between 293 and 333 K. Furthermore, after seven cycling process, the sorption and desorption efficiencies of the biosorbent were found to be 70, and 58%, respectively meaning that the biosorbent had sufficiently high reusability performance as a clean-up tool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Is it homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysis derived from [RhCp*Cl2]2? In operando XAFS, kinetic, and crucial kinetic poisoning evidence for subnanometer Rh4 cluster-based benzene hydrogenation catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C; Fulton, John L; Roberts, John A S; Szymczak, Nathaniel K; Smurthwaite, Tricia D; Özkar, Saim; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Finke, Richard G

    2011-11-23

    Determining the true, kinetically dominant catalytically active species, in the classic benzene hydrogenation system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers 34 years ago starting with [RhCp*Cl(2)](2) (Cp* = [η(5)-C(5)(CH(3))(5)]), has proven to be one of the most challenging case studies in the quest to distinguish single-metal-based "homogeneous" from polymetallic, "heterogeneous" catalysis. The reason, this study will show, is the previous failure to use the proper combination of: (i) in operando spectroscopy to determine the dominant form(s) of the precatalyst's mass under catalysis (i.e., operating) conditions, and then crucially also (ii) the previous lack of the necessary kinetic studies, catalysis being a "wholly kinetic phenomenon" as J. Halpern long ago noted. An important contribution from this study will be to reveal the power of quantitiative kinetic poisoning experiments for distinguishing single-metal, or in the present case subnanometer Rh(4) cluster-based catalysis, from larger, polymetallic Rh(0)(n) nanoparticle catalysis, at least under favorable conditions. The combined in operando X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and kinetic evidence provide a compelling case for Rh(4)-based, with average stoichiometry "Rh(4)Cp*(2.4)Cl(4)H(c)", benzene hydrogenation catalysis in 2-propanol with added Et(3)N and at 100 °C and 50 atm initial H(2) pressure. The results also reveal, however, that if even ca. 1.4% of the total soluble Rh(0)(n) had formed nanoparticles, then those Rh(0)(n) nanoparticles would have been able to account for all the observed benzene hydrogenation catalytic rate (using commercial, ca. 2 nm, polyethyleneglycol-dodecylether hydrosol stabilized Rh(0)(n) nanoparticles as a model system). The results--especially the poisoning methodology developed and employed--are of significant, broader interest since determining the nature of the true catalyst continues to be a central, often vexing issue in any and all catalytic reactions

  14. An investigation of turbulent catalytically stabilized channel flow combustion of lean hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantzaras, I.; Benz, P.; Schaeren, R.; Bombach, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The catalytically stabilised thermal combustion (CST) of lean hydrogen-air mixtures was investigated numerically in a turbulent channel flow configuration using a two-dimensional elliptic model with detailed heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions. Comparison between turbulent and laminar cases having the same incoming mean properties shows that turbulence inhibits homogeneous ignition due to increased heat transport away from the near-wall layer. The peak root-mean-square temperature and species fluctuations are always located outside the extent of the homogeneous reaction zone indicating that thermochemical fluctuations have no significant influence on gaseous combustion. (author) 4 figs., 6 refs.

  15. Investigating parasitic current formation in MITLs through high-order continuum kinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogman, G. V.; Hammer, J. H.; Farmer, W. A.; Shumlak, U.

    2017-10-01

    The Z pulsed power facility is designed to deliver more than 20 MA of current to a load through magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs), which prevent high voltage arcs. Experimental results show that as much as 10% of the current can be lost due to the unintended formation of low-density plasmas in the MITLs. The configuration of the electric and magnetic fields within the MITL, where the plasma is born, creates conditions in which drift and kinetic instabilities can lead to the formation of parasitic currents. To understand the plasma dynamics that lead to current loss, the MITL configuration is investigated using a high-order continuum kinetic Vlasov-Poisson solver in two spatial and two velocity dimensions. The simulations capture the effects of varying magnetization and yield insights into plasma behavior over the course of current rise and corresponding magnetic field generation. The effects of plasma formation at the cathode versus at the anode are explored in detail. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Micromodel investigation of transport effect on the kinetics of reductive dissolution of hematite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changyong; Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhi

    2013-05-07

    Reductive dissolution of hematite in porous media was investigated using a micromodel (8.1 × 4.5 × 0.028 mm) with realistic pore network structures that include distinctive advection domain, macropores and micropores created in silicon substrate. The micromodel pore surface was sputter deposited with a thin layer (230 nm) of hematite. The hematite in the micromodel was reduced by injecting pH-varying solutions (pH 5.0, 6.0, 7.0) containing a reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2, 100 μM), a biogenic soluble electron transfer mediator produced by Shewanella species. The reduction kinetics was determined by measuring effluent Fe(II) (aq) concentration and by spectroscopically monitoring the hematite dissolution front in the micromodel. Batch experiment was also performed to estimate the hematite reduction rate under the well-mixed condition. Results showed significant spatial variation in local redox reaction rate that was controlled by the coupled transport and reaction. The overall rate of the redox reaction in the micromodel required a three-domain numerical model to effectively describe reaction kinetics either with distinctive apparent rate parameters or mass transfer coefficients in different pore domains. Results from this study demonstrated the feasibility of a domain-based modeling approach for scaling reaction rates from batch to porous media systems where reactions may be significantly limited by transport.

  17. Investigating the conformational stability of prion strains through a kinetic replication model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Zampieri

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Prion proteins are known to misfold into a range of different aggregated forms, showing different phenotypic and pathological states. Understanding strain specificities is an important problem in the field of prion disease. Little is known about which PrP(Sc structural properties and molecular mechanisms determine prion replication, disease progression and strain phenotype. The aim of this work is to investigate, through a mathematical model, how the structural stability of different aggregated forms can influence the kinetics of prion replication. The model-based results suggest that prion strains with different conformational stability undergoing in vivo replication are characterizable in primis by means of different rates of breakage. A further role seems to be played by the aggregation rate (i.e. the rate at which a prion fibril grows. The kinetic variability introduced in the model by these two parameters allows us to reproduce the different characteristic features of the various strains (e.g., fibrils' mean length and is coherent with all experimental observations concerning strain-specific behavior.

  18. Use of surface plasmon resonance to investigate lateral wall deposition kinetics and properties of polydopamine films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Cui, Dafu; Cai, Haoyuan; Zhang, Lulu; Chen, Xing; Sun, Jianhai; Chao, Yapeng

    2013-03-15

    Dopamine (DA) is a particularly important neurotransmitter. Polydopamine (pDA) films have been demonstrated to be important materials for the immobilization of biomolecules onto almost any type of solid substrate. In this study, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based sensor system with the sensor chip surface parallel to the direction of gravity was used to investigate the lateral wall deposition kinetics and properties of pDA films. The deposition kinetics of pDA Films are limited by the oxidation process. The pDA film could not be removed from the sensor chip completely by a strongly alkaline solution, indicating that the pDA film was heterogeneous in the direction of deposition. The pDA film formed near the interior of the solution was less stable than the film formed near the gold-solution interface. Adsorption of proteins on pDA film was studied compared with that on bare gold and dextran sensor chip. The reduction of Au(111) cations by the pDA film, forming a layer of gold particles, was monitored using SPR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation of rehydration kinetics of open-sun dried okra samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe Kocabay, Özlem; İsmail, Osman

    2017-06-01

    In this study rehydration kinetics of open-sun dried okra, which dried naturally and two pre-treatment, was investigated at 25 and 50 °C. By the obtained data, parameters with respect to rehydration kinetics and diffusion mechanism were calculated. In dehydration experiments, it was determined that blanching pre-treatment has influence on the drying time and okra samples were dried at 18 h. On the contrary in rehydration experiments maximum equilibrium rehydration values were achieved with the okras dried naturally. Experimental equilibrium rehydration ( R eq ), theoretical equilibrium rehydration ( R max ) and diffusion coefficient ( D) of okra dried naturally at 50 °C were calculated as 5.57 (g water/g dry matter), 5.96 (g water/g dry matter) and 2.17 × 10-10 (m2/s), respectively. Rehydration exponent (n) value, which is also important to identify the diffusion type of dried okra, was determined as between 0.332 and 0.383. Because of the exponent value n < 0.50, diffusion was defined as natural Fick type.

  20. Thermoactivated persulfate oxidation of pesticide chlorpyrifos in aquatic system: kinetic and mechanistic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Ya; Ying, Rongrong; Wang, Guoqing; Long, Tao; Li, Jianhua; Lin, Yusuo

    2017-04-01

    The widespread occurrence of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in the environment poses risks to both ecologic system as well as human health. This study investigated the oxidation kinetics of chlorpyrifos (CP), one of the typical OPPs, by thermoactivated persulfate (PS) oxidation process, and evaluated the influence of key kinetic factors, such as PS concentrations, pH, temperature, bicarbonate, and chloride ions. The reaction pathways and mechanisms were also proposed based on products identification by LC-MS techniques. Our results revealed that increasing initial PS concentration and temperature favored the decomposition of CP, whereas the oxidation efficiency was not affected by pH change ranging from 3 to 11. Bicarbonate was found to play a detrimental role on CP removal rates, while chloride showed no effect. The oxidation pathways including initial oxidation of P=S bond to P=O, dechlorination, dealkylation, and the dechlorination-hydroxylation were proposed, and the detailed underlying mechanisms were also discussed. Molecular orbital (MO) calculations indicated that P=S bond was the most favored oxidation site of the molecule. The toxicity of reaction solution was believed to increase due to the formation of products with P=O structures. This work demonstrates that OPPs can readily react with SO4·- and provides important information for further research on the oxidation of these contaminants.

  1. The size dependence of hydrogen mobility and sorption kinetics for carbon-supported MgH2 particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, Yuen S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/328200360; Obbink, Margo Klein; Srinivasan, Subramanian; Magusin, Pieter C M M; De Jong, Krijn P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; De Jongh, Petra E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/186125372

    2014-01-01

    MgH2 is a promising material for reversible solid-state hydrogen storage. It is known that particle size can have a strong impact on hydrogen dynamics and sorption characteristics, but more detailed insight has been hampered by the great challenge to prepare small and well-defined particles and

  2. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of alcohols and hydroxylamines by hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by methyltrioxorhenium, MTO, and the oxygen binding properties of cobalt Schiff base complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauche, Timothy [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Catalysis is a very interesting area of chemistry, which is currently developing at a rapid pace. A great deal of effort is being put forth by both industry and academia to make reactions faster and more productive. One method of accomplishing this is by the development of catalysts. Enzymes are an example of catalysts that are able to perform reactions on a very rapid time scale and also very specifically; a goal for every man-made catalyst. A kinetic study can also be carried out for a reaction to gain a better understanding of its mechanism and to determine what type of catalyst would assist the reaction. Kinetic studies can also help determine other factors, such as the shelf life of a chemical, or the optimum temperature for an industrial scale reaction. An area of catalysis being studied at this time is that of oxygenations. Life on this earth depends on the kinetic barriers for oxygen in its various forms. If it were not for these barriers, molecular oxygen, water, and the oxygenated materials in the land would be in a constant equilibrium. These same barriers must be overcome when performing oxygenation reactions on the laboratory or industrial scale. By performing kinetic studies and developing catalysts for these reactions, a large number of reactions can be made more economical, while making less unwanted byproducts. For this dissertation the activation by transition metal complexes of hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen coordination will be discussed.

  3. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Formation and Disruption of Hydrogen Bonds in Pharmaceutical Semicrystalline Dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duong, Tu; Reekmans, Gunter; Venkatesham, Akkaladevi; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Adriaensens, Peter; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2017-05-01

    We recently found that indomethacin (IMC) can effectively act as a powerful crystallization inhibitor for polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG) despite the fact that the absence of interactions between the drug and the carrier in the solid state was reported in the literature. However, in the present study, we investigate the possibility of drug-carrier interactions in the liquid state to explain the polymer crystallization inhibition effect of IMC. We also aim to discover other potential PEG crystallization inhibitors. Drug-carrier interactions in both liquid and solid state are characterized by variable temperature Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and cross-polarization magic angle spinning (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CP/MAS NMR). In the liquid state, FTIR data show evidence of the breaking of hydrogen bonding between IMC molecules to form interactions of the IMC monomer with PEG. The drug-carrier interactions are disrupted upon storage and polymer crystallization, resulting in segregation of IMC from PEG crystals that can be observed under polarized light microscopy. This process is further confirmed by (13)C NMR since in the liquid state, when the IMC/PEG monomer units ratio is below 2:1, IMC signals are undetectable because of the loss of cross-polarization efficiency in the mobile IMC molecules upon attachment to PEG chains via hydrogen bonding. This suggests that each ether oxygen of the PEG unit can form hydrogen bonds with two IMC molecules. The NMR spectrum of IMC shows no change in solid dispersions with PEG upon storage, indicating the absence of interactions in the solid state, hence confirming previous studies. The drug-carrier interactions in the liquid state elucidate the crystallization inhibition effect of IMC on PEG as well as other semicrystalline polymers such as poloxamer and Gelucire. However, hydrogen bonding is a necessary but apparently not a sufficient condition for the polymer crystallization inhibition

  4. Investigation of hydrogen recombination under natural convection conditions; Untersuchungen zur Wasserstoffrekombination unter Naturkonvektionsbedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Berno

    2015-09-04

    Passive Autocatalytic Recombiners (PAR) are installed inside the containment of nuclear power plants in order to prevent the build-up of flammable mixtures and to mitigate the effects of hydrogen deflagrations, which can occur in the event of a severe accident combined with the release of hydrogen. In order to simulate the operating behaviour of PARs, the computer program REKO-DIREKT is being developed at the Forschungszentrum Juelich in collaboration with the Institute for Reactor Safety and Reactor Technology at the RWTH Aachen. For the validation of the code, data from experimental facilities operated at Juelich are used. This work focusses on the analysis of the chimney effect through the PAR housing as well as the optimization of the chimney model of REKO-DIREKT. Therefore experimental investigations are carried out in the REKO-4 facility under natural convection conditions. This facility is equipped with numerous measuring devices, e.g. katharometers for in-situ measuring of the hydrogen concentration and the optical flow measurement technique Particle-Image-Velocimetry. In preliminary assessments the equipment is being qualified in order to determine the measurement accuracy. In the following experimental investigations, a small-scale PAR is used, that is built in a modular way allowing it to be equipped with different chimney geometries. The experimental results produce a database that shows the central correlation between the hydrogen concentration, the catalyst temperature and the inlet velocity. The results include the variation of the recombiner's chimney height and experiments at different operating pressures. After optimization of the chimney model, the simulation program is validated against experiments in the large-scale facility THAI in Eschborn, which have been performed subsequent to this thesis in the context of the OECD/NEA-THAI project. Finally, the influence of a downward-directed, near-wall flow on the operational behaviour of the small

  5. Investigating H (hydrogen) self-diffusion in olivine and upper mantle electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novella, D.; Du Frane, W. L.; Jacobsen, B.; Weber, P. K.; Ryerson, F. J.; Tyburczy, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Considerable amounts of H2O could be present deep within Earth's interior, where H (hydrogen) atoms can enter natural minerals as defect in their nominally anhydrous structures. Up to several wt.% H2O have been observed in natural minerals that were originally formed in the deep mantle and brought to the surface through volcanic eruptions. The range of observed H2O contents in mantle minerals collected at Earth's surfaces would drastically influence the physical and chemical properties of mantle material. As a consequence, hydrogen has likely played a critical role in the evolution of the Earth, its atmosphere and the oceans. H2O contained in upwelling plumes and downwelling slabs complete a potentially deep water cycle between Earth's mantle and oceans. Such a cycle would traverse through the upper mantle, where H diffusion through the predominant mineral olivine would control its transport and distribution. Chemical diffusion (diffusion due to a chemical gradient) in olivine has been widely investigated over the past few decades, but only limited data have been reported on self-diffusion (the intrinsic transport of H in the mineral structure). This gap in information needs to be investigated more extensively to fully understand how H2O transports throughout the mantle. We will discuss results of H self-diffusion in San Carlos olivine single crystal that were obtained in experiments performed at high-pressure and high-temperature using a piston cylinder apparatus, reproducing conditions encountered in the deep upper mantle. H self-diffusion coefficients were investigated by tracking deuterium diffusion profiles in oriented, single crystals of olivine that were saturated by hydrogen. Diffusion coefficients along the 3 principal orientation of olivine are highly anisotropic, with an over 1 order of magnitude difference between the `fast' [100], and the `slower' [010] and [001] orientations. Diffusion coefficients are used to calculate a substantial contribution of

  6. First principles DFT investigation of yttrium-decorated boron-nitride nanotube: Electronic structure and hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Richa Naja, E-mail: ltprichanaja@gmail.com [Indian Institute Of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India); Chakraborty, Brahmananda [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2015-06-24

    The electronic structure and hydrogen storage capability of Yttrium-doped BNNTs has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom prefers the hollow site in the center of the hexagonal ring with a binding energy of 0.8048eV. Decorating by Y makes the system half-metallic and magnetic with a magnetic moment of 1.0µ{sub B}. Y decorated Boron-Nitride (8,0) nanotube can adsorb up to five hydrogen molecules whose average binding energy is computed as 0.5044eV. All the hydrogen molecules are adsorbed with an average desorption temperature of 644.708 K. Taking that the Y atoms can be placed only in alternate hexagons, the implied wt% comes out to be 5.31%, a relatively acceptable value for hydrogen storage materials. Thus, this system can serve as potential hydrogen storage medium.

  7. The investigation of kinetic and isotherm of fluoride adsorption onto functionalize pumice stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgari, Ghorban [Department of Environmental Health Engineering, School of Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roshani, Babak, E-mail: babak.roshani@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, 57 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Ghanizadeh, Ghader [Health Research Center and Health School, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Removal of fluoride from drinking water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pumice as adsorbent functionalized by the cationic surfactant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of HDTMA loading. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Best fit of equilibrium expressions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum amount of adsorption. - Abstract: In this research work, pumice that is functionalized by the cationic surfactant, hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA), is used as an adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from drinking water. This work was carried out in two parts. The effects of HDTMA loading, pH (3-10), reaction time (5-60 min) and the adsorbent dosage (0.15-2.5 g L{sup -1}) were investigated on the removal of fluoride as a target contaminate from water through the design of different experimental sets in the first part. The results from this first part revealed that surfactant-modified pumice (SMP) exhibited the best performance at dose 0.5 g L{sup -1}, pH 6, and it adsorbs over 96% of fluoride from a solution containing 10 mg L{sup -1} fluoride after 30 min of mixing time. The four linear forms of the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms model were applied to determine the best fit of equilibrium expressions. Apart from the regression coefficient (R{sup 2}), four error functions were used to validate the isotherm and kinetics data. The experimental adsorption isotherm complies with Langmuir equation model type 1. The maximum amount of adsorption (Q{sub max}) was 41 mg g{sup -1}. The kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of fluoride best fitted with the pseudo-second-order kinetic type 1. Thermodynamic parameters evaluation of fluoride adsorption on SMP showed that the adsorption process under the selected conditions was spontaneous and endothermic. The suitability of SMP in defluoridation at field condition was investigated with natural groundwater samples collected from a nearby fluoride endemic area

  8. Hydrogen storage capacity on Ti-decorated porous graphene: First-principles investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lihua; Kang, Long; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Daobin; Gong, Jijun; Wang, Chunni; Zhang, Meiling; Wu, Xiaojuan

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen storage capacity on Titanium (Ti) decorated porous graphene (PG) has been investigated using density functional theory simulations with generalized gradient approximation method. The possible adsorption sites of Ti atom on PG and electronic properties of Ti-PG system are also discussed.The results show a Ti atom prefers to strongly adsorb on the center site above the C hexagon with the binding energy of 3.65 eV, and the polarization and the hybridization mechanisms both contribute to the Ti atom adsorption on PG. To avoid a tendency of clustering among Ti atoms, the single side of the PG unit cell should only contain one Ti atom. For the single side of PG, four H2 molecules can be adsorbed around Ti atom, and the adsorption mechanism of H2 molecules come from not only the polarization mechanism between Ti and H atoms but also the orbital hybridization among Ti atom, H2 molecules and C atoms. For the case of double sides of PG, eight H2 molecules can be adsorbed on Ti-decorated PG unit cell with the average adsorption energy of -0.457 eV, and the gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity is 6.11 wt.%. Furthermore, ab inito molecular-dynaics simulation result shows that six H2 molecules can be adsorbed on double sides of unit cell of Ti-PG system and the configuration of Ti-PG is very stable at 300 K and without external pressure, which indicates Ti-decorated PG could be considered as a potential hydrogen storage medium at ambient conditions.

  9. Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric investigations of the hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labelled methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewett, J.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-24

    Suitable analytical methods must be tested and developed for monitoring the individual process steps within the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor and for tritium accountability. The utility of laser-Raman spectroscopy accompanied by mass spectrometry with an Omegatron was investigated using the analysis of all hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labeled methanes as an example. The Omegatron is useful for analyzing all hydrogen isotopes mixed with the stable helium isotopes. The application of this mass spectrometer were demonstrated by analyzing mixtures of deuterated methanes. In addition, it was employed to study the radiochemical Witzbach exchange reaction between tritium and methanes. A laser-Raman spectrometer was designed for analysis of tritium-containing gases and was built from individual components. A tritium-compatible, metal-sealed Raman cuvette having windows with good optical properties and additional means for measuring the stray light was first used successfully in this work. The Raman spectra of the hydrogen isotopes were acquired in the pure rotation mode and in the rotation-vibration mode and were used for on. The deuterated methanes were measured by Raman spectroscopy, the wavenumbers determined were assigned to the corresponding vibrations, and the wavenumbers for the rotational fine-structure were summarized in tables. The fundamental Vibrations of the deuterated methanes produced Witzbach reactions were detected and assigned. The fundamental vibrations of the molecules were obtained with Raman spectroscopy for the first time in this work. The @-Raman spectrometer assembled is well suited for the analysis of tritium- containing gases and is practical in combination with mass spectrometry using an Omegatron, for studying gases used in fusion.

  10. Investigation of Atomic Physics and Frequency Stability with a Croygenic Hydrogen Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walsworth, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    .... The cryogenic hydrogen maser (CHM) operates at low temperatures, and may provide frequency stability that is one to three orders of magnitude better than a room temperature hydrogen maser because of greatly reduced thermal noise and larger signal power...

  11. A kinetic and theoretical study of the borate catalysed reactions of hydrogen peroxide: the role of dioxaborirane as the catalytic intermediate for a wide range of substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deary, Michael E; Durrant, Marcus C; Davies, D Martin

    2013-01-14

    Our recent work has provided new insights into the equilibria and species that exist in aqueous solution at different pHs for the boric acid - hydrogen peroxide system, and the role of these species in oxidation reactions. Most recently, (M. C. Durrant, D. M. Davies and M. E. Deary, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2011, 9, 7249-7254), we have produced strong theoretical and experimental evidence for the existence of a previously unreported monocyclic three membered peroxide species, dioxaborirane, that is the likely catalytic species in borate mediated electrophilic reactions of hydrogen peroxide in alkaline solution. In the present paper, we extend our study of the borate-peroxide system to look at a wide range of substrates that include substituted dimethyl anilines, methyl-p-tolyl sulfoxide, halides, hydrogen sulfide anion, thiosulfate, thiocyanate, and hydrazine. The unusual selectivity-reactivity pattern of borate catalysed reactions compared with hydrogen peroxide and inorganic or organic peracids previously observed for the organic sulfides (D. M. Davies, M. E. Deary, K. Quill and R. A. Smith, Chem.-Eur. J., 2005, 11, 3552-3558) is also seen with substituted dimethyl aniline nucleophiles. This provides evidence that the pattern is not due to any latent electrophilic tendency of the organic sulfides and further supports dioxaborirane being the likely reactive intermediate, thus broadening the applicability of this catalytic system. Moreover, density functional theory calculations on our proposed mechanism involving dioxaborirane are consistent with the experimental results for these substrates. Results obtained at high concentrations of both borate and hydrogen peroxide require the inclusion the diperoxodiborate dianion in the kinetic analysis. A scheme detailing our current understanding of the borate-peroxide system is presented.

  12. Hydrogenation Reactions of CO and CO2: New Insights through In Situ X-ray Spectroscopy and Chemical Transient Kinetics Experiments on Cobalt Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Walter Thomas

    . To attempt to circumvent this, a chemical transient kinetics (CTK) reactor was designed and built. Verification of the reactor was performed by evaluating a catalyst from the literature and confirming the results. A CoMgO catalyst was used to accomplish this, and our original findings show that at short time scales steric hindrances at the surface may push the product distribution towards olefinic rather than branched compounds. Continuing work on the CTK, two distinct particle sizes of Co nanoparticles were synthesized and tested under atmospheric conditions (H2:CO = 2:1) on the transient reactor. 4.3 nm Co and 9.5 nm Co were supported on MCF-17 to study the previously observed size effect, where Co nanoparticles lose activity at smaller sizes. It was found that indeed, the 4.3 nm Co are less active because they contain less CO dissociation sites, which are necessary for populating the surface with carbon monomers and spurring subsequent chain growth. The specific CO dissociation site was identified as the Co (221) step, of which larger Co particles have more and smaller Co particles have less. To investigate the nature of the MnO / Co3O4 interface, an in situ study using synchrotron radiation was undertaken. A sample of 6nm MnO nanoparticles loaded on mesoporous Co3O4 was studied with ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Mn and Co L edges, and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy. X-ray measurements show that under reducing conditions of CO + H2, the MnO nanoparticles wet the Co surface until it is completely covered by a layer of MnO. Through the combination of techniques, it is shown that the system is catalytic active at the low pressures studied, and that the nature of the interface between MnO and Co3O4 is highly dependent on the temperature and gaseous environment it is prepared in. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  13. Investigation of Influential Parameters in Deep Oxidative Desulfurization of Dibenzothiophene with Hydrogen Peroxide and Formic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Haghighat Mamaghani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective oxidative system consisting of hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, and sulfuric acid followed by an extractive stage were implemented to remove dibenzothiophene in the simulated fuel oil. The results revealed such a great performance in the case of H2O2 in the presence of formic and sulfuric acids that led to the removal of sulfur compounds. Sulfuric acid was employed to increase the acidity of media as well as catalytic activity together with formic acid. The oxidation reaction was followed by a liquid-liquid extraction stage using acetonitrile as a polar solvent to remove produced sulfones from the model fuel. The impact of operating parameters including the molar ratio of formic acid to sulfur (, hydrogen peroxide to sulfur (, and the time of reaction was investigated using Box-Behnken experimental design for oxidation of the model fuel. A significant quadratic model was introduced for the sulfur removal as a function of effective parameters by the statistic analysis.

  14. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Computed Tomography of Chemiluminescence for Hydrogen-Air Premixed Laminar Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Lv

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography of chemiluminescence (CTC is a promising technique for combustion diagnostics, providing instantaneous 3D information of flame structures, especially in harsh circumstance. This work focuses on assessing the feasibility of CTC and investigating structures of hydrogen-air premixed laminar flames using CTC. A numerical phantom study was performed to assess the accuracy of the reconstruction algorithm. A well-designed burner was used to generate stable hydrogen-air premixed laminar flames. The OH⁎ chemiluminescence intensity field reconstructed from 37 views using CTC was compared to the OH⁎ chemiluminescence distributions recorded directly by a single ICCD camera from the side view. The flame structures in different flow velocities and equivalence ratios were analyzed using the reconstructions. The results show that the CTC technique can effectively indicate real distributions of the flame chemiluminescence. The height of the flame becomes larger with increasing flow velocities, whereas it decreases with increasing equivalence ratios (no larger than 1. The increasing flow velocities gradually lift the flame reaction zones. A critical cone angle of 4.76 degrees is obtained to avoid blow-off. These results set up a foundation for next studies and the methods can be further developed to reconstruct 3D structures of flames.

  15. Reaction kinetics of acetone peroxide formation and structure investigations using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, L; Mortensen, P M; Trane, R; Harris, P; Berg, R W

    2009-01-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) has been prepared in order to study the effect of pH and temperature on the reaction kinetics. Raman spectra of liquid mixtures of acetone and hydrogen peroxide were recorded versus time throughout the experiments. The spectral data of the liquid phases indicate that at 25 degrees C the reaction between acetone and hydrogen peroxide proceeds to form intermediates within one day. Based on the assumption that a likely reaction path involves a sequence of reaction steps between acetone and hydrogen peroxide, calculations of Raman spectra were performed using a density functional theory (DFT)/Hartree-Fock approach. It was not possible from this to assess with certainty which intermediate products formed most extensively in an acetone/hydrogen peroxide mixture. However, it was concluded that the most likely reaction mixture is a mixture of the different intermediate products and that the rate determining step is the ring closure. The reaction rate of TATP formation was found to increase with temperature and with sulfuric acid additions to the acetone/hydrogen peroxide mixture. By correlation of the induction time of TATP crystallization against pH it was shown that the reaction rate is first order with respect to the H+ concentration. Raman spectra of the precipitates from mixtures were in agreement with previous studies done for TATP, except in one case in which a crystal crystallized at 343 K had a distinctly different Raman spectrum. Comparison with calculated spectra revealed that the crystal produced could be diacetone diperoxide (DADP) or tetraacetone tetraperoxide (TrATrP). Single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that the crystal crystallized at 343 K was DADP.

  16. Efficient photocatalytic degradation of tetrabromodiphenyl ethers and simultaneous hydrogen production by TiO2-Cu2O composite films in N2 atmosphere: Influencing factors, kinetics and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhe; Wang, Xi; Dong, Haitai; Li, Shangyi; Li, Xukai; Li, Laisheng

    2017-10-15

    TiO2-Cu2O photocatalyst composite film with a heterostructure was synthesized on a copper substrate for 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE47) reduction. First, Cu2O film was synthesized by the electrochemical deposition method, and then TiO2 was coated on the surface of the Cu2O film. The morphology, surface chemical composition and optical characteristics of TiO2-Cu2O film were characterized. The degradation efficiency of BDE47 and hydrogen production by TiO2-Cu2O films was higher than those by pure TiO2 or Cu2O films. The highest BDE47 degradation efficiency of 90% and hydrogen production of 12.7mmolLliq(-1) after 150min were achieved by 67%TiO2-Cu2O films. The influencing factors were investigated in terms of film component, solvent condition, and initial pH. A kinetics study demonstrated that BDE47 degradation followed a pseudo-first-order model. Photocatalytic apparent reaction rate constant of BDE47 by TiO2-Cu2O films was 0.0070min(-1), which was 3.3 times of that by directly photolysis process. During photocatalytic debrmination process, the photogenerated holes were reserved in the valance band of Cu2O to oxidize methanol. Meanwhile, the partial photogenerated electrons transferred to the conduction band of TiO2 and directly eliminated the ortho-Br of BDE47 and yielded BDE28 and BDE15. The other partial photogenerated electrons reduced protons (H(+)) to form atomic hydrogen (H°), which could substitute the para-Br of BDE47 and generated BDE17 and produce hydrogen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The tropospheric processing of acidic gases and hydrogen sulphide in volcanic gas plumes as inferred from field and model investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Aiuppa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving the constraints on the atmospheric fate and depletion rates of acidic compounds persistently emitted by non-erupting (quiescent volcanoes is important for quantitatively predicting the environmental impact of volcanic gas plumes. Here, we present new experimental data coupled with modelling studies to investigate the chemical processing of acidic volcanogenic species during tropospheric dispersion. Diffusive tube samplers were deployed at Mount Etna, a very active open-conduit basaltic volcano in eastern Sicily, and Vulcano Island, a closed-conduit quiescent volcano in the Aeolian Islands (northern Sicily. Sulphur dioxide (SO2, hydrogen sulphide (H2S, hydrogen chloride (HCl and hydrogen fluoride (HF concentrations in the volcanic plumes (typically several minutes to a few hours old were repeatedly determined at distances from the summit vents ranging from 0.1 to ~10 km, and under different environmental conditions. At both volcanoes, acidic gas concentrations were found to decrease exponentially with distance from the summit vents (e.g., SO2 decreases from ~10 000 μg/m3at 0.1 km from Etna's vents down to ~7 μg/m3 at ~10 km distance, reflecting the atmospheric dilution of the plume within the acid gas-free background troposphere. Conversely, SO2/HCl, SO2/HF, and SO2/H2S ratios in the plume showed no systematic changes with plume aging, and fit source compositions within analytical error. Assuming that SO2 losses by reaction are small during short-range atmospheric transport within quiescent (ash-free volcanic plumes, our observations suggest that, for these short transport distances, atmospheric reactions for H2S and halogens are also negligible. The one-dimensional model MISTRA was used to simulate quantitatively the evolution of halogen and sulphur compounds in the plume of Mt. Etna. Model predictions support the hypothesis of minor HCl chemical processing during plume transport, at least in cloud-free conditions. Larger

  18. Investigation of the degradation of a thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaic module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dyk, E.E.; Audouard, A.; Meyer, E.L. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Woolard, C.D. [Department of Chemistry, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2007-01-23

    The degradation of a thin-film hydrogenated single-junction amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic (PV) module has been studied. We investigated the different modes of electrical and physical degradation of a-Si:H PV modules by employing a degradation and failure assessment procedure used in conjunction with analytical techniques, including, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry. This paper reveals that due to their thickness, thin films are very sensitive to the type of degradation observed. Moreover, this paper deals with the problems associated with the module encapsulant, poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate) (EVA). The main objective of this study was to establish the influence of outdoor environmental conditions on the performance of a thin-film PV module comprising a-Si:H single-junction cells. (author)

  19. The investigation of the kinetics of hydrochemical oxidation of metal sulphides with the aim of determination of the optimal conditions for the selective extraction of molybdenum from ores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutsik V.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of the oxidation of molybdenyte, pyrite and sphalerite in solutions of nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium hypochlorite was studied by the rotating disk method. The influence of the molar concentration of reagent, pH of solution, temperature, disk rotation frequency, and duration of measurements on the specific rate of hydrochemical oxidation of sulpfides was determined. The kinetic models allowing to calculate the dissolution rate of sulphides when these parameters change simultaneously were obtained. The conditions of kinetically and diffusion-controlled processes were detected. The details of mechanism of the studied processes were revealed. The nature of intermediate solid products, the reasons and the conditions of their formation as well as the character of their influence on the kinetics of dissolution processes were determined. The probable schemes of interactions corresponding to the observable kinetic dependences were offered. The conditions of the effective and selective molybdenum leaching directly from ore without its concentration were found.

  20. Investigation of the hydrogen of silica glass being laser-irradiating by 1H MAS NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Fu, Bo; Gao, Zhixing; Shao, Zhufeng; Xiang, Zaikui; Nie, Lanjian

    2017-08-01

    The occurrence of the damage among the silica glass being laser-irradiation is closed related with the hydrogen. The laser of 248nm lead to the structure collapsing to made the silica glass crystallized. With the crystallized and non- crystallized parts, the 1H MAS NMR result shows that the concentration of the hydrogen are different of the damaged and non-damaged silica glass. Which is the evidence for the damage-delaying by the hydrogen.

  1. Investigation of a novel electrocatalyst for hydrogen peroxide reduction and its application to sensing and biosensing.

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Macia, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide has, for many years, been shown to be a very important compound due to its wide and varied applications in many industrial processes as well as biological systems. Therefore, its detection and measurement represents an important analytical issue. Traditional methods such as titrimetry or spectrophotometry have more recently been displaced by electrochemical techniques, which have proven to be an inexpensive and effective means of hydrogen peroxide determination. Hydrogen ...

  2. Protein oligomerization equilibria and kinetics investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: a mathematical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, David M; Levitus, Marcia

    2014-10-30

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a technique that is increasingly being used to investigate protein oligomerization equilibria and dynamics. Each individual FCS decay is characterized by its amplitude and a characteristic diffusion time, both of which are sensitive to the degree of dissociation of the protein. Here, we provide a mathematical treatment that relates these observables with the parameters of interest: the equilibrium constants of the different protein dissociation steps and their corresponding dissociation and association kinetic rate constants. We focused on the two most common types of protein homooligomers (dimers and tetramers) and on the experimental variables relevant for the design of the experiment (protein concentration, fractional concentration of labeled protein). The analysis of the theoretical expectations for proteins with different dissociation constants is a key aspect of experiment design and data analysis and cannot be performed without a physically accurate treatment of the system. In particular, we show that the analysis of FCS data using some commonly used empirical models may result in a serious misinterpretation of the experimental results.

  3. Theoretical Investigation of Kinetic Processes in Small Radicals of Importance in Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Millard [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Dagdigian, Paul J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-12-12

    Our group studies inelastic and reactive collisions of small molecules, focusing on radicals important in combustion environments. The goal is the better understanding of kinetic processes that may be difficult to access experimentally. An essential component is the accurate determination and fitting of potential energy surfaces (PESs). After fitting the ab initio points to obtain global PESs, we treat the dynamics using time-independent (close-coupling) methods. Cross sections and rate constants for collisions of are determined with our Hibridon program suite . We have studied energy transfer (rotationally, vibrationally, and/or electronically inelastic) in small hydrocarbon radicals (CH2 and CH3) and the CN radical. We have made a comparison with experimental measurements of relevant rate constants for collisions of these radicals. Also, we have calculated accurate transport properties using state-of-the-art PESs and to investigate the sensitivity to these parameters in 1-dimensional flame simulations. Of particular interest are collision pairs involving the light H atom.

  4. Experimental investigation of magnetic-field-induced aggregation kinetics in nonaqueous ferrofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, Junaid M; Philip, John; Raj, Baldev

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the influence of field ramp rate on the kinetics of magnetic dipole-dipole induced chainlike structure formation in a nonaqueous nanoparticle dispersion using light scattering studies. With increase in magnetic field, at a constant ramp rate, the transmitted light intensity diminishes and the transmitted light spot is transformed to a diffused ring due to scattering from the self-assembled linear aggregates. The decay rate of transmitted intensity increases up to an optimum ramp rate, above which the trend becomes reverse. At an optimum ramp rate, the minimum time for initial aggregation coincides with the exposure time where the intensity decay is fastest. The variation of transmitted intensity at different ramp rate is explained on the basis of initial aggregation time that depends on Brownian motion, dipolar magnetic attraction and multibody hydrodynamic interactions. The slope of the transmitted light intensity after the removal of magnetic field depends on the time required for dissociation of ordered linear structures. Disappearance of the ring pattern and the reappearance of original light spot, upon removal of the magnetic field, confirm the perfect reversibility of the linear aggregates. The observed concentration dependant decay rates are in good agreement with aggregation theory.

  5. Investigation of free-radical copolymerization propagation kinetics of vinyl acetate and methyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossi, Marco; Liang, Kun; Hutchinson, Robin A; Moscatelli, Davide

    2010-04-01

    The free-radical copolymerization propagation kinetics of vinyl acetate (VAc) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) at 50 degrees C were investigated through an experimental study combined with a computational analysis based on quantum chemistry. Copolymer composition data, obtained using pulsed laser polymerization followed by size exclusion chromatography (PLP-SEC) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), were well represented by the terminal model using monomer reactivity ratios obtained with the computational approach (r(VAc) = 0.001 and r(MMA) = 27.9). Concerning the composition-averaged copolymerization propagation rate coefficient k(p,cop), the differences between the terminal model and the implicit penultimate unit effect (IPUE) model (s(MMA) = 0.544 and s(VAc) = 0.173) are small for VAc/MMA, with the terminal model sufficient to describe the experimental k(p,cop) data measured by PLP-SEC. Monomer and radical charge distributions determined computationally are used to explain the reactivity exhibited by the VAc/MMA system.

  6. Modeling and Investigation of the Swelling Kinetics of Acrylamide-Sodium Acrylate Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmi Seyhun Kipcak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The acrylamide-sodium acrylate hydrogel was synthesized by free radical polymerization of the method of solution polymerization. Dynamic swelling tests were conducted at 25, 40, and 60°C temperatures, in order to investigate the swelling properties of the synthesized hydrogel. The results have shown that swelling content and swelling rate of the hydrogel increase with increasing the swelling water temperature. The diffusivity values changed from 1.81×10-7 to 2.97×10-7 m2 s−1 over the temperature range. The activation energies were found as 3.56, 3.71, and 3.86 kJ mol−1 at 25, 40, and 60°C, respectively. The experimental drying curves obtained were fitted to a three different models, namely, Peleg’s, first-order absorption kinetic, and exponential association equation models. All the models applied provided a good agreement with the experimental data with high values of the coefficient of determination (R2, the least values of the reduced chi-square (χ2, and root mean square error (RMSE. Comparing the determination of coefficient, reduced chi-square, and root mean square error values of three models, it was concluded that the exponential association equation model represents swelling characteristics better than the others.

  7. Kinetic and structural investigation of the cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopečný, David; Končitíková, Radka; Popelka, Hana; Briozzo, Pierre; Vigouroux, Armelle; Kopečná, Martina; Zalabák, David; Šebela, Marek; Skopalová, Jana; Frébort, Ivo; Moréra, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinins are hormones that regulate plant development and their environmental responses. Their levels are mainly controlled by the cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKO), which oxidatively cleaves cytokinins using redox-active electron acceptors. CKO belongs to the group of flavoproteins with an 8α-N1-histidyl FAD covalent linkage. Here, we investigated the role of seven active site residues, H105, D169, E288, V378, E381, P427 and L492, in substrate binding and catalysis of the CKO1 from maize (Zea mays, ZmCKO1) combining site-directed mutagenesis with kinetics and X-ray crystallography. We identify E381 as a key residue for enzyme specificity that restricts substrate binding as well as quinone electron acceptor binding. We show that D169 is important for catalysis and that H105 covalently linked to FAD maintains the enzyme's structural integrity, stability and high rates with electron acceptors. The L492A mutation significantly modulates the cleavage of aromatic cytokinins and zeatin isomers. The high resolution X-ray structures of ZmCKO1 and the E381S variant in complex with N6-(2-isopentenyl)adenosine reveal the binding mode of cytokinin ribosides. Those of ZmCKO2 and ZmCKO4a contain a mobile domain, which might contribute to binding of the N9 substituted cytokinins. © 2015 FEBS.

  8. Hydration and hydrogen bond network of water around hydrophobic surface investigated by terahertz spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, K; Suzuki, T; Kondo, N; Ogawa, Y

    2014-12-21

    Water conformation around hydrophobic side chains of four amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-aminobutyric acid, and L-norvaline) was investigated via changes in complex dielectric constant in the terahertz (THz) region. Each of these amino acids has the same hydrophilic backbone, with successive additions of hydrophobic straight methylene groups (-CH2-) to the side chain. Changes in the degree of hydration (number of dynamically retarded water molecules relative to bulk water) and the structural conformation of the water hydrogen bond (HB) network related to the number of methylene groups were quantitatively measured. Since dielectric responses in the THz region represent water relaxations and water HB vibrations at a sub-picosecond and picosecond timescale, these measurements characterized the water relaxations and HB vibrations perturbed by the methylene apolar groups. We found each successive straight -CH2- group on the side chain restrained approximately two hydrophobic hydration water molecules. Additionally, the number of non-hydrogen-bonded (NHB) water molecules increased slightly around these hydrophobic side chains. The latter result seems to contradict the iceberg model proposed by Frank and Evans, where water molecules are said to be more ordered around apolar surfaces. Furthermore, we compared the water-hydrophilic interactions of the hydrophilic amino acid backbone with those with the water-hydrophobic interactions around the side chains. As the hydrophobicity of the side chain increased, the ordering of the surrounding water HB network was altered from that surrounding the hydrophilic amino acid backbone, thereby diminishing the fraction of NHB water and ordering the surrounding tetrahedral water HB network.

  9. Hydrogen Bond Network of Water around Protein Investigated with Terahertz and Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, Keiichiro; Ogawa, Yuichi; Kondo, Naoshi

    2016-12-20

    The dynamical and structural properties of water at protein interfaces were characterized on the basis of the broadband complex dielectric constant (0.25 to 400 THz) of albumin aqueous solutions. Our analysis of the dielectric responses between 0.25 and 12 THz first revealed hydration water with retarded reorientational dynamics extending ∼8.5 Å (corresponding to three to four layers) out from the albumin surface. Second, the number of nonhydrogen-bonded water was decreased in the presence of the albumin solute, indicating protein inhibits the fragmentation of the water hydrogen-bond network. Finally, water molecules at the albumin interface were found to form a distorted hydrogen-bond structure due to topological and energetic disorder of the protein surface. In addition, the intramolecular O-H stretching vibration of water (∼100 THz), which is sensitive to hydrogen-bond environment, pointed to a trend that hydration water has a larger population of strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules compared with that of bulk water. From these experimental results, we concluded that the "strengthened" water hydrogen bonds at the protein interface dynamically slow down the reorientational motion of water and form the less-defective hydrogen-bond network by inhibiting the fragmentation of water-water hydrogen bonds. Nevertheless, such a strengthened water hydrogen-bond network is composed of heterogeneous hydrogen-bond distances and angles, and thus characterized as structurally "distorted." Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kinetics measurements and in situ Raman spectroscopy of formation of hydrogen-tetrabutylammonium bromide semi-hydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trueba, A.T.; Radović, I.R.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Kroon, M.C.; Peters, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of formation of H2-TBAB semi-clathrate hydrates was studied in this work in order to elucidate their potential for H2 storage. The influence of pressure (5-16 MPa), TBAB concentration (2.6 mol% and 3.7 mol%) and formation method (T-cycle method and T-constant method) on the hydrate

  11. A Microscale Approach to Chemical Kinetics in the General Chemistry Laboratory: The Potassium Iodide Hydrogen Peroxide Iodine-Clock Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattsangi, Prem D.

    2011-01-01

    A microscale laboratory for teaching chemical kinetics utilizing the iodine clock reaction is described. Plastic pipets, 3 mL volume, are used to store and deliver precise drops of reagents and the reaction is run in a 24 well plastic tray using a total 60 drops of reagents. With this procedure, students determine the rate of reaction and the…

  12. Non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures based on a biological kinetic model of aerobic enzymatic methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, Vasily A; Rytov, Sergey V; Shim, Natalia; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    The non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures during methane oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria Methylosinus sporium strain 5 (NCIMB 11126) and Methylocaldum gracile strain 14 L (NCIMB 11912) under copper-rich (8.9 µM Cu(2+)), copper-limited (0.3 µM Cu(2+)) or copper-regular (1.1 µM Cu(2+)) conditions has been described mathematically. The model was calibrated by experimental data of methane quantities and carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane measured previously in laboratory microcosms reported by Feisthauer et al. [ 1 ] M. gracile initially oxidizes methane by a particulate methane monooxygenase and assimilates formaldehyde via the ribulose monophosphate pathway, whereas M. sporium expresses a soluble methane monooxygenase under copper-limited conditions and uses the serine pathway for carbon assimilation. The model shows that during methane solubilization dominant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation occurs. An increase of biomass due to growth of methanotrophs causes an increase of particulate or soluble monooxygenase that, in turn, decreases soluble methane concentration intensifying methane solubilization. The specific maximum rate of methane oxidation υm was proved to be equal to 4.0 and 1.3 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. sporium under copper-rich and copper-limited conditions, respectively, and 0.5 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. gracile. The model shows that methane oxidation cannot be described by traditional first-order kinetics. The kinetic isotope fractionation ceases when methane concentrations decrease close to the threshold value. Applicability of the non-linear model was confirmed by dynamics of carbon isotope signature for carbon dioxide that was depleted and later enriched in (13)C. Contrasting to the common Rayleigh linear graph, the dynamic curves allow identifying inappropriate isotope data due to inaccurate substrate concentration analyses. The non-linear model pretty adequately described experimental

  13. Investigations of cycle behaviour of the contact mass in the RESC process for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaler, M.; Hacker, V.; Anilkumar, M.; Albering, J.; Besenhard, J.O. [Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Inorganic Materials, CD-Laboratory for Fuel Cell Systems, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 21, 8010 Graz (Austria); Schroettner, H.; Schmied, M. [Research Institute for Electron Microscopy and Fine Structure Research, Graz University of Technology, Steyrergasse 17, 8010 Graz (Austria)

    2006-11-15

    The reformer sponge iron cycle produces hydrogen from hydrocarbons with high efficiencies and a high degree of purity. In this process, the gas purification step is performed by a cyclic redox reaction of the contact mass (iron oxide) with synthesis gas and steam at high temperatures. In order to get information about the lifetime of the contact mass, investigations of the cycle behaviour of the contact mass have been carried out. First experiments showed that iron oxide pellets without additives were deactivated quickly for the redox reaction due to sintering effects. SiO{sub 2}, CaO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were added to the iron oxides, and the effects of different compositions were investigated. The contact mass was characterized before cycling, after 10, and 20 cycles by XRD, SEM, mercury porosimetry and Raman spectroscopy. It was shown that a higher content of SiO{sub 2} prevents sintering of iron species during reduction and the subsequent oxidation with water vapour over 20 cycles at 800{sup o}C. A quartz content below 6.5wt% prevented the contact mass from reacting already after 5 cycles. (author)

  14. Investigating the role of atomic hydrogen on chloroethene reactions with iron using tafel analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiankang; Farrell, James

    2003-09-01

    Metallic iron filings are commonly employed as reducing agents in permeable barriers used for remediating groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Reactions of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with zerovalent iron were investigated to determine the role of atomic hydrogen in their reductive dechlorination. Experiments simultaneously measuring dechlorination and iron corrosion rates were performed to determine the fractions of the total current going toward dechlorination and hydrogen evolution. Corrosion rates were determined using Tafel analysis, and dechlorination rates were determined from rates of byproduct generation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the number of reactions that controlled the observed rates of chlorocarbon disappearance, as well as the role of atomic hydrogen in TCE and PCE reduction. Comparison of iron corrosion rates with those for TCE reaction showed that TCE reduction occurred almost exclusively via atomic hydrogen at low pH values and via atomic hydrogen and direct electron transfer at neutral pH values. In contrast, reduction of PCE occurred primarily via direct electron transfer at both low and neutral pH values. At low pH values and micromolar concentrations, TCE reaction rates were faster than those for PCE due to more rapid reduction of TCE by atomic hydrogen. At neutral pH values and millimolar concentrations, PCE reaction rates were faster than those for TCE. This shift in relative reaction rates was attributed to a decreasing contribution of the atomic hydrogen reaction mechanism with increasing halocarbon concentrations and pH values. The EIS data showed that all the rate limitations for TCE and PCE dechlorination occurred during the transfer of the first two electrons. Results from this study show that differences in relative reaction rates of TCE and PCE with iron are dependent on the significance of the reduction pathway involving atomic hydrogen.

  15. Gold setting the "gold standard" among transition metals as a hydrogen bond acceptor - a theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewald, Ferdinand; Raubenheimer, Helgard G; Dillen, Jan; Esterhuysen, Catharine

    2017-04-11

    The Au(i) atom of dimethylaurate (DMA) is shown to behave as a hydrogen-bond acceptor, providing theoretical evidence that it can act as a Lewis base. Calculations at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ-pp level of theory confirm that DMA forms hydrogen bonds decreasing in strength from -16.2 kcal mol-1 to -2.4 kcal mol-1 in the order HCN ≈ HF > H2O > HCCH > NH3 > CH4, i.e. following the trend of decreasing proton acidity of the hydrogen-bond donor. The geometrical and Atoms in Molecules (AIM) parameters of the hydrogen-bonded adducts compare well to those obtained with the auride anion, a known hydrogen-bond acceptor. Relativistic effects are shown to play a dominant role in the formation of the hydrogen bonds with DMA: omission of these effects (confirmed using two different approaches) results in the loss of the hydrogen bond. Instead, the hydrogen-bond donor interacts with the carbon atom on one of the methyl ligands, yielding an adduct that is closely comparable to those found with the Cu and Ag analogues of DMA.

  16. Calorimetric Investigation of Hydrogen Bonding of Formamide and Its Methyl Derivatives in Organic Solvents and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Rakipov, Ilnaz T.; Solomonov, Boris N.

    2013-04-01

    Formamide and its derivatives have a large number of practical applications; also they are structural fragments of many biomolecules. Hydrogen bonds strongly affect their physicochemical properties. In the present work a calorimetric study of formamide and its methyl derivatives was carried out. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of formamide, N-methylformamide, and N, N-dimethylformamide in organic solvents at 298.15 K were measured. The relationships between the obtained enthalpies of solvation and the structure of the studied compounds were observed. Hydrogen-bond enthalpies of amides with chlorinated alkanes, ethers, ketones, esters, nitriles, amines, alcohols, and water were determined. The strength of hydrogen bonds of formamide, N-methylformamide, and N, N-dimethylformamide with proton donor solvents is practically equal. Enthalpies of hydrogen bonds of formamide with the proton acceptor solvents are two times larger in magnitude than the enthalpies of N-methylformamide. The process of hydrogen bonding of amides in aliphatic alcohols and water is complicated. The obtained enthalpies of hydrogen bonding in aliphatic alcohols vary considerably from the amide structure due to the competition between solute-solvent and solvent-solvent hydrogen bonds. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements were carried out to explain the calorimetric data. Hydration enthalpies of methyl derivatives of formamides contain a contribution of the hydrophobic effect. New thermochemical data on the hydrogen bonding of formamides may be useful for predicting the properties of biomacromolecules.

  17. Investigating Hydrogen Bonding in Phenol Using Infrared Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Anna M.; Toda, Megan J.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen bonding of phenol can be used as an introductory model for biological systems because of its structural similarities to tyrosine, a para-substituted phenol that is an amino acid essential to the synthesis of proteins. Phenol is able to form hydrogen bonds readily in solution, which makes it a suitable model for biological…

  18. An Experimental Investigation of Hypergolic Ignition Delay of Hydrogen Peroxide with Fuel Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, John A.; Gostowski, Rudy; Chianese, Silvio

    2003-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of decomposition and ignition delay of hydrogen peroxide at concentrations of 80% to 98% with combinations of hydrocarbon fuels, tertiary amines and transition metal chelates will be presented in the proposed paper. The results will be compared to hydrazine ignition delays with hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid mixtures using the same test apparatus.

  19. Hydroxide ion versus chloride and methoxide as an exogenous ligand reveals the influence of hydrogen bonding with second-sphere coordination water molecules in the electron transfer kinetics of Mn complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghachtouli, Sanae; Guillot, Régis; Aukauloo, Ally; Dorlet, Pierre; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, Elodie; Costentin, Cyrille

    2012-03-19

    We recently reported on the synthesis of a new pentadentate N(4)O ligand, tBuL(-), together with the X-ray diffraction structure of the corresponding mononuclear manganese(III)-hydroxo complex namely [(tBuL)Mn(III)OH](ClO(4)), (1 (ClO(4))). [El Ghachtouli et al. Energy Environ. Sci. 2011, 4, 2041.] In the present work, we evidence through electrochemical analysis that complex 1(+), in the presence of water, shows a peculiar behavior toward electron-transfer kinetics. The synthesis, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and EPR spectroscopic characterization of two other mononuclear manganese(III)-chlorido and methoxo complexes-namely, [(tBuL)Mn(III)Cl](PF(6)), (2(PF(6))) and [(tBuL)Mn(III)OMe](ClO(4)), (3(ClO(4)))-are also reported. 2(PF(6)) and 3(ClO(4)) compounds will serve as reference complexes for the electron-transfer kinetics investigation. The peculiar behavior of 1(ClO(4)) is attributed to the specificity of hydroxide anion as ligand presumably allowing intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions and thus affecting electron-transfer properties. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  20. Fundamental kinetics of supercritical coal liquefaction: effect of catalysts and hydrogen-donor solvents. Second quarterly report, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, B.J.; Smith, J.M.; Madras, G.; Kodera, Y.

    1996-07-01

    This quarterly report relates our recent progress toward the overall objective of understanding the supercritical fluid extraction of hydrocarbons from coal. Our approach is to simulate coal as a high molecular-weight polymeric material and study the degradation of polymers under various conditions, including temperature, pressure, and solvent. The degradation of such macromolecules is applicable to the decomposition (depolymerization) of the coal network. Another potential application of this research is to the recycling of plastics. Our recent research involved the study of the oxidative degradation of polystyrene in tricholorobenzene using tertbutyl peroxide. A continuous-mixture kinetics model for the rate of polymer degradation and peroxide consumption was developed to describe the temporal behavior of the molecular-weight distributions and its various moments. Based on this work, a research paper entitled `Oxidative Degradation Kinetics of Polystyrene in Solution,` will be submitted to the journal, Chemical Engineering Science.

  1. First-Principles Investigation of Li Intercalation Kinetics in Phospho-Olivines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Rahul

    agreement with experiments on large LiFePO4 single crystals. Third, we investigate why LiFePO4 can be charged and discharged rapidly despite having to undergo a first-order phase transition. Conventional wisdom dictates that a system with strong equilibrium Li segregation behavior requires both nucleation and growth in the charge and discharge process, which should impede the overall kinetics. Rather, through first-principles calculations, we determine the minimal energy required to access a non-equilibrium transformation path entirely through the solid solution. Not only does this transformation mechanism require little driving force, but it also rationalizes how a kinetically favorable but nonequilibrium path is responsible for the extremely high rate performance associated with this material. The consequences of a rapid non-equilibrium single-particle transformation mechanism on (dis)charging a multi-particle assembly, as is the case in porous electrodes, are discussed and compared to experimental observations. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  2. High-level direct-dynamics variational transition state theory calculations including multidimensional tunneling of the thermal rate constants, branching ratios, and kinetic isotope effects of the hydrogen abstraction reactions from methanol by atomic hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Truhlar, Donald G; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio

    2011-03-07

    We report a detailed theoretical study of the hydrogen abstraction reaction from methanol by atomic hydrogen. The study includes the analysis of thermal rate constants, branching ratios, and kinetic isotope effects. Specifically, we have performed high-level computations at the MC3BB level together with direct dynamics calculations by canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with the microcanonically optimized multidimensional tunneling (μOMT) transmission coefficient (CVT/μOMT) to study both the CH(3)OH+H→CH(2)OH+H(2) (R1) reaction and the CH(3)OH+H→CH(3)O+H(2) (R2) reaction. The CVT/μOMT calculations show that reaction R1 dominates in the whole range 298≤T (K)≤2500 and that anharmonic effects on the torsional mode about the C-O bond are important, mainly at high temperatures. The activation energy for the total reaction sum of R1 and R2 reactions changes substantially with temperature and, therefore, the use of straight-line Arrhenius plots is not valid. We recommend the use of new expressions for the total R1 + R2 reaction and for the R1 and R2 individual reactions. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Pyrrole Hydrogenation over Rh(111) and Pt(111) Single-Crystal Surfaces and Hydrogenation Promotion Mediated by 1-Methylpyrrole: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliewer, Christopher J.; Bieri, Marco; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-03-04

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of pyrrole over both Pt(111) and Rh(111) single-crystal surfaces at Torr pressures (3 Torr pyrrole, 30 Torr H{sub 2}) to form pyrrolidine and the minor product butylamine. Over Pt(111) at 298 K it was found that pyrrole adsorbs in an upright geometry cleaving the N-H bond to bind through the nitrogen evidenced by SFG data. Over Rh(111) at 298 K pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry relative to the surface through the p-aromatic system. A pyrroline surface reaction intermediate, which was not detected in the gas phase, was seen by SFG during the hydrogenation over both surfaces. Significant enhancement of the reaction rate was achieved over both metal surfaces by adsorbing 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. SFG vibrational spectroscopic results indicate that reaction promotion is achieved by weakening the bonding between the N-containing products and the metal surface because of lateral interactions on the surface between 1-methylpyrrole and the reaction species, reducing the desorption energy of the products. It was found that the ring-opening product butylamine was a reaction poison over both surfaces, but this effect can be minimized by treating the catalyst surfaces with 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. The reaction rate was not enhanced with elevated temperatures, and SFG suggests desorption of pyrrole at elevated temperatures.

  4. Experimental and Kinetic Investigation of the Influence of OH Groups on NOX Formation

    KAUST Repository

    Bohon, Myles

    2016-05-04

    This work investigates the influence of one or more OH groups present on the fuel molecule and the resultant formation of NOX emissions. Combustion of oxygenated fuels has been increasing globally and such fuels offer significant potential in the reduction of pollutant emissions. One such emission class is the oxides of nitrogen, which typically form through a combination of two regimes: the thermal and non-thermal mechanisms. While thermal NO formation can be reduced by lowering the combustion temperature, non-thermal NO formation is coupled to the fuel chemistry. An experimental and computational investigation of NOX formation in three different burner configurations and under a range of equivalence ratios and temperature regimes explored the differences in NO formation. Measurements of temperature profiles and in-flame species concentrations, utilizing both probed and non-intrusive laser based techniques, allowed for the investigation of NO formation through non-thermal pathways and the differences that exist between fuels with varying numbers of OH groups. The first burner configuration was composed of a high swirl liquid spray burner with insulted combustion chamber walls designed specifically for the combustion of low energy density fuels. In this system the combustion of alcohols and glycerol (the largest by-product of biodiesel production), along with other fuels with multiple hydroxyl groups, was studied. Measurements of the mean flame temperature and exhaust gas measurements of NOX showed significant reductions in non-thermal NO concentrations with increasing numbers of OH groups. An accompanying modeling study and detailed reaction path analysis showed that fuel decomposition pathways through formaldehyde were shown a preference due to the presence of the OH groups which resulted in reduced contributions to the hydrocarbon radical pools subsequent reductions to the Prompt NO mechanism. Two burner configurations with reduced dimensionality facilitated

  5. Investigation of Copper Ammonia Leaching from Smelter Slags: Characterization, Leaching and Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidari, Ehsan; Aghazadeh, Valeh

    2015-10-01

    Although ammonia leaching of copper from slags has been reported generally as a part of copper slag utilization methods, but no detailed studies have been reported in the literature. In this research, we tried to investigate the effect of different parameters on ammonia leaching of copper from copper smelting slag by identifying different copper-bearing phases and following them during leaching time. Mineralogical characterization of the smelting slag (1.7 pct Cu) was done using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, diagnostic leaching tests, and scanning electron microscopy. The characterization studies indicated that main copper-bearing species are soluble copper oxides and chalcocite along with minor amount of covellite, bornite, blister copper particles, and chalcopyrite. It was also found that only approximately 0.2 pct Cu was present in the insoluble bulk silicate phases. These results suggest that approximately 88 pct of the total copper of slag could be extracted by ammonia sulfide leaching. Leaching tests were carried out and the effects of various parameters, namely pH, ammonia concentration, temperature, presence of oxygen, stirring speed, and pulp density were examined on copper leaching. The temperature and stirring speed had the most pronounced effect on the copper leaching, whereas ammonia affected the leaching yield at low concentrations of ammonia. It was found that 78 pct of Cu could be extracted within 4 hours and under optimum conditions: T = 343 K (70 °C), 2M ammonia, pH 10.5, stirring speed = 900 rpm, pulp density = 10 pct ( w s/ v). The kinetic data were analyzed with the shrinking core models, and it was found that the leaching process is controlled by both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer and the activation energy is calculated to be 49.4 kJ mol-1.

  6. Reactor design and kinetics study of 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl photodecay in surfactant solution by using a photosensitizer and hydrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, W; Kwan, C Y

    2003-05-01

    The system design based on the photodegradation kinetics of 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl (4,4'-DCB) in surfactant solution with the aid of solvents (acetone and/or squalane) has been studied. Organic solvents acetone and squalane were added as a photosensitizer and a hydrogen source, respectively, to achieve better photolysis performance. The quantum yield of 4,4'-DCB photodecay in Tween 80 micellar solution in the presence of added acetone was increased from 0.032 to 0.043 at its optimal condition. Acetone was shown to be an effective photosensitizer at low concentration, but an overdose would quench the reaction. Furthermore, the addition of squalane could further promote the photodechlorination of 4,4'-DCB in the Tween 80/acetone solutions for an additional 59% of rate improvement. However, an overdose of either solvent was found to cause UV light attenuation and to reduce the observed quantum yield. This effect has been justified and quantified in this study by a proposed light attenuation model, which has also been incorporated into the kinetic equation so that the resulted formula can be used to design the UV reactors for water and wastewater treatment works.

  7. An investigation on the modelling of kinetics of thermal decomposition of hazardous mercury wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busto, Yailen; M G Tack, Filip; Peralta, Luis M; Cabrera, Xiomara; Arteaga-Pérez, Luis E

    2013-09-15

    The kinetics of mercury removal from solid wastes generated by chlor-alkali plants were studied. The reaction order and model-free method with an isoconversional approach were used to estimate the kinetic parameters and reaction mechanism that apply to the thermal decomposition of hazardous mercury wastes. As a first approach to the understanding of thermal decomposition for this type of systems (poly-disperse and multi-component), a novel scheme of six reactions was proposed to represent the behaviour of mercury compounds in the solid matrix during the treatment. An integration-optimization algorithm was used in the screening of nine mechanistic models to develop kinetic expressions that best describe the process. The kinetic parameters were calculated by fitting each of these models to the experimental data. It was demonstrated that the D₁-diffusion mechanism appeared to govern the process at 250°C and high residence times, whereas at 450°C a combination of the diffusion mechanism (D₁) and the third order reaction mechanism (F3) fitted the kinetics of the conversions. The developed models can be applied in engineering calculations to dimension the installations and determine the optimal conditions to treat a mercury containing sludge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Temperature-jump investigation of adsorption/desorption kinetics at methylated silica/solution interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, F.Y.; Waite, S.W.; Harris, J.M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A temperature-jump relaxation technique is used to monitor reversible adsorption/desorption kinetics at the reversed-phase C1-silica/solution interface. A Joule discharge is used to heat a packed bed of trimethylchlorosilane-derivatized silica gel on a microsecond time scale. Single-exponential relaxation kinetics are observed for adsorption of an ionic fluorescent probe, 1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate, to a C1-silica surface from methanol/water solution. The relaxation rate increases with concentration of solute in solution, which shows that adsorption kinetics are detectable in the relaxation. The adsorption rate of the ionic probe is slower than diffusion-controlled, exhibiting significant influence over the adsorption equilibrium constant. The adsorption rate of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine is indistinguishable from the diffusion limit, indicating a negligible barrier to adsorption for this neutral species. 20 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Investigating the link between fermentative metabolism and hydrogen production in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, S.J.; Nixon, P.J. [Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    In the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the electrons required for hydrogen production can come from both the biophotolysis of water and from the fermentation of carbohydrate reserves. Anoxia leads to the activation of several fermentative pathways, which produce a number of end products including formic, malic and acetic acid along with ethanol, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. It has been proposed that by switching off competing fermentative pathways hydrogen production can be increased. Therefore the aim of this study was to devise an experimental strategy to down-regulate the expression of enzymes thought to control C. reinhardtii's fermentative metabolism. We demonstrate here that it is possible to use artificial microRNA (amiRNA) technology to generate knock-down mutants with reduced expression of pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1), a key fermentative enzyme in C. reinhardtii. This work opens up new possibilities to improve hydrogen yields through metabolic engineering. (orig.)

  10. Liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage: catalytic hydrogen generation under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-Long; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Yan, Jun-Min; Zhang, Xin-Bo; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-25

    There is a demand for a sufficient and sustainable energy supply. Hence, the search for applicable hydrogen storage materials is extremely important owing to the diversified merits of hydrogen energy. Lithium and sodium borohydride, ammonia borane, hydrazine, and formic acid have been extensively investigated as promising hydrogen storage materials based on their relatively high hydrogen content. Significant advances, such as hydrogen generation temperatures and reaction kinetics, have been made in the catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous lithium and sodium borohydride and ammonia borane as well as in the catalytic decomposition of hydrous hydrazine and formic acid. In this Minireview we briefly survey the research progresses in catalytic hydrogen generation from these liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  11. Kinetic considerations on the electrogenerated luminescence of luminol at platinum electrode in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Paolo; Favaro, Gabriella; Gallina, Albino; Antiochia, Riccarda

    2002-03-01

    The ECL behavior of the luminol/H2O2 and luminol/O2 systems was evaluated at Pt electrode by using different electroanalytical techniques such as chronoamperometry, cyclic and rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry. Diffusive and kinetic parameters such as the diffusion coefficient of luminol, D, the number of exchanged electrons, n, and the apparent heterogeneous rate constant, kap, were determined in the maximum light emission conditions achieved at pH 11, at an electrode potential of 750 mV vs. SCE. The experimental order of reaction were determined from the relation between the reactant concentrations and the emitted light intensity.

  12. Cosolvent Effects on Solute-Solvent Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics: Ultrafast 2D IR Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashid, Somnath M; Jin, Geun Young; Bagchi, Sayan; Kim, Yung Sam

    2015-12-10

    Cosolvents strongly influence the solute-solvent interactions of biomolecules in aqueous environments and have profound effects on the stability and activity of several proteins and enzymes. Experimental studies have previously reported on the hydrogen-bond dynamics of water molecules in the presence of a cosolvent, but understanding the effects from a solute's perspective could provide greater insight into protein stability. Because carbonyl groups are abundant in biomolecules, the current study used 2D IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the hydrogen-bond dynamics of the solute's carbonyl group in aqueous solution, with and without the presence of DMSO as a cosolvent. 2D IR spectroscopy was used to quantitatively estimate the time scales of the hydrogen-bond dynamics of the carbonyl group in neat water and 1:1 DMSO/water solution. The 2D IR results show spectral signatures of a chemical exchange process: The presence of the cosolvent was found to lower the hydrogen-bond exchange rate by a factor of 5. The measured exchange rates were 7.50 × 10(11) and 1.48 × 10(11) s(-1) in neat water and 1:1 DMSO/water, respectively. Molecular dynamics simulations predict a significantly shorter carbonyl hydrogen-bond lifetime in neat water than in 1:1 DMSO/water and provide molecular insights into the exchange mechanism. The binding of the cosolvent to the solute was found to be accompanied by the release of hydrogen-bonded water molecules to the bulk. The widely different hydrogen-bond lifetimes and exchange rates with and without DMSO indicate a significant change in the ultrafast hydrogen-bond dynamics in the presence of a cosolvent, which, in turn, might play an important role in the stability and activity of biomolecules.

  13. Investigation of Coal-biomass Catalytic Gasification using Experiments, Reaction Kinetics and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, Francine [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Agblevor, Foster [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Klein, Michael [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Sheikhi, Reza [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    A collaborative effort involving experiments, kinetic modeling, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to understand co-gasification of coal-biomass mixtures. The overall goal of the work was to determine the key reactive properties for coal-biomass mixed fuels. Sub-bituminous coal was mixed with biomass feedstocks to determine the fluidization and gasification characteristics of hybrid poplar wood, switchgrass and corn stover. It was found that corn stover and poplar wood were the best feedstocks to use with coal. The novel approach of this project was the use of a red mud catalyst to improve gasification and lower gasification temperatures. An important results was the reduction of agglomeration of the biomass using the catalyst. An outcome of this work was the characterization of the chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms of the co-gasification fuels, and the development of a set of models that can be integrated into other modeling environments. The multiphase flow code, MFIX, was used to simulate and predict the hydrodynamics and co-gasification, and results were validated with the experiments. The reaction kinetics modeling was used to develop a smaller set of reactions for tractable CFD calculations that represented the experiments. Finally, an efficient tool was developed, MCHARS, and coupled with MFIX to efficiently simulate the complex reaction kinetics.

  14. Kinetic investigation of the oxidation of N-alkyl anilines by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Kinetics of oxidation of N-methyl and N-ethyl aniline by peroxomono- phosphoric acid (PMPA) in aqueous and 5% (v/v) acetonitrile medium respectively have been studied in presence of anionic micelles of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) at different pH. Oxidation rate of both the substrates increases up to a certain ...

  15. Investigation of Chemical Kinetics on Soot Formation Event of n-Heptane Spray Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Jangi, Mehdi; Bai, Xue-Song

    2014-01-01

    . Numerical computation is performed using OpenFOAM and chemistry coordinate mapping (CCM) approach is used to expedite the calculation. Three n-heptane kinetic mechanisms with different chemistry sizes and comprehensiveness in oxidation pathways and soot precursor formation are adopted. The three examined...

  16. Esterification of Oleic Acid for Biodiesel Production Catalyzed by SnCl2: A Kinetic Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio J. da Silva

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of biodiesel from low-cost raw materials which generally contain high amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs is a valuable alternative that would make their production costs more competitive than petroleum-derived fuel. Currently, the production of biodiesel from this kind of raw materials comprises a two-stage process, which requires an initial acid-catalyzed esterification of the FFA, followed by a basecatalyzed transesterification of the triglycerides. Commonly, the acid H2SO4 is the catalyst on the first step of this process. It must be said, however, that major drawbacks such as substantial reactor corrosion and the great generation of wastes, including the salts formed due to neutralization of the mineral acid, are negative and virtually unsurmountable aspects of this protocol. In this paper, tin(II chloride dihydrate (SnCl2·2H2O, an inexpensive Lewis acid, was evaluated as catalyst on the ethanolysis of oleic acid, which is the major component of several fat and vegetable oils feedstocks. Tin chloride efficiently promoted the conversion of oleic acid into ethyl oleate in ethanol solution and in soybean oil samples, under mild reaction conditions. The SnCl2 catalyst was shown to be as active as the mineral acid H2SO4. Its use has relevant advantages in comparison to mineral acids catalysts, such as less corrosion of the reactors and as well as avoiding the unnecessary neutralization of products. Herein, the effect of the principal parameters of reaction on the yield and rate of ethyl oleate production has been investigated. Kinetic measurements revealed that the esterification of oleic acid catalyzed by SnCl2·2H2O is first-order in relation to both FFAs and catalyst concentration. Experimentally, it was verified that the energy of activation of the esterification reaction of oleic acid catalyzed by SnCl2 was very close those reported for H2SO4.

  17. Study on biodegradation of Mazut by newly isolated strain Enterobacter cloacae BBRC10061: improving and kinetic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorasani Alireza Chackoshian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mazut as a source content of various hydrocarbons is hard to be degraded and its cracking could turn mazut into useful materials. Nevertheless degradation of mazut by routine methods is too expensive but application of indigenous microorganisms as biocatalysts could be effective and important to lower the costs and expand its consumption. Mazut biodegradation can be improved using various strategies; Therefore in this study newly isolated strain Enterobacter cloacae BBRC 10061 was used in a method of gradual addition of mazut into medium and its results were compared with simple addition method. To investigate degradation of mazut by BBRC 10061, influence of increase of mazut concentration was assayed based on gradual addition method. Also different kinetic models were used to evaluate kinetics of the process. Results showed that gradual addition method has been a beneficial technique for improvement of mazut degradation because bacterial induction to produce biosurfactant and essential enzymes for cracking mazut was higher during process. Although addition of more mazut increased the rate of biodegradation but percentage of degradation decreased. pH of medium decreased during biodegradation period while electric potential increased. Also the biodegradation kinetics was not fitted with the biokinetic models; therefore kinetics of biodegradation of mazut has to be studied by new models.

  18. Study on Biodegradation of Mazut by Newly Isolated strain Enterobacter Cloacae BBRC10061: Improving and Kinetic Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Chackoshian Khorasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mazut as a source content of various hydrocarbons is hard to be degraded and its cracking could turn mazut into useful materials. Nevertheless degradation of mazut by routine methods is too expensive but application of indigenous microorganisms as biocatalysts could be effective and important to lower the costs and expand its consumption. Mazut biodegradation can be improved using various strategies; Therefore in this study newly isolated strain Enterobacter cloacae BBRC 10061 was used in a method of gradual addition of mazut into medium and its results were compared with simple addition method. To investigate degradation of mazut by BBRC 10061, influence of increase of mazut concentration was assayed based on gradual addition method. Also different kinetic models were used to evaluate kinetics of the process. Results showed that gradual addition method has been a beneficial technique for improvement of mazut degradation because bacterial induction to produce biosurfactant and essential enzymes for cracking mazut was higher during process. Although addition of more mazut increased the rate of biodegradation but percentage of degradation decreased. pH of medium decreased during biodegradation period while electric potential increased. Also the biodegradation kinetics was not fitted with the biokinetic models; therefore kinetics of biodegradation of mazut has to be studied by new models.

  19. Investigation of the kinetics and mechanism of the glycerol chlorination reaction using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUN WANG

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As a primary by-product in biodiesel production, glycerol can be used to prepare an important fine chemical, epichlorohydrin, by the glycerol chlorination reaction. Although this process has been applied in industrial production, unfortunately, less attention has been paid to the analysis and separation of the compounds in the glycerol chlorination products. In this study, a convenient and accurate method to determine the products in glycerol chlorination reaction was established and based on the results the kinetic mechanism of the reaction was investigated. The structure of main products, including 1,3--dichloropropan-2-ol, 2,3-dichloropropan-1-ol, 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol, 2-chloro-1,3-propanediol and glycerol was ascertained by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and the isomers of the products were distinguished. Apidic acid was considered as the best catalyst because of its excellent catalytic effect and high boiling point. The mechanism of the glycerol chlorination reaction was proposed and a new kinetic model was developed. Kinetic equations of the process in the experimental range were obtained by data fitting and the activation energies of each tandem reaction were 30.7, 41.8, 29.4 and 49.5 kJ mol-1, respectively. This study revealed the process and mechanism of the kinetics and provides the theoretical basis for engineering problems.

  20. Inter-hydrogen bond coupling in crystals of 3-phenylpyrazole polymorphs investigated by polarized IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachuła, Barbara; Flakus, Henryk T; Garbacz, Aleksandra; Stolarczyk, Agnieszka

    2014-04-05

    The remarkably strong differences in the fine structure patterns of the νN-H and νN-D bands, temperature and H/D isotopic effects in crystals of two 3-phenylpyrazole (3PhPz) polymorphs, with tetrameric and hexameric hydrogen bond aggregates, were examined by polarized IR spectroscopy, aided by the calculations utilizing the "strong-coupling" model. Experimental and theoretical approaches have suggested that the anti-co-operativity of hydrogen bonds is the main factor responsible for the differences in the spectral properties of both polymorphs. This interaction affects hydrogen-bond geometry of the associates constituting the lattices and in consequence decides about the relative contribution of two different exciton coupling mechanism, "through-space" (SS) and "tail-to-head" (TH), in the spectra generation. The relative contribution of each individual exciton coupling mechanism in the spectra generation is temperature-dependent. In tetramers the TH coupling mechanism dominates at low temperatures, whereas the role of the SS mechanism increases at higher temperatures. For the hexamers the SS mechanism dominates in the wide temperature range. The two types of 3PhPz associates exhibit two different ways of occurring of the H/D isotopic recognition in the crystal hydrogen bonds. In the tetrameric polymorph identical hydrogen isotope atoms exist in entire hydrogen-bonded cycle of 3PhPz. In the case of 3PhPz hexamers, the H/D isotopic recognition mechanism involves pairs of the closely-spaced hydrogen bonds in a cycle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanistic and kinetic investigations on the role of methanol and dimethyl ether in the Methanol-To-Hydrocarbons reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Espín, Juan Salvador Martínez

    2017-01-01

    The main scope of this PhD thesis was to gain knowledge on the mechanistic and kinetic behavior of methanol and DME in the industrially relevant Methanol-To-Hydrocarbons (MTH) reaction with the use of zeolitic materials as catalysts. Industrial MTH processes use methanol, DME or combined methanol/DME feeds over zeolitic catalysts. Methanol and its dehydration product, DME, are conventionally attributed an analogous behavior in MTH; however, a thorough investigation on the theme is still missi...

  2. Investigations for optimal dissolved hydrogen (DH) concentration in reactor coolant system (RCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Muneo [Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Takamatsu (Japan); Nishizawa, Eiichi; Kasahara, Kazuo

    1998-12-31

    Optimal dissolved hydrogen (DH) concentration control is among the most important issues in developing program to maintain plant reliability for aging plant because it is useful in securing material integrity. Also, it is believed to be one of the most promising approaches, following pH control and Zn injection, to radiation exposure source reduction. This work involved collecting data for corrosion products in the coolant, particularly Ni (because the chemical forms of this element, parent element of {sup 58}Co, are affected by DH concentration), during the power operation at Ikata NPP, and determining the relations between DH, crud chemical forms and particle size distributions. In order to determine the optimal DH concentration for exposure source reduction, the results were evaluated in comparison with the findings about crud chemical forms from thermodynamic methods. Regarding DH dependence of crud characteristics, the results of field investigations revealed as follows: In crud chemical form, the ratio of Ni (metal) to total crud increases as the DH concentration increments. {sup 58}Co (Ni (metal) and spinel combined) median particle size grows greater as the DH concentration increments. These findings, together with other obtained findings (e.g., relations between particle size and release/deposition) and the calculations developed using thermodynamic methods, brought us to the following conclusion over the DH concentration control for the radiation exposure source reduction. Provided that the DH concentration should be controlled within the typical value (25 to 35 cc-STP/kg-H{sub 2}O), that concentration should be as close to the lower limit (25 cc-STP/kg-H{sub 2}O) as possible and the variation of DH concentration should be minimized. (J.P.N.)

  3. Stereodirectional Origin of anti-Arrhenius Kinetics for a Tetraatomic Hydrogen Exchange Reaction: Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics for OH + HBr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Nayara D; Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Silva, Valter H C; Camargo, Ademir J; Mundim, Kleber C; de Oliveira, Heibbe C B

    2016-07-14

    Among four-atom processes, the reaction OH + HBr → H2O + Br is one of the most studied experimentally: its kinetics has manifested an unusual anti-Arrhenius behavior, namely, a marked decrease of the rate constant as the temperature increases, which has intrigued theoreticians for a long time. Recently, salient features of the potential energy surface have been characterized and most kinetic aspects can be considered as satisfactorily reproduced by classical trajectory simulations. Motivation of the work reported in this paper is the investigation of the stereodirectional dynamics of this reaction as the prominent reason for the peculiar kinetics: we started in a previous Letter ( J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2015 , 6 , 1553 - 1558 ) a first-principles Born-Oppenheimer "canonical" molecular dynamics approach. Trajectories are step-by-step generated on a potential energy surface quantum mechanically calculated on-the-fly and are thermostatically equilibrated to correspond to a specific temperature. Here, refinements of the method permitted a major increase of the number of trajectories and the consideration of four temperatures -50, +200, +350, and +500 K, for which the sampling of initial conditions allowed us to characterize the stereodynamical effect. The role is documented of the adjustment of the reactants' mutual orientation to encounter the entrance into the "cone of acceptance" for reactivity. The aperture angle of this cone is dictated by a range of directions of approach compatible with the formation of the specific HOH angle of the product water molecule; and consistently the adjustment is progressively less effective the higher the kinetic energy. Qualitatively, this emerging picture corroborates experiments on this reaction, involving collisions of aligned and oriented molecular beams, and covering a range of energies higher than the thermal ones. The extraction of thermal rate constants from this molecular dynamics approach is discussed and the systematic

  4. An investigation of the loss of ductility in hydrogen charged beta-Ti alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Ian M.

    1995-01-01

    The high strength, low density, and good corrosion resistance of Ti-based alloys make them candidate materials for a number of applications in the aerospace industry. A major limitation in the use of these alloys in the advanced hypersonic flight vehicle program is their susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. This study focuses on the hydrogen sensitivity of TIMETAL 21S beta-Ti alloy. The material received was in the form of grip-ends of failed tensile test samples which had been exposed to different charging conditions (combinations of hydrogen pressure and temperature). The samples received, the charging conditions, and their fracture mode are discussed. It can be seen that the fracture behavior changes from ductile to brittle with increasing hydrogen content, but the transition in behavior occurs for a small increase in hydrogen concentration. The aim of this program was to assess the microstructural differences between the ductile and brittle alloys to ascertain the embrittlement mechanism. A range of tools which included x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used.

  5. Investigation of kinetics and absorption isotherm models for hydroponic phytoremediation of waters contaminated with sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, Ali; Tafazzoli, Milad; Mortazavian, Soroosh; James, David E

    2017-11-24

    Two common wetland plants, Pampas Grass (Cortaderia selloana) and Lucky Bamboo (Dracaena sanderiana), were used in hydroponic cultivation systems for the treatment of simulated high-sulfate wastewaters. Plants in initial experiments at pH 7.0 removed sulfate more efficiently compared to the same experimental conditions at pH 6.0. Results at sulfate concentrations of 50, 200, 300, 600, 900, 1200, 1500 and 3000 mg/L during three consecutive 7-day treatment periods with 1-day rest intervals, showed decreasing trends of both removal efficiencies and uptake rates with increasing sulfate concentrations from the first to the second to the third 7-day treatment periods. Removed sulfate masses per unit dry plant mass, calculated after 23 days, showed highest removal capacity at 600 mg/L sulfate for both plants. A Langmuir-type isotherm best described sulfate uptake capacity of both plants. Kinetic studies showed that compared to pseudo first-order kinetics, pseudo-second order kinetic models slightly better described sulfate uptake rates by both plants. The Elovich kinetic model showed faster rates of attaining equilibrium at low sulfate concentrations for both plants. The dimensionless Elovich model showed that about 80% of sulfate uptake occurred during the first four days' contact time. Application of three 4-day contact times with 2-day rest intervals at high sulfate concentrations resulted in slightly higher uptakes compared to three 7-day contact times with 1-day rest intervals, indicating that pilot-plant scale treatment systems could be sized with shorter contact times and longer rest-intervals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hydrogen interaction kinetics of Ge dangling bonds at the Si0.25Ge0.75/SiO2 interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stesmans, A.; Nguyen Hoang, T.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2014-07-01

    The hydrogen interaction kinetics of the GePb1 defect, previously identified by electron spin resonance (ESR) as an interfacial Ge dangling bond (DB) defect occurring in densities ˜7 × 1012 cm-2 at the SiGe/SiO2 interfaces of condensation grown (100)Si/a-SiO2/Ge0.75Si0.25/a-SiO2 structures, has been studied as function of temperature. This has been carried out, both in the isothermal and isochronal mode, through defect monitoring by capacitance-voltage measurements in conjunction with ESR probing, where it has previously been demonstrated the defects to operate as negative charge traps. The work entails a full interaction cycle study, comprised of analysis of both defect passivation (pictured as GePb1-H formation) in molecular hydrogen (˜1 atm) and reactivation (GePb1-H dissociation) in vacuum. It is found that both processes can be suitably described separately by the generalized simple thermal (GST) model, embodying a first order interaction kinetics description based on the basic chemical reactions GePb1 + H2 → GePb1H + H and GePb1H → GePb1 + H, which are found to be characterized by the average activation energies Ef = 1.44 ± 0.04 eV and Ed = 2.23 ± 0.04 eV, and attendant, assumedly Gaussian, spreads σEf = 0.20 ± 0.02 eV and σEd = 0.15 ± 0.02 eV, respectively. The substantial spreads refer to enhanced interfacial disorder. Combination of the separately inferred kinetic parameters for passivation and dissociation results in the unified realistic GST description that incorporates the simultaneous competing action of passivation and dissociation, and which is found to excellently account for the full cycle data. For process times ta ˜ 35 min, it is found that even for the optimum treatment temperature ˜380 °C, only ˜60% of the GePb1 system can be electrically silenced, still far remote from device grade level. This ineffectiveness is concluded, for the major part, to be a direct consequence of the excessive spreads in the activation energies, ˜2

  7. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  8. Investigation of low-resistivity from hydrogenated lightly B-doped diamond by ion implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Xia Yan et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have implanted boron (B ions (dosage: 5×1014 cm-2 into diamond and then hydrogenated the sample by implantating hydrogen ions at room temperature. A p-type diamond material with a low resistivity of 7.37 mΩ cm has been obtained in our experiment, which suggests that the hydrogenation of B-doped diamond results in a low-resistivity p-type material. Interestingly, inverse annealing, in which carrier concentration decreased with increasing annealing temperature, was observed at annealing temperatures above 600 °C. In addition, the formation mechanism of a low-resistivity material has been studied by density functional theory calculation using a plane wave method.

  9. Quantum chemistry investigation of secondary reaction kinetics in acrylate-based copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccato, Danilo; Mavroudakis, Evangelos; Moscatelli, Davide

    2013-05-30

    Recently, a growing amount of attention has been focused on the influence of secondary reactions on the free radical polymerization features and the properties and microstructure of the final polymer, particularly in the context of acrylate copolymers. One of the most challenging aspects of this research is the accurate determination of the corresponding reaction kinetics. In this paper, this problem is addressed using quantum chemistry. The reaction rate coefficients of various backbiting, propagation, and β-scission steps are estimated considering different chain configurations of a terpolymer system composed of methyl acrylate, styrene, and methyl methacrylate. The replacement of methyl acrylate radical units with styrene and methyl methacrylate globally decreases the backbiting probability and shifts the equilibrium toward the reactants, while the effect of replacing adjacent units is weaker and more dependent upon the specific substituting monomer. Propagation kinetics is affected primarily by the replacement of the radical units, while this effect appears to be particularly effective on midchain radical reactivity. The overall results clarify the different physicochemical behavior of chain-end, midchain, and short-branch radicals as a function of copolymer composition, providing new insights into free radical polymerization kinetics.

  10. Investigating the efficiency and kinetic coefficients of nutrient removal in the subsurface artificial wetland of Yazd wastewater treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Farzadkia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Investigating the performance of naturally operated treatment plants may be due to the fact that they cannot be operated as desired, or that they should be modified to achieve good performance e.g. for nutrients removal. The advantage of kinetic coefficient determination is that the model can be adjusted to fit data and then used for analyzing alternatives to improve the process. This study investigates the efficiency of subsurface artificial wetland and determines its kinetic coefficients for nutrient removal. Methods: The present study investigated the kinetics of biological reactions that occurred in subsurface wetland to remove wastewater nutrient. Samples were taken from 3 locations of wetlands for 6 months. The nutrient content was determined through measuring Total Kjehldahl Nitrogen (TKN, ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate values. Results: Average levels for TKN, ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate in effluent of control wetland were 41.15, 23.59, 1.735, and 6.43 mg/L, and in wetland with reeds were 28.91, 19.99, 1.49 and 5.63 mg/L, respectively. First-order, second-order, and Stover-Kincannon models were applied and analyzed using statistical parameters obtained from the models (Umax, KB. Conclusion: The nutrients removal at Yazd wastewater treatment plant was remarkable, and the presence of reeds in wetland beds was not very efficient in improving system performance. Other more efficient plants are suggested to be evaluated in the system. Stover-Kincannon kinetic model provided predictions having the closest relationship with actual data obtained from the field.

  11. Investigation of hydrogenase molecular marker to optimize hydrogen production from organic wastes and effluents of agro-food industries [abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton, C.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years policy makers have started looking for alternatives to fossil fuels, not only to counter the threat of global warming, but also to reduce the risk of overdependence on imported oil and gas supplies. By contrast with hydrocarbon fuels, hydrogen (H2, whether burned directly or used in fuel cells, is intrinsically a clean energy vector with near zero emission. However the main current method of producing hydrogen, steam reforming of methane, involves the release of large quantities of greenhouse gases. So although hydrogen already accounts for around 2% of world consumption of energy, its more widespread adoption is limited by several challenges. Therefore new processes are investigated, especially those using renewable raw material, e.g. woods and organic wastes, and/or involving microorganisms. Indeed, for some algae and bacteria, the generation of molecular hydrogen is an essential part of their energy metabolism. The approach with the greatest commercial potential is fermentative hydrogen generation (dark fermentation by bacteria from the Clostridium genus. This biological process, as a part of the methane-producing anaerobic digestion process, is very promising since it allows the production of hydrogen from a wide variety of renewable resources such as carbohydrate waste from the agricultural and agro-food industries or processed urban waste and sewage. To date most publications on hydrogen production by Clostridium strains have focused on the effects of operating parameters (such as temperature, pH, dilution rate, etc.. We now need to extend this knowledge by identifying and monitoring the various different metabolic agents involved in high H2 activity. Consequently the aim of this research at the CWBI in the University of Liege is to investigate the role of [Fe] hydrogenases, the key enzymes that remove excess electrons accumulating during fermentation. Clostridium butyricum CWBI1009, the strain used for these investigations

  12. Thermodynamic investigation of waste cooking oil based hydrogen generation system with chemical looping process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahla Faleh

    2016-07-01

    The results show that coke formation can be thermodynamically inhibited by increasing the S/C ratio and/or the NiO/C ratio. The conditions that maximize hydrogen production, minimize methane and carbon monoxide content as well as avoid coke formation at thermoneutral conditions were found to be S/C = 5, T = 600 °C and NiO/C = 0.493. Under these conditions, a hydrogen yield of 144.3 mol/kg of soybean waste cooking oil can be obtained, which appears to be an attractive result for starting experimental research.

  13. Direct Observation of the Kinetically Relevant Site of CO Hydrogenation on Supported Ru Catalyst at 700 K by Time-Resolved FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, Heinz; Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-04

    Time-resolved FT-IR spectra of carbon monoxide hydrogenation over alumina-supported ruthenium particles were recorded on themillisecond time scale at 700 K using pulsed release of CO and a continuous flow of H2/N2 (ratio 0.067 or 0.15, 1 atm total pressure). Adsorbed carbon monoxide was detected along with gas phase products methane (3016 and 1306 cm-1), water (1900 +- 1300 cm-1), and carbon dioxide (2348 cm-1). Aside from adsorbed CO, no other surface species were observed. The rate of formation of methane is 2.5 +- 0.4 s-1 and coincides with the rate of carbon dioxide growth (3.4 +- 0.6 s-1), thus indicating that CH4 and CO2 originate from a common intermediate. The broad band of adsorbed carbon monoxide has a maximum at 2010 cm-1 at early times (36 ms) that shifts gradually to 1960 cm-1 over a period of 3 s as a result of the decreasing surface concentration of CO. Kinetic analysis of the adsorbed carbon monoxide reveals that surface sites absorbing at the high frequency end of the infrared band are temporally linked to gas phase product growth. Specifically, a (linear) CO site at 2026 cm-1 decays with a rate constant of 2.9 +- 0.1 s-1, which coincides with the rise constant of CH4. This demonstrates that the linear CO site at 2026 cm-1 is the kinetically most relevant one for the rate-determining CO dissociation step under reaction conditions at 700 K.

  14. A statistical mechanical theory of proton transport kinetics in hydrogen-bonded networks based on population correlation functions with applications to acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckerman, Mark E; Chandra, Amalendu; Marx, Dominik

    2010-09-28

    Extraction of relaxation times, lifetimes, and rates associated with the transport of topological charge defects in hydrogen-bonded networks from molecular dynamics simulations is a challenge because proton transfer reactions continually change the identity of the defect core. In this paper, we present a statistical mechanical theory that allows these quantities to be computed in an unbiased manner. The theory employs a set of suitably defined indicator or population functions for locating a defect structure and their associated correlation functions. These functions are then used to develop a chemical master equation framework from which the rates and lifetimes can be determined. Furthermore, we develop an integral equation formalism for connecting various types of population correlation functions and derive an iterative solution to the equation, which is given a graphical interpretation. The chemical master equation framework is applied to the problems of both hydronium and hydroxide transport in bulk water. For each case it is shown that the theory establishes direct links between the defect's dominant solvation structures, the kinetics of charge transfer, and the mechanism of structural diffusion. A detailed analysis is presented for aqueous hydroxide, examining both reorientational time scales and relaxation of the rotational anisotropy, which is correlated with recent experimental results for these quantities. Finally, for OH(-)(aq) it is demonstrated that the "dynamical hypercoordination mechanism" is consistent with available experimental data while other mechanistic proposals are shown to fail. As a means of going beyond the linear rate theory valid from short up to intermediate time scales, a fractional kinetic model is introduced in the Appendix in order to describe the nonexponential long-time behavior of time-correlation functions. Within the mathematical framework of fractional calculus the power law decay ∼t(-σ), where σ is a parameter of the

  15. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn Charles [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  16. Investigation of the hydrogen neutrals in a discharge source used for production of metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhinova, I.; Iordanova, S.; Pashov, A.

    2016-03-01

    The paper discusses the possible mechanisms for production of metal hydrides (MH) in a DC discharge source. The results of different experiments suggest that the molecules are sputtered directly from the surface of the cathode, where they are formed after adsorption of atomic hydrogen. This hypothesis allows one to understand the operation of the source studied and to optimize its working conditions.

  17. Silicon Photoelectrode Thermodynamics and Hydrogen Evolution Kinetics Measured by Intensity-Modulated High-Frequency Resistivity Impedance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neale, Nathan R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Anderson, Nicholas C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Steven T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Van De Lagemaat, Jao [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pekarek, Ryan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Carroll, Gerard M. [Formerly NREL

    2017-10-13

    We present an impedance technique based on light intensity-modulated high-frequency resistivity (IMHFR) that provides a new way to elucidate both the thermodynamics and kinetics in complex semiconductor photoelectrodes. We apply IMHFR to probe electrode interfacial energetics on oxide-modified semiconductor surfaces frequently used to improve the stability and efficiency of photoelectrochemical water splitting systems. Combined with current density-voltage measurements, the technique quantifies the overpotential for proton reduction relative to its thermodynamic potential in Si photocathodes coated with three oxides (SiOx, TiO2, and Al2O3) and a Pt catalyst. In pH 7 electrolyte, the flatband potentials of TiO2- and Al2O3-coated Si electrodes are negative relative to samples with native SiOx, indicating that SiOx is a better protective layer against oxidative electrochemical corrosion than ALD-deposited crystalline TiO2 or Al2O3. Adding a Pt catalyst to SiOx/Si minimizes proton reduction overpotential losses but at the expense of a reduction in available energy characterized by a more negative flatband potential relative to catalyst-free SiOx/Si.

  18. Experimental investigations relevant for hydrogen and fission product issues raised by the Fukushima accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Gupta

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The accident at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011, caused by an earthquake and a subsequent tsunami, resulted in a failure of the power systems that are needed to cool the reactors at the plant. The accident progression in the absence of heat removal systems caused Units 1-3 to undergo fuel melting. Containment pressurization and hydrogen explosions ultimately resulted in the escape of radioactivity from reactor containments into the atmosphere and ocean. Problems in containment venting operation, leakage from primary containment boundary to the reactor building, improper functioning of standby gas treatment system (SGTS, unmitigated hydrogen accumulation in the reactor building were identified as some of the reasons those added-up in the severity of the accident. The Fukushima accident not only initiated worldwide demand for installation of adequate control and mitigation measures to minimize the potential source term to the environment but also advocated assessment of the existing mitigation systems performance behavior under a wide range of postulated accident scenarios. The uncertainty in estimating the released fraction of the radionuclides due to the Fukushima accident also underlined the need for comprehensive understanding of fission product behavior as a function of the thermal hydraulic conditions and the type of gaseous, aqueous, and solid materials available for interaction, e.g., gas components, decontamination paint, aerosols, and water pools. In the light of the Fukushima accident, additional experimental needs identified for hydrogen and fission product issues need to be investigated in an integrated and optimized way. Additionally, as more and more passive safety systems, such as passive autocatalytic recombiners and filtered containment venting systems are being retrofitted in current reactors and also planned for future reactors, identified hydrogen and fission product issues will need to be coupled

  19. Investigations on synthesis, characterization and hydrogenation behavior of hydrogen storage alloys, Mm{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Ni{sub 5-y-z}Al{sub y}Fe{sub z}(x=0,0.05,0.1,0.2,0.3;y=0,0.1;z=0,0.1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Sumita [Department of Physics, Government P. G. College, Uttarkashi 249193 (India); Upadhyay, R.K. [Department of Physics, Government P. G. College, Rishikesh 249201 (India)

    2007-12-15

    The present study deals with investigations on the synthesis and characterization of Ca substituted versions of MmNi{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage materials typified by the compositions Mm{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Ni{sub 5-y-z}Al{sub y}Fe{sub z}(x=0,0.05,0.1,0.2,0.3;y=0,0.1;z=0,0.1). A comparative study of Ca concentration present in the materials, with emphasis on their hydrogen storage capacity, was carried out and then the role of Al and Fe was studied. The structural characterization revealed formation of CaCu{sub 5}-type structure and small amount of free Ni in the as-synthesized alloys. Some extra XRD-peaks, corresponding to CaH{sub 2} were detected in dehydrogenated versions which disappeared in Fe containing samples. The hydrogenation behavior of these materials was monitored through pc-isotherms and kinetic curves. A composition, Mm{sub 0.9}Ca{sub 0.1}Ni{sub 4.8}Al{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 0.1} having maximum storage capacity of 1.6 wt% was resynthesized using composite pellet route which improved hydrogen storage capacity drastically, i.e. 1.9 wt%. (author)

  20. The investigation reaction kinetic for polyurethanes based on different types of diisocyanate and castor oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Ivan S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of polyurethanes based on vegetable oils is very complex and thus for industrial production of this materials it is important to determine the optimal temperature for polymerisation and finally to obtain materials with the proper mechanical properties. The goal of this work was to assess the kinetic of catalysed and noncatalysed reactions for polyurethanes based on castor oil as the polyol component and different types of diisocyanates. Due to the presences of hydroxyl groups on ricinoleic acid, castor oil is suitable for polyurethane preparation. The differential scanning calorimetry has been employed to study the polyurethane formation reaction using Ozawa isoconversion method. It was estimated that the catalyst addition decreases the activation energy. The highest reduction of activation energy was observed for the reactive systems with hexamethylene diisocyanate. Validity of obtained kinetic model was examined by FTIR spectroscopy following the apsorption of reactive groups. Obtained results of mechanical characteristics of the polyuretahane networks (with different NCO/OH ratio confirmed that applied method could be used for prediction of optimal reaction condition in polyurethane networks synthesis.

  1. Kinetics and mechanism of the manganese(II) catalysed Calmagite dye oxidation using in situ generated hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheriff, Tippu S; Cope, Steven; Varsani, Dhimal S

    2013-04-28

    The kinetics and mechanism for the bleaching of Calmagite (H3CAL, 3-hydroxy-4-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenylazo)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) in aqueous solution at pH 8.00 and 23 ± 1 °C using in situ generated H2O2 is described. Complete mineralisation of H3CAL results with turnover frequencies (TOF = moles of H3CAL bleached per mole of manganese per hour) of 40 h(-1). The monohydroxy azo dyes Me-H2CAL, Orange G and Orange II are not bleached which indicates that a requirement of dye bleaching is the coordination of the dye to the Mn centre. Spectroscopic studies show the formation of Mn(CAL)2 and Mn(CAL) species but in the presence of Tiron (1,2-dihydroxybenzene-3,5-disulfonate, disodium salt, monohydrate, Na2TH2·H2O), [Mn(CAL)(T)] is formed. It is proposed that a Mn(III)-hydroperoxide species is generated, [Mn(O2H)(CAL)(TQ)] from the in situ generated H2O2, where TQ represents the o-quinone form of Tiron, and this is the active species in the bleaching of coordinated CAL; the formation of this hydroperoxide species is supported by UV/VIS and ESI-MS data. The formation of a Mn(III) species is supported by EPR studies which also show some evidence for the presence of a labile d(5) Mn(II) species in the presence of the reducing substrate hydroxylamine (NH2OH). This would enable rapid ligand exchange for both in situ H2O2 generation and dye bleaching to occur; there is no evidence for the presence of Mn(IV)=O species. The virtue of low local concentrations of in situ generated H2O2 is shown to be important in preventing over oxidation of the catalyst and thus contributing to a robust catalytic system.

  2. Thermochemistry of Alane Complexes for Hydrogen Storage: A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the relative stabilities of alane (AlH3) complexes with electron donors is essential for identifying hydrogen storage materials for vehicular applications that can be regenerated by off-board methods; however, almost no thermodynamic data are available to make this assessment. To fill this gap, we employed the G4(MP2) method to determine heats of formation, entropies, and Gibbs free energies of formation for 38 alane complexes with NH3−nRn (R = Me, Et; n = 0−3), pyridine, pyrazine, triethylenediamine (TEDA), quinuclidine, OH2−nRn (R = Me, Et; n = 0−2), dioxane, and tetrahydrofuran (THF). Monomer, bis, and selected dimer complex geometries were considered. Using these data, we computed the thermodynamics of the key formation and dehydrogenation reactions that would occur during hydrogen delivery and alane regeneration, from which trends in complex stability were identified. These predictions were tested by synthesizing six amine−alane complexes involving trimethylamine, triethylamine, dimethylethylamine, TEDA, quinuclidine, and hexamine and obtaining upper limits of ΔG° for their formation from metallic aluminum. Combining these computational and experimental results, we establish a criterion for complex stability relevant to hydrogen storage that can be used to assess potential ligands prior to attempting synthesis of the alane complex. On the basis of this, we conclude that only a subset of the tertiary amine complexes considered and none of the ether complexes can be successfully formed by direct reaction with aluminum and regenerated in an alane-based hydrogen storage system. PMID:22962624

  3. Investigation of Influential Parameters in Deep Oxidative Desulfurization of Dibenzothiophene with Hydrogen Peroxide and Formic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Alireza Haghighat Mamaghani; Shohreh Fatemi; Mehrdad Asgari

    2013-01-01

    An effective oxidative system consisting of hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, and sulfuric acid followed by an extractive stage were implemented to remove dibenzothiophene in the simulated fuel oil. The results revealed such a great performance in the case of H2O2 in the presence of formic and sulfuric acids that led to the removal of sulfur compounds. Sulfuric acid was employed to increase the acidity of media as well as catalytic activity together with formic acid. The oxidation reaction was ...

  4. Experimental and First-Principles Investigation of MoWS2 with High Hydrogen Evolution Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Honglin; Yu, Ke; Tang, Zheng; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2016-11-02

    Electrochemically splitting water for hydrogen evolution has attracted a lot attention and developed into a promising approach to produce hydrogen energy. Searching for high-activity and economical electrocatalysts to replace Pt-based catalysts remains a great challenge. In this paper, we reported a concise and effective strategy to fabricate the novel MoWS2 composite for use as the electrocatalyst through a hydrothermal method for the first time. The final obtained MoWS2 composite demonstrated a well-defined hierarchical structure and established that its densely stacked nanopetals act as the active sites in the corresponding hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) processes. Experimental results show that the composites can deliver a clearly promoted HER activity and are superior to the pure structure. In order to give a more in-depth explanation, we also performed a first-principles calculation to further survey the electronic properties, compound form, and HER mechanism of different structures. The charge distribution of MoWS2 composite indicates that electrons can directionally transfer from WS2 to the neighboring MoS2 and form an "electron-rich" configuration, which is beneficial to increase the HER rate and promote the overall performance. This thorough research will not only provide new thought to the analyses and elucidation of the inner mechanism of the HER process for this kind of two-dimensional composite but also guide further work on the basis of experimental and calculation results.

  5. Vibrational kinetics of electronically excited states in H2 discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, Gianpiero; Pietanza, Lucia D.; D'Ammando, Giuliano; Celiberto, Roberto; Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2017-11-01

    The evolution of atmospheric pressure hydrogen plasma under the action of repetitively ns electrical pulse has been investigated using a 0D state-to-state kinetic model that self-consistently couples the master equation of heavy particles and the Boltzmann equation for free electrons. The kinetic model includes, together with atomic hydrogen states and the vibrational kinetics of H2 ground state, vibrational levels of singlet states, accounting for the collisional quenching, having a relevant role because of the high pressure. The mechanisms of excitations, radiative decay and collisional quenching involving the excited H2 states and the corresponding cross sections, integrated over the non-equilibrium electron energy distribution function (EEDF) to obtain kinetic rates, are discussed in the light of the kinetic simulation results, i.e. the time evolution during the pulse of the plasma composition, of the EEDF and of the vibrational distributions of ground and singlet excited states.

  6. Experimental investigations and modeling of devolatilization based on superimposed kinetics of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker Degn

    A non-isothermal one-dimensional model has been developed to describe biomass pyrolysis at fast heating rate (600-104 Ks-1), high temperatures (up to 1500C) and is valid for different biomass particle sizes (... in the model. Cylindrical representation of a biomass particle shapewas chosen to be the most suitable in the pyrolysis model. The evolution of devolatilization time required for the completepyrolysis showed that the particles with a mean diameter ... obtained in the wire mesh and drop tube reactors. Thus, the modelincluding these two parameters provides an acceptable fit of char yield to the experimental data. The present results showedthat the proposed kinetic model for the fast biomass pyrolysis is relatively simple and predicts reasonably accurately...

  7. Photooxidation of the phenylazonaphthol AO20 on TIO2: kinetic and mechanistic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, C; Jacques, P; Kalt, A

    2001-11-01

    The results of the photocatalytic and photosensitized degradations of the monoazo dye AO20 in aqueous solution using suspended titanium dioxide are presented. Kinetic and mechanistic details have been elucidated using UV/Vis, FTIR and TCO techniques. It was proven that adsorption of dye molecules onto the support material is essential for the processes to be effective. Moreover, even if their mechanisms differ during the early stages, photocatalysis and photosensitization lead to very similar ultimate breakdown products. Indeed, the original dye anchored to the oxide surface systematically undergoes fast decomposition until it is transformed into CO2 or aliphatic acids (formic, acetic, oxalic acids), which react rather slowly with hydroxyl radicals or trapped holes.

  8. Kinetic Investigation of Styrene Free Radical Polymerization by Using Binary Mixtures of Monofunctional Initiators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Ziaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymerization of styrene in presence of two monofunctional initiators is studied kinetically in an ampoule scale. Polymerizations were ceased at different conversions for each ampoule while the temperature was increased almost linearly during the reaction. Three different initiator mixtures were used. The first mixtures were composed of benzoil peroxide (BPO and t-butyl perbenzoate (TBPB with various molar ratios and temperature programs. The second and third series were performed on mixtures of BPO and α,α'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN and AIBN with TBPB, respectively. The experimental results for these series revealed thatincreasing the percentage of TBPB in the initiator mixtures at the same reaction temperature intervals enhanced polymerization rate and molecular weight of the resulting polymers. On the other hand the results from the second series indicated that reducing AIBN in the mixture would have reduction effect on the reaction temperatureintervals while both conversion and the polymer molecular weight are increased

  9. Investigation on nucleation kinetics, growth and characterization of urea oxalic acid-ferroelectric single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhivya, R.; Ezhil Vizhi, R.; Rajan Babu, D.

    2017-06-01

    Nucleation and growth kinetics renders the information about the crystal growth process, which can be adopted to grow large size crystals. Urea oxalic acid was synthesized by slow evaporation method. Solubility was analyzed gravimetrically and it was observed that it exhibits positive temperature coefficient of solubility which is suitable for bulk growth. Metastable zonewidth was observed by adopting polythermal method. Induction period was measured by isothermal method for the saturation temperature by varying the degrees of supersaturation. Based on the classical theory of nucleation, the other nucleation parameters such as interfacial energy, Gibbs critical free energy and radius of critical nuclei were calculated. Urea oxalic acid (UOA) was synthesized and subsequently grown by a slow cooling technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study confirms that the crystal belongs to a monoclinic system. Dielectric analysis affirms the ferroelectric property of the material and the results were further discussed in detail.

  10. Investigation of Acorn fruit Ash Efficiency in Cadmium Removal from Aqueous Solutions: Adsorption Isotherm and Kinetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Zarei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heavy metals are known as significant pollutants because of toxicity and nonbiodegradable characteristics. Cadmium is one of the heavy metals that have carcinogen potential. So, this study carried out in order to investigate the acorn fruit ash efficiency in cadmium removal from aqueous solutions. Methods: This study was done in the batch laboratory conditions. In this study, the effect of different parameters including pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, and initial cadmium concentration were evaluated. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used for analysis of the equilibrium isotherm. Adsorption kinetics of cadmium by different models were also investigated. The measurement of residual cadmium in the samples was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry at 228.8 nm. The SPSS-16 software was used for analysis of data. Results: According to the results, the maximum adsorption capacity of cadmium was 9.29 mg/g at pH=7 and 8 g/L adsorbent dose. The removal efficiency was increased with increasing contact time and decreased with increasing of cadmium initial concentration. Investigation of achieving data showed that the adsorption process followed better by Freundlich isotherm and the pseudo-second order kinetic. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, it could be concluded that the acorn fruit ash had high ability in cadmium adsorption and could be used as a cheap adsorbent in the removal of cadmium.

  11. Physico-Geometrical Kinetics of Solid-State Reactions in an Undergraduate Thermal Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Nobuyoshi; Goshi, Yuri; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Tatsuoka, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    An undergraduate kinetic experiment of the thermal decomposition of solids by microscopic observation and thermal analysis was developed by investigating a suitable reaction, applicable techniques of thermal analysis and microscopic observation, and a reliable kinetic calculation method. The thermal decomposition of sodium hydrogen carbonate is…

  12. Chemical kinetic modeling of H{sub 2} applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinov, N.M.; Westbrook, C.K.; Cloutman, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Work being carried out at LLNL has concentrated on studies of the role of chemical kinetics in a variety of problems related to hydrogen combustion in practical combustion systems, with an emphasis on vehicle propulsion. Use of hydrogen offers significant advantages over fossil fuels, and computer modeling provides advantages when used in concert with experimental studies. Many numerical {open_quotes}experiments{close_quotes} can be carried out quickly and efficiently, reducing the cost and time of system development, and many new and speculative concepts can be screened to identify those with sufficient promise to pursue experimentally. This project uses chemical kinetic and fluid dynamic computational modeling to examine the combustion characteristics of systems burning hydrogen, either as the only fuel or mixed with natural gas. Oxidation kinetics are combined with pollutant formation kinetics, including formation of oxides of nitrogen but also including air toxics in natural gas combustion. We have refined many of the elementary kinetic reaction steps in the detailed reaction mechanism for hydrogen oxidation. To extend the model to pressures characteristic of internal combustion engines, it was necessary to apply theoretical pressure falloff formalisms for several key steps in the reaction mechanism. We have continued development of simplified reaction mechanisms for hydrogen oxidation, we have implemented those mechanisms into multidimensional computational fluid dynamics models, and we have used models of chemistry and fluid dynamics to address selected application problems. At the present time, we are using computed high pressure flame, and auto-ignition data to further refine the simplified kinetics models that are then to be used in multidimensional fluid mechanics models. Detailed kinetics studies have investigated hydrogen flames and ignition of hydrogen behind shock waves, intended to refine the detailed reactions mechanisms.

  13. Determination of the Kinematics of the Qweak Experiment and Investigation of an Atomic Hydrogen Moller Polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Valerie M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The Qweak experiment has tested the Standard Model through making a precise measurement of the weak charge of the proton (QpW). This was done through measuring the parity-violating asymmetry for polarized electrons scattering off of unpolarized protons. The parity-violating asymmetry measured is directly proportional to the four-momentum transfer (Q^2) from the electron to the proton. The extraction of QpW from the measured asymmetry requires a precise Q^2 determination. The Qweak experiment had a Q^2 = 24.8 ± 0.1 m(GeV^2) which achieved the goal of an uncertainty of <= 0.5%. From the measured asymmetry and Q^2, QpW was determined to be 0.0719 ± 0.0045, which is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction. This puts a 7.5 TeV lower limit on possible "new physics". This dissertation describes the analysis of Q^2 for the Qweak experiment. Future parity-violating electron scattering experiments similar to the Qweak experiment will measure asymmetries to high precision in order to test the Standard Model. These measurements will require the beam polarization to be measured to sub-0.5% precision. Presently the electron beam polarization is measured through Moller scattering off of a ferromagnetic foil or through using Compton scattering, both of which can have issues reaching this precision. A novel Atomic Hydrogen Moller Polarimeter has been proposed as a non-invasive way to measure the polarization of an electron beam via Moller scattering off of polarized monatomic hydrogen gas. This dissertation describes the development and initial analysis of a Monte Carlo simulation of an Atomic Hydrogen Moller Polarimeter.

  14. Kinetic Studies on State of the Art Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Graves, Christopher R.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigatedhydrogen/steam and refor...

  15. Hydrogen adsorption on rhodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, M.E.; Michri, A.A.; Kalish, T.V.; Pshenichnikov, A.G.; Kazarinov, V.E.

    1987-09-01

    Measurements of thermal desorption and electron work function were used to investigate the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption from the gas phase on rhodium single-crystal faces and on a polycrystalline rhodium sample at room temperatures over the pressure range from 1.3-10/sup -3/ to 1.3 x 10/sup -5/ Pa. It was found that dipoles oriented with their negative ends toward the gas phase (dipoles of type I) form more rapidly than dipoles having the opposite orientation (dipoles of type II). For formation of the latter, a mechanism is proposed according to which the rate-determining step of the overall process is the transition of reversibly adsorbed hydrogen to dipoles of type II (the spillover), which occurs at surface defects. It was shown that the kinetics of this process with respect to the individual defect obeys an equation which is zeroth order in theta/sub H/ and pressure.

  16. Development and investigation of a photoelectrochemical membrane for solar hydrogen production from aqueous solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    This work presents experimental results on a new photoelectrochemical TiO2/Cu(In,Ga)Se2/Nb0.03Ti0.097O1.84-solarcell-membrane that can be used for light driven hydrogen formation from aqueous solutions, where the reduction process is accompanied by the oxidation of inexpensive electron donors like organic residues in waste water or water itself. In contrast to basic photoelectrochemical cell concepts, the new membrane is based on a two photon-absorption process, approaching...

  17. Influence of hydrogen cations on kinetics and equilibria of heavy-metal sorption by algae-sorption of copper cations by the algaPalmaria palmata(Linnaeus) Weber & Mohr (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłos, Andrzej; Rajfur, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen cations on kinetics and equilibria of sorption of copper cations by the marine alga Palmaria palmata (Linnaeus) Weber & Mohr was studied under static conditions. The competitive effect of the H + cations is described, which influenced the uncertainty of evaluation of the alga sorption capacity. Under static conditions, the variation of the Cu 2+ /H + concentration ratio during sorption was found nonmonotonic. The Langmuir isotherm model was used to determine the sorption capacity of the alga, namely 12.4 mg g -1 of dry algae mass. A similar value was determined from the kinetic parameters of the ionic exchange which is considered a pseudo-second-order chemical reaction. The consistent results indicated that the mathematical models used correctly described the equilibria and kinetics of the ionic exchange between algae and solutions.

  18. Laboratory investigation of the role of desorption kinetics on americium transport associated with bentonite colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Timothy Mark; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Stuart Douglas; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the parameters that control colloid-mediated transport of radionuclides is important for the safe disposal of used nuclear fuel. We report an experimental and reactive transport modeling examination of americium transport in a groundwater-bentonite-fracture fill material system. A series of batch sorption and column transport experiments were conducted to determine the role of desorption kinetics from bentonite colloids in the transport of americium through fracture materials. We used fracture fill material from a shear zone in altered granodiorite collected from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland and colloidal suspensions generated from FEBEX bentonite, a potential repository backfill material. The colloidal suspension (100 mg L(-1)) was prepared in synthetic groundwater that matched the natural water chemistry at GTS and was spiked with 5.5 × 10(-10) M (241)Am. Batch characterizations indicated that 97% of the americium in the stock suspension was adsorbed to the colloids. Breakthrough experiments conducted by injecting the americium colloidal suspension through three identical columns in series, each with mean residence times of 6 h, show that more than 95% of the bentonite colloids were transported through each of the columns, with modeled colloid filtration rates (k(f)) of 0.01-0.02 h(-1). Am recoveries in each column were 55-60%, and Am desorption rate constants from the colloids, determined from 1-D transport modeling, were 0.96, 0.98, and 0.91 h(-1) in the three columns, respectively. The consistency in Am recoveries and desorption rate constants in each column indicates that the Am was not associated with binding sites of widely-varying strengths on the colloids, as one binding site with fast kinetics represented the system accurately for all three sequential columns. Our data suggest that colloid-mediated transport of Am in a bentonite-fracture fill material system is unlikely to result in transport over long distance scales because

  19. Time resolved spectroscopic investigation of SiD2 + D2: kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubaiey, Najem A.; Walsh, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Silylenes (silanediyls) have made an important impact on organosilicon chemistry even if it is of more recent foundation than carbenes in organic chemistry and much less complete. These species are highly reactive intermediates. They play a central role in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of various silicon-containing thin films which have a technological importance in microelectronics as well as in the dry etching processes of silicon wafers. Spectroscopic methods have been developed to observe these species, a necessary pre-requisite to their direct monitoring. In this work, deuterated phenylsilane precursor, PhSiD3 was chosen for SiD2 because its analogue phenylsilane, PhSiH3 proved to be a good precursor for SiH2 and the high quality decay signals observed revealed that SiD2 be readily detected from PhSiD3 and that if other decomposition pathways (e.g. PhSiD + D2) are occurring, they do not effect measurements of the rate constants for SiD2. The absorption spectrum of SiD2 formed from the flash photolysis of a mixture of PhSiD3 and SF6 at 193nm were found in the region 17384-17391 cm-1 with strong band at 17387.07 cm-1. This single rotational line of pQ1 was chosen to monitor SiD2 removal. Time-resolved studies of SiD2 have been carried out to obtain rate constants for its bimolecular reactions with D2. The reactions were studied over the pressure range 5-100 Torr (in SF6 bath gas) at four temperatures in the range 298-498K. Single decay from 10 photolysis laser shots were averaged and found to give reasonable first-order kinetics fits. Second order kinetics were obtained by pressure dependence of the pseudo first order decay constants and substance D2 pressures within experimental error. The reaction was found to be weakly pressure dependent at all temperatures, consistent with a third-body mediated association process. In addition, SiH2+ H2 reaction is approximately ca. 60% faster than SiD2+D2 reaction. Theoretical extrapolations (using Lindemann

  20. Time resolved spectroscopic investigation of SiD2 + D2: kinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Rubaiey Najem A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silylenes (silanediyls have made an important impact on organosilicon chemistry even if it is of more recent foundation than carbenes in organic chemistry and much less complete. These species are highly reactive intermediates. They play a central role in the chemical vapour deposition (CVD of various silicon-containing thin films which have a technological importance in microelectronics as well as in the dry etching processes of silicon wafers. Spectroscopic methods have been developed to observe these species, a necessary pre-requisite to their direct monitoring. In this work, deuterated phenylsilane precursor, PhSiD3 was chosen for SiD2 because its analogue phenylsilane, PhSiH3 proved to be a good precursor for SiH2 and the high quality decay signals observed revealed that SiD2 be readily detected from PhSiD3 and that if other decomposition pathways (e.g. PhSiD + D2 are occurring, they do not effect measurements of the rate constants for SiD2. The absorption spectrum of SiD2 formed from the flash photolysis of a mixture of PhSiD3 and SF6 at 193nm were found in the region 17384-17391 cm-1 with strong band at 17387.07 cm-1. This single rotational line of pQ1 was chosen to monitor SiD2 removal. Time-resolved studies of SiD2 have been carried out to obtain rate constants for its bimolecular reactions with D2. The reactions were studied over the pressure range 5-100 Torr (in SF6 bath gas at four temperatures in the range 298-498K. Single decay from 10 photolysis laser shots were averaged and found to give reasonable first-order kinetics fits. Second order kinetics were obtained by pressure dependence of the pseudo first order decay constants and substance D2 pressures within experimental error. The reaction was found to be weakly pressure dependent at all temperatures, consistent with a third-body mediated association process. In addition, SiH2+ H2 reaction is approximately ca. 60% faster than SiD2+D2 reaction. Theoretical extrapolations (using

  1. Investigation of the microbial metabolism of carbon dioxide and hydrogen in the kangaroo foregut by stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Scott; Kang, Alicia; Gulino, Lisa-Maree; Manefield, Mike; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Kienzle, Marco; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Dawson, Kerri; Klieve, Athol V

    2014-09-01

    Kangaroos ferment forage material in an enlarged forestomach analogous to the rumen, but in contrast to ruminants, they produce little or no methane. The objective of this study was to identify the dominant organisms and pathways involved in hydrogenotrophy in the kangaroo forestomach, with the broader aim of understanding how these processes are able to predominate over methanogenesis. Stable isotope analysis of fermentation end products and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) were used to investigate the organisms and biochemical pathways involved in the metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach. Our results clearly demonstrate that the activity of bacterial reductive acetogens is a key factor in the reduced methane output of kangaroos. In in vitro fermentations, the microbial community of the kangaroo foregut produced very little methane, but produced a significantly greater proportion of acetate derived from carbon dioxide than the microbial community of the bovine rumen. A bacterial operational taxonomic unit closely related to the known reductive acetogen Blautia coccoides was found to be associated with carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism in the kangaroo foregut. Other bacterial taxa including members of the genera Prevotella, Oscillibacter and Streptococcus that have not previously been reported as containing hydrogenotrophic organisms were also significantly associated with metabolism of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in the kangaroo forestomach.

  2. Electric field tuned MoS2/metal interface for hydrogen evolution catalyst from first-principles investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, F. L.; Zhou, T. W.; Liu, X. Q.; Kang, W.; Zeng, W.; Zhang, Y. X.; Fang, L.; Lu, Y.; Zhou, M.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the interfacial properties of catalyst/substrate is crucial for the design of high-performance catalyst for important chemical reactions. Recent years have witnessed a surge of research in utilizing MoS2 as a promising electro-catalyst for hydrogen production, and field effect has been employed to enhance the activity (Wang et al 2017 Adv. Mater. 29, 1604464; Yan et al 2017 Nano Lett. 17, 4109–15). However, the underlying atomic mechanism remains unclear. In this paper, by using the prototype MoS2/Au system as a probe, we investigate effects of external electric field on the interfacial electronic structures via density functional theory (DFT) based first-principles calculations. Our results reveal that although there is no covalent interaction between MoS2 overlayer and Au substrate, an applied electric field efficiently adjusts the charge transfer between MoS2 and Au, leading to tunable Schottky barrier type (n-type to p-type) and decrease of barrier height to facilitate charge injection. Furthermore, we predict that the adsorption energy of atomic hydrogen on MoS2/Au to be readily controlled by electric field to a broad range within a modest magnitude of field, which may benefit the performance enhancement of hydrogen evolution reaction. Our DFT results provide valuable insight into the experimental observations and pave the way for future understanding and control of catalysts in practice, such as those with vacancies, defects, edge states or synthesized nanostructures.

  3. Investigation of the sintering kinetics of lead powders. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, P.K.; Munir, Z.A.

    1977-08-01

    An analysis of the parameters involved in the sintering of lead powders under vacuum has been made. Sintering was accomplished at temperatures between 250/sup 0/ and 280/sup 0/C. Evaluation of surface area reduction data results in values of the mechanism exponent N between 5.3 and 6.7. Lack of shrinkage and the low vapor pressure of lead at the experimental temperatures lead to the conclusion that surface diffusion is the rate-controlling sintering mechanism. However, comparison of the experimentally measured activation energy, 170 kJ/mol (40.7 Kcal/mol), to that reported in the literature for surface self-diffusion of lead showed a significant discrepancy. Effects of pore isolation and surface oxide layers are proposed as possible explanations for this discrepancy as well as the deviation in the N values from those obtained theoretically. An attempt to isolate the effect of the oxide layer was made by sintering lead in a hydrogen atmosphere. Under these conditions, sintering is accompanied by shrinkage, thus indicating the presence of bulk-transport process. A mechanism exponent corresponding to viscous flow sintering was obtained. Furthermore, the calculated activation energy for this process was in good agreement with that reported for creep in lead.

  4. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Amyloid Aggregation Investigated by a Phenomenological Coarse-Grained Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, Andrea; Pellarin, Riccardo; Caflisch, Amedeo

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered polypeptide aggregates that have been implicated in several neurodegenerative pathologies, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and prion diseases, [1, 2] and, more recently, also in biological functionalities. [3, 4, 5] These findings have paved the way for a wide range of experimental and computational studies aimed at understanding the details of the fibril-formation mechanism. Computer simulations using low-resolution models, which employ a simplified representation of protein geometry and energetics, have provided insights into the basic physical principles underlying protein aggregation in general [6, 7, 8] and ordered amyloid aggregation. [9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15] For example, Dokholyan and coworkers have used the Discrete Molecular Dynamics method [16, 17] to shed light on the mechanisms of protein oligomerization [18] and the conformational changes that take place in proteins before the aggregation onset. [19, 20] One challenging observation, which is difficult to observe by computer simulations, is the wide range of aggregation scenarios emerging from a variety of biophysical measurements. [21, 22] Atomistic models have been employed to study the conformational space of amyloidogenic polypeptides in the monomeric state, [23, 24, 25] the very initial steps of amyloid formation, [26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32] and the structural stability of fibril models. [33, 34, 35) However, all-atom simulations of the kinetics of fibril formation are beyond what can be done with modern computers.

  5. Simple Numerical Method for Kinetical Investigation of Planar Mechanical Systems with Two Degrees of Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Bíró

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to demonstrate the application of a simple numerical method which is suitable for motion analysis of different mechanical systems. For mechanical engineer students it is important task. Mechanical systems consisting of rigid bodies are linked to each other by different constraints. Kinematical and kinetical analysis of them leads to integration of second order differential equations. In this way the kinematical functions of parts of mechanical systems can be determined. Degrees of freedom of the mechanical system increase as a result of built-in elastic parts. Numerical methods can be applied to solve such problems. The simple numerical method will be demonstrated in MS Excel by author by the aid of two examples. MS Excel is a quite useful tool for mechanical engineers because easy to use it and details can be seen moreover failures can be noticed. Some parts of results obtained by using the numerical method were checked by analytical way. The published method can be used in higher education for mechanical engineer students.

  6. A methyl methacrylate-HEMA-CL(n) copolymerization investigation: from kinetics to bioapplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Rooney, Thomas R; Lupi, Monica; Ubezio, Paolo; Hutchinson, Robin A; Moscatelli, Davide

    2013-10-01

    The radical copolymerization kinetics of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and poly-ϵ-caprolactone macromonomer functionalized with a vinyl end group (HEMA-CL(n)) is studied using a pulsed-laser technique. The reactivity ratios for this system are near unity, while a linear relationship between k(p,cop), the copolymer-averaged propagation rate coefficient, and the composition of macromonomer in the feed (0-80 wt% range) is determined. At 50 wt% macromonomer in the feed, a 1.67 ± 0.02 and 1.64 ± 0.06 increase in k(p,cop)/k(p,MMA) is determined for HEMA-CL3 and HEMA-CL2, respectively. These macromonomers are adopted to synthesize nanoparticles (NPs) in the range of 100-150 nm through batch emulsion free radical polymerization (BEP) to produce partially degradable drug delivery carriers. The produced NPs are tested in 4T1 cell line and show excellent characteristics as carriers: they do not affect cell proliferation, and a relevant number of NPs, thousands per cell, are internalized. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Removal of Anionic Dyes from Water by Potash Alum Doped Polyaniline: Investigation of Kinetics and Thermodynamic Parameters of Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Braja N; Majhi, Deola

    2015-06-25

    Polyaniline was synthesized by the oxidative polymerization method by using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant. The positive charge in the backbone of the polymer was generated by using Potash alum as a dopant. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used for characterization of doped polyaniline. The doped polyaniline can be used for selective adsorption of various dyes (selectively sulfonated dyes) from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies regarding the effect of contact time, initial dye concentration, pH, doses of adsorbent, and temperature on adsorption kinetics were investigated. The influence of other anions like Cl(-), NO3(-), and SO4(2-) on the adsorption density of dyes onto doped polyaniline was also explored. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetics were found to be the most appropriate models to describe the removal of anionic dyes from water through adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters such as free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)), and entropy (ΔS(0)) changes were also evaluated. The interaction of dyes with doped polyaniline was also investigated by FTIR and UV spectroscopy.

  8. QM AND AB INITIO INVESTIGATION ON THE HYDROGEN BONDING, NMR CHEMICAL SHIFTS AND SOLVENT EFFECTS ON THE DPPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Monajjemi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen bonding effects that were produced from interaction of membrane lipid dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-ethanolamine (DPPE with 1-5 water molecules, has been theoretically  investigated through the quantum mechanical calculations at the Hartree-Fock level of theory and the 3-21G, 6-31G and 6-31G* basis sets with the computational package of Gaussian 98. According to the obtained results of the structural optimization of the isolated DPPE in the gas phase, we can see the evidences of interactions in the head group of this macromolecule (from the molecular point of view we have a proton transfer from the ammonium group to the phosphate oxygen of zwitterionic form. As we know that the hydrogen bonding of DPPE with water molecules which have surrounded its head group plays an important role in the permeability of DPPE. So, in order to understand the microscopic physico-chemical nature of this subject we have analyzed bond and torsion angles of DPPE before and after added water molecules.  In this paper we have theoretically studied the complexes DPPE with water molecules which have surrounded its head group. As mentioned before, this theoretically study has been done through Hartree-Fock level of theory by using simple basis sets. Theoretical data shows that the interaction of head group of DPPE with water molecules causes some changes in the geometry of DPPE which were explained by the contribution of zwitterionic form of DPPE macromolecule, and finally hydrated DPPE becomes stable complex. Comparison between theoretical and experimental geometry data of DPPE macromolecule shows that the calculation at the HF/3-21 level of theory produces results which they are in better agreement with the experimental data. Moreover the hydrogen bonding effects on the NMR shielding tensor of selected atoms in the hydrated complexes of DPPE were reported. The ";Gauge Including Atomic Orbitals"; (GIAO approaches within the SCF-Hartree-Fock approximation have

  9. Role of hydrogen abstraction acetylene addition mechanisms in the formation of chlorinated naphthalenes. 2. Kinetic modeling and the detailed mechanism of ring closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Grant J; Russell, Douglas K

    2014-12-26

    The dominant formation mechanisms of chlorinated phenylacetylenes, naphthalenes, and phenylvinylacetylenes in relatively low pressure and temperature (∼40 Torr and 1000 K) pyrolysis systems are explored. Mechanism elucidation is achieved through a combination of theoretical and experimental techniques, the former employing a novel simplification of kinetic modeling which utilizes rate constants in a probabilistic framework. Contemporary formation schemes of the compounds of interest generally require successive additions of acetylene to phenyl radicals. As such, infrared laser powered homogeneous pyrolyses of dichloro- or trichloroethylene were perturbed with 1,2,4- or 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene. The resulting changes in product identities were compared with the major products expected from conventional pathways, aided by the results of our previous computational work. This analysis suggests that a Bittner-Howard growth mechanism, with a novel amendment to the conventional scheme made just prior to ring closure, describes the major products well. Expected products from a number of other potentially operative channels are shown to be incongruent with experiment, further supporting the role of Bittner-Howard channels as the unique pathway to naphthalene growth. A simple quantitative analysis which performs very well is achieved by considering the reaction scheme as a probability tree, with relative rate constants being cast as branching probabilities. This analysis describes all chlorinated phenylacetylene, naphthalene, and phenylvinylacetylene congeners. The scheme is then tested in a more general system, i.e., not enforcing a hydrogen abstraction/acetylene addition mechanism, by pyrolyzing mixtures of di- and trichloroethylene without the addition of an aromatic precursor. The model indicates that these mechanisms are still likely to be operative.

  10. Remediation of sulfidic wastewater by catalytic oxidation with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Naveed; Maitra, Saikat; Dutta, Binay Kanti; Ahmad, Farooq

    2009-01-01

    Oxidation of sulfide in aqueous solution by hydrogen peroxide was investigated in the presence of hydrated ferric oxide catalyst. The ferric oxide catalyst was synthesized by sol gel technique from ferric chloride and ammonia. The synthesized catalyst was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction analysis, scanning electrom microscope and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The catalyst was quite effective in oxidizing the sulfide by hydrogen peroxide. The effects of sulfide concentration, catalyst loading, H2O2 dosing and temperature on the kinetics of sulfide oxidation were investigated. Kinetic equations and activation energies for the catalytic oxidation reaction were calculated based on the experimental results.

  11. Investigation of La1−xSrxCrO3−∂ (x ~ 0.1 as Membrane for Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yngve Larring

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Various inorganic membranes have demonstrated good capability to separate hydrogen from other gases at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen-permeable, dense, mixed proton-electron conducting ceramic oxides offer superior selectivity and thermal stability, but chemically robust candidates with higher ambipolar protonic and electronic conductivity are needed. In this work, we present for the first time the results of various investigations of La1−xSrxCrO3−∂ membranes for hydrogen production. We aim in particular to elucidate the material’s complex transport properties, involving co-ionic transport of oxide ions and protons, in addition to electron holes. This opens some new possibilities for efficient heat and mass transfer management in the production of hydrogen. Conductivity measurements as a function of pH2 at constant pO2 exhibit changes that reveal a significant hydration and presence of protons. The flux and production of hydrogen have been measured under different chemical gradients. In particular, the effect of water vapor in the feed and permeate gas stream sides was investigated with the aim of quantifying the ratio of hydrogen production by hydrogen flux from feed to permeate and oxygen flux the opposite way (“water splitting”. Deuterium labeling was used to unambiguously prove flux of hydrogen species.

  12. Report on investigations and studies on development of materials for hydrogen absorbing alloys; Suiso kyuzo gokin no zairyo no kaihatsu ni kansuru chosa kenkyu hokokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1984-03-01

    This paper describes investigations and studies on hydrogen absorbing alloy materials and the technologies to utilize them. In the investigations and studies, literatures were collected and put into order, questionnaire surveys were performed and analyzed, lecture meetings and panel discussions were held, and the discussion results were summarized. In the present status of developing hydrogen absorbing alloys, the current status of and problems in developing such hydrogen absorbing alloys as Ti-based, Mg-based, and rare earth-based alloys were put into order. Discussions were given on prospects of possibilities of developing new alloys, making them amorphous, and putting them into mass production. In the current status of developing the utilizing technologies, such technologies as hydrogen storage systems and heat pumps were put into order and discussed. With regard to problems in hydrogen absorbing alloys, discussions were given on alloy weight, pulverization, activation, heat conductivity, and alloy costs. In discussing the safety, discussions were given on the safety and compliance with related laws and regulations relative to hydrogen transportation using a great amount of hydrogen absorbing alloys, their storage, and heat storage systems. In addition, questionnaire surveys were carried out with an objective to identify the status of developing hydrogen absorbing alloys and needs from the industries. (NEDO)

  13. Investigation of La1−xSrxCrO3−∂ (x ~ 0.1) as Membrane for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larring, Yngve; Vigen, Camilla; Ahouanto, Florian; Fontaine, Marie-Laure; Peters, Thijs; Smith, Jens B.; Norby, Truls; Bredesen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Various inorganic membranes have demonstrated good capability to separate hydrogen from other gases at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen-permeable, dense, mixed proton-electron conducting ceramic oxides offer superior selectivity and thermal stability, but chemically robust candidates with higher ambipolar protonic and electronic conductivity are needed. In this work, we present for the first time the results of various investigations of La1−xSrxCrO3−∂ membranes for hydrogen production. We aim in particular to elucidate the material’s complex transport properties, involving co-ionic transport of oxide ions and protons, in addition to electron holes. This opens some new possibilities for efficient heat and mass transfer management in the production of hydrogen. Conductivity measurements as a function of pH2 at constant pO2 exhibit changes that reveal a significant hydration and presence of protons. The flux and production of hydrogen have been measured under different chemical gradients. In particular, the effect of water vapor in the feed and permeate gas stream sides was investigated with the aim of quantifying the ratio of hydrogen production by hydrogen flux from feed to permeate and oxygen flux the opposite way (“water splitting”). Deuterium labeling was used to unambiguously prove flux of hydrogen species. PMID:24958299

  14. Dissolution, diffusion and permeation behavior of hydrogen in vanadium: a first-principles investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian; Zhou, Hong-Bo; Liu, Yue-Lin; Gui, Li-Jiang; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2011-04-06

    Employing a first-principles method, we have studied the stability, diffusivity, and permeation properties of hydrogen (H) and its isotopes in bcc vanadium (V). A single H atom is found to favor the tetrahedral interstitial site (TIS) in V. The charge density distribution exhibits a strong interaction between H and its neighbor V atoms. Analysis of DOS and Bader charge reveals that the occupation number of H-induced low energy states is directly associated with the stability of H in V. Further, H is shown to diffuse between the neighboring TISs with a diffusion barrier of 0.07 eV. Diffusion coefficients and permeabilities of H isotopes in V are estimated with empirical theory. At a typical temperature of 800 K, the diffusion coefficient and the permeability of H are 2.48 × 10(-4) cm(2) s(-1) and 2.19 × 10(-9) mol m(-1) s(-1) Pa(- 1/2), respectively.

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the kinetics and mechanism of the Cl + 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, L.; Priya, A. Mano; Sleiman, C.; Zeineddine, M. N.; Coddeville, P.; Fittschen, C.; Ballesteros, B.; Canosa, A.; Senthilkumar, L.; El Dib, G.; Tomas, A.

    2017-10-01

    The reaction of 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone (4H4M2P) with Cl atoms was studied for the first time experimentally and theoretically. Relative kinetic measurements were carried out at room temperature and 1 bar of synthetic air/N2 in two different environmental chambers: a 300 L Teflon bag and a 16 L borosilicate glass cell. Reactants, reference compounds and products were monitored either by IR absorption or by GC-FID. Theoretical calculations were performed using the density functional theory method at BH&HLYP level of theory for twelve hydrogen abstraction pathways. The individual rate coefficients for the most favorable H-abstraction pathways were calculated by canonical variational theory using small curvature tunneling method at 298 K. An average experimental rate coefficient of (7.4 ± 0.6) × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 was obtained at 298 K, in good agreement with the theoretical rate coefficient. The branching ratios for each reaction channel were evaluated theoretically from the individual rate coefficients of the identified channels. The H-atom abstracted on the -CH2 group appeared to be the dominant channel with a small barrier height. Formaldehyde, acetic acid, HCl, CO2 and CO were identified by IR as the major primary products. The obtained results are presented and discussed in terms of structure-reactivity relationships. A mechanism is suggested for the formation of the observed products. The atmospheric implications of the studied reaction are presented and more particularly, the lifetime of 4H4M2P towards Cl atoms is evaluated to be about 3 days.

  16. Investigations on the growth kinetics of Laves phase precipitates in 12% Cr creep-resistant steels: Experimental and DICTRA calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat, O. [Max Planck Institute fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Strasse 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)] [Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Edmundo Larenas 270, Concepcion (Chile); Garcia, J., E-mail: jose.garcia@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Rojas, D. [Max Planck Institute fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Strasse 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Carrasco, C. [Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Edmundo Larenas 270, Concepcion (Chile); Inden, G. [Max Planck Institute fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Max Planck Strasse 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The growth kinetics of Laves phase precipitates (type Fe{sub 2}W) in the early stage of creep (650 deg. C for 10,000 h) in two 12% Cr ferrite-martensitic steels has been investigated. In one alloy the Laves phase formed on tempering, while in the second alloy the Laves phase precipitated during creep. Kinetic simulations were performed using the software DICTRA. The particle size of the Laves phase was measured on transmission electron microscopy samples. The equilibrium phase fraction of the Laves phase was reached in the first thousand hours. Simulations of particle growth showed good agreement with the experimental results. Competitive growth between M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the Laves phase showed that M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides reached their equilibrium after 12 days, whereas the Laves phase reached equilibrium after 3 months. Simulations of the influence of the interfacial energy and addition of Co, Cu and Si on Laves phase precipitation are presented.

  17. Fast Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Sensors to Investigate the Kinetics of Gas Uptake in Ultra-Microporous Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Benjamin; Wixforth, Achim; Denysenko, Dmytro; Volkmer, Dirk

    2017-06-23

    Observation of the kinetics and measurement of the activation energies for gas diffusion in porous materials requires very fast and sensitive sensors. In this work, thin films of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with different pore sizes are grown on a surface acoustic wave (SAW) substrate, resulting in very sensitive and specific sensor systems for the detection of various gases at very short time scales. Using specially designed SAW delay lines for the detection, up to 200-nm-wide cubic MOF crystals were grown directly from a solution on the sensitive sensor chip area. One example, MFU-4, exhibits a smallest pore aperture of 2.5 Å and shows a highly sensitive and specific response to CO2, H2, He, NH3, and H2O. It is shown that such a MOF@SAW sensor responds within milliseconds to gas loading and its sensitivity reaches levels as low as 1 ppmv, currently only limited by the gas mixing system. This unique combination of sensitivity and fast response characteristics allows even for real-time investigations of the sorption kinetics during gas uptake and release. As is typical for SAW sensors, the production of the chips is very straightforward and inexpensive and-combined with the unique properties of the MOFs with their tunable pore sizes and adjustable internal surface properties-holds promise for different sensor applications.

  18. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panella, B.

    2006-09-13

    A great challenge for commercializing hydrogen powered vehicles is on-board hydrogen storage using economic and secure systems. A possible solution is hydrogen storage in light-weight solid materials. Here three principle storage mechanisms can be distinguished: i) absorption of hydrogen in metals ii) formation of compounds with ionic character, like complex hydrides and iii) physisorption (or physical adsorption) of hydrogen molecules on porous materials. Physical adsorption exhibits several advantages over chemical hydrogen storage as for example the complete reversibility and the fast kinetics. Two classes of porous materials were investigated for physical hydrogen storage, i.e. different carbon nanostructures and crystalline metal-organic frameworks possessing extremely high specific surface area. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were measured using a Sieverts' apparatus both at room temperature and at 77 K at pressures up to the saturation regime. Additionally, the adsorption sites of hydrogen in these porous materials were identified using thermal desorption spectroscopy extended to very low temperatures (down to 20 K). Furthermore, the adsorbed hydrogen phase was studied in various materials using Raman spectroscopy at different pressures and temperatures. The results show that the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of porous materials correlates linearly with the specific surface area and is independent of structure and composition. In addition the pore structure of the adsorbent plays an important role for hydrogen storage since the adsorption sites for H2 could be assigned to pores possessing different dimensions. Accordingly it was shown that small pores are necessary to reach high storage capacities already at low pressures. This new understanding may help to tailor and optimize new porous materials for hydrogen storage. (orig.)

  19. A theoretical investigation on kinetics, mechanism, and thermochemistry of the gas-phase reactions of methyl fluoroacetate with OH radicals and fate of alkoxy radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Bhupesh Kumar; Deka, Ramesh Chandra

    2014-09-25

    We theoretically investigated OH-initiated hydrogen abstraction reactions of methyl fluoroacetate (MFA) CH2FC(O)OCH3 at the MPWB1K level of theory in conjunction with the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set. Thermodynamic and kinetic data are computed using the comparatively accurate G2(MP2) method. Two most stable conformers of MFA are identified, and the energy difference between them is found to be only 0.32 kcal mol(-1). Both of them are considered for rate coefficient calculations, and the contribution from each of the conformers is found to be quite significant. We propose an indirect mechanism due to validation of pre- and post-reactive complexes. The rate parameters are determined using canonical transition state theory and energetics at the G2(MP2) level. The temperature dependence of the rate constant can be described by the Arrhenius expressions: k = 8.79 × 10(-13) exp[(-377.27 ± 64)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) over a temperature range of 250-450 K. The ΔfH°298 for CH2FC(O)OCH3, CH2FC(O)OC(•)H2, and C(•)HFC(O)OCH3 are also computed using an isodesmic procedure. The OH-driven atmospheric lifetime of MFA was estimated to be 24 days. A mechanistic study to shed light on the atmospheric degradation and the sole fate for the consumption of CH2FC(O)OCH2O(•) radical has also been reported.

  20. Spectroscopic and Theoretical Investigations of the Potential Energy Surfaces of Molecules with Intramolecular π-type Hydrogen Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocola, Esther; Shin, Hee-Won; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz; Laane, Jaan

    2011-03-01

    Spectroscopic methods and theoretical calculations have been utilized to investigate the conformations of several cyclic organic molecules. The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of 2-indanol show the presence of four conformations. The one with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the --OH group and the benzene ring is of lowest energy. The potential energy surface (PES) in terms of the ring puckering and internal rotational vibrations, which govern the conformational changes, was determined. 3-Cyclopenten-1-ol possesses a similar PES as established from its infrared and Raman spectra and theoretical calculations. This PES also shows the presence of four conformations. The π -bonding conformer lies at lowest energy. LIF has been used to study the conformational energies of 2-hydroxytetralin, and 2-cyclohexenol has been investigated by infrared and Raman techniques. The analyses of the hydrogen bonding in these molecules as well as in a dozen others were supported by both ab initio and DFT calculations. Supported by R.A. Welch grant A-0396.

  1. Theoretical and Experimental Investigations of (I) Reaction Kinetics. (II) Theory of Liquids, and (III) Optical Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-14

    AUTHOR(’.) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) Henry Eyring, Principal InvestigatorAAR Dl14G9 0 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND A3DRESS 10. PROGRAM...environmcntal pollution. 16 In the bulk of soil, the pesticide disappears by diffusion and a chemica ! reacLion; the rate processes considered on the sui-face of

  2. In Situ Techniques for the Investigation of the Kinetics of Austenitization of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo; Apel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The austenitization and inter-critical annealing of X4CrNiMo16-5-1 (1.4418) supermartensitic stainless steel were investigated in-situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), dilatometry and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under isochronal heating conditions. Austenitization occurred...

  3. Numerical Investigation of the Role of Volumetric Transformation Strain on the Relaxation Stress and the Corresponding Hydrogen Interstitial Concentration in Niobium Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Bal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of relaxation stress on the hydrogen concentration in Niobium- (Nb- H media were investigated by iterative numerical modeling approach. To calculate the transformation strain, relaxation stress, and corresponding relaxed hydrogen concentration around an edge dislocation, a new third-order polynomial formulation was utilized in the model. With the aid of this polynomial, hydrogen induced relaxation stress never exceeds the dislocation stress, which indicates that the total stress field never turns to compressive state and diverges the results. The current model calculates the hydrogen concentration not only in the vicinity of an edge dislocation but also far away from the dislocation. Furthermore, the effect of relaxation stress on the interaction energy was also captured in the model. Overall, the current findings shed light on the complicated hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms of metallic materials by demonstrating that hydrogen induced relaxation has a significant effect on the hydrogen atom concentration and the interaction energy between the existing internal stress field and the solute hydrogen atom.

  4. Dissolution, diffusion and permeation behavior of hydrogen in vanadium: a first-principles investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Jian; Zhou Hongbo; Gui Lijiang; Jin Shuo; Zhang Ying; Lu Guanghong [Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu Yuelin, E-mail: LGH@buaa.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China)

    2011-04-06

    Employing a first-principles method, we have studied the stability, diffusivity, and permeation properties of hydrogen (H) and its isotopes in bcc vanadium (V). A single H atom is found to favor the tetrahedral interstitial site (TIS) in V. The charge density distribution exhibits a strong interaction between H and its neighbor V atoms. Analysis of DOS and Bader charge reveals that the occupation number of H-induced low energy states is directly associated with the stability of H in V. Further, H is shown to diffuse between the neighboring TISs with a diffusion barrier of 0.07 eV. Diffusion coefficients and permeabilities of H isotopes in V are estimated with empirical theory. At a typical temperature of 800 K, the diffusion coefficient and the permeability of H are 2.48 x 10{sup -4} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} and 2.19 x 10{sup -9} mol m{sup -1} s{sup -1} Pa{sup -1/2}, respectively.

  5. Minimum Entropy Generation Theorem Investigation and Optimization of Metal Hydride Alloy Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to carry out numerical simulation of the hydrogen storage on exothermic reaction of metal hydride LaNi5 alloy container. In addition to accelerating the reaction speed of the internal metal hydride by internal control tube water-cooled mode, analyze via the application of second law of thermodynamics the principle of entropy generation. Use COMSOL Mutilphysics 4.3 a to engage in finite element method value simulation on two-dimensional axisymmetric model. Also on the premise that the internal control tube parameters the radius ri, the flow rate U meet the metal hydride saturation time, observe the reaction process of two parameters on the tank, entropy distribution and the results of the accumulated entropy. And try to find the internal tube parameter values of the minimum entropy, whose purpose is to be able to identify the reaction process and the reaction results of internal tank’s optimum energy conservation.

  6. Microwave gallium-68 radiochemistry for kinetically stable bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: structural investigations and cellular uptake under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Israt S; Arrowsmith, Rory L; Cortezon-Tamarit, Fernando; Twyman, Frazer; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Botchway, Stanley W; Dilworth, Jonathan R; Carroll, Laurence; Aboagye, Eric O; Pascu, Sofia I

    2016-01-07

    We report the microwave synthesis of several bis(thiosemicarbazones) and the rapid gallium-68 incorporation to give the corresponding metal complexes. These proved kinetically stable under 'cold' and 'hot' biological assays and were investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and radioactive cell retention studies under normoxia and hypoxia. (68)Ga complex retention was found to be 34% higher in hypoxic cells than in normoxic cells over 30 min, further increasing to 53% at 120 min. Our data suggests that this class of gallium complexes show hypoxia selectivity suitable for imaging in living cells and in vivo tests by microPET in nude athymic mice showed that they are excreted within 1 h of their administration.

  7. Pharmaceutical solid-state kinetic stability investigation by using moisture-modified Arrhenius equation and JMP statistical software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mingkun; Perlman, Michael; Lu, Qing; Varga, Csanad

    2015-03-25

    An accelerated stress approach utilizing the moisture-modified Arrhenius equation and JMP statistical software was utilized to quantitatively assess the solid state stability of an investigational oncology drug MLNA under the influence of temperature (1/T) and humidity (%RH). Physical stability of MLNA under stress conditions was evaluated by using XRPD, DSC, TGA, and DVS, while chemical stability was evaluated by using HPLC. The major chemical degradation product was identified as a hydrolysis product of MLNA drug substance, and was subsequently subjected to an investigation of kinetics based on the isoconversion concept. A mathematical model (ln k=-11,991×(1/T)+0.0298×(%RH)+29.8823) based on the initial linear kinetics observed for the formation of this degradant at all seven stress conditions was built by using the moisture-modified Arrhenius equation and JMP statistical software. Comparison of the predicted versus experimental lnk values gave a mean deviation value of 5.8%, an R(2) value of 0.94, a p-value of 0.0038, and a coefficient of variation of the root mean square error CV(RMSE) of 7.9%. These statistics all indicated a good fit to the model for the stress data of MLNA. Both temperature and humidity were shown to have a statistically significant impact on stability by using effect leverage plots (p-valueArrhenius equation modeling theory. The model was found to be of value to aid setting of specifications and retest period, and storage condition selection. A model was also generated using only four conditions, as an example from a resource saving perspective, which was found to provide a good fit to the entire set of data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigations of charge-changing processes for light proton-rich nuclei on carbon and solid-hydrogen targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawahata, K. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ozawa, A., E-mail: ozawa@tac.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Saito, Y.; Abe, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Inaba, N.; Ishibashi, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Matsunaga, S. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Okada, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Sato, S. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Suzuki, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Zenihiro, J. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    We investigated charge-changing processes (total charge-changing cross sections and partial charge-changing cross sections) for light proton-rich nuclei ({sup 34–36}Ar, {sup 33}Cl, {sup 25–28}Si) at around 300A MeV on carbon and solid-hydrogen targets. We estimated the nuclear proton point radii of {sup 33}Cl and {sup 25,26,27}Si from the observed total charge-changing cross sections by using Glauber-model calculations with a phenomenological correction factor. Furthermore, we estimated the proton skin thickness for {sup 33}Cl coupled with its previously observed matter radius. From investigations of the partial charge-changing cross sections, clear zigzag pattern was observed for all isotopes. The present studies suggest that the pattern may be common in the proton-rich side, and depends on the odd–even nature of the fragment charge.

  9. Experimental investigation of convective drying kinetics of kiwi under different conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darıcı, Selçuk; Şen, Soner

    2015-08-01

    The effects of air temperature, velocity and humidity on drying characteristics of kiwi are experimentally investigated for the temperatures in the range of 50-80 °C, of the velocities 0.5-2.0 m/s, of the relative humidity values of 5-20 % and for two slice thicknesses. It is observed that there is a very close agreement between the model of Midilli et al. (Dry Technol 20:1503-1513, 2002) and the present study with coefficients of correlation R2 of 0.9949-0.9996.

  10. Investigation of Kinetic Hydrate Inhibition Using a High Pressure Micro Differential Scanning Calorimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraboina, Nagu; Malmos, Christine; von Solms, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    . These investigations were performed using small samples in four different capillary tubes in the calorimeter cell. When the isothermal method was employed, it was found that Luvicap EG significantly delays the hydrate nucleation time as compared to water. The results obtained from the ramping method demonstrated...... of hydrate growth. Additionally, hydrate formed in the presence of inhibitor decomposed at higher temperatures compared to pure water, indicating that while hydrate formation is initially inhibited; once hydrates form, they are more stable in the presence of inhibitor. Overall, this method proved a viable...

  11. A clinical investigation of the tooth whitening efficacy of a new hydrogen peroxide-containing dentifrice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakar, Ashish; Rustogi, Kedar; Zhang, Yun Po; Petrone, Margaret E; DeVizio, William; Proskin, Howard M

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this four-week, double-blind clinical study was to assess the tooth whitening efficacy of a new dentifrice delivering 1.0% hydrogen peroxide, 0.243% sodium fluoride, and sodium tripolyphosphate in a high-cleaning silica base (Test Dentifrice), relative to that of a control dentifrice containing 0.243% sodium fluoride in a silica base (Control Dentifrice). Following a baseline oral soft tissue examination and tooth shade assessment using the Vita Shade Guide, qualifying adult male and female subjects from the New Delhi, India area were randomized into either the Test or Control Dentifrice group. The two groups were balanced for baseline mean Vita Shade Guide rank scores. All subjects were provided with their assigned dentifrice and a soft-bristled adult toothbrush for home use. Subjects were instructed to brush their teeth for two minutes twice daily (morning and evening), using only the dentifrice provided, and to refrain from using any other oral hygiene products for the entire four weeks of the study. There were no restrictions regarding diet or smoking habits during the course of the study. Oral soft tissue and tooth shade evaluations for each subject were repeated after two and four weeks of product use. Forty-four (44) subjects complied with the protocol and completed the entire study. At the two- and four-week examinations, the Test Dentifrice group had statistically significant mean shade rank score reductions of 4.04 and 5.17, respectively, compared to baseline (p tooth whitening effectiveness, producing a mean shade rank score reduction from baseline of 5.17 after four weeks' use.

  12. Chemical kinetic modeling of H{sub 2} applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Marinov, N.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This project is intended to develop detailed and simplified kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of practical systems fueled by hydrogen, and then to use those mechanisms to examine the performance, efficiency, pollutant emissions, and other characteristics of those systems. During the last year, a H2/NOx mechanism has been developed that gives much improved predictions of NOx emissions compared to experimental data. Preliminary chemical kinetic and equilibrium calculations have been performed in support of Br2-H2O experiments to be conducted at NREL. Hydrogen, hydrogen/methane and hydrogen/natural gas mixtures have been investigated in a knock-rating engine to assess their automotive knock characteristics. The authors are currently developing the simplified analog reaction mechanisms that are computationally simple, yet still reproduce many of the macroscopic features of flame propagation.

  13. Kinetics of Hydrogen Radical Reactions with Toluene Including Chemical Activation Theory Employing System-Specific Quantum RRK Theory Calibrated by Variational Transition State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-02

    Pressure-dependent reactions are ubiquitous in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. We employ a new calibration procedure for quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (QRRK) unimolecular rate theory within a chemical activation mechanism to calculate the pressure-falloff effect of a radical association with an aromatic ring. The new theoretical framework is applied to the reaction of H with toluene, which is a prototypical reaction in the combustion chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons present in most fuels. Both the hydrogen abstraction reactions and the hydrogen addition reactions are calculated. Our system-specific (SS) QRRK approach is adjusted with SS parameters to agree with multistructural canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) at the high-pressure limit. The new method avoids the need for the usual empirical estimations of the QRRK parameters, and it eliminates the need for variational transition state theory calculations as a function of energy, although in this first application we do validate the falloff curves by comparing SS-QRRK results without tunneling to multistructural microcanonical variational transition state theory (MS-μVT) rate constants without tunneling. At low temperatures, the two approaches agree well with each other, but at high temperatures, SS-QRRK tends to overestimate falloff slightly. We also show that the variational effect is important in computing the energy-resolved rate constants. Multiple-structure anharmonicity, torsional-potential anharmonicity, and high-frequency-mode vibrational anharmonicity are all included in the rate computations, and torsional anharmonicity effects on the density of states are investigated. Branching fractions, which are both temperature- and pressure-dependent (and for which only limited data is available from experiment), are predicted as a function of pressure.

  14. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  15. Investigations on the formation kinetics of CdSe quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, D.; Schwedhelm, S.; Kudryashov, I.; Lischka, K.; Litvinov, D.; Rosenauer, A.; Gerthsen, D.; Strassburg, M.; Hoffmann, A.; Bimberg, D.

    2000-06-01

    High- resolution TEM investigations reveal that CdSe quantum dot samples are often characterised by the existence of two different types of islands, which form a bimodal size distribution. Analysing the density distribution function of the two dominating size classes of islands, we show that islands of an average size of about 16 nm (type B islands) are clearly correlated with a phase transition via a Stranski-Krastanow growth process. The smaller clusters with a size of less than 10 nm (type A islands) are formed during the growth of the wetting layer, bevor the critical wetting layer thickness is reached. The stability range for the formation of dislocation-free SK islands was experimentally determined. We discuss gain measurements and stimulated emission of vertically stacked CdSe-ZnSe quantum dot structures which were grown on tilted GaAs substrates.

  16. Experimental and numerical investigation of the internal kinetics of a surf-zone plunging breaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emarat, Narumon; Forehand, David I.M.; Christensen, Erik Damgaard

    2012-01-01

    for surfzone breaking waves have been reported. In this study, a comparison is made between the experimental and numerical investigation of the internal kinematics of a surf-zone plunging breaker. The full-field velocity measuring technique known as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is used in the experiments...... that this was due to the small amount of smoothing applied in the BIM to enable it to continue to supply input data to the Navier–Stokes solver well beyond the breaking of the wave. In addition, some small differences were also found between the numerically predicted velocity distributions and those measured...... in the experiments. These disagreements occurred mostly in the aerated region and it is proposed that they could be caused by errors in the PIV velocity data due to air bubble effects. However, they could also be attributed to the fact that no turbulence model is used in the numerical scheme and it is these aerated...

  17. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  18. Dehydrogenation kinetics of pure and nickel-doped magnesium hydride investigated by in situ time-resolved powder X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.R.; Andreasen, A.; Vegge, Tejs

    2006-01-01

    The dehydrogenation kinetics of pure and nickel (Ni)-doped (2w/w%) magnesium hydride (MgH2) have been investigated by in situ time-resolved powder X-ray diffraction (PXD). Deactivated samples, i.e. air exposed, are investigated in order to focus on the effect of magnesium oxide (MgO) surface layers...

  19. Hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks: An investigation of structure-property relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowsell, Jesse

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been identified as candidate hydrogen storage materials due to their ability to physisorb large quantities of small molecules. Thirteen compounds (IRMOF-1, -2, -3, -6, -8, -9, -11, -13, -18, -20, MOF-74, MOF-177 and HKUST-1) have been prepared and fully characterized for the evaluation of their dihydrogen (H2) adsorption properties. All compounds display approximately type I isotherms with no hysteresis at 77 K up to 1 atm. The amount adsorbed ranges from 0.89 to 2.54 wt%; however, saturation is not achieved under these conditions. The influences of link functionalization, catenation and topology are examined for the eleven MOFs composed of Zn4O(O2C-)6 clusters. Enhanced H2 uptake by catenated compounds is rationalized by increased overlap of the surface potentials within their narrower pores. This is corroborated by the larger isosteric heat of adsorption of IRMOF-11 compared to IRMOF-1. Inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopic analysis of four Zn4O-based materials (IRMOF-1, -8, -11, and MOF-74) under a range of H2 loading suggests the presence of multiple localized adsorption sites on both the inorganic and organic moieties. To determine the structural details of the adsorption sites, variable temperature single crystal X-ray diffraction was used to analyze adsorbed argon and dinitrogen molecules in IRMOF-1. The principle binding site was found to be the same for both adsorbates and is located on faces of the octahedral Zn4O(O2C-)6 clusters with close contacts to three carboxylate groups. A total of eight symmetry-independent adsorption sites were identified for argon at 30 K. Similar sites were observed for dinitrogen, suggesting that they are good model adsorbates for the behaviour of dihydrogen. Two additional materials composed of inorganic clusters with coordinatively unsaturated metal sites (MOF-74, HKUST-1) were examined and their increased capacities and isosteric heats of adsorption provide further evidence that the

  20. Methane Steam Reforming Kinetics for a Rhodium-Based Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jon Geest; Jakobsen, M.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2010-01-01

    Methane steam reforming is the key reaction to produce synthesis gas and hydrogen at the industrial scale. Here the kinetics of methane steam reforming over a rhodium-based catalyst is investigated in the temperature range 500-800 A degrees C and as a function of CH4, H2O and H-2 partial pressures...

  1. Three applications of path integrals: equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects, and the temperature dependence of the rate constant of the [1,5] sigmatropic hydrogen shift in (Z)-1,3-pentadiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Tomáš; Vaníček, Jiří

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments have confirmed the importance of nuclear quantum effects even in large biomolecules at physiological temperature. Here we describe how the path integral formalism can be used to describe rigorously the nuclear quantum effects on equilibrium and kinetic properties of molecules. Specifically, we explain how path integrals can be employed to evaluate the equilibrium (EIE) and kinetic (KIE) isotope effects, and the temperature dependence of the rate constant. The methodology is applied to the [1,5] sigmatropic hydrogen shift in pentadiene. Both the KIE and the temperature dependence of the rate constant confirm the importance of tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects as well as of the anharmonicity of the potential energy surface. Moreover, previous results on the KIE were improved by using a combination of a high level electronic structure calculation within the harmonic approximation with a path integral anharmonicity correction using a lower level method.

  2. Experimental and kinetic modeling studies on the biphasic hydrogenation of levulinic acid to gamma-valerolactone using a homogeneous water-soluble Ru-(TPPTS) catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalid, M.; Broekhuis, A. A.; Heeres, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    gamma-Valerolactone (GVL) is considered a very attractive biomass derived platform chemical. This paper describes the application of biphasic homogeneous catalysis for the hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) to GVL using molecular hydrogen. A water soluble Ru-catalyst made in situ from RuCl3 center

  3. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of the Reaction between the (•)OH Radical and Adenine: A Theoretical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhøj, Birgitte O; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2015-06-18

    The accessibility of all possible reaction paths for the reaction between the nucleobase adenine and the (•)OH radical is investigated through quantum chemical calculations of barrier heights and rate constants at the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level with Eckart tunneling corrections. First the computational method is validated by considering the hydrogen abstraction from the heterocyclic N9 nitrogen in adenine as a test system. Geometries for all molecules in the reaction are optimized with four different DFT exchange-correlation functionals (B3LYP, BHandHLYP, M06-2X, and ωB97X-D), in combination with Pople and Dunning basis sets, all of which have been employed in similar investigations in the literature. Improved energies are obtained through single point calculations with CCSD(T) and the same basis sets, and reaction rate constants are calculated for all methods both without tunneling corrections and with the Wigner, Bell, and Eckart corrections. In comparison to CCSD(T)//BHandHLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ reference results, the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) method combined with Eckart tunneling corrections provides a sensible compromise between accuracy and time. Using this method, all subreactions of the reaction between adenine and the (•)OH radical are investigated. The total rate constants for hydrogen abstraction and addition for adenine are predicted with this method to be 1.06 × 10(-12) and 1.10 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1), respectively. Abstractions of H61 and H62 contribute the most, while only addition to the C8 carbon is found to be of any significance, in contrast to previous claims that addition is the dominant reaction pathway. The overall rate constant for the complete reaction is found to be 2.17 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecules(-1) s(-1), which agrees exceptionally well with experimental results.

  4. Investigation of TiO2 based Mixed-metal Oxide Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Si

    Abstract of the Dissertation. Investigation of TiO2 based Mixed-metal Oxide Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen. by. Si Luo. Doctor of Philosophy. in. Chemistry. Stony Brook University. 2017. The environmental impacts of fossil fuel consumption and the resulting global warming have attracted increasing attention to technologies and fuels that are both sustainable and renewable in the 21st century. To date, hydrogen has been proposed as an encouraging candidate of the next generation of chemical fuels, which meets all demands for carbon free and efficient chemistries that could be produced from a variety of sources. However, despite tremendous efforts, there is a clear need to develop new catalysts for the production of hydrogen through catalytic processes that are sustainable, such as in the photocatalytic splitting of water (PCS: H2O → H2 + 0.5O2) and the water-gas shift process (WGS: CO + H2O → H2 + CO2). This thesis is primarily motivated by this challenge and has focused on the photochemical and thermal production of H2 by the employment of novel TiO2 based catalysts. TiO2 is one of the most widely studied photocatalysts in all history, due to its relatively high activity, robust stability, safety and low cost. In this thesis, several TiO2-based mixed metal oxide nano catalysts (CeOx-TiO2, Ru-TiO2, Ga-TiO2) have been synthesized with carefully controlled morphology/structure and with inclusion of co-catalysts (Pt). These novel materials were comprehensively characterized to better understand their morphology, crystal structure, and electronic properties in an attempt to unravel phenomena responsible for high catalytic performance for the production of H2 from H2O. We have discovered the importance of low-dimensional metal oxide and interfacial stabilized nano-scaled mixed metal oxides for H2 production, while learning how best to tune such structure to optimize both thermal and photochemical conversion. Optimized structure and/or composition have been

  5. Investigation of Pd nanoparticles supported on zeolites for hydrogen production from formic acid dehydrogenation

    OpenAIRE

    Navlani García, Miriam; Martis, Martin; Lozano Castelló, Dolores; Cazorla Amorós, Diego; Mori, Kohsuke; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Catalysts based on palladium nanoparticles supported on different zeolites (BETA, ZSM-5 and Y) were prepared and their catalytic performance in formic acid dehydrogenation was studied. The effects of the zeolite structure and porous texture on the catalytic activity were investigated by comparing the behavior of these samples. The results revealed that the samples based on BETA zeolite are promising catalysts for this application. The authors would like to acknowledge the Ministerio de Eco...

  6. Tuning the properties of a complex disordered material: Full factorial investigation of PECVD-grown amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordell, Bradley J.; Keck, Christopher L.; Nguyen, Thuong D.; Caruso, A.N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Purohit, Sudhaunshu S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Lanford, William A. [Department of Physics, University at Albany, Albany, NY 12222 (United States); Dutta, Dhanadeep; Gidley, David [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Henry, Patrick; King, Sean W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States); Paquette, Michelle M., E-mail: paquettem@umkc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    A multiresponse 2{sup 5} full factorial experiment is performed to investigate the effects of growth conditions (temperature, power, pressure, total flow rate, partial precursor flow rate) on the chemical, mechanical, dielectric, electronic, and charge transport properties of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B{sub x}C:H{sub y}) grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from ortho-carborane. The main and interaction effects are determined and discussed, and the relationships between properties are investigated via correlation analysis. The process condition with the strongest influence on growth rate is pressure, followed by partial precursor flow rate, with low pressure and high partial flow rate conditions yielding the highest growth rates. The atomic concentration of hydrogen (at.% H) and density are controlled primarily by temperature and power, with low temperature and power conditions leading to relatively soft, hydrogen-rich, low-density, porous films, and vice versa. The B/C ratio is controlled by temperature, power, pressure, and the power*pressure interaction, and is uncorrelated to hydrogen concentration. Thin-film dielectric and electronic structure properties, including high-frequency dielectric constant (ε{sub 1}), low-frequency/total dielectric constant (κ), optical band gap (E{sub Tauc}/E{sub 04}), and Urbach energy (E{sub U}), are correlated strongly with at.% H, and weakly to moderately with B/C ratio. These properties are dominated by the influence of temperature, with a second significant influence from the power*pressure interaction. The interaction of power and pressure leads to two opposite growth regimes—high power and high pressure or low power and low pressure—that can produce a-B{sub x}C:H{sub y} films with similar dielectric or electronic structure properties. Charge transport properties also show a correlation with at.% H and B/C, but not with the electronic structure and disorder parameters, which

  7. Experimental and numerical investigations of the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion chamber of an industrial gas turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Haj Ayed, A.; Kusterer, K; Funke, H.H.-W.; J. Keinz; Striegan, C.; Bohn, D

    2015-01-01

    Combined with the use of renewable energy sources for its production, hydrogen represents a possible alternative gas turbine fuel within future low emission power generation. Due to the large difference in the physical properties of hydrogen compared to other fuels such as natural gas, well established gas turbine combustion systems cannot be directly applied for dry-low-NOx (DLN) hydrogen combustion. Thus, the development of DLN combustion technologies is an essential and challenging task fo...

  8. Investigation of hydrogen-defect interaction in tungsten by the probe fluence method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusinov, A., E-mail: rusinov.aleksandr@gmail.com [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPHI' , Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Gasparyan, Yu.; Trifonov, N.; Pisarev, A. [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPHI' , Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Lindig, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Sakamoto, M. [Advanced Fusion Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2011-08-01

    Deuterium trapping by defects in W polycrystalline foils during ion bombardment was investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy using the low fluence probe method. Probe TDS spectra showed, that there are at least six peaks in the region 350-900 K: at 370 K, 450 K, 530 K, 580 K, 630 K, 750 K. Experiments with as received samples showed that D is trapped mainly in low energy traps in the region 390-650 K. These defects are attributed to technological defects such as dislocations and vacancies. The peak at 750 K easily disappears when annealing the sample at about 1300 K and can be attributed to vacancy clusters. The peak at 630 K irreversibly increases at high fluence, it also appears when annealing the sample above 1300 K. This peak can be attributed to voids. Voids of about 20 nm in diameter in the near surface region were observed by FIB/SEM in cases when 630 K peak was observed.

  9. Structural stability of hydrogenated amorphous carbon overcoats used in heat-assisted magnetic recording investigated by rapid thermal annealing

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films are extensively used as protective overcoats of magnetic recording media. Increasing demands for even higher storage densities have necessitated the development of new storage technologies, such as heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), which uses laser-assisted heating to record data on high-stability media that can store single bits in extremely small areas (∼1 Tbit/in.2). Because HAMR relies on locally changing the coercivity of the magnetic medium by raising the temperature above the Curie temperature for data to be stored by the magnetic write field, it raises a concern about the structural stability of the ultrathin a-C film. In this study, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) experiments were performed to examine the thermal stability of ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Structural changes in the a-C:H films caused by RTA were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and conductive atomic force microscopy. The results show that the films exhibit thermal stability up to a maximum temperature in the range of 400-450 °C. Heating above this critical temperature leads to hydrogen depletion and sp 2 clustering. The critical temperature determined by the results of this study represents an upper bound of the temperature rise due to laser heating in HAMR hard-disk drives and the Curie temperature of magnetic materials used in HAMR hard disks. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Investigating the Interaction between the Neonatal Fc Receptor and Monoclonal Antibody Variants by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Larraillet, Vincent; Schlothauer, Tilman; Kettenberger, Hubert; Hilger, Maximiliane; Rand, Kasper D.

    2015-01-01

    The recycling of immunoglobulins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is of crucial importance in the maintenance of antibody levels in plasma and is responsible for the long half-lives of endogenous and recombinant monoclonal antibodies. From a therapeutic point of view there is great interest in understanding and modulating the IgG–FcRn interaction to optimize antibody pharmacokinetics and ultimately improve efficacy and safety. Here we studied the interaction between a full-length human IgG1 and human FcRn via hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and targeted electron transfer dissociation to map sites perturbed by binding on both partners of the IgG–FcRn complex. Several regions in the antibody Fc region and the FcRn were protected from exchange upon complex formation, in good agreement with previous crystallographic studies of FcRn in complex with the Fc fragment. Interestingly, we found that several regions in the IgG Fab region also showed reduced deuterium uptake. Our findings indicate the presence of hitherto unknown FcRn interaction sites in the Fab region or a possible conformational link between the IgG Fc and Fab regions upon FcRn binding. Further, we investigated the role of IgG glycosylation in the conformational response of the IgG–FcRn interaction. Removal of antibody glycans increased the flexibility of the FcRn binding site in the Fc region. Consequently, FcRn binding did not induce a similar conformational stabilization of deglycosylated IgG as observed for the wild-type glycosylated IgG. Our results provide new molecular insight into the IgG–FcRn interaction and illustrate the capability of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to advance structural proteomics by providing detailed information on the conformation and dynamics of large protein complexes in solution. PMID:25378534

  11. Investigating the interaction between the neonatal Fc receptor and monoclonal antibody variants by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Larraillet, Vincent; Schlothauer, Tilman; Kettenberger, Hubert; Hilger, Maximiliane; Rand, Kasper D

    2015-01-01

    The recycling of immunoglobulins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is of crucial importance in the maintenance of antibody levels in plasma and is responsible for the long half-lives of endogenous and recombinant monoclonal antibodies. From a therapeutic point of view there is great interest in understanding and modulating the IgG-FcRn interaction to optimize antibody pharmacokinetics and ultimately improve efficacy and safety. Here we studied the interaction between a full-length human IgG(1) and human FcRn via hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and targeted electron transfer dissociation to map sites perturbed by binding on both partners of the IgG-FcRn complex. Several regions in the antibody Fc region and the FcRn were protected from exchange upon complex formation, in good agreement with previous crystallographic studies of FcRn in complex with the Fc fragment. Interestingly, we found that several regions in the IgG Fab region also showed reduced deuterium uptake. Our findings indicate the presence of hitherto unknown FcRn interaction sites in the Fab region or a possible conformational link between the IgG Fc and Fab regions upon FcRn binding. Further, we investigated the role of IgG glycosylation in the conformational response of the IgG-FcRn interaction. Removal of antibody glycans increased the flexibility of the FcRn binding site in the Fc region. Consequently, FcRn binding did not induce a similar conformational stabilization of deglycosylated IgG as observed for the wild-type glycosylated IgG. Our results provide new molecular insight into the IgG-FcRn interaction and illustrate the capability of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to advance structural proteomics by providing detailed information on the conformation and dynamics of large protein complexes in solution. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Some Investigations on Protease Enzyme Production Kinetics Using Bacillus licheniformis BBRC 100053 and Effects of Inhibitors on Protease Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ghobadi Nejad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to great commercial application of protease, it is necessary to study kinetic characterization of this enzyme in order to improve design of enzymatic reactors. In this study, mathematical modeling of protease enzyme production kinetics which is derived from Bacillus licheniformis BBRC 100053 was studied (at 37°C, pH 10 after 73 h in stationary phase, and 150 rpm. The aim of the present paper was to determine the best kinetic model and kinetic parameters for production of protease and calculating Ki (inhibition constant of different inhibitors to find the most effective one. The kinetic parameters Km (Michaelis-Menten constant and Vm (maximum rate were calculated 0.626 mM and 0.0523 mM/min. According to the experimental results, using DFP (diisopropyl fluorophosphate and PMSF (phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride as inhibitors almost 50% of the enzyme activity could be inhibited when their concentrations were 0.525 and 0.541 mM, respectively. Ki for DFP and PMSF were 0.46 and 0.56 mM, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the Lineweaver-Burk model was the best fitting model for protease production kinetics DFP was more effective than PMSF and both of them should be covered in the group of noncompetitive inhibitors.

  13. Computational Investigation of the Thermochemistry and Kinetics of Steam Methane Reforming Over a Multi-Faceted Nickel Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Blaylock, D. Wayne

    2011-08-20

    A microkinetic model of steam methane reforming over a multi-faceted nickel surface using planewave, periodic boundary condition density functional theory is presented. The multi-faceted model consists of a Ni(111) surface, a Ni(100) surface, and nickel step edge sites that are modeled as a Ni(211) surface. Flux and sensitivity analysis are combined to gain an increased understanding of the important reactions, intermediates, and surface facets in SMR. Statistical thermodynamics are applied to allow for the investigation of SMR under industrially-relevant conditions (e.g., temperatures in excess of 500 °C and pressures in excess of 1 bar). The most important surface reactions are found to occur at the under-coordinated step edge sites modeled using the Ni(211) surface as well as on the Ni(100) surface. The primary reforming pathway is predicted to be through C*+ O*→ CO*at high temperatures; however, hydrogen-mediated reactions such as C*+ OH*→ COH*and C.H.*+ O*→ CHO*are predicted to become more important at low temperatures. The rate-limiting reactions are predicted to be dissociative chemisorption of methane in addition to the aforementioned C-O addition reactions. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  14. Kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrogen absorption and release in {beta}-titanium alloys; Kinetik und Thermodynamik der Wasserstoffaufnahme und -abgabe von {beta}-Titanlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, M.; Christ, H.J. [Siegen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik

    1998-12-31

    The work reported was intended to yield results allowing to describe as completely as possible the processes of interaction of {beta}-titanium and hydrogen. Three alloys have been selected for the experiments which suitably differ in stability of the {beta} phase. The characterisation of the hydrogen/metal interactions is primarily based on gravimetric measurements. A method was found to determine the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen, which is a significant variable for quantitative characterisation of the hydrogen absorption rate. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] In der Arbeit wird eine moeglichst vollstaendige Beschreibung der Wechselwirkung von {beta}-Titanlegierungen mit Wasserstoff angestrebt. Hierfuer wird mit drei Legierungen gearbeitet, die sich hinsichtlich der Stabilitaet der {beta}-Phase in sinnvoll abgestufter Weise unterscheiden. Fuer die Charakterisierung der Wasserstoff/Metall-Wechselwirkung wurden insbesondere gravimetrische Messungen eingesetzt. Weiterhin wurde die fuer eine quantitative Beschreibung der Wasserstoffaufnahmegeschwindigkeit wichtige Groesse des Diffusionskoeffizienten von Wasserstoff mit einem Verfahren bestimmt. (orig./MM)

  15. Photoelectrochemical kinetics of Eosin Y-sensitized zinc oxide films investigated by scanning electrochemical microscopy under illumination with different LED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yan; Tefashe, Ushula Mengesha [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Nonomura, Kazuteru; Loewenstein, Thomas; Schlettwein, Derck [Institute of Applied Physics, Justus Liebig University of Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Wittstock, Gunther, E-mail: gunther.wittstock@uni-oldenburg.d [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

    2009-12-30

    The overall efficiency of the light-induced charge separation in dye-sensitized solar cells depends on the kinetic competition between back electron transfer and dye regeneration processes by a redox electrolyte. In a previous study, the reduction of the intermittently formed photo-oxidized dye molecules by iodide ions in the electrolyte phase was investigated using the feedback mode of a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) and a quantitative model had been derived. Here we provide a more thorough experimental verification of this model by variation of the excitation wavelength, light intensities and mediator concentrations. Nanoporous ZnO/Eosin Y films prepared by self-assembly were used as model electrodes and were used with an iodide/triiodide electrolyte. The experimentally found effective rate constants could be related to the rate constant for the reaction of the dissolved donor with photo-oxidized Eosin Y bound to ZnO and the absorption spectrum of the dye and confirmed the assumption made in the derivation of the model. For the regeneration process of Eosin Y, a rate constant of k{sub ox} with different light emitting diodes and light intensities is determined.

  16. A new real-time method for investigation of affinity properties and binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Alexey V.; Nikitin, Maxim P.; Bragina, Vera A.; Znoyko, Sergey L.; Zaikina, Marina N.; Ksenevich, Tatiana I.; Gorshkov, Boris G.; Nikitin, Petr I.

    2015-04-01

    A method for quantitative investigation of affinity constants of receptors immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles (MP) is developed based on spectral correlation interferometry (SCI). The SCI records with a picometer resolution the thickness changes of a layer of molecules or nanoparticles due to a biochemical reaction on a cover slip, averaged over the sensing area. The method is compatible with other types of sensing surfaces employed in biosensing. The measured values of kinetic association constants of magnetic nanoparticles are 4 orders of magnitude higher than those of molecular antibody association with antigen. The developed method also suggests highly sensitive detection of antigens in a wide dynamic range. The limit of detection of 92 pg/ml has been demonstrated for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) with 50-nm MP employed as labels, which produce 3-order amplification of the SCI signals. The calibration curve features high sensitivity (slope) of 3-fold signal raise per 10-fold increase of PSA concentration within 4-order dynamic range, which is an attractive compromise for precise quantitative and highly sensitive immunoassay. The proposed biosensing technique offers inexpensive disposable sensor chips of cover slips and represents an economically sound alternative to traditional immunoassays for disease diagnostics, detection of pathogens in food and environmental monitoring.

  17. Investigation into solar drying of potato: effect of sample geometry on drying kinetics and CO2 emissions mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, P P

    2015-03-01

    Drying experiments have been performed with potato cylinders and slices using a laboratory scale designed natural convection mixed-mode solar dryer. The drying data were fitted to eight different mathematical models to predict the drying kinetics, and the validity of these models were evaluated statistically through coefficient of determination (R(2)), root mean square error (RMSE) and reduced chi-square (χ (2)). The present investigation showed that amongst all the mathematical models studied, the Modified Page model was in good agreement with the experimental drying data for both potato cylinders and slices. A mathematical framework has been proposed to estimate the performance of the food dryer in terms of net CO2 emissions mitigation potential along with unit cost of CO2 mitigation arising because of replacement of different fossil fuels by renewable solar energy. For each fossil fuel replaced, the gross annual amount of CO2 as well as net amount of annual CO2 emissions mitigation potential considering CO2 emissions embodied in the manufacture of mixed-mode solar dryer has been estimated. The CO2 mitigation potential and amount of fossil fuels saved while drying potato samples were found to be the maximum for coal followed by light diesel oil and natural gas. It was inferred from the present study that by the year 2020, 23 % of CO2 emissions can be mitigated by the use of mixed-mode solar dryer for drying of agricultural products.

  18. INVESTIGATION OF IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON PROPERTIES USED IN HYDROGEN SULFIDE FINE REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Isik-Gulsac

    Full Text Available Abstract The effects of relative humidity (RH, carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, oxygen (O2 presence and gas hourly space velocity (GHSV on H2S adsorption dynamics of KOH/CaO impregnated activated carbon are investigated in this study. X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray detector (SEM-EDX, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR techniques are applied and nitrogen adsorption characteristics are determined for characterization. The presence of water, O2 and lower GHSV has beneficial effects on the activated carbon performance. CO2 decreases the adsorption capacity due to its acidic characteristics. Best adsorption capacity is obtained as 13 wt % in KOH/CaO impregnated activated carbon, in a CH4 (60%/CO2 (38%/O2 (2% gas atmosphere, at ambient temperature, RH 90 and 5000 h-1 GHSV. Sulphur species formation was verified with the help of SEM-EDX, XRD, TGA, FTIR and nitrogen adsorption analysis on the exhausted samples.

  19. Experimental investigation on combustion of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures in the medium of low-superheated steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribaturin, N. A.; Fedorov, V. A.; Alekseev, M. V.; Bogomolov, A. R.; Sorokin, A. L.; Azikhanov, S. S.; Shevyrev, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental data are represented on the investigation of combustion of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures in the medium of low-superheated (initial temperature of approximately 150°C) steam at atmospheric pressure. The influence of the ratio of mass flows of the combustible mixture and steam on the qualitative composition of combustion products and the temperature of produced steam is revealed. Main laws for combustion of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow, which affect the completeness of mixture combustion, are determined. Experimental data on the influence of concentrations of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the flow of the steam and the combustible mixture upon the completeness of combustion are given. It is found that, when burning the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow with a temperature of 1000-1200°C, it is possible using a variation of the combustible mixture flow. At the same time, the volume fraction of noncondensable gases in the produced steam is no more than 2%. It is revealed that there are several combustion modes of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow, in which, in one case, the steam always suppresses combustion and, in another one, detonation of the combustible mixture combustible mixture occurs. It is found that with the excess air factor close to unit, the combustion of the methane-oxygen mixture within steam and the vapor conversion of methane, which result in the appearance of free hydrogen in the produced high-temperature steam, are possible. The description and the principle of the operation of the experimental bench for investigation of combustion of methane-oxygen and hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in the medium of steam are given. Results of experimental investigations of burning fuel and oxygen in the medium of steam are used in the development of a steam superheater for a hightemperature steam turbine.

  20. Investigation of thermal and optical properties of some quartet mixed hydrogen-bonded liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumuş, Mustafa

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the thermal and optical properties of quartet mixtures formed at different weight ratios (1:1:1:1 and 1.5:1:1:1) from liquid crystals 4-octyloxy-4‧-cyanobiphenyl (8OCB), 4-hexylbenzoic acid, 4-(octyloxy)benzoic acid and 4-(decyloxy)benzoic acid were investigated by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and polarized optic microscopy (POM). The phase transition temperatures of the novel quartet mixtures measured in the DSC experiments are in line with the POM experiments. The experimental results clearly show that the novel liquid crystal mixtures have displayed pure liquid crystalline properties. According to the phase diagram drawn from DSC results, the nematic range of the novel mixture at the eutectic point is larger than the nematic ranges of the components. The mesomorphic structures of produced homolog complex mixtures are found to be smectic and nematic phases. But the smectic phase cannot be observed in the novel complex 1.5:1:1:1 mixture during continuous cooling. The nematic range of the novel complex 1.5:1:1:1 mixture is bigger than the nematic range of the novel complex 1:1:1:1 mixture with increasing 8OCB. Also, the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition temperature decreases with increasing the weight ratio of 8OCB in the complex quartet mixture. Another interesting result is that the produced mixtures are to be like a medical cream at room temperatures. Furthermore, order parameter and thermal stability factor of the transitions are also calculated.

  1. A digital microfluidic system for the investigation of pre-steady-state enzyme kinetics using rapid quenching with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nichols, K.P.F.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2007-01-01

    A digital microfluidic system based on electrowetting has been developed to facilitate the investigation of pre-steady-state reaction kinetics using rapid quenching and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The device consists of individually

  2. Hydrogen in the Methanol Production Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralj, Anita Kovac; Glavic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very important industrial gas in chemical processes. It is very volatile; therefore, it can escape from the process units and its mass balance is not always correct. In many industrial processes where hydrogen is reacted, kinetics are often related to hydrogen pressure. The right thermodynamic properties of hydrogen can be found for…

  3. Hydrogenation properties of Mg-Al alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    . Further, it is found that the kinetics of hydrogenation, as well dehydrogenation, may be significantly improved by alloying compared to pure Mg. The expense of these improvements of the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation properties is a lower gravimetric hydrogen density in the hydrogenated product, (C) 2008...

  4. Hydrogen sorption and desorption properties of Pd-alloys and steels investigated by electrochemical methods and mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uluc, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Although it has been more than a century since the first known hydrogen embrittlement case was reported, the fundamental question regarding its mechanism is still open to debate. Understanding the hydrogen-metal interactions is of great importance in tailoring microstructures that will have

  5. Modeling of the non isothermal and non isobaric transformations kinetics. Application to the kaolinite de-hydroxylation and to the tri-uranium octo-oxide reduction by hydrogen; Modelisation de la cinetique de transformations non isothermes et (ou) non isobares. Application a la deshydroxylation de la kaolinite et a la reduction de l'octooxyde de triuranium par l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, St

    2002-12-15

    The aim of this work is to be able to describe transformations, occurring when solids and gases are in non isothermal and non isobaric conditions, with kinetic models. A methodology has been used. Two essential processes have to be taken into account: the germination and the growth. The germs are supposed to be formed (at constant temperature and pressure) in the grains surface with a constant velocity by surface unit, (gamma), called germination surface frequency (number of germs.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}. The growth velocity is characterized by a growth surface reactivity, (phi) (in mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}). With an appropriate transformation model, it is possible to obtain the variations of (gamma) and (phi) in terms of the temperature and pressure which are then used in the calculation of the velocity in non isothermal and non isobaric conditions. In order to validate the developed method, two reactions have been studied. For the first one, the kaolinite de-hydroxylation, an anisotropic germination-growth model, where the step limiting the growth is a diffusion step, has been developed in order to explain the experimental kinetic curves. Nevertheless the velocity curves calculated from this model do not allow to describe the reaction for some temperature variations. This result shows the difficulty to precisely determine the germination surface frequency what induces an important approximation on the kinetic curves. The second reaction is the tri-uranium octo-oxide reduction by hydrogen. It has been shown that this reaction occurs according to three successive transformations. A kinetic model has been developed for each of these reactions considering germination as instantaneous. At last, in comparing this model with the experimental velocity curves, a very good agreement has been verified as well as for a temperature variation than for a hydrogen partial pressure change during the reaction. (O.M.)

  6. An investigation into the crystallization tendency/kinetics of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredients: A case study with dipyridamole and cinnarizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; Redington, Wynette; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous drug formulations have great potential to enhance solubility and thus bioavailability of BCS class II drugs. However, the higher free energy and molecular mobility of the amorphous form drive them towards the crystalline state which makes them unstable. Accurate determination of the crystallization tendency/kinetics is the key to the successful design and development of such systems. In this study, dipyridamole (DPM) and cinnarizine (CNZ) have been selected as model compounds. Thermodynamic fragility (mT) was measured from the heat capacity change at the glass transition temperature (Tg) whereas dynamic fragility (mD) was evaluated using methods based on extrapolation of configurational entropy to zero [Formula: see text] , and heating rate dependence of Tg [Formula: see text] . The mean relaxation time of amorphous drugs was calculated from the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) equation. Furthermore, the correlation between fragility and glass forming ability (GFA) of the model drugs has been established and the relevance of these parameters to crystallization of amorphous drugs is also assessed. Moreover, the crystallization kinetics of model drugs under isothermal conditions has been studied using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine the Avrami constant 'n' which provides an insight into the mechanism of crystallization. To further probe into the crystallization mechanism, the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of model systems were also analysed by statistically fitting the crystallization data to 15 different kinetic models and the relevance of model-free kinetic approach has been established. The crystallization mechanism for DPM and CNZ at each extent of transformation has been predicted. The calculated fragility, glass forming ability (GFA) and crystallization kinetics are found to be in good correlation with the stability prediction of amorphous solid dispersions. Thus, this research work involves a multidisciplinary approach to

  7. Investigations on hydrogen isotope ratios of endogenous urinary steroids: reference-population-based thresholds and proof-of-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Thomas; Thomas, Andreas; Thevis, Mario; Saugy, Martial

    2012-09-01

    Carbon isotope ratio (CIR) analysis has been routinely and successfully used in sports drug testing for many years to uncover the misuse of endogenous steroids. One limitation of the method is the availability of steroid preparations exhibiting CIRs equal to endogenous steroids. To overcome this problem, hydrogen isotope ratios (HIR) of endogenous urinary steroids were investigated as a potential complement; results obtained from a reference population of 67 individuals are presented herein. An established sample preparation method was modified and improved to enable separate measurements of each analyte of interest where possible. From the fraction of glucuronidated steroids; pregnanediol, 16-androstenol, 11-ketoetiocholanolone, androsterone (A), etiocholanolone (E), dehydroepiandrosterone (D), 5α- and 5β-androstanediol, testosterone and epitestosterone were included. In addition, sulfate conjugates of A, E, D, epiandrosterone and 17α- and 17β-androstenediol were considered and analyzed after acidic solvolysis. The obtained results enabled the calculation of the first reference-population-based thresholds for HIR of urinary steroids that can readily be applied to routine doping control samples. Proof-of-concept was accomplished by investigating urine specimens collected after a single oral application of testosterone-undecanoate. The HIR of most testosterone metabolites were found to be significantly influenced by the exogenous steroid beyond the established threshold values. Additionally, one regular doping control sample with an extraordinary testosterone/epitestosterone ratio of 100 without suspicious CIR was subjected to the complementary methodology of HIR analysis. The HIR data eventually provided evidence for the exogenous origin of urinary testosterone metabolites. Despite further investigations on HIR being advisable to corroborate the presented reference-population-based thresholds, the developed method proved to be a new tool supporting modern

  8. Investigation of amorphous silicon carbide:hydrogen and Parylene-C thin films as encapsulation materials for neural interface devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jui-Mei

    Neural interface devices have been developed for neuroscience and neuroprosthetics applications to record and stimulate nerve signals. Chronic use of these devices is prevented by their lack of long-term stability due to device failure or immune system responses. Fully integrated, wireless, silicon-based neural interface (INI) devices are being developed to address the main failure modes by eliminating the wired connections. Furthermore, chronic stable, conformal, hermetic, biocompatible, and electrically insulating coating materials that sustain chronic implantation and guarantee stable recording or stimulation are needed. Even though a large selection of materials has been proposed and tested for this purpose, to date, no encapsulation material or coating process presented in scientific literature has been thoroughly characterized or qualified as long-term hermetic encapsulation for silicon micro-electrode arrays. In this work, hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiCx:H) and Parylene-C films were investigated as encapsulation materials. The deposition parameters and corresponding film properties were explored and correlated with the encapsulation characteristics. The bond configuration of the deposited a-SiCx:H films was analyzed by FT-IR in order to develop films with strong chemical structure and low defect density. Film properties were optimized based on the bond configuration and process temperature requirements ( 12 months). Oxygen plasma etching processes necessary for deinsulation of the electrode tips and the etching performance on the Parylene-C were investigated, and the relationship between tip exposure and electrode impedance was studied. Excellent encapsulation properties of Parylene-C were demonstrated. The correlation between process parameters and Parylene-C properties was investigated, including surface topography, adhesion, and crystallinity.

  9. A new real-time method for investigation of affinity properties and binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlov, Alexey V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov St, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nikitin, Maxim P. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov St, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 16/10 Miklukho-Maklaya St, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutskii per., Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation); Bragina, Vera A.; Znoyko, Sergey L.; Zaikina, Marina N.; Ksenevich, Tatiana I.; Gorshkov, Boris G. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov St, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nikitin, Petr I., E-mail: nikitin@kapella.gpi.ru [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov St, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31 Kashirskoe shosse, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    A method for quantitative investigation of affinity constants of receptors immobilized on magnetic nanoparticles (MP) is developed based on spectral correlation interferometry (SCI). The SCI records with a picometer resolution the thickness changes of a layer of molecules or nanoparticles due to a biochemical reaction on a cover slip, averaged over the sensing area. The method is compatible with other types of sensing surfaces employed in biosensing. The measured values of kinetic association constants of magnetic nanoparticles are 4 orders of magnitude higher than those of molecular antibody association with antigen. The developed method also suggests highly sensitive detection of antigens in a wide dynamic range. The limit of detection of 92 pg/ml has been demonstrated for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) with 50-nm MP employed as labels, which produce 3-order amplification of the SCI signals. The calibration curve features high sensitivity (slope) of 3-fold signal raise per 10-fold increase of PSA concentration within 4-order dynamic range, which is an attractive compromise for precise quantitative and highly sensitive immunoassay. The proposed biosensing technique offers inexpensive disposable sensor chips of cover slips and represents an economically sound alternative to traditional immunoassays for disease diagnostics, detection of pathogens in food and environmental monitoring. - Highlights: • Method for study of affinity constants of magnetic nanoparticles with receptors is proposed. • Association constants of such particles are 4 orders higher than for biomolecules. • Method is compatible with widely used biosensor surfaces and affordable consumables. • It has high sensitivity: 3-fold signal increasing per 10-fold of PSA concentration. • Limit of detection for PSA is 92 pg/ml, dynamic range – 4 orders of concentration.

  10. Role of protons in the pump cycle of KdpFABC investigated by time-resolved kinetic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damnjanovic, Bojana; Apell, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-05-20

    The time-resolved kinetics of the KdpFABC complex solubilized in Aminoxide WS-35 was investigated by ATP concentration jump experiments. ATP was photoreleased from its inactive precursor, caged ATP, and charge movements in the membrane domain of the KdpFABC were detected by the electrochromic dye RH421. At low ATP concentrations, the ATP binding step became rate-limiting with an apparent, pH-independent ATP binding affinity of ~70 μM. At saturating ATP concentrations, the rate-limiting step is the conformational transition (E1-P → P-E2) with a rate constant of ~1.7 s(-1) at 20 °C that was independent of K(+) concentration. This observation together with the detected fluorescence decrease indicates that K(+) (or another positive ion) is bound in the membrane domain after enzyme phosphorylation and the conformational transition to the P-E2 state. pH dependence experiments revealed different roles of H(+) in the transport mechanism. Two different functions of protons for the ion pump must be distinguished. On one hand, there are electrogenically bound "functional" protons, which are not transported but prerequisite for the performance of the ATP-driven half-cycle. On the other hand, protons bind to the transport sites, acting as weak congeners of K(+). There possibly are noncompetitively bound protons, affecting the enzyme activity and/or coupling between KdpA and KdpB subunits. Finally, the recently proposed Post-Albers model for the KdpFABC complex was supplemented with stoichiometry factors of 2 for K(+) and 3 for H(+), and additional inhibitory side reactions controlled by H(+) were introduced, which are relevant at pH <6.5 and/or in the absence of K(+).

  11. The investigation of the hydrogen bond saturation effect during the dipole-dipole induced azobenzene supramolecular self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linfeng; Wu, Rongliang; Guang, Shanyi; Su, Xinyan; Xu, Hongyao

    2013-12-21

    The substituent group and hydrogen bonds play important roles in supramolecular self-assembly. To exploit the influential mechanism of hydrogen bonds during the dipole-dipole induced supramolecular self-assembly, some rigid azobenzene molecules with different electronegativity and hydrogen bonding capabilities were identified and designed. Different regular-shaped architectures were constructed via a simple solution process under mild conditions. Both experimental results and density functional theory calculations show that weak π-π stacking interactions lead to thick and short nanocylinders, strong dipole-dipole interactions and dipole induced π-π stacking lead to long and thin nanorods, appropriate hydrogen bonds consolidate the dipole-dipole interactions and dipole induced π-π stacking, forming thin nanosheets, while excessive hydrogen bonds in azobenzene would ruin the regular-shaped structures, giving irregular and stochastic aggregates. Namely there exists a certain hydrogen bond saturation effect in generating azobenzene nanostructures driven by dipole-dipole interactions. The results indicate that the morphologies of organic materials with azobenzene structures can be effectively controlled through rational molecular design by way of introducing appropriate dipole and hydrogen bonds.

  12. Mechanism of CO 2 Hydrogenation on Pd/Al 2 O 3 Catalysts: Kinetics and Transient DRIFTS-MS Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiang; Shi, Hui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, János

    2015-09-17

    The hydrogenation of CO2 was investigated over a wide range of reaction conditions, using two Pd/γ-Al2O3 catalysts with different Pd loadings (5% and 0.5%) and dispersions (~11% and ~100%, respectively). Turnover rates for CO and CH4 formation were both higher over 5% Pd/Al2O3 with a larger average Pd particle size than those over 0.5% Pd/Al2O3 with a smaller average particle size. The selectivity to methane (22-40%) on 5% Pd/Al2O3 was higher by a factor of 2-3 than that on 0.5% Pd/Al2O3. The drastically different rate expressions and apparent energies of activation for CO and CH4 formation lead us to conclude that reverse water gas shift and CO2 methanation do not share the same rate-limiting step on Pd, and that the two pathways are probably catalyzed at different surface sites. Measured reaction orders in CO2 and H2 pressures were similar over the two catalysts, suggesting that the reaction mechanism for each pathway does not change with particle size. In accordance, the DRIFTS results reveal that the prevalent surface species and their evolution patterns are comparable on the two catalysts during transient and steady-state experiments, switching feed gases among CO2, H2 and CO2+H2. The DRIFTS and MS results also demonstrate that no direct dissociation of CO2 takes place over the two catalysts, and that CO2 has to first react with surface hydroxyls on the oxide support. The thus-formed bicarbonates react with dissociatively adsorbed hydrogen on Pd particles to produce adsorbed formate species (bifunctional catalyst: CO2 activation on the oxide support, and H2 dissociation on the metal particles). Formates near the Pd particles (most likely at the metal/oxide interface) can react rapidly with adsorbed H

  13. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Kjøller, John; Larsen, B.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast at tempe......A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast...... at temperatures around 600 K and above, but the reversed reaction showed somewhat slower kinetics around 600 K. At higher temperatures the opposite was found. The enthalpy and entropy change by the hydrogenation, derived from pressure-concentration isotherms, agree fairly well with those reported earlier....

  14. Experimental and numerical investigations of the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion chamber of an industrial gas turbine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haj Ayed, A; Kusterer, K; Funke, H.H.-W; Keinz, J; Striegan, C; Bohn, D

    2015-01-01

    .... Due to the large difference in the physical properties of hydrogen compared to other fuels such as natural gas, well established gas turbine combustion systems cannot be directly applied for dry-low-NOx (DLN...

  15. Hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide sequestration in TBAF semi-clathrate hydrates: Kinetics and evolution of hydrate-phase composition by in situ raman spectroscopy - Abstract -

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres Trueba, A.; Radoviæ, I.R.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Kroon, M.C.; Peters, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) represents almost one third of the emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels additionally, CO2 has been identified as the mayor contributor of global warming. Hydrogen (H2), on the other hand, due to its properties is considered a promising energy carrier. Clathrate hydrates

  16. Investigation of hydrogen recycling in long-duration discharges and its modification with a hot wall in the spherical tokamak QUEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, K.; Yoshida, N.; Honda, T.; Wang, Z.; Kuzmin, A.; Takagi, I.; Hirata, T.; Oya, Y.; Miyamoto, M.; Zushi, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Watanabe, O.; Onchi, T.; Kuroda, K.; Long, H.; Watanabe, H.; Tokunaga, K.; Higashijima, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Nagata, T.; Takase, Y.; Fukuyama, A.; Mitarai, O.

    2017-12-01

    Fully non-inductive plasma maintenance was achieved by a microwave of 8.2 GHz and 40 kW for more than 1 h 55 min with a well-controlled plasma-facing wall (PFW) temperature of 393 K, using a hot wall in the middle-sized spherical tokamak QUEST, until the discharge was finally terminated by the uncontrollability of the density. The PFW was composed of atmospheric plasma-sprayed tungsten and stainless steel. The hot wall plays an essential role in reducing the amount of wall-stored hydrogen and facilitates hydrogen recycling. The behaviour of fuel hydrogen in the PFW was investigated by monitoring the injection and evacuation of hydrogen into and from the plasma-producing vessel. A fuel particle balance equation based on the presence of a hydrogen transport barrier between the deposited layer and the substrate was applied to the long-duration discharges. It was found that the model could readily predict the observed behaviour in which a higher wall temperature likely gives rise to faster wall saturation.

  17. Redox Kinetics and Nonstoichiometry of Ce0.5Zr0.5O2−δ for Water Splitting and Hydrogen Production

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2017-04-25

    Water splitting and chemical fuel production as a promising carbon-neutral energy solution relies critically on an efficient electrochemical process over catalyst surfaces. The fundamentals within the surface redox pathways, including the complex interactions of mobile ions and electrons between the bulk and the surface, along with the role of adsorbates and electrostatic fields remain yet to be understood quantitatively. This work presents a detailed kinetics study and nonstoichiometry characterization of Ce0.5Zr0.5O2−δ (CZO), one of the most recognized catalysts for water splitting. The use of CZO leads to >60% improvement in the kinetic rates as compared with undoped ceria with twice the total yield at 700 °C, resulting from the improved reducibility. The peak H2 production rate is 95 μmol g–1 s–1 at 700 °C, and the total production is 750 μmol g–1. A threshold temperature of 650 °C is required to achieve significant H2 production at fast rates. The redox kinetics is modeled using two-step surface chemistry with bulk-to-surface transport equilibrium. Kinetics and equilibrium parameters are extracted, and the model predictions show good agreement with the measurements. The enthalpy of bulk defect formation for CZO is found to be 262 kJ/mol, >40% lower than that of undoped ceria. As oxygen vacancy is gradually filled up, the surface H2O splitting chemistry undergoes a transition from exothermic to endothermic, with the crossover around δ = 0.04 to 0.05, which constrains the further ion incorporation process. Our kinetics study reveals that the H2O splitting process with CZO is kinetics limited at low temperature and transitions to partial-equilibrium with significantly enhanced backward reaction at high temperature. The charge-transfer step is found to be the rate-limiting step for H2O splitting. The detailed kinetics and nonstoichiometric equilibria should be helpful in guiding the design and optimization of CZO as a catalyst, oxygen storage

  18. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the reaction between the •OH radical and adenine – a theoretical investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milhøj, Birgitte Olai; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2015-01-01

    the computational method is validated by considering the hydrogen abstraction from the heterocyclic N9 nitrogen in adenine as a test system. Geometries for all molecules in the reaction are optimised with four different DFT exchange-correlation functionals (B3LYP, BHandHLYP, M06-2X and wB97X-D), in combination...

  19. Primary Ion Depletion Kinetics (PIDK) Studies as a New Tool for Investigating Chemical Ionization Fragmentation Reactions with PTR-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhfried, Erna; Märk, Tilmann D; Biasioli, Franco

    2013-01-01

    We report on a new approach for studying fragmentation channels in Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS), which we name primary ion depletion kinetics (PIDK). PTR-MS is a chemical ionization mass spectrometric (CIMS) technique deploying hydronium ions for the chemical ionization. Induced by extremely high concentrations of analyte M, depletion of the primary ions in the drift tube occurs. This is observed as quasi zero concentration of the primary ion H3O(+), and constant MH(+). Under these non-standard conditions, we find an overall changed fragmentation. We offer two explanations. Either the changed fragmentation pattern is the result of secondary proton transfer reactions. Or, alternatively, the fast depletion of H3O(+) leads to reduced heating of H3O(+) in the drift field, and consequently changed fragmentation following protonation of the analyte M. In any case, we use the observed changes in fragmentation as a successful new approach to fragmentation studies, and term it primary ion depletion kinetics, PIDK. PIDK easily yields an abundance of continuous data points with little deviation, because they are obtained in one experimental run, even for low abundant fragments. This is an advantage over traditional internal kinetic energy variation studies (electric field per number density (E/N) variation studies). Also, some interpretation on the underlying fragmentation reaction mechanisms can be gleamed. We measure low occurring fragmentation (kinetics allows for the identification of dehydrogenation [MH(+) -H2] and adduct formation (RMH(+)) as low abundant fragmentation channels in monosulfides.

  20. In-situ investigation of strain-induced martensitic transformation kinetics in an austenitic stainless steel by inductive measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso de Celada Casero, C.; Kooiker, Harm; Groen, Manso; Post, J; San Martin, D

    2017-01-01

    An inductive sensor developed by Philips ATC has been used to study in-situ the austenite (γ) to martensite (α′) phase transformation kinetics during tensile testing in an AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel. A correlation between the sensor output signal and the volume fraction of α′-martensite

  1. Esterification of oleic acid for biodiesel production catalyzed by SnCl{sub 2}: a kinetic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, A. L.; Gonzaga Neves, S. C.; Silva, M. J. da [Departament of Chemistry, Federal University of Vicosa, Vicosa, Minas Gerais, 36570-000 (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The production of biodiesel from low-cost raw materials which generally contain high amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs) is a valuable alternative that would make their production costs more competitive than petroleum-derived fuel. Currently, the production of biodiesel from this kind of raw materials comprises a two-stage process, which requires an initial acid-catalyzed esterification of the FFA, followed by a basecatalyzed transesterification of the triglycerides. Commonly, the acid H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is the catalyst on the first step of this process. It must be said, however, that major drawbacks such as substantial reactor corrosion and the great generation of wastes, including the salts formed due to neutralization of the mineral acid, are negative and virtually unsurmountable aspects of this protocol. In this paper, tin(II) chloride dihydrate (SnCl{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O), an inexpensive Lewis acid, was evaluated as catalyst on the ethanolysis of oleic acid, which is the major component of several fat and vegetable oils feedstocks. Tin chloride efficiently promoted the conversion of oleic acid into ethyl oleate in ethanol solution and in soybean oil samples, under mild reaction conditions. The SnCl{sub 2} catalyst was shown to be as active as the mineral acid H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Its use has relevant advantages in comparison to mineral acids catalysts, such as less corrosion of the reactors and as well as avoiding the unnecessary neutralization of products. Herein, the effect of the principal parameters of reaction on the yield and rate of ethyl oleate production has been investigated. Kinetic measurements revealed that the esterification of oleic acid catalyzed by SnCl{sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O is first-order in relation to both FFAs and catalyst concentration. Experimentally, it was verified that the energy of activation of the esterification reaction of oleic acid catalyzed by SnCl{sub 2} was very close to those reported for H{sub 2}SO{sub 4

  2. Demonstration of Ion Kinetic Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions and Investigation of Magnetic Reconnection Using Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shock-driven laser inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions have demonstrated the presence of ion kinetic effects in ICF implosions and also have been used as a proton source to probe the strongly driven reconnection of MG magnetic fields in laser-generated plasmas. Ion kinetic effects arise during the shock-convergence phase of ICF implosions when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions (λii) approaches the size of the hot-fuel region (Rfuel) and may impact hot-spot formation and the possibility of ignition. To isolate and study ion kinetic effects, the ratio of N - K =λii /Rfuel was varied in D3He-filled, shock-driven implosions at the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility, from hydrodynamic-like conditions (NK 0.01) to strongly kinetic conditions (NK 10). A strong trend of decreasing fusion yields relative to the predictions of hydrodynamic models is observed as NK increases from 0.1 to 10. Hydrodynamics simulations that include basic models of the kinetic effects that are likely to be present in these experiments-namely, ion diffusion and Knudsen-layer reduction of the fusion reactivity-are better able to capture the experimental results. This type of implosion has also been used as a source of monoenergetic 15-MeV protons to image magnetic fields driven to reconnect in laser-produced plasmas at conditions similar to those encountered at the Earth's magnetopause. These experiments demonstrate that for both symmetric and asymmetric magnetic-reconnection configurations, when plasma flows are much stronger than the nominal Alfvén speed, the rate of magnetic-flux annihilation is determined by the flow velocity and is largely insensitive to initial plasma conditions. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Grant Number DENA0001857.

  3. Investigation of zinc recovery by hydrogen reduction assisted pyrolysis of alkaline and zinc-carbon battery waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebin, Burçak; Petranikova, Martina; Steenari, Britt-Marie; Ekberg, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Zinc (Zn) recovery from alkaline and zinc-carbon (Zn-C) battery waste were studied by a laboratory scale pyrolysis process at a reaction temperature of 950°C for 15-60min residence time using 5%H 2(g) -N 2(g) mixture at 1.0L/min gas flow rate. The effect of different cooling rates on the properties of pyrolysis residue, manganese oxide particles, were also investigated. Morphological and structural characterization of the produced Zn particles were performed. The battery black mass was characterized with respect to the properties and chemical composition of the waste battery particles. The thermodynamics of the pyrolysis process was studied using the HSC Chemistry 5.11 software. A hydrogen reduction reaction of the battery black mass (washed with Milli-Q water) takes place at the chosen temperature and makes it possible to produce fine Zn particles by rapid condensation following the evaporation of Zn from the pyrolysis batch. The amount of Zn that can be separated from the black mass increases by extending the residence time. Recovery of 99.8% of the Zn was achieved at 950°C for 60min residence time using 1.0L/min gas flow rate. The pyrolysis residue contains MnO and Mn 2 O 3 compounds, and the oxidation state of manganese can be controlled by cooling rate and atmosphere. The Zn particles exhibit spherical and hexagonal particle morphology with a particle size varying between 200nm and 3µm. However the particles were formed by aggregation of nanoparticles which are primarily nucleated from the gas phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of crude extract of lentil plant (Lens culinaris Medikus) in peroxidase-based analyses: fast kinetic determination of hydrogen peroxide and sarcosine in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Galende, Patricia; Manzano Muñoz, Teresa; Roig, Manuel G; García de María, Cándido

    2012-11-01

    Peroxidase-catalysed reactions are used in a wide variety of analytical applications, most of them based on the final quantification of hydrogen peroxide. Clinical tests for glucose, cholesterol, creatine, creatinine or uric acid in blood or urine and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for pesticides, hepatitis or acquired immune deficiency syndrome are good examples of such applications. The most widely used and commercially available peroxidase for biotechnological processes and analytical applications is horseradish peroxidase followed, although in much lower proportion, by soybean peroxidase. The high commercial interest in peroxidases has led to the search for new sources of these enzymes. This work describes the analytical use of lentil plant peroxidase (LPP), which is a new peroxidase extracted from lentil plants (Lens culinaris Medikus); an abundant post-harvest agricultural waste in the area of Castilla y León (Spain). A procedure for the quantification of hydrogen peroxide in urine is first proposed using crude extract of lentil plant instead of the purified enzyme. This procedure is then applied to the determination of sarcosine; a natural amino acid that has attracted considerable interest in clinical diagnostics since urinary sarcosine was proposed and later questioned as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Under the action of sarcosine oxidase, sarcosine is oxidized by molecular oxygen to give glycine, formaldehyde and hydrogen peroxide that is quantified according to the previously proposed procedure. The limit of detection for both hydrogen peroxide and sarcosine is around 5 × 10(-7) M. In the determination of sarcosine, the high selectivity of the overall enzymatic reaction, the simple sample treatment and instrumentation, the high-sample throughput and the use of LPP in the plant extract instead of the purified enzyme provide a rapid and inexpensive procedure with characteristics very suitable for routine analysis in a clinical laboratory.

  5. An Experimental Investigation on Performance and Emissions of a Single Cylinder D.I Diesel Engine with Manifold Hydrogen Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroun A.K. Shahad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is a clean fuel for internal combustion engines as it produces only water vapor and nitrogen oxides when it burns. In this research, hydrogen is used as a blending fuel with diesel to reduce pollutants emission and to improve performance. It is inducted in the inlet manifold, (continuous manifold induction, which is of a single cylinder, four stroke, direct injection, variable compression ratio water cold diesel engine, type (Kirloskar. This technique of hydrogen blending is selected because of its simplicity and low cost. Hydrogen blending is built on the basis of energy replacement. A special electronic unit is designed and fabricated to control hydrogen blending ratio. The maximum achieved ratio is 30% of input energy and beyond that the engine operation becomes unsatisfactory. Tests are done with 17.5 compression ratio and 1500 rpm. The brake specific fuel consumption is reduced by 29% and the engine thermal efficiency increased by 16% at these operating conditions. The pollutant emissions of carbon oxides, UHC, and smoke opacity are dramatically decreased by 19.5%, 13%,and 45% respectively while NOx emission increased by 10%.

  6. Theoretical investigation of the coupling between hydrogen-atom transfer and stacking interaction in adenine-thymine dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Giovanni

    2013-04-15

    Three different dimers of the adenine-thymine (A-T) base pair are studied to point out the changes of important properties (structure, atomic charge, energy and so on) induced by coupling between the movement of the atoms in the hydrogen bonds and the stacking interaction. The comparison of these results with those for the A-T monomer system explains the role of the stacking interaction in the hydrogen-atom transfer in this biologically important base pair. The results support the idea that this coupling depends on the exact dimer considered and is different for the N-N and N-O hydrogen bonds. In particular, the correlation between the hydrogen transfer and the stacking interaction is more relevant for the N-N bridge than for the N-O one. Also, the two different mechanisms of two-hydrogen transfer (step by step and concerted) can be modified by the stacking interaction between the base pairs. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF COMBUSTION, PERFORMANCE AND EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF SPARK IGNITION ENGINE FUELLED WITH BUTHANOL – GASOLINE MIXTURE AND A HYDROGEN ENRICHED AIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredas Rimkus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, spark ignition engine fuelled with buthanol-gasoline mixture and a hydrogen-enriched air was investigated. Engine performance, emissions and combustion characteristics were investigated with different buthanol (10% and 20% by volume gasoline mixtures and additionally supplied oxygen and hydrogen (HHO gas mixture (3.6 l/min in the sucked air. Hydrogen, which is in the HHO gas, improves gasoline and gasoline-buthanol mixture combustion, increases indicated pressure during combustion phase and decreases effective specific fuel consumption. Buthanol addition decreases the rate of heat release, the combustion temperature and pressure are lower which have an influence on lower nitrous oxide (NOx emission in exhaust gases. Buthanol lowers hydrocarbon (HC formation, but it increases carbon monoxide (CO concentration and fuel consumption. Combustion process analysis was carried out using AVL BOOST software. Experimental research and combustion process numerical simulation showed that using balanced buthanol and hydrogen addition, optimal efficient and ecological parameters could be achieved when engine is working with optimal spark timing, as it would work on gasoline fuel.

  9. Thermochemical properties of the hydrogen getter DEB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balooch, M.; LeMay, J.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wang, W.-E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, 4164 Etcheverry Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)

    1999-04-20

    Vapor pressures of the hydrogen getter 1,4 bis(phenylethynyl)benzene (DEB), together with two of its derivatives namely DEB mixed with carbon-supported Pd (DEB-Pd/C) and hydrogenated DEB-Pd/C, are measured from room temperature to the melting temperature (179 C). The corresponding thermodynamic information, such as the enthalpy of vaporization, boiling point, and the deviation from ideal solution behavior of DEB-Pd/C, has been derived from the vapor pressure-temperature relationships. In addition, the hydrogenation kinetics of DEB-Pd/C (powder form and rod-like) has also been investigated at a fixed pressure of 13.3 Pa (0.1 Torr) and at four temperatures, 21 C, 35 C, 45 C and 55 C. (orig.) 5 refs.

  10. Experimental investigation of solid hydrogen pellet ablation in high-temperature plasmas using holographic interferometry and other diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Jr., C. E.

    1981-03-01

    The technology currently most favored for the refueling of fusion reactors is the high-velocity injection of solid hydrogen pellets. Design details are presented for a holographic interferometer/shadowgraph used to study the microscopic characteristics of a solid hydrogen pellet ablating in an approx. 1-keV plasma. Experimental data are presented for two sets of experiments in which the interferometer/shadowgraph was used to study approx. 1-mm-diam solid hydrogen pellets injected into the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at velocities of 1000 m/s. In addition to the use of the holographic interferometer, the pellet ablation process is diagnosed by studying the emission of Balmer-alpha photons and by using the available tokamak diagnostics (Thomson scattering, microwave/far-infrared interferometer, pyroelectric radiometer, hard x-ray detector).

  11. Hydrogen storage materials with focus on main group I-II elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Anders

    2005-07-01

    A future hydrogen based society, viz. a society in which hydrogen is the primary energy carrier, is viewed by many as a solution to many of the energy related problems of the world {integral} the ultimate problem being the eventual depletion of fossil fuels. Although, for the hydrogen based society to become realizable, several technical difficulties must be dealt with. Especially, the transport sector relies on a cheap, safe and reliable way of storing hydrogen with high storage capacity, fast kinetics and favourable thermodynamics. No potential hydrogen storage candidate has been found yet, which meets all the criteria just summarized. The hydrogen storage solution showing the greatest potential in fulfilling the hydrogen storage criteria with respect to storage capacity, is solid state storage in light metal hydrides e.g. alkali metals and alkali earth metals. The remaining issues to be dealt with mainly concerns the kinetics of hydrogen uptake/release and the thermal stability of the formed hydride. In this thesis the hydrogen storage properties of some magnesium based hydrides and alkali metal tetrahydridoaluminates, a subclass of the so called complex hydrides, are explored in relation to hydrogen storage. After briefly reviewing the major energy related problems of the world, including some basic concepts of solid state hydrogen storage the dehydrogenation kinetics of various magnesium based hydrides are investigated. By means of time resolved in situ X-ray powder diffraction, quantitative phase analysis is performed for air exposed samples of magnesium, magnesium-copper, and magnesium-aluminum based hydrides. From kinetic analysis of the different samples it is generally found that the dehydrogenation kinetics of magnesium hydride is severely hampered by the presence of oxide impurities whereas alloying with both Cu and Al creates compounds significantly less sensitive towards contamination. This leads to a phenomenological explanation of the large

  12. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  13. Investigating the Interaction between the Neonatal Fc Receptor and Monoclonal Antibody Variants by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Larraillet, Vincent; Schlothauer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    in understanding and modulating the IgG-FcRn interaction to optimize antibody pharmacokinetics and ultimately improve efficacy and safety. Here we studied the interaction between a full-length human IgG1 and human FcRn via hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and targeted electron transfer dissociation......-type glycosylated IgG. Our results provide new molecular insight into the IgG-FcRn interaction and illustrate the capability of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to advance structural proteomics by providing detailed information on the conformation and dynamics of large protein complexes in solution....

  14. Nanoparticle Nucleation Is Termolecular in Metal and Involves Hydrogen: Evidence for a Kinetically Effective Nucleus of Three {Ir3H2x·P2W15Nb3O62}(6-) in Ir(0)n Nanoparticle Formation From [(1,5-COD)Ir(I)·P2W15Nb3O62](8-) Plus Dihydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkar, Saim; Finke, Richard G

    2017-04-19

    The nucleation process yielding Ir(0)∼300 nanoparticles from (Bu4N)5Na3[(1,5-COD)Ir·P2W15Nb3O62] (abbreviated hereafter as (COD)Ir·POM(8-), where POM(9-) = the polyoxometalate, P2W15Nb3O62(9-)) under H2 is investigated to learn the true molecularity, and hence the associated kinetically effective nucleus (KEN), for nanoparticle formation for the first time. Recent work with this prototype transition-metal nanoparticle formation system ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014 , 136 , 17601 - 17615 ) revealed that nucleation in this system is an apparent second-order in the precatalyst, A = (COD)Ir·POM(8-), not the higher order implied by classic nucleation theory and its nA ⇌ An, "critical nucleus", An concept. Herein, the three most reasonable more intimate mechanisms of nucleation are tested: bimolecular nucleation, termolecular nucleation, and a mechanism termed "alternative termolecular nucleation" in which 2(COD)Ir(+) and 1(COD)Ir·POM(8-) yield the transition state of the rate-determining step of nucleation. The results obtained definitively rule out a simple bimolecular nucleation mechanism and provide evidence for the alternative termolecular mechanism with a KEN of 3, Ir3. All higher molecularity nucleation mechanisms were also ruled out. Further insights into the KEN and its more detailed composition involving hydrogen, {Ir3H2xPOM}(6-), are also obtained from the established role of H2 in the Ir(0)∼300 formation balanced reaction stoichiometry, from the p(H2) dependence of the kinetics, and from a D2/H2 kinetic isotope effect of 1.2(±0.3). Eight insights and conclusions are presented. A section covering caveats in the current work, and thus needed future studies, is also included.

  15. Kinetics of rapid covalent bond formation of aniline with humic acid: ESR investigations with nitroxide spin labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinka, Kevin; Matthies, Michael; Theiling, Marius; Hideg, Kalman; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics used in livestock farming are distributed to farmland by application of slurry as fertilizer. Previous work suggests rapid covalent binding of the aniline moiety to humic acids found in soil. In the current work, kinetics of this binding were measured in X-band EPR spectroscopy by incubating Leonardite humic acid (LHA) with a paramagnetic aniline spin label (anilino-NO (2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-oxyl)). Binding was detected by a pronounced broadening of the spectral lines after incubation of LHA with anilino-NO. The time evolution of the amplitude of this feature was used for determining the reaction kinetics. Single- and double-exponential models were fitted to the data obtained for modelling one or two first-order reactions. Reaction rates of 0.16 min-1 and 0.012 min-1, were found respectively. Addition of laccase peroxidase did not change the kinetics but significantly enhanced the reacting fraction of anilino-NO. This EPR-based method provides a technically simple and effective method for following rapid binding processes of a xenobiotic substance to humic acids.

  16. INVESTIGATION ON THE EFFECT OF SHAPES ON THE DRYING KINETICS AND SENSORY EVALUATION STUDY OF DRIED JACKFRUIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pek Li Gan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Jackfruits are seasonal and highly nutritional fruits indigenous to the Southwestern rainforests of India. However much of the produce are spoilt annually due to poor preservation techniques. Minimal studies have been conducted on the drying kinetics of jackfruit and the effect of shapes on the drying kinetics. In this research, drying curves of three different shaped jackfruit slices were obtained using a convective oven at 40oC, 50oC, 60oC and 70oC. Modified Midilli-Kucuk Model was found to be the best kinetic model for drying of jackfruits. At all temperatures, effective moisture diffusivity values and activation energy varied from 2.66 x 10-10 - 4.85 x 10-10 m2/s and 16.08 - 20.07 kJ/mol respectively. Drying was found to be most efficient at 50oC using the square shaped slices with a R2, RMSE and SSE value of 0.9984, 0.01127 and 0.002668 respectively.  Sensory evaluation of untreated and additive-added dried jackfruit slices was conducted by 40 untrained sensory panelists. Jackfruit with ascorbic acid and sugar coating had highest aesthetics value due to better retention of colour by ascorbic acid. However sugar coated jackfruit had the most favorable taste and smell. Further optimization must be done to satisfy consumers collectively to enable a highly marketable product.

  17. Physiological role of Kv1.3 channel in T lymphocyte cell investigated quantitatively by kinetic modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Hou

    Full Text Available Kv1.3 channel is a delayed rectifier channel abundant in human T lymphocytes. Chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disorders lead to the over-expression of Kv1.3 in T cells. To quantitatively study the regulatory mechanism and physiological function of Kv1.3 in T cells, it is necessary to have a precise kinetic model of Kv1.3. In this study, we firstly established a kinetic model capable to precisely replicate all the kinetic features for Kv1.3 channels, and then constructed a T-cell model composed of ion channels including Ca2+-release activated calcium (CRAC channel, intermediate K+ (IK channel, TASK channel and Kv1.3 channel for quantitatively simulating the changes in membrane potentials and local Ca2+ signaling messengers during activation of T cells. Based on the experimental data from current-clamp recordings, we successfully demonstrated that Kv1.3 dominated the membrane potential of T cells to manipulate the Ca2+ influx via CRAC channel. Our results revealed that the deficient expression of Kv1.3 channel would cause the less Ca2+ signal, leading to the less efficiency in secretion. This was the first successful attempt to simulate membrane potential in non-excitable cells, which laid a solid basis for quantitatively studying the regulatory mechanism and physiological role of channels in non-excitable cells.

  18. INTEGRATED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEM MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B

    2007-11-16

    makes it difficult to remove the heat of reaction, especially in the relatively short target refueling times, see Attachment 3. This document describes a detailed numerical model for general metal hydride beds that couples reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer, for both hydriding and dehydriding of the bed. The detailed model is part of a comprehensive methodology for the design, evaluation and modification of hydrogen storage systems. In Hardy [2007], scoping models for reaction kinetics, bed geometry and heat removal parameters are discussed. The scoping models are used to perform a quick assessment of storage systems and identify those which have the potential to meet DOE performance targets. The operational characteristics of successful candidate systems are then evaluated with the more detailed models discussed in this document. The detailed analysis for hydrogen storage systems is modeled in either 2 or 3-dimensions, via the general purpose finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics{reg_sign}. The two-dimensional model serves to provide rapid evaluation of bed configurations and physical processes, while the three-dimensional model, which requires a much longer run time, is used to investigate detailed effects that do not readily lend themselves to two-dimensional representations. The model is general and can be adapted to any geometry or storage media. In this document, the model is applied to a modified cylindrical shell and tube geometry with radial fins perpendicular to the axis, see Figures 4.1-1 and 4.1-2. Sodium alanate, NaAlH{sub 4}, is used as the hydrogen storage medium. The model can be run on any DOS, LINUX or Unix based system.

  19. A DFT+U investigation of hydrogen adsorption on the LaFeO3(010) surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boateng, Isaac W.; Tia, Richard; Adei, Evans; Dzade, N.Y.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41249311X; Catlow, C. Richard A.; de Leeuw, Nora H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/376421061

    2017-01-01

    The ABO3 perovskite lanthanum ferrite (LaFeO3) is a technologically important electrode material for nickel–metal hydride batteries, energy storage and catalysis. However, the electrochemical hydrogen adsorption mechanism on LaFeO3 surfaces remains under debate. In the present study, we have

  20. Experimental and numerical investigations of the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion chamber of an industrial gas turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Haj Ayed

    2015-09-01

    The study reveals great potential for the successful application of numerical flow simulation to predict flame structure and NOx emission level of micromix hydrogen combustion, help understanding the flow phenomena related with the micromixing, reaction zone and NOx formation and support further optimization of the burner performance.

  1. Catalytic deactivation on methane steam reforming catalysts. 2. Kinetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnelli, M.E.; Ponzi, E.N.; Yeramian, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    The kinetics of methane steam reforming reaction over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst was investigated at a temperature range of 640-740/sup 0/C in a flow reactor at atmospheric pressure. The experiments were performed varying the inlet concentration of methane, hydrogen, and water. A kinetic scheme of the Houghen-Watson type was satisfactorily proposed assuming the dissociative adsorption of CH/sub 4/ as the rate-limiting step, but this kinetic scheme can be easily replaced by a first-order kinetics (r/sub CH/4/sub / = kapparho/sub CH/4/sub /) for engineering purposes. Catalyst activation with H/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ mixtures or with the reactant mixture results in the same extent of reaction.

  2. Experimental and reaction kinetic investigation of 1-octene metathesis reaction with Hoveyda-Grubbs first generation precatalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Gryp, Percy; Marx, Sanette; Vosloo, Hermanus C.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we report the catalytic performance, reaction engineering kinetics and elucidation of the reaction mechanism using density functional theory (DFT) for the metathesis reaction of 1-octene in the presence of the Hoveyda-Grubbs 2 [RuCl2(CHoOiPrC6H4)(H2IMes)] precatalyst. The study showed that reaction temperature (30-100 °C), 1-octene/precatalyst molar ratio (5000-14,000) and different solvents had a significant effect on the selectivity, activity and turnover number. Turnover numb...

  3. Investigation of the Mechanism of Electron Capture and Electron Transfer Dissociation of Peptides with a Covalently Attached Free Radical Hydrogen Atom Scavenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Chang Ho; Yin, Sheng; Peng, Ivory; Loo, Joseph A; Beauchamp, J L

    2015-11-15

    The mechanisms of electron capture and electron transfer dissociation (ECD and ETD) are investigated by covalently attaching a free-radical hydrogen atom scavenger to a peptide. The 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-l-oxyl (TEMPO) radical was chosen as the scavenger due to its high hydrogen atom affinity (ca. 280 kJ/mol) and low electron affinity (ca. 0.45 ev), and was derivatized to the model peptide, FQX TEMPO EEQQQTEDELQDK. The X TEMPO residue represents a cysteinyl residue derivatized with an acetamido-TEMPO group. The acetamide group without TEMPO was also examined as a control. The gas phase proton affinity (882 kJ/mol) of TEMPO is similar to backbone amide carbonyls (889 kJ/mol), minimizing perturbation to internal solvation and sites of protonation of the derivatized peptides. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of the TEMPO tagged peptide dication generated stable odd-electron b and y type ions without indication of any TEMPO radical induced fragmentation initiated by hydrogen abstraction. The type and abundance of fragment ions observed in the CID spectra of the TEMPO and acetamide tagged peptides are very similar. However, ECD of the TEMPO labeled peptide dication yielded no backbone cleavage. We propose that a labile hydrogen atom in the charge reduced radical ions is scavenged by the TEMPO radical moiety, resulting in inhibition of N-C α backbone cleavage processes. Supplemental activation after electron attachment (ETcaD) and CID of the charge-reduced precursor ion generated by electron transfer of the TEMPO tagged peptide dication produced a series of b + H (b H ) and y + H (y H ) ions along with some c ions having suppressed intensities, consistent with stable O-H bond formation at the TEMPO group. In summary, the results indicate that ECD and ETD backbone cleavage processes are inhibited by scavenging of a labile hydrogen atom by the localized TEMPO radical moiety. This observation supports the conjecture that ECD and ETD processes involve long

  4. Computational investigation of the kinetics and mechanism of the initial steps of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helden, Pieter; Berg, Jan-Albert van den; Petersen, Melissa A; Janse van Rensburg, Werner; Ciobîcă, Ionel M; van de Loosdrecht, Jan

    2017-04-28

    A multi-site microkinetic model for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) reaction up to C2 products on a FCC cobalt catalyst surface is presented. This model utilizes a multi-faceted cobalt nanoparticle model for the catalyst, consisting of the two dominant cobalt surface facets Co(111) and Co(100), and a step site represented by the Co(211) surface. The kinetic parameters for the intermediates and transition states on these sites were obtained using plane-wave, periodic boundary condition density functional theory. Using direct DFT data as is, the microkinetic results disagree with the expected experimental results. Employing an exploratory approach, a small number of microkinetic model modifications were tested, which significantly improved correspondence to the expected experimental results. Using network flux and sensitivity analysis, an in-depth discussion is given on the relative reactivity of the various sites, CO activation mechanisms, the nature of the reactive chain growth monomer, the probable C2 formation mechanism, the active site ensemble interplay and the very important role of CO* surface coverage. The findings from the model scenarios are discussed with the aim of guiding future work in understanding the FTS mechanism and subsequent controlling kinetic parameters.

  5. Investigation of crystallization kinetics and deformation behavior in supercooled liquid region of CuZr-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ke; Fan, Xinhui; Li, Bing; Li, Yanhong; Wang, Xin; Xu, Xuanxuan [Xi' an Technological Univ. (China). School of Material and Chemical Engineering

    2017-08-15

    In this paper, a systematic study of crystallization kinetics and deformation behavior is presented for (Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50}){sub 94}Al{sub 6} bulk metallic glass in the supercooled liquid region. Crystallization results showed that the activation energy for (Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50}){sub 94}Al{sub 6} was calculated using the Arrhenius equation in isothermal mode and the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose method in non-isothermal mode. The activation energy was quite high compared with other bulk metallic glasses. Based on isothermal transformation kinetics described by the Johson-Mehl-Avrami model, the average Avrami exponent of about 3.05 implies a mainly diffusion controlled three-dimensional growth with an increasing nucleation rate during the crystallization. For warm deformation, the results showed that deformation behavior, composed of homogeneous and inhomogeneous deformation, is strongly dependent on strain rate and temperature. The homogeneous deformation transformed from non-Newtonian flow to Newtonian flow with a decrease in strain rate and an increase in temperature. It was found that the crystallization during high temperature deformation is induced by heating. The appropriate working temperature/strain rate combination for the alloy forming, without in-situ crystallization, was deduced by constructing an empirical deformation map. The optimum process condition for (Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50}){sub 94}Al{sub 6} can be expressed as T∝733 K and ∝ ε 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}.

  6. Kinetic characteristics of debris flows as exemplified by field investigations and discrete element simulation of the catastrophic Jiweishan rockslide, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zongxing; Tang, Huiming; Xiong, Chengren; Su, Aijun; Criss, Robert E.

    2017-10-01

    The Jiweishan rockslide of June 5, 2009 in China provides an important opportunity to elucidate the kinetic characteristics of high-speed, long-runout debris flows. A 2D discrete element model whose mechanical parameters were calibrated using basic field data was used to simulate the kinetic behavior of this catastrophic landslide. The model output shows that the Jiweishan debris flow lasted about 3 min, released a gravitational potential energy of about 6 × 10^13 J with collisions and friction dissipating approximately equal amounts of energy, and had a maximum fragment velocity of 60-70 m/s, almost twice the highest velocity of the overall slide mass (35 m/s). Notable simulated characteristics include the high velocity and energy of the slide material, the preservation of the original positional order of the slide blocks, the inverse vertical grading of blocks, and the downslope sorting of the slide deposits. Field observations that verify these features include uprooted trees in the frontal collision area of the air-blast wave, downslope reduction of average clast size, and undamaged plants atop huge blocks that prove their lack of downslope tumbling. The secondary acceleration effect and force chains derived from the numerical model help explain these deposit features and the long-distance transport. Our back-analyzed frictions of the motion path in the PFC model provide a reference for analyzing and predicting the motion of similar geological hazards.

  7. Reversible hydrogen storage in the Ni-rich pseudo-binary Mg{sub 6}Pd{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 0.75} intermetallic compound: Reaction pathway, thermodynamic and kinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponthieu, M. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); ICMPE/CNRS-UPEC UMR 7182, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Fernandez, J.F., E-mail: josefrancisco.fernandez@uam.es [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Cuevas, F. [ICMPE/CNRS-UPEC UMR 7182, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Ares, J.R.; Leardini, F.; Bodega, J.; Sanchez, C. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg{sub 6.2}Pd{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 0.65} reversibly absorbs 5.6 wt.% H in a two plateau pressure PCI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ternary phase depletes in Mg and Ni at low hydrogen pressure to form Mg{sub 2}Ni. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reaction pathway of hydrogenation has been determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enthalpy of the high pressure plateau is less negative than the one of pure Mg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low activation energy for desorption has been found for highly hydrided material. - Abstract: To improve the hydrogen storage properties of Mg{sub 6}Pd and to reduce its cost, Pd has been partly substituted by Ni at the solubility limit of the Mg{sub 6}(Pd,Ni) {rho}-phase. The attained composition is Mg{sub 6.2}Pd{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 0.65} as determined by Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Hydrogenation of this compound has been investigated by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDX), Pressure-Composition-Isotherms (PCI) and thermal desorption analysis. On absorption, it decomposes in two steps as evidenced by two distinct plateau pressures. At low pressure, a partial segregation of Mg and Ni out of the pseudo-binary Mg{sub 6.2}Pd{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 0.65} {rho}-phase occurs leading to the formation of MgH{sub 2}, Mg{sub 2}Ni and Mg{sub 6}Pd{sub 0.7}Ni{sub 0.3} phases. At high pressure, the Mg{sub 6}Pd{sub 0.7}Ni{sub 0.3} phase disproportionates into MgH{sub 2}, Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, MgPd and Mg{sub 5}Pd{sub 2} phases. The hydrogenation reaction is reversible providing a hydrogen capacity of 5.6 wt.% H. The reaction enthalpy of the high pressure plateau is less negative than for pure Mg. Furthermore, the activation energy for H-desorption exhibits a dramatic decrease for hydrogen contents above 4 wt.% H, i.e. after the alloy disproportionation.

  8. Experimental investigations relevant for hydrogen and fission product issues raised by the Fukushima accident

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    The accident at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011, caused by an earthquake and a subsequent tsunami, resulted in a failure of the power systems that are needed to cool the reactors at the plant. The accident progression in the absence of heat removal systems caused Units 1-3 to undergo fuel melting. Containment pressurization and hydrogen explosions ultimately resulted in the escape of radioactivity from reactor containments into the atmosphere and ocean. Problems in...

  9. Investigation of electron and hydrogenic-donor states confined in a permeable spherical box using B-splines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Nikbakht

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   Effects of quantum size and potential shape on the spectra of an electron and a hydrogenic-donor at the center of a permeable spherical cavity have been calculated, using linear variational method. B-splines have been used as basis functions. By extensive convergence tests and comparing with other results given in the literature, the validity and efficiency of the method were confirmed.

  10. Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation of Barite Growth: Role of Spectator Ions in Elementary Step Edge Growth Kinetics and Hillock Morphology [Supporting Information Only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jindra, Sarah A. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States); Bertagni, Angela L. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States); Bracco, Jacquelyn N. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Higgins, Steven R. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States)

    2017-09-25

    Here, to better understand the role of spectator ions in barite growth, the kinetics of step edge growth on barite (001) surfaces were studied under various salt solutions. Hydrothermal atomic force microscopy (HAFM) was used to investigate the effect of background electrolytes (NaCl, NaBr, and NaNO3) as a function of saturation index and ionic strength (I) on barite growth sourced at dislocations at 108 °C. Results demonstrate that hillock morphology is affected by I, as well as type of anion, where the prevalence of steps aligned on the [010] direction is highest under Cl. There is a modest increase in kinetic coefficient of 55–130% with a 10-fold increase in I for each salt. In comparing the kinetic coefficients of the salts at low ionic strength (0.01 M), there is a moderate difference, suggesting that the anion may play a role in barium attachment.

  11. Removal of Dibenzothiophene Using Activated Carbon/γ-Fe2O3 Nano-Composite: Kinetic and Thermodynamic Investigation of the Removal Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Fayazi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, removal of dibenzothiophene (DBT from model oil (n-hexane was investigated using magnetic activated carbon (MAC nano-composite adsorbent. The synthesized nano-composite was characterized by FT-IR, FE-SEM, BET and VSM techniques. The MAC nano-composite exhibited a nearly superparamagnetic property with a saturation magnetization (Ms of 29.2 emu g-1, which made it desirable for separation under an external magnetic field. The magnetic adsorbent afforded a maximum adsorption capacity of 38.0 mg DBT g-1 at the optimized conditions (adsorbent dose, 8 g l-1; contact time, 1 h; temperature, 25 °C. Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used to fit equilibrium data for MAC nano-composite. Adsorption process could be well described by the Langmuir model. Kinetic studies were carried out and showed the sorption kinetics of DBT was best described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. In addition, the MAC nano-composite exhibited good capability of recycling to adsorb DBT in gasoline deep desulfurization.

  12. Electron microscopic investigation of the kinetics of the layer and island crystallization of amorphous V2O3 films deposited by pulsed laser evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagmut, A. G.

    2017-06-01

    An electron microscopic investigation was performed on the kinetics of the layer and island crystallization of amorphous V2O3 films deposited by pulsed laser evaporation of vanadium in an oxygen atmosphere. The crystallization was initiated by the action of an electron beam on an amorphous film in the column of a transmission electron microscope. The kinetic curves were plotted on the basis of a frame-by-frame analysis of the video recorded during the crystallization of the film. It was found that the layer crystallization of amorphous films is characterized by a quadratic dependence of the fraction of the crystalline phase x on the time t, whereas the island crystallization is described by an exponential dependence of x on t. The kinetic curves of island crystallization of amorphous films were analyzed on the basis of the α-version of the Kolmogorov model. For each type of crystallization, there are specific values of the dimensionless relative length unit δ0, which is equal to the ratio of the characteristic length unit to the parameter characterizing the unit cell of the crystal. It was established that, for the layer crystallization, the relative length unit lies in the range δ0 4300-4700, whereas for the fine-grained island crystallization, it amounts to δ0 110.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Influence of the Hydrogen Bond Networks in Ethanol/Water Mixtures on Dielectric Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Javier; Sweatman, Martin B; Lue, Leo

    2018-01-04

    The dielectric response of fluids to electromagnetic radiation in the microwave region originates from processes occurring at the molecular level. Understanding these processes in more detail is relevant to many fields, such as microwave heating, fluid mixing, and separation technologies. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the dielectric spectra of ethanol/water mixtures. We compare our predictions with experimental results at different compositions. We show how the dielectric response can be estimated to a high level of accuracy using three dielectric relaxations: a dominant and slower process at microwave frequencies and two faster processes. A deeper study of the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network formed in these systems reveals how collective processes between the individual species are the origin of the final dielectric response. Our results agree with the "wait-and-switch" mechanism, which describes the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network as the combination of two processes: the fast breakage and formation of individual hydrogen bonds and the subsequent reorganization of the entire network once this process becomes energetically favorable. Since the dielectric response is related to dipole reorientations in the system, it is directly linked to these mechanisms.

  14. Nonmonotonic Temperature Dependence of the Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate Constant and Kinetic Isotope Effect of Hydrogen Radical Reaction with Benzene Calculated by Variational Transition-State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G; Xu, Xuefei

    2017-11-30

    The reaction between H and benzene is a prototype for reactions of radicals with aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report calculations of the reaction rate constants and the branching ratios of the two channels of the reaction (H addition and H abstraction) over a wide temperature and pressure range. Our calculations, obtained with an accurate potential energy surface, are based on variational transition-state theory for the high-pressure limit of the addition reaction and for the abstraction reaction and on system-specific quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory calibrated by variational transition-state theory for pressure effects on the addition reaction. The latter is a very convenient way to include variational effects, corner-cutting tunneling, and anharmonicity in falloff calculations. Our results are in very good agreement with the limited experimental data and show the importance of including pressure effects in the temperature interval where the mechanism changes from addition to abstraction. We found a negative temperature effect of the total reaction rate constants at 1 atm pressure in the temperature region where experimental data are missing and accurate theoretical data were previously missing as well. We also calculated the H + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 and D + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 kinetic isotope effects, and we compared our H + C 6 H 6 results to previous theoretical data for H + toluene. We report a very novel nonmonotonic dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on temperature. A particularly striking effect is the prediction of a negative temperature dependence of the total rate constant over 300-500 K wide temperature ranges, depending on the pressure but generally in the range from 600 to 1700 K, which includes the temperature range of ignition in gasoline engines, which is important because aromatics are important components of common fuels.

  15. Numerical investigation of non-perturbative kinetic effects of energetic particles on toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in tokamaks and stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaby, Christoph; Könies, Axel; Kleiber, Ralf [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    The resonant interaction of shear Alfvén waves with energetic particles is investigated numerically in tokamak and stellarator geometry using a non-perturbative MHD-kinetic hybrid approach. The focus lies on toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs), which are most easily destabilized by a fast-particle population in fusion plasmas. While the background plasma is treated within the framework of an ideal-MHD theory, the drive of the fast particles, as well as Landau damping of the background plasma, is modelled using the drift-kinetic Vlasov equation without collisions. Building on analytical theory, a fast numerical tool, STAE-K, has been developed to solve the resulting eigenvalue problem using a Riccati shooting method. The code, which can be used for parameter scans, is applied to tokamaks and the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X. High energetic-ion pressure leads to large growth rates of the TAEs and to their conversion into kinetically modified TAEs and kinetic Alfvén waves via continuum interaction. To better understand the physics of this conversion mechanism, the connections between TAEs and the shear Alfvén wave continuum are examined. It is shown that, when energetic particles are present, the continuum deforms substantially and the TAE frequency can leave the continuum gap. The interaction of the TAE with the continuum leads to singularities in the eigenfunctions. To further advance the physical model and also to eliminate the MHD continuum together with the singularities in the eigenfunctions, a fourth-order term connected to radiative damping has been included. The radiative damping term is connected to non-ideal effects of the bulk plasma and introduces higher-order derivatives to the model. Thus, it has the potential to substantially change the nature of the solution. For the first time, the fast-particle drive, Landau damping, continuum damping, and radiative damping have been modelled together in tokamak- as well as in stellarator geometry.

  16. Storage of hydrogen isotopes. Investigation of the aging behaviour of metallic tritides; Stockage des isotopes de l'hydrogene etude du vieillissement des tritiures metalliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiebaut, St.

    2010-06-15

    This report aims at giving a synthesis of scientific works performed by the author while indicating the reasons for his choice of research topics, and the perspectives which could be interesting to follow. After an overview of his professional course, the author proposes an analysis of the available literature at the time he started his research works. Then, he comments the results he obtained during his research thesis in the field of short duration aging (more precisely with experimental investigations on the aging behaviour of palladium and palladium alloys which are used in tritium storage). The following periods of his research career dealt with long duration aging, and then with aging modelling

  17. In-Situ Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensitic Transformation Kinetics in an Austenitic Stainless Steel by Inductive Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Celada-Casero

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An inductive sensor developed by Philips ATC has been used to study in-situ the austenite (γ to martensite (α′ phase transformation kinetics during tensile testing in an AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel. A correlation between the sensor output signal and the volume fraction of α′-martensite has been found by comparing the results to the ex-situ characterization by magnetization measurements, light optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The sensor has allowed for the observation of the stepwise transformation behavior, a not-well-understood phenomena that takes place in large regions of the bulk material and that so far had only been observed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

  18. Numerical investigation of the recrystallization kinetics by means of the KWC phase-field model with special order parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundin, Julia

    2017-06-01

    The present paper proposes an extension to the phase-field model of Kobayashi, Warren and Carter (KWC) as described in (Warren et al 2002 Acta Mater.) to incorporate the recrystallization process which occurs during heat treatments of alloy systems with predeformed defect structure. The standard KWC model is extended by an additional order parameter for recrystallized grains and describes the general results for the steady-state moving boundary. The simulation results of the initial grain growth and recrystallization process in various systems show that the extended phase-field model is able to describe the influence of the initial grain boundaries on the recrystallization kinetics and to incorporate the misorientation dependency of the low angle grain boundary mobility which strongly influences the orientation distribution in the resulting microstructure.

  19. A density functional theory investigation on the mechanism and kinetics of dimethyl carbonate formation on Cu2 O catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Riguang; Song, Luzhi; Wang, Baojun; Li, Zhong

    2012-04-30

    A theoretical analysis about the mechanism and kinetics of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) formation via oxidative carbonylation of methanol on Cu(2)O catalyst is explored using periodic density functional calculations, both in gas phase and in solvent. The effect of solvent is taken into account using the conductor-like screening model. The calculated results show that CO insertion to methoxide species to produce monomethyl carbonate species is the rate-determining step, the corresponding activation barrier is 161.9 kJ mol(-1). Then, monomethyl carbonate species reacts with additional methoxide to form DMC with an activation barrier of 98.8 kJ mol(-1), above reaction pathway mainly contributes to the formation of DMC. CO insertion to dimethoxide species to form DMC is also considered and analyzed, the corresponding activation barrier is 308.5 kJ mol(-1), suggesting that CO insertion to dimethoxide species is not competitive in dynamics in comparison with CO insertion to methoxide species. The solvent effects on CO insertion to methoxide species involving the activation barriers suggest that the rate-determining step can be significantly affected by the solvent, 70.2 kJ mol(-1) in methanol and 63.9 kJ mol(-1) in water, which means that solvent effect can reduce the activation barrier of CO insertion to methoxide species and make the reaction of CO insertion to methoxide in solvents much easier than that in gas phase. Above calculated results can provide good theoretical guidance for the mechanism and kinetics of DMC formation and suggest that solvent effect can well improve the performance of DMC formation on Cu(2)O catalyst in a liquid-phase slurry. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Hydrogen evolution on nickel electrode in synthetic tap water - alkaline solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrov, Yanko; Schosger, Jean-Pierre; Stoynov, Zdravko; de Bruijn, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The effect of tap water contaminants on the kinetics of the hydrogen evolution reaction on a nickel electrode in 1 mol dm(-3) KOH was investigated by galvanostatic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. It was found that the tap water contaminants lead to an increase in

  1. Simulation of silicon nanoparticles stabilized by hydrogen at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galashev, Alexander Y., E-mail: galashev@ecko.uran.r [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Division, Institute of Industrial Ecology (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    The stability of different silicon nanoparticles are investigated at a high temperature. The temperature dependence of the physicochemical properties of 60- and 73-atom silicon nanoparticles are investigated using the molecular dynamics method. The 73-atom particles have a crystal structure, a random atomic packing, and a packing formed by inserting a 13-atom icosahedron into a 60-atom fullerene. They are surrounded by a 'coat' from 60 atoms of hydrogen. The nanoassembled particle at the presence of a hydrogen 'coat' has the most stable number (close to four) of Si-Si bonds per atom. The structure and kinetic properties of a hollow single-layer fullerene-structured Si{sub 60} cluster are considered in the temperature range 10 K {<=} T {<=} 1760 K. Five series of calculations are conducted, with a simulation of several media inside and outside the Si{sub 60} cluster, specifically, the vacuum and interior spaces filled with 30 and 60 hydrogen atoms with and without the exterior hydrogen environment of 60 atoms. Fullerene surrounded by a hydrogen 'coat' and containing 60 hydrogen atoms in the interior space has a higher stability. Such cluster has smaller self-diffusion coefficients at high temperatures. The fullerene stabilized with hydrogen is stable to the formation of linear atomic chains up to the temperatures 270-280 K.

  2. Theoretical investigation on hydrogen bond interaction of diketo/keto-enol form uracil and thymine tautomers with intercalators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anithaa, V S; Vijayakumar, S; Sudha, M; Shankar, R

    2017-11-06

    The interaction of diketo and keto-enol form of thymine and uracil tautomers with acridine (Acr), phenazine (Phen), benzo[c]cinnoline (Ben), 1,10-phenanthroline (1,10-Phe), and 4,7-phenenthroline (4,7-Phe) intercalating drug molecules was studied using density functional theory at B3LYP/6-311++G** and M05-2×/6-311++G** levels of theory. From the interaction energy, it is found that keto-enol form tautomers have stronger interaction with intercalators than diketone form tautomers. On complex formation of thymine and uracil tautomers with benzo[c]cinnoline the drug molecules have high interaction energy values of -20.14 (BenT3) and -20.55 (BenU3) kcal mol-1, while phenazine has the least interaction energy values of -6.52 (PhenT2) and -6.67 (PhenU2) kcal mol-1. The closed shell intermolecular type interaction between the molecules with minimum elliptical value of 0.018 and 0.019 a.u at both levels of theory has been found from topological analysis. The benzo[c]cinnoline drug molecule with thymine and uracil tautomers has short range intermolecular N-H…N, C-H…O, and O-H...N hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) resulting in higher stability than other drug molecules. The proper hydrogen bonds N-H..N and O-H..N have the frequency shifted toward the lower side (red shifted) with the elongation in their bond length while the improper hydrogen bond C-H...O has the frequency shifted toward the higher side (blue shifted) of the spectral region with the contraction in their bond length. Further, the charge transfer between proton acceptor and donor along with stability of the bond is studied using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Graphical abstract Hydrogen bond interaction of diketo/keto-enol form uracil and thymine tautomers with intercalators.

  3. Mechanism and kinetics of tyrosinase inhibition by glycolic acid: a study using conventional spectroscopy methods and hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupling with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Da; Tu, Zong-Cai; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lu; He, Na; McClements, David Julian

    2017-01-25

    Tyrosinase is an enzyme that promotes enzymatic browning of fruits and vegetables, thereby reducing product quality. A variety of analytical tools were used to characterize the interactions between tyrosinase and a natural tyrosinase inhibitor (glycolic acid). Hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupling with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) was used to elucidate the interaction mechanism between glycolic acid and tyrosinase. UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis indicated that glycolic acid inhibited tyrosinase activity in a mixed-type manner with an IC50 of 83 ± 14 μM. The results of these techniques suggested that glycolic acid bound to tyrosinase through hydrophobic attraction, and this interaction led to a pronounced conformational change of the enzyme molecules. HDX-MS analysis showed that the activity of tyrosinase was primarily inhibited by a structural perturbation of its active site (His 263). This study provides a comprehensive understanding of the interaction between glycolic acid and tyrosinase, which could lead to new approaches to control tyrosinase activity in foods and other products.

  4. HGMS: Glasses and Nanocomposites for Hydrogen Storage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinska, Kris [PI; Hemmers, Oliver

    2013-02-17

    The primary goal of this project is to fabricate and investigate different glass systems and glass-derived nanocrystalline composite materials. These glass-based, two-phased materials will contain nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen and be of potential interest as hydrogen storage media. The glass materials with intrinsic void spaces that are able to precipitate functional nanocrystals capable to attract hydrogen are of particular interest. Proposed previously, but never practically implemented, one of promising concepts for storing hydrogen are micro-containers built of glass and shaped into hollow microspheres. The project expanded this concept to the exploration of glass-derived nanocrystalline composites as potential hydrogen storage media. It is known that the most desirable materials for hydrogen storage do not interact chemically with hydrogen and possess a high surface area to host substantial amounts of hydrogen. Glasses are built of disordered networks with ample void spaces that make them permeable to hydrogen even at room temperature. Glass-derived nanocrystalline composites (two-phased materials), combination of glasses (networks with ample voids) and functional nanocrystals (capable to attract hydrogen), appear to be promising candidates for hydrogen storage media. Key advantages of glass materials include simplicity of preparation, flexibility of composition, chemical durability, non-toxicity and mechanical strength, as well as low production costs and environmental friendliness. This project encompasses a fundamental research into physics and chemistry of glasses and nanocrystalline composite materials, derived from glass. Studies are aimed to answer questions essential for considering glass-based materials and composites as potential hydrogen storage media. Of particular interest are two-phased materials that combine glasses with intrinsic voids spaces for physisorption of hydrogen and nanocrystals capable of chemisorption. This project does not

  5. A kinetic model of the hydrogen assisted selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia over Ag/Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamm, Stefanie; Olsson, Louise; Fogel, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    A global kinetic model which describes H2-assisted NH3-SCR over an Ag/Al2O3 monolith catalyst has been developed. The intention is that the model can be applied for dosing NH3 and H2 to an Ag/Al2O3 catalyst in a real automotive application as well as contribute to an increased understanding...... of the reaction mechanism for NH3-SCR. Therefore, the model needs to be simple and accurately predict the conversion of NOx. The reduction of NO is described by a global reaction, with a molar stoichiometry between NO, NH3 and H2 of 1:1:2. Further reactions included in the model are the oxidation of NH3 to N2...... and NO, oxidation of H2, and the adsorption and desorption of NH3. The model was fitted to the results of an NH3-TPD experiment, an NH3 oxidation experiment, and a series of H2-assisted NH3-SCR steady-state experiments. The model predicts the conversion of NOx well even during transient experiments....

  6. Organic chemistry on cold molecular films: kinetic stabilization of SN1 and SN2 intermediates in the reactions of ethanol and 2-methylpropan-2-ol with hydrogen bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Chan; Maeng, Kye-Won; Kang, Heon

    2003-04-14

    We prepared thin molecular films of ethanol and 2-methylpropan-2-ol on Ru(001) substrates at temperature of 100-150 K and examined their reactivity toward HBr. The reaction intermediates and products formed at the surfaces were unambiguously identified by the techniques of Cs(+) reactive ion scattering (RIS) and low-energy sputtering. The reaction on the ethanol surface produced protonated ethanol, which is stabilized on the surface and does not proceed to further reactions. On the 2-methylpropan-2-ol surface, protonated alcohol [(CH(3))(3)COH(2) (+)] and carbocation [(CH(3))(3)C(+)] were formed with the respective yield of 20 and 78 %. Alkyl bromides, which are the final products of the corresponding reactions in liquid solvents, have extremely small yields on these surfaces (< 0.3 % for ethyl bromide and 2 % for tert-butyl bromide). The results indicate that the reactions on frozen films are characterized by kinetic control, stabilization of ionic intermediates (protonated alcohols and tert-butyl cation), and effective blocking of the charge recombination steps in S(N)1 and S(N)2 paths. The implication of these findings for the molecular evolution process in interstellar medium is also discussed.

  7. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael U. Niemann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices. Nanostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS2/MoS2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc. and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.

  8. Analytical and experimental investigation of rubbing interaction in labyrinth seals for a liquid hydrogen fuel pump. [space shuttle main engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, F. X.; Kennedy, F. E.; Schulson, E. M.

    1984-01-01

    Cracking of the titanium knife edges on the labyrinth seals of the liquid hydrogen fuel pump in the Space Shuttle main engine is considered. Finite element analysis of the thermal response of the knife edge in sliding contact with the wear ring surface shows that interfacial temperatures can be quite high and they are significantly influenced by the thermal conductivity of the surfaces in rubbing contact. Thermal shock experiments on a test specimen similar to the knife edge geometry demonstrate that cracking of the titanium alloy is possible in a situation involving repeated thermal cycles over a wide temperature range, as might be realized during a rub in the liquid hydrogen fuel pump. High-speed rub interaction tests were conducted using a representative knife edge and seal geometry over a broad range of interaction rates and alternate materials were experimentally evaluated. Plasma-sprayed aluminum-graphite was found to be significantly better than presently used aluminum alloy seals from the standpoint of rub performance. Ion nitriding the titanium alloy knife-edges also improved rub performance compared to the untreated baseline.

  9. Investigation of hydrogen attack in 2.25Cr-1Mo steels with a high-triaxiality void growth model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Burg, M.W.D.; Van Der Giessen, E. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Lab. for Engineering Mechanics; Brouwer, R.C. [Shell Internationale Petroleum Maatschappij, The Hague (Netherlands)

    1996-02-01

    A model is presented to estimate the lifetime under hydrogen attack (HA) conditions. The first ingredient is the Odette-Vagarali model to calculate the equilibrium methane pressure as a function of hydrogen pressure, temperature, and type and composition of the carbides and the alloy. The second ingredient is a model for the growth to coalescence of methane-filled grain boundary cavities, possibly under the presence of (applied or residual) macroscopic stresses. This model is based on recent detailed numerical studies of the growth of voids under simultaneous grain boundary diffusion and creep of the grain material. A new, accurate analytical approximate void growth relation valid for high stress triaxialities is adapted for application to HA. The model is used to perform a study of HA, including a computation of Nelson curves, in 2.25Cr-1Mo steels with different types of carbides and for various applied stress states. Finally, the results of the model are presented in a concise, non-dimensional form that reveals the key parameters that determine HA life times.

  10. Monitoring the heat-induced structural changes of alkaline phosphatase by molecular modeling, fluorescence spectroscopy and inactivation kinetics investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrașcu, Loredana; Stănciuc, Nicoleta; Aprodu, Iuliana; Ciuciu, Ana-Maria; Alexe, Petru; Bahrim, Gabriela Elena

    2015-10-01

    The heat induced conformational changes of calf alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were analyzed using different methods, based on fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular modeling and inactivation studies. Experimental studies were conducted in buffer solution in the temperature range between 25 and 70 °C. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation provided details on thermally induced changes in ALP structure, highlighting that heating favored the hydrophobic exposure and important alteration of the catalytic site above 60 °C. Additional information to MD data were obtained by using different fluorescence spectroscopy methods, which revealed a complex mechanism of thermal denaturation. Therefore, the emissive properties indicated an unfolding of ALP at temperatures below 60 °C, whereas at higher temperatures, the polypeptides chains fold leading to a higher exposure of Trp residues. In order to establish a structure-function relationship, the results were correlated with inactivation studies of ALP in buffer at pH 9.0. The inactivation data were fitted using a first-order kinetic model, resulting in an activation energy value of 207.26 ± 21.68 kJ · mol(-1).

  11. Kinetic Monte Carlo Investigation of the Effects of Vacancy Pairing on Oxygen Diffusivity in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian S.

    2011-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia s high oxygen diffusivity and corresponding high ionic conductivity, and its structural stability over a broad range of temperatures, have made the material of interest for use in a number of applications, for example, as solid electrolytes in fuel cells. At low concentrations, the stabilizing yttria also serves to increase the oxygen diffusivity through the presence of corresponding oxygen vacancies, needed to maintain charge neutrality. At higher yttria concentration, however, diffusivity is impeded by the larger number of relatively high energy migration barriers associated with yttrium cations. In addition, there is evidence that oxygen vacancies preferentially occupy nearest-neighbor sites around either dopant or Zr cations, further affecting vacancy diffusion. We present the results of ab initio calculations that indicate that it is energetically favorable for oxygen vacancies to occupy nearest-neighbor sites adjacent to Y ions, and that the presence of vacancies near either species of cation lowers the migration barriers. Kinetic Monte Carlo results from simulations incorporating this effect are presented and compared with results from simulations in which the effect is not present.

  12. An investigation into the kinetics and mechanism of the removal of cyanobacteria by extract of Ephedra equisetina root.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Yan

    Full Text Available An aqueous extract of Ephedra equisetina root was found to induce cyanobacterial cell death. The extract displayed no negative effects on the fish populations but instead, improved the habitat conditions for the growth of macrophytes, zooplankton and bacteria because the inhibiting effects of the extracts on cyanobacteria helped clear up the water column. The removal kinetics of cyanobacteria by E. equisetina extract appears to be a first order process with the rate constant being extract-dose-dependent. Compounds including the flavonoids found in E. equisetina root kill the cyanobacteria in vitro at a dose of 5.0 µg extract per 100 mL water or above. The extract constituents act to disrupt the thylakoid membrane, interrupt the electronic transport, decrease the effective quantum yield, and eventually lead to the failure of photosynthesis in Microcystis aeruginosa. This study presents an easily-deployed, natural and promising approach for controlling cyanobacterial blooms as an emergency measure, and also provides insight into the dynamics and mechanism of the extract consisting of multiple compounds synergistically removing algae.

  13. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  14. Hydrogen supplies for SPFC vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, D.; Bauen, A.; Fouquet, R.; Leach, M.; Pearson, P.; Anderson, D.

    2000-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a study investigating the potential of using hydrogen fuel for fuel cell-powered fleet vehicles based at a depot in a range of counties. An overview of current hydrogen supply and demand is presented, and research already carried out on potential hydrogen refuelling infrastructures, and the costs of producing hydrogen as a transportation fuel are examined. Hydrogen demand modelling, and supplying hydrogen to fleet vehicles, alternative hydrogen supply options, energy and emissions comparison with competing fuels, and health and safety standards are discussed.

  15. Kinetic investigation of the oxidation of naval excess hazardous materials in supercritical water for the design of a transpiration-wall reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, S.F.; Hanush, R.G.; Hunter, T.B. [and others

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Sandia`s supercritical fluids reactor (SFR) to generate data for the design of a transpiration-wall supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) reactor. The reactor is intended for the disposal of hazardous material generated on naval vessels. The design parameters for the system require an accurate knowledge of destruction efficiency vs. time and temperature. Three candidate materials were selected for testing. The experiments consisted of oxidizing these materials in the SFR at isothermal conditions over the temperature range of 400-550C at 24.1 MPa. A small extrapolation of the results shows that these materials can be adequately destroyed (to 99.9% destruction removal efficiency, DRE, based on total organic carbon (TOC) in the effluent) in approximately 5 seconds at 600C. The results vary smoothly and predictably with temperature such that extrapolation to higher temperatures beyond the experimental capabilities of the SFR can be made with reasonable confidence. The preliminary design of the transpiration-wall reactor has a rapid heat-up section within the reactor vessel that requires the addition of a fuel capable of quickly reacting with oxygen at temperatures below 500C. Candidate alcohols and JP-5 jet fuel were evaluated in this context. Oxidation rates for the alcohols were examined using in situ Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the potential utility of supplying the oxidizer line with hydrogen peroxide as an additive to enhance rapid initiation of the feed at unusually low temperatures was investigated. Experiments were conducted in the Supercritical Constant Volume Reactor (SCVR) using hydrogen peroxide as the initial oxidizing species. The results show that this concept as a method of enhancing low temperature reactivity appears to fail because thermal decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide is more rapid than the fuel oxidation rate at low temperatures. 8 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Worldwide clean energy system technology using hydrogen (WE-NET). subtask 9. Investigation of innovative and leading technologies; Suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET). subtask 9. Kakushinteki sendoteki gijutsu ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The WE-NET Project is a long-term project designed to ensure that an energy network technology using hydrogen becomes a reality not later than 2020. So the project cannot remain effective unless constant efforts are made to foresee future trends of technology and optimize it as the making of entire system for the project. In this project, new technologies which are not up for development are also investigated. Their feasibility should be studied, if necessary. From the foregoing point of view, new technologies are studied, collected and evaluated. Thus, useful suggestions and proposals may be made as to the course for the project to follow, as well as its research and development. Proposals highly evaluated up to FY 1995 are the hydrogen-oxygen internal-combustion Stirling`s engine, hydrogen production by solid oxide electrolysis, magnetic refrigeration technology for liquefaction of hydrogen, solar thermal hydrogen production with iron sponge technology, and hydrogen producing technology with photocatalyst. Conceptual investigation themes in FY 1996 are the hydrogen internal-combustion Stirling engine, solar thermal hydrogen production, phototransformation process, and high-temperature steam electrolysis. 9 figs., 54 tabs.

  17. High-frequency conductivity of optically excited charge carriers in hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon investigated by spectroscopic femtosecond pump–probe reflectivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Wei [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Yurkevich, Igor V. [Aston University, Nonlinearity and Complexity Research Group, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Zakar, Ammar [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Kaplan, Andrey, E-mail: a.kaplan.1@bham.ac.uk [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-01

    We report an investigation into the high-frequency conductivity of optically excited charge carriers far from equilibrium with the lattice. The investigated samples consist of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon films grown on a thin film of silicon oxide on top of a silicon substrate. For the investigation, we used an optical femtosecond pump–probe setup to measure the reflectance change of a probe beam. The pump beam ranged between 580 and 820 nm, whereas the probe wavelength spanned 770 to 810 nm. The pump fluence was fixed at 0.6 mJ/cm{sup 2}. We show that at a fixed delay time of 300 fs, the conductivity of the excited electron–hole plasma is described well by a classical conductivity model of a hot charge carrier gas found at Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution, while Fermi–Dirac statics is not suitable. This is corroborated by values retrieved from pump–probe reflectance measurements of the conductivity and its dependence on the excitation wavelength and carrier temperature. The conductivity decreases monotonically as a function of the excitation wavelength, as expected for a nondegenerate charge carrier gas. - Highlights: • We study high‐frequency conductivity of excited hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon. • Reflectance change was measured as a function of pump and probe wavelength. • Maxwell–Boltzmann transport theory was used to retrieve the conductivity. • The conductivity decreases monotonically as a function of the pump wavelength.

  18. Laboratory and numerical investigations of kinetic interface sensitive tracers transport for immiscible two-phase flow porous media systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatomir, Alexandru Bogdan A. C.; Sauter, Martin

    2017-04-01

    A number of theoretical approaches estimating the interfacial area between two fluid phases are available (Schaffer et al.,2013). Kinetic interface