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Sample records for hydrogen jet target

  1. The hydrogen laminar jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanz, M. [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidomecanica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rosales, M. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain); Instituto de Innovacion en Mineria y Metalurgia, Avenida del Valle 738, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, A.L. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Numerical and asymptotic methods are used to investigate the structure of the hydrogen jet discharging into a quiescent air atmosphere. The analysis accounts in particular for the variation of the density and transport properties with composition. The Reynolds number of the flow R{sub j}, based on the initial jet radius a, the density {rho}{sub j} and viscosity {mu}{sub j} of the jet and the characteristic jet velocity u{sub j}, is assumed to take moderately large values, so that the jet remains slender and stable, and can be correspondingly described by numerical integration of the continuity, momentum and species conservation equations written in the boundary-layer approximation. The solution for the velocity and composition in the jet development region of planar and round jets, corresponding to streamwise distances of order R{sub j}a, is computed numerically, along with the solutions that emerge both in the near field and in the far field. The small value of the hydrogen-to-air molecular weight ratio is used to simplify the solution by considering the asymptotic limit of vanishing jet density. The development provides at leading-order explicit analytical expressions for the far-field velocity and hydrogen mass fraction that describe accurately the hydrogen jet near the axis. The information provided can be useful in particular to characterize hydrogen discharge processes from holes and cracks. (author)

  2. Charmonium Spectroscopy at the ISR using an Antiproton Beam and a Hydrogen Jet Target

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment studies the formation of charmonium states not directly accessible in e|+e|- annihilation. The good momentum definition of the cooled @* beam allows a precise measurement of the width of these states. A hydrogen gas jet has been used, yielding a luminosity of 3.10|3|0 cm|-|2sec|-|1 with 10|1|1~@*. Three types of exclusive events are selected: e|+e|-~(J/@Y) for calibration of the energy of the machine, e|+e|-@g~(@c states) and @g@g~(@h^c, @h'^c). The experiment uses MWPC, scintillator hodoscopes, Freon Cerenkov counters for the e|+e|- determination and electromagnetic calorimeters (@g detection and energies of the electrons).

  3. Experimental study of hydrogen jet ignition and jet extinguishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierman, R.W.

    1979-04-01

    Two phases are described of an experimental study that investigated: (1) the ignition characteristics of hydrogen--sodium jets, (2) the formation of hydrogen in sodium--humid air atmospheres, and (3) the extinguishment characteristics of burning hydrogen--sodium jets. Test conditions were similar to those postulated for highly-improbable breeder reactor core melt-through accidents and included: jet temperature, jet velocity, jet hydrogen concentration, jet sodium concentration, atmospheric oxygen concentration, and atmospheric water vapor concentration

  4. Jet target intense neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    A jet target Intense Neutron Source (INS) is being built by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with DOE/MFE funding in order to perform radiation damage experiments on materials to be used in fusion power reactors. The jet target can be either a supersonic or a subsonic jet. Each type has its particular advantages and disadvantages, and either of the jets can be placed inside the spherical blanket converter which will be used to simulate a fusion reactor neutron environment. Preliminary mock-up experiments with a 16-mA, 115 keV, H + ion beam on a nitrogen gas supersonic jet show no serious problems in the beam formation, transport, or jet interaction

  5. Liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougon, M.; Marquet, M.; Prugne, P.

    1961-01-01

    A description is given of 1) Atmospheric pressure target: liquid hydrogen, 400 mm thickness; thermal insulation: styrofoam; the hydrogen vapors are used to improve the target cooling; Mylar windows. 2) Vacuum target: 12 liter content: hydrogen or deuterium; liquid thickness 400 mm; thermal insulation is afforded by a vacuum vessel and a liquid nitrogen shield. Recovery and liquefaction of deuterium vapors are managed in the vacuum vessel which holds the target. The target emptying system is designed for operating in a few minutes. (author) [fr

  6. Special hydrogen target (Prop. 210)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, C.E.

    1979-11-01

    This guide contains a description of the electrical control and automatic vacuum systems for the Special Hydrogen Target (Prop. 210) together with the flow diagram and the mimic control panel layout for the system. (U.K.)

  7. Hydrogen jet recombination under postulated LMFBR accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierman, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Certain conditions may be postulated in LMFBR risk assessments for which the potential of hydrogen release to the reactor containment building needs to be evaluated. The inherent self-ignition characteristics of hydrogen jets entering the air atmosphere of the reactor containment building should be understood for such analyses. If hydrogen jets were to self-ignite (recombine) at the source where they enter the reactor containment building, then undesirable hydrogen accumulation would not occur. Therefore, experiments have been conducted investigating the phenomena associated with the recombination of hydrogen jets under conditions similar to those postulated for LMFBR studies. The data presented define the conditions required for self-ignition of the hydrogen jets

  8. Laval nozzles for cluster-jet targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieser, Silke; Bonaventura, Daniel; Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Hetz, Benjamin; Koehler, Esperanza; Lessmann, Lukas; Khoukaz, Alfons [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Cluster-jet targets are highly suited for storage ring experiments due to the fact that they provide high and constant beam densities. Therefore, a cluster-jet target is planned to be the first internal target for the PANDA experiment at FAIR. A cluster source generates a continuous flow of cryogenic solid clusters by the expansion of pre-cooled gases within fine Laval nozzles. For the production of clusters the geometry of the nozzle is crucial. The production of such nozzles with their complex inner geometry represents a major technical challenge. The possibility to produce new fine Laval nozzles ensures the operation of cluster-jet targets, e.g. for the PANDA experiment, and opens the way for future investigations on the cluster production process to match the required targets performance. Optimizations on the recently developed production process and the fabrication of new glass nozzles were done. Initial measurements of these nozzles at the PANDA cluster-jet target prototype and the investigation of the cluster beam origin within the nozzle will be presented and discussed. For the future more Laval nozzles with different geometries will be produced and additional measurements with these new nozzles at the PANDA cluster-jet target prototype towards higher performance will be realized.

  9. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas jet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipps, K.A.; Greife, U.; Bardayan, D.W.; Blackmon, J.C.; Kontos, A.; Linhardt, L.E.; Matos, M.; Pain, S.D.; Pittman, S.T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K.T.; Smith, M.S.; Thompson, P.

    2014-01-01

    New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer, and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and heavy ion detector systems to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address these issues, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration has designed, built, and characterized a supersonic gas jet target, capable of providing gas areal densities on par with commonly used solid targets within a region of a few millimeters diameter. Densities of over 5×10 18 atoms/cm 2 of helium have been achieved, making the JENSA gas jet target the most dense helium jet achieved so far

  10. A self-focusing mercury jet target

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, C

    2002-01-01

    Mercury jet production targets have been studied in relation to antiproton production and, more recently, pion production for a neutrino factory. There has always been a temptation to include some self-focusing of the secondaries by passing a current through the mercury jet analogous to the already proven lithium lens. However, skin heating of the mercury causes fast vaporization leading to the development of a gliding discharge along the surface of the jet. This external discharge can, nevertheless, provide some useful focusing of the secondaries in the case of the neutrino factory. The technical complications must not be underestimated.

  11. Analysis of jet flames and unignited jets from unintended releases of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houf, W.G.; Evans, G.H.; Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551-0969 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    A combined experimental and modeling program is being carried out at Sandia National Laboratories to characterize and predict the behavior of unintended hydrogen releases. In the case where the hydrogen leak remains unignited, knowledge of the concentration field and flammability envelope is an issue of importance in determining consequence distances for the safe use of hydrogen. In the case where a high-pressure leak of hydrogen is ignited, a classic turbulent jet flame forms. Knowledge of the flame length and thermal radiation heat flux distribution is important to safety. Depending on the effective diameter of the leak and the tank source pressure, free jet flames can be extensive in length and pose significant radiation and impingement hazard, resulting in consequence distances that are unacceptably large. One possible mitigation strategy to potentially reduce the exposure to jet flames is to incorporate barriers around hydrogen storage equipment. The reasoning is that walls will reduce the extent of unacceptable consequences due to jet releases resulting from accidents involving high-pressure equipment. While reducing the jet extent, the walls may introduce other hazards if not configured properly. The goal of this work is to provide guidance on configuration and placement of these walls to minimize overall hazards using a quantitative risk assessment approach. The program includes detailed CFD calculations of jet flames and unignited jets to predict how hydrogen leaks and jet flames interact with barriers, complemented by an experimental validation program that considers the interaction of jet flames and unignited jets with barriers. As a first step in this work on barrier release interaction the Sandia CFD model has been validated by computing the concentration decay of unignited turbulent free jets and comparing the results with the classic concentration decay laws for turbulent free jets taken from experimental data. Computations for turbulent hydrogen

  12. The E760 Jet Target: Measurements of performance at 77K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boero, G.; Macri, M.; Robutti, E.; Allspach, D.; Kendziora, C.; Marinelli, M.

    1994-11-01

    In this report we describe the measurements performed on the E760 hydrogen Jet Target in order to some of the basic parameters of the system. These measurements were performed in the context of the upgrade program of the target for the successor experiment E835. Fermilab experiment E760 studied charmonium states formed in antiproton-proton annihilations. The antiproton-proton interactions were produced in a jet of hydrogen gas which intersected the antiproton beam coasting in the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator. The results from E760 have shown that an increase in integrated luminosity by a factor of more than 5 is needed to complete the study of the charmonium spectrum. The E835 experiment is designed to achieve this by increasing the intensity of the antiproton beam and the density of the hydrogen-cluster-jet. This report is concerned with preparations for the work needed to increase the density of the hydrogen-cluster-jet

  13. Development of a cluster-jet target for PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; PANDA Cluster Jet Target Group

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The Stefan Meyer Institute (SMI) is part of the international PANDA collaboration. The universal detector will be constructed for the future high-energy antiproton storage ring HESR at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, GSI/Darmstadt). PANDA will use antiproton beams (1.5 to 15 GeV/c) for hadron physics in the charmonium region. The physics program of PANDA will comprehend charmonium spectroscopy below and above open charm threshold, search for exotics (glueballs, hybrids), lambda and double-lambda hypernuclei studies and the investigation of in-medium modifications of charmed mesons - an experimentally unexplored field. SMI contributes to major parts of the PANDA detector like the hydrogen cluster-jet target and the antiproton - cluster jet interaction zone: in order to reach the desired target density, an optimization of the nozzle and the skimmer arrangement is essential. A density-profile monitor for the cluster-jet was designed and built at SMI. Several nozzle types have been studied using different gases, temperatures and inlet pressures. To ensure low background the residual gas load in the interaction zone has to be minimized. The installation of NEG (non-evaporative-getter) coated beam pipes is planned. A prototype of the interaction zone has been set up at SMI. The pumping capacity of NEG and the reactivation cycles were tested. The status of the development of the cluster-jet target and studies of the interaction region will be presented (author)

  14. Development of a cluster-jet target for PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Orth, H.; Luehning, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Stefan Meyer Institut (SMI) is part of the international PANDA collaboration. The universal detector will be constructed at the future high-energy antiproton storage ring HESR at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, GSI/Darmstadt). PANDA will use antiproton beams (1.5 to 15 GeV/c) for hadron physics in the charmonium region. The physics program of PANDA will encompass charmonium spectroscopy below and above open charm threshold, search for exotics (glueballs, hybrids), lambda and double-lambda hypernuclei studies and the investigation of in-medium modifications of charmed mesons - an experimentally unexplored field. SMI contributes to major parts of the PANDA detector like the hydrogen cluster-jet target and the vacuum system of the antiproton - target interaction zone. In order to reach the desired target density, an optimization of the cold head, the nozzle and the skimmer arrangement is essential. A density-profile monitor for the cluster-jet was designed and built at SMI. Several nozzle types will be studied using different gases, temperatures and inlet pressures. Additionally we, together with the cluster-jet target group at GSI, are carrying out R and D for improving the jet-density. The Genova/Fermilab cluster-jet target used for these measurements has been in use at Fermilab for the experiments E760 and E835 and has been transferred to GSI for this purpose. The setup of the density-profile monitor at SMI and several measurements at GSI will be presented. (author)

  15. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  16. Characterization of high-pressure, underexpanded hydrogen-jet flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefer, R.W.; Houf, W.G.; Williams, T.C. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Bourne, B.; Colton, J. [SRI International, 333 Ravenwood Ave., Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Measurements were performed to characterize the dimensional and radiative properties of large-scale, vertical hydrogen-jet flames. This data is relevant to the safety scenario of a sudden leak in a high-pressure hydrogen containment vessel and will provide a technological basis for determining hazardous length scales associated with unintended hydrogen releases at storage and distribution centers. Jet flames originating from high-pressure sources up to 413 bar (6000 psi) were studied to verify the application of correlations and scaling laws based on lower-pressure subsonic and choked-flow jet flames. These higher pressures are expected to be typical of the pressure ranges in future hydrogen storage vessels. At these pressures the flows exiting the jet nozzle are categorized as underexpanded jets in which the flow is choked at the jet exit. Additionally, the gas behavior departs from that of an ideal-gas and alternate formulations for non-ideal gas must be introduced. Visible flame emission was recorded on video to evaluate flame length and structure. Radiometer measurements allowed determination of the radiant heat flux characteristics. The flame length results show that lower-pressure engineering correlations, based on the Froude number and a non-dimensional flame length, also apply to releases up to 413 bar (6000 psi). Similarly, radiative heat flux characteristics of these high-pressure jet flames obey scaling laws developed for low-pressure, smaller-scale flames and a wide variety of fuels. The results verify that such correlations can be used to a priori predict dimensional characteristics and radiative heat flux from a wide variety of hydrogen-jet flames resulting from accidental releases. (author)

  17. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets, are described. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member

  18. Properties of large-scale methane/hydrogen jet fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, E. [CEA Saclay, DEN, LTMF Heat Transfer and Fluid Mech Lab, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jamois, D.; Leroy, G.; Hebrard, J. [INERIS, F-60150 Verneuil En Halatte (France); Jallais, S. [Air Liquide, F-78350 Jouy En Josas (France); Blanchetiere, V. [GDF SUEZ, 93 - La Plaine St Denis (France)

    2009-12-15

    A future economy based on reduction of carbon-based fuels for power generation and transportation may consider hydrogen as possible energy carrier Extensive and widespread use of hydrogen might require a pipeline network. The alternatives might be the use of the existing natural gas network or to design a dedicated network. Whatever the solution, mixing hydrogen with natural gas will modify the consequences of accidents, substantially The French National Research Agency (ANR) funded project called HYDROMEL focuses on these critical questions Within this project large-scale jet fires have been studied experimentally and numerically The main characteristics of these flames including visible length, radiation fluxes and blowout have been assessed. (authors)

  19. Supersonic Combustion of Hydrogen Jets System in Hypersonic Stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhapbasbaev, U.K.; Makashev, E.P.

    2003-01-01

    The data of calculated theoretical investigations of diffusive combustion of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic stream received with Navier-Stokes parabola equations closed by one-para metrical (k-l) model of turbulence and multiply staged mechanism of hydrogen oxidation are given. Combustion mechanisms depending on the operating parameters are discussing. The influences of air stream composition and ways off fuel feed to the length of ignition delay and level quantity of hydrogen bum-out have been defined. The calculated theoretical results of investigations permit to make the next conclusions: 1. The diffusive combustion of the system of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic flow happens in the cellular structures with alternation zones of intensive running of chemical reactions with their inhibition zones. 2. Gas dynamic and heat Mach waves cause a large - scale viscous formation intensifying mixing of fuel with oxidizer. 3. The system ignition of plane supersonic hydrogen jets in hypersonic airy co-flow happens with the formation of normal flame front of hydrogen airy mixture with transition to the diffusive combustion. 4. The presence of active particles in the flow composition initiates the ignition of hydrogen - airy mixture, provides the intensive running of chemical reactions and shortens the length of ignition delay. 5. The supersonic combustion of hydrogel-airy mixture is characterized by two zones: the intensive chemical reactions with an active energy heat release is occurring in the first zone and in the second - a slow hydrogen combustion limited by the mixing of fuel with oxidizer. (author)

  20. Molecular hydrogen jets from the Orion nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.N.R.; Storey, J.W.V.; Zealey, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the relationship of the recently discovered complex of Herbig Haro objects in Orion to the IR sources in this region, the authors have carried out a survey of the molecular hydrogen S(1) line distribution. The observations have led to the discovery of a previously unsuspected structure of finger-like filaments of H 2 emission extending radially outwards from a common centre at IRC9. (author)

  1. Acoustically Forced Coaxial Hydrogen / Liquid Oxygen Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Conference Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 18 Mar 2016 – 15 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Acoustically Forced Coaxial Hydrogen / Liquid Oxygen Jet...perform, display, or disclose the work. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES For presentation at 28th Annual Conference on Liquid Atomization and Spray Systems...serious problems in the development of liquid rocket engines. In order to understand and predict them, it is necessary to understand how representative

  2. Horizontal H 2-air turbulent buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Sun, Shuyu

    2012-01-01

    The current article is devoted to introducing mathematical and physical analyses with numerical investigation of a buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage in air from a horizontal round source. H 2-air jet is an example of the non

  3. Production of JET fuel containing molecules of high hydrogen content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasek Sz.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The harmful effects of aviation can only be reduced by using alternative fuels with excellent burning properties and a high hydrogen content in the constituent molecules. Due to increasing plastic consumption the amount of the plastic waste is also higher. Despite the fact that landfill plastic waste has been steadily reduced, the present scenario is not satisfactory. Therefore, the aim of this study is to produce JET fuel containing an alternative component made from straight-run kerosene and the waste polyethylene cracking fraction. We carried out our experiments on a commercial NiMo/Al2O3/P catalyst at the following process parameters: T=200-300°C, P=40 bar, LHSV=1.0-3.0 h-1, hydrogen/hydrocarbon ratio= 400 Nm3/m3. We investigated the effects of the feedstocks and the process parameters on the product yields, the hydrodesulfurization and hydrodearomatization efficiencies, and the main product properties. The liquid product yields varied between 99.7-99.8%. As a result of the hydrogenation the sulfur (1-1780 mg/kg and the aromatic contents (9.0-20.5% of the obtained products and the values of their smoke points (26.0-34.7 mm fulfilled the requirements of JET fuel standard. Additionally, the concentration of paraffins increased in the products and the burning properties were also improved. The freezing points of the products were higher than -47°C, therefore product blending is needed.

  4. Moeller polarimetry with atomic hydrogen targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudakov, E.; Luppov, V.

    2005-01-01

    A novel proposal of using polarized atomic hydrogen gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on Moeller scattering is discussed. Such a target of practically 100% polarized electrons could provide a superb systematic accuracy of about 0.5% for beam polarization measurements. Feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed. (orig.)

  5. A windowless frozen hydrogen target system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, P.E.; Beer, G.A.; Beveridge, J.L.

    1995-06-01

    A cryogenic target system has been constructed in which gaseous mixtures of all three hydrogen isotopes have been frozen onto a thin, 65 mm diameter gold foil. The foil is cooled to 3 K while inside a 70 K radiation shield, all of which is mounted in a vacuum system maintained at 10 -9 torr. Stable multi-layer hydrogen targets of known uniformity and thickness have been maintained for required measurement times of up to several days. To date, hundreds of targets have been successfully used in muon-catalyzed fusion experiments at TRIUMF. (author). 12 refs., 6 figs

  6. Irradiated target cooling using circular air jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvaraj, P.; Natesan, K.; Velusamy, K.; Baskaran, V.; Sundararajan, T.

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of irradiation on materials, sample coupons are irradiated in cyclotron facilities. During the irradiation process, these samples produce significant heat. This heat needs to be continuously removed from the samples in order to avoid melting of the samples as well as to keep the samples at a particular temperature during irradiation. The area available for heat transfer is limited due to the small size of the samples. To increase the heat transfer rate, jet cooling is used as it provides large heat transfer co-efficient. To understand the heat transfer characteristics of jet cooling under these conditions, experiments have been carried out. Electric Joule heating is adopted to simulate irradiation heat in stainless steel samples. An array of circular nozzles is used to create air jet. From the study the values of the parameters correspond to the maximum heat removal rate are found out. The results are also compared with an empirical correlation from the literature. (author)

  7. Hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium isotope exchange experiments in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, L.D.; Andrew, P.; Bracco, G.; Conroy, S.; Corti, S.; Ehrenberg, J.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Jarvis, O.N.; Lomas, P.; Loughlin, M.; Peacock, A.T.; Saibene, G.; Sadler, G.; Sartori, R.; Stamp, M.F.; Thomas, P.R.; Belle, P. van (JET Joint Untertaking, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom))

    1992-12-01

    Isotope exchange experiments have been performed in JET using hydrogen, deuterium, and, in the recent preliminary tritium experiment (PTE), tritium. The rate of change-over from one isotope to another involves two quite different time constants. We have modelled this behaviour using a multireservoir model which splits the accessible hydrogenic particles into two groups, each having a different rate of exchange of particles with the plasma. By applying this model to the sequence of discharges during and after the PTE, we can determine the parameters in the model. The resulting fit also gives a good representation of hydrogen/deuterium change-over experiments, indicating that the tritium behaves in the same manner as other hydrogen isotopes, at least as far as recycling is concerned. Discrepancies between the model and the actual measurements of tritium recovery after the PTE lead us to conclude that isotope exchange processes resulting from collisions of molecules with the vessel walls play a significant role in spreading tritrium around the machine. (orig.).

  8. Numerical Simulation of Hydrogen Air Supersonic Coaxial Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharavath, Malsur; Manna, Pulinbehari; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, the turbulent structure of coaxial supersonic H2-air jet is explored numerically by solving three dimensional RANS equations along with two equation k-ɛ turbulence model. Grid independence of the solution is demonstrated by estimating the error distribution using Grid Convergence Index. Distributions of flow parameters in different planes are analyzed to explain the mixing and combustion characteristics of high speed coaxial jets. The flow field is seen mostly diffusive in nature and hydrogen diffusion is confined to core region of the jet. Both single step laminar finite rate chemistry and turbulent reacting calculation employing EDM combustion model are performed to find the effect of turbulence-chemistry interaction in the flow field. Laminar reaction predicts higher H2 mol fraction compared to turbulent reaction because of lower reaction rate caused by turbulence chemistry interaction. Profiles of major species and temperature match well with experimental data at different axial locations; although, the computed profiles show a narrower shape in the far field region. These results demonstrate that standard two equation class turbulence model with single step kinetics based turbulence chemistry interaction can describe H2-air reaction adequately in high speed flows.

  9. Moller Polarimetry with Atomic Hydrogen Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudakov, Eugene; Luppov, V.

    2012-01-01

    A proposal to use polarized atomic hydrogen gas as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on the Moller scattering is described. Such a gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, would provide a target of practically 100% polarized electrons. It is conceivable to reach a ∼0.3% systematic accuracy of the beam polarimetry with such a target. Feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed

  10. Study of the Behaviour of a Pulsed Liquid Jet Target

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, C D

    2000-01-01

    This Web document describes laboratory tests of a water jet using a Nordson piston pump (Model 25B 16:1, Nordson Corp. Ohio, USA) and 5 mm diameter Nordson needle valve (A7A-LBS) - a high-tech water pistol! These tests are a preliminary stage in the development of a mercury-jet pion-production target for a neutrino factory based on a muon storage ring [Refs.1,2]. Click on pictures for enlarged images.

  11. Interaction of two plasma jets produced successively from Cu target

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Badziak, J.; Borodziuk, S.; Chodukowski, T.; Parys, P.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Krouský, Eduard; Mašek, Karel; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Pisarczyk, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2010), s. 497-504 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : Laser targets * laser produced-plasma jets * interaction of plasma jets * PALS laser Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.656, year: 2010

  12. Thermal shocks and magnetohydrodynamics in high power mercury jet targets

    CERN Document Server

    Lettry, Jacques; Gilardoni, S S; Benedikt, Michael; Farhat, M; Robert, E

    2003-01-01

    The response of mercury samples submitted to a pulsed proton beam and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects of a mercury jet injected into a 20 T magnetic field are reported. The experimental conditions differ from those of proposed neutrino factories and the purpose of these measurements is to provide benchmarks for simulation tools of a realistic free mercury jet target. These measurements were completed in June 2002. Analysis is ongoing and the presented results are preliminary. (12 refs).

  13. Realization of a liquid hydrogen target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libin, J.F.; Gangnant, F.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments by the SPEG facility at GANIL need liquid hydrogen targets of some cm 3 . To achieve such targets, temperatures lower than 20 K must be obtained while their thin windows must withstand to pressures higher than 1000 m bars at these temperatures. Havar windows of 4.4 μm thickness met these requirements. A RW5 type Leybold cryo-generator was used as well as a system of ohmic heaters allowing regaining the initial state in a time equivalent with time elapsed for cooling. The working regime was chosen to be constant volume - variable pressure. The various components of this equipment (cryogenic head, buffer volume, hydrogen reservoir and vacuum pump) were coupled through 'aeroquip' allowing by dismantling and changes to keep the hydrogen isolated from the ambient atmosphere. The tests confirmed the accuracy of estimations done for the buffer volume and pressure. The only uncertainty is related to the window deformations. The time of cooling and reheating of target is around one hour. This allows during an experiment to aerate the chamber as the target was accessible to any necessary intervention

  14. Preliminary analyses of Li jet flows for the IFMIF target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Mizuho; Kato, Yoshio; Nakamura, Hideo; Maekawa, Hiroshi

    1997-03-01

    The characteristics of liquid lithium (Li) plane jet flowing along a concave wall were studied using a multi-dimensional numerical code, FLOW-3D, as part of the two-year conceptual design activity (CDA) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) that started in February 1995. The IFMIF will provide high flux, high energy (∼14MeV) neutron irradiation field by deuteron-Li reaction in the Li jet target for testing and development of low-activation and damage-resistant fusion materials. The Li jet target flow at high-velocity (≤ 20m/s) in vacuum, and should adequately remove the intense deuteron beam power (≤ 10MW). The two-dimensional analyses on the thermal and hydraulic responses of the target flow, under the conditions proposed in the IFMIF-CDA, indicated enough temperature margins to avoid significant vaporization and voiding respectively at the jet free surface and the peak temperature location in the jet by keeping the flow stability. (author)

  15. Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Autoigniting Hydrogen Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaithambi, Rajapandiyan

    Autoignition is an important phenomenon and a tool in the design of combustion engines. To study autoignition in a canonical form a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent autoigniting hydrogen jet in vitiated coflow conditions at a jet Reynolds number of 10,000 is performed. A detailed chemical mechanism for hydrogen-air combustion and non-unity Lewis numbers for species transport is used. Realistic inlet conditions are prescribed by obtaining the velocity eld from a fully developed turbulent pipe flow simulation. To perform this simulation a scalable modular density based method for direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible reacting flows is developed. The algorithm performs explicit time advancement of transport variables on structured grids. An iterative semi-implicit time advancement is developed for the chemical source terms to alleviate the chemical stiffness of detailed mechanisms. The algorithm is also extended from a Cartesian grid to a cylindrical coordinate system which introduces a singularity at the pole r = 0 where terms with a factor 1/r can be ill-defined. There are several approaches to eliminate this pole singularity and finite volume methods can bypass this issue by not storing or computing data at the pole. All methods however face a very restrictive time step when using a explicit time advancement scheme in the azimuthal direction (theta) where the cell sizes are of the order DelrDeltheta. We use a conservative finite volume based approach to remove the severe time step restriction imposed by the CFL condition by merging cells in the azimuthal direction. In addition, fluxes in the radial direction are computed with an implicit scheme to allow cells to be clustered along the jet's shear layer. This method is validated and used to perform the large scale turbulent reacting simulation. The resulting flame structure is found to be similar to a turbulent diusion flame but stabilized by autoignition at the

  16. Performance of the cluster-jet target for PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hergemoeller, Ann-Katrin; Bonaventura, Daniel; Grieser, Silke; Hetz, Benjamin; Koehler, Esperanza; Khoukaz, Alfons [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, 48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The success of storage ring experiments strongly depends on the choice of the target. For this purpose, a very appropriate internal target for such an experiment is a cluster-jet target, which will be the first operated target at the PANDA experiment at FAIR. In this kind of target the cluster beam itself is formed due to the expansion of pre-cooled gases within a Laval nozzle and is prepared afterwards via two orifices, the skimmer and the collimator. The target prototype, operating successfully for years at the University of Muenster, provides routinely target thicknesses of more than 2 x 10{sup 15} (atoms)/(cm{sup 2}) in a distance of 2.1 m behind the nozzle. Based on the results of the performance of the cluster target prototype the final cluster-jet target source was designed and set into operation in Muenster as well. Besides the monitoring of the cluster beam itself and the thickness with two different monitoring systems at this target, investigations on the cluster mass via Mie scattering will be performed. In this presentation an overview of the cluster target design, its performance and the Mie scattering method are presented and discussed.

  17. Plasma jet generation by flyer disk collision with massive target

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Borodziuk, S.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Ullschmied, Jiří; Krouský, Eduard; Mašek, Karel; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Kálal, M.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 1 (2007), s. 1-10 ISSN 0078-5466 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : Plasma jets * flyer targets * laser targets * laser ablation * shock waves * craters * PALS facility Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.284, year: 2007

  18. High-repetition-rate laser-proton acceleration from a condensed hydrogen jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obst, Lieselotte; Zeil, Karl; Metzkes, Josefine; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Rehwald, Martin; Sommer, Philipp; Brack, Florian; Schramm, Ulrich [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Goede, Sebastian; Gauthier, Maxence; Roedel, Christian; MacDonald, Michael; Schumaker, William; Glenzer, Siegfried [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Applications of laser-accelerated protons demand a stable source of energetic particles at high repetition rates. We present the results of our experimental campaign in cooperation with MEC/SLAC at the 10Hz Ti:Sa laser Draco of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), employing a pure condensed hydrogen jet as a renewable target. Draco delivers pulses of 30 fs and 5 J at 800 nm, focused to a 3 μm spot by an F/2.5 off-axis parabolic mirror. The jet's nominal electron density is approximately 30 times the critical density and its thickness is 2 μm, 5 μm or 10 μm, depending on the applied aperture on the source. Ion diagnostics reveal mono-species proton acceleration in a solid angle of at least +/-45 with respect to the incoming laser beam, with maximum energies of around 5 MeV. The expanding jet could be monitored on-shot with a temporally synchronized probe beam perpendicular to the pump laser axis. Recorded probe images resemble those of z-pinch experiments with metal wires and indicate an m=0 instability in the plasma.

  19. Optical diagnostics of mercury jet for an intense proton target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H; Tsang, T; Kirk, H G; Ladeinde, F; Graves, V B; Spampinato, P T; Carroll, A J; Titus, P H; McDonald, K T

    2008-04-01

    An optical diagnostic system is designed and constructed for imaging a free mercury jet interacting with a high intensity proton beam in a pulsed high-field solenoid magnet. The optical imaging system employs a backilluminated, laser shadow photography technique. Object illumination and image capture are transmitted through radiation-hard multimode optical fibers and flexible coherent imaging fibers. A retroreflected illumination design allows the entire passive imaging system to fit inside the bore of the solenoid magnet. A sequence of synchronized short laser light pulses are used to freeze the transient events, and the images are recorded by several high speed charge coupled devices. Quantitative and qualitative data analysis using image processing based on probability approach is described. The characteristics of free mercury jet as a high power target for beam-jet interaction at various levels of the magnetic induction field is reported in this paper.

  20. Effect of steam condensation on pressure and temperature under hydrogen jet fire in a vented enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Mike; Xiao, Jianjun; Travis, Jack

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen release through leaks due to the LOCA and MCCI accidents and its immediate ignition leads to formation of hydrogen jet fire in a containment of reactor building. An experimental study of hydrogen jet fire in a chamber of 1x1x1 m 3 volume with different vent position, vent areas from 1 to 90 cm 2 and hydrogen mass flow rates from 0.027 to 1.087 g/s were performed in current work. Depending on hydrogen mass flow rate and vent area a well-ventilated or under-ventilated jet fire regime may occur. In the case of relatively small hydrogen release rate and large vent area, relatively stable jet fire behaviour for well-ventilated jet fire leading to over-pressure not more than 0.8 mbar was found. Three different scenarios of under-ventilated jet fire behaviour with self-extinction, re-ignition and external flame leading to relatively high overpressure of 10-100 mbar were found experimentally and numerically. Numerical simulations with GASFLOW-MPI code were performed with/without modelling heat conduction in solid walls, steam condensation, convective heat transfer and thermal radiation. With heat transfer modelling, both initial pressure peak and pressure decay were very well predicted compared to the experimental data. Numerical simulations were then compared with experimental Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS) images obtained to visualize the hydrogen combustion process. Self-extinction and re-ignition events were captured in the numerical simulation as well. An adiabatic case indicates that heat transfer and steam condensation must be included into the combustion model to accurately predict the physical phenomena of turbulent hydrogen jet flames in a vented enclosure. (author)

  1. The tagged photon beam polarization of the jet target experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, N.; Muccifora, V.

    1989-01-01

    The applicability of the residual electron selection method to the tagging method of the jet target laboratory has been studied. With this end in view the behaviour of the polarized bremsstrahlung cross section in the range considered has been analysed, while the polarization increase by means of the RES has been evaluated. The vertical conditions of the focusing of the tagging spectrometer as a function of energy have been determined. Finally the gamma beam density and the tagging efficiency have been calculated

  2. The self limiting effect of hydrogen cluster in gas jet under liquid nitrogen temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jifeng; Yang Chaowen; Miao Jingwei; Fu Pengtao; Luo Xiaobing; Shi Miangong

    2010-01-01

    The generation of hydrogen clusters in gas jet is tested using the Rayleigh scattering method under liquid nitrogen temperature of 79 K. The self limiting effect of hydrogen cluster is studied and it is found that the cluster formation is greatly affected by the number of expanded molecules. The well designed liquid nitrogen cold trap ensured that the hydrogen cluster would keep maximum size for maximum 15 ms during one gas jet. The scattered light intensity exhibits a power scaling on the backing pressure ranging from 5 to 48 bar with the power value of 4.1.

  3. Heavy water jet target and a beryllium target for production of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, C.M.; Anderson, J.D.; Barschall, H.H.; Davis, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    A limitation on the neutron flux obtainable from proton or deuteron induced reactions is the heating of the target by the accelerated charged particles. The heat can be removed more easily if the target moves. The possibility of using a rotating Be target and a heavy water jet as a target for bombardment by 35-MeV deuterons was studied. In a thick Be metal target moving at 10 m/sec through such a beam of 1 cm diameter a temperature pulse of about 300 0 C will be produced by the 0.3 MW beam. The Be target should be able to withstand such a temperature pulse. A Be target suitable for 3 MW of power in a 1 cm diameter beam would require internal cooling and a higher velocity. A free jet of heavy water is also a possible target. Laser photographs of water jets in vacuum show small angles of divergence. The effect of heating by a 0.3 MW beam is probably not important because the temperature rise produced by the beam is small compared to the absolute temperature of the unheated jet. (auth)

  4. Redeposition effects on the target plates of the JET tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coad, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Complete tiles from the X-point target region of the JET tokamak can be analysed by ion beam techniques in a special chamber equipped to handle beryllium- and tritium-contaminated samples. From the amounts of deuterium co-deposited during plasma operations, and the pattern of beryllium deposits remaining from regular Be evaporation in the torus, erosion and redeposition effects at the target area can be determined. The largest amounts of net redeposition occur in the 'private zone' and near the inner separatrix. There appears to be a net transfer of material from the outer to the inner strike zone: the data are compared with models for divertor transport. (Author)

  5. High-intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, M., E-mail: maxence.gauthier@stanford.edu; Kim, J. B.; Curry, C. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Göde, S.; Propp, A.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Aurand, B.; Willi, O. [Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf (Germany); Goyon, C.; Hazi, A.; Pak, A.; Ruby, J.; Williams, G. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kerr, S. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1R1 (Canada); Ramakrishna, B. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (India); Rödel, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Jena (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    We report on the successful operation of a newly developed cryogenic jet target at high intensity laser-irradiation. Using the frequency-doubled Titan short pulse laser system at Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we demonstrate the generation of a pure proton beam a with maximum energy of 2 MeV. Furthermore, we record a quasi-monoenergetic peak at 1.1 MeV in the proton spectrum emitted in the laser forward direction suggesting an alternative acceleration mechanism. Using a solid-density mixed hydrogen-deuterium target, we are also able to produce pure proton-deuteron ion beams. With its high purity, limited size, near-critical density, and high-repetition rate capability, this target is promising for future applications.

  6. Narrow power deposition profiles on the JET divertor target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingertat, J.; Laux, M.; Monk, R.

    2001-01-01

    One of the key unresolved issues in the design of a future fusion reactor is the power handling capability of the divertor target plates. Earlier we reported on the existence of narrow power deposition profiles in JET, obtained mainly from Langmuir probe measurements. We repeated these measurements in the MkI, MkII and MkIIGB divertor configurations with an upgraded probe system, which allowed us to study the profile shape in more detail. The main results of this study are: In NB heated discharges the electron temperature and power flux at the outer target show a distinct peak of ∼5 mm half-width near the separatrix strike point. The corresponding profiles on the inner target do not show a similar feature. The height of the narrow peak increases with NB heating power and decreases with deuterium and impurity gas puffing. Ion orbit losses are suggested as a possible explanation of the observed profile shape

  7. Production method of hydrogen jet plasma process in hydro machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, F.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of present paper is to the process of plasma formation in hydro machinery when a hydro turbine operates at various conditions and load rejection. By investigation the power, shock pressure , and impact effects of hydro machinery, it is revealed that energy and hydrogen are generated by the plasma process. The investigation on several turbines of various hydro power plants reveals that cold fusion process in hydro machinery generates hydrogen. The hypothesis concerning the participation of alkaline metals in river water and the atomic nuclei of the runner blade material in the formation of hydrogen are considered. It is possible to assume hydrogen, deuterium, helium, and tritium atoms (based on Dr. Mizuno and Dr. Kanarev theories) that are formed, diffuse into cavitation bubbles. The plasma is generated during the collapse of the bubble; thus, the quantity of burnt hydrogen determine the volume of generating hydrogen and the impact force caused by hydrogen explosion (noise).There are five main notions, which can determine hydrogen and plasma process: (1) turbine power effect, (2) high shock pressure, (3) crack on turbine parts, (4) impacts effects and (4) the lift of rotating parts. The frequency of the excitation lies in a range from 0.786 to 1.095 Hz.In future, it may be possible to design hydro turbines based on the plasma process that generates hydrogen; or there may exist turbines that rotate with a mixture of hydrogen explosion and water energies

  8. Hydrogen extraction from liquid lithium-lead alloy by bubbling with rotational jet nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Bo; Yang Tongzai; Guan Rui; Weng Kuiping

    2010-01-01

    The technology of tritium extraction from lithium-lead alloy has been simulated, hydrogen extraction from lithium-lead alloy by bubbling with rotational jet nozzle being used to simulate tritium in the study based on the introduction of fluid dynamics to establish algebraic model. The results show that the higher than lithium-lead melting temperature, the higher cumulative hydrogen extraction efficiency, and gas holdup of bubble column is little affected by the impeller diameter. Gas holdup when using small aperture is slightly higher when using large aperture only at a high helium flow rate, but the smaller the aperture, the greater the bubble surface area, and a marked increase in intensity of flow circulation for liquid lithium-lead with the increase of helium flow rate, hydrogen extraction rate increases too. Moreover, influence of the jet rotational velocity on hydrogen extraction is limited. (authors)

  9. X-ray burst studies with the JENSA gas jet target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Konrad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When a neutron star accretes hydrogen and helium from the outer layers of its companion star, thermonuclear burning enables the αp-process as a break out mechanism from the hot CNO cycle. Model calculations predict (α, p reaction rates significantly affect both the light curves and elemental abundances in the burst ashes. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA gas jet target enables the direct measurement of previously inaccessible (α,p reactions with radioactive beams provided by the rare isotope re-accelerator ReA3 at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL, USA. JENSA is going to be the main target for the Recoil Separator for Capture Reactions (SECAR at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB. Commissioning of JENSA and first experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL showed a highly localized, pure gas target with a density of ∼1019 atoms per square centimeter. Preliminary results are presented from the first direct cross section measurement of the 34Ar(α, p37 K reaction at NSCL.

  10. Horizontal H 2-air turbulent buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    The current article is devoted to introducing mathematical and physical analyses with numerical investigation of a buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage in air from a horizontal round source. H 2-air jet is an example of the non-Boussinesq buoyant jet in which a low-density gas jet is injected/leak into a high-density ambient. The density of the mixture is a function of the concentration only, the binary gas mixture is assumed to be of a linear mixing type and the rate of entrainment is assumed to be a function of the plume centerline velocity and the ratio of the mean plume and ambient densities. On the other hand, the local rate of entrainment consists of two components; one is the component of entrainment due to jet momentum while the other is the component of entrainment due to buoyancy. The top-hat profile assumption is used to obtain the mean centerline velocity, width, density and concentration of the H 2-air horizontal jet in addition to kinematic relations which govern the jet trajectories. A set of ordinary differential equations is obtained and solved numerically using Runge-Kutta method. In the second step, the mean axial velocity, mean concentration and mean density of the jet are obtained based on Gaussian model. Finally, several quantities of interest, including the cross-stream velocity, Reynolds stress, velocity-concentration correlation (radial flux), turbulent eddy viscosity and turbulent eddy diffusivity, are obtained by solving the governing partial differential equations. Additionally, the turbulent Schmidt number is estimated and the normalized jet-feed material density and the normalized momentum flux density are correlated. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental Investigation of Jet-Induced Mixing of a Large Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Vandresar, N. T.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of fluid mixing on the depressurization of a large liquid hydrogen storage tank. The test tank is approximately ellipsoidal, having a volume of 4.89 m(exp 3) and an average wall heat flux of 4.2 W/m(exp 2) due to external heat input. A mixer unit was installed near the bottom of the tank to generate an upward directed axial jet flow normal to the liquid-vapor interface. Mixing tests were initiated after achieving thermally stratified conditions in the tank either by the introduction of hydrogen gas into the tank or by self-pressurization due to ambient heat leak through the tank wall. The subcooled liquid jet directed towards the liquid-vapor interface by the mixer induced vapor condensation and caused a reduction in tank pressure. Tests were conducted at two jet submergence depths for jet Reynolds numbers from 80,000 to 495,000 and Richardson numbers from 0.014 to 0.52. Results show that the rate of tank pressure change is controlled by the competing effects of subcooled jet flow and the free convection boundary layer flow due to external tank wall heating. It is shown that existing correlations for mixing time and vapor condensation rate based on small scale tanks may not be applicable to large scale liquid hydrogen systems.

  12. Electric and spectroscopic properties of argon-hydrogen RF microplasma jets at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza-Correa, J A; Oliveira, C; Amorim, J [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol-CTBE, Caixa Postal 6170, 13083-970, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gomes, M P, E-mail: jorge.correa@bioetanol.org.b, E-mail: carlos.filho@bioetanol.org.b, E-mail: gomesmp@ita.b, E-mail: jayr.amorim@bioetanol.org.b [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica-ITA, Praca Marechal Eduardo Gomes 50, 12.228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-10-06

    Microplasma jets of argon-hydrogen (Ar-H{sub 2}) gas mixture were generated by 144.0 MHz radio-frequency (RF) waves at powers of 5 W, 10 W, 20 W and 50 W. The experimental setup employed creates stable microplasmas at atmospheric pressure from 5.0 mm up to 20.0 mm visual glow lengths. We have determined the rms voltages, the rms electric currents and the power absorptions of these microplasma jets. By making use of optical spectroscopy, the emission spectra of Ar-H{sub 2} microplasma jets were recorded in the range 3060-8200 A, in order to estimate the axial distribution profiles of electron density, rotational temperature, excitation temperature and hydrogen atomic temperature.

  13. The CERN polarized atomic hydrogen beam target project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubischta, W.; Dick, L.

    1990-01-01

    The UA6-experiment at the CERN p bar p Colider is at present using an unpolarized hydrogen cluster target with a thickness up to 5.10 14 atoms/cm 2 . It is planned to replace this target by a polarized atomic hydrogen beam target with a thickness up to about 10 13 atoms/cm 2 . This paper discusses basic requirements and results of atom optical calculations

  14. Supersonic jets of hydrogen and helium for laser wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, K.; Wojda, F.; Senje, L.; Burza, M.; Aurand, B.; Genoud, G.; Persson, A.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of laser wakefield accelerated electrons in supersonic gas flows of hydrogen and helium are investigated. At identical backing pressure, we find that electron beams emerging from helium show large variations in their spectral and spatial distributions, whereas electron beams accelerated in hydrogen plasmas show a higher degree of reproducibility. In an experimental investigation of the relation between neutral gas density and backing pressure, it is found that the resulting number density for helium is ∼30% higher than for hydrogen at the same backing pressure. The observed differences in electron beam properties between the two gases can thus be explained by differences in plasma electron density. This interpretation is verified by repeating the laser wakefield acceleration experiment using similar plasma electron densities for the two gases, which then yielded electron beams with similar properties.

  15. Supersonic jets of hydrogen and helium for laser wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Svensson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The properties of laser wakefield accelerated electrons in supersonic gas flows of hydrogen and helium are investigated. At identical backing pressure, we find that electron beams emerging from helium show large variations in their spectral and spatial distributions, whereas electron beams accelerated in hydrogen plasmas show a higher degree of reproducibility. In an experimental investigation of the relation between neutral gas density and backing pressure, it is found that the resulting number density for helium is ∼30% higher than for hydrogen at the same backing pressure. The observed differences in electron beam properties between the two gases can thus be explained by differences in plasma electron density. This interpretation is verified by repeating the laser wakefield acceleration experiment using similar plasma electron densities for the two gases, which then yielded electron beams with similar properties.

  16. CALCULATIONS FOR A MERCURY JET TARGET IN A SOLENOID MAGNET CAPTURE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; PALMER, R.B.; THIEBERGER, P.; WEGGEL, R.J.; MCDONALD, K.

    2001-01-01

    A mercury jet is being considered as the production target for a muon storage ring facility to produce an intense neutrino beam. A 20 T solenoid magnet that captures pions for muon production surrounds the mercury target. As the liquid metal jet enters or exits the field eddy currents are induced. We calculate the effects that a liquid metal jet experiences in entering and exiting the magnetic field for the magnetic configuration considered in the Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study II

  17. Development of the jet-target system of the MAGIX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan, Aulenbacher [Institut fuer Kernphysik, JGU, Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: Magix/MESA-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Since the new accelerator MESA which will be built up in Mainz in the next years operates at low Energies (100 MeV), but at high beam currents (1 mA), a thin windowless target is required. Therefore the MAGIX collaboration is developing a Jet-Target. This target blasts a Gas-Jet perpendicular to the beam through the scattering chamber of MAGIX. This talk is about the development of this Target System.

  18. Exploratory investigation of the HIPPO gas-jet target fluid dynamic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisel, Zach, E-mail: zmeisel@nd.edu [Department of Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Shi, Ke; Jemcov, Aleksandar [Hessert Laboratory for Aerospace Research, Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Couder, Manoel [Department of Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2016-08-21

    In order to optimize the performance of gas-jet targets for future nuclear reaction measurements, a detailed understanding of the dependence of the gas-jet properties on experiment design parameters is required. Common methods of gas-jet characterization rely on measuring the effective thickness using nuclear elastic scattering and energy loss techniques; however, these tests are time intensive and limit the range of design modifications which can be explored to improve the properties of the jet as a nuclear reaction target. Thus, a more rapid jet-characterization method is desired. We performed the first steps towards characterizing the gas-jet density distribution of the HIPPO gas-jet target at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Laboratory by reproducing results from {sup 20}Ne(α,α){sup 20}Ne elastic scattering measurements with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations performed with the state-of-the-art CFD software ANSYS Fluent. We find a strong sensitivity to experimental design parameters of the gas-jet target, such as the jet nozzle geometry and ambient pressure of the target chamber. We argue that improved predictive power will require moving to three-dimensional simulations and additional benchmarking with experimental data.

  19. Modelling auto ignition of hydrogen in a jet ignition pre-chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boretti, Alberto A. [School of Science and Engineering, University of Ballarat, PO Box 663, Ballarat, Victoria 3353 (Australia)

    2010-04-15

    Spark-less jet ignition pre-chambers are enablers of high efficiencies and load control by quantity of fuel injected when coupled with direct injection of main chamber fuel, thus permitting always lean burn bulk stratified combustion. Towards the end of the compression stroke, a small quantity of hydrogen is injected within the pre-chamber, where it mixes with the air entering from the main chamber. Combustion of the air and fuel mixture then starts within the pre-chamber because of the high temperature of the hot glow plug, and then jets of partially combusted hot gases enter the main chamber igniting there in the bulk, over multiple ignition points, lean stratified mixtures of air and fuel. The paper describes the operation of the spark-less jet ignition pre-chamber coupling CFD and CAE engine simulations to allow component selection and engine performance evaluation. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the plasma hydrogen isotope content by residual gas analysis at JET and AUG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenik, A.; Alegre, D.; Brezinsek, S.; De Castro, A.; Kruezi, U.; Oberkofler, M.; Panjan, M.; Primc, G.; Reichbauer, T.; Resnik, M.; Rohde, V.; Seibt, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Wauters, T.; Zaplotnik, R.; ASDEX-Upgrade, the; EUROfusion MST1 Teams; contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    The isotope content of the plasma reflects on the dynamics of isotope changeover experiments, efficiency of wall conditioning and the performance of a fusion device in the active phase of operation. The assessment of the isotope ratio of hydrogen and methane molecules is used as a novel method of assessing the plasma isotope ratios at JET and ASDEX-Upgrade (AUG). The isotope ratios of both molecules in general shows similar trends as the isotope ratio detected by other diagnostics. At JET, the absolute values of RGA signals are in relatively good agreement with each other and with spectroscopy data, while at AUG the deviation from neutral particle analyser data are larger, and the results show a consistent spatial distribution of the isotope ratio. It is further shown that the isotope ratio of the hydrogen molecule can be used to study the degree of dissociation of the injected gas during changeover experiments.

  1. Characteristics of autoignited laminar lifted flames in heated coflow jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2012-06-01

    The characteristics of autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. In result, as the jet velocity increased, the blowoff was directly occurred from the nozzle-attached flame without experiencing a stabilized lifted flame, in the non-autoignited regime. In the autoignited regime, the autoignited lifted flame of carbon monoxide diluted by nitrogen was affected by the water vapor content in the compressed air oxidizer, as evidenced by the variation of the ignition delay time estimated by numerical calculation. In particular, in the autoignition regime at low temperatures with added hydrogen, the liftoff height of the autoignited lifted flames decreased and then increased as the jet velocity increased. Based on the mechanism in which the autoignited laminar lifted flame is stabilized by ignition delay time, the liftoff height can be influenced not only by the heat loss, but also by the preferential diffusion between momentum and mass diffusion in fuel jets during the autoignition process. © 2012 The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  2. Development of a high-density gas-jet target for nuclear astrophysics and reaction studies with rare isotope beams. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwe, Greife [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-08-12

    The purpose of this project was to develop a high-density gas jet target that will enable a new program of transfer reaction studies with rare isotope beams and targets of hydrogen and helium that is not currently possible and will have an important impact on our understanding of stellar explosions and of the evolution of nuclear shell structure away from stability. This is the final closeout report for the project.

  3. Development of a high-density gas-jet target for nuclear astrophysics and reaction studies with rare isotope beams. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwe, Greife

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a high-density gas jet target that will enable a new program of transfer reaction studies with rare isotope beams and targets of hydrogen and helium that is not currently possible and will have an important impact on our understanding of stellar explosions and of the evolution of nuclear shell structure away from stability. This is the final closeout report for the project.

  4. Thin-thick hydrogen target for nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheller, J.-M.; Juster, F.-P.; Authelet, G. [CEA Saclay, Irfu/SACM, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette cedex (France); Vinyar, I. [PELIN Limited Liability Company 27 A, Gzhatskaya Str, office 103 St. Petersbourg 195220 (Russian Federation); Relland, J. [CEA Saclay, Irfu/SIS, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette cedex (France); Commeaux, C. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, campus Universitaire-Bat 103, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

    2014-01-29

    In spectroscopic studies of unstable nuclei, hydrogen targets are of key importance. The CHyMENE Project aims to provide to the nuclear physics community a thin and pure solid windowless hydrogen or deuterium target. CHyMENE project must respond to this request for the production of solid Hydrogen. The solid hydrogen target is produced in a continuous flow (1 cm/s) by an extrusion technique (developed with the PELIN laboratory) in a vacuum chamber. The shape of the target is determined by the design of the nozzle at the extrusion process. For the purpose, the choice is a rectangular shape with a width of 10 mm and a thickness in the range of 30-50 microns necessary for the physics objectives. The cryostat is equipped with a GM Cryocooler with sufficient power for the solidification of the hydrogen in the lower portion of the extruder. In the higher part of the cryostat, the hydrogen gas is first liquefied and partially solidified. It is then compressed at 100 bars in the cooled extruder before expulsion of the film through the nozzle at the center of the reaction vacuum chamber. After the previous step, the solid hydrogen ribbon falls by gravity into a dedicated chamber where it sublimes and the gas is pumped and evacuated in a exhaust line. This paper deals with the design of the cryostat with its equipment, with the sizing of the thermal bridge (Aluminum and copper), with the results regarding the contact resistance as well as with the vacuum computations of the reaction and recovery hydrogen gas chambers.

  5. Liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets; Cibles a hydrogene et deuterium liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bougon, M; Marquet, M; Prugne, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    A description is given of 1) Atmospheric pressure target: liquid hydrogen, 400 mm thickness; thermal insulation: styrofoam; the hydrogen vapors are used to improve the target cooling; Mylar windows. 2) Vacuum target: 12 liter content: hydrogen or deuterium; liquid thickness 400 mm; thermal insulation is afforded by a vacuum vessel and a liquid nitrogen shield. Recovery and liquefaction of deuterium vapors are managed in the vacuum vessel which holds the target. The target emptying system is designed for operating in a few minutes. (author) [French] Description de: 1) Cible a pression atmospherique; hydrogene liquide, 400 mm d'epaisseur; l'isolement thermique: styrofoam; on utilise les vapeurs d'hydrogene pour ameliorer le refroidissement de la cible; hublots en Mylar. 2) Cible sous vide; contenance 12 litres; hydrogene ou deuterium; epaisseur du liquide 400 mm; l'isolement thermique est assure par une cuve a vide et un ecran d'azote liquide. Recuperation et liquefaction des vapeurs de deuterium sont effectuees dans la cuve a vide contenant la cible. Le systeme de vidange pour la cible est concu pour fonctionner en quelques minutes. (auteur)

  6. Structures and the Hydrogen Bonding Abilities of Estrogens Studied by Supersonic Jet/laser Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Fumiya; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki

    2013-06-01

    Estrone, estradiol, estriol are known as endogenous estrogen which have the same steroidal frame with different substituent, leading to difference of physiological activity upon the formation of hydrogen bond with estrogen receptor. In the present study, structures of estrogens and their hydrated clusters in a supersonic jet have been studied by various laser spectroscopic techniques and density functional theory calculation to study how the difference of substituents affects their hydrogen bonding ability. Infrared spectra in the OH stretching region indicate a formation of intramolecular hydrogen-bond in estriol, which may lead to weaker physiological activity among the three estrogens. We also measured electronic and infrared spectra of 1:1 hydrated clusters of estrogen. The results show a switch of stable hydration site from the phenolic OH group to the five member ring by substituting one more OH group.

  7. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-01-01

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10 18 atoms/s, where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells

  8. NOx emission characteristics in turbulent hydrogen jet flames with coaxial air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Hee Jang; Park, Yang Ho; Yoon, Young Bin

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of NOx emissions in pure hydrogen nonpremixed jet flames with coaxial air are analyzed numerically for a wide range of coaxial air conditions. Among the models tested in simple nonpremixed jet flame, the one-half power scaling law could be reproduced only by the Model C using the HO 2 /H 2 O 2 reaction, implying the importance of chemical nonequilibrium effect. The flame length is reduced significantly by augmenting coaxial air, and could be represented as a function of the ratio of coaxial air to fuel velocity. Predicted EINOx scaling showed a good concordance with experimental data, and the overall one-half power scaling was observed in coaxial flames with Model C when flame residence time was defined with flame volume instead of a cubic of the flame length. Different level of oxygen mass fraction at the stoichiometric surface was observed as coaxial air was increased. These different levels imply that the coaxial air strengthens the nonequilibrium effect

  9. Microcomputer-aided monitor for liquid hydrogen target system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitami, T.; Watanabe, K.

    1983-03-01

    A microcomputer-aided monitor for a liquid hydrogen target system has been designed and tested. Various kinds of input data such as temperature, pressure, vacuum, etc. are scanned in a given time interval. Variation with time in any four items can be displayed on CRT and, if neccessary, printed out on a sheet of recording paper. (author)

  10. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  11. Fast-ignition heavy-ion fusion target by jet impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, P.; Ogando, F.; Eliezer, S.; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A new target design for HIF, based on the fast-ignition principles, is proposed. Unlike the previous designs proposed so far, in this case just one energy source is needed to drive the whole process to ignition. The ultra-fast deposition of energy onto the compressed core is produced in this case by hypervelocity jets generated during the process. The collision of jets converts their kinetic energy into thermal energy of the nuclear fuel, which is expected to produce ignition under proper design. The process is studied in this paper, describing its most relevant features like jet production and later collision

  12. A free Hg jet system for use in a high-power target experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Spampinato, Philip; Gabriel, Tony A; Graves, Van; Haseroth, H; Kirk, Harold G; Lettry, Jacques; McDonald, Kirk T; Rennich, Mark; Simos, Nikolaos; Titus, P; Tsang, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    We describe a mercury jet system that is suitable for insertion into the 15cm diameter bore of a high-field solenoid magnet. The device features a hermetically sealed primary containment volume which is enclosed in a secondary containment system to insure isolation of mercury vapors from the remaining experimental environment. The jet diameter is 1-cm while the jet velocity will be up to 20 m/s. Optical diagnostics is incorporated into the target design to allow observation of the dispersal of the mercury as a result of interaction with a 24 GeV proton beam with up to 20 x 10

  13. EURISOL Multi-MW Target: Investigation of the hydrodynamics of liquid metal (Hg) jet

    CERN Document Server

    Freibergs, J

    In order to develop a windowless target it is necessary to investigate the hydrodynamics of liquid metal (Hg) jet. On the basis of the schematic layout of a high-power target module presented in Ref. [2], and the parameters of the windowless target (speed of the mercury jet up to 30 m/s, diameter of jet 10-20 mm and length of jet about 1 m), a first estimation of the parameters of the main components of a Hg-loop has been obtained by the Institute of Physics, University of Latvia. A preliminary engineering design of a functional Hg-loop to be constructed soon is also proposed. A simplified water stand has been developed with the ability of testing different Hg-nozzle configurations. The tests carried out showed that the kinetic energy of the jet is so high that the coaxial water flow at contact point is transformed into small bubbles (spray). The characteristics of the jet were shown to depend on the pressure of the stand.

  14. High-intensity, thin-target He-jet production source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Y.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Butler, G.W.; Rosenauer, Dk; Loebner, K.E.G.; Lind, V.G.; Phillips, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    A thin-target He-jet system suited to the production and rapid transport of non-volatile radioactive species has been successfully operated with proton beam intensities of up to 700 μA. The system consists of a water-cooled, thin-target chamber, capillary gas transport system, moving tape/Ge detection system, and an aerosol generator/gas recirculator. The yields for a wide variety of uranium fission and deep spallation products have been measured and robust operation of the system demonstrated for several weeks. He-jet transport and collection efficiencies ranged between 15 and 25% with collection rates of 10 7 to 10 8 atoms/sec/isotope. The high-intensity, thin-target He-jet approach represents a robust production source for nonvolatile radioactive heavy ion beams

  15. Interfacial Stability of Spherically Converging Plasma Jets for Magnetized Target Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason; Wu, S. T.; Eskridge, Richard; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A fusion propulsion scheme has been proposed that makes use of the merging of a spherical distribution of plasma jets to dynamically form a gaseous liner to implode a magnetized target to produce the fusion reaction. In this paper, a study is made of the interfacial stability of the interaction of these jets. Specifically, the Orr-Sommerfeld equation is integrated to obtain the growth rate of a perturbation to the primary flow at the interface between the colliding jets. The results lead to an estimate on the tolerances on the relative flow velocities of the merging plasma jets to form a stable, imploding liner. The results show that the maximum temporal growth rate of the perturbed flow at the jet interface is very small in comparison with the time to full compression of the liner. These data suggest that, as far as the stability of the interface between the merging jets is concerned, the formation of the gaseous liner can withstand velocity variation of the order of 10% between the neighboring jets over the density and temperature ranges investigated.

  16. Experimental investigation of ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating scenarios for ITER's half-field hydrogen phase performed in JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.; Johnson, T. J.; Hellsten, T.; Ongena, J.; Mayoral, M. L.; Frigione, D.; Sozzi, C.; Calabro, G.; Lennholm, M.; Beaumont, P.; Blackman, T.; Brennan, D.; Brett, A.; Cecconello, M.; Coffey, I.; Coyne, A.; Crombe, K.; Czarnecka, A.; Felton, R.; Giroud, C.; Gorini, G.; Hellesen, C.; Jacquet, P.; Kiptily, V.; Knipe, S.; Krasilnikov, A.; Maslov, M.; Monakhov, I.; Noble, C.; Nocente, M.; Pangioni, L.; Proverbio, I.; Sergienko, G.; Stamp, M.; Studholme, W.; Tardocchi, M.; Vdovin, V.; Versloot, T.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Whitehurst, A.; Wooldridge, E.; Zoita, V.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2012-01-01

    Two ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating schemes proposed for the half-field operation phase of ITER in hydrogen plasmas—fundamental H majority and second harmonic 3 He ICRF heating—were recently investigated in JET. Although the same magnetic field and RF frequencies ( f ≈ 42 MHz and f

  17. Hydrogen-enriched non-premixed jet flames : analysis of the flame surface, flame normal, flame index and Wobbe index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranga Dinesh, K.K.J.; Jiang, X.; Oijen, van J.A.

    2014-01-01

    A non-premixed impinging jet flame is studied using three-dimensional direct numerical simulation with detailed chemical kinetics in order to investigate the influence of fuel variability on flame surface, flame normal, flame index and Wobbe index for hydrogen-enriched combustion. Analyses indicate

  18. Targets for bulk hydrogen analysis using thermal neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Csikai, J; Buczko, C M

    2002-01-01

    The reflection property of substances can be characterized by the reflection cross-section of thermal neutrons, sigma subbeta. A combination of the targets with thin polyethylene foils allowed an estimation of the flux depression of thermal neutrons caused by a bulk sample containing highly absorbing elements or compounds. Some new and more accurate sigma subbeta values were determined by using the combined target arrangement. For the ratio, R of the reflection and the elastic scattering cross-sections of thermal neutrons, R=sigma subbeta/sigma sub E sub L a value of 0.60+-0.02 was found on the basis of the data obtained for a number of elements from H to Pb. Using this correlation factor, and the sigma sub E sub L values, the unknown sigma subbeta data can be deduced. The equivalent thicknesses, to polyethylene or hydrogen, of the different target materials were determined from the sigma subbeta values.

  19. Hydrogen jet combustion in a scramjet combustor with the rearwall-expansion cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Xiang; Wang, Zhen-Guo; Sun, Ming-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xin; Wang, Hong-Bo

    2018-03-01

    This study is carried out to experimentally investigate the combustion characteristics of the hydrogen jet flame stabilized by the rearwall-expansion cavity in a model scramjet combustor. The flame distributions are characterized by the OH* spontaneous emission images, and the dynamic features of the flames are studied through the high speed framing of the flame luminosity. The combustion modes are further analyzed based on the visual flame structure and wall pressure distributions. Under the present conditions, the combustion based on the rearwall-expansion cavity appears in two distinguished modes - the typical cavity shear-layer stabilized combustion mode and the lifted-shear-layer stabilized combustion mode. In contrast with the shear-layer stabilized mode, the latter holds stronger flame. The transition from shear-layer stabilized combustion mode to lifted-shear-layer stabilized mode usually occurs when the equivalence ratio is high enough. While the increases of the offset ratio and upstream injection distance both lead to weaker jet-cavity interactions, cause longer ignition delay, and thus delay the mode transition. The results reveal that the rearwall-expansion cavity with an appropriate offset ratio should be helpful in delaying mode transition and preventing thermal choke, and meanwhile just brings minor negative impact on the combustion stability and efficiency.

  20. NOx emission characteristics in turbulent hydrogen jet flames with coaxial air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Hee Jang [Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yang Ho; Yoon, Young Bin [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    The characteristics of NOx emissions in pure hydrogen nonpremixed jet flames with coaxial air are analyzed numerically for a wide range of coaxial air conditions. Among the models tested in simple nonpremixed jet flame, the one-half power scaling law could be reproduced only by the Model C using the HO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reaction, implying the importance of chemical nonequilibrium effect. The flame length is reduced significantly by augmenting coaxial air, and could be represented as a function of the ratio of coaxial air to fuel velocity. Predicted EINOx scaling showed a good concordance with experimental data, and the overall one-half power scaling was observed in coaxial flames with Model C when flame residence time was defined with flame volume instead of a cubic of the flame length. Different level of oxygen mass fraction at the stoichiometric surface was observed as coaxial air was increased. These different levels imply that the coaxial air strengthens the nonequilibrium effect

  1. Jets in Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernovae: Constraints from a Comprehensive Analysis of Radio Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppejans, D. L.; Margutti, R.; Guidorzi, C.; Chomiuk, L.; Alexander, K. D.; Berger, E.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Blanchard, P. K.; Challis, P.; Chornock, R.; Drout, M.; Fong, W.; MacFadyen, A.; Migliori, G.; Milisavljevic, D.; Nicholl, M.; Parrent, J. T.; Terreran, G.; Zauderer, B. A.

    2018-03-01

    The energy source powering the extreme optical luminosity of hydrogen-stripped superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) is not known, but recent studies have highlighted the case for a central engine. Radio and/or X-ray observations are best placed to track the fastest ejecta and probe the presence of outflows from a central engine. We compile all the published radio observations of SLSNe-I to date and present three new observations of two new SLSNe-I. None were detected. Through modeling the radio emission, we constrain the subparsec environments and possible outflows in SLSNe-I. In this sample, we rule out on-axis collimated relativistic jets of the kind detected in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We constrain off-axis jets with opening angles of 5° (30°) to energies of {E}{{k}}values {ε }e=0.1 and {ε }B=0.01. The deepest limits rule out emission of the kind seen in faint uncollimated GRBs (with the exception of GRB 060218) and from relativistic SNe. Finally, for the closest SLSN-I, SN 2017egm, we constrain the energy of an uncollimated nonrelativistic outflow like those observed in normal SNe to {E}{{k}}≲ {10}48 erg.

  2. Blow-off of hydrogen using an optimized design of discharge jet-mixer arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristow, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen is ignitable in air at volume concentrations between 4 % and 75 %. Therefore, in the case of an emergency evacuation of a hydrogen-cooled generator in nuclear power plants, the gas has to be safely blown-off above the turbine building. Especially, a leakage at the hydrogen containing piping system at the generator has gained more and more importance in the context of safety assessments. The design of a blow-off system respects two safety aspects: Firstly, a short blow-off time is necessary to reduce the hydrogen release inside the turbine building in case of a leakage. Secondly, for the postulated ignition of the released hydrogen on the roof of the building the resulting pressure load must remain below the maximum admissible one of the turbine building roof. In order to fulfill the first condition an appropriate fast evacuation piping system from the generator to the blow-off outlet is designed. Regarding the latter the blow-off system uses special discharge nozzles placed horizontally in a radial-symmetric configuration. In this respect, the influence of strong wind conditions during the evacuation process is also considered. The resulting ignitable volume of the overlapping H2-air clouds does not exceed the maximum allowed ignitable volume. In the following the underlying process of blow-off by a fast hydrogen evacuation system is discussed. First the transient general blow-off behavior in the dedicated piping system is analyzed with the fluid piping tool ROLAST. The results of these calculations are boundary conditions for the subsequent qualification of the blow-off jet-mixer. Here a proof of the general functionality is given (2D CFD). Subsequently the blow-off behavior of the H2-air mixture is discussed in independent 3D CFD calculations with and without wind. From these analyses the possible ignitable gas volumes are determined. Final step is a simplified semi-analytical assessment of the resulting possible deflagration loads on the civil structure

  3. Electric field and temperature in a target induced by a plasma jet imaged using Mueller polarimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slikboer, E.T.; Sobota, A.; Guaitella, O.; Garcia-Caurel, E.

    2018-01-01

    Mueller polarimetry is used to investigate the behavior of an electro optic target (BSO crystal) under exposure of guided ionization waves produced by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet. For the first time, this optical technique is time resolved to obtain the complete Mueller matrix of the sample

  4. Moeller polarimeter for VEPP-3 storage ring based on internal polarized gas jet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyug, M.V.; Grigoriev, A.V.; Kiselev, V.A.; Lazarenko, B.A.; Levichev, E.B.; Mikaiylov, A.I.; Mishnev, S.I.; Nikitin, S.A.; Nikolenko, D.M.; Rachek, I.A.; Shestakov, Yu.V.; Toporkov, D.K.; Zevakov, S.A.; Zhilich, V.N.

    2005-01-01

    A new method to determine the polarization of an electron beam circulating in a storage ring by a non-destructive way, based on measuring the asymmetry in scattering of beam electrons on electrons of the internal polarized gas jet target, has been developed and tested at the VEPP-3 storage ring

  5. A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for precision spectroscopy at the HITRAP facility at GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedemann, D.; Stiebing, K. E.; Winters, D. F. A.; Quint, W.; Varentsov, V.; Warczak, A.; Malarz, A.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2014-11-01

    A pulsed supersonic gas jet target for experiments at the HITRAP facility at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt has been designed and built as a multi-purpose installation for key experiments on fundamental atomic physics in strong fields. This setup is currently installed at the Institut für Kernphysik of Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main (IKF), in order to explore its operation prior to its installation at the HITRAP facility. Design and performance of the target are described. The measured target densities of 5.9×1012 atoms/cm3 for helium and 8.1×1012 atoms/cm³ for argon at the stagnation pressure of 30 bar match the required values. The target-beam diameter of 0.9 mm and the pulsed operation mode (jet built-up-time ≤15 ms) are well suited for the use at HITRAP.

  6. EINOx scaling in a non-premixed turbulent hydrogen jet with swirled coaxial air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jeongseog; Hwang, Jeongjae; Yoon, Youngbin [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    The effect of swirl flow on pollutant emission (nitrous oxide) was studied in a non-premixed turbulent hydrogen jet with coaxial air. A swirl vane was equipped in a coaxial air feeding line and the angle of the swirl vane was varied from 30 to 90 degrees. Under a fixed global equivalence ratio of {phi}{sub G} = 0.5, fuel jet air velocity and coaxial air velocity were varied in an attached flame region as u{sub F} = 85.7-160.2 m/s and u{sub A} = 7.4-14.4 m/s. In the present study, two mixing variables of coaxial air and swirl flow were considered: the flame residence time and global strain rate. The objective of the current study was to analyze the flame length behavior, and the characteristics of nitrous oxide emissions under a swirl flow conditions, and to suggest a new parameter for EINOx (the emission index of nitrous oxide) scaling. From the experimental results, EINOx decreased with the swirl vane angle and increased with the flame length (L). We found the scaling variables for the flame length and EINOx using the effective diameter (d{sub F,eff}) in a far-field concept. Normalized flame length (L divided by d{sub F,eff}) fitted well with the theoretical expectations. EINOx increased in proportion to the flame residence time ({proportional_to}{tau}{sub R}{sup 1/2.8}) and the global strain rate ({proportional_to}S{sub G}{sup 1/2.8}). (author)

  7. Laser-driven polarized hydrogen and deuterium internal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    After completing comprehensive tests of the performance of the source with both hydrogen and deuterium gas, we began tests of a realistic polarized deuterium internal target. These tests involve characterizing the atomic polarization and dissociation fraction of atoms in a storage cell as a function of flow and magnetic field, and making direct measurements of the average nuclear tensor polarization of deuterium atoms in the storage cell. Transfer of polarization from the atomic electron to the nucleus as a result of D-D spin-exchange collisions was observed in deuterium, verifying calculations suggesting that high vector polarization in both hydrogen and deuterium can be obtained in a gas in spin temperature equilibrium without inducing RF transitions between the magnetic substates. In order to improve the durability of the system, the source glassware was redesigned to simplify construction and installation and eliminate stress points that led to frequent breakage. Improvements made to the nuclear polarimeter, which used the low energy 3 H(d,n) 4 He reaction to analyze the tensor polarization of the deuterium, included installing acceleration lenses constructed of wire mesh to improve pumping conductance, construction of a new holding field coil, and elimination of the Wien filter from the setup. These changes substantially simplified operation of the polarimeter and should have reduced depolarization in collisions with the wall. However, when a number of tests failed to show an improvement of the nuclear polarization, it was discovered that extended operation of the system with a section of teflon as a getter for potassium caused the dissociation fraction to decline with time under realistic operating conditions, suggesting that teflon may not be a suitable material to eliminate potassium from the target. We are replacing the teflon surfaces with drifilm-coated ones and plan to continue tests of the polarized internal target in this configuration

  8. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    OpenAIRE

    Halfon, S.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Paul, M.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Feinberg, G.; Friedman, M.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Tessler, M.; Silverman, I.

    2013-01-01

    A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as ...

  9. Combustion of hydrogen-air jets in local chemical equilibrium: A guide to the CHARNAL computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, D. B.; Launder, B. E.; Morse, A. P.; Maples, G.

    1974-01-01

    A guide to a computer program, written in FORTRAN 4, for predicting the flow properties of turbulent mixing with combustion of a circular jet of hydrogen into a co-flowing stream of air is presented. The program, which is based upon the Imperial College group's PASSA series, solves differential equations for diffusion and dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy and also of the R.M.S. fluctuation of hydrogen concentration. The effective turbulent viscosity for use in the shear stress equation is computed. Chemical equilibrium is assumed throughout the flow.

  10. Θ"+ search at HERMES with deuterium and hydrogen targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Siguang; Schnell, Gunar

    2016-01-01

    The previous search at HERMES for narrow baryon states excited in quasi-real photo-production, decaying through the channel Θ"+ → pK_S"0 → pπ"+ π"-, has been extended. Improved decay-particle reconstruction, more advanced particle identification, and increased event samples are employed. The structure that was observed earlier at an invariant mass of 1528 MeV shifts to 1522 MeV in the new analysis of data with a deuterium target, with a drop of statistical significance to about 2σ. The number of events above background is 68_-_3_1"+"9"8(stat)±13(sys). No such structure is observed in the hydrogen data set. (author)

  11. An optimized hydrogen target for muon catalyzed fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheisari, R., E-mail: gheisari@pgu.ac.i [Physics Department, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr 75169 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-01

    This paper deals with the optimization of the processes involved in muon catalyzed fusion. Muon catalyzed fusion ({mu}CF) is studied in all layers of the solid hydrogen structure H/0.1%T+D{sub 2}+HD. The layer H/T acts as an emitter source of energetic t{mu} atoms, due to the so-called Ramsauer-Townsend effect. These t{mu} atoms are slowed down in the second layer (degrader) and are forced to take place nuclear fusion in HD. The degrader affects time evolution of t{mu} atomic beam. This effect has not been considered until now in {mu}CF-multilayered targets. Due to muon cycling and this effect, considerable reactions occur in the degrader. In our calculations, it is shown that the fusion yield equals 180{+-}1.5. It is possible to separate events that overlap in time.

  12. Upgrade to the Cryogenic Hydrogen Gas Target Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael; Tribble, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen gas target at Texas A&M is a vital component for creating a secondary radioactive beam that is then used in experiments in the Momentum Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS). A stable beam from the K500 superconducting cyclotron enters the gas cell and some incident particles are transmuted by a nuclear reaction into a radioactive beam, which are separated from the primary beam and used in MARS experiments. The pressure in the target chamber is monitored so that a predictable isotope production rate can be assured. A ``black box'' received the analog pressure data and sent RS232 serial data through an outdated serial connection to an outdated Visual Basic 6 (VB6) program, which plotted the chamber pressure continuously. The black box has been upgraded to an Arduino UNO microcontroller [Atmel Inc.], which can receive the pressure data and output via USB to a computer. It has been programmed to also accept temperature data for future upgrade. A new computer program, with updated capabilities, has been written in Python. The software can send email alerts, create audible alarms through the Arduino, and plot pressure and temperature. The program has been designed to better fit the needs of the users. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  13. Distillation of hydrogen isotopes for polarized HD targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, T., E-mail: takeshi@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 10-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Bouchigny, S. [IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay (France); CEA LIST, BP6-92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses, CEDEX (France); Didelez, J.-P. [IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay (France); Fujiwara, M. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 10-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Fukuda, K. [Kansai University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Shizuki Awaji 656-2131 (Japan); Kohri, H.; Kunimatsu, T.; Morisaki, C.; Ono, S. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 10-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Rouille, G. [IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay (France); Tanaka, M. [Kobe Tokiwa University, Ohtani-cho 2-6-2, Nagata, Kobe 653-0838 (Japan); Ueda, K.; Uraki, M.; Utsuro, M. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 10-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Wang, S.Y. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan (China); Yosoi, M. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 10-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a new cryogenic distillation system to purify Hydrogen-Deuteride (HD) gas for polarized HD targets in LEPS experiments at SPring-8. A small amount of ortho-H{sub 2} ({approx}0.01%) in the HD gas plays an important role in efficiently polarizing the HD target. Since there are 1-5% impurities of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} in commercially available HD gases, it is necessary to purify the HD gas up to {approx}99.99%. The distillation system is equipped with a cryogenic distillation unit filled with many small stainless steel cells called 'Heli-pack'. The distillation unit consists of a condenser part, a rectification part, and a reboiler part. The unit is kept at the temperature of 17-21 K. The Heli-pack has a large surface area that makes a good contact between gases and liquids. An amount of 5.2 mol of commercial HD gas is fed into the distillation unit. Three trials were carried out to purify the HD gas by changing temperatures (17.5 K and 20.5 K) and gas extraction speeds (1.3 ml/min and 5.2 ml/min). The extracted gas was analyzed using a gas analyzer system combining a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a gas chromatograph. One mol of HD gas with a purity better than 99.99% has been successfully obtained for the first time. The effective NTP (Number of Theoretical Plates), which is an indication of the distillation performances, is obtained to be 37.2{+-}0.6. This value is in good agreement with a designed value of 37.9. The HD target is expected to be efficiently polarized under a well-controlled condition by adding an optimal amount of ortho-H{sub 2} to the purified HD gas.

  14. High Power Proton Beam Shocks and Magnetohydrodynamics in a Mercury Jet Target for a Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Fabich, A; Fabjan, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of liquid metal jet targets for secondary particle production with high power proton beams has been studied. The main aspects of the thesis were benchmark experiments covering the behaviour of liquid targets under thermal shock waves induced by high power proton beams, and also magnetohydrodynamic effects. Severe challenges were imposed by safety issues and the restricted beam time to the tests in ISOLDE at CERN and at the High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Grenoble. Restricted access times in high radiation level areas were of the order of minutes and in this short time span, the complete experimental setup had to be performed and verified. The involvement of mercury as liquid target material and its activation during beam tests demanded special confinement precautions. The setup for both experiments was based on the use of a high speed camera system for observation of the mercury target. The presence of high radiation or high magnetic field required the installation of the sensitive camera sy...

  15. Performance of a hydrogen/deuterium polarized gas target in a storage ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buuren, L.D.; Szczerba, D.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bulten, H.J.; Klous, S.; Mul, F.A.; Poolman, H.R.; Simani, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a hydrogen/deuterium polarized gas target in a storage ring is presented. The target setup consisted of an atomic beam source, a cryogenic storage cell and a Breit-Rabi polarimeter. High frequency transition units were constructed to produce vector polarized hydrogen and

  16. Evidence of 9Be  +  p nuclear reactions during 2ω CH and hydrogen minority ICRH in JET-ILW hydrogen and deuterium plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kiptily, V.; Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.; Afanasyev, V. I.; Giroud, C.; Goloborodko, V.; Hellesen, C.; Popovichev, S. V.; Mironov, M. I.; contributors, JET

    2018-02-01

    The intensity of 9Be  +  p nuclear fusion reactions was experimentally studied during second harmonic (2ω CH) ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and further analyzed during fundamental hydrogen minority ICRH of JET-ILW hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. In relatively low-density plasmas with a high ICRH power, a population of fast H+ ions was created and measured by neutral particle analyzers. Primary and secondary nuclear reaction products, due to 9Be  +  p interaction, were observed with fast ion loss detectors, γ-ray spectrometers and neutron flux monitors and spectrometers. The possibility of using 9Be(p, d)2α and 9Be(p, α)6Li nuclear reactions to create a population of fast alpha particles and study their behaviour in non-active stage of ITER operation is discussed in the paper.

  17. Equilibrium chemical reaction of supersonic hydrogen-air jets (the ALMA computer program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghobashi, S.

    1977-01-01

    The ALMA (axi-symmetrical lateral momentum analyzer) program is concerned with the computation of two dimensional coaxial jets with large lateral pressure gradients. The jets may be free or confined, laminar or turbulent, reacting or non-reacting. Reaction chemistry is equilibrium.

  18. Interferometric analysis of laboratory photoionized plasmas utilizing supersonic gas jet targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Kyle James; Ivanov, Vladimir; Mancini, Roberto; Mayes, Daniel C.

    2018-06-01

    Photoionized plasmas are an important component of active galactic nuclei, x-ray binary systems and other astrophysical objects. Laboratory produced photoionized plasmas have mainly been studied at large scale facilities, due to the need for high intensity broadband x-ray flux. Using supersonic gas jets as targets has allowed university scale pulsed power generators to begin similar research. The two main advantages of this approach with supersonic gas jets include: possibility of a closer location to the x-ray source and no attenuation related to material used for containment and or tamping. Due to these factors, this experimental platform creates a laboratory environment that more closely resembles astrophysical environments. This system was developed at the Nevada Terawatt Facility using the 1 MA pulsed power generator Zebra. Neon, argon, and nitrogen supersonic gas jets are produced approximately 7-8mm from the z-pinch axis. The high intensity broadband x-ray flux produced by the collapse of the z-pinch wire array implosion irradiates the gas jet. Cylindrical wire arrays are made with 4 and 8 gold 10µm thick wire. The z-pinch radiates approximately 12-16kj of x-ray energy, with x-ray photons under 1Kev in energy. The photoionized plasma is measured via x-ray absorption spectroscopy and interferometry. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to the measure neutral density of the jet prior to the zebra shot at a wavelength of 266 nm. A dual channel air-wedge shearing interferometer is used to measure electron density of the ionized gas jet during the shot, at wavelengths of 532nm and 266nm. Using a newly developed interferometric analysis tool, average ionization state maps of the plasma can be calculated. Interferometry for nitrogen and argon show an average ionization state in the range of 3-8. Preliminary x-ray absorption spectroscopy collected show neon absorption lines. This work was sponsored in part by DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451.

  19. Integrated modelling of material migration and target plate power handling at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coster, D.P.; Bonnin, X.; Chankin, A.

    2005-01-01

    The complexity of the tokamak edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) region is such that extrapolation to ITER requires modelling to be pursued through the integration of a number of edge codes, each of which must be thoroughly tested against results from present day machines. This contribution demonstrates how the edge modelling effort at JET is focused on such an approach by considering two examples, target power loading and material erosion and migration, the understanding of which are crucial issues for ITER. (author)

  20. THERMODYNAMIC INTERACTION OF THE PRIMARY PROTON BEAM WITH A MERCURY JET TARGET AT A NEUTRINO FACTORY SOURCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIMOS, N.; LUDEWIG, H.; KIRK, H.; THIEBERGER, P.; MCDONALD, K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the thermodynamic interaction of an intense proton beam with the proposed mercury jet target at a neutrino factory or muon collider source, and the consequences of the generated pressure waves on the target integrity. Specifically, a 24 GeV proton beam with approximately 1.6e13 protons per pulse and a pulse length of 2 nanosec will interact with a 1 cm diameter mercury jet within a 20 Tesla magnetic field. In one option, a train of six such proton pulses is to be delivered on target within 2 microsec, in which case the state of the mercury jet following the interaction with each pulse is critical. Using the equation of state for mercury from the SESAME library, in combination with the energy deposition rates calculated the by the hadron interaction code MARS, the induced 3-D pressure field in the target is estimated. The consequent pressure wave propagation and attenuation in the mercury jet is calculated using an ANSYS code transient analysis, and the state of the mercury jet at the time of arrival of the subsequent pulse is assessed. The amplitude of the pressure wave reaching the nozzle that ejects the mercury jet into the magnetic field is estimated and the potential for mechanical damage is addressed

  1. 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.

    1983-07-01

    This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, construction details and operating experience are discussed

  2. Measurement of free-surface of liquid metal lithium jet for IFMIF target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroo Kondo; Nobuo Yamaoka; Takuji Kanemura; Seiji Miyamoto; Hiroshi Horiike; Mizuho Ida; Hiroo Nakamura; Izuru Matsushita; Takeo Muroga

    2006-01-01

    This reports an experimental study on flow characteristics of a lithium target flow of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). Surface shapes of the target were tried to measure by pattern projection method that is a three dimensional image measurement method. Irregularity of the surface shape caused by surface wakes was successfully measured by the method. IFMIF liquid lithium target is formed a flat plane jet of 25 mm in depth and 260 mm in width, and flows in a flow velocity range of 10 to 20 m/s. Aim of this study is to develop measurement techniques for monitoring of the target when IFMIF is in operation. The lithium target flow is high speed jet and the temperature high is more than 500 K. Also, light is not transmitted into liquid metal lithium. Therefore, almost of all flow measurement techniques developed for water are not used for lithium flow. In this study, pattern projection method was employed to measure the surface irregularity of the target. In the method, stripe patterns are projected onto the flow surface. The projected patterns are deformed according the surface shape. Three-dimensional surface shape is measured by analyzing the deformed patterns recorded using a CCD camera. The method uses the property that lithium dose not transmit visible lights. The experiments were carried out using a lithium loop at Osaka University. In this facility, lithium plane jet of 10 mm in depth and 70 mm width is obtained in the velocity range of less than 15 m/s using a two contractions nozzle. The pattern projection method was used to measure the amplitude of surface irregularity caused by surface wakes. The surface wakes were generated from small damaged at the nozzle edge caused by erosion, and those were successfully measured by the method. The measurement results showed the amplitude of the surface wakes were approximately equal to a size of damage of a nozzle. The amplitude was decreasing with distance to down stream and with decreasing

  3. Intensification process of air-hydrogen mixture burning in the variable cross section channel by means of the air jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the results of numerical modeling of a transonic region formation in the flat channel. Hydrogen flows into the channel through the holes in the wall. The jet of compressed air is localized downstream the holes. The transonic region formation is formed by the burning of heterogeneous hydrogen-air mixture. It was considered in the framework of the simplified chemical kinetics. The interesting feature of the regime obtained is the following: the distribution of the Mach numbers is qualitatively similar to the case of pulse-periodic energy sources. This mode is a favorable prerequisite for the effective fuel combustion in the expanding part of the channel when injecting fuel into this part.

  4. Renewable hydrocarbons for jet fuels from biomass and plastics via microwave-induced pyrolysis and hydrogenation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuesong

    This dissertation aims to enhance the production of aromatic hydrocarbons in the catalytic microwave-induced pyrolysis, and maximize the production of renewable cycloalkanes for jet fuels in the hydrogenation process. In the process, ZSM-5 catalyst as the highly efficient catalyst was employed for catalyzing the pyrolytic volatiles from thermal decomposition of cellulose (a model compound of lignocellulosic biomass). A central composite experiment design (CCD) was used to optimize the product yields as a function of independent factors (e.g. catalytic temperature and catalyst to feed mass ratio). The low-density polyethylene (a mode compound of waste plastics) was then carried out in the catalytic microwave-induced pyrolysis in the presence of ZSM-5 catalyst. Thereafter, the catalytic microwave-induced co-pyrolysis of cellulose with low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was conducted over ZSM-5 catalyst. The results showed that the production of aromatic hydrocarbons was significantly enhanced and the coke formation was also considerably reduced comparing with the catalytic microwave pyrolysis of cellulose or LDPE alone. Moreover, practical lignocellulosic biomass (Douglas fir sawdust pellets) was converted into aromatics-enriched bio-oil by catalytic microwave pyrolysis. The bio-oil was subsequently hydrogenated by using the Raney Ni catalyst. A liquid-liquid extraction step was implemented to recover the liquid organics and remove the water content. Over 20% carbon yield of liquid product regarding lignocellulosic biomass was obtained. Up to 90% selectivity in the liquid product belongs to jet fuel range cycloalkanes. As the integrated processes was developed, catalytic microwave pyrolysis of cellulose with LDPE was conducted to improve aromatic production. After the liquid-liquid extraction by the optimal solvent (n-heptane), over 40% carbon yield of hydrogenated organics based on cellulose and LDPE were achieved in the hydrogenation process. As such, real

  5. New supersonic gas jet target for low energy nuclear reaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favela, F.; Acosta, L.; Andrade, E.; Araujo, V.; Huerta, A.; de Lucio, O. G.; Murillo, G.; Ortiz, M. E.; Policroniades, R.; Santa Rita, P.; Varela, A.; Chávez, E.

    2015-12-01

    A windowless supersonic gas jet target (SUGAR) has been put in operation recently in Mexico. It is the first target of its kind in the country and the region. New research opportunities become available with this facility through the study of the direct beam-gas interaction: nuclear physics and astrophysics, atomic physics, interaction of radiation with matter and other interdisciplinary applications. A general description of the apparatus and its commissioning is given here. Air, nitrogen and argon jets were produced. Proton and deuteron beams were used to measure key parameters of the system to compare with theoretical estimates. In addition, as a first study case, we present data from the 14N (d ,α )12C reaction, at center of mass energies between 1.9 and 3.0 MeV with an E-Δ E telescope detector at 35°. Excitation functions for several excited states were constructed and an 16O resonance at 22.72 MeV was confirmed.

  6. Turbulent heat mixing of a heavy liquid metal flow in the MEGAPIE target geometry-The heated jet experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieglitz, Robert; Daubner, Markus; Batta, A.; Lefhalm, C.-H.

    2007-01-01

    The MEGAPIE target installed at the Paul-Scherrer Institute is an example of a spallation target using eutectic liquid lead-bismuth (Pb 45 Bi 55 ) both as coolant and neutron source. An adequate cooling of the target requires a conditioning of the flow, which is realized by a main flow transported in an annular gap downwards, u-turned at a hemispherical shell into a cylindrical riser tube. In order to avoid a stagnation point close to the lowest part of the shell a jet flow is superimposed to the main flow, which is directed towards to the stagnation point and flows tangentially along the shell. The heated jet experiment conducted in the THEADES loop of the KALLA laboratory is nearly 1:1 representation of the lower part of the MEGAPIE target. It is aimed to study the cooling capability of this specific geometry in dependence on the flow rate ratio (Q main /Q jet ) of the main flow (Q main ) to the jet flow (Q jet ). Here, a heated jet is injected into a cold main flow at MEGAPIE relevant flow rate ratios. The liquid metal experiment is accompanied by a water experiment in almost the same geometry to study the momentum field as well as a three-dimensional turbulent numerical fluid dynamic simulation (CFD). Besides a detailed study of the envisaged nominal operation of the MEGAPIE target with Q main /Q jet = 15 deviations from this mode are investigated in the range from 7.5 ≤ Q main /Q jet ≤ 20 in order to give an estimate on the safe operational threshold of the target. The experiment shows that, the flow pattern establishing in this specific design and the turbulence intensity distribution essentially depends on the flow rate ratio (Q main /Q jet ). All Q main /Q jet -ratios investigated exhibit an unstable time dependent behavior. The MEGAPIE design is highly sensitive against changes of this ratio. Mainly three completely different flow patterns were identified. A sufficient cooling of the lower target shell, however, is only ensured if Q main /Q jet ≤ 12

  7. The effect of target materials on the propagation of atmospheric-pressure plasma jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Longfei; Yan, Wen; Xia, Yang; Liu, Dongping

    2018-05-01

    The current study is focused on the effect of target materials (quartz plate, copper sheet, and quartz plate with a grounded copper sheet on the back) on the propagation of atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jets. The dynamics of ionization waves (IWs) and the relative amount of reactive oxygen species (OH and O) in the IW front were compared by using spatial and temporal images and relative optical emission spectroscopy. Our measurements show that the targets can significantly affect the propagation and intensity of the IWs. In addition, strong OH emission lines were detected when the IWs impinged upon the damp surface. Numerical simulations have been carried out to explain the experimental observation. The propagation velocity of IWs predicted by the simulation was in good agreement with the experimental results. Simulation results suggest that the density and velocity of IWs mainly depend on the electric field between the high voltage electrode tip and the target. Analysis indicates that the targets could change the electric field distribution between the high voltage electrode and targets and thus affect the dynamics and the density of the IWs, the generation of reactive oxygen species, and the corresponding sterilization efficiency.

  8. A three-cell liquid hydrogen target for an extended focal plane polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovanov, L.B.; Borzounov, Yu.T.; Piskunov, N.M.; Tsvinev, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the design and working principle of a 3-cell liquid hydrogen target produced for the high-energy deuteron polarimeter HYPOM. This target uses liquid Helium as a cooling agent. After a general description of the apparatus, tests and operating modes are thoroughly explained. In particular the air controlled self regulation of Helium flow in the cryostat to stabilize the liquid hydrogen level is presented. (author)

  9. Development of Criteria for Flashback Propensity in Jet Flames for High Hydrogen Content and Natural Gas Type Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalantari, Alireza [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Sullivan-Lewis, Elliot [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); McDonell, Vincent [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-10-17

    Due to increasingly stringent air quality requirements stationary power gas turbines have moved to lean-premixed operation, which reduces pollutant emissions but can result in flashback. Curtailing flashback can be difficult with hydrocarbon fuels and becomes even more challenging when hydrogen is used as the fuel. In fact, flashback is a key operability issue associated with low emission combustion of high hydrogen content fuels. Flashback can cause serious damage to the premixer hardware. Hence, design tools to predict flashback propensity are of interest. Such a design tool has been developed based on the data gathered by experimental study to predict boundary layer flashback using non-dimensional parameters. The flashback propensity of a premixed jet flame has been studied experimentally. Boundary layer flashback has been investigated under turbulent flow conditions at elevated pressures and temperatures (i.e. 3 atm to 8 atm and 300 K to 500 K). The data presented in this study are for hydrogen fuel at various Reynolds numbers, which are representative of practical gas turbine premixer conditions and are significantly higher than results currently available in the literature. Three burner heads constructed of different materials (stainless steel, copper, and zirconia ceramic) were used to evaluate the effect of tip temperature, a parameter found previously to be an important factor in triggering flashback. This study characterizes flashback systematically by developing a comprehensive non-dimensional model which takes into account all effective parameters in boundary layer flashback propensity. The model was optimized for new data and captures the behavior of the new results well. Further, comparison of the model with the single existing study of high pressure jet flame flashback also indicates good agreement. The model developed using the high pressure test rig is able to predict flashback tendencies for a commercial gas turbine engine and can thus serve as a

  10. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Paul, M.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Feinberg, G.; Friedman, M.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Tessler, M.; Silverman, I.

    2013-12-01

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm3) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the 7Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ˜200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm2 and volume power density of ˜2 MW/cm3 at a lithium flow of ˜4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 1-2 mA) at SARAF.

  11. Scientific opportunities at SARAF with a liquid lithium jet target neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Ido; Arenshtam, Alex; Berkovits, Dan; Eliyahu, Ilan; Gavish, Inbal; Grin, Asher; Halfon, Shlomi; Hass, Michael; Hirsh, T. Y.; Kaizer, Boaz; Kijel, Daniel; Kreisel, Arik; Mardor, Israel; Mishnayot, Yonatan; Palchan, Tala; Perry, Amichay; Paul, Michael; Ron, Guy; Shimel, Guy; Shor, Asher; Tamim, Noam; Tessler, Moshe; Vaintraub, Sergey; Weissman, Leo

    2018-05-01

    SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) is based on a 5 mA, 40 MeV, proton/deuteron accelerator. Phase-I, operational since 2010, provides proton and deuteron beams up to 4 and 5 MeV, respectively, for basic and applied research activities. The high power Liquid-Lithium jet Target (LiLiT), with 1.912 MeV proton beam, provides high flux quasi-Maxwellian neutrons at kT 30 keV (about 2 × 1010 n/s/cm2/mA on the irradiated sample, about 1 cm from the target), enabling studies of s-process reactions relevant to nucleo-synthesis of the heavy elements in giant AGB stars. With higher energy proton beams and with deuterons, LiLiT can provide higher fluxes of high energy neutrons up to 20 MeV. The experimental program with SARAF phase-I will be enhanced shortly with a new target room complex which is under construction. Finally, SARAF phase-II, planned to start operation at 2023, will enable full capabilities with proton/ deuteron beams at 5 mA and 40 MeV. Liquid lithium targets will then be used to produce neutron sources with intensities of 1015 n/s, which after thermalization will provide thermal neutron (25 meV) fluxes of about 1012 n/s/cm2 at the entrance to neutron beam lines to diffraction and radiography stations.

  12. Quasi-elastic and inelastic inclusive electron scattering from an oxygen jet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghinolfi, M.; Cenni, R.; Levi Sandri, P.; Longhi, A.; Mokeev, V.I.; Polli, E.; Reolon, A.; Ricco, G.; Simula, S.; Taiuti, M.; Teglia, A.; Zucchiatti, A.

    1996-01-01

    The results of an experiment on inclusive electron scattering from an oxygen jet target, performed in a wide range of energy and momentum transfer covering both quasi-elastic and Δ(1232) resonance regions, are reported. In the former region the theoretical predictions, obtained including effects of nucleon-nucleon correlations in both initial and final states, give a good description of the experimental data. In the inelastic region a broadening as well as a damping of the resonant part of the cross section with respect to the free nucleon case is observed. The need of more detailed calculations including nuclear structure effects on the electroproduction cross section of nucleon resonances is highlighted. (orig.)

  13. Characteristics of autoignited laminar lifted flames in heated coflow jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2012-01-01

    and then increased as the jet velocity increased. Based on the mechanism in which the autoignited laminar lifted flame is stabilized by ignition delay time, the liftoff height can be influenced not only by the heat loss, but also by the preferential diffusion between

  14. A free-jet Hg target operating in a high magnetic field intersecting a high-power proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Graves; Spampinato, Philip; Gabriel, Tony; Kirk, Harold; Simos, Nicholas; Tsang, Thomas; McDonald, Kirk; Peter Titus; Fabich, Adrian; Haseroth, Helmut; Lettry, Jacques

    2006-06-01

    A proof-of-principal experiment to investigate the interaction of a proton beam, high magnetic field, and high- Z target is planned to take place at CERN in early 2007. This experiment is part of the Muon Collider Collaboration, with participants from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Princeton University, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology, European Organization for Nuclear Research-CERN, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. An unconstrained mercury jet target system that interacts with a high power (1 MW) proton beam in a high magnetic field (15 T) is being designed. The Hg jet diameter is 1-cm with a velocity up to 20 m/s. A laser optical diagnostic system will be incorporated into the target design to permit observation of the dispersal of the jet resulting from interaction with a 24 GeV proton beam with up to 20×10 12 ppp. The target system includes instruments for sensing mercury vapor, temperature, flow rate, and sump tank level, and the means to position the jet relative to the magnetic axis of a solenoid and the proton beam. The design considerations for the system include all issues dealing with safely handling approximately 23 l of Hg, transporting the target system and the mercury to CERN, decommissioning the experiment, and returning the mildly activated equipment and Hg to the US.

  15. Target and ion source developments for a helium-jet type ISOL at the Kyoto university reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Yoichi; Okano, Kotoyuki; Funakoshi, Yoshihiro

    1985-01-01

    A target system and ion sources for a He-jet type ISOL have been successfully constructed and the characteristics have been studied. The beam intensities of short-lived fission products have been much improved by increasing the He gas pressure owing to a range effect of fission products in the He gas and a short transport time effect of aerosols in a target chamber and a capillary. An oscillating electron ion source has been coupled with the He-jet system and ten kinds of elements have been ionized with efficiencies of 0.4-2.4%. A high temperature thermal ion source has been studied to ionize the alkali, alkaline-earth and rare-earth elements. The effects of the He-jet on the ion source have been discussed. (orig.)

  16. Theoretical analysis and semianalytical solutions for a turbulent buoyant hydrogen-air jet

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Sun, S.; Salama, Amgad

    2012-01-01

    Semianalytical solutions are developed for turbulent hydrogen-air plume. We derived analytical expressions for plume centerline variables (radius, velocity, and density deficit) in terms of a single universal function, called plume function. By combining the obtained analytical expressions of centerline variables with empirical Gaussian expressions of the mean variables, we obtain semianalytical expressions for mean quantities of hydrogen-air plume (velocity, density deficit, and mass fraction).

  17. Experimental investigation on the thermal properties of hydrogen jet flame and hot currents in the downstream region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Tomohiko; Mogi, Toshio; Wada, Yuji; Horiguchi, Sadashige [Research Core for Explosion Safety, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Hamada, Shota; Miyake, Atsumi; Ogawa, Terushige [Graduate School of Environment and Information Sciences, Yokohama National University, 79-7 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2008-07-15

    A series of experiments were conducted to understand the thermal hazards of hydrogen jet flames. In particular, we focused on the temperature properties of hot currents in the downstream region, because it was expected that this involved the most serious thermal hazards. The flame length and width depended on the nozzle diameter and the spouting pressure, namely, the mass flow rate, with similar dependences that were reported by other researchers. The temperature rise from ambient air along the trajectory depended on the balance of the flame length and the traveling distance from the flame tip. The position of the trajectory depended not only on the balance of flame length and the traveling distance, but also on the horizontal momentum induced by the spouting pressure. Empirical formulae for predicting the position and temperature rise of the trajectory were developed by the flame length, traveling distance, spouting pressure, and nozzle diameter as variables. (author)

  18. A liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the MEG and MEG II liquid xenon calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signorelli, G., E-mail: giovanni.signorelli@pi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Baldini, A.M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Nicolò, D. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Galli, L.; Gallucci, G.; Grassi, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Papa, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Sergiampietri, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Venturini, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    We designed, built and operated a liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the liquid xenon calorimeter of the MEG experiment. The target was used throughout the entire data taking period, from 2008 to 2013 and it is being refurbished and partly re-designed to be integrated and used in the MEG-II experiment.

  19. Heat and momentum transfer from an atmospheric argon hydrogen plasma jet to spherical particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaessen, P.H.M.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis the author describes the energy and momentum transfer from the plasma jet to the spray particles. This is done both experimentally and theoretically. Also the internal energy process of the recombining plasma is discussed. All elastic and inelastic collisional and radiative processes, as well as transport effects within the plasma are considered. In the next section, the so called passive spectroscopy is treated. It describes the diagnostics of electron density and temperature measurement, as well as the investigation on heat content of the particles. Spatially resolved electron density and temperature profiles are presented. Next, the active spectroscopy, i.e. the laser Doppler anemometer is dealt with. With this diagnostic, axial spray-particle velocities inside the plasma jet were determined. The author also presents heat and momentum transfer modelling of the plasma, related to the plasma particle interaction. Finally, a one dimensional model verification is made, using the experimentally determined particle velocity and plasma temperature profiles. (Auth.)

  20. Small-scale reforming of diesel and jet fuels to make hydrogen and syngas for fuel cells: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xinhai; Li, Peiwen; Shen, Yuesong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Issues of reforming of heavy hydrocarbon fuels are reviewed. • The advantages of autothermal reforming over other types of reforming are discussed. • The causes and solutions of the major problems for reforming reactors are studied. • Designs and startup strategies for autothermal reforming reactors are proposed. - Abstract: This paper reviews the technological features and challenges of autothermal reforming (ATR) of heavy hydrocarbon fuels for producing hydrogen and syngas onboard to supply fuels to fuel cells for auxiliary power units. A brief introduction at the beginning enumerates the advantages of using heavy hydrocarbon fuels onboard to provide hydrogen or syngas for fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A detailed review of the reforming and processing technologies of diesel and jet fuels is then presented. The advantages of ATR over steam reforming (SR) and partial oxidation reforming (POX) are summarized, and the ATR reaction is analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. The causes and possible solutions to the major problems existing in ATR reactors, including hot spots, formation of coke, and inhomogeneous mixing of fuel, steam, and air, are reviewed and studied. Designs of ATR reactors are discussed, and three different reactors, one with a fixed bed, one with monoliths, and one with microchannels are investigated. Novel ideas for design and startup strategies for ATR reactors are proposed at the end of the review

  1. Optimization of a liquid hydrogen/deuterium target with extremely thin foil windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nake, C.J.

    1993-09-01

    For external experiments at COSY a target of liquid hydrogen or deuterium has been developed, which is very small in order to take advantage of the excellent beam quality of COSY. Targets with thicknesses down to only mm's have been built and operate without bubbles. In order to make the effects of reactions in the windows much smaller than the target reactions, windows with a thickness of about 1.5 μm have been achieved. A novel system which stabilizes the pressure difference between the inside and the outside of the target cell to a small constant value under all target conditions is used. (orig.)

  2. Experimental and analytical studies on high-speed plane jet along concave wall simulating IFMIF Li target flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.; Ida, M.; Kato, Y.; Maekawa, H.; Katsuta, H.; Itoh, K.; Kukita, Y.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the conceptual design activity (CDA) of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF), the characteristics of the high-speed liquid lithium (Li) plane jet target flow have been studied by water experiments and numerical analyses for both heating and non-heating conditions. The simulated prototypal-size water flows were stable over the entire length of ∝130 mm at the average velocity up to 17 m/s. The jet flow had a specific radial velocity profile, close to that of free-vortex flow, because of a static pressure distribution in the jet thickness due to centrifugal force. Detailed velocity measurement revealed that this flow condition is penetrating into the upstream reducer nozzle up to a distance ∼ the jet thickness. The numerical analyses using a two-dimensional Cartesian-coordinate model were successful to predict the velocity profile transient around the nozzle exit, though underestimated the development of the velocity profile and the jet thickness. (orig.)

  3. Analysis of flame shapes in turbulent hydrogen jet flames with coaxial air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Hee Jang

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the characteristics of flame shapes and flame length in three types of coaxial air flames realizable by varying coaxial air and/or fuel velocity. Forcing coaxial air into turbulent jet flames induces substantial changes in flame shapes and NOx emissions through the complex flow interferences that exist within the mixing region. Mixing enhancement driven by coaxial air results in flame volume decrease, and such a diminished flame volume finally reduces NOx emissions significantly by decreasing NOx formation zone where a fuel/air mixture burns. It is found that mixing in the vicinity of high temperature zone mainly results from the increase of diffusive flux than the convective flux, and that the increase of mass diffusion is amplified as coaxial air is increased. Besides, it is reaffirmed that nonequilibrium chemistry including HO 2 /H 2 O 2 should be taken into account for NOx prediction and scaling analysis by comparing turbulent combustion models. In addition, it is found that coaxial air can break down the self-similarity law of flames by changing mixing mechanism, and that EINOx scaling parameters based on the self-similarity law of simple jet flames may not be eligible in coaxial air flames

  4. Analysis of flame shapes in turbulent hydrogen jet flames with coaxial air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Hee Jang [Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    This paper addresses the characteristics of flame shapes and flame length in three types of coaxial air flames realizable by varying coaxial air and/or fuel velocity. Forcing coaxial air into turbulent jet flames induces substantial changes in flame shapes and NOx emissions through the complex flow interferences that exist within the mixing region. Mixing enhancement driven by coaxial air results in flame volume decrease, and such a diminished flame volume finally reduces NOx emissions significantly by decreasing NOx formation zone where a fuel/air mixture burns. It is found that mixing in the vicinity of high temperature zone mainly results from the increase of diffusive flux than the convective flux, and that the increase of mass diffusion is amplified as coaxial air is increased. Besides, it is reaffirmed that nonequilibrium chemistry including HO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} should be taken into account for NOx prediction and scaling analysis by comparing turbulent combustion models. In addition, it is found that coaxial air can break down the self-similarity law of flames by changing mixing mechanism, and that EINOx scaling parameters based on the self-similarity law of simple jet flames may not be eligible in coaxial air flames

  5. Observed transition from Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation through feedout oscillations to Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a laser target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Nikitin, S. P.; Oh, J.; Metzler, N.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental study of hydrodynamic perturbation evolution triggered by a laser-driven shock wave breakout at the free rippled rear surface of a plastic target is reported. At sub-megabar shock pressure, planar jets manifesting the development of the Richtmyer-Meshkov-type instability in a non-accelerated target are observed. As the shock pressure exceeds 1 Mbar, an oscillatory rippled expansion wave is observed, followed by the “feedout” of the rear-surface perturbations to the ablation front and the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which breaks up the accelerated target.

  6. A three-cell liquid hydrogen target for an extended focal plane polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovanov, L.B.; Chesny, P.; Gheller, J.M.; Guillier, G.; Ladygin, V.P.; Theure, Ph.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the design and working principle of a three-cell liquid hydrogen target produced for the high-energy deuteron polarimeter HYPOM. This target uses liquid helium as a cooling agent. After a general description of the apparatus, tests and operating modes are thoroughly explained. In particular the air controlled self-regulation of helium flow in the cryostat to stabilize the liquid hydrogen level is presented. The main feature of this target is the simplicity of the design as well as its safeness towards any incident. Results of cooling down, filling up of the target and stabilization regime were processed during one experiment of physics at synchrotron Saturne II. (orig.)

  7. Comment on "Protonium annihilation into $\\pi^{0} \\pi^{0}$ at rest in a liquid hydrogen target"

    CERN Document Server

    Amsler, Claude; Barnett, B M; Batty, C J; Benayoun, M; Blüm, P; Braune, K; Bugg, D V; Case, T; Credé, V; Crowe, K M; Doser, Michael; Dünnweber, W; Engelhardt, D; Faessler, M A; Haddock, R P; Heinsius, F H; Heinzelmann, M; Hessey, N P; Hidas, P; Jamnik, D; Kalinowsky, H; Kammel, P; Kisiel, J; Klempt, E; Koch, H; Kunze, M; Kurilla, U; Landua, Rolf; Matthäy, H; Meyer, C A; Meyer-Wildhagen, F; Ouared, R; Peters, K; Pick, B; Ratajczak, M; Regenfus, C; Reinnarth, J; Röthel, W; Sarantsev, A V; Spanier, S; Strohbusch, U; Suffert, Martin; Suh, J S; Thoma, U; Uman, I; Wallis-Plachner, S; Walther, D; Wiedner, U; Wittmack, K; Zou, B S

    2002-01-01

    We comment on the recent paper published by the Obelix Collaboration on protonium annihilation into pi /sup 0/ pi /sup 0/ at rest in a liquid hydrogen target ÝPhys. Rev. D 65, 012001 (2002)¿, with particular reference to the discrepancy with the results obtained by the Crystal Barrel Collaboration.

  8. Lagrangian Investigation of Auto-ignition in a Hydrogen Jet Flame in a Vitiated Co-flow: Animations of Particle Trajectories in Composition Space from PDF Model Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haifeng; Pope, Stephen B.

    2007-01-01

    PDF model calculations have been performed of the Cabra lifted hydrogen flame in a vitiated co-flow. Particle trajectories are extracted from the Lagrangian particle method used to solve the modeled PDF equation. The particle trajectories in the mixture fraction-temperature plane reveal (at successive downstream locations): essentially inert mixing between the cold fuel jet and the hot co-flow; the auto-ignition of very lean particles; and, subsequent mixing and reaction, leading to near-equi...

  9. Beam-induced depolarisation at the HERMES transversely polarised hydrogen target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, P.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the polarised hydrogen target of the HERMES experiment at DESY in Hamburg. The HERMES target is based on hyperfine-splitting of hydrogen in an external magnetic field and provides nuclear-polarised hydrogen for the HERMES experiment. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenon of beam-induced depolarisation. The HERA electron beam consists of short bunches which produce a high-frequency magnetic field. A Fourier analysis of these bunches leads to a series of harmonics, based on the fundamental frequency of roughly 10.4 MHz, which can cause a transition between hyperfine states of the target atoms. Only through careful setting of the external magnetic field is it possible to avoid these transitions and the resulting depolarisation of the target gas. Measurements of these resonances were made during the first HERMES run 1995-2000. The target region was modified in 2001 to allow HERMES to use hydrogen polarised perpendicularly to the direction of the electron beam. This modification gave HERMES access to the so-called 'Transversity' distribution for the first time, but also allows additional resonances in the target, which were previously forbidden by selection rules. The measurement and minimisation of these 'Sigma resonances' are presented. A distinctive feature of the HERMES experiment is its novel storage cell which allows target atoms to make multiple passes of the HERA beam. An exact description of beam-induced depolarisation must therefore consider the geometry of the storage cell and the distribution of the magnetic field throughout the cell. Calculations of the depolarisation can be made by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation using first-order perturbation theory. A simple analytical model and a molecular-flow Monte-Carlo are used to predict the exact shape of the resonances. The first measurements of the resonances with a transverse magnetic holding field are presented and compared with the simulations. (orig.)

  10. A highly polarized hydrogen/deuterium internal gas target embedded in a toroidal magnetic spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheever, D.; Ihloff, E.; Kelsey, J.; Kolster, H.; Meitanis, N.; Milner, R.; Shinozaki, A.; Tsentalovich, E.; Zwart, T.; Ziskin, V.; Xiao, Y.; Zhang, C.

    2006-01-01

    A polarized hydrogen/deuterium internal gas target has been constructed and operated at the internal target region of the South Hall Ring (SHR) of the MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center to carry out measurements of spin-dependent electron scattering at 850MeV. The target used an Atomic Beam Source (ABS) to inject a flux of highly polarized atoms into a thin-walled, coated storage cell. The polarization of the electron beam was determined using a Compton laser backscattering polarimeter. The target polarization was determined using well-known nuclear reactions. The ABS and storage cell were embedded in the Bates Large Acceptance Toroidal Spectrometer (BLAST), which was used to detect scattered particles from the electron-target interactions. The target has been designed to rapidly (∼8h) switch operation from hydrogen to deuterium. Further, this target was the first to be operated inside a magnetic spectrometer in the presence of a magnetic field exceeding 2kG. An ABS intensity 2.5x10 16 at/s and a high polarization (∼70%) inside the storage cell have been achieved. The details of the target design and construction are described here and the performance over an 18 month period is reported

  11. Build-up of a liquid hydrogen target with extremely thin windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeckle, V.G.

    1992-06-01

    Small hydrogen targets with only a few cubic millimeters of liquid have many advantages in experiments on accelerators with phase-space cooled particle beams. In order to achieve good suppression of systematic errors by secondary reactions in the target and in the target windows, the thickness of the foil window for a 1 mm target may only be 0.3 μm. A pressure difference of 200 mbar permits the use of such thin foils (with a diameter of 6 mm). A purely mechanical pressure control unit was built, which consists of soft bellows and a loading weight. The pressure difference from a vacuum, which is in the bellows, is set by the weight on the bellows. The working parameters were chosen so that deuterium, nitrogen and oxygen can be used. The pressure variations in the cell are only ± 2.5 mbar. A mixing of gaseous and liquid hydrogen in the target cell and the formation of bubbles due to free convection can be prevented. A quiet volume of liquid hydrogen free of bubbles was obtained. (orig./HP) [de

  12. Dynamically polarized hydrogen target as a broadband, wavelength-independent thermal neutron spin polarizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jinkui; Garamus, Vasil M.; Mueller, Wilhelm; Willumeit, Regine

    2005-01-01

    A hydrogen-rich sample with dynamically polarized hydrogen nuclei was tested as a wavelength-independent neutron transmission spin polarizer. The experiment used a modified setup of the dynamic nuclear polarization target station at the GKSS research center. The standard solvent sample at the GKSS DNP station was used. It is 2.8mm thick and consists of 43.4wt% water, 54.6wt% glycerol, and 2wt% of EHBA-Cr(v) complex. The wavelength of the incident neutrons for the transmission experiment was λ=8.1A with Δλ/λ=10%. The polarization of neutron beam after the target sample was analyzed with a supermirror analyzer. A neutron polarization of -52% was achieved at the hydrogen polarization of -69%. Further experiments will test the feasibility of other hydrogen-rich materials, such as methane, as the polarizer. A theoretical calculation shows that a polarized methane target would allow over 95% neutron polarizations with more than 30% transmission

  13. Modelling of SOL flows and target asymmetries in JET field reversal experiments with EDGE2D code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chankin, A.; Coad, J.; Corrigan, G.

    1999-11-01

    The EDGE2D code with drifts can reproduce the main trends of target asymmetries observed in field reversal experiments. It also re-produces qualitatively the main feature of recent JET results obtained with double-sided reciprocating Langmuir probes introduced near the top of the torus: the reversal of parallel plasma flow with toroidal field reversal. The code results suggest that the major contributor to the observed target asymmetries is the co-current toroidal momentum generated inside the scrape-off layer (SOL) by j r xB forces due to the presence of large up-down pressure asymmetries. Contrary to previous expectations of the predominant role of ExB drifts in creating target asymmetries, ∇B and centrifugal drifts were found to be mainly responsible for both parallel flows and target asymmetries. (author)

  14. Production of hydrogen, nitrogen and argon pellets with the Moscow-Juelich pellet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, M.; Boukharov, A.; Semenov, A.; Gerasimov, A.; Chernetsky, V.; Fedorets, P.

    2009-01-01

    Targets of frozen droplets ("pellets") from various liquefiable gases like H 2 , D 2 , N 2 , Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe are very promising for high luminosity experiments with a 4π detector geometry at storage-rings. High effective target densities (> 10 15 atoms/cm 2 ), a small target size (⊘ ≈ 20–30 μm), a low gas load and a narrow pellet beam are the main advantages of such targets. Pioneering work on pellet targets has been made at Uppsala, Sweden. A next generation target has been built at the IKP of FZJ in collaboration with two institutes (ITEP and MPEI) from Moscow, Russia. It is a prototype for the future pellet target at the PANDA experiment at FAIR/HESR (supported by INTAS 06-1000012-8787, 2007/08) and makes use of a new cooling and liquefaction method, based on cryogenic liquids instead of cooling machines. The main advantages of this method are the vibration-free cooling and the possibility for cryogenic jet production from various gases in a wide range of temperatures. Different regimes of pellet production from H 2 , N 2 and Ar have been observed and their parameters have been measured. For the first time, mono-disperse and satellite-free droplet production was achieved for cryogenic liquids from H 2 , N 2 and Ar. (author)

  15. Pulsed X-ray radiography of a gas jet target for laser-matter interaction experiments with the use of a CCD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakowski, R.; Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; MikoIajczyk, J.; Szczurek, A.; Szczurek, M.; Foeldes, I.B.; Toth, Zs.

    2005-01-01

    Characterization of gas jet targets has been carried out using pulsed X-ray radiography. A laser-plasma X-ray source was applied for backlighting of the targets to obtain X-ray shadowgraphs registered with a CCD detector. From the shadowgraphs, characteristics of the targets were determined

  16. Polarimetry of the polarized hydrogen deuteride HDice target under an electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, Vivien E. [Blaise Pascal Univ., Aubiere (France)

    2013-10-01

    The study of the nucleon structure has been a major research focus in fundamental physics in the past decades and still is the main research line of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). For this purpose and to obtain statistically meaningful results, having both a polarized beam and a highly efficient polarized target is essential. For the target, this means high polarization and high relative density of polarized material. A Hydrogen Deuteride (HD) target that presents both such characteristics has been developed first at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and brought to the Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2008. The HD target has been shown to work successfully under a high intensity photon beam (BNL and Jefferson Lab). However, it remained to be seen if the target could stand an electron beam of reasonably high current (nA). In this perspective, the target was tested for the first time in its frozen spin mode under an electron beam at Jefferson Lab in 2012 during the g14 experiment. This dissertation presents the principles and usage procedures of this HD target. The polarimetry of this target with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) during the electron beam tests is also discussed. In addition, this dissertation also describes another way to perform target polarimetry with the elastic scattering of electrons off a polarized target by using data taken on helium-3 during the E97-110 experiment that occurred in Jefferson Lab's Hall A in 2003.

  17. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R., E-mail: elena.koresheva@gmail.com; Krokhin, O. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Osipov, I. E. [Power Efficiency Centre, Inter RAO UES (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  18. First demonstration of multi-MeV proton acceleration from a cryogenic hydrogen ribbon target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Stephan D.; Obst, Lieselotte; Metzkes-Ng, Josefine; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Zeil, Karl; Michaux, Sylvain; Chatain, Denis; Perin, Jean-Paul; Chen, Sophia N.; Fuchs, Julien; Gauthier, Maxence; Cowan, Thomas E.; Schramm, Ulrich

    2018-04-01

    We show efficient laser driven proton acceleration up to 14 MeV from a 62 μm thick cryogenic hydrogen ribbon. Pulses of the short pulse laser ELFIE at LULI with a pulse length of ≈350 fs at an energy of 8 J per pulse are directed onto the target. The results are compared to proton spectra from metal and plastic foils with different thicknesses and show a similarly good performance both in maximum energy as well as in proton number. Thus, this target type is a promising candidate for experiments with high repetition rate laser systems.

  19. Fuel cell and hydrogen R and D targets and funding : a comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, K.A.; Jollie, D.; Baker, A.

    2005-01-01

    Substantial research and development is needed if fuel cells and hydrogen are to become a mass market reality. Setting research and development targets are central to the long term development of the market. An overview of fuel cell research in the United States, the European Union, and parts of Asia was presented. Research and development targets were analyzed, as well as funding levels for fuel cells and hydrogen. The time frames of targets were considered, as well as the levels of ambition and overall program goals of various countries. Funding barriers and challenges were also considered. It was noted that some governments, such as Japan and Korea, have set a number of very ambitious, highly focused long term targets with substantial funding. The European Union has taken a more integrated approach, wrapping fundamental research and development into large integrated projects which run in combination with a number of other market aspects, such as public acceptance and roadmapping. The United States has a number of long term programmes and targets, but levels of funding are set annually with the passing of each year's Fiscal Budget. The overall goal of the paper was to provide a clearer picture of regional fuel cell research in order to discover areas for potential international collaboration

  20. Effect of experimentally observed hydrogenic fractionation on inertial confinement fusion ignition target performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenty, P. W.; Wittman, M. D.; Harding, D. R.

    2006-01-01

    The need of cryogenic hydrogenic fuels in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition targets has been long been established. Efficient implosion of such targets has mandated keeping the adiabat of the main fuel layer at low levels to ensure drive energies are kept at reasonable minima. The use of cryogenic fuels helps meet this requirement and has therefore become the standard in most ICF ignition designs. To date most theoretical ICF ignition target designs have assumed a homogeneous layer of deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel kept slightly below the triple point. However, recent work has indicated that, as cryogenic fuel layers are formed inside an ICF capsule, isotopic dissociation of the tritium (T), deuterium (D), and DT takes place leading to a 'fractionation' of the final ice layer. This paper will numerically investigate the effects that various scenarios of fractionation have on hot-spot formation, ignition, and burn in ICF ignition target designs

  1. The HERMES polarized hydrogen and deuterium gas target in the HERA electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.

    2005-01-01

    The HERMES hydrogen and deuterium nuclear-polarized gas targets have been in use since 1996 with the polarized electron beam of HERA at DESY to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Polarized atoms from a Stern-Gerlach Atomic Beam Source are injected into a storage cell internal to the HERA electron ring. Atoms diffusing from the center of the storage cell into a side tube are analyzed to determine the atomic fraction and the atomic polarizations. The atoms have a nuclear polarization, the axis of which is defined by an external magnetic holding field. The holding field was longitudinal during 1996-2000, and was changed to transverse in 2001. The design of the target is described, the method for analyzing the target polarization is outlined, and the performance of the target in the various running periods is presented

  2. The HERMES polarized hydrogen and deuterium gas target in the HERA electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Peking University, Beijing

    2004-08-01

    The HERMES hydrogen and deuterium nuclear-polarized gas targets have been in use since 1996 with the polarized electron beam of HERA at DESY to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Polarized atoms from a Stern-Gerlach Atomic Beam Source are injected into a storage cell internal to the HERA electron ring. Atoms diffusing from the center of the storage cell into a side tube are analyzed to determine the atomic fraction and the atomic polarizations. The atoms have a nuclear polarization, the axis of which is defined by an external magnetic holding field. The holding field was longitudinal during 1996-2000, and was changed to transverse in 2001. The design of the target is described, the method for analyzing the target polarization is outlined, and the performance of the target in the various running periods is presented. (orig.)

  3. Quantitative study of the ionization-induced refraction of picosecond laser pulses in gas-jet targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, A.J.; Borghesi, M.; Iwase, A.; Jones, M.W.; Pert, G.J.; Rae, S.; Burnett, K.; Willi, O.

    1996-01-01

    A quantitative study of refractive whole beam defocusing and small scale breakup induced by optical ionization of subpicosecond and picosecond, 0.25 and 1 μm, laser pulses in gas-jet targets at densities above 1x10 19 cm -3 has been carried out. A significant reduction of the incident laser intensity was observed due to refraction from ionization-induced density gradients. The level of refraction measured with optical probing correlated well with the fraction of energy transmitted through the plasma. The numerical and analytical models were found to agree well with experimental observations. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Proposal of measuring the mechanisms of nuclear excitation leading to fission with the ADONE jet-target tagged photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucherini, V.; Bianchi, N.; De Sanctis, E.; Guaraldo, C.; Levi Sandri, P.; Muccifora, V.; Polli, E.; Reolon, A.R.; Aiello, S.; De Filippo, E.; Lanzano', G.; Lo Nigro, S.; Milone, C.; Pagano, A.; Botvina, A.S.; Iljinov, A.S.; Mebel, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms of excitation with subsequent fission of heavy nuclei can be conveniently studied by means of photons, since this probe is able to interact deeply inside the nucleus. We propose the use of the (200-1200 MeV) tagged photon beam from the ADONE Jet Target in order to study the mass-energy and total momentum distributions of fission fragments, to obtain experimental information on the configurations (excitation energy and nucleonic composition) of produced compound nuclei and on their decay channels

  5. Performance of a hydrogen/deuterium polarized gas target in a storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buuren, L.D. van; Szczerba, D.; Brand, J.F.J. van den; Bulten, H.J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Klous, S.; Kolster, H.; Lang, J.; Mul, F.A.; Poolman, H.R.; Simani, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of a high-density polarized hydrogen/deuterium gas target internal to a medium-energy electron storage ring is presented. Compared to our previous electron scattering experiments with tensor-polarized deuterium at NIKHEF (Zhou et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 378 (1996) 40; Ferro-Luzzi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 2630; Van den Brand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 (1997) 1235; Bouwhuis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 687; Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 687) the target figure of merit, (polarization) 2 xluminosity, was improved by more than an order of magnitude. The target density was increased by upgrading the flux of nuclear-polarized atoms injected into the storage cell and by using a longer (60 cm) and colder (∼70 K) storage cell. A maximal target thickness of 1.2 (1.1)±0.1x10 14 nuclei/cm 2 was achieved with deuterium (hydrogen). With typical beam currents of 110 mA, this corresponds to a luminosity of about 8.4 (7.8)±0.8x10 31 e - nuclei cm -2 s -1 . By reducing the molecular background and using a stronger target guide field, a higher polarization was achieved. The target was used in combination with a 720 MeV polarized electron beam stored in the AmPS ring (NIKHEF) to measure spin observables in electron-proton and electron-deuteron scattering. Scattered electrons were detected in a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer. Ejected hadrons were detected in a single time-of-flight scintillator array. The product of beam and target vector polarization, P e P t , was determined from the known spin-correlation parameters of e'p quasi-elastic (or elastic) scattering. With the deuterium (hydrogen) target, values up to P e P t =0.49±0.03 (0.32±0.03) were obtained with an electron beam polarization of P e =0.62±0.04 (0.56±0.03) as measured with a Compton backscattering polarimeter (Passchier et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 414 (1998) 4988). From this, we deduce a cell-averaged target polarization of P t =0.78±0.07 (0.58±0

  6. Operation of a Free Hg Jet Delivery System in a High-Power Target Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Graves, V; Spampinato, P; Kirk, H; Fabich, A; Efthymiopoulos, I; Lettry, J; McDonald, K

    2010-01-01

    Op­er­a­tion of a mer­cury jet de­liv­ery sys­tem is pre­sent­ed. The de­liv­ery sys­tem is part of the Mer­cury In­tense Tar­get (MERIT) Ex­per­i­ment, a proof-of-prin­ci­ple ex­per­i­ment con­duct­ed at CERN in 2007 which demon­strat­ed the fea­si­bil­i­ty of using an un­con­strained jet of mer­cury as a tar­get for a fu­ture Neu­tri­no Fac­to­ry or Muon Col­lid­er. The Hg sys­tem was de­signed to pro­duce a 1-cm-di­am­e­ter, 20 m/s Hg jet in­side a high-field (15 Tesla), 15-cm-bore solenoid mag­net. A high-speed op­ti­cal di­ag­nos­tic sys­tem al­lowed ob­ser­va­tion of the in­ter­ac­tion of the jet with both 14- and 24-GeV pro­ton beams. Per­for­mance of the Hg sys­tem dur­ing the in-beam ex­per­i­ment will be pre­sent­ed.

  7. Pulsed laser ablation of borax target in vacuum and hydrogen DC glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, A. N.; Miotello, A.; Mosaner, P.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our experiment was to produce a material with B sbnd H bonds for applications in hydrogen storage and generation. By using KrF excimer laser ( λ = 248 nm) ablation of borax (Na 2B 4O 7) target, thin films were deposited on KBr and silicon substrates. Ablation was performed both in vacuum and in hydrogen atmosphere. DC glow discharge technique was utilized to enhance hydrogen gas ionization. Experiments were performed using laser fluence from 5 to 20 J/cm 2. Films were deposited under gas pressure of 1 × 10 -5 to 5 × 10 -2 mbar and substrate temperatures of 130-450 °C. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of films showed presence of circular particulates. Film thickness, roughness and particulates number increased with increase in laser fluence. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis shows that sodium content in the particulates is higher than in the target. This effect is discussed in terms of atomic arrangements (both at surface and bulk) in systems where ionic and covalent bonds are present and by looking at the increased surface/bulk ratio of the particulates with respect to the deposited films. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed presence of B sbnd O stretching and B sbnd O sbnd B bending bonds. Possible reasons for absence of B sbnd H bonds are attributed to binding enthalpy of the competing molecules.

  8. CO2-free hydrogen as a substitute to fossil fuels: What are the targets? Prospective assessment of the hydrogen market attractiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansilla, C.; Avril, S.; Imbach, J.; Le Duigou, A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen is usually presented as a promising energy carrier that has a major role to play in low carbon mobility, through the use of fuel cells. However, such a market is not expected in the short term. In the meantime, hydrogen may also contribute to reduce carbon emissions in diverse sectors: oil refining, low carbon mobility through the industrial deployment of advanced bio-fuels, natural gas consumption, and methanol production. According to the targeted market, objective costs are rather different; and so is the reachable mitigated CO 2 amount. This paper assesses the dynamics of these markets' attractiveness, in order to provide target costs for CO 2 -free hydrogen production. The potential of the markets of hydrogen as a fuel and hydrogen for the biomass-to-liquid production is highlighted, as they could represent significant volumes by 2050, as well as interesting perspectives for CO 2 emission reduction. However the targets are very sensitive to the CO 2 price, thus highlighting the requirement for economic instruments in order to facilitate the penetration of such technologies. Hydrogen is then highlighted as a key player of the energy system in the years to come, as the connection of the energy and mobility sectors. (authors)

  9. INTERACTION OF A 24 GeV PROTON BEAM WITH A MUON COLLIDER MERCURY JET TARGET EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS AND THERMODYNAMIC ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIMOS, N.; KIRK, H.; FINFROCK, C.; GREENE, G.; LUDEWIG, H.; MCDONALD, K.; MOKHOV, N.

    2001-01-01

    A muon collider or a neutrino factory based on a muon storage ring require intense beams of muons that can be generated by a 1-4 MW proton beam incident on a moving target inside a 20-T solenoid magnet, with a mercury jet as a preferred example. This paper addresses the thermodynamic interaction of the intense proton beam with the proposed mercury jet target, and the consequences of the generated pressure waves on the target integrity. Specifically, a 24 GeV proton beam with approximately 16 TP (1 TP = 10 12 protons) per pulse and a pulse length of 2 ns will interact with a 1 cm diameter mercury jet within the 20-Tesla magnetic field. In one option, a train of six such proton pulses is to be delivered on target within 2 micros, in which case the state of the mercury jet following the interaction with each pulse is critical. Using the equation of state for mercury from the SESAME library, in combination with the energy deposition rates calculated the by the hadron interaction code MARS, the induced 3-D pressure field in the target is estimated. The consequent pressure wave propagation and attenuation in the mercury jet is calculated using a transient analysis based on finite element modeling, and the state of the mercury jet at the time of arrival of the subsequent pulse is assessed. Issues associated with the use of a liquid metal jet as a target candidate are addressed. Lastly, some experimental results from the BNL E951 experiment are presented and discussed

  10. Detailed studies of a high-density polarized hydrogen gas target for storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapfe, K.; Brueckner, W.; Gaul, H.G.; Grieser, M.; Lin, M.T.; Moroz, Z.; Povh, B.; Rall, M.; Stechert, B.; Steffens, E.; Stenger, J.; Stock, F.; Tonhaeuser, J.; Montag, C.; Rathmann, F.; Fick, D.; Braun, B.; Graw, G.; Haeberli, W.

    1996-01-01

    A high-density target of polarized atomic hydrogen gas for applications in storage rings was produced by injecting atoms from an atomic beam source into a T-shaped storage cell. The influence of the internal gas target on electron-cooled beams of 27 MeV α-particles and 23 MeV protons in the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring has been studied in detail. Target polarization and target thickness were measured by means of 27 MeV α-particles. For hyperfine states 1+2 a target thickness of n=(0.96±0.04) x 10 14 H/cm 2 was achieved with the cell walls cooled to 100 K. Working with a weak magnetic holding field (∼5 G) the maximum target polarization was P T =0.84±0.02 when state 1 and P T =0.46±0.01 when states 1+2 were injected. The target polarization was found to be constant over a period of 3 months with a net charge of Q∼100 C passing the storage cell. (orig.)

  11. Characterization of extreme ultraviolet light-emitting plasmas from a laser-excited fluorine containing liquid polymer jet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, B.; Assmann, J.; Faubel, M.; Gaebel, K.; Kranzusch, S.; Lugovoj, E.; Mann, K.; Missalla, T.; Peth, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    The operation of a liquid polymer jet laser-plasma target and the characterization of the absolute x-ray emission in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength window from 9-19 nm is reported. The target is a liquid polymer (perfluoro-polyether) that is exposed to pulsed and focused laser light at 532 nm in the form of a thin, liquid microjet (d=40 to 160 μm) in vacuum. The spectral brightness of the source in the 13 nm range is relatively high because a large fraction of radiative energy is emitted in one single line only, which is assigned to be the 2p-3d F VII doublet at 12.8 nm, with a laser energy conversion efficiency of 0.45% (2π sr, 2% bandwidth) in our initial experiment. A further increase of the relative emission has been found in the wavelength range between 7 and 17 nm when the jet diameter was increased from 40 to 160 μm. The two-dimensional spatial profile of the source plasma (d=40 to 50 μm) has been analyzed with a pinhole camera

  12. A thin gold coated hydrogen heat pipe -cryogenic target for external experiments at cosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Bary, M.; Abdel-Samad, S.; Elawadi, G.A.; Kilian, K.; Ritman, J.

    2008-01-01

    A gravity assisted Gold Coated Heat Pipe (GCHP) with 5-mm diameter has been developed and tested to cool a liquid hydrogen target for external beam experiments at COSY. The need for a narrow target diameter leads us to study the effect of reducing the heat pipe diameter to 5 mm instead of 7 mm, to study the effect of coating the external surface of the heat pipe by a polished gold layer (to decrease the radiation heat load), and to study the effect of using the heat pipe without using 20 layers super isolation around it (aluminized Mylar foil) to keep the target diameter as small as possible. The developed gold coated heat pipe was tested with 20 layers of super isolation and without. The operating characteristics for both conditions were compared to show the advantages and disadvantages

  13. A thin gold coated hydrogen heat pipe-cryogenic target for external experiments at COSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Bary, M.; Abdel-Samad, S.; Elawadi, G. A.; Kilian, K.; Ritman, J.

    2009-05-01

    A gravity assisted Gold coated heat pipe (GCHP) with 5-mm diameter has been developed and tested to cool a liquid hydrogen target for external beam experiments at COSY. The need for a narrow target diameter leads us to study the effect of reducing the heat pipe diameter to 5 mm instead of 7 mm, to study the effect of coating the external surface of the heat pipe by a shiny gold layer (to decrease the radiation heat load), and to study the effect of using the heat pipe without using 20 layers of' super-insulation around it (aluminized Mylar foil) to keep the target diameter as small as possible. The developed gold coated heat pipe was tested with 20 layers of super-insulation (WI) and without super-insulation (WOI). The operating characteristics for both conditions were compared to show the advantages and disadvantages.

  14. Studies of spin relaxation and recombination at the HERMES hydrogen/deuterium gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgarten, C.

    2000-09-01

    The HERMES (HERA measurement of spin) experiment is located in the eastern straight section of the HERA storage ring at DESY in Hamburg. It is designed to study the spin structure of the nucleons by deep inelastic scattering of polarized positrons resp. electrons provided by the HERA storage ring at 27.5 GeV impingingon the nucleons of internal polarized gas targets. The setup of the HERMES experiment is shown. First results are the measurement of the spin structure functions g 1 n with the polarized 3 He target (1995) and of g 1 p with polarized atomic hydrogen target, which was operated in 1996 and 1997. Beneath the inclusive physics, the possibility to detect and identify hadronic scattering products allows the measurement of semi-inclusive processes with the central item of the HERMES physics program. (orig.)

  15. Ion target impact energy during Type I edge localized modes in JET ITER-like Wall

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guillemaut, C.; Jardin, A.; Horáček, Jan; Autrique, A.; Arnoux, G.; Boom, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J.W.; De La Luna, E.; Devaux, S.; Eich, T.; Giroud, C.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Lipschutz, B.; Matthews, G.F.; Moulton, D.; O’Mullane, M.; Stamp, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 8 (2015), č. článku 085006. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14002 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : magnetic confinement fusion * edge localized modes * JET ITER-like wall * plasma * tokamak Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.404, year: 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0741-3335/57/8/085006

  16. EURISOL-DS Multi-MW Target Comparative Neutronic Performance of the Baseline Configuration vs. the Hg-Jet Option

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera-Martínez, A

    2006-01-01

    This technical report summarises the comparative study between several design options for the Multi-MW target station performed within Task #2 of the European Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam Facility Design Study (EURISOL DS) [1]. Previous analyses were carried out, using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA [2], to determine optimal values for relevant parameters in the target design [3] and to analyse a preliminary Multi-MW target assembly configuration [4]. The second report showed that the aimed fission rates, i.e. ~1015 fissions/s, could be achieved with such a configuration. Nevertheless, a preliminary study of the target assembly integration [5] suggested reducing some of the dimensions. Moreover, the yields of specific isotopes have yet to be assessed and compared to other target configurations. This note presents a detailed comparison of the baseline configuration and the Hg-jet option, in terms of primary and neutron distribution, power densities and fission product yields. A scaled-down versi...

  17. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  18. Exclusive ρ0 meson cross section ratios on deuterium and hydrogen targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, A.G.S.

    2006-06-01

    The HERMES experiment is a large forward angle spectrometer located at the HERA accelerator ring at DESY, Hamburg. This thesis presents the analysis of the kinematic dependencies of ρ 0 vector meson production on hydrogen and deuterium targets. The relative gluon and quark contribution to the ρ 0 production amplitude is expected to depend on the kinematical variable x Bj , and by measuring the ratio of ρ 0 electroproduction cross sections on deuterium and hydrogen from HERMES data this dependence is confirmed. This thesis describes the methods used to extract the cross section ratio from the HERMES data taken between the years 1996 and 2000 and compares the results with the theoretical predictions. Until 2005 the missing mass resolution of the HERMES spectrometer was only sufficient to allow exclusivity at the level of a data sample. The HERMES Recoil Detector, installed in early 2006, is an upgrade which will augment the HERMES spectrometer by establishing exclusivity at the event level and therefore improving the resolution to which various kinematical variables may be reconstructed. Additionally, the Recoil Detector will contribute to the overall background suppression capability of the HERMES spectrometer. These improvements will provide a strong reduction in the statistical uncertainties present in the ρ 0 -analysis and other analyses at HERMES. The Recoil Detector critically relies on its track reconstruction software to enable its capability to provide event level exclusive measurements. This tracking code is presented in detail. (orig.)

  19. Exclusive {rho}{sup 0} meson cross section ratios on deuterium and hydrogen targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, A.G.S.

    2006-08-15

    The HERMES experiment is a large forward angle spectrometer located at the HERA accelerator ring at DESY, Hamburg. This thesis presents the analysis of the kinematic dependencies of {rho}{sup 0} vector meson production on hydrogen and deuterium targets. The relative gluon and quark contribution to the {rho}{sup 0} production amplitude is expected to depend on the kinematical variable x{sub Bj}, and by measuring the ratio of {rho}{sup 0} electroproduction cross sections on deuterium and hydrogen from HERMES data this dependence is confirmed. This thesis describes the methods used to extract the cross section ratio from the HERMES data taken between the years 1996 and 2000 and compares the results with the theoretical predictions. Until 2005 the missing mass resolution of the HERMES spectrometer was only sufficient to allow exclusivity at the level of a data sample. The HERMES Recoil Detector, installed in early 2006, is an upgrade which will augment the HERMES spectrometer by establishing exclusivity at the event level and therefore improving the resolution to which various kinematical variables may be reconstructed. Additionally, the Recoil Detector will contribute to the overall background suppression capability of the HERMES spectrometer. These improvements will provide a strong reduction in the statistical uncertainties present in the {rho}{sup 0}-analysis and other analyses at HERMES. The Recoil Detector critically relies on its track reconstruction software to enable its capability to provide event level exclusive measurements. This tracking code is presented in detail. (orig.)

  20. A polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source for internal target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczerba, D.; Buuren, L.D. van; Brand, J.F.J. van den; Bulten, H.J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Klous, S.; Kolster, H.; Lang, J.; Mul, F.; Poolman, H.R.; Simani, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    A high-brightness hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source is presented. The apparatus, previously used in electron scattering experiments with tensor-polarized deuterium (Ferro-Luzzi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 2630; van den Brand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 (1997) 1235; Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1998) 687; Bouwhuis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 3755), was configured as a source for internal target experiments to measure single- and double-polarization observables, with either polarized hydrogen or vector/tensor polarized deuterium. The atomic beam intensity was enhanced by a factor of ∼2.5 by optimizing the Stern-Gerlach focusing system using high tip-field (∼1.5 T) rare-earth permanent magnets, and by increasing the pumping speed in the beam-formation chamber. Fluxes of (5.9±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s were measured in a diameter 12 mmx122 mm compression tube with its entrance at a distance of 27 cm from the last focusing element. The total output flux amounted to (7.6±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s

  1. Transverse polarization of Σ+(1189) in photoproduction on a hydrogen target in CLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepali, C. S.; Amaryan, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Fleming, J. A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Torayev, B.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental results on the Σ+(1189) hyperon transverse polarization in photoproduction on a hydrogen target using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Laboratory are presented. The Σ+(1189) was reconstructed in the exclusive reaction γ+p→KS0+Σ+(1189) via the Σ+→pπ0 decay mode. The KS0 was reconstructed in the invariant mass of two oppositely charged pions with the π0 identified in the missing mass of the detected pπ+π- final state. Experimental data were collected in the photon energy range Eγ=1.0-3.5 GeV (s range 1.66-2.73 GeV). We observe a large negative polarization of up to 95%. As the mechanism of transverse polarization of hyperons produced in unpolarized photoproduction experiments is still not well understood, these results will help to distinguish between different theoretical models on hyperon production and provide valuable information for the searches of missing baryon resonances.

  2. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  3. The use of application-specific performance targets and engineering considerations to guide hydrogen storage materials development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stetson, Ned T., E-mail: ned.stetson@ee.doe.gov [U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EE-2H, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Ordaz, Grace; Adams, Jesse; Randolph, Katie [U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EE-2H, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); McWhorter, Scott [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •Portable power and material handling equipment as early market technology pathways. •Engineering based system-level storage-materials requirements. •Application based targets. -- Abstract: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technologies Office, carried out through the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, maintains a broad portfolio of activities to enable the commercialization of fuel cells across a range of near, mid and long-term applications. Improved, advanced hydrogen storage technologies are seen as a critical need for successful implementation of hydrogen fuel cells in many of these applications. To guide and focus materials development efforts, the DOE develops system performance targets for the specific applications of interest, and carries out system engineering analyses to determine the system-level performance delivered when the materials are incorporated into a complete system. To meet the needs of applications, it is important to consider the system-level performance, not just the material-level properties. An overview of the DOE’s hydrogen storage efforts in developing application-specific performance targets and systems engineering to guide hydrogen storage materials identification and development is herein provided.

  4. The use of application-specific performance targets and engineering considerations to guide hydrogen storage materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stetson, Ned T.; Ordaz, Grace; Adams, Jesse; Randolph, Katie; McWhorter, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Portable power and material handling equipment as early market technology pathways. •Engineering based system-level storage-materials requirements. •Application based targets. -- Abstract: The Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technologies Office, carried out through the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, maintains a broad portfolio of activities to enable the commercialization of fuel cells across a range of near, mid and long-term applications. Improved, advanced hydrogen storage technologies are seen as a critical need for successful implementation of hydrogen fuel cells in many of these applications. To guide and focus materials development efforts, the DOE develops system performance targets for the specific applications of interest, and carries out system engineering analyses to determine the system-level performance delivered when the materials are incorporated into a complete system. To meet the needs of applications, it is important to consider the system-level performance, not just the material-level properties. An overview of the DOE’s hydrogen storage efforts in developing application-specific performance targets and systems engineering to guide hydrogen storage materials identification and development is herein provided

  5. Hydrogen isotope double differential production cross sections induced by 62.7 MeV neutrons on a lead target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerveno, M.; Haddad, F.; Eudes, Ph.; Kirchner, T.; Lebrun, C.; Slypen, I.; Meulders, J.P.; Le Brun, C.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecolley, J.F.; Louvel, M.; Lefebvres, F.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Double differential hydrogen isotope production cross sections have been extracted in 62.7 MeV neutron induced reactions on a lead target. The angular distribution was measured at eight angles from 20 deg. to 160 deg. allowing the extraction of angle-differential, energy differential, and total production cross sections. A first set of comparisons with several theoretical calculations is also presented

  6. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off an unpolarised hydrogen target at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Jonathan R.T.

    2010-08-15

    Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) i.e. ep {yields} ep{gamma} is the simplest interaction that allows access to Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs), a theoretical framework describing nucleon structure. The strong interest in GPDs results from the fact that they can be used to determine the total angular momentum of quarks inside the nucleon and provide a 3-dimensional picture of nucleon structure. The measurement of the DVCS process is facilitated by the interference with a competing interaction known as the Bethe-Heitler process which has the same nal state. DVCS information is obtained from the asymmetrical in distribution of the real photon around the azimuthal angle {phi} at HERMES. Beam charge and beam helicity asymmetries, extracted from DVCS events with an unpolarised hydrogen target recorded during the 2006-2007 and 1996-2007 data taking periods, are presented in this thesis. The asymmetry amplitudes are presented over the range of HERMES kinematic acceptance, with their dependence on kinematic variables t, x{sub B} and Q{sup 2} also shown and compared to a phenomenological model. (orig.)

  7. Target continuum distorted-wave theory for collisions of fast protons with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crothers, D.S.F.; Dunseath, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    By considering the target continuum distorted-wave (TCDW) theory as the high-energy limit of the half-way house variational continuum distorted-wave theory, it is shown not only that there is no intermediate elastic divergence but also that the second-order amplitude based on a purely elastic intermediate state is of order υ -6 and is thus negligible. The residual inelastic TCDW theory is developed to second-order at high velocities. It is used to describe charge exchange during collisions of fast protons with atomic hydrogen. Using an on-shell peaking approximation and considering 1s-1s capture it is shown that the residual purely second-order transition amplitude comprises two terms, one real term of order υ -6 and one purely imaginary term of order υ -7 ln υ. At 5 MeV laboratory energy, it is shown that these are negligible. It is also shown that the υ -5 first-order term gives a differential cross section in very good agreement with an experiment at all angles including forward, interference minimum, Thomas maximum and large angles, particularly having folded our theory over experimental resolution. (author)

  8. Analyses of microstructure, composition and retention of hydrogen isotopes in divertor tiles of JET with the ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzaki, S.; Tokitani, M.; Otsuka, T.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.; Miyamoto, M.; Sakamoto, R.; Ashikawa, N.; Sakurada, S.; Uemura, Y.; Azuma, K.; Yumizuru, K.; Oyaizu, M.; Suzuki, T.; Kurotaki, H.; Hamaguchi, D.; Isobe, K.; Asakura, N.; Widdowson, A.; Heinola, K.; Jachmich, S.; Rubel, M.; contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    Results of the comprehensive surface analyses of divertor tiles and dusts retrieved from JET after the first ITER-like wall campaign (2011-2012) are presented. The samples cored from the divertor tiles were analyzed. Numerous nano-size bubble-like structures were observed in the deposition layer on the apron of the inner divertor tile, and a beryllium dust with the same structures were found in the matter collected from the inner divertor after the campaign. This suggests that the nano-size bubble-like structures can make the deposition layer to become brittle and may lead to cracking followed by dust generation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of chemical states of species in the deposition layers identified the formation of beryllium-tungsten intermetallic compounds on an inner vertical tile. Different tritium retention profiles along the divertor tiles were observed at the top surfaces and at deeper regions of the tiles by using the imaging plate technique.

  9. An Approach to Understanding Cohesive Slurry Settling, Mobilization, and Hydrogen Gas Retention in Pulsed Jet Mixed Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2009-05-22

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. Some of these vessels have mixing-system requirements to maintain conditions where the accumulation of hydrogen gas stays below acceptable limits, and the mixing within the vessels is sufficient to release hydrogen gas under normal conditions and during off-normal events. Some of the WTP process streams are slurries of solid particles suspended in Newtonian fluids that behave as non-Newtonian slurries, such as Bingham yield-stress fluids. When these slurries are contained in the process vessels, the particles can settle and become progressively more concentrated toward the bottom of the vessels, depending on the effectiveness of the mixing system. One limiting behavior is a settled layer beneath a particle-free liquid layer. The settled layer, or any region with sufficiently high solids concentration, will exhibit non-Newtonian rheology where it is possible for the settled slurry to behave as a soft solid with a yield stress. In this report, these slurries are described as settling cohesive slurries.

  10. The PRESPEC liquid-hydrogen target for in-beam gamma spectroscopy of exotic nuclei at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louchart, C.; Gheller, J.M.; Chesny, Ph.; Authelet, G.; Rousse, J.Y.; Obertelli, A.; Boutachkov, P.; Pietri, S.; Ameil, F.; Audirac, L.; Corsi, A.; Dombradi, Z.; Gerl, J.; Gillibert, A.; Korten, W.; Mailleret, C.; Merchan, E.; Nociforo, C.; Pietralla, N.; Ralet, D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a new liquid hydrogen and deuterium target dedicated to in-beam γ spectroscopy experiments in inverse kinematics at relativistic incident energies at GSI/FAIR. Target thicknesses from 10 to 80 mm can be achieved for an effective diameter of 60 mm. The target-cell and entrance window are maded of 200μm thick Mylar. The design has the advantage of being free of absorbing material at forward angles and 90°, allowing the detection of photons in a wide angular range. A commissioning experiment with a 54 Cr beam at 130 MeV/nucleon has been performed at GSI, using the Rare Isotopes INvestigation at GSI (RISING) detectors. The target has been shown to behave as expected and is ready for experiments at fragmentation Radioactive-Ion Beam Facilities. -- Highlights: • We report on a new liquid hydrogen target for gamma spectroscopy experiments at FAIR. • A commissioning experiment has been performed at GSI, using the RISING detectors. • The target behaves as expected and is ready for experiments

  11. Micron-size hydrogen cluster target for laser-driven proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, S.; Kanasaki, M.; Uno, M.; Matsui, R.; Uesaka, M.; Kishimoto, Y.; Fukuda, Y.

    2018-04-01

    As a new laser-driven ion acceleration technique, we proposed a way to produce impurity-free, highly reproducible, and robust proton beams exceeding 100 MeV using a Coulomb explosion of micron-size hydrogen clusters. In this study, micron-size hydrogen clusters were generated by expanding the cooled high-pressure hydrogen gas into a vacuum via a conical nozzle connected to a solenoid valve cooled by a mechanical cryostat. The size distributions of the hydrogen clusters were evaluated by measuring the angular distribution of laser light scattered from the clusters. The data were analyzed mathematically based on the Mie scattering theory combined with the Tikhonov regularization method. The maximum size of the hydrogen cluster at 25 K and 6 MPa in the stagnation state was recognized to be 2.15 ± 0.10 μm. The mean cluster size decreased with increasing temperature, and was found to be much larger than that given by Hagena’s formula. This discrepancy suggests that the micron-size hydrogen clusters were formed by the atomization (spallation) of the liquid or supercritical fluid phase of hydrogen. In addition, the density profiles of the gas phase were evaluated for 25 to 80 K at 6 MPa using a Nomarski interferometer. Based on the measurement results and the equation of state for hydrogen, the cluster mass fraction was obtained. 3D particles-in-cell (PIC) simulations concerning the interaction processes of micron-size hydrogen clusters with high power laser pulses predicted the generation of protons exceeding 100 MeV and accelerating in a laser propagation direction via an anisotropic Coulomb explosion mechanism, thus demonstrating a future candidate in laser-driven proton sources for upcoming multi-petawatt lasers.

  12. Experimental study of the dissociation of 100-600 KeV hydrogen cluster ions in an argon gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, M.; Clouvas, A.; Frischkorn, H.J.; Gaillard, M.J.; Poizat, J.C.; Remillieux, J.

    1985-09-01

    We have studied the break-up of accelerated hydrogen cluster ions passing through an argon gas target. The absolute dissociation cross section has been measured for a wide variety of H n + (odd masses only) cluster ions, with n between 5 and 23 and with projectile velocities ranging from 1.5 to 5 x 10 8 cm/s. We discuss the dissociation processes and the dependence of their cross-sections upon the cluster mass and velocity

  13. Total projectile electron loss cross sections of U^{28+} ions in collisions with gaseous targets ranging from hydrogen to krypton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Beam lifetimes of stored U^{28+} ions with kinetic energies of 30 and 50  MeV/u, respectively, were measured in the experimental storage ring of the GSI accelerator facility. By using the internal gas target station of the experimental storage ring, it was possible to obtain total projectile electron loss cross sections for collisions with several gaseous targets ranging from hydrogen to krypton from the beam lifetime data. The resulting experimental cross sections are compared to predictions by two theoretical approaches, namely the CTMC method and a combination of the DEPOSIT code and the RICODE program.

  14. Assessment of the effect of parallel temperature gradients in the JET SOL on Te measured by divertor target Langmuir probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ďuran, I.; Ješko, K.; Fuchs, V.; Groth, M.; Guillemaut, C.; Gunn, J.P.; Horáček, J.; Pitts, R.A.; Tskhakaya, D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Higher than expected electron temperatures (Te) are often measured by divertor Langmuir probes (LP) in high recycling and detached regimes in JET and other tokamaks. As a possible mechanism to explain this discrepancy, we investigate the effect of penetration of fast, almost collisionless

  15. Fragmentation cross sections of relativistic 8436Kr and 10947Ag nuclei in targets from hydrogen to lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, B.S.; Waddington, C.J.; Cummings, J.R.; Garrard, T.L.; Klarmann, J.

    1995-01-01

    With the addition of krypton and silver projectiles we have extended our previous studies of the fragmentation of heavy relativistic nuclei in targets ranging in mass from hydrogen to lead. These projectiles were studied at a number of discrete energies between 450 and 1500A MeV. The total and partial charge-changing cross sections were determined for each energy, target, and projectile, and the values compared with previous predictions. A new parametrization of the dependence of the total charge-changing cross sections on the target and projectile is introduced, based on nuclear charge radii derived from electron scattering. We have also parametrized the energy dependence of the total cross sections over the range of energies studied. New parameters were found for a previous representation of the partial charge-changing cross sections in hydrogen and a new parametrization has been introduced for the nonhydrogen targets. The evidence that limiting fragmentation has been attained for these relatively light projectile nuclei at Bevalac energies is shown to be inconclusive, and further measurements at higher energies will be needed to address this question

  16. Pulsed laser ablation of wire-shaped target in a thin water jet: effects of plasma features and bubble dynamics on the PLAL process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell’Aglio, Marcella; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Kohsakowski, Sebastian; Barcikowski, Stephan; Wagener, Philipp; Santagata, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, emission spectroscopy and fast imaging surveys during pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) for nanoparticles (NPs) production have been used, in order to provide further details about the process involved and the potentialities offered by a wire-shaped sample ablated in a flowing water jet. This kind of set-up has been explored because the laser ablation efficiency in water increases when a thin water layer and a wire-shaped target are used. In order to understand the physical processes causing the increasing ablation efficiency, both the laser-induced plasma and bubble dynamics generated in a flowing liquid jet have been analysed. The plasma parameters and the bubble behaviour in such a system have been compared with those observed in conventional PLAL experiments, where either a bulk or a wire-shaped target is immersed in bulk water. From the data presented here it is evidenced that the plasma and shockwave induced during the breakdown process can play a direct role in the ablation efficiency variation observed. With regard to the cavitation bubbles evolving near a free surface (the interface between water and air) it should be noted that these have to be treated with caution as a consequence of the strong influence played in these circumstances by the boundary of the water jet during its expansion dynamics. The effects due to the size of the liquid layer, the presence of the water/air interface, the liquid characteristics, the target shape, the plasma evolution and the bubble dynamics together with their outcomes on the NPs’ production, are presented and discussed. (paper)

  17. [Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the following topics: the Wisconsin test facility for storage cells; results of target tests; the new UHV target test system; funding request for a new atomic beam system; and planning of storage ring experiments

  18. Cryogenic Hydrogen Fuel for Controlled Inertial Confinement Fusion (Cryogenic Target Factory Concept Based on FST-Layering Method)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R.; Koshelev, I. E.; Krokhin, O. N.; Nikitenko, A. I.; Osipov, I. E.

    2017-12-01

    A central element of a power plant based on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is a target with cryogenic hydrogen fuel that should be delivered to the center of a reactor chamber with a high accuracy and repetition rate. Therefore, a cryogenic target factory (CTF) is an integral part of any ICF reactor. A promising way to solve this problem consists in the FST layering method developed at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI). This method (rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets) is unique, having no analogs in the world. The further development of FST-layering technologies is implemented in the scope of the LPI program for the creation of a modular CTF and commercialization of the obtained results. In this report, we discuss our concept of CTF (CTF-LPI) that exhibits the following distinctive features: using a FST-layering technology for the elaboration of an in-line production of cryogenic targets, using an effect of quantum levitation of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) in magnetic field for noncontacting manipulation, transport, and positioning of the free-standing cryogenic targets, as well as in using a Fourier holography technique for an on-line characterization and tracking of the targets flying into the reactor chamber. The results of original experimental and theoretical investigations performed at LPI indicate that the existing and developing target fabrication capabilities and technologies can be applied to ICF target production. The unique scientific, engineering, and technological base developed in Russia at LPI allows one to make a CTFLPI prototype for mass production of targets and delivery thereof at the required velocity into the ICF reactor chamber.

  19. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Chan, Tucker; Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-04-02

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables — jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum — have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their “local” computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applications do require knowledge about the jet constituents, we also build a hybrid event shape that incorporates (local) jet clustering information. As a straightforward application of our general technique, we derive an event-shape version of jet trimming, allowing event-wide jet grooming without explicit jet identification. Finally, we briefly mention possible applications of our method for jet substructure studies.

  20. Status of the hydrogen and deuterium atomic beam polarized target for NEPTUN experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balandikov, N.I.; Ershov, V.P.; Fimushkin, V.V.; Kulikov, M.V.; Pilipenko, Y.K.; Shutov, V.B.

    1995-01-01

    NEPTUN-NEPTUN-A is a polarized experiment at Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK, IHEP) with two internal targets. Status of the atomic beam polarized target that is being developed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna is presented. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  1. First Nuclear Reaction Experiment with Stored Radioactive 56Ni Beam and Internal Hydrogen and Helium Targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egelhof, P.; Bagchi, Soumya; Csatlós, M.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Furuno, T; Geissel, H.; Gernhauser, R.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, Nasser; Kuilman, M.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Najafi, M.A.; Rigollet, C.; Streicher, B.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of light-ion induced direct reactions using stored and cooled radioactive beams, interacting with internal targets of storage rings, can lead to substantial advantages over external target experiments, in particular for direct reaction experiments in inverse kinematics at very low

  2. Development Of A Hydrogen And Deuterium Polarized Gas Target For Application In Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, Willy

    2009-01-01

    The exploration of spin degrees of freedom in nuclear and high-energy interactions requires the use of spin-polarized projectiles and/or spin-polarized targets. During the last two decades, the use of external beams from cyclotrons has to a large extent been supplanted by use of circulating beams stored in storage rings. In these experiments, the circulating particles pass millions of times through targets internal to the ring. Thus the targets need to be very thin to avoid beam loss by scattering out of the acceptance aperture of the ring.

  3. MicroRNA-145 protects cardiomyocytes against hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂-induced apoptosis through targeting the mitochondria apoptotic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruotian Li

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs, a class of small and non-encoding RNAs that transcriptionally or post-transcriptionally modulate the expression of their target genes, has been implicated as critical regulatory molecules in many cardiovascular diseases, including ischemia/reperfusion induced cardiac injury. Here, we report microRNA-145, a tumor suppressor miRNA, can protect cardiomyocytes from hydrogen peroxide H₂O₂-induced apoptosis through targeting the mitochondrial pathway. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR demonstrated that the expression of miR-145 in either ischemia/reperfused mice myocardial tissues or H₂O₂-treated neonatal rat ventricle myocytes (NRVMs was markedly down-regulated. Over-expression of miR-145 significantly inhibited the H₂O₂-induced cellular apoptosis, ROS production, mitochondrial structure disruption as well as the activation of key signaling proteins in mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. These protective effects of miR-145 were abrogated by over-expression of Bnip3, an initiation factor of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in cardiomyocytes. Finally, we utilized both luciferase reporter assay and western blot analysis to identify Bnip3 as a direct target of miR-145. Our results suggest miR-145 plays an important role in regulating mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in heart challenged with oxidative stress. MiR-145 may represent a potential therapeutic target for treatment of oxidative stress-associated cardiovascular diseases, such as myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  4. A supersonic jet target for the cross section measurement of the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction with the recoil mass separator ERNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapagnani, D.; Buompane, R.; Di Leva, A.; Gialanella, L.; Busso, M.; De Cesare, M.; De Stefano, G.; Duarte, J. G.; Gasques, L. R.; Morales Gallegos, L.; Palmerini, S.; Romoli, M.; Tufariello, F.

    2017-09-01

    12C(α, γ)16O cross section plays a key-role in the stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis of massive stars. Hence, it must be determined with the precision of about 10% at the relevant Gamow energy of 300 keV. The ERNA (European Recoil mass separator for Nuclear Astrophysics) collaboration measured, for the first time, the total cross section of 12C(α, γ)16O by means of the direct detection of the 16O ions produced in the reaction down to an energy of Ecm = 1.9 MeV. To extend the measurement at lower energy, it is necessary to limit the extension of the He gas target. This can be achieved using a supersonic jet, where the oblique shock waves and expansion fans formed at its boundaries confine the gas, which can be efficiently collected using a catcher. A test version of such a system has been designed, constructed and experimentally characterized as a bench mark for a full numerical simulation using FV (Finite Volume) methods. The results of the commissioning of the jet test version and the design of the new system that will be used in combination with ERNA are presented and discussed.

  5. Reprint of: A supersonic jet target for the cross section measurement of the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction with the recoil mass separator ERNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapagnani, D.; Buompane, R.; Di Leva, A.; Gialanella, L.; Busso, M.; De Cesare, M.; De Stefano, G.; Duarte, J. G.; Gasques, L. R.; Morales Gallegos, L.; Palmerini, S.; Romoli, M.; Tufariello, F.

    2018-01-01

    12C(α, γ)16O cross section plays a key-role in the stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis of massive stars. Hence, it must be determined with the precision of about 10% at the relevant Gamow energy of 300 keV. The ERNA (European Recoil mass separator for Nuclear Astrophysics) collaboration measured, for the first time, the total cross section of 12C(α, γ)16O by means of the direct detection of the 16O ions produced in the reaction down to an energy of Ecm = 1.9 MeV. To extend the measurement at lower energy, it is necessary to limit the extension of the He gas target. This can be achieved using a supersonic jet, where the oblique shock waves and expansion fans formed at its boundaries confine the gas, which can be efficiently collected using a catcher. A test version of such a system has been designed, constructed and experimentally characterized as a bench mark for a full numerical simulation using FV (Finite Volume) methods. The results of the commissioning of the jet test version and the design of the new system that will be used in combination with ERNA are presented and discussed.

  6. Interpretation of ion flux and electron temperature profiles at the JET divertor target during high recycling and detached discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monk, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed experiments have been carried out with the JET Mark I pumped divertor to characterise high recycling and detached plasma regimes. This paper presents new measurements of high resolution divertor ion flux profiles that identify the growth of additional peaks during high recycling discharges. These ion flux profiles are used in conjunction with Dα and neutral flux measurements to examine the physics of divertor detachment and compare against simple analytic models. Finally, problems are highlighted with conventional methods of single and triple probe interpretation under high recycling conditions. By assuming that the single probe behaves as an asymmetric double probe the whole characteristic may be fitted and significantly lower electron temperatures may be derived when the electron to ion saturation current ratio is reduced. The results from the asymmetric double probe fit are shown to be consistent with independent diagnostic measurements. (orig.)

  7. Performance of the multiple target He/PbI sub 2 aerosol jet system for mass separation of neutron-deficient actinide isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, S; Asai, M; Haba, H; Sakama, M; Kojima, Y; Shibata, M; Nagame, Y; Oura, Y; Kawade, K

    2002-01-01

    A multiple target He/PbI sub 2 aerosol jet system coupled with a thermal ion source was installed in the isotope separator on line (JAERI-ISOL) at the JAERI tandem accelerator facility. The neutron-deficient americium and curium isotopes produced in the sup 2 sup 3 sup 3 sup , sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U( sup 6 Li, xn) and sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Np( sup 6 Li, xn) reactions were successfully mass-separated and the overall efficiency including the ionization of Am atoms was evaluated to be 0.3-0.4%. The identification of a new isotope sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Cm with the present system is reported.

  8. Assessing infrared intensity using the evaporation rate of liquid hydrogen inside a cryogenic integrating sphere for laser fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, K.; Iwamoto, A.; Asahina, T.; Yamanoi, K.; Arikawa, Y.; Nagatomo, H.; Nakai, M.; Norimatsu, T.; Azechi, H.

    2017-07-01

    Infrared (IR) heating processes have been studied to form a deuterium layer in an inertial confinement fusion target. To understand the relationship between the IR intensity and the fuel layering time constant, we have developed a new method to assess the IR intensity during irradiation. In our method, a glass flask acting as a dummy target is filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2) and is then irradiated with 2-μm light. The IR intensity is subsequently calculated from the time constant of the LH2 evaporation rate. Although LH2 evaporation is also caused by the heat inflow from the surroundings and by the background heat, the evaporation rate due to IR heating can be accurately determined by acquiring the time constant with and without irradiation. The experimentally measured IR intensity is 0.66 mW/cm2, which agrees well with a value estimated by considering the IR photon energy balance. Our results suggest that the present method can be used to measure the IR intensity inside a cryogenic system during IR irradiation of laser fusion targets.

  9. Assessing infrared intensity using the evaporation rate of liquid hydrogen inside a cryogenic integrating sphere for laser fusion targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, K; Iwamoto, A; Asahina, T; Yamanoi, K; Arikawa, Y; Nagatomo, H; Nakai, M; Norimatsu, T; Azechi, H

    2017-07-01

    Infrared (IR) heating processes have been studied to form a deuterium layer in an inertial confinement fusion target. To understand the relationship between the IR intensity and the fuel layering time constant, we have developed a new method to assess the IR intensity during irradiation. In our method, a glass flask acting as a dummy target is filled with liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) and is then irradiated with 2-μm light. The IR intensity is subsequently calculated from the time constant of the LH 2 evaporation rate. Although LH 2 evaporation is also caused by the heat inflow from the surroundings and by the background heat, the evaporation rate due to IR heating can be accurately determined by acquiring the time constant with and without irradiation. The experimentally measured IR intensity is 0.66 mW/cm 2 , which agrees well with a value estimated by considering the IR photon energy balance. Our results suggest that the present method can be used to measure the IR intensity inside a cryogenic system during IR irradiation of laser fusion targets.

  10. Investigations of charge-changing processes for light proton-rich nuclei on carbon and solid-hydrogen targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawahata, K. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ozawa, A., E-mail: ozawa@tac.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Saito, Y.; Abe, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Inaba, N.; Ishibashi, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Matsunaga, S. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Okada, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Sato, S. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Suzuki, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Zenihiro, J. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    We investigated charge-changing processes (total charge-changing cross sections and partial charge-changing cross sections) for light proton-rich nuclei ({sup 34–36}Ar, {sup 33}Cl, {sup 25–28}Si) at around 300A MeV on carbon and solid-hydrogen targets. We estimated the nuclear proton point radii of {sup 33}Cl and {sup 25,26,27}Si from the observed total charge-changing cross sections by using Glauber-model calculations with a phenomenological correction factor. Furthermore, we estimated the proton skin thickness for {sup 33}Cl coupled with its previously observed matter radius. From investigations of the partial charge-changing cross sections, clear zigzag pattern was observed for all isotopes. The present studies suggest that the pattern may be common in the proton-rich side, and depends on the odd–even nature of the fragment charge.

  11. BioTfueL Project: Targeting the Development of Second-Generation Bio-diesel and Bio-jet Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viguie, J.C.; Ullrich, N.; Porot, P.; Bournay, L.; Hecquet, M.; Rousseau, J.

    2013-01-01

    2. generation biofuels will have an important part to take in the energy transition as far as fuels are concerned. Using non edible biomass, they will avoid any direct competition with food usage. Within second generation biofuels, the BTL route consists in the production of middle distillates (Diesel and jet fuel) via gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. These fuels are called 'drop in' fuels; this means that to be used they technically do not request any modification in the vehicle whatever the blending rate with conventional fuels. This route is currently at the pre-industrial phase where demonstration is required. This article presents the BioTfueL project which has been created by Axens, CEA, IFP Energies Nouvelles, Sofiproteol, ThyssenKrupp Uhde and Total. This project is focused on the original concept of co-processing (biomass can be gasified together with fossil feedstock) and proposes to develop and demonstrate a full process chain to be commercialized worldwide via licensing. (authors)

  12. Development of liquid-lithium film jet-flow for the target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reactions for BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Miura, Kuniaki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Aritomi, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    A feasibility study on liquid lithium target in the form of a flowing film was performed to evaluate its potential use as a neutron generation target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction in BNCT. The target is a windowless-type flowing film on a concave wall. Its configuration was adapted for a proton beam which is 30mm in diameter and with energy and current of up to 3MeV and 20mA, respectively. The flowing film of liquid lithium was 0.6mm in thickness, 50mm in width and 50mm in length. The shapes of the nozzle and concave back wall, which create a stable flowing film jet, were decided based on water experiments. A lithium hydrodynamic experiment was performed to observe the stability of liquid lithium flow behavior. The flowing film of liquid lithium was found to be feasible at temperatures below the liquid lithium boiling saturation of 342°C at the surface pressure of 1×10(-3)Pa. Using a proto-type liquid lithium-circulating loop for BNCT, the stability of the film flow was confirmed for velocities up to 30m/s at 220°C and 250°C in vacuum at a pressure lower than 10(-3) Pa. It is expected that for practical use, a flowing liquid lithium target of a windowless type can solve the problem of radiation damage and target cooling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Jet fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxon, D.H.

    1985-10-01

    The paper reviews studies on jet fragmentation. The subject is discussed under the topic headings: fragmentation models, charged particle multiplicity, bose-einstein correlations, identified hadrons in jets, heavy quark fragmentation, baryon production, gluon and quark jets compared, the string effect, and two successful models. (U.K.)

  14. Interaction of 14 MeV neutrons with hydrogenated target proton emission calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Perez, N.; Desdin.

    1996-01-01

    Using neutron emission data of a 14 MeV neutron generator, a paraffin target, and based on the n + H 1 → n '+ p reaction, have been obtained the characteristics of the proton emission in a proton-neutron mixed field. It was used Monte Carlo simulation and it was obtained the proton output as function of the converter width and the energy spectrum of protons corresponding to different converter thickness. Among 0.07 and 0.2 cm there is a maximum zone for the proton emission. The energy spectrum agrees with obtained on previous papers. Figures showing these results are provided

  15. Double ionization of the hydrogen sulfide molecule by electron impact: Influence of the target orientation on multiple differential cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imadouchene, N. [Laboratoire de Mécanique, Structures et Energétique Université Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-Ouzou, B.P. 17, Tizi-Ouzou 15000 (Algeria); Aouchiche, H., E-mail: h_aouchiche@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Mécanique, Structures et Energétique Université Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-Ouzou, B.P. 17, Tizi-Ouzou 15000 (Algeria); Champion, C. [Centre d’Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Université Bordeaux, CNRS/IN2P3, Boîte Postale 120, Gradignan 33175 (France)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • The double ionization of the H{sub 2}S molecule is here theoretically studied. • The orientation dependence of the differential cross sections is scrutinized. • The specific double ionizing mechanisms are clearly identified. - Abstract: Multiple differential cross sections of double ionization of hydrogen sulfide molecule impacted by electrons are here investigated within the first Born approximation. In the initial state, the incident electron is represented by a plane wave function whereas the target is described by means of a single-center molecular wave function. In the final state, the two ejected electrons are described by Coulomb wave functions coupled by the Gamow factor, whereas the scattered electron is described by a plane wave. In this work, we analyze the role played by the molecular target orientation in the double ionization of the four outermost orbitals, namely 2b{sub 1}, 5a{sub 1}, 2b{sub 2} and 4a{sub 1} in considering the particular case of two electrons ejected from the same orbital. The contribution of each final state to the double ionization process is studied in terms of shape and magnitude for specific molecular orientations and for each molecular orbital we identified the mechanisms involved in the double ionization process, namely, the Shake-Off and the Two-Step 1.

  16. Transverse momentum and its compensation in current and target jets in deep inelastic muon-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneodo, M.; Giubellino, P.; Peroni, C.; Dosseli, U.; Haas, J.; Kellner, G.; Montgomery, H.E.; Osborne, A.M.; Brasse, F.W.; Flauger, W.; Goessling, C.; Korbel, V.; Nassalski, J.; Fiegiel, J.; Hoppe, C.; Janata, F.; Rondio, E.; Studt, M.; Torre, A. de la; Blum, D.; Heusse, P.; Jaffre, M.; Jacholkowska, A.; Pascaud, C.; Carr, J.; Chima, J.S.; Clifft, R.; Edwards, M.; Norton, P.R.; Oakham, F.G.; Thompson, J.C.; Arvidson, A.; Aubert, J.J.; Beaufays, J.; Becks, K.H.; Bee, C.; Benchouk, C.; Bird, I.; Boehm, E.; Braun, H.; Brown, S.; Brueck, H.; Calen, H.; Callebaut, D.; Cobb, J.H.; Combley, F.; Coughlan, J.; Court, G.R.; D'Agostini, G.; Dahlgren, S.; Davies, J.K.; Drees, J.; Dumont, J.J.; Dueren, M.; Edwards, A.; Ferrerro, M.I.; Foster, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Geddes, N.; Grafstroem, P.; Grard, F.; Gustafsson, L.; Hagberg, E.; Hasert, F.J.; Hayman, P.; Johnson, A.S.; Krueger, J.; Kullander, S.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Long, K.; Montanet, F.; Mount, R.P.; Paul, L.; Payre, P.; Pettingale, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Poetsch, M.; Preissner, H.; Renton, P.; Schultze, K.; Sloan, T.; Stockhausen, W.; Taylor, G.N.; Wahlen, H.; Whalley, M.; Wheeler, S.; Williams, W.S.C.; Wimpenny, S.; Windmolders, R.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented on the transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons in 280 GeV muon-proton deep inelastic interactions. The transverse momenta are defined relative to the accurately measured virtual photon direction and the experiment has almost complete angular acceptance for the final state hadrons. Significantly larger values of the average transverse momentum squared are found for the forward going hadrons than for the target remnants. This result, combined with a study of the rapidity region over which the transverse momentum is compensated, can be explained by a significant contribution from soft gluon radiation, but not by a large value of the primordial transverse momentum of the struck quark. (orig.)

  17. Experimental investigation of the formation of negative hydrogen ions in collisions between positive ions and atomic or molecular targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattouf, Elie

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the negative hydrogen ion (H - ) in collisions between a positive ion and a neutral atomic or molecular target is studied experimentally at impact energies of a few keV. The doubly-differential cross sections for H - formation are measured as a function of the kinetic energy and emission angle for the collision systems OH + + Ar and O + + H 2 O at 412 eV/a.m.u. These H - ions can be emitted at high energies (keV) in hard quasi-elastic two-body collisions involving a large momentum transfer to the H center. However, H - anions are preferentially emitted at low energy (eV) due to soft many-body (≥ 2) collisions resulting in a low momentum transfer. The formation of H - ions by electron capture follows excitation or ionization of the molecule. The molecular fragmentation dynamics is modeled to simulate the emission of H - ions. The overall good agreement between the simulation and the experiment leads to the understanding of most of the experimental observations. (author) [fr

  18. Intracellular Targeting of CEA Results in Th1-Type Antibody Responses Following Intradermal Genetic Vaccination by a Needle-Free Jet Injection Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Johansson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The route and method of immunization, as well as the cellular localization of the antigen, can influence the generation of an immune response. In general, intramuscular immunization results in Th1 responses, whereas intradermal delivery of DNA by gene gun immunization often results in more Th2 responses. Here we investigate how altering the cellular localization of the tumor antigen CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen affects the quality and amplitude of DNA vaccine-induced antibody responses in mice following intradermal delivery of DNA by a needle-free jet injection device (Biojector. CEA was expressed either in a membrane-bound form (wild-type CEA or in two truncated forms (CEA6 and CEA66 with cytoplasmic localization, where CEA66 was fused to a promiscuous T-helper epitope from tetanus toxin. Repeated intradermal immunization of BALB/c mice with DNA encoding wild-type CEA produced high antibody titers of a mixed IgG1/IgG2a ratio. In contrast, utilizing the DNA construct that resulted in intracellular targeting of CEA led to a reduced capacity to induce CEA-specific antibodies, but instead induced a Th1-biased immune response.

  19. High-Frequency Jet Ventilation for Complete Target Immobilization and Reduction of Planning Target Volume in Stereotactic High Single-Dose Irradiation of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Lung Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, Peter; Kraus, Hans-Joerg; Muehlnickel, Werner; Sassmann, Volker; Hering, Werner; Strauch, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of complete target immobilization by means of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV); and to show that the saving of planning target volume (PTV) on the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) under HFJV, compared with SBRT with respiratory motion, can be predicted with reliable accuracy by computed tomography (CT) scans at peak inspiration phase. Methods and Materials: A comparison regarding different methods for defining the PTV was carried out in 22 patients with tumors that clearly moved with respiration. A movement span of the gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by fusing respiration-correlated CT scans. The PTV enclosed the GTV positions with a safety margin throughout the breathing cycle. To create a PTV from CT scans acquired under HFJV, the same margins were drawn around the immobilized target. In addition, peak inspiration phase CT images (PIP-CTs) were used to approximate a target immobilized by HFJV. Results: The resulting HFJV-PTVs were between 11.6% and 45.4% smaller than the baseline values calculated as respiration-correlated CT-PTVs (median volume reduction, 25.4%). Tentative planning by means of PIP-CT PTVs predicted that in 19 of 22 patients, use of HFJV would lead to a reduction in volume of ≥20%. Using this threshold yielded a positive predictive value of 0.89, as well as a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 0.5. Conclusions: In all patients, SBRT under HFJV provided a reliable immobilization of the GTVs and achieved a reduction in PTVs, regardless of patient compliance. Tentative planning facilitated the selection of patients who could better undergo radiation in respiratory standstill, both with greater accuracy and lung protection.

  20. Experimental study of hydrogen formation and recombination under postulated LMFBR accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierman, R.W.; Hilliard, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    The report describes an experimental study of hydrogen jets burning in air, hydrogen formation by sodium in humid air atmospheres, and the effects of nitrogen, water vapor sodium vapor/aerosol, jet velocity, and jet temperature on ignition of hydrogen jets. The results show that hydrogen jets above 1450 0 F (788 0 C) issuing into an air atmosphere need no ignition source for ignition, a hydrogen jet temperature higher than 500 0 F (260 0 C) and containing more than six grams of sodium per cubic meter of jet gas will auto-ignite in an air atmosphere, the burning efficiency of a hydrogen jet decreases rapidly to zero when the oxygen concentration outside the flame region approaches 10 percent, and hydrogen does not form from a sodium-nitrogen jet issuing into a humid air atmosphere until the ratio O 2 /(H 2 O + O 2 ) is less than 0.5

  1. The JET multi-pellet injector launcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupschus, P.; Bailey, W.; Gadeberg, M.; Hedley, L.; Twyman, P.; Szabo, T.; Evans, D.

    1987-01-01

    Under a collaborative agreement between the Joint European Torus JET and the United States Department of Energy US DOE, JET and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) jointly built a multi-pellet injector for fuelling and re-fuelling of the JET plasma. A three-barrel repetitive pneumatic pellet Launcher - built by ORNL - is attached to a JET pellet launcher-machine interface (in short: Pellet Interface) which is the subject of this paper. The present Launcher-Interface combination provides deuterium or hydrogen injection at moderate pellet speeds for the next two operational periods on JET. The Pellet Interface, however, takes into account the future requirements of JET. It was designed to allow the attachment of the high speed pellet launchers now under development at JET and complies with the requirements of remote handling and tritium operation. In addition, the use of tritium pellets is being considered

  2. Rebounding of a shaped-charge jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, E. V.; Sorokin, M. V.; Fomin, V. M.

    2007-09-01

    The phenomenon of rebounding of a shaped-charge jet from the armour surface with small angles between the jet axis and the target surface is considered. Rebounding angles as a function of jet velocity are obtained in experiments for a copper shaped-charge jet. An engineering calculation technique is developed. The results calculated with the use of this technique are in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  3. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings. Annual report, February 1, 1986-January 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, W.

    1986-01-01

    Insertion of an internal polarized gas target into storage rings for protons, antiprotons or electrons would permit interesting new experiments, particularly if the circulating beam is polarized as well. The purpose of the present project is the development of a polarized gas target, based on injection of polarized hydrogen or deuterium atoms into a storage cell in order to build up the required target thickness. A method has been developed and tested, which permits measurement of the target polarization under realistic conditions (i.e., in the presence of an intense ion beam) without the need for a large accelerator. First measurements with an oxidized aluminum cell have been made. It is proposed to study wall depolarization in storage cells and to search for suitable wall conditions (wall material, coating, temperature, vacuum conditions) to permit eventual construction of a polarized gas target for a storage ring

  4. Quasi-free scattering in the ionization and destruction of hydrogen and helium Rydberg atoms in collision with neutral targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renwick, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen and helium Rydberg atoms (H** and He**), with principal quantum number n ranging from 10 to 20, have been used in collision experiments from 1 to 40 keV/amu. These were produced by electron capture in a charge-exchange cell and analyzed by ionization in a modulated electric field combined with phase-sensitive detection. Three experiments have been conducted. In the first, spectra of the band of H and He Rydberg states from electron capture were produced by the modulated field technique and compared. Considerable differences were found between the two. Both types of spectra were analyzed with calculations of Stark energies and field ionization rates. Attempts were made to simulate the spectra using this information and some assumptions about the state distribution produced in the electron capture. In the second experiment, destruction cross sections for H** incident on N 2 , Ar, and SF 6 were measured. This was a further test of the independent-particle model for Rydberg atom scattering; in this model, the atom is destroyed by quasi-free scattering of either the ionic core or the outer electron. Already proven valid for n = 20-35, this has been extended to n as low as 10, as measurements with n = 10 showed full compliance with the model. In the third experiment, not only destruction cross sections but also ionization cross sections for H** and He** incident on Xe, AR, and N 2 were measured. The ionization measurement is a more sensitive test of the quasi-free scattering of the Rydberg electron. This was especially important for the Xe and Ar targets, which exhibits a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in their free-electron scattering cross sections. The quasi-free Rydberg electron should reproduce these data. Unmistakable deviations from the quasi-free prediction were seen in Xe and N 2 but not in Ar. This represents the first measurement of a breakdown of the Independent Particle Model for fast Rydberg atom scattering

  5. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance

  6. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kye-Si, E-mail: kskwon@sch.ac.kr; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Soonchunhyang University 22, Soonchunhyang-Ro, Shinchang, Asan Chungnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Hyun-Seok [Department of Electrical and Robot Engineering, Soonchunhyang University, 22, Soonchunhyang-Ro, Shinchang, Asan Chungnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  7. Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid WaterMicrojets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2007-05-31

    We describe a method for generating molecular hydrogen directly from the charge separation effected via rapid flow of liquid water through a metal orifice, wherein the input energy is the hydrostatic pressure times the volume flow rate. Both electrokinetic currents and hydrogen production rates are shown to follow simple equations derived from the overlap of the fluid velocity gradient and the anisotropic charge distribution resulting from selective adsorption of hydroxide ions to the nozzle surface. Pressure-driven fluid flow shears away the charge balancing hydronium ions from the diffuse double layer and carries them out of the aperture. Downstream neutralization of the excess protons at a grounded target electrode produces gaseous hydrogen molecules. The hydrogen production efficiency is currently very low (ca. 10-6) for a single cylindrical jet, but can be improved with design changes.

  8. Impurity line emission due to thermal charge exchange in JET edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggi, C F; Horton, L D; Koenig, R; Stamp, M [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Summers, H P [Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1994-07-01

    High n-shell emission from hydrogen-like carbon (C VI, n=8-7) has been routinely observed from the plasma edge of JET. By comparing the measured spectral line intensities with the signals predicted by advanced atomic physics modelling of carbon and hydrogen radiation, integrated with modelling of the divertor and edge plasma, it is concluded that charge transfer from excited state hydrogen donors into fully stripped carbon ions can account for the observed spectral emission, but that the hydrogen distribution and to a lesser extent the carbon distribution away from the strike zone predicted by the transport model are too low. Data presented are those of three upper X-point discharges, where the target material was carbon. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Boosted jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juknevich, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the substructure of jets high transverse momentum at hadron colliders. A template method is introduced to distinguish heavy jets by comparing their energy distributions to the distributions of a set of templates which describe the kinematical information from signal or background. As an application, a search for a boosted Higgs boson decaying into bottom quarks in association with a leptonically decaying W boson is presented as well. (author)

  10. Emerging Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilit...

  11. Emerging jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Weiler, Andreas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland). TH-PH Div.; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  12. Emerging jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  13. Effect of hydroprocessing severity on characteristics of jet fuel from OSCO 2 and Paraho distillates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prok, G. M.; Flores, F. J.; Seng, G. T.

    1981-01-01

    Jet A boiling range fuels and broad-property research fuels were produced by hydroprocessing shale oil distillates, and their properties were measured to characterize the fuels. The distillates were the fraction of whole shale oil boiling below 343 C from TOSCO 2 and Paraho syncrudes. The TOSCO 2 was hydroprocessed at medium severity, and the Paraho was hydroprocessed at high, medium, and low severities. Fuels meeting Jet A requirements except for the freezing point were produced from the medium severity TOSCO 2 and the high severity Paraho. Target properties of a broad property research fuel were met by the medium severity TOSCO 2 and the high severity Paraho except for the freezing point and a high hydrogen content. Medium and low severity Paraho jet fuels did not meet thermal stability and freezing point requirements.

  14. Requirements for low-cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multiunit inertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, G.B.; Moir, R.W.; Hoffmman, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The economy of scale for multiunit inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants is explored based on the molten salt HYLIFE-II fusion chamber concept, for the purpose of producing lower cost electricity and hydrogen fuel. The cost of electricity (CoE) is minimized with a new IFE systems code IFEFUEL5 for a matrix of plant cases with one to eight fusion chambers of 250 to 2000-MW (electric) net output each, sharing a common heavy-ion driver and target factory. Improvements to previous HYLIFE-II models include a recirculating induction linac driver optimized as a function of driver energy and rep-rate (average driver power), inclusion of beam switchyard costs, a fusion chamber cost scaling dependence on both thermal power and fusion yield, and a more accurate bypass pump power scaling with chamber rep-rate. A CoE less than 3 cents/kW(electric)-h is found for plant outputs greater than 2 GW(electric), allowing hydrogen fuel production by wafer electrolysis to provide lower fuel cost per mile for higher efficiency hydrogen engines compared with gasoline engines. These multiunit, multi-GW(electric) IFE plants allow staged utility plant deployment, lower optimum chamber rep-rates, less sensitivity to driver and target fabrication costs, and a CoE possibly lower than future fission, fossil, and solar competitors. 37 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Determination of hydrogen cluster velocities and comparison with numerical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Täschner, A.; Köhler, E.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Khoukaz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of powerful hydrogen cluster jet targets in storage ring experiments led to the need of precise data on the mean cluster velocity as function of the stagnation temperature and pressure for the determination of the volume density of the target beams. For this purpose a large data set of hydrogen cluster velocity distributions and mean velocities was measured at a high density hydrogen cluster jet target using a trumpet shaped nozzle. The measurements have been performed at pressures above and below the critical pressure and for a broad range of temperatures relevant for target operation, e.g., at storage ring experiments. The used experimental method is described which allows for the velocity measurement of single clusters using a time-of-flight technique. Since this method is rather time-consuming and these measurements are typically interfering negatively with storage ring experiments, a method for a precise calculation of these mean velocities was needed. For this, the determined mean cluster velocities are compared with model calculations based on an isentropic one-dimensional van der Waals gas. Based on the obtained data and the presented numerical calculations, a new method has been developed which allows to predict the mean cluster velocities with an accuracy of about 5%. For this two cut-off parameters defining positions inside the nozzle are introduced, which can be determined for a given nozzle by only two velocity measurements

  16. Future hydrogen markets for large-scale hydrogen production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    The cost of delivered hydrogen includes production, storage, and distribution. For equal production costs, large users (>10 6 m 3 /day) will favor high-volume centralized hydrogen production technologies to avoid collection costs for hydrogen from widely distributed sources. Potential hydrogen markets were examined to identify and characterize those markets that will favor large-scale hydrogen production technologies. The two high-volume centralized hydrogen production technologies are nuclear energy and fossil energy with carbon dioxide sequestration. The potential markets for these technologies are: (1) production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet) including liquid fuels with no net greenhouse gas emissions and (2) peak electricity production. The development of high-volume centralized hydrogen production technologies requires an understanding of the markets to (1) define hydrogen production requirements (purity, pressure, volumes, need for co-product oxygen, etc.); (2) define and develop technologies to use the hydrogen, and (3) create the industrial partnerships to commercialize such technologies. (author)

  17. NASA Jet Noise Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The presentation highlights NASA's jet noise research for 2016. Jet-noise modeling efforts, jet-surface interactions results, acoustic characteristics of multi-stream jets, and N+2 Supersonic Aircraft system studies are presented.

  18. Multi-unit inertial fusion plants based on HYLIFE-II, with shared heavy-ion RIA driver and target factory, producing electricity and hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, G.; Moir, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffman, M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-05-05

    Following is a modification of the IFEFUEL systems code, called IFEFUEL2, to treat specifically the HYLIFE-II target chamber concept. The same improved Recirculating Induction Accelerator (RIA) energy scaling model developed recently by Bieri is used in this survey of the economics of multi-unit IFE plants producing both electricity and hydrogen fuel. Reference cases will assume conventional HI-indirect target gains for a 2 mm spot, and improved HYLIFE-II BoP models as per Hoffman. Credits for improved plant availability and lower operating costs due to HYLIFE-II`s 30-yr target chamber lifetime are included, as well as unit cost reductions suggested by Delene to credit greater {open_quotes}learning curve{close_quotes} benefits for the duplicated portions of a multi-unit plant. To illustrate the potential impact of more advanced assumptions, additional {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} cases will consider the possible benefits of an MHD + Steam BoP, where direct MHD conversion of plasma from baseball-size LiH target blanket shells is assumed to be possible in a new (as yet undesigned) liquid Flibe-walled target chamber, together and separately, with advanced, higher-gain heavy-ion targets with Fast Ignitors. These runs may help decide the course of a possible future {open_quotes}HYLIFE-III{close_quotes} IFE study. Beam switchyard and final focusing system costs per target chamber are assumed to be consistent with single-sided illumination, for either {open_quotes}conventional{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} indirect target gain assumptions. Target costs are scaled according to the model by Woodworth. In all cases, the driver energy and rep rate for each chosen number of target chambers and total plant output will be optimized to minimize the cost of electricity (CoE) and the associated cost of hydrogen (CoH), using a relationship between CoE and CoH to be presented in the next section.

  19. Polarized gas targets for storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is widely recognized that polarized gas targets in electron storage rings represent a new opportunity for precision nuclear physics studies. New developments in polarized target technology specific to internal applications will be discussed. In particular, polarized gas targets have been used in the VEPP-3 electron ring in Novosibirsk. A simple storage cell was used to increase the total target thickness by a factor of 15 over the simple gas jet target from an atomic beam source. Results from the initial phase of this project will be reported. In addition, the plans for increasing the luminosity by an additional order or magnitude will be presented. The application of this work to polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets for the HERA ring will be noted. The influence of beam-induced depolarization, a phenomena encountered in short-pulse electron storage rings, will be discussed. Finally, the performance tests of laser-driven sources will be presented. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  20. Temperature effects on the behavior of liquid hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical-shell directly driven inertial confinement fusion target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.; Mok, L.S.

    1984-05-01

    The present work studies the temperature effects on the formation of a uniform liquid hydrogen layer inside a spherical glass shell (SGS). The profile of the liquid layer is first investigated for an isothermal case. An equation suitable for describing the profile is derived by including the London-van der Waals attractive forces between the liquid and substrate molecules. Two theoretical models are then established to explain the changes in the liquid layer profile under the influence of a vertically applied temperature gradient. The characteristics of the fluid flows are obtained by solving the fluid equations under the low-Reynolds-number approximations. The effect of the component separation both in the liquid layer and the vapor region, which is induced by the temperature gradient, is studied when the enclosure inside the SGS is a mixture of hydrogen isotopes. A uniform layer can also be formed for the mixture liquid except that the required temperature gradient is now positive in direction, unlike the case of the single-component liquid. The heating effect due to the radioactive decay of tritium is also evaluated. An experimental apparatus capable of generating a desired temperature gradient across the SGS at liquid hydrogen temperatures is described. The profiles of the liquid layer are observed for different temperature gradients and the results are in qualitative agreement with the theoretical predictions

  1. Effect of hydrogen addition on autoignited methane lifted flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choin, Byung Chul; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets with hydrogen-enriched methane fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. The results showed that the autoignited lifted flame of the methane/hydrogen mixture, which had an initial

  2. Structure of strongly underexpanded gas jets submerged in liquids – Application to the wastage of tubes by aggressive jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, Francis, E-mail: roger@ensma.fr [Institut PPRIME, Département Fluides, Thermique, Combustion CNRS ENSMA Université de Poitiers UPR 3346, ENSMA BP 109, 86960 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Carreau, Jean-Louis; Gbahoué, Laurent; Hobbes, Philippe [Institut PPRIME, Département Fluides, Thermique, Combustion CNRS ENSMA Université de Poitiers UPR 3346, ENSMA BP 109, 86960 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Allou, Alexandre; Beauchamp, François [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, DTN/STPA/LTRS, 13108 Saint-Paul lez, Durance Cedex (France)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Underexpanded gas jets submerged in liquids behave similarly to homogeneous gas jets. • The counter rotating vortex pairs of jet produce discrete imprints on the targets. • The shape of hollows made on the targets is explained by the jet structure. • The erosion–corrosion phenomenon well explains the wastage of exchange tubes. - Abstract: Strongly underexpanded gas jets submerged in a liquid at rest behave similarly to underexpanded homogeneous gas jets. The existence of the Taylor-Görtler vortices around the inner zone of the gas jets is demonstrated in free gas jets submerged in water by means of optical probe. In the near field, the same phenomenon produces discrete imprints, approximately distributed in a circle, when underexpanded nitrogen jet submerged in liquid sodium hydroxide and underexpanded water vapour jet submerged in liquid sodium impact onto AU{sub 4}G-T{sub 4} and Incoloy 800{sup ®} alloy targets respectively. For a jet-target couple, the volume of the hollow is satisfactorily related to the strain energy density of the material and the kinetic energy of the gas jet. However, the comparison between volumes of hollows produced by both jets also indicates strong corrosive action of the medium on targets. This allows better understanding of the mechanism of wastage of tubes employed in steam generators integrated in liquid metal fast breeder reactors.

  3. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. B.; Göde, S.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. The pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.

  4. Measurements of the spin structure of the nucleon using SPHICE: A strongly polarized hydrogen and deuterium ice target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babusci, D.; Blecher, M.; Breuer, M.; Caracappa, A.; Commeaux, C.; Didelez, J.; Fan, Q.; Giordano, G.; Hicks, K.; Hoblit, S.; Hoffmann-Rothe, P.; Honig, A.; Kistner, O.C.; Khandaker, M.; Li, Z.; Lucas, M.A.; Matone, G.; Miceli, L.; Preedom, B.M.; Rigney, M.; Sandorfi, A.M.; Schaerf, C.; Thorn, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Frozen-spin HD polarized targets operating between 0.4 and 4K, used with cold-transfer (4K) techniques, provide great configurational flexibility. Their long depolarization times under target usage conditions assure reasonable match between polarization production and usage times, for weakly ionizing beam fluxes, and the very long relaxation times at fields above 7T (∼1 yr.) provide an economical storage mode and open-quote open-quote off-the-shelf close-quote close-quote availability. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  5. First experiments in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Bartlett, D.V.; Baeumel, G.

    1985-01-01

    Results obtained from JET since June 1983 are described which show that this large tokamak behaves in a similar manner to smaller tokamaks, but with correspondingly improved plasma parameters. Long-duration hydrogen and deuterium plasmas (>10 s) have been obtained with electron temperatures reaching >4 keV for power dissipations =1.6), loss of vertical stability occurred, as expected from previous calculations. Forces of several hundred tonnes (at Isub(p)=2.7 MA) were transmitted to the vacuum vessel. Measured confinement times are larger than the corresponding INTOR values. The maximum achievable density is limited by disruptions. Impurity levels determine this limiting density, and the paper concludes with proposals to reduce these. In addition, progress in neutral injection and RF heating is described, as well as preparations for D-T operation. (author)

  6. Production of jet fuel from alternative source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eller, Zoltan; Papp, Anita; Hancsok, Jenoe [Pannonia Univ., Veszprem (Hungary). MOL Dept. of Hydrocarbon and Coal Processing

    2013-06-01

    Recent demands for low aromatic content jet fuels have shown significant increase in the last 20 years. This was generated by the growing of aviation. Furthermore, the quality requirements have become more aggravated for jet fuels. Nowadays reduced aromatic hydrocarbon fractions are necessary for the production of jet fuels with good burning properties, which contribute to less harmful material emission. In the recent past the properties of gasolines and diesel gas oils were continuously severed, and the properties of jet fuels will be more severe, too. Furthermore, it can become obligatory to blend alternative components into jet fuels. With the aromatic content reduction there is a possibility to produce high energy content jet fuels with the desirable properties. One of the possibilities is the blending of biocomponents from catalytic hydrogenation of triglycerides. Our aim was to study the possibilities of producing low sulphur and aromatic content jet fuels in a catalytic way. On a CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst we studied the possibilities of quality improving of a kerosene fraction and coconut oil mixture depending on the change of the process parameters (temperature, pressure, liquid hourly space velocity, volume ratio). Based on the quality parameters of the liquid products we found that we made from the feedstock in the adequate technological conditions products which have a high smoke point (> 35 mm) and which have reduced aromatic content and high paraffin content (90%), so these are excellent jet fuels, and their stack gases damage the environment less. (orig.)

  7. Jet Car Track Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located in Lakehurst, New Jersey, the Jet Car Track Site supports jet cars with J57 engines and has a maximum jet car thrust of 42,000 pounds with a maximum speed of...

  8. Jet Crackle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    crackle is correlated to signals with intermittent periods of steepened shock-like waves followed by weaker, longer, rounded rarefaction regions, but to...turbulence is concentrated in a weakly curved (for a typical round jet) shear layer between the high-speed potential core flow and the surrounding co-flow...decreases into the acoustic field. The effect of varying dc between −0.1 and −0.003δm(t)/∆U causes the Nδm/Lx curves to shift downward as fewer waves

  9. An Optical Study of Processes in Hydrogen Flame in a Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    growth of the hydrogen- flame length with the hydrogen flow rate was observed, whereas for a turbulent hydrogen jet (Reynolds number Re > 104 [5]), the... flame length remained almost constant and varied only weakly with the flow rate of hydrogen. For a subsonic jet flow, flame images display an...There are some data in the literature which show how the diffusive- flame length varies with the rate of hydrogen flow [4, 7]. The length of a

  10. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  11. Investigation of the hydrogen multilayered target H/T-D{sub 2} and muonic X-ray yields in ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheisari, R., E-mail: gheisari@pgu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr 75169 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-12-21

    This paper extends applications of the multilayered solid target H/T-D{sub 2}, which is kept at 3 K. The time evolutions of muonic tritium atoms ({mu}t) are obtained, by taking into account {mu}t production rate at different places of deuterium material. The apparatus H/T-D{sub 2} can be used for checking nuclear properties of implanted ions, which take part at muon transfer. Electromagnetic X-rays are generated by muon atomic transitions. The muonic X-ray transition energies are strongly affected by the size of nuclei. Here, a solid hydrogen-tritium (H/T) with a Almost-Equal-To 1 mm thick is used for {mu}t production. For ion implantation, the required amount of deuterium material is determined to be about 3.2 {mu}m. Moreover, the muonic X-ray yields are estimated and compared with those of the arrangement H/T-D{sub 2}. While the present target requires argon ion beam intensity nearly a factor of 2 times smaller; gives a relatively higher X-ray yield (15% enhancement per hour) at the energy 644 keV with the detection efficiency of Almost-Equal-To 1%.

  12. Jet inclusive cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons

  13. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) irreversibly inactivates creatine kinase from Pelodiscus sinensis by targeting the active site cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Lee, Jinhyuk; Hao, Hao; Park, Yong-Doo; Qian, Guo-Ying

    2017-12-01

    Creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2, CK) plays an important role in cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis by catalysing the transfer of phosphate between ATP and creatine phosphate. In this study, we investigated the effects of H 2 O 2 on PSCKM (muscle type creatine kinase from Pelodiscus sinensis) by the integrating method between enzyme kinetics and docking simulations. We found that H 2 O 2 strongly inactivated PSCKM (IC 50 =0.25mM) in a first-order kinetic process, and targeted the active site cysteine directly. A conformational study showed that H 2 O 2 did not induce the tertiary structural changes in PSCKM with no extensive exposure of hydrophobic surfaces. Sequential docking simulations between PSCKM and H 2 O 2 indicated that H 2 O 2 interacts with the ADP binding region of the active site, consistent with experimental results that demonstrated H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation. Our study demonstrates the effect of H 2 O 2 on PSCKM enzymatic function and unfolding, and provides important insight into the changes undergone by this central metabolic enzyme in ectothermic animals in response to the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipp, Ludwig [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Torrington, CT (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Conventional compressors have not been able to meet DOE targets for hydrogen refueling stations. They suffer from high capital cost, poor reliability and pose a risk of fuel contamination from lubricant oils. This project has significantly advanced the development of solid state hydrogen compressor technology for multiple applications. The project has achieved all of its major objectives. It has demonstrated capability of Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) technology to potentially meet the DOE targets for small compressors for refueling sites. It has quantified EHC cell performance and durability, including single stage hydrogen compression from near-atmospheric pressure to 12,800 psi and operation of EHC for more than 22,000 hours. Capital cost of EHC was reduced by 60%, enabling a path to meeting the DOE cost targets for hydrogen compression, storage and delivery ($2.00-2.15/gge by 2020).

  15. Jet Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.; O'Hara, G.W.; Pollard, I.E.

    1988-07-01

    The paper presents the Jet Joint Undertaking annual report 1987. A description is given of the JET and Euratom and International Fusion Programmes. The technical status of JET is outlined, including the development and improvements made to the system in 1987. The results of JET Operation in 1987 are described within the areas of: density effects, temperature improvements, energy confinement studies and other material effects. The contents also contain a summary of the future programme of JET. (U.K.)

  16. Hypervelocity jets from conical hollow-charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, P. M.; Martinez-Val, J. M.; Eliezer, S.; Piera, M.; Guillen, J.; Cobo, M. D.; Ogando, F.; Crisol, A.; Gonzalez, L.; Prieto, J.; Velarde, G.

    1997-01-01

    In this article the formation of jets by means of the implosion of conical targets is analyzed. This implosion might be induced by high intensity lasers or X rays. It is known of experiments with explosive and numeric simulations that the formation of jets depends critically on the aperture of the cone. It is found in these simulations that for a given collapsing speed an angle of the cone exists below which jet doesn't take place. This critical angle grows with the collapsing speed. The numerical simulations seem to indicate that the production of jets is related to the separation of the shock wave that takes place in the collapsing region. We will also analyze the mass and kinetic energy of the jets taken place as a function of the initial opening of the cone

  17. Analysis of diffractive dissociation of K- into K-π+π- on a liquid hydrogen target at the compass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasinski, Prometeusz Kryspin

    2012-01-01

    The systematic exploration of excited meson and baryon states was the central topic of the COmmon Muon Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) physics program in the years 2008 and 2009 at the CERN facility. Particularly states non fitting a constituent quark model were searched for, identified by their exotic quantum numbers which are forbidden by a simple q anti q scheme. A high energetic hadron-beam on a fixed target yielded in resonances decaying into a large variety of final states. The diffractive and central production mechanisms allowed for a clean exclusive selection of channels such as π - p → π + π - π + p recoil , which then were analysed with a high precision and a huge number of events. Apart from the main pion component in the negative hadron beam a small fraction of kaons of about 2.5% allowed the study of light strange resonances in the K - π + π - decay channel. The best measurement in this channel was quoted to be so far the measurement of the WA03 experiment at CERN. The ACCMOR-collaboration has the data recorded and analysed with an experimental set-up very similar to the COMPASS-spectrometer. COMPASS had therefore not only the ability to remeasure this channel with a significantly higher number of events and better precision to cross-check those over 30 years old results. Moreover, improved analysis methods together with new evidences from other experiments, are expected to enlighten our present picture of the hadron spectrum. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of meson spectroscopy. The formation of bound quark anti-quark systems allows to interpret our measurements in terms of coupled quantum numbers, with properties as spin, charge conjugation and parity. Particularly kaonic isospin I=(1)/(2) resonances are classified as proposed by group theory and differences to I=1 and I=0 states, formed mainly by u and d quarks and their anti-quarks, are pointed out. That chapter introduces also the production mechanisms used to

  18. Vector boson tagged jets and jet substructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitev Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In these proceedings, we report on recent results related to vector boson-tagged jet production in heavy ion collisions and the related modification of jet substructure, such as jet shapes and jet momentum sharing distributions. Z0-tagging and γ-tagging of jets provides new opportunities to study parton shower formation and propagation in the quark-gluon plasma and has been argued to provide tight constrains on the energy loss of reconstructed jets. We present theoretical predictions for isolated photon-tagged and electroweak boson-tagged jet production in Pb+Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV at the LHC, addressing the modification of their transverse momentum and transverse momentum imbalance distributions. Comparison to recent ATLAS and CMS experimental measurements is performed that can shed light on the medium-induced radiative corrections and energy dissipation due to collisional processes of predominantly quark-initiated jets. The modification of parton splitting functions in the QGP further implies that the substructure of jets in heavy ion collisions may differ significantly from the corresponding substructure in proton-proton collisions. Two such observables and the implication of tagging on their evaluation is also discussed.

  19. Understanding jet noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabasov, S A

    2010-08-13

    Jets are one of the most fascinating topics in fluid mechanics. For aeronautics, turbulent jet-noise modelling is particularly challenging, not only because of the poor understanding of high Reynolds number turbulence, but also because of the extremely low acoustic efficiency of high-speed jets. Turbulent jet-noise models starting from the classical Lighthill acoustic analogy to state-of-the art models were considered. No attempt was made to present any complete overview of jet-noise theories. Instead, the aim was to emphasize the importance of sound generation and mean-flow propagation effects, as well as their interference, for the understanding and prediction of jet noise.

  20. Very forward jet, Mueller Navelet jets and jet gap jet measurements in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Cerci, Salim

    2018-01-01

    The measurements of very forward jet, Mueller-Navelet jets and jet-gap-jet events are presented for different collision energies. The analyses are based on data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Jets are defined through the anti-$k_\\mathrm{t}$ clustering algorithm for different cone sizes. Jet production studies provide stringent tests of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and contribute to tune Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and phenomenological models. The measurements are compared to predictions from various Monte Carlo event generators.

  1. Autoignited laminar lifted flames of methane/hydrogen mixtures in heated coflow air

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Autoignited lifted flame behavior in laminar jets of methane/hydrogen mixture fuels has been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. Three regimes of autoignited lifted flames were identified depending on initial temperature and hydrogen

  2. Jet Vertex Charge Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Nektarijevic, Snezana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A newly developed algorithm called the jet vertex charge tagger, aimed at identifying the sign of the charge of jets containing $b$-hadrons, referred to as $b$-jets, is presented. In addition to the well established track-based jet charge determination, this algorithm introduces the so-called \\emph{jet vertex charge} reconstruction, which exploits the charge information associated to the displaced vertices within the jet. Furthermore, the charge of a soft muon contained in the jet is taken into account when available. All available information is combined into a multivariate discriminator. The algorithm has been developed on jets matched to generator level $b$-hadrons provided by $t\\bar{t}$ events simulated at $\\sqrt{s}$=13~TeV using the full ATLAS detector simulation and reconstruction.

  3. Delving into QCD jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, K.

    1980-01-01

    The author discusses, in an introductory fashion, the latest developments in the study of hadronic jets produced in hard processes, based on perturbative QCD. Emphasis is on jet calculus (and its applications and generalizations), and on the appearance of a parton-like consistent, over-all picture of jet evolution in momentum, colour, and real space-time. (Auth.)

  4. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  5. Numerical investigations of the WASA pellet target operation and proposal of a new technique for the PANDA pellet target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varentsov, Victor L., E-mail: v.varentsov@gsi.de [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-01

    The conventional nozzle vibration technique of the hydrogen micro-droplet generation that is supposed to be used for internal pellet target production for the future PANDA experiment at the international FAIR facility in Darmstadtfor is described. The operation of this technique has been investigated by means of detailed computer simulations. Results of calculations for the geometry and operation conditions of the WASA pellet generator are presented and discussed. We have found that for every given pellet size, there is a set of operation parameters where the efficiency of the WASA hydrogen pellet target operation is considerably increased. Moreover, the results of presented computer simulations clearly show that the future PANDA pellet target setup can be realized with the use of much smaller (and cheaper) vacuum pumps than those used at present in the WASA hydrogen pellet target. To qualitatively improve the PANDA hydrogen pellet target performance we have proposed the use of a novel flow focusing method of Ganan-Calvo and Barreto (1997,1999) combined with the use of conventional vacuum injection capillary. Possibilities of this approach for the PANDA pellet target production have been also explored by means of computer simulations. The results of these simulations show that the use of this new approach looks very promising and in particular, there is no need here to use of expensive ultra-pure hydrogen to prevent nozzle clogging or freezing up due to impurities and it will allow simple, fast, smooth and a wide range of change of pellet sizes in accordance with requirements of different experiments at the PANDA detector. In this article we also propose and describe the idea of a new technique to break up a liquid microjet into microdroplets using a process of liquid jet evaporation under pulsed laser beam irradiation. This technique should be experimentally checked before it may be used in the design of the future PANDA pellet target setup.

  6. Numerical investigations of the WASA pellet target operation and proposal of a new technique for the PANDA pellet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varentsov, Victor L.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional nozzle vibration technique of the hydrogen micro-droplet generation that is supposed to be used for internal pellet target production for the future PANDA experiment at the international FAIR facility in Darmstadtfor is described. The operation of this technique has been investigated by means of detailed computer simulations. Results of calculations for the geometry and operation conditions of the WASA pellet generator are presented and discussed. We have found that for every given pellet size, there is a set of operation parameters where the efficiency of the WASA hydrogen pellet target operation is considerably increased. Moreover, the results of presented computer simulations clearly show that the future PANDA pellet target setup can be realized with the use of much smaller (and cheaper) vacuum pumps than those used at present in the WASA hydrogen pellet target. To qualitatively improve the PANDA hydrogen pellet target performance we have proposed the use of a novel flow focusing method of Ganan-Calvo and Barreto (1997,1999) combined with the use of conventional vacuum injection capillary. Possibilities of this approach for the PANDA pellet target production have been also explored by means of computer simulations. The results of these simulations show that the use of this new approach looks very promising and in particular, there is no need here to use of expensive ultra-pure hydrogen to prevent nozzle clogging or freezing up due to impurities and it will allow simple, fast, smooth and a wide range of change of pellet sizes in accordance with requirements of different experiments at the PANDA detector. In this article we also propose and describe the idea of a new technique to break up a liquid microjet into microdroplets using a process of liquid jet evaporation under pulsed laser beam irradiation. This technique should be experimentally checked before it may be used in the design of the future PANDA pellet target setup.

  7. Normal and grazing incidence pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured MoSx hydrogen evolution catalysts from a MoS2 target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominski, V. Yu.; Romanov, R. I.; Fominski, D. V.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Troyan, I. A.

    2018-06-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of a MoS2 target causes enhanced splashing of the material. So, for MoSx films obtained by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the conventional normal incidence (NI) configuration, their typical morphology is characterized by an underlying granular structure with an overlayer of widely dispersed spherical Mo and MoSx particles possessing micro-, sub-micro- and nanometer sizes. We investigated the possibility of using high surface roughness, which occurs due to particle deposition, as a support with a large exposed surface area for thin MoSx catalytic layers for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). For comparison, the HER performance of MoSx layers formed by grazing incidence (GI) PLD was studied. During GI-PLD, a substrate was placed along the direction of laser plume transport and few large particles loaded the substrate. The local structure and composition of thin MoSx layers formed by the deposition of the vapor component of the laser plume were varied by changing the pressure of the buffer gas (argon, Ar). In the case of NI-PLD, an increase in Ar pressure caused the formation of quasi-amorphous MoSx (x ≥ 2) films that possessed highly active catalytic sites on the edges of the layered MoS2 nanophase. At the same time, a decrease in the deposition rate of the MoSx film appeared due to the scattering of the vapor flux by Ar molecules during flux transport from the target to the substrate. This effect prevented uniform deposition of the MoSx catalytic film on the surface of most particles, whose deposition rate was independent of Ar pressure. The scattered vapor flux containing Mo and S atoms was a dominant source for MoSx film growth during GI-PLD. The thickness and composition distribution of the MoSx film on the substrate depended on both the pressure of the buffer gas and the distance from the target. For 1.0-2.5 cm from the target, the deposition rate was quite sufficient to form S-enriched quasi-amorphous MoSx (2.5 < x < 6) catalytic

  8. Isotope separation in crossed-jet systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, R.J.; Anderson, J.B.

    1978-11-01

    The separation of isotopes in crossed-jet systems was investigated with Monte Carlo calculations of the separation effects for jets of Ne/Ar and /sup 235/UF/sub 6///sup 238/UF/sub 6/ mixtures entering a hydrogen stream. For the ideal condition of uniform stream velocities at zero temperature, the separation factor ..cap alpha.. was found to be 16.0 for Ne/Ar and 1.17 for /sup 235/UF/sub 6///sup 238/UF/sub 6/. For less ideal but more practical conditions, Monte Carlo calculations of the complete crossed-jet systems gave separation factors as high as 3.3 for Ne/Ar and ..cap alpha.. = 1.046 - 1.078 for /sup 235/UF/sub 6///sup 238/UF/sub 6/.

  9. Surface and microstructure modifications of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy cutting by a water jet/high power laser converging coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Laurent; Tazibt, Abdel; Aillerie, Michel; Tidu, Albert

    2018-01-01

    The metallurgical evolution of the Ti-6Al-4V samples is analyzed after an appropriate cutting using a converging water jet/high power laser system. New surface microstructures are obtained on the cutting edge as a result of thermo-mechanical effects of such hybrid fluid-jet-laser tool on the targeted material. The laser beam allows to melt and the water-jet to cool down and to evacuate the material upstream according to a controlled cutting process. The experimental results have shown that a rutile layer can be generated on the surface near the cutting zone. The recorded metallurgical effect is attributed to the chemical reaction between water molecules and titanium, where the laser thermal energy brought onto the surface plays the role of reaction activator. The width of the oxidized zone was found proportional to the cutting speed. During the reaction, hydrogen gas H2 is formed and is absorbed by the metal. The hydrogen atoms trapped into the alloy change the metastable phase formation developing pure β circular grains as a skin at the kerf surface. This result is original so it would lead to innovative converging laser water jet process that could be used to increase the material properties especially for surface treatment, a key value of surface engineering and manufacturing chains.

  10. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  11. Recent results from a high Pt jet experiment at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormell, L.; Corcoran, M.; Dris, M.

    1979-04-01

    Some recent results from a two-arm calorimeter experiment performed at Fermilab are presented. The properties of high P/sub t/ jets produced in hydrogen from incident pions and protons were studied. These studies lead to several important results: the high P/sub t/ jet events observed are produced by parton--parton (quark or gluon) scattering, and therefore: an effective parton structure function for the pion and the internal transverse momentum of these partons could be measured. 16 references

  12. Generation of sphere and shell laser fusion targets. Final report, October 1, 1976--November 30, 1977. Report No. 1-78

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate methods of fabricating sphere and shell laser fusion targets. A hollow hydrogen pellet generator has been constructed, and experiments have been performed to study the effects of system parameters on the production of hollow droplets. Techniques for coating hydrogen pellets with high Z material have been studied, and a system has been constructed to coat spherical solid hydrogen pellets with neon. A preliminary experiment has been performed to freeze the deuterium gas inside a glass microsphere using cold He gas jet. Based on this, two systems have been designed and are under construction to investigate methods of obtaining and retaining uniform D-T layer on the inside surface of a microsphere using cold gas jets

  13. Pneumatic pellet injectors for TFTR and JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the development of pneumatic hydrogen pellet injectors for plasma fueling applications on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET). The performance parameters of these injectors represent an extension of previous experience and include pellet sizes in the range 2-6 mm in diameter and speeds approaching 2 km/s. Design features and operating characteristics of these pneumatic injectors are presented

  14. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.; Lallia, P.; O'Hara, G.W.; Pollard, I.E.

    1987-06-01

    The paper presents the annual report of the Joint European Torus (JET) Joint Undertaking, 1986. The report is divided into two parts: a part on the scientific and technical programme of the project, and a part setting out the administration and organisation of the Project. The first part includes: a summary of the main features of the JET apparatus, the JET experimental programme, the position of the Project in the overall Euratom programme, and how JET relates to other large fusion devices throughout the world. In addition, the technical status of JET is described, as well as the results of the JET operations in 1986. The final section of the first part outlines the proposed future programme of JET. (U.K.)

  15. Jet substructure in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, David W

    2011-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the jet invariant mass and substructure in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 37 pb$^{-1}$. These results exercise the tools for distinguishing the signatures of new boosted massive particles in the hadronic final state. Two "fat" jet algorithms are used, along with the filtering jet grooming technique that was pioneered in ATLAS. New jet substructure observables are compared for the first time to data at the LHC. Finally, a sample of candidate boosted top quark events collected in the 2010 data is analyzed in detail for the jet substructure properties of hadronic "top-jets" in the final state. These measurements demonstrate not only our excellent understanding of QCD in a new energy regime but open the path to using complex jet substructure observables in the search for new physics.

  16. Rotation Effect on Jet Impingement Heat Transfer in Smooth Rectangular Channels with Film Coolant Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Parsons

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of channel rotation on jet impingement cooling by arrays of circular jets in twin channels was studied. Impinging jet flows were in the direction of rotation in one channel and opposite to the direction of rotation in the other channel. The jets impinged normally on the smooth, heated target wall in each channel. The spent air exited the channels through extraction holes in each target wall, which eliminates cross flow on other jets. Jet rotation numbers and jet Reynolds numbers varied from 0.0 to 0.0028 and 5000 to 10,000, respectively. For the target walls with jet flow in the direction of rotation (or opposite to the direction of rotation, as rotation number increases heat transfer decreases up to 25% (or 15% as compared to corresponding results for non-rotating conditions. This is due to the changes in flow distribution and rotation induced Coriolis and centrifugal forces.

  17. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  18. Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

  19. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  20. Novel laboratory simulations of astrophysical jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Parrish Clawson

    This thesis was motivated by the promise that some physical aspects of astrophysical jets and collimation processes can be scaled to laboratory parameters through hydrodynamic scaling laws. The simulation of astrophysical jet phenomena with laser-produced plasmas was attractive because the laser- target interaction can inject energetic, repeatable plasma into an external environment. Novel laboratory simulations of astrophysical jets involved constructing and using the YOGA laser, giving a 1064 nm, 8 ns pulse laser with energies up to 3.7 + 0.2 J . Laser-produced plasmas were characterized using Schlieren, interferometry and ICCD photography for their use in simulating jet and magnetosphere physics. The evolution of the laser-produced plasma in various conditions was compared with self-similar solutions and HYADES computer simulations. Millimeter-scale magnetized collimated outflows were produced by a centimeter scale cylindrically symmetric electrode configuration triggered by a laser-produced plasma. A cavity with a flared nozzle surrounded the center electrode and the electrode ablation created supersonic uncollimated flows. This flow became collimated when the center electrode changed from an anodeto a cathode. The plasma jets were in axially directed permanent magnetic fields with strengths up to 5000 Gauss. The collimated magnetized jets were 0.1-0. 3 cm wide, up to 2.0 cm long, and had velocities of ~4.0 × 10 6 cm/s. The dynamics of the evolution of the jet were compared qualitatively and quantitatively with fluxtube simulations from Bellan's formulation [6] giving a calculated estimate of ~2.6 × 10 6 cm/s for jet evolution velocity and evidence for jet rotation. The density measured with interferometry was 1.9 ± 0.2 × 10 17 cm -3 compared with 2.1 × 10 16 cm -3 calculated with Bellan's pressure balance formulation. Kinks in the jet column were produced consistent with the Kruskal-Shafranov condition which allowed stable and symmetric jets to form with

  1. Quantum-chemical study of antioxidant additives for jet fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletaeva, O.Yu. [Ufa State Petroleum Technological Univ., Ufa (Russian Federation); Karimova, R.I. [Bashkir State Agrarian Univ., Ufa (Russian Federation); Movsumzade, E.M. [Institute of Education of Indigenous Small-Numbered Peoples of the North RAE, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    To obtain the necessary quality of jet fuels it can be used technological methods (hydrocracking, deep hydration, hydrogenation) that increases the cost of the finished product. The second way is to use less purified raw materials with the introduction of effective additives. Fuels obtained by direct distillation, in ambient air are oxidized with great difficulty and oxidation products accumulate in them is very slow. Fuels derived by hydrogenation processes, have high susceptibility to oxidation, as a result in 1-2 years of storage considerably reduced their quality. Antioxidant additives play an important role in improving the quality of jet fuel. (orig.)

  2. On jet substructure methods for signal jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Mrinal [Consortium for Fundamental Physics, School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Manchester,Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Powling, Alexander [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Manchester,Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Siodmok, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences,ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); CERN, PH-TH,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-08-17

    We carry out simple analytical calculations and Monte Carlo studies to better understand the impact of QCD radiation on some well-known jet substructure methods for jets arising from the decay of boosted Higgs bosons. Understanding differences between taggers for these signal jets assumes particular significance in situations where they perform similarly on QCD background jets. As an explicit example of this we compare the Y-splitter method to the more recently proposed Y-pruning technique. We demonstrate how the insight we gain can be used to significantly improve the performance of Y-splitter by combining it with trimming and show that this combination outperforms the other taggers studied here, at high p{sub T}. We also make analytical estimates for optimal parameter values, for a range of methods and compare to results from Monte Carlo studies.

  3. Contradictions about Fine Structures in Meson Spectra and Proposed High-Resolution Hadron Spectrometer Using 'Interactive' Solid-State Hydrogen Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maglich, Bogdan C.

    2004-01-01

    High resolution has been discouraged in meson spectrometry for 4 decades by the Doctrine of Experiments Incompatible with Theory (DEIT). DEIT a priori rejects narrow hadron resonances on the paradigm that only broad hadron peaks, Γ≥ 100 MeV, can exist -- in spite of the accumulated evidence to the contrary. The facts are: Mesons 2 orders of magnitude narrower than 'allowed' for hadrons, have been confirmed; a new one was announced at this conference. Narrow meson structures have been repeatedly reported at high momentum transfer, vertical bar t vertical bar >0.2, while they are absent at the low transfer, vertical bar t vertical bar ∼0.01, where 99% of the experiments are performed. Modification of meson mass and width as a function of the density of nuclear matter in which they are produced, have been recently reported.We postulate for meson spectra: (1) Intrinsic ('true') width, Γ, is different from the observable ('apparent') width, Γ': Γ< Γ' (2) Γ of all meson states are narrow and can be observed only at or near the maximum vertical bar t vertical bar reachable in the reaction, and (3) Γ of all meson resonances are subject to broadening as vertical bar t vertical bar decreases. Since both Γ' and the production σ are inversely proportional to vertical bar t vertical ar, most of the observed spectra are produced at the lowest vertical bar t vertical bar <0.01 and thus the peaks appear broad. We have conceptually designed a novel type hadron spectrometer with an order of magnitude better resolution (0.1 MeV). It would operate at 2 orders of magnitude higher vertical bar t vertical bar (0.3< vertical bar t vertical bar <1 (GeV/c)2, than most experiments to date (vertical bar t vertical bar <0.01). Mesons in the mass region 0.5 < Mx<5 GeV would be produced in πP→PX (baryons in PP→PP*) in a 'solid state hydrogen target' consisting of an array of plastic scintillator fibers, CH; collisions with C are electronically rejected. Missing mass of P is

  4. Jet Substructure Without Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., ITP

    2011-08-19

    We present an alternative approach to identifying and characterizing jet substructure. An angular correlation function is introduced that can be used to extract angular and mass scales within a jet without reference to a clustering algorithm. This procedure gives rise to a number of useful jet observables. As an application, we construct a top quark tagging algorithm that is competitive with existing methods. In preparation for the LHC, the past several years have seen extensive work on various aspects of collider searches. With the excellent resolution of the ATLAS and CMS detectors as a catalyst, one area that has undergone significant development is jet substructure physics. The use of jet substructure techniques, which probe the fine-grained details of how energy is distributed in jets, has two broad goals. First, measuring more than just the bulk properties of jets allows for additional probes of QCD. For example, jet substructure measurements can be compared against precision perturbative QCD calculations or used to tune Monte Carlo event generators. Second, jet substructure allows for additional handles in event discrimination. These handles could play an important role at the LHC in discriminating between signal and background events in a wide variety of particle searches. For example, Monte Carlo studies indicate that jet substructure techniques allow for efficient reconstruction of boosted heavy objects such as the W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons, the top quark, and the Higgs boson.

  5. Jet quenching at ALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    RHIC results on leading hadron suppression indicate that the jets produced in hard processes are strongly quenched by the dense medium created in heavy ion collisions. Most of the energy lost by the leading parton remains within the jet cone, but several questions on the medium modification of the jet structure have not been addressed. These include the longitudinal and transverse structures of the quenched jet, the associated radiation observables, and the dependence on the parton flavor. These topics will be studied by ALICE thanks to both the robustness of its tracking and the charged particle identification system. Large medium effects are expected in both the low pt and in the high pt regions. To make ALICE better suited for jet physics, the performances on high p t particles and jets can be significantly improved by completing the present set-up with a large Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EmCal). This will significantly improve the resolution on the jet energy and on the particle composition (with the detection of both charged and neutral particles). It will also allow to calibrate the jet energy by measuring the high energy photon emitted in the opposite direction. EmCal will be used to trigger on the jet energy itself, thus allowing a significant improvement of the statistics achievable for jets of high energy. Finally, due too both the γ/π 0 and the electron/hadron discrimination, EmCal will enhance the ALICE capabilities at high p t for direct photons and heavy quarks measurements

  6. Jets in Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Tim

    2018-05-01

    Jet streams, "jets" for short, are remarkably coherent streams of air found in every major atmosphere. They have a profound effect on a planet's global circulation, and have been an enigma since the belts and zones of Jupiter were discovered in the 1600s. The study of jets, including what processes affect their size, strength, direction, shear stability, and predictability, are active areas of research in geophysical fluid dynamics. Jet research is multidisciplinary and global, involving collaborations between observers, experimentalists, numerical modelers, and applied mathematicians. Jets in atmospheres have strong analogies with shear instability in nonneutral plasmas, and these connections are highlighted throughout the article. The article begins with a description of four major challenges that jet researchers face: nonlinearity, non-intuitive wave physics, non-constant-coefficients, and copious nondimensional numbers. Then, two general fluid-dynamical tenets, the practice of rendering expressions dimensionally homogeneous (nondimensional), and the universal properties of shocks are applied to the open question of what controls the on-off switch of shear instability. The discussion progresses to how the physics of jets varies in equatorial, midlatitude, and polar regions, and how jets are observed to behave in each of these settings. The all-in-one conservation law of potential vorticity (PV), which combines the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and thermal energy into a single expression, is the common language of jet research. Earth and Uranus have weak retrograde equatorial jets, but most planets exhibit super-rotating equatorial jets, which require eddies to transport momentum up gradient in a non-intuitive manner. Jupiter and Saturn exhibit multiple alternating jets in their midlatitudes. The theory for why jets are invariably zonal (east-west orientated) is reviewed, and the particular challenges that Jupiter's sharp westward jets present to existing

  7. Design choices and issues in fixed-target B experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, L.

    1993-01-01

    The main priority of any experiment on B physics in the years to come will be an endeavour to observe CP violation in the B sector. Such measurements imply the following requirements of the experiment. Trigger: a muon trigger will be sensitive to J/ψ reactions and muon tags; an electron trigger will double the number of lepton events; in order to include kaon tags and self-tagging reactions, the experiment must not rely entirely on lepton triggers. Secondary Vertex triggers and hadron p T triggers should be included in order to have the maximum flexibility. Detector: vertex detector; particle identification; good momentum resolution; electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters; muon detector. In addition the following issues have to be addressed: Collider or fixed-target mode? If fixed target, extracted beam or internal target? If internal target, gas jet or wire target? If a gas jet, hydrogen or a heavy gas? Beam pipe design. Silicon microvertex design and radiation damage. K s 0 decay path. Particle identification. Momentum resolution. Order of detectors. No single method stands out as the open-quotes obvious one.close quotes An extracted beam yields better vertex resolution and an internal target easier triggering. A flexible and diverse triggering scheme is of prime importance in order to be sensitive to as many reactions as possible, the experiment should not be limited to lepton triggers only. Proposed experiments (P867, HERA B) at existing machines will be invaluable for testing new devices and strategies for the LHC and SSC experiments

  8. Phenomenology of jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, T.F.

    1980-05-01

    The basic idea of these lectures is very simple. Quarks and gluons - the elementary quanta of quantum chromodynamics or QCD - are produced with perturbarively calculable rates in short distance processes. This is because of asymptotic freedom. These quanta produced at short distances are, in a sense, 'visible' as jets of hadrons. (The jets do not contain the colored QCD quanta if - as we will assume - color is confined. The jets contain only colorless hadrons.) The distribution of these jets is the distribution of the original quanta, apart from fluctuations generated in the (long distance) jet formation process. The distribution of the jets can thus thest QCD in a particularly clear way at the parton level, at distance of order 5 x 10 -16 cm (PETRA/PEP energies). (orig.)

  9. A turbulent radio jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, F.D.

    1983-01-01

    A relativistic plasma flow can explain many of the observations on the one-sided jets, which are associated with radio sources that show superluminal motions in their cores. The pressure from the ambient medium will communicate across the jet in a relatively short distance, typically 30 kpc. The friction between the jet and the external medium then makes the flow go turbulent. As a result the jet dissipates energy and will be brought to rest within a few hundred kpc, if it does not strike an obstacle before. The mean flow in the jet is strongly sheared and stretches the lines of force of any magnetic field frozen into the plasma. The dominant field direction, as seen from the rest frame of the plasma, is therefore parallel to the length of the jet. Polarization measurements have shown that this is in fact the case. (author)

  10. Effect of hydrogen addition on autoignited methane lifted flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choin, Byung Chul

    2012-01-01

    Autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets with hydrogen-enriched methane fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. The results showed that the autoignited lifted flame of the methane/hydrogen mixture, which had an initial temperature over 920 K, the threshold temperature for autoignition in methane jets, exhibited features typical of either a tribrachial edge or mild combustion depending on fuel mole fraction and the liftoff height increased with jet velocity. The liftoff height in the hydrogen-assisted autoignition regime was dependent on the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time for the addition of small amounts of hydrogen, as was the case for pure methane jets. When the initial temperature was below 920 K, where the methane fuel did not show autoignition behavior, the flame was autoignited by the addition of hydrogen, which is an ignition improver. The liftoff height demonstrated a unique feature in that it decreased nonlinearly as the jet velocity increased. The differential diffusion of hydrogen is expected to play a crucial role in the decrease in the liftoff height with increasing jet velocity.

  11. Hydrogen distribution in a containment with a high-velocity hydrogen-steam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, G.R.; Muhlestein, L.D.; Postma, A.K.; Claybrook, S.W.

    1982-09-01

    Hydrogen mixing and distribution tests are reported for a modeled high velocity hydrogen-steam release from a postulated small pipe break or release from a pressurizer relief tank rupture disk into the lower compartment of an Ice Condenser Plant. The tests, which in most cases used helium as a simulant for hydrogen, demonstrated that the lower compartment gas was well mixed for both hydrogen release conditions used. The gas concentration differences between any spatial locations were less than 3 volume percent during the hydrogen/steam release period and were reduced to less than 0.5 volume percent within 20 minutes after termination of the hydrogen source. The high velocity hydrogen/steam jet provided the dominant mixing mechanism; however, natural convection and forced air recirculation played important roles in providing a well mixed atmosphere following termination of the hydrogen source. 5 figures, 4 tables

  12. Modelling of Turbulent Lifted Jet Flames using flamelets: a priori assessment and a posteriori validation

    OpenAIRE

    Ruan, S; Swaminathan, Nedunchezhian; Darbyshire, O

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the modelling of turbulent lifted jet flames using flamelets and presumed PDF approach with interests on both flame lift-off height and flame brush structure. First, flamelet models used to capture contributions from premixed and non-premixed modes to the partially premixed combustion in the lifted jet flame are assessed using a Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data for turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame. The joint PDFs of mixture fraction, Z, and progress ...

  13. Hadronic jets an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Banfi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Jet physics is an incredibly rich subject detailing the narrow cone of hadrons and other particles produced by the hadronization of a quark or gluon in a particle physics or heavy ion experiment. This book is a general overview of jet physics for scientists not directly involved in the field. It presents the basic experimental and theoretical problems arising when dealing with jets, and describing the solutions proposed in recent years.

  14. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.

    1988-03-01

    The paper is a JET progress report 1987, and covers the fourth full year of JET's operation. The report contains an overview summary of the scientific and technical advances during the year, and is supplemented by appendices of detailed contributions of the more important JET articles published during 1987. The document is aimed at specialists and experts engaged in nuclear fusion and plasma physics, as well as the general scientific community. (U.K.)

  15. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-03-01

    This plan details the goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks and schedule for EERE's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen Program. Similar detailed plans exist for the other DOE offices that make up the Hydrogen Program.

  16. Low-Z material for limiters and wall surfaces in JET: beryllium and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Hugon, M.; Booth, S.J.; Dean, J.R.; Dietz, K.J.; Sonnenberg, K.; Watkins, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The relative merits of graphite and beryllium, as a low-Z material for limiters and wall surfaces in JET, are compared. A consideration of data on thermomechanical properties, retention of hydrogen and gettering action, indicates that beryllium offers the best prospects as a material for the JET belt limiters and walls. (U.K.)

  17. Optical characteristics of a RF DBD plasma jet in various A r / O 2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Using the optical emission spectrum analysis of the RF plasma jet, the excitation temperature is determined based on the Boltzmann plot method. The electron density in the plasma medium of the RF plasma jet is obtained by the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer H β . It is mostly seen that, the radiation intensity of Ar ...

  18. and Jet Power/Emission in AGNs Zhongzu Wu1,∗ , Minfeng Gu2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Neutral hydrogen (HI) 21-cm absorption has been detected against very powerful radio jets. In this paper, based on Gupta's sample. (Gupta et al. 2006), we present our preliminary study of the correlations between the HI column density N(HI) and the jet power, N(HI) versus the low frequency luminosity at 408 MHz, ...

  19. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  20. Properties of gluon jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, K.

    1987-01-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed, and the measured characteristics are compared to the theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, in general the agreement between experiment and theory is remarkable. There are some intriguing differences. Since the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on our understanding of QCD. Finally, the future prospects are discussed

  1. Properties of gluon jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, K.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of gluon jets are reviewed from an experimental point of view. The measured characteristics are compared to theoretical expectations. Although neither data nor models for the gluon jets are in the mature stage, there are remarkable agreements and also intriguing disagreements between experiment and theory. Since much interesting data have begun to emerge from various experiments and the properties of gluon jets are deeply rooted in the basic structure of non-Abelian gauge theory, the study of gluon jets casts further light on understanding of QCD. The future prospects are discussed

  2. Are jets really there

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillethun, E.

    1976-09-01

    Based on the results of high energy proton-proton collisions obtained at the CERN ISR in 1972-73, the production of 'jets' is discussed. Jets in e + e - collisions are also discussed and the parameters 'sphericity' and 'rapidity' are used in analysis of the data. The jets studied have been defined as having at least one particle of high transverse momentum. It is not clear whether the jets represent new physics or are another way of stating that resonances (rho,K*, Δ, N* etc.) are produced with high p(sub T), and that in such production the high transverse momentum must be balanced essentially locally in the collision. (JIW)

  3. Direct-injection strategies for a hydrogen-fueled engine : an optical and numerical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, S.; Salazar, V. [Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scarcelli, R.; Wallner, T. [Argonne National Lab, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Vehicles with hydrogen-fueled engines are competitive with systems based on fuel cells. There is a lack of fundamental knowledge about in-cylinder processes in hydrogen direct injection engines. This presentation discussed a study that used a variety of injector configurations to establish a broad database. A light-load conditions that can profit from stratification was investigated. Several results were presented, including the 5-hole nozzle produced an asymmetric jet pattern which may be good for late injection. Very lean regions in the wake of the transient jets were found to be similar to those found in diesel injection. The 13-hole nozzle demonstrated complete jet collapse, consistent with Schlieren imaging by Petersen. Stratification made efficiency sensitive to the targeting of the single-hole injector. Computational fluid dynamics with a commercially available code aimed to improve the process of design optimization. The simulation predicted less fuel dispersion than was experimentally measured. Details of the fuel penetration were captured. It was concluded that for the single-hole nozzle, the pre-spark fuel distribution is consistent with results from the fired engine. tabs., figs.

  4. Hydrogen storage in Mg: a most promising material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, I.P.; Jain, A.; Lal, C.

    2009-01-01

    In the last one decade hydrogen has attracted worldwide interest as an energy carrier. This has generated comprehensive investigations on the technology involved and how to solve the problems of production, storage and applications of hydrogen. The interest in hydrogen as energy of the future is due to it being a clean energy, most abundant element in the universe, the lightest fuel and richest in energy per unit mass. Hydrogen as a fuel can be used to cook food, drive cars, jet planes, run factories and for all our domestic energy requirements. It can provide cheap electricity. In short, hydrogen shows the solution and also allows the progressive and non-traumatic transition of today's energy sources, towards feasible safe reliable and complete sustainable energy chains. The present article deals with the hydrogen storage in metal hydrides with particular interest in Mg as it has potential to become one of the most promising storage materials. Many metals combine chemically with Hydrogen to form a class of compounds known as Hydrides. These hydrides can discharge hydrogen as and when needed by raising their temperature or pressure. An optimum hydrogen-storage material is required to have various properties viz. high hydrogen capacity per unit mass and unit volume which determines the amount of available energy, low dissociation temperature, moderate dissociation pressure, low heat of formation in order to minimize the energy necessary for hydrogen release, low heat dissipation during the exothermic hydride formation, reversibility, limited energy loss during charge and discharge of hydrogen, fast kinetics, high stability against O 2 and moisture for long cycle life, cyclibility, low cost of recycling and charging infrastructures and high safety. So far most of the hydrogen storage alloys such as LaNi 5 , TiFe, TiMn 2 , have hydrogen storage capacities, not more than 2 wt% which is not satisfactory for practical application as per DOE Goal. A group of Mg based

  5. Jet mass spectra in Higgs+one jet at NNLL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouttenus, Teppo T.; Stewart, Iain W.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2013-02-01

    The invariant mass of a jet is a benchmark variable describing the structure of jets at the LHC. We calculate the jet mass spectrum for Higgs plus one jet at the LHC at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order using a factorization formula. At this order, the cross section becomes sensitive to perturbation theory at the soft m 2 jet /p jet T scale. Our calculation is exclusive and uses the 1-jettiness global event shape to implement a veto on additional jets. The dominant dependence on the jet veto is removed by normalizing the spectrum, leaving residual dependence from non-global logarithms depending on the ratio of the jet mass and jet veto variables. For our exclusive jet cross section these non-global logarithms are parametrically smaller than in the inclusive case, allowing us to obtain a complete NNLL result. Results for the dependence of the jet mass spectrum on the kinematics, jet algorithm, and jet size R are given. Using individual partonic channels we illustrate the difference between the jet mass spectra for quark and gluon jets. We also study the effect of hadronization and underlying event on the jet mass in Pythia. To highlight the similarity of inclusive and exclusive jet mass spectra, a comparison to LHC data is presented.

  6. Jet mass spectra in Higgs+one jet at NNLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouttenus, Teppo T.; Stewart, Iain W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics; Tackmann, Frank J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Waalewijn, Wouter J. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2013-02-15

    The invariant mass of a jet is a benchmark variable describing the structure of jets at the LHC. We calculate the jet mass spectrum for Higgs plus one jet at the LHC at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order using a factorization formula. At this order, the cross section becomes sensitive to perturbation theory at the soft m{sup 2}{sub jet}/p{sup jet}{sub T} scale. Our calculation is exclusive and uses the 1-jettiness global event shape to implement a veto on additional jets. The dominant dependence on the jet veto is removed by normalizing the spectrum, leaving residual dependence from non-global logarithms depending on the ratio of the jet mass and jet veto variables. For our exclusive jet cross section these non-global logarithms are parametrically smaller than in the inclusive case, allowing us to obtain a complete NNLL result. Results for the dependence of the jet mass spectrum on the kinematics, jet algorithm, and jet size R are given. Using individual partonic channels we illustrate the difference between the jet mass spectra for quark and gluon jets. We also study the effect of hadronization and underlying event on the jet mass in Pythia. To highlight the similarity of inclusive and exclusive jet mass spectra, a comparison to LHC data is presented.

  7. Liquid jets for fast plasma termination in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbluth, M.N.; Putvinskij, S.V.; Parks, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    Recent simulations by Putvisnkij et al. (PSI Conference, 1996) have shown that introducing impurities into the plasma in order to mitigate adverse disruption effects in ITER may actually be deleterious because of a potentially unwelcome phenomenon: generation of multi-MeV runaway electrons by the collisional avalanche mechanism (Rosenbluth, M.N., et al., in Fusion Energy 1996 (Proc. 16th Int. Conf. Montreal, 1996) Vol. 2, IAEA, Vienna (in press) Paper FP-26). The injection of a liquid hydrogen jet to deliver a massive density increase is proposed as a means of avoiding runaways, while providing the same beneficial effects as impurities. A discussion of many jet related topics, such as ablation/penetration, jet breakup time and stability, is presented. Owing to an ablation pressure instability, it is predicted that the jet will quickly break up into a regular chain of droplets with dimensions of approximately the size of the jet radius. It is found that while deep penetration in the plasma can easily be achieved, bubble growth and disruptive boiling (flashing) during the propagation in the vacuum gap between the nozzle exit and the plasma are the main processes limiting the jet survival time. Calculations indicate that for ITER reference parameters, the jet can remain coherent in vacuum for a distance ∼ 1 m before disintegrating. On the basis of this present understanding, the prospect for the safe termination of ITER discharges by high density liquid jet injection appears promising. (author). 20 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  8. Hydrogen converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina developed a process of 99 Mo production from fission, based on irradiation of uranium aluminide targets with thermal neutrons in the RA-3 reactor of the Ezeiza Atomic Centre. These targets are afterwards dissolved in an alkaline solution, with the consequent liberation of hydrogen as the main gaseous residue. This work deals with the use of a first model of metallic converter and a later prototype of glass converter at laboratory scale, adjusted to the requirements and conditions of the specific redox process. Oxidized copper wires were used, which were reduced to elementary copper at 400 C degrees and then regenerated by oxidation with hot air. Details of the bed structure and the operation conditions are also provided. The equipment required for the assembling in cells is minimal and, taking into account the operation final temperature and the purge with nitrogen, the procedure is totally safe. Finally, the results are extrapolated for the design of a converter to be used in a hot cell. (author)

  9. Jets from Young Stars in Cygnus-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    How do you spot very young, newly formed stars? One giveaway is the presence of jets and outflows that interact with the stars environments. In a new study, scientists have now discovered an unprecedented number of these outflows in a nearby star-forming region of our galaxy.Young Stars Hard at WorkCO map of the Cygnus-X region of the galactic plane, with the grid showing the UWISH2 coverage and the black triangles showing the positions of the detected outflows. [Makin Froebrich 2018]The birth and evolution of young stars is a dynamic, energetic process. As new stars form, material falls inward from the accretion disks surrounding young stellar objects, or YSOs. This material can power collimated streams of gas and dust that flow out along the stars rotation axes, plowing through the surrounding material. Where the outflows collide with the outside environment, shocks form that can be spotted in near-infrared hydrogen emission.Though weve learned a lot about these outflows, there remain a number of open questions. What factors govern their properties, such as their lengths, luminosities, and orientations? What is the origin of the emission features we see within the jets, known as knots? What roles do the driving sources and the environments play in the behavior and appearance of the jets?A selection of previously unknown outflows discovered as a result of this survey. Click for a closer look. [Makin Froebrich 2018]To answer these questions, we need to build a large, unbiased statistical sample of YSOs from across the galactic plane. Now, a large infrared survey known as the UKIRT Widefield Infrared Survey for H2 (UWISH2) is working toward that goal.Jackpot in Cygnus-XIn a recent publication, Sally Makin and Dirk Froebrich (University of Kent, UK), present results from UWISH2s latest release: a survey segment targeting a 42-square-degree region in the galactic plane known as the Cygnus-X star-forming region.The teams search for shock-excited emission in Cygnus

  10. Jet physics in ALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loizides, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    The ALICE experiment is one of the experiments currently prepared for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva, starting operation end of 2007. ALICE is dedicated to the research on nucleus-nucleus collisions at ultra-relativistic energies, which addresses the properties of strongly interacting matter under varying conditions of high density and temperature. The conditions provided at the LHC allow significant qualitative improvement with respect to previous studies. In particular, energetic probes, light quarks and gluons, will be abundantly produced. These probes might be identified by their fragmentation into correlated particles, so called jets, of high enough energy to allow full reconstruction of jet properties; even in the underlying heavy-ion environment. Understanding the dependence of high-energy jet production and fragmentation influenced by the dense medium created in the collision region is an open field of active research. Generally, one expects energy loss of the probes due to medium-induced gluon radiation. It is suggested that hadronization products of these, rather soft gluons may be contained within the jet emission cone, resulting in a modification of the characteristic jet fragmentation, as observed via longitudinal and transverse momentum distributions with respect to the direction of the initial parton, as well as of the multiplicity distributions arising from the jet fragmentation. Particle momenta parallel to the jet axis are softened (jet quenching), while transverse to it increased (transverse heating). The present thesis studies the capabilities of the ALICE detectors to measure these jets and quantifies obtainable rates and the quality of jet reconstruction, in both proton-proton and lead-lead collisions at the LHC. In particular, it is addressed whether modification of the jet fragmentation can be detected within the high-particle-multiplicity environment of central lead-lead collisions. (orig.)

  11. Deformations of free jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruchuri, Srinivas

    This thesis studies three different problems. First we demonstrate that a flowing liquid jet can be controllably split into two separate subfilaments through the applications of a sufficiently strong tangential stress to the surface of the jet. In contrast, normal stresses can never split a liquid jet. We apply these results to observations of uncontrolled splitting of jets in electric fields. The experimental realization of controllable jet splitting would provide an entirely novel route for producing small polymeric fibers. In the second chapter we present an analytical model for the bending of liquid jets and sheets from temperature gradients, as recently observed by Chwalek et al. [Phys. Fluids, 14, L37 (2002)]. The bending arises from a local couple caused by Marangoni forces. The dependence of the bending angle on experimental parameters is presented, in qualitative agreement with reported experiments. The methodology gives a simple framework for understanding the mechanisms for jet and sheet bending. In chapter 4 we address the discrepancy between hydrodynamic theory of liquid jets, and the snap-off of narrow liquid jets observed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations [23]. This has been previously attributed to the significant role of thermal fluctuations in nanofluidic systems. We argue that hydrodynamic description of such systems should include corrections to the Laplace pressure which result from the failure of the sharp interface assumption when the jet diameter becomes small enough. We show that this effect can in principle give rise to jet shapes similar to those observed in MD simulations, even when thermal fluctuations are completely neglected. Finally we summarize an algorithm developed to simulate droplet impact on a smooth surface.

  12. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  13. The scientific success of JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keilhacker, M.; Gibson, A.; Gormezano, C.; Rebut, P.H.

    2001-01-01

    The paper highlights the JET work in physics and technology during the period of the JET Joint Undertaking (1978-1999), with special emphasis on what has been learned for extrapolation to a NEXT STEP device. - Global confinement scaling has been extended to high currents and heating powers. Dimensionless scaling experiments of ELMy H mode plasmas suggest that bulk plasma transport is gyro-Bohm and predict ignition for a device with ITER-FDR parameters. Experiments in which the plasma elongation and triangularity were varied independently show a strong increase of confinement time with elongation (τ E ∼κ α 0.8±0.3 ), thus supporting a basic design principle of ITER-FEAT. With the Pellet Enhanced Performance (PEP) mode, JET has discovered the beneficial effect of reversed magnetic shear on confinement, opening the possibility of advanced tokamak scenarios. - With a three stage programme of progressively more closed divertors, JET has demonstrated the benefits of divertor closure, in particular, of high divertor neutral pressure which facilitates helium removal. It has also shown that in detached (or semidetached) radiative divertor plasmas the average power load on the target plates of a NEXT STEP device should be tolerable but, in addition, that the transient power loads during ELMs could cause problems. - In 1991 JET has demonstrated the first ever controlled production of a megawatt of fusion power. More extensive D-T experiments in 1997 (DTE1) have established new records in fusion performance: 16 MW transient fusion power with Q in =0.62 (i.e. close to breakeven, Q in =1) and 4 MW steady state fusion power with Q in =0.18 for 4 s. DTE1 has also allowed a successful test of various reactor ICRF heating schemes and a clear demonstration of alpha particle heating, consistent with classical expectations. - JET has developed and tested some of the most important technologies for a NEXT STEP and a reactor, in particular the safe handling of tritium and the

  14. Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

  15. Quark jets, gluon jets and the three-gluon vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fodor, Z.

    1989-11-01

    Using hadronic jets in electron-positron annihilation, we suggest a simple and model-independent method to see the differences between quark and gluon jets. We define and analyse special energy dependent moments of jets and choose those which are the most characteristic to the jet type. The method handles the energy of a jet in an adequate way. We discuss new methods using jet flavor tagging, ordinary flavor tagging of a definite quark jet or discrimination between quark and gluon jets, to test the triple-gluon vertex in electron-positron annihilation. An enriched sample of gluon jets, jets with the smallest energy in four-jet events, as well as a continuous tagging variable are also studied. 21 refs., 6 figs. (Author)

  16. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.

    1987-03-01

    The paper presents the progress report of the Joint European Torus (JET) Joint Undertaking, 1986. The report contains a survey of the scientific and technical achievements on JET during 1986; the more important articles referred to in this survey are reproduced as appendices to this Report. The last section discusses developments which might improve the overall performance of the machine. (U.K.)

  17. Detritiation studies for JET decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevezentsev, A.N.; Bell, A.C.; Williams, J.; Brennan, P.D. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fussion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01

    JET is the world largest tokamak and has the capacity of operating with a tritium plasma. Three experimental campaigns, the Preliminary Tritium Experiment (0.1g T{sub 2}) in 1991, the Trace Tritium Experiment (5g T{sub 2}) in 2005, and the large experiment, the Deuterium-Tritium Experiment (DTE1) (100g T{sub 2}) in 1997, were carried out at JET with tritium plasmas. In DTE1 about 35 grams of tritium were fed directly into the vacuum vessel, with about 30% of this tritium being retained inside the vessel. In several years time JET will cease experimental operations and enter a decommissioning phase. In preparation for this the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, the JET Operator, has been carrying out studies of various detritiation techniques. The materials which have been the subject of these studies include solid materials, such as various metals (Inconel 600 and 625, stainless steel 316L, beryllium, 'oxygen-free' copper, aluminium bronze), carbon fibre composite tiles, 'carbon' flakes and dust present in the vacuum vessel and also soft housekeeping materials. Liquid materials include organic liquids, such as vacuum oils and scintillation cocktails, and water. Detritiation of gas streams was also investigated. The purpose of the studies was to select and experimentally prove primary and auxiliary technologies for in-situ detritiation of in-vessel components and ex-situ detritiation of components removed from the vessel. The targets of ex-vessel detritiation were a reduction of the tritium inventory in and the rate of tritium out-gassing from the materials, and conversion, if possible, of intermediate level waste to low level waste and a reduction in volume of waste for disposal. The results of experimental trials and their potential application are presented. (orig.)

  18. A measurement of the A-dependence of the J/PSI cross section by comparing data on hydrogen and tungsten targets at 39.5 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corden, M.J.; Dowell, J.D.; Garvey, J.; Homer, R.J.; Jobes, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; McMahon, T.J.; Owen, R.C.; Sumorok, K.C.T.; Vallance, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    J/PSI production on hydrogen and tungsten targets has been compared at 39.5 GeV/c and the variation of the A-dependence of the J/PSI cross section as a function of psub(t) 2 and xsub(F) has been measured. The A-dependence parameter, α, rises with increasing p 2 2 and falls with increasing xsub(F). Both effects are shown not to be due to the Fermi motion of nucleons in the tungsten nucleus. (orig.)

  19. Jet physics at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E T jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at √s = 1800 GeV with ∼ 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The summation E T cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at √s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with √s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions

  20. Jet physics in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic jets provide tests of strong interactions which are interesting both in their own right and as backgrounds to many New Physics searches. It is also through tests of Quantum Chromodynamics that new physics may be discovered. The extensive dataset recorded with the ATLAS detector throughout the 7 TeV centre-of-mass LHC operation period allows QCD to be probed at distances never reached before. We present a review of selected ATLAS jet performance and physics measurements, together with results from new physics searches using the 2011 dataset. They include studies of the underlying event and fragmentation models, measurements of the inclusive jet, dijet and multijet cross sections, parton density functions, heavy flavours, jet shape, mass and substructure. Searches for new physics in monojet, dijet and photon-jet final states are also presented.

  1. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  2. Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-01

    This document outlines activities for educating key target audiences, as suggested by workshop participants. Held December 4-5, 2002, the Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop kicked off a new education effort coordinated by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  3. Autoignited laminar lifted flames of methane/hydrogen mixtures in heated coflow air

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2012-04-01

    Autoignited lifted flame behavior in laminar jets of methane/hydrogen mixture fuels has been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. Three regimes of autoignited lifted flames were identified depending on initial temperature and hydrogen to methane ratio. At relatively high initial temperature, addition of a small amount of hydrogen to methane improved ignition appreciably such that the liftoff height decreased significantly. In this hydrogen-assisted autoignition regime, the liftoff height increased with jet velocity, and the characteristic flow time - defined as the ratio of liftoff height to jet velocity - correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time. At lower temperature, the autoignited lifted flame demonstrated a unique feature in that the liftoff height decreased with increasing jet velocity. Such behavior has never been observed in lifted laminar and turbulent jet flames. A transition regime existed between these two regimes at intermediate temperature. © 2011 The Combustion Institute.

  4. Jets and QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Kramer, G.

    2010-12-01

    The observation of quark and gluon jets has played a crucial role in establishing Quantum Chromodynamics [QCD] as the theory of the strong interactions within the Standard Model of particle physics. The jets, narrowly collimated bundles of hadrons, reflect configurations of quarks and gluons at short distances. Thus, by analysing energy and angular distributions of the jets experimentally, the properties of the basic constituents of matter and the strong forces acting between them can be explored. In this review we summarise the properties of quark and gluon jets and the impact of their observation on Quantum Chromodynamics, primarily the discovery of the gluons as the carriers of the strong force. Focusing on these basic points, jets in e + e - collisions will be in the foreground of the discussion. In addition we will delineate the role of jets as tools for exploring other particle aspects in ep and pp/p anti p collisions - quark and gluon densities in protons, measurements of the QCD coupling, fundamental 2-2 quark/gluon scattering processes, but also the impact of jet decays of top quarks, and W ± ,Z bosons on the electroweak sector. The presentation to a large extent is formulated in a non-technical language with the intent to recall the significant steps historically and convey the significance of this field also to communities beyond high energy physics. (orig.)

  5. Jets and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kramer, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2010-12-15

    The observation of quark and gluon jets has played a crucial role in establishing Quantum Chromodynamics [QCD] as the theory of the strong interactions within the Standard Model of particle physics. The jets, narrowly collimated bundles of hadrons, reflect configurations of quarks and gluons at short distances. Thus, by analysing energy and angular distributions of the jets experimentally, the properties of the basic constituents of matter and the strong forces acting between them can be explored. In this review we summarise the properties of quark and gluon jets and the impact of their observation on Quantum Chromodynamics, primarily the discovery of the gluons as the carriers of the strong force. Focusing on these basic points, jets in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions will be in the foreground of the discussion. In addition we will delineate the role of jets as tools for exploring other particle aspects in ep and pp/p anti p collisions - quark and gluon densities in protons, measurements of the QCD coupling, fundamental 2-2 quark/gluon scattering processes, but also the impact of jet decays of top quarks, and W{sup {+-}},Z bosons on the electroweak sector. The presentation to a large extent is formulated in a non-technical language with the intent to recall the significant steps historically and convey the significance of this field also to communities beyond high energy physics. (orig.)

  6. Jet angularity measurements for single inclusive jet production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Lee, Kyle; Ringer, Felix

    2018-04-01

    We study jet angularity measurements for single-inclusive jet production at the LHC. Jet angularities depend on a continuous parameter a allowing for a smooth interpolation between different traditional jet shape observables. We establish a factorization theorem within Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) where we consistently take into account in- and out-of-jet radiation by making use of semi-inclusive jet functions. For comparison, we elaborate on the differences to jet angularities measured on an exclusive jet sample. All the necessary ingredients for the resummation at next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL) accuracy are presented within the effective field theory framework. We expect semiinclusive jet angularity measurements to be feasible at the LHC and we present theoretical predictions for the relevant kinematic range. In addition, we investigate the potential impact of jet angularities for quark-gluon discrimination.

  7. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  8. Intermediate PT jet spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutay, L.J.; Koltick, D.; Hauptman, J.; Stork, D.; Theodosiou, G.

    1988-01-01

    A design is presented for a limited solid angle, high resolution double arm spectrometer at 90 degree to the begin, with a vertex detector and particle identification in both arms. The jet arm is designed to accept a complete jet, and identify its substructure of sub-jets, hadrons, and leptons. The particle arm would measure e,π,K,p ratios for P T 0 to the beam for the purpose of tagging Higgs production by boson fusion, 1 gauge boson (WW, ZZ, and WZ) scattering 2 L, and other processes involving the interactions of virtual gauge bosons

  9. Latest results from JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) is a large tokamak designed with the essential objective of obtaining and studying plasmas with parameters close to those envisaged for an eventual power-generating, nuclear-fusion reactor. JET is situated on a site near Abingdon, Oxon, UK. JET is the largest single project of the nuclear fusion research programme of the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). The tokamak started operation in mid 1983 after a five year construction period. The scientific and technical results achieved so far are summarised in this article. (orig.)

  10. Oscillating acoustic streaming jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moudjed, Brahim; Botton, Valery; Henry, Daniel; Millet, Severine; Ben Hadid, Hamda; Garandet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    The present paper provides the first experimental investigation of an oscillating acoustic streaming jet. The observations are performed in the far field of a 2 MHz circular plane ultrasound transducer introduced in a rectangular cavity filled with water. Measurements are made by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in horizontal and vertical planes near the end of the cavity. Oscillations of the jet appear in this zone, for a sufficiently high Reynolds number, as an intermittent phenomenon on an otherwise straight jet fluctuating in intensity. The observed perturbation pattern is similar to that of former theoretical studies. This intermittently oscillatory behavior is the first step to the transition to turbulence. (authors)

  11. Using NEG-pumping near a high density internal target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Alexander; Marton, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard; Zmeskal, Johann [Stefan Meyer Institut fuer Subatomare Physik, OeAW (Germany); Orth, Herbert [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The universal detector PANDA will be constructed at the future high-energy antiproton storage ring HESR at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, GSI/Darmstadt). It will use antiproton beams (1.5 to 15 GeV/c) for hadron physics in the charmonium region. The Stefan Meyer Institut (SMI) contributes to major parts of the PANDA detector like the hydrogen cluster-jet target and the vacuum system of the antiproton - target interaction zone. To ensure low background, the residual gas load in the interaction zone and in the antiproton beam-pipe has to be minimised. Most of the gas load will come from the high density internal hydrogen target. As the detector will cover almost the full solid angle, the installation of pumps near the interaction zone is impossible. Therefore the use of NEG (non-evaporative-getter) coated beam pipes has been considered as an alternative. Two setups with NEG coated tubes have been installed at SMI as prototypes of the PANDA interaction zone. General parameters of the NEG-film, its outgassing behaviour, the pumping speed and the pumping capacity for hydrogen have been tested. The results of the studies on the PANDA-interaction region are presented.

  12. Using NEG-pumping near a high density internal target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Orth, H.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Stefan Meyer Institut (SMI) is part of the international PANDA collaboration. The universal detector will be constructed at the future high-energy antiproton storage ring HESR at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, GSI/Darmstadt). PANDA will use antiproton beams (1.5 to 15 GeV/c) for hadron physics in the charmonium region. SMI contributes to major parts of the PANDA detector like the hydrogen cluster-jet target and the vacuum system of the antiproton - target interaction zone. To ensure low background, the residual gas load in the interaction zone and in the antiproton beam-pipe has to be minimized. Most of the gas load, of course will come from the high density internal hydrogen target. Since the PANDA detector will cover almost the full solid angle, the installation of pumps near the interaction zone is impossible. Therefore, the use of NEG (non-evaporative-getter) coated beam pipes has been considered as an alternative. Two setups with NEG coated tubes have been installed at SMI as prototypes of the PANDA interaction zone. The outgassing behavior, the pumping speed and the pumping capacity for hydrogen have been tested. The status of the studies of the interaction region will be presented. (author)

  13. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  14. Proton emission from thin hydrogenated targets irradiated by laser pulses at 10.sup.16./sup. W/cm.sup.2./sup

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Cirrone, P.; Picciotto, A.; Krása, Josef; Margarone, Daniele; Velyhan, Andriy; Láska, Leoš; Ullschmied, Jiří; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 2 (2012), "02B315-1"-"02B315-4" ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : harmonics * hydrogenation * iodine * ion emission * laser beam effects * plasma materials processing * proton production * semiconductor counters Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.602, year: 2012

  15. Energy: the solar hydrogen alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocheris, J O.M.

    1977-01-01

    The author argues that nuclear and solar energy should begin replacing conventional fossil sources as soon as possible because oil, gas and even coal supplies will be depleted within decades. A hydrogen economy would introduce major technical problems but its chief benefits are that it permits energy storage in a post fossil fuel era when electricity is expected to play a major role. It can be converted to electricity, cleanly and efficiently with fuel cells and in liquid form can be burnt as jet fuel. Hydrogen can also be burnt in internal combustion engines although less efficiently in fuel cells. However, although hydrogen is clean and efficient, technical development is still needed to reduce its cost and to cope with safety problems. The book contains a wealth of technical information and is a valuable reference on a topic of growing importance.

  16. Hydrogen Village : creating hydrogen and fuel cell communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Hydrogen Village (H2V) is a collaborative public-private partnership administered through Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Canada and funded by the Governments of Canada and Ontario. This end user-driven, market development program accelerates the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell (FC) technologies throughout the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The program targets 3 specific aspects of market development, notably deployment of near market technologies in community based stationary and mobile applications; development of a coordinated hydrogen delivery and equipment service infrastructure; and societal factors involving corporate policy and public education. This presentation focused on lessons learned through outreach programs and the deployment of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) heat and power generation; indoor and outdoor fuel cell back up power systems; fuel cell-powered forklifts, delivery vehicles, and utility vehicles; hydrogen internal combustion engine powered shuttle buses, sedans, parade float; hydrogen production/refueling stations in the downtown core; and temporary fuel cell power systems

  17. Measurements of Jets in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Nattrass, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE detector can be used for measurements of jets in pp , p Pb, and Pb–Pb collisions. Measurements of jets in pp collisions are consis- tent with expectations from perturbative calculations and jets in p Pb scale with the number of nucleon–nucleon collisions, indicating that cold nuclear matter effects are not observed for jets. Measurements in Pb–Pb collisions demonstrate suppression of jets relative to expectations from binary scaling to the equivalent number of nucleon–nucleon collisions

  18. Jet lag prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lose time. Symptoms of jet lag include: Trouble falling asleep or waking up Tiredness during the day ... at your destination. For longer trips, before you leave, try to adapt to the time schedule of ...

  19. Intermonsoonal equatorial jets

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.

    , respectively. Hydrographic features and transport computations favour a well developed equatorial jet during both seasons. The net surface eastward and subsurface westward flows are well balanced during the premonsoon transition period and appear...

  20. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P.

    2000-05-01

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  1. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  2. The JET divertor coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, J.R.; Froger, C.; Sborchia, C.

    1989-01-01

    The divertor coil is mounted inside the Jet vacuum vessel and is able to carry 1 MA turns. It is of conventional construction - water cooled copper, epoxy glass insulation -and is contained in a thin stainless steel case. The coil has to be assembled, insulated and encased inside the Jet vacuum vessel. A description of the coil is given, together with technical information (including mechanical effects on the vacuum vessel), an outline of the manufacture process and a time schedule. (author)

  3. Pellet injectors for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Buechl, K.; Lang, R.S.; Schilling, H.B.; Ulrich, M.

    1981-09-01

    Pellet injection for the purpose of refuelling and diagnostic of fusion experiments is considered for the parameters of JET. The feasibility of injectors for single pellets and for quasistationary refuelling is discussed. Model calculations on pellet ablation with JET parameters show the required pellet velocity ( 3 ). For single pellet injection a light gas gun, for refuelling a centrifuge accelerator is proposed. For the latter the mechanical stress problems are discussed. Control and data acquisition systems are outlined. (orig.)

  4. Protostellar Jets in Context

    CERN Document Server

    Tsinganos, Kanaris; Stute, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Conference Protostellar Jets in Context held by the JETSET Marie Curie Research Training Network in July 2008. This meeting not only served to showcase some of the network's achievements but was also a platform to hear from, discuss and debate the recent findings of world-class astrophysicists in the field of protostellar jet research. Jets from young stars are of course not an isolated astrophysical phenomenon. It is known that objects as diverse as young brown dwarfs, planetary nebulae, symbiotic stars, micro-quasars, AGN, and gamma-ray bursters produce jets. Thus in a series of talks, protostellar jets were put in context by comparing them with their often much larger brethren and also by considering the ubiquitous accretion disks that seem to be necessary for their formation. With this spectrum of contributions on observations and the theory of astrophysical jets and accretion disks, this book serves as a comprehensive reference work for researchers and students...

  5. Jet supercooling and molecular jet spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wharton, L.; Levy, D.

    1979-01-01

    The marriage of the laser and the seeded supersonic jet has generated a family of new optical spectroscopic results. We shall discuss the essential features of the technique and some results. The results will include structural and dynamical views of NO 2 , NaAr, and I 2 -noble gas complexes. The extension of the method to heavier systems is illustrated with free base phthalocyanine

  6. ATLAS Standard Model Measurements Using Jet Grooming and Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Ucchielli, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Boosted topologies allow to explore Standard Model processes in kinematical regimes never tested before. In such LHC challenging environments, standard reconstruction techniques quickly hit the wall. Targeting hadronic final states means to properly reconstruct energy and multiplicity of the jets in the event. In order to be able to identify the decay product of boosted objects, i.e. W bosons, $t\\bar{t}$ pairs or Higgs produced in association with $t\\bar{t}$ pairs, ATLAS experiment is currently exploiting several algorithms using jet grooming and jet substructure. This contribution will mainly cover the following ATLAS measurements: $t\\bar{t}$ differential cross section production and jet mass using the soft drop procedure. Standard Model measurements offer the perfect field to test the performances of new jet tagging techniques which will become even more important in the search for new physics in highly boosted topologies.”

  7. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  8. Hydrogen energy stations: along the roadside to the hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.W.; Rifkin, J.; O'Connor, T.; Swisher, J.; Lipman, T.; Rambach, G.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen has become more than an international topic of discussion within government and among industry. With the public announcements from the European Union and American governments and an Executive Order from the Governor of California, hydrogen has become a ''paradigm change'' targeted toward changing decades of economic and societal behaviours. The public demand for clean and green energy as well as being ''independent'' or not located in political or societal conflict areas, has become paramount. The key issues are the commitment of governments through public policies along with corporations. Above all, secondly, the advancement of hydrogen is regional as it depends upon infrastructure and fuel resources. Hence, the hydrogen economy, to which the hydrogen highway is the main component, will be regional and creative. New jobs, businesses and opportunities are already emerging. And finally, the costs for the hydrogen economy are critical. The debate as to hydrogen being 5 years away from being commercial and available in the marketplace versus needing more research and development contradicts the historical development and deployment of any new technology be it bio-science, flat panel displays, computers or mobile phones. The market drivers are government regulations and standards soon thereafter matched by market forces and mass production. Hydrogen is no different. What this paper does is describes is how the hydrogen highway is the backbone to the hydrogen economy by becoming, with the next five years, both regional and commercial through supplying stationary power to communities. Soon thereafter, within five to ten years, these same hydrogen stations will be serving hundreds and then thousands of hydrogen fuel powered vehicles. Hydrogen is the fuel for distributed energy generation and hence positively impacts the future of public and private power generators. The paradigm has already changed. (author)

  9. Production of Hydrogen from Bio-ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrice Giroudiere; Christophe Boyer; Stephane His; Robert Sanger; Kishore Doshi; Jijun Xu

    2006-01-01

    IFP and HyRadix are collaborating in the development of a new hydrogen production system from liquid feedstock such as bio-ethanol. Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions along with high hydrogen yield are the key objectives. Market application of the system will be hydrogen refueling stations as well as medium scale hydrogen consumers including the electronics, metals processing, and oils hydrogenation industries. The conversion of bio-ethanol to hydrogen will be performed within a co-developed process including an auto-thermal reformer working under pressure. The technology will produce high-purity hydrogen with ultralow CO content. The catalytic auto-thermal reforming technology combines the exothermic and endothermic reaction and leads to a highly efficient heat integration. The development strategy to reach a high hydrogen yield target with the bio-ethanol hydrogen generator is presented. (authors)

  10. Single-phase liquid jet impingement heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, B.W.; Ma, C.F.

    1995-01-01

    Impinging liquid jets have been demonstrated to be an effective means of providing high heat/mass transfer rates in industrial transport processes. When a liquid jet strikes a surface, thin hydrodynamic and thermal boundary layers from in the region directly beneath due to the jet deceleration and the resulting increase in pressure. The flow is then forced to accelerate in a direction parallel to the target surface in what is termed the wall jet or parallel flow zone. The thickness of the hydrodynamic and thermal boundary layers in the stagnation region may be of the order of tens of micrometers. Consequently, very high heat/mass transfer coefficients exist in the stagnation zone directly under the jet. Transport coefficients characteristic of parallel flow prevail in the wall jet region. The high heat transfer coefficients make liquid jet impingement an attractive cooling option where high heat fluxes are the norm. Some industrial applications include the thermal treatment of metals, cooling of internal combustion engines, and more recently, thermal control of high-heat-dissipation electronic devices. Both circular and planar liquid jets have attracted research attention. 180 refs., 35 figs., 11 tabs

  11. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.; Kupschus, P.

    1984-09-01

    The report is in sections, as follows. (1) Introduction and summary. (2) A brief description of the origins of the JET Project within the EURATOM fusion programme and the objectives and aims of the device. The basic JET design and the overall philosophy of operation are explained and the first six months of operation of the machine are summarised. The Project Team Structure adopted for the Operation Phase is set out. Finally, in order to set JET's progress in context, other large tokamaks throughout the world and their achievements are briefly described. (3) The activities and progress within the Operation and Development Department are set out; particularly relating to its responsibilities for the operation and maintenance of the tokamak and for developing the necessary engineering equipment to enhance the machine to full performance. (4) The activities and progress within the Scientific Department are described; particularly relating to the specification, procurement and operation of diagnostic equipment; definition and execution of the programme; and the interpretation of experimental results. (5) JET's programme plans for the immediate future and a broad outline of the JET Development Plan to 1990 are given. (author)

  12. Steam-water jet analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwa, B.A.; Harlow, F.H.; Demuth, R.B.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1984-05-01

    This report presents the results of a theoretical study on the effects of the steam-water jet emitted from a hypothetical rupture in the high-pressure piping pf a nuclear power plant. A set of calculations is presented, incorporating increasingly complex formulations for mass and momentum exchange between the liquid and vapor flow fields. Comparisons between theory and detailed experimental data are given. The study begins with a thorough evaluation of the specification of equilibrium mass and momentum exchange (homogeneous equilibrium) throughout the flow region, a model that generally overpredicts the rate of jet momentum divergence. The study finds that a near-equilibrium momentum exchange rate and a strongly nonequilibrium momentum exchange rate are needed in the region of large vapor-volume fraction to explain the impingement data for fully developed two-phase jets. This leads to the viewpoint that the large-scale jet is characterized by a flow of large liquid entities that travel relatively unaffected by the strongly diverging vapor flow field. The study also finds circumstances in which a persistent core of metastable superheated water can cause much larger impingement pressures than would otherwise be possible. Existing engineering methods are evaluated for jet-loading predictions in plant design. The existing methods appear to be conservative in most possible rupture circumstances with one exception: when the impingement target is about one pipe-diameter away, large enough to capture the full jet, and the rupture flow area is equal to the full pipe flow area, the existing method can produce loadings that are slightly lower than observed for subcooled, flashing discharge. Recommendations have been made to improve the prediction of existing methods under these conditions

  13. Effect of feed-gas humidity on nitrogen atmospheric-pressure plasma jet for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Karl D; McLean, Robert J C; DeLeon, Gian; Melnikov, Vadim

    2016-11-14

    We investigate the effect of feed-gas humidity on the oxidative properties of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet using nitrogen gas. Plasma jets operating at atmospheric pressure are finding uses in medical and biological settings for sterilization and other applications involving oxidative stress applied to organisms. Most jets use noble gases, but some researchers use less expensive nitrogen gas. The feed-gas water content (humidity) has been found to influence the performance of noble-gas plasma jets, but has not yet been systematically investigated for jets using nitrogen gas. Low-humidity and high-humidity feed gases were used in a nitrogen plasma jet, and the oxidation effect of the jet was measured quantitatively using a chemical dosimeter known as FBX (ferrous sulfate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange). The plasma jet using high humidity was found to have about ten times the oxidation effect of the low-humidity jet, as measured by comparison with the addition of measured amounts of hydrogen peroxide to the FBX dosimeter. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using nitrogen as a feed gas have a greater oxidizing effect with a high level of humidity added to the feed gas.

  14. Evaporative behavior of carbon with MPD Arc Jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukegawa, Toshio; Madarame, Haruki; Okamoto, Koji [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-10-01

    Using the Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic Arc Jet (MPD Arc Jet) device, the plasma-material interaction during simulated plasma disruption was experimentally investigated. To clarify the effects of the evaporation, the isotropic graphite was used as a target. The thermal conductivity of the isotropic graphite was much higher than that of the pyrolytic graphite, resulting in smaller evaporation. The light intensity distribution during the simulated disruption for the isotropic graphite was quite different from that for the pyrolytic graphite. (author)

  15. Plasma hydrogenated cationic detonation nanodiamonds efficiently deliver to human cells in culture functional siRNA targeting the Ewing sarcoma junction oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Ayala, Juan; Petit, Tristan; Girard, Hugues A; Malvy, Claude P; Le Cam, Eric; Treussart, François; Arnault, Jean-Charles

    2015-03-01

    The expression of a defective gene can lead to major cell dysfunctions among which cell proliferation and tumor formation. One promising therapeutic strategy consists in silencing the defective gene using small interfering RNA (siRNA). In previous publications we showed that diamond nanocrystals (ND) of primary size 35 nm, rendered cationic by polyethyleneimine-coating, can efficiently deliver siRNA into cell, which further block the expression of EWS/FLI-1 oncogene in a Ewing sarcoma disease model. However, a therapeutic application of such nanodiamonds requires their elimination by the organism, particularly in urine, which is impossible for 35 nm particles. Here, we report that hydrogenated cationic nanodiamonds of primary size 7 nm (ND-H) have also a high affinity for siRNA and are capable of delivering them in cells. With siRNA/ND-H complexes, we measured a high inhibition efficacy of EWS/FLI-1 gene expression in Ewing sarcoma cell line. Electron microscopy investigations showed ND-H in endocytosis compartments, and especially in macropinosomes from which they can escape before siRNA degradation occurred. In addition, the association of EWS/FLI-1 silencing by the siRNA/ND-H complex with a vincristine treatment yielded a potentiation of the toxic effect of this chemotherapeutic drug. Therefore ND-H appears as a promising delivery agent in anti-tumoral gene therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.

    1986-03-01

    This is an overview summary of the scientific and technical advances at JET during the year 1985, supplemented by appendices of detailed contributions (in preprint form) of eight of the more important JET articles produced during that year. It is aimed not only at specialists and experts but also at a more general scientific community. Thus there is a brief summary of the background to the project, a description of the basic objectives of JET and the principle design features of the machine. The new structure of the Project Team is also explained. Developments and future plans are included. Improvements considered are those which are designed to overcome certain limitations encountered generally on Tokamaks, particularly those concerned with density limits, with plasma MHD behaviour, with impurities and with plasma transport. There is also a complete list of articles, reports and conference papers published in 1985 - there are 167 such items listed. (UK)

  17. Implications of Upwells as Hydrodynamic Jets in a Pulse Jet Mixed System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, Leonard F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bamberger, Judith A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Minette, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    satisfies these criteria when vigorous breakthrough is achieved, not all available data follow the free jet profile for the central upwell, particularly at lower nozzle velocities. Alternative flow regimes are considered and new models for cloud height, “cavern height,” and the rate of jet penetration (jet celerity) are benchmarked against data to anchor scaling analyses. This analytical modeling effort to provide a technical basis for scaling PJM mixed vessels has significant implications for vessel mixing, because jet physics underlies “cavern” height, cloud height, and the volume of mixing considerations. A new four-parameter cloud height model compares favorably to experimental results. This model is predictive of breakthrough in 8 ft vessel tests with the two-part simulant. Analysis of the upwell in the presence of yield stresses finds evidence of expanding turbulent jets, confined turbulent jets, and confined laminar flows. For each, the critical elevation at which jet momentum depletes is predicted, which compare favorably to experimental cavern height data. Partially coupled momentum and energy balances suggest that these are limiting cases of a gradual transition from a turbulent expanding flow to a confined laminar flow. This analysis of the central upwell alone lays essential groundwork for complete analysis of mode three mixing (i.e., breakthrough with slow peripheral mixing). Consideration of jet celerity shows that the rate of jet penetration is a governing consideration in breakthrough to the surface. Estimates of the volume of mixing are presented. This analysis shows that flow along the vessel wall is sluggish such that the central upwell governs the volume of mixing. This analysis of the central upwell alone lays essential groundwork for complete analysis of mode three mixing and estimates of hydrogen release rates from first principles.

  18. Jet shapes in hadron and electron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainer, N.

    1993-05-01

    High energy jets are observed both in hadronic machines like the Tevatron and electron machines like LEP. These jets have an extended structure in phase space which can be measured. This distribution is usually called the jet shape. There is an intrinsic relation between jet variables, like energy and direction, the jet algorithm used, and the jet shape. Jet shape differences can be used to separate quark and gluon jets

  19. Galaxies with jet streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, R.

    1981-01-01

    Describes recent research work on supersonic gas flow. Notable examples have been observed in cosmic radio sources, where jet streams of galactic dimensions sometimes occur, apparently as the result of interaction between neighbouring galaxies. The current theory of jet behaviour has been convincingly demonstrated using computer simulation. The surprisingly long-term stability is related to the supersonic velocity, and is analagous to the way in which an Appollo spacecraft re-entering the atmosphere supersonically is protected by the gas from the burning shield. (G.F.F.)

  20. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  1. Jet pump assisted artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  2. Global status of hydrogen research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakeman, J.B.; Browning, D.J.

    2001-07-01

    This report surveys the global status of hydrogen research and identifies technological barriers to the implementation of a global hydrogen economy. It is concluded that there will be a 30 year transition phase to the full implementation of the hydrogen economy. In this period, hydrogen will be largely produced by the reformation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane. It will be necessary to ensure that any carbonaceous oxides (and other unwanted species) formed as by-products will be trapped and not released into the atmosphere. Following the transition phase, hydrogen should be largely produced from renewable energy sources using some form of water cracking, largely electrolysis. Target performances and costs are identified for key technologies. The status of hydrogen research in the UK is reviews and it is concluded that the UK does not have a strategy for the adoption of the hydrogen economy, nor does it have a coherent and co-ordinated research and development strategy addressing barriers to the hydrogen economy. Despite this fact, because of the long transition phase, it is still possible for the UK to formulate a coherent strategy and make a significant contribution to the global implementation of the hydrogen economy, as there are still unresolved technology issues. The report concludes with a number of recommendations. (Author)

  3. Enhanced wall pumping in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenberg, J.; Harbour, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The enhanced wall pumping phenomenon in JET is observed for hydrogen or deuterium plasmas which are moved from the outer (larger major radius) limiter position either to the inner wall or to the top/bottom wall of the vacuum vessel. This phenomenon is analysed by employing a particle recycling model which combines plasma particle transport with particle re-emission from and retention within material surfaces. The model calculates the important experimentally observable quantities, such as particle fluxes, global particle confinement time, plasma density and density profile. Good qualitative agreement is found and, within the uncertainties, the agreement is quantitative if the wall pumping is assumed to be caused by two simultaneously occurring effects: (1) Neutral particle screening at the inner wall and the top/bottom wall is larger than that at the outer limiter because of different magnetic topologies at different poloidal positions; and (2) although most of the particles (≥ 90%) impacting on the wall can be promptly re-emitted, a small fraction (≤ 10%) of them must be retained in the wall for a period of time which is similar to or larger than the global plasma particle confinement time. However, the wall particle retention time need not be different from that of the outer limiter, i.e. pumping can occur when there is no difference between the material properties of the limiter and those of the wall. (author). 45 refs, 18 figs

  4. Questioning hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag, Roel; Mazza, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen is to be compared to electricity, the only widespread and viable alternative. When hydrogen is used to transmit renewable electricity, only 51% can reach the end user due to losses in electrolysis, hydrogen compression, and the fuel cell. In contrast, conventional electric storage technologies allow between 75% and 85% of the original electricity to be delivered. Even when hydrogen is extracted from gasified coal (with carbon sequestration) or from water cracked in high-temperature nuclear reactors, more of the primary energy reaches the end user if a conventional electric process is used instead. Hydrogen performs no better in mobile applications, where electric vehicles that are far closer to commercialization exceed fuel cell vehicles in efficiency, cost and performance. New, carbon-neutral energy can prevent twice the quantity of GHG's by displacing fossil electricity than it can by powering fuel cell vehicles. The same is true for new, natural gas energy. New energy resources should be used to displace high-GHG electric generation, not to manufacture hydrogen

  5. Low-pressure supersonic gas expansions. A study of the formation of cold hydrogen- and deuterium atomic beams for polarised gas targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nass, A.

    2002-04-01

    In the present thesis expansions of atomic and molecular gases were studied. Velocity distributions characterize thereby the arising beams very well and give conclusions on the processes occurring in the expansion. these can be described by continuum models until the transition to the molecular flow range occurs. By certain criteria this transition can be described. Because a description of all processes by these models is difficult, the possibility was studied to describe gas expansions by means of Monte Carlo simulations. These simulate by means of binary collisions the motion of the molecules of the expanding gas and calculate from the distribution of the particles in the phase space the beam parameter, like for instance density, flow velocities, and beam temperatures. The results of these calculations were tested by different experimental means. To this belong especially the measurements of the velocity distributions by the time-of-flight method and the intensity profiles by the beam-profile monitor. All experimentally obtained data agree with the results of the calculations within the measurement errors. By this it is possible to predict the behavior during an expansion both qualitatively and quantitatively. precise statements on density and velocity distributions are possible, by which for instance new beam-shaping geometries can be tested. From the simulated distributions also a novel start generator for sextupole Monte Carlo simulations can be generated, which contains no models, but relates directly to the obtained data. The thesis that by a H 2 carrier beam a hydrogen or deuterium atomic beam with high phase-space density can be produced, was uniquely disproved. The high diffusion of both kinds of particles leads to a fast mixing and by this to no improvement of the atomic- beam intensity. The measured data were confirmed by the performed Monte Carlo simulations. The calculations on the base of Navier-Stokes equations are in the flow range applied here

  6. Well-to-wake analysis of ethanol-to-jet and sugar-to-jet pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeongwoo; Tao, Ling; Wang, Michael

    2017-01-01

    To reduce the environmental impacts of the aviation sector as air traffic grows steadily, the aviation industry has paid increasing attention to bio-based alternative jet fuels (AJFs), which may provide lower life-cycle petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than petroleum jet fuel. This study presents well-to-wake (WTWa) results for four emerging AJFs: ethanol-to-jet (ETJ) from corn and corn stover, and sugar-to-jet (STJ) from corn stover via both biological and catalytic conversion. For the ETJ pathways, two plant designs were examined: integrated (processing corn or corn stover as feedstock) and distributed (processing ethanol as feedstock). Also, three H 2 options for STJ via catalytic conversion are investigated: external H 2 from natural gas (NG) steam methane reforming (SMR), in situ H 2 , and H 2 from biomass gasification. Results demonstrate that the feedstock is a key factor in the WTWa GHG emissions of ETJ: corn- and corn stover-based ETJ are estimated to produce WTWa GHG emissions that are 16 and 73%, respectively, less than those of petroleum jet. As for the STJ pathways, this study shows that STJ via biological conversion could generate WTWa GHG emissions 59% below those of petroleum jet. STJ via catalytic conversion could reduce the WTWa GHG emissions by 28% with H 2 from NG SMR or 71% with H 2 from biomass gasification than those of petroleum jet. This study also examines the impacts of co-product handling methods, and shows that the WTWa GHG emissions of corn stover-based ETJ, when estimated with a displacement method, are lower by 11 g CO 2 e/MJ than those estimated with an energy allocation method. Corn- and corn stover-based ETJ as well as corn stover-based STJ show potentials to reduce WTWa GHG emissions compared to petroleum jet. Particularly, WTWa GHG emissions of STJ via catalytic conversion depend highly on the hydrogen source. On the other hand, ETJ offers unique opportunities to exploit extensive existing corn ethanol

  7. Turbulent jet in confined counterflow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mean flowfield of a turbulent jet issuing into a confined, uniform counterflow was investigated computationally. Based on dimensional analysis, the jet penetration length was shown to scale with jet-to-counterflow momentum flux ratio. This scaling and the computational results reproduce the well-known correct limit of ...

  8. Elucidating Jet Energy Loss Using Jets Prospects from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Grau, N

    2009-01-01

    Jets at the LHC are expected to provide the testing ground for studying QCD energy loss. In this contribution, we briefly outline the strategy that will be used to measure jets in ATLAS and how we will go about studying energy loss. We describe the utility of measuring the jet $R_{AA}$, the fragmentation function, and heavy flavor jets. Utilizing the collision energy provided by the LHC and the nearly hermetic and highly segmented calorimeter, ATLAS is expected to make important contributions to the understanding of parton energy loss using fully reconstructed jets.

  9. Elucidating Jet Energy Loss Using Jets: Prospects from ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau, N.

    2009-01-01

    Jets at the LHC are expected to provide the testing ground for studying QCD energy loss. In this contribution, we briefly outline the strategy that will be used to measure jets in ATLAS and how we will go about studying energy loss. We describe the utility of measuring the jet R AA , the fragmentation function, and heavy flavor jets. Utilizing the collision energy provided by the LHC and the nearly hermetic and highly segmented calorimeter, ATLAS is expected to make important contributions to the understanding of parton energy loss using fully reconstructed jets.

  10. A high-intensity He-jet production source for radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, D.J.; Kimberly, H.J.; Grisham, D.L.; Talbert, W.L.; Wouters, J.M.; Rosenauer, D.; Bai, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a thin-target, He-jet transport system operating with high primary beam intensities is explored as a high-intensity production source for radioactive beams. This method is expected to work well for short-lived, non-volatile species. As such the thin-target, He-jet approach represents a natural complement to the thick-target ISOL method in which such species are not, in general, rapidly released. Highlighted here is a thin-target, He-jet system that is being prepared for a 500 + μA, 800-MeV proton demonstration experiment at LAMPF this summer

  11. Separation of contributions from deeply virtual Compton scattering and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process in measurements on a hydrogen target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, Z.

    2009-09-01

    Hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons from an unpolarized proton target is studied in an effort to elucidate generalized parton distributions. The data accumulated during the years 1996-2005 with the HERMES spectrometer are analyzed to yield asymmetries with respect to the combined dependence of the cross section on beam helicity and charge, thereby revealing previously unseparated contributions from deeply virtual Compton scattering and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process. The integrated luminosity is sufficient to show correlated dependences on two kinematic variables, and provides the most precise determination of the dependence on only the beam charge. (orig.)

  12. JET joint undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    JET began operations on 25 June 1983. This annual report contains administrative information and a general review of scientific and technical developments. Among them are vacuum systems, toroidal and poloidal field systems, power supplies, neutral beam heating, radiofrequency heating, remote handling, tritium handling, control and data acquisition systems and diagnostic systems

  13. Triton burnup in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipsham, E.; Jarvis, O.N.; Sadler, G.

    1989-01-01

    Triton burnup measurements have been made at JET using time-integrated copper activation and time-resolved silicon detector techniques. The results confirm the classical nature of both the confinement and the slowing down of the 1 MeV tritons in a plasma. (author) 8 refs., 3 figs

  14. Vortex diode jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  15. Jets in Active Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which are rapidly rotating neutron stars emitting narrow beams of radiation. Images of ... rized into starburst galaxies and AGN powered by SMBHs. The ..... swer lies in the relativistic motion of the jets which boosts the flux density of .... radio cores, detection of ... to as synchrotron self-Compton or SSC, or those of the cosmic.

  16. LHCb jet reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco, Oscar; Rangel, Murilo; Barter, William; Bursche, Albert; Potterat, Cedric; Coco, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. It has been designed to collide proton beams at an energy up to 14 TeV in the center of mass. In 2011, the data taking was done with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, the instant luminosity has reached values greater than 4 X 10 32 cm -2 s -1 and the integrated luminosity reached the value of 1,02fb -1 on the LHCb. The jet reconstruction is fundamental to observe events that can be used to test perturbative QCD (pQCD). It also provides a way to observe standard model channels and searches for new physics like SUSY. The anti-kt algorithm is a jet reconstruction algorithm that is based on the distance of the particles on the space ηX φ and on the transverse momentum of particles. To maximize the energy resolution all information about the trackers and the colorimeters are used on the LHCb experiment to create objects called particle flow objects that are used as input to anti-kt algorithm. The LHCb is specially interesting for jets studies because its η region is complementary to the others main experiments on LHC. We will present the first results of jet reconstruction using 2011 LHCb data. (author)

  17. LHCb jet reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco, Oscar; Rangel, Murilo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Barter, William [University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bursche, Albert [Universitat Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Potterat, Cedric [Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Coco, Victor [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. It has been designed to collide proton beams at an energy up to 14 TeV in the center of mass. In 2011, the data taking was done with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, the instant luminosity has reached values greater than 4 X 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and the integrated luminosity reached the value of 1,02fb{sup -1} on the LHCb. The jet reconstruction is fundamental to observe events that can be used to test perturbative QCD (pQCD). It also provides a way to observe standard model channels and searches for new physics like SUSY. The anti-kt algorithm is a jet reconstruction algorithm that is based on the distance of the particles on the space {eta}X {phi} and on the transverse momentum of particles. To maximize the energy resolution all information about the trackers and the colorimeters are used on the LHCb experiment to create objects called particle flow objects that are used as input to anti-kt algorithm. The LHCb is specially interesting for jets studies because its {eta} region is complementary to the others main experiments on LHC. We will present the first results of jet reconstruction using 2011 LHCb data. (author)

  18. Fastener investigation in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunting, P., E-mail: patrick.bunting@ccfe.ac.uk; Thompson, V.; Riccardo, V.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Experimental work to identify the cause of a bolt seizure inside the JET vessel. • Taguchi method used to reduce tests to 16 while covering 5 parameters. • Experimental work was unable to reproduce bolt seizure. • Thread contamination had little effect on the bolt performance. - Abstract: JET is an experimental fusion reactor consisting of magnetically confined, high temperature plasma inside a large ultra-high vacuum chamber. The inside of the chamber is protected from the hot plasma with tiles made from beryllium, tungsten, carbon composites and other materials bolted to the vessel wall. The study was carried out in response to a JET fastener seizing inside the vacuum vessel. The following study looks at characterising the magnitude of the individual factors affecting the fastener break away torque. This was carried out using a statistical approach, the Taguchi method: isolating the net effect of individual factors present in a series of tests [1](Grove and Davis, 1992). Given the severe environment within the JET vessel due to the combination of heat, ultra-high vacuum and the high contact pressure in bolt threads, the contributions of localised diffusion bonding is assessed in conjunction with various combinations of bolt and insert material.

  19. Jet Inlet Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    AFRL-RW-EG-TR-2014-044 Jet Inlet Efficiency Nigel Plumb Taylor Sykes-Green Keith Williams John Wohleber Munitions Aerodynamics Sciences...CONTRACT NUMBER N/A 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) Nigel Plumb Taylor Sykes-Green Keith Williams John

  20. Abrasive water jet cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leist, K.J.; Funnell, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    In the process of selecting a failed equipment cut-up tool for the process facility modifications (PFM) project, a system using an abrasive water jet (AWJ) was developed and tested for remote disassembly of failed equipment. It is presented in this paper

  1. Jet-images: computer vision inspired techniques for jet tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogan, Josh; Kagan, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Schwarztman, Ariel [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory,Menlo Park, CA 94028 (United States)

    2015-02-18

    We introduce a novel approach to jet tagging and classification through the use of techniques inspired by computer vision. Drawing parallels to the problem of facial recognition in images, we define a jet-image using calorimeter towers as the elements of the image and establish jet-image preprocessing methods. For the jet-image processing step, we develop a discriminant for classifying the jet-images derived using Fisher discriminant analysis. The effectiveness of the technique is shown within the context of identifying boosted hadronic W boson decays with respect to a background of quark- and gluon-initiated jets. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate that the performance of this technique introduces additional discriminating power over other substructure approaches, and gives significant insight into the internal structure of jets.

  2. Jet-images: computer vision inspired techniques for jet tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogan, Josh; Kagan, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Schwarztman, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach to jet tagging and classification through the use of techniques inspired by computer vision. Drawing parallels to the problem of facial recognition in images, we define a jet-image using calorimeter towers as the elements of the image and establish jet-image preprocessing methods. For the jet-image processing step, we develop a discriminant for classifying the jet-images derived using Fisher discriminant analysis. The effectiveness of the technique is shown within the context of identifying boosted hadronic W boson decays with respect to a background of quark- and gluon-initiated jets. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate that the performance of this technique introduces additional discriminating power over other substructure approaches, and gives significant insight into the internal structure of jets.

  3. Analysis of High Speed Jets Produced by a Servo Tube Driven Liquid Jet Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portaro, Rocco; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2017-11-01

    In today's healthcare environment many types of medication must be administered through the use of hypodermic needles. Although this practice has been in use for many years, drawbacks such as accidental needle stick injuries, transmission of deadly viruses and bio-hazardous waste are still present. This study focuses on improving a needle free technology known as liquid jet injection, through the implementation of a linear servo tube actuator for the construction of a fully closed loop liquid jet injection system. This device has the ability to deliver both micro- and macro- molecules, high viscosity fluids whilst providing real time control of the jet pressure profile for accurate depth and dispersion control. The experiments are conducted using a prototype that consists of a 3 kW servo tube actuator, coupled to a specially designed injection head allowing nozzle size and injection volume to be varied. The device is controlled via a high speed servo amplifier and FPGA. The high speed jets emanating from the injector are assessed via high speed photography and through the use of a force transducer. Preliminary results indicate that the system allows for accurate shaping of the jet pressure profile, making it possible to target different tissue depths/types accurately.

  4. Jet substructure using semi-inclusive jet functions in SCET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory,Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California,Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Ringer, Felix; Vitev, Ivan [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory,Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-25

    We propose a new method to evaluate jet substructure observables in inclusive jet measurements, based upon semi-inclusive jet functions in the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). As a first example, we consider the jet fragmentation function, where a hadron h is identified inside a fully reconstructed jet. We introduce a new semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function G{sub i}{sup h}(z=ω{sub J}/ω,z{sub h}=ω{sub h}/ω{sub J},ω{sub J},R,μ), which depends on the jet radius R and the large light-cone momenta of the parton ‘i’ initiating the jet (ω), the jet (ω{sub J}), and the hadron h (ω{sub h}). The jet fragmentation function can then be expressed as a semi-inclusive observable, in the spirit of actual experimental measurements, rather than as an exclusive one. We demonstrate the consistency of the effective field theory treatment and standard perturbative QCD calculations of this observable at next-to-leading order (NLO). The renormalization group (RG) equation for the semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function G{sub i}{sup h}(z,z{sub h},ω{sub J},R,μ) are also derived and shown to follow exactly the usual timelike DGLAP evolution equations for fragmentation functions. The newly obtained RG equations can be used to perform the resummation of single logarithms of the jet radius parameter R up to next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL{sub R}) accuracy. In combination with the fixed NLO calculation, we obtain NLO+NLL{sub R} results for the hadron distribution inside the jet. We present numerical results for pp→(jet h)X in the new framework, and find excellent agreement with existing LHC experimental data.

  5. Jet substructure using semi-inclusive jet functions in SCET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Ringer, Felix; Vitev, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new method to evaluate jet substructure observables in inclusive jet measurements, based upon semi-inclusive jet functions in the framework of Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET). As a first example, we consider the jet fragmentation function, where a hadron h is identified inside a fully reconstructed jet. We introduce a new semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function G_i"h(z=ω_J/ω,z_h=ω_h/ω_J,ω_J,R,μ), which depends on the jet radius R and the large light-cone momenta of the parton ‘i’ initiating the jet (ω), the jet (ω_J), and the hadron h (ω_h). The jet fragmentation function can then be expressed as a semi-inclusive observable, in the spirit of actual experimental measurements, rather than as an exclusive one. We demonstrate the consistency of the effective field theory treatment and standard perturbative QCD calculations of this observable at next-to-leading order (NLO). The renormalization group (RG) equation for the semi-inclusive fragmenting jet function G_i"h(z,z_h,ω_J,R,μ) are also derived and shown to follow exactly the usual timelike DGLAP evolution equations for fragmentation functions. The newly obtained RG equations can be used to perform the resummation of single logarithms of the jet radius parameter R up to next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL_R) accuracy. In combination with the fixed NLO calculation, we obtain NLO+NLL_R results for the hadron distribution inside the jet. We present numerical results for pp→(jet h)X in the new framework, and find excellent agreement with existing LHC experimental data.

  6. Deciphering jet quenching with JEWEL

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    In heavy ion collisions jets arising from the fragmentation of hard quarks and gluons experience strong modifications due to final state re-scattering. This so-called jet quenching is related to the emergence of collectivity and equilibration in QCD. I will give an introduction to jet quenching and its modeling in JEWEL, a Monte Carlo implementation of a dynamical model for jet quenching. I will then discuss examples highlighting how JEWEL can be used to elucidate the physical mechanisms relevant for jet quenching.  

  7. Experimental investigation of the effects of heat release on mixing processes and flow structure in a high-speed subsonic turbulent H{sub 2} jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theron, M.; Bellenoue, M. [Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique, CNRS UPR 9028, Poitiers (France)

    2006-06-15

    In this paper, we explore the effects of heat release on mixing and flow structure in a high-speed subsonic turbulent H{sub 2} jet in an air coflow. Heat release effects are determined from the comparison of nonreacting and reacting jet behavior, boundary conditions being identical in both cases. Experiments are performed in a wind tunnel specifically designed for this purpose. Planar laser induced fluorescence on OH radicals and on acetone (seeded in the hydrogen jet) are used to characterize the cartography of scalars, and laser Doppler velocimetry is used to characterize velocity profiles in the far field of the H{sub 2} jet. Results show significant effects of heat release on mixing and flow structure, indicating an overall reduction of mixing and entrainment in the reacting jet compared to the nonreacting jet. First, a change is observed in the orientation of coherent structures originating from Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities, and responsible for air entrainment within the jet, which appear 'flatter' in the jet flame. Then, the flame length is increased over what would be predicted from the intersection of the mean stoichiometric contour with the centerline of the nonreacting jet. And finally, the longitudinal average velocity decrease along the jet axis is quicker in the nonreacting jet, and nondimensional transverse velocity fluctuations are about half as high in the reacting jet as in the nonreacting jet, indicating a reduction of the turbulence intensity of the flow in this direction in the jet flame. (author)

  8. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  9. Structure of pulsed plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavolowsky, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    A pulsed plasma jet is a turbulent, inhomogeneous fluid mechanical discharge capable of initiating and enhancing combustion. Having shown the ability to ignite lean fuel mixtures, it now offers the potential for real-time control of combustion processes. This study explored the fluid-mechanical and chemical properties of such jets. The fluid-mechanical structure of the jet was examined using two optical diagnostic techniques. Self-light streak photography provided information on the motion of luminous gas particles in its core. It revealed that plasma jets behave either totally subsonic or embody a supersonic core. The turbulent, thermal evolution of the jet was explored using high-speed-laser schlieren cinematography. By examining plasma jet generators with both opaque and transparent plasma cavities, detailed information on plasma formation and jet structure, beginning with the electric arc discharge in the cavity, was obtained. These records revealed the production of thermal stratifications in the cavity that could account for the plasma particles in the jet core. After the electrical discharges ceased, the turbulent jet behaved as a self-similar plume. Molecular-beam mass spectrometry was used to determine temperature and species concentration in the jet. Both non-combustible and combustible jets were studied

  10. Hydrogen injection device in BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Koji.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the increasing ratio of main steam system dose rate due to N-16 activity due to excess hydrogen injection in the hydrogen injection operation of BWR type reactors. Constitution: There are provided a hydrogen injection mechanism for injecting hydrogen into primary coolants of a BWR type reactor, and a chemical injection device for injecting chemicals such as methanol, which makes nitrogen radioisotopes resulted in the reactor water upon hydrogen injection non-volatile, into the pressure vessel separately from hydrogen. Injected hydrogen and the chemicals are not reacted in the feedwater system, but the reaction proceeds due to the presence of radioactive rays after the injection into the pressure vessel. Then, hydrogen causes re-combination in the downcomer portion to reduce the dissolved oxygen concentration. Meanwhile, about 70 % of the chemicals is supplied by means of a jet pump directly to the reactor core, thereby converting the chemical form of N-16 in the reactor core more oxidative (non-volatile). (Kawakami, Y.)

  11. DeepJet: a deep-learned multiclass jet-tagger for slim and fat jets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Qu, Huilin; Stoye, Markus; Kieseler, Jan; Verzetti, Mauro

    2018-01-01

    We present a customized neural network architecture for both, slim and fat jet tagging. It is based on the idea to keep the concept of physics objects, like particle flow particles, as a core element of the network architecture. The deep learning algorithm works for most of the common jet classes, i.e. b, c, usd and gluon jets for slim jets and W, Z, H, QCD and top classes for fat jets. The developed architecture promising gains in performance as shown in simulation of the CMS collaboration. Currently the tagger is under test in real data in the CMS experiment.

  12. Analysis of diffractive dissociation of K– into K–π+π– on a liquid hydrogen target at the COMPASS spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Jasinski, P

    The systematic exploration of excited meson and baryon states was the central topic of the COmmon Muon Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) physics program in the years 2008 and 2009 at the CERN facility. Particularly states non fitting a constituent quark model were searched for, identified by their exotic quantum numbers which are forbidden by a simple q¯q scheme. A high energetic hadron-beam on a fixed target yielded in resonances decaying into a large variety of final states. The diffractive and central production mechanisms allowed for a clean exclusive selection of channels such as -p ! +-+precoil, which then were analysed with a high precision and a huge number of events. Apart from the main pion component in the negative hadron beam a small fraction of kaons of about 2.5% allowed the study of light strange resonances in the K-+- decay channel. The best measurement in this channel was quoted to be so far the measurement of theWA03 experiment at CERN. The ACCMOR-collaboration has t...

  13. Jet photoproduction at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frixione, S.

    1997-01-01

    We compute various kinematical distributions for one-jet and two-jet inclusive photoproduction at HERA. Our results are accurate to next-to-leading order in QCD. We use the subtraction method for the cancellation of infrared singularities. We perform a thorough study of the reliability of QCD predictions; in particular, we consider the scale dependence of our results and discuss the cases when the perturbative expansion might break down. We also deal with the problem of the experimental definition of the pointlike and hadronic components of the incident photon, and briefly discuss the sensitivity of QCD predictions upon the input parameters of the calculation, like α S and the parton densities. (orig.)

  14. QCD and jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munehisa, Tomo

    1990-01-01

    We present a review on the parton shower in e + e - annihilation. Also we discuss the next-to-leading-logarithmic parton shower. We emphasize that this new model provides a useful tool for the determinations of Λ MS from jet distributions. Analysis by the new model gives us Λ MS = 0.235±0.052 GeV from data of PETRA, PEP and TRISTAN. (author)

  15. Cryogenically assisted abrasive jet micromachining of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getu, H; Papini, M; Spelt, J K

    2008-01-01

    The abrasive jet micromachining (AJM) of elastomers and polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for use in micro-fluidic devices was found to be very slow or impossible at room temperature. To enhance the material removal rate in such materials, a stream of liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) was injected into the abrasive jet, cooling the target to cryogenic temperatures. Erosion rate measurements on the three polymeric materials (PDMS, ABS and PTFE) with and without the use of LN 2 were compared along with the profiles of micromachined channels and holes. It was found that the use of LN 2 cooling caused brittle erosion in PDMS, allowing it to be micromachined successfully. An erosion rate increase was also observed in PTFE and ABS at high and intermediate impact angles. The use of LN 2 also was found to reduce particle embedding

  16. Active control of continuous air jet with bifurcated synthetic jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dančová Petra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthetic jets (SJs have many significant applications and the number of applications is increasing all the time. In this research the main focus is on the primary flow control which can be used effectively for the heat transfer increasing. This paper deals with the experimental research of the effect of two SJs worked in the bifurcated mode used for control of an axisymmetric air jet. First, the control synthetic jets were measured alone. After an adjustment, the primary axisymmetric jet was added in to the system. For comparison, the primary flow without synthetic jets control was also measured. All experiments were performed using PIV method whereby the synchronization between synthetic jets and PIV system was necessary to do.

  17. Metastable hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose, V.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the basic physical properties of the metastable 2 2 sub(1/2) state of atomic hydrogen. Applications relying on its special properties, including measurement of the Lamb shift, production of spin-polarized protons and the measurement of molecular electric moments, are discussed. (author)

  18. Jet operated heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    A jet pump system is shown that utilizes waste heat to provide heating and/or cooling. Waste heat diverted through a boiler causes a refrigerant to evaporate and expand for supersonic discharge through a nozzle thereby creating a vacuum in an evaporator coil. The vacuum draws the refrigerant in a gaseous state into a condensing section of a jet pump along with refrigerant from a reservoir in a subcooled liquid form. This causes condensation of the gas in a condensation section of the jet pump, while moving at constant velocity. The change in momentum of the fluid overcomes the system high side pressure. Some of the condensate is cooled by a subcooler. Refrigerant in a subcooled liquid state from the subcooler is fed back into the evaporator and the condensing section with an adequate supply being insured by the reservoir. The motive portion of the condensate is returned to the boiler sans subcooling. By proper valving start-up is insured, as well as the ability to switch from heating to cooling

  19. Greenland plateau jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George William Kent Moore

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The high ice-covered topography of Greenland represents a significant barrier to atmospheric flow and, as a direct and indirect result, it plays a crucial role in the coupled climate system. The wind field over Greenland is important in diagnosing regional weather and climate, thereby providing information on the mass balance of the ice sheet as well as assisting in the interpretation of ice core data. Here, we identify a number of hitherto unrecognised features of the three-dimensional wind field over Greenland; including a 2500-km-long jet along the central ice sheet's western margin that extends from the surface into the middle-troposphere, as well as a similar but smaller scale and less intense feature along its eastern margin. We refer to these features as Greenland Plateau Jets. The jets are coupled to the downslope katabatic flow and we argue that they are maintained by the zonal temperature gradients associated with the strong temperature inversion over the central ice sheet. Their importance for Greenland's regional climate is discussed.

  20. Results of Using the Global Positioning System to Maintain the Time and Frequency Synchronization in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Deep Space Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clements, P. A; Kirk, A; Unglaub, R

    1986-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Deep Space Network (DSN) consists of three tracking stations located in California, Australia, and Spain, each with two hydrogen maser clocks as the time and frequency standard...

  1. Industrial implications of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressouyre, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two major industrial implications of hydrogen are examined: problems related to the effect of hydrogen on materials properties (hydrogen embrittlement), and problems related to the use and production of hydrogen as a future energy vector [fr

  2. Multiple Jets at the LHC with High Energy Jets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Rosenkrantz; Smillie, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a flexible Monte Carlo implementation of the perturbative framework of High Energy Jets, describing multi-jet events at hadron colliders. The description includes a resummation which ensures leading logarithmic accuracy for large invariant mass between jets, and is matched to tree......-level accuracy for multiplicities up to 4 jets. The resummation includes all-order hard corrections, which become important for increasing centre-of-mass energy of the hadronic collision. We discuss observables relevant for confronting the perturbative framework with 7 TeV data from the LHC, and the impact...

  3. New type of metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukharov, A.V.; Ankudinov, V.B.; Ogorodnikov, V.P.; Marukhin, Y.A.

    2014-01-01

    Now the technologies based on interaction of high-intensity beams with substance of a target are being intensively developed. As a target it is possible to use the new type of monodisperse metal targets. The principal advantages of new targets type are: target cooling isn't required; there is no induced activity: the target can be used many times; small dispersion on the speed, the size and interaction points with a beam. The basis of a target is the jet of molten metal, following in the vacuum chamber .Under the influence of the special disturbance superimposed on the liquid jet, the jet disintegrated into identical drops. In the vacuum chamber the drops freeze and form into the solid granules. It is possible to receive monodisperse targets from different metals, alloys and salts (diameter of targets is from 30 .m to 1.5 mm). Dispersion by the sizes and speed is less than 1%. The technique allows to receive not only continuous targets, but also hollow targets with dispersion on thickness of wall within 1...2%.

  4. Study of secondary electron emission from thin carbon targets with swift charged particles: heavy ions, hydrogen ions; Etude experimentale de l`emission electronique secondaire de cibles minces de carbone sous l`impact de projectiles rapides: ions lourds, ions hydrogene (atomiques, moleculaires ou sous forme d`agregats)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billebaud, A

    1995-07-12

    The main subject of this work is the study of electron emission from the two surfaces of thin solid targets bombarded with swift charged particles. The slowing down of swift ions in matter is mainly due to inelastic interaction with target electrons (ionization, excitation): the energy transfer to target electrons is responsible for the secondary electron emission process. The phenomenological and theoretical descriptions of this phenomena are the subject of the first chapter. We focused on secondary electron emission induced by different kind of projectiles on thin carbon foils. In chapter two we describe hydrogen cluster induced electron emission measurement between 40 and 120 keV/proton. These projectiles, composed of several atoms, allowed us to study and highlight collective effects of the electron emission process. We extended our study of electron emission to molecular (H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}) and composite (H{sup -}, H{sup 0}) projectiles at higher energies (<= 2 MeV): we have designed an experimental set-up devoted to electron emission statistics measurements which allowed us to study, among others things, the role of projectile electrons in secondary electron emission. This experiment is described in the third chapter. Finally, the fourth chapter describes new measurements of electron emission induced by energetic (13 MeV/u) and highly charged argon ion provided by the medium energy beam line (SME) of GANIL (Caen), which have been analyzed in the framework of a semi-empirical model of secondary electron emission. This set of experiments brings new results on composite projectile interaction with matter, and on the consequences of high energy deposition in solids. (author).

  5. Identifying jet quantum numbers event by event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teper, M.J.

    1979-12-01

    A method is proposed to identify the parton that gives rise to any particular jet. The method improves with the number of particles in the jet, and should indicate which of the jets in a three jet event at PETRA is the gluon jet. (author)

  6. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinikoski, T.O.; Penttilae, S.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Analysis of Hybrid Hydrogen Systems: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, J.; Braun, R.; Munoz, D.; Penev, M.; Kinchin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Report on biomass pathways for hydrogen production and how they can be hybridized to support renewable electricity generation. Two hybrid systems were studied in detail for process feasibility and economic performance. The best-performing system was estimated to produce hydrogen at costs ($1.67/kg) within Department of Energy targets ($2.10/kg) for central biomass-derived hydrogen production while also providing value-added energy services to the electric grid.

  8. Magnetic Untwisting in Jets that Go into the Outer Solar Corona in Polar Coronal Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David

    2014-06-01

    We present results from a study of 14 jets that were observed in SDO/AIA EUV movies to erupt in the Sun’s polar coronal holes. These jets were similar to the many other jets that erupt in coronal holes, but reached higher than the vast majority, high enough to be observed in the outer corona beyond 2 solar radii from Sun center by the SOHO/LASCO/C2 coronagraph. We illustrate the characteristic structure and motion of these high-reaching jets by showing observations of two representative jets. We find that (1) the speed of the jet front from the base of the corona out to 2-3 solar radii is typically several times the sound speed in jets in coronal holes, (2) each high-reaching jet displays unusually large rotation about its axis (spin) as it erupts, and (3) in the outer corona, many jets display lateral swaying and bending of the jet axis with an amplitude of a few degrees and a period of order 1 hour. From these observations we infer that these jets are magnetically driven, propose that the driver is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is basically a large-amplitude (non-linear) torsional Alfven wave that is put into the open magnetic field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts, and estimate that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy before reaching the outer corona. These observations of high-reaching coronal jets suggest that the torsional magnetic waves observed in Type-II spicules can similarly dissipate in the corona and thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes and quiet regions. This work is funded by the NASA/SMD Heliophysics Division’s Living With a Star Targeted Research & Technology Program.

  9. Analysis of diffractive dissociation of K{sup -} into K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} on a liquid hydrogen target at the compass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasinski, Prometeusz Kryspin

    2012-01-02

    The systematic exploration of excited meson and baryon states was the central topic of the COmmon Muon Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) physics program in the years 2008 and 2009 at the CERN facility. Particularly states non fitting a constituent quark model were searched for, identified by their exotic quantum numbers which are forbidden by a simple q anti q scheme. A high energetic hadron-beam on a fixed target yielded in resonances decaying into a large variety of final states. The diffractive and central production mechanisms allowed for a clean exclusive selection of channels such as {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}p{sub recoil}, which then were analysed with a high precision and a huge number of events. Apart from the main pion component in the negative hadron beam a small fraction of kaons of about 2.5% allowed the study of light strange resonances in the K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay channel. The best measurement in this channel was quoted to be so far the measurement of the WA03 experiment at CERN. The ACCMOR-collaboration has the data recorded and analysed with an experimental set-up very similar to the COMPASS-spectrometer. COMPASS had therefore not only the ability to remeasure this channel with a significantly higher number of events and better precision to cross-check those over 30 years old results. Moreover, improved analysis methods together with new evidences from other experiments, are expected to enlighten our present picture of the hadron spectrum. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of meson spectroscopy. The formation of bound quark anti-quark systems allows to interpret our measurements in terms of coupled quantum numbers, with properties as spin, charge conjugation and parity. Particularly kaonic isospin I=(1)/(2) resonances are classified as proposed by group theory and differences to I=1 and I=0 states, formed mainly by u and d quarks and their anti-quarks, are pointed out. That chapter

  10. Analysis of diffractive dissociation of K{sup -} into K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} on a liquid hydrogen target at the compass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasinski, Prometeusz Kryspin

    2012-01-02

    The systematic exploration of excited meson and baryon states was the central topic of the COmmon Muon Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) physics program in the years 2008 and 2009 at the CERN facility. Particularly states non fitting a constituent quark model were searched for, identified by their exotic quantum numbers which are forbidden by a simple q anti q scheme. A high energetic hadron-beam on a fixed target yielded in resonances decaying into a large variety of final states. The diffractive and central production mechanisms allowed for a clean exclusive selection of channels such as {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}p{sub recoil}, which then were analysed with a high precision and a huge number of events. Apart from the main pion component in the negative hadron beam a small fraction of kaons of about 2.5% allowed the study of light strange resonances in the K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay channel. The best measurement in this channel was quoted to be so far the measurement of the WA03 experiment at CERN. The ACCMOR-collaboration has the data recorded and analysed with an experimental set-up very similar to the COMPASS-spectrometer. COMPASS had therefore not only the ability to remeasure this channel with a significantly higher number of events and better precision to cross-check those over 30 years old results. Moreover, improved analysis methods together with new evidences from other experiments, are expected to enlighten our present picture of the hadron spectrum. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of meson spectroscopy. The formation of bound quark anti-quark systems allows to interpret our measurements in terms of coupled quantum numbers, with properties as spin, charge conjugation and parity. Particularly kaonic isospin I=(1)/(2) resonances are classified as proposed by group theory and differences to I=1 and I=0 states, formed mainly by u and d quarks and their anti-quarks, are pointed out. That chapter

  11. Dynamics of Newtonian annular jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, D.D.

    1978-12-01

    The main objectives of this investigation are to identify the significant parameters affecting the dynamics of Newtonian annular jets, and to develop theoretical models for jet break-up and collapse. This study has been motivated by recent developments in laser-fusion reactor designs; one proposed cavity design involves the use of an annular lithium jet to protect the cavity wall from the pellet debris emanating from the microexplosion

  12. Photon + jets at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2009-06-01

    Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb{sup -1} and 1.0 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

  13. STANFORD: Internal targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riordan, Michael

    1989-05-15

    Of burgeoning interest to many nuclear and particle physicists is a storage ring technique for fixed target experiments. It hinges on the use of gas-jet targets, shooting a narrow stream of atoms through a circulating beam of electrons or protons. Pioneered at CERN and the Soviet Novosibirsk Laboratory, more such 'internal targets' are being built or contemplated for storage rings in Europe, the Soviet Union, and the United States. From 9-12 January, physicists from around the world met at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to discuss prospects and problems in this expanding field.

  14. Polarization measurement for internal polarized gaseous targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhenyu; Ye Yunxiu; Lv Haijiang; Mao Yajun

    2004-01-01

    The authors present an introduction to internal polarized gaseous targets, polarization method, polarization measurement method and procedure. To get the total nuclear polarization of hydrogen atoms (including the polarization of the recombined hydrogen molecules) in the target cell, authors have measured the parameters relating to atomic polarization and polarized hydrogen atoms and molecules. The total polarization of the target during our measurement is P T =0.853 ± 0.036. (authors)

  15. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and fluid flow of an impinging round jet of plasma into confined walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Shimizu, Akihiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulations are presented on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of an impinging round jet of argon plasma with atmospheric pressure. The target slab with finite thickness upon which plasma jet impinges is assumed to be as SiC which is a candidate material for plasma facing material of fusion reactor. The plasma jet is treated by use of a magnetohydrodynamics model that takes its two-temperature non-equilibrium state into account. The rear side of the target slab is assumed to be cooled by a gas-solid suspension impinging round jet. The result shows that the plasma is in non-equilibrium state in which the electron temperature is higher than the heavy particle in the outer region of plasma jet core and that the heat flux to the target slab is over 8 MW/m 2 in the region of the plasma jet core contacts. (author)

  16. Water experiment of high-speed, free-surface, plane jet along concave wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hideo; Ida, Mizuho; Kato, Yoshio; Maekawa, Hiroshi; Itoh, Kazuhiro; Kukita, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    In the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), an intense 14 MeV neutron beam will be generated in the high-speed liquid lithium (Li) plane jet target flowing along concave wall in vacuum. As part of the conceptual design activity (CDA) of the IFMIF, the stability of the plane liquid jet flow was studied experimentally with water in a well-defined channel geometry for non-heating condition. A two-dimensional double-reducer nozzle being newly proposed for the IFMIF target successfully provided a high-speed (≤ 17 m/s) stable water jet with uniform velocity distribution at the nozzle exit without flow separation in the nozzle. The free surface of the jet was covered by two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional waves, the size of which did not change much over the tested jet length of ∼130 mm. The jet velocity profile changed around the nozzle exit from uniform to that of free-vortex flow where the product of the radius of stream line and local velocity is constant in the jet thickness. The jet thickness increased immediately after exiting the nozzle because of the velocity profile change. The predicted jet thickness by a modified one-dimensional momentum model agreed with the data well. (author)

  17. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H.J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  18. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on

  19. Ammonia chemistry in a flameless jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zieba, Mariusz; Schuster, Anja; Scheffknecht, Guenter [Institute of Process Engineering and Power Plant Technology, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 23, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Brink, Anders; Hupa, Mikko [Process Chemistry Centre, Aabo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Aabo (Finland)

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, the nitrogen chemistry in an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) doped flameless jet is investigated using a kinetic reactor network model. The reactor network model is used to explain the main differences in ammonia chemistry for methane (CH{sub 4})-containing fuels and methane-free fuels. The chemical pathways of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formation and destruction are identified using rate-of-production analysis. The results show that in the case of natural gas, ammonia reacts relatively late at fuel lean condition leading to high NO{sub x} emissions. In the pre-ignition zone, the ammonia chemistry is blocked due to the absence of free radicals which are consumed by methane-methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) conversion. In the case of methane-free gas, the ammonia reacted very rapidly and complete decomposition was reached in the fuel rich region of the jet. In this case the necessary radicals for the ammonia conversion are generated from hydrogen (H{sub 2}) oxidation. (author)

  20. Geometrical scaling of jet fragmentation photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Koichi, E-mail: koichi.hattori@riken.jp [RIKEN BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 (United States); Theoretical Research Division, Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); McLerran, Larry, E-mail: mclerran@bnl.gov [RIKEN BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 (United States); Physics Dept., Bdg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY-11973 (United States); Physics Dept., China Central Normal University, Wuhan (China); Schenke, Björn, E-mail: bschenke@bnl.gov [Physics Dept., Bdg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY-11973 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We discuss jet fragmentation photons in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We argue that, if the jet distribution satisfies geometrical scaling and an anisotropic spectrum, these properties are transferred to photons during the jet fragmentation.

  1. Transition in synthetic jets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesař, Václav; Kordík, Jozef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 187, NOV 2012 (2012), s. 105-117 ISSN 0924-4247 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA02020795; GA ČR(CZ) GPP101/12/P556; GA ČR(CZ) GCP101/11/J019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : turbulence * synthetic jet * transition * velocity spectra Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.841, year: 2012 http://www. science direct.com/ science /article/pii/S0924424712005031

  2. Hadron jets in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, C.

    1982-11-01

    The subject of hadron jet studies, to judge by the work presented at this workshop, is a maturing field which is still gathering steam. The very detailed work being done in lepton-lepton and lepton-hadron collisions, the second-generation measurements being carried out at Fermilab, the CERN SPS, and the ISR, and the very high energy hard scatterings being observed at the CERN Collider all show enormous promise for increased understanding. Perhaps we shall yet reach that long-sought nirvana in which high-p/sub perpendicular/ collisions become truly simple

  3. Jet physics at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venus, W.

    1991-01-01

    The results of studies of the jet structure of hadronic Z 0 decays performed in the first year of Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP) operation are reviewed. The measurements of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) coupling constant α s (M z )and the detection of the presence of the triple gluon vertex are summarized. After a brief review of the promising status of QCD in relation to even the very soft processes, the running of the coupling constants to high energy is considered in the context of grand unified theories. The necessity and importance of further theoretical work is stressed. (author)

  4. A study on the fire response of compressed hydrogen gas vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Yohsuke; Tomioka, Junichi; Suzuki, Jinji [Japan Automobile Research Institute (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the events that could arise when fighting fires in vehicles with compressed hydrogen CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) composite cylinders, we conducted experiments to examine whether a hydrogen jet flame caused by the activation of the pressure relief device (PRD) can extinguished and how spraying water influences the cylinder and PRD. The experiments clarified that the hydrogen jet flame cannot be extinguished easily with water or dry powder extinguishers and that spraying water during activation of the PRD may result in closure of the PRD, but is useful for maintaining the strength of CFRP composite cylinders for vehicles. (orig.)

  5. A high intensity Stern-Gerlach polarized hydrogen source for the Munich MP-Tandem laboratory using ECR ionization and charge exchange in cesium vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertenberger, R.; Eisermann, Y.; Metz, A.; Schiemenz, P.; Graw, G.

    2001-01-01

    The 14 year old Lamb-Shift hydrogen source of the Munich Tandem laboratory is presently replaced by a newly developed Stern-Gerlach type atomic beam source (ABS) with electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) ionization and subsequent double charge exchange in a supersonic cesium vapor jet target. The atomic beam source provides an intensity of 6.4*10 16 atoms/sec of polarized hydrogen and of about 5*10 16 atoms/sec of polarized deuterium. Beam intensities larger than 100 μA were observed for positive H-vector + and D-vector + ion beams after ECR ionization and intensities larger than 10 μA for negative D-vector - ion beams in three magnetic substates

  6. Hydrogen isotope separation for fusion power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R., E-mail: robert.smith@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Whittaker, D.A.J.; Butler, B.; Hollingsworth, A.; Lawless, R.E.; Lefebvre, X.; Medley, S.A.; Parracho, A.I.; Wakeling, B. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Summary of the tritium plant, the Active Gas Handling System (AGHS), at JET. • Review of the Water Detritiation System (WDS) under construction. • Design of the new Material Detritiation Facility (MDF). • Review of problems in fusion related to metal/hydrogen system. - Abstract: The invited talk given at MH2014 in Salford ranged over many issues associated with hydrogen isotope separation, fusion machines and the hydrogen/metal systems found in the Joint European Torus (JET) machine located near Oxford. As this sort of talk does not lend itself well to a paper below I have attempted to highlight some of the more pertinent information. After a description of the Active Gas Handling System (AGHS) a brief summary of isotope separation systems is described followed by descriptions of three major projects currently being undertaken by the Tritium Engineering and Science Group (TESG), the upgrade to the Analytical Systems (AN-GC) at the AGH, the construction of a Water Detritiation System (WDS) and a Material Detritiation Facility (MDF). Finally, a review of some of the challenges facing fusion with respect to metal/hydrogen systems is presented.

  7. Imaging hydrogen flames by two-photon, laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, R.; Lempert, W.; Kumar, V.; Diskin, G.

    1991-01-01

    A nonintrusive multicomponent imaging system is developed which can image hydrogen, hot oxygen, and air simultaneously. An Ar-F excimer laser is injection-locked to cover the Q1 two-photon transition in molecular hydrogen which allows the observation of both hot oxygen and cold hydrogen. Rayleigh scattering from the water molecules occurs at the same frequency as the illuminating laser allowing analysis of the air density. Images of ignited and nonignited hydrogen jets are recorded with a high-sensitivity gated video camera. The images permit the analysis of turbulent hydrogen-core jet, the combustion zone, and the surrounding air, and two-dimensional spatial correlations can be made to study the turbulent structure and couplings between different regions of the flow field. The method is of interest to the study of practical combustion systems which employ hydrogen-air diffusion flames.

  8. A spin-filter polarimeter for low energy hydrogen and deuterium ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemieux, S.K.; Clegg, T.B.; Karwowski, H.J.; Thompson, W.J.; Crosson, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient polarimeter which reveals populations of individual hyperfine states of nuclear-spin-polarized H ± (or D ± ) ion beams has been tested. This device is based on unique properties of a three-level interaction in the 2S 1/2 and 2P 1/2 states of hydrogen (or deuterium) atoms, created when the incident, polarized ion beams undergo electron pickup in cesium vapour. Used on a polarized ion source, its efficiency faciy facilitates both rapid optimization and continual monitoring of parameters that affect the beam polarization. With such sources, and perhaps in applications with polarized gas jet targets, the device has potential for an absolute accuracy of better than 2%. (orig.)

  9. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  10. Transportation system of recoil nucleus by helium jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, S.C.; Borges, A.M.; Lemos Junior, O.F.; Auler, L.T.; Silva, A.G. da

    1981-01-01

    The transportation system of recoil nucleus by helium jet, is studied. It is used a technique aiming to put in the detection area (region of low background) the recoils, produced by nuclear reactions between target and particle beams, those produced with the help of cyclotron CV-28. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Method and apparatus for electrokinetic co-generation of hydrogen and electric power from liquid water microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saykally, Richard J; Duffin, Andrew M; Wilson, Kevin R; Rude, Bruce S

    2013-02-12

    A method and apparatus for producing both a gas and electrical power from a flowing liquid, the method comprising: a) providing a source liquid containing ions that when neutralized form a gas; b) providing a velocity to the source liquid relative to a solid material to form a charged liquid microjet, which subsequently breaks up into a droplet spay, the solid material forming a liquid-solid interface; and c) supplying electrons to the charged liquid by contacting a spray stream of the charged liquid with an electron source. In one embodiment, where the liquid is water, hydrogen gas is formed and a streaming current is generated. The apparatus comprises a source of pressurized liquid, a microjet nozzle, a conduit for delivering said liquid to said microjet nozzle, and a conductive metal target sufficiently spaced from said nozzle such that the jet stream produced by said microjet is discontinuous at said target. In one arrangement, with the metal nozzle and target electrically connected to ground, both hydrogen gas and a streaming current are generated at the target as it is impinged by the streaming, liquid spray microjet.

  12. A proposed neutron spectrometer system for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elevant, T.; Hellbom, G.; Scheffel, J.; Malmskog, S.

    1979-12-01

    A neutron spectrometer system is proposed primarily for measurements of ion temperature and density and ion beam energy distribution in extended fusion plasmas like e.g. in JET. Three different spectrometers are involved: time of flight, proton recoil and 3 He. Energy resolutions of a few percent both for DD and DT neutrons are provided. Six order of magnitudes in flux ranges will be covered by the system when employing multi-target systems. A neutron collimator and shielding system will be desirable in order to obtain relevant information. Due to the entire differences in energy and fluxes for DD and DT plasmas a flexible collimator-shielding system is recommended

  13. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  14. Turbulent jet in confined counterflow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    framework for presenting the results of the flowfield and jet penetration length. ... A turbulent jet is a basic free shear flow and has received research attention (see, .... MBE76 identify this to be a transitional zone and for. √ .... higher return flow and also higher velocity from counterflow due to a narrower gap thus leading.

  15. Associated jet production at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Bartels, Julius; de Roeck, A; Graudenz, Dirk; Wüsthoff, M

    1996-01-01

    We compare the BFKL prediction for the associated production of forward jets at HERA with fixed-order matrix element calculations taking into account the kinematical cuts imposed by experimental conditions. Comparison with H1 data of the 1993 run favours the BFKL prediction. As a further signal of BFKL dynamics, we propose to look for the azimuthal dependence of the forward jets.

  16. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  17. LHCb; LHCb Jet Reconstruction

    CERN Multimedia

    Augusto, O

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. It has been designed to collide proton beams at an energy up to 14 TeV in the center of mass. In 2011, the data taking was done with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, the instant luminosity has reached values greater than $4 \\times 10^{32} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ and the integrated luminosity reached the value of 1.02 $fb^{-1}$ on the LHCb. The jet reconstruction is fundamental to observe events that can be used to test pertubative QCD (pQCD). It also provides a way to observe standard model channels and searches for new physics like SUSY. The anti-kt algorithm is a jet reconstruction algorithm that is based on the distance of the particles on the space $\\eta \\times \\phi$ and on the transverse momentum of particles. To maximize the energy resolution all information about the trackers and the calo...

  18. Disruption prediction at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milani, F.

    1998-12-01

    The sudden loss of the plasma magnetic confinement, known as disruption, is one of the major issue in a nuclear fusion machine as JET (Joint European Torus). Disruptions pose very serious problems to the safety of the machine. The energy stored in the plasma is released to the machine structure in few milliseconds resulting in forces that at JET reach several Mega Newtons. The problem is even more severe in the nuclear fusion power station where the forces are in the order of one hundred Mega Newtons. The events that occur during a disruption are still not well understood even if some mechanisms that can lead to a disruption have been identified and can be used to predict them. Unfortunately it is always a combination of these events that generates a disruption and therefore it is not possible to use simple algorithms to predict it. This thesis analyses the possibility of using neural network algorithms to predict plasma disruptions in real time. This involves the determination of plasma parameters every few milliseconds. A plasma boundary reconstruction algorithm, XLOC, has been developed in collaboration with Dr. D. O'Brien and Dr. J. Ellis capable of determining the plasma wall/distance every 2 milliseconds. The XLOC output has been used to develop a multilayer perceptron network to determine plasma parameters as l i and q ψ with which a machine operational space has been experimentally defined. If the limits of this operational space are breached the disruption probability increases considerably. Another approach for prediction disruptions is to use neural network classification methods to define the JET operational space. Two methods have been studied. The first method uses a multilayer perceptron network with softmax activation function for the output layer. This method can be used for classifying the input patterns in various classes. In this case the plasma input patterns have been divided between disrupting and safe patterns, giving the possibility of

  19. Autoignition of hydrogen in shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbhor, Abhijit; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Chitilappilly, Lazar

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we compare the autoignition characteristics of laminar, nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jets in two different oxidizer flow configurations: (a) co-flowing heated air and (b) wake of heated air, using two-dimensional numerical simulations coupled with detailed chemical kinetics. In both cases, autoignition is observed to initiate at locations with low scalar dissipation rates and high HO2 depletion rates. It is found that the induction stage prior to autoignition is primarily dominated by chemical kinetics and diffusion while the improved scalar mixing imparted by the large-scale flow structures controls the ignition progress in later stages. We further investigate the ignition transience and its connection with mixing by varying the initial wake conditions and fuel jet to oxidizer velocity ratios. These studies reveal that the autoignition delay times are independent of initial wake flow conditions. However, with increased jet velocity ratios, the later stages of ignition are accelerated, mainly due to enhanced mixing facilitated by the higher scalar dissipation rates. Furthermore, the sensitivity studies for the jet in wake configuration show a significant reduction in ignition delay even for about 0.14% (by volume) hydrogen dilution in the oxidizer. In addition, the detailed autoignition chemistry and the relative roles of certain radical species in the initiation of the autoignition process in these non-premixed jets are investigated by tracking the evolution of important chain reactions using a Lagrangian particle tracking approach. The reaction H2 + O2 ↔ HO2 + H is recognized to be the dominant chain initiation reaction that provides H radicals essential for the progress of subsequent elementary reactions during the pre-ignition stage.

  20. The hydrogen village: building hydrogen and fuel cell opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.

    2006-01-01

    The presentation addressed the progress the Hydrogen Village Program has made in its first 24 months of existence and will provide an understanding of the development of new markets for emerging Hydrogen and Fuel Cell technologies based on first hand, real world experience. The Hydrogen Village (H2V) is an End User driven, Market Development Program designed to accelerate the sustainable commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies through awareness, education and early deployments throughout the greater Toronto area (GTA). The program is a collaborative public-private partnership of some 35 companies from a broad cross section of industry administered through Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Canada and funded by the Governments of Canada and Ontario. The intent of the H2V is to develop markets for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell technologies that benefit the local and global community. The following aspects of market development are specifically targeted: 1) Deployments: of near market technologies in all aspects of community life (stationary and mobile). All applications must be placed within the community and contact peoples in their day-to-day activity. End user involvement is critical to ensure that the applications chosen have a commercial justification and contribute to the complementary growth of the market. 2) Development: of a coordinated hydrogen delivery and equipment service infrastructure. The infrastructure will develop following the principles of conservation and sustainability. 3) Human and societal factors: - Public and Corporate policy, public education, Codes/ Standards/ Regulations - Opportunity for real world implementation and feedback on developing codes and standards - Build awareness among regulatory groups, public, and the media. The GTA Hydrogen Village is already well under way with strategically located projects covering a wide range of hydrogen and fuel cell applications including: Residential heat and power generation using solid oxide

  1. Platelet activating factor receptor binding plays a critical role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Gerardo; Kazimi, Nasser; Nghiem, Dat X.; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Applying military jet fuel (JP-8) or commercial jet fuel (Jet-A) to the skin of mice suppresses the immune response in a dose-dependant manner. The release of biological response modifiers, particularly prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ), is a critical step in activating immune suppression. Previous studies have shown that injecting selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors into jet fuel-treated mice blocks immune suppression. Because the inflammatory phospholipid mediator, platelet-activating factor (PAF), up-regulates cyclooxygenase-2 production and PGE 2 synthesis by keratinocytes, we tested the hypothesis that PAF-receptor binding plays a role in jet fuel-induced immune suppression. Treating keratinocyte cultures with PAF and/or jet fuel (JP-8 and Jet-A) stimulates PGE 2 secretion. Jet fuel-induced PGE 2 production was suppressed by treating the keratinocytes with specific PAF-receptor antagonists. Injecting mice with PAF, or treating the skin of the mice with JP-8, or Jet-A, induced immune suppression. Jet fuel-induced immune suppression was blocked when the jet fuel-treated mice were injected with PAF-receptor antagonists before treatment. Jet fuel treatment has been reported to activate oxidative stress and treating the mice with anti-oxidants (Vitamins C, or E or beta-hydroxy toluene), before jet fuel application, interfered with immune suppression. These findings confirm previous studies showing that PAF-receptor binding can modulate immune function. Furthermore, they suggest that PAF-receptor binding may be an early event in the induction of immune suppression by immunotoxic environmental agents that target the skin

  2. Nucleosynthesis in Jets from Collapsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Nishimura, Nobuya; Hashimoto, Masa-aki

    2008-01-01

    We investigate nucleosynthesis inside magnetically driven jets ejected from collapsars, or rotating magnetized stars collapsing to a black hole, based on two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the collapsars during the core collapse. We follow the evolution of the abundances of about 4000 nuclides from the collapse phase to the ejection phase using a large nuclear reaction network. We find that the r-process successfully operates only in the energetic jets (>10 51 erg), so that U and Th are synthesized abundantly, even when the collapsars have a relatively small magnetic field (10 10 G) and a moderately rotating core before the collapse. The abundance patterns inside the jets are similar to that of the r-elements in the solar system. The higher energy jets have larger amounts of 56 Ni. Less energetic jets, which have small amounts of 56 Ni, could induce GRB without supernova, such as GRB060505 and GRB060614

  3. Magnetically driven jets and winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Berk, H. L.; Contopoulos, J.

    1991-01-01

    Four equations for the origin and propagation of nonrelativistic jets and winds are derived from the basic conservation laws of ideal MHD. The axial current density is negative in the vicinity of the axis and positive at larger radii; there is no net current because this is energetically favored. The magnetic field is essential for the jet solutions in that the zz-component of the magnetic stress acts, in opposition to gravity, to drive matter through the slow magnetosonic critical point. For a representative self-consistent disk/jet solution relevant to a protostellar system, the reaction of the accreted mass expelled in the jets is 0.1, the ratio of the power carried by the jets to the disk luminosity is 0.66, and the ratio of the boundary layer to disk luminosities is less than about 0.13. The star's rotation rate decreases with time even for rotation rates much less than the breakup rate.

  4. Carbon deposition and hydrogen retention in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    The results of measurements on co-deposition of hydrogen isotopes and wall materials, hydrogen retention, redeposition of carbon and deposition of hydrogen on PMI of JT-60U are described. From above results, selection of plasma facing material and ability of carbon wall is discussed. Selection of plasma facing materials in fusion reactor, characteristics of carbon materials as the plasma facing materials, erosion, transport and deposition of carbon impurity, deposition of tritium in JET, results of PMI in JT-60, application of carbon materials to PFM of ITER, and future problems are stated. Tritium co-deposition in ITER, erosion and transport of carbon in tokamak, distribution of tritium deposition on graphite tile used as bumper limiter of TFTR, and measurement results of deposition of tritium on the Mark-IIA divertor tile and comparison between them are described. (S.Y.)

  5. Investigation of low emission combustors using hydrogen lean direct injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert ISAC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the key technology challenges for the use of hydrogen in gas turbine engines is the performance of the combustion system, in particular the fuel injectors. Tests were conducted to measure the nitrogen oxide (NOx emissions and combustion performance at inlet conditions of 588 to 811 K, 0.4 to 1.4 MPa, and equivalence ratios up to 0.48. All the injectors were based on Lean Direct Injection (LDI technology with multiple injection points and quick mixing. One challenge to hydrogen-based premixing combustion systems is flashback since hydrogen has a reaction rate over 7 times that of Jet-A.

  6. Nitric oxide formation in H2/CO syngas non-premixed jet flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranga Dinesh, K.K.J.; Richardson, E.S.; van Oijen, J.A.; Luo, K.H.; Jiang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of high hydrogen content (HHC) syngas nonpremixed jet flames have been carried out to study the nitric oxide (NO) formation. The detailed chemistry employed is the GRI 3.0 updated with the influence of the NCN radical chemistry using flamelet generated manifolds

  7. Numerical simulations of turbulent jet ignition and combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Irannejad, Abolfazl; Jaberi, Farhad

    2013-11-01

    The ignition and combustion of a homogeneous lean hydrogen-air mixture by a turbulent jet flow of hot combustion products injected into a colder gas mixture are studied by a high fidelity numerical model. Turbulent jet ignition can be considered as an efficient method for starting and controlling the reaction in homogeneously charged combustion systems used in advanced internal combustion and gas turbine engines. In this work, we study in details the physics of turbulent jet ignition in a fundamental flow configuration. The flow and combustion are modeled with the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) approach, in which the filtered form the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity and the FMDF transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar (temperature and species mass fractions) field. The hydrogen oxidation is described by a detailed reaction mechanism with 37 elementary reactions and 9 species.

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Targets the Cys320/Cys529 Motif in Kv4.2 to Inhibit the Ito Potassium Channels in Cardiomyocytes and Regularizes Fatal Arrhythmia in Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shan-Feng; Luo, Yan; Ding, Ying-Jiong; Chen, Ying; Pu, Shi-Xin; Wu, Hang-Jing; Wang, Zhong-Feng; Tao, Bei-Bei; Wang, Wen-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The mechanisms underlying numerous biological roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) remain largely unknown. We have previously reported an inhibitory role of H2S in the L-type calcium channels in cardiomyocytes. This prompts us to examine the mechanisms underlying the potential regulation of H2S on the ion channels. Results: H2S showed a novel inhibitory effect on Ito potassium channels, and this effect was blocked by mutation at the Cys320 and/or Cys529 residues of the Kv4.2 subunit. H2S broke the disulfide bridge between a pair of oxidized cysteine residues; however, it did not modify single cysteine residues. H2S extended action potential duration in epicardial myocytes and regularized fatal arrhythmia in a rat model of myocardial infarction. H2S treatment significantly increased survival by ∼1.4-fold in the critical 2-h time window after myocardial infarction with a protection against ventricular premature beats and fatal arrhythmia. However, H2S did not change the function of other ion channels, including IK1 and INa. Innovation and Conclusion: H2S targets the Cys320/Cys529 motif in Kv4.2 to regulate the Ito potassium channels. H2S also shows a potent regularizing effect against fatal arrhythmia in a rat model of myocardial infarction. The study provides the first piece of evidence for the role of H2S in regulating Ito potassium channels and also the specific motif in an ion channel labile for H2S regulation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 129–147. PMID:25756524

  9. HYDROGEN PERMITTED LINES IN THE FIRST NEAR-IR SPECTRA OF Th 28 MICROJET: ACCRETION OR EJECTION TRACERS?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, Deirdre; Podio, Linda; Bacciotti, Francesca; Nisini, Brunella

    2010-01-01

    We report the first near-infrared detection of the bipolar microjet from T Tauri star ThA 15-28 (hereafter Th 28). Spectra were obtained with Very Large Telescope (VLT)/ISAAC for the slit both perpendicular and parallel to the flow to examine jet kinematics and gas physics within the first arcsecond from the star. The jet was successfully detected in both molecular and atomic lines. The H 2 component was found to be entirely blueshifted around the base of the bipolar jet. It shows that only the blue lobe is emitting in H 2 while light is scattered in the direction of the red lobe, highlighting an asymmetric extinction and/or excitation between the two lobes. Consistent with this view, the red lobe is brighter in all atomic lines. Interestingly, the jet was detected not only in [Fe II], but also in Brγ and Paβ lines. Though considered tracers mainly of accretion, we find that these high excitation hydrogen permitted lines trace the jet as far as 150 AU from the star. This is confirmed in a number of ways: the presence of the [Fe II] 2.13 μm line which is of similarly high excitation; H I velocities which match the jet [Fe II] velocities in both the blue and red lobe; and high electron density close to the source of >6 x 10 4 cm -3 derived from the [Fe II] 1.64, 1.60 μm ratio. These near-infrared data complement Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) optical and near-ultraviolet data for the same target which were used in a jet rotation study, although no rotation signature could be identified here due to insufficient angular resolution. The unpublished HST/STIS Hα emission is included here alongside the other H I lines. Identifying Brγ and Paβ as tracers of ejection is significant because of the importance of finding strong near-infrared probes close to the star, where forbidden lines are quenched, which will help understand accretion ejection when observed with high spatial resolution instruments such as VLTI/AMBER.

  10. The isotope effect on divertor conditions and neutral pumping in horizontal divertor configurations in JET-ILW Ohmic plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Uljanovs

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the impact of isotope mass and divertor configuration on the divertor conditions and neutral pressures is critical for predicting the performance of the ITER divertor in DT operation. To address this need, ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasma experiments were conducted in JET with the ITER-like wall in varying divertor configurations. In this study, these plasmas are simulated with EDGE2D-EIRENE outfitted with a sub-divertor model, to predict the neutral pressures in the plenum with similar fashion to the experiments. EDGE2D-EIRENE predictions show that the increased isotope mass results in up to a 25% increase in peak electron densities and 15% increase in peak ion saturation current at the outer target in deuterium when compared to hydrogen for all horizontal divertor configurations. Indicating that a change from hydrogen to deuterium as main fuel decreases the neutral mean free path, leading to higher neutral density in the divertor. Consequently, this mechanism also leads to higher neutral pressures in the sub-divertor. The experimental data provided by the hydrogen and deuterium ohmic discharges shows that closer proximity of the outer strike point to the pumping plenum results in a higher neutral pressure in the sub-divertor. The diaphragm capacitance gauge pressure measurements show that a two to three-fold increase in sub-divertor pressure was achieved in the corner and nearby horizontal configurations compared to the far-horizontal configurations, likely due to ballistic transport (with respect to the plasma facing components of the neutrals into the sub-divertor. The corner divertor configuration also indicates that a neutral expansion occurs during detachment, resulting in a sub-divertor neutral density plateau as a function of upstream density at the outer-mid plane.

  11. Micro-/nano-characterization of the surface structures on the divertor tiles from JET ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokitani, M., E-mail: tokitani.masayuki@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Miyamoto, M. [Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Masuzaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Fujii, Y. [Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Sakamoto, R. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Oya, Y. [Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Hatano, Y. [University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Otsuka, T. [Kindai University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka, 577-8502 (Japan); Oyaidzu, M.; Kurotaki, H.; Suzuki, T.; Hamaguchi, D.; Isobe, K.; Asakura, N. [National Institute for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Rokkasho Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Widdowson, A. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rubel, M. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Micro-/nano-characterization of the surface structures on the divertor tiles from JET ITER-like wall were studied. • The stratified mixed-material deposition layer composed by W, C, O, Mo and Be with the thickness of ∼1.5 μm was formed on the apron of Tile 1. • The study revealed the micro- and nano-scale modification of the inner tile surface of the JET ILW. - Abstract: Micro-/nano-characterization of the surface structures on the divertor tiles used in the first campaign (2011–2012) of the JET tokamak with the ITER-like wall (JET ILW) were studied. The analyzed tiles were a single poloidal section of the tile numbers of 1, 3 and 4, i.e., upper, vertical and horizontal targets, respectively. A sample from the apron of Tile 1 was deposition-dominated. Stratified mixed-material layers composed of Be, W, Ni, O and C were deposited on the original W-coating. Their total thickness was ∼1.5 μm. By means of transmission electron microscopy, nano-size bubble-like structures with a size of more than 100 nm were identified in that layer. They could be related to deuterium retention in the layer dominated by Be. The surface microstructure of the sample from Tile 4 also showed deposition: a stratified mixed-material layer with the total thickness of 200–300 nm. The electron diffraction pattern obtained with transmission electron microscope indicated Be was included in the layer. No bubble-like structures have been identified. The surface of Tile 3, originally coated by Mo, was identified as the erosion zone. This is consistent with the fact that the strike point was often located on that tile during the plasma operation. The study revealed the micro- and nano-scale modification of the inner tile surface of the JET ILW. In particular, a complex mixed-material deposition layer could affect hydrogen isotope retention and dust formation.

  12. Cryogenic system for liquid hydrogen polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitami, T.; Chiba, M.; Hirabayashi, H.; Ishii, T.; Kato, S.

    1979-01-01

    A cryogenic system has been constructed for a liquid hydrogen polarimeter in order to measure polarization of high energy proton at the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron of Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. The system principally consists of a cryogenerator with a cryogenic transfer line, a liquid hydrogen cryostat, and a 14.5 l target container of thin aluminum alloy where liquid hydrogen is served for the experiment. The refrigeration capacity is about 54 W at 20.4 K without a target container. (author)

  13. Inclusive jet cross sections and jet shapes at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainer, N.

    1991-09-01

    The inclusive jet cross section and jet shapes at √s = 1.8 TeV have been measured by CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. results are compared to recent next-to-leading order QCD calculations, which predict variation of the cross section with cone size, as well as variation of the jet shape with energy. A lower limit on the parameter Λ c , which characterize a contact interaction associated with quark sub-structure is determined to be 1400 GeV at the 95% confidence level. 3 refs., 4 figs

  14. Transonic Performance Characteristics of Several Jet Noise Suppressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, James W.; Salters, Leland B., Jr.; Cassetti, Marlowe D.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation of the transonic performance characteristics of several noise-suppressor configurations has been conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. The models were tested statically and over a Mach number range from 0.70 to 1.05 at an angle of attack of 0 deg. The primary jet total-pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to about 4.5. The effect of secondary air flow on the performance of two of the configurations was investigated. A hydrogen peroxide turbojet-engine simulator was used to supply the hot-jet exhaust. An 8-lobe afterbody with centerbody, short shroud, and secondary air had the highest thrust-minus-drag coefficients of the six noise-suppressor configurations tested. The 12-tube and 12-lobe afterbodies had the lowest internal losses. The presence of an ejector shroud partially shields the external pressure distribution of the 8-lobe after-body from the influence of the primary jet. A ring-airfoil shroud increased the static thrust of the annular nozzle but generally decreased the thrust minus drag at transonic Mach numbers.

  15. The JET high temperature in-vessel inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Businaro, T.; Cusack, R.; Calbiati, L.; Raimondi, T.

    1989-01-01

    The JET In-vessel Inspection System (IVIS) has been enhanced for operation under the following nominal conditions: vacuum vessel at 350 degC; vacuum vessel evacuated (∼10 -9 mbar); radiation dose during D-T phase 10 rads. The target resolution of the pictures is 2 mm at 5 m distance and tests on radiation resistance of the IVIS system are being carried out. Since June 1988, the new system is installed in the JET machine and the first inspections of the intire vessel at 250 degC have been satisfactory done. (author). 3 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab

  16. JET flywheel generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huart, M.; Sonnerup, L.

    1986-01-01

    Two large vertical shaft flywheel generators each provides the JET device with peak power up to 400 MW and energy up to 2600 MJ per pulse to induce and confine the multi-mega-ampere plasma current. The integrated rotor flywheel consists of a 650 tonne/10 m diameter rim carrying the poles of the machine. The energy is stored kinetically during a 9 min interval of acceleration from half-speed to full-speed and then released during a 20 s long deceleration. A design life of 100 000 cycles at full energy rating was specified. The mechanical design and construction of the generators is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the assessment of the stresses and fatigue life of the rotor system, its dynamic behaviour (rim movement, critical speed and balancing) and on the performance in operation of the large thrust bearing. (author)

  17. JET pump limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenberg, K.; Deksnis, E.; Shaw, R.; Reiter, D.

    1988-01-01

    JET plans to install two pump limiter modules which can be used for belt-limiter, inner-wall and X-point discharges and, also, for 1-2s as the main limiter. A design is presented which is compatible with two diagnostic systems, and which allows partial removal of the pump limiter to provide access for remote-handling operations. The high heat-flux components are initially cooled during a pulse. Heat is removed between discharges by radiation and pressure contacts to a water-cooled support structure. The pumping edge will be made of annealed pyrolytic graphite. Exhaust efficiency has been estimated, for a 1-d edge model, using a Monte-Carlo calculation of neutral gas transport. When the pump limiter is operated together with other wall components we expect an efficiency of ≅ 5% (2.5 x 10 21 part/s). As a main limiter the efficiency increases to about 10%. (author)

  18. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  19. Clues from Bent Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-04-01

    Powerful jets emitted from the centers of distant galaxies make for spectacular signposts in the radio sky. Can observations of these jets reveal information about the environments that surround them?Signposts in the SkyVLA FIRST images of seven bent double-lobed radio galaxies from the authors sample. [Adapted from Silverstein et al. 2018]An active supermassive black hole lurking in a galactic center can put on quite a show! These beasts fling out accreting material, often forming intense jets that punch their way out of their host galaxies. As the jets propagate, they expand into large lobes of radio emission that we can spot from Earth observable signs of the connection between distant supermassive black holes and the galaxies in which they live.These distinctive double-lobed radio galaxies (DLRGs) dont all look the same. In particular, though the jets are emitted from the black holes two poles, the lobes of DLRGs dont always extend perfectly in opposite directions; often, the jets become bent on larger scales, appearing to us to subtend angles of less than 180 degrees.Can we use our observations of DLRG shapes and distributions to learn about their surroundings? A new study led by Ezekiel Silverstein (University of Michigan) has addressed this question by exploring DLRGs living in dense galaxy-cluster environments.Projected density of DLRGcentral galaxy matches (black) compared to a control sample of random positionscentral galaxy matches (red) for different distances from acluster center. DLRGs have a higher likelihood of being located close to a cluster center. [Silverstein et al. 2018]Living Near the HubTo build a sample of DLRGs in dense environments, Silverstein and collaborators started from a large catalog of DLRGs in Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars with radio lobes visible in Very Large Array data. They then cross-matched these against three galaxy catalogs to produce a sample of 44 DLRGs that are each paired to a nearby massive galaxy, galaxy group

  20. Hydrogen the fuel for 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, I.P.

    2009-01-01

    Non-Conventional Energy Sources, such as solar and hydrogen energy will remain available for infinite period. One of the reasons of great worry for all of us is reducing sources of conventional energies. The rate of fossil fuel consumption is higher than the rate of the fossil fuel production by the nature. The results will be the scarcity of automobile fuel in the world which will create lot of problems in transport sector. The other aspect is pollution added by these sources in our environment which increases with more use of these sources, resulting in the poor quality of life on this planet. There is constant search of alternate fuel to solve energy shortage which can provide us energy without pollution. Hence most frequently discussed source is hydrogen which when burnt in air produces a clean form of energy. In the last one decade hydrogen has attracted worldwide interest as a secondary energy carrier. This has generated comprehensive investigations on the technology involved and how to solve the problems of production, storage and transportation of hydrogen. The interest in hydrogen as energy of the future is due to it being a clean energy, most abundant element in the universe, the lightest fuel, richest in energy per unit mass and unlike electricity, it can be easily stored. Hydrogen gas is now considered to be the most promising fuel of the future. In future it will be used in various applications, e.g. it can generate Electricity, useful in cooking food, fuel for automobiles, hydrogen powered industries, Jet Planes, Hydrogen Village and for all our domestic energy requirements. Hydrogen as a fuel has already found applications in experimental cars and all the major car companies are in competition to build a commercial car and most probably they may market hydrogen fuel automobiles in near future but at a higher cost compared to gasoline cars but it is expected that with time the cost of hydrogen run cars will decrease with time. Long lasting, light and

  1. A multimaterial electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutanto, E; Shigeta, K; Kim, Y K; Graf, P G; Hoelzle, D J; Barton, K L; Alleyne, A G; Ferreira, P M; Rogers, J A

    2012-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing has emerged as a high-resolution alternative to other forms of direct solution-based fabrication approaches, such as ink-jet printing. This paper discusses the design, integration and operation of a unique E-jet printing platform. The uniqueness lies in the ability to utilize multiple materials in the same overall print-head, thereby enabling increased degrees of heterogeneous integration of different functionalities on a single substrate. By utilizing multiple individual print-heads, with a carrousel indexing among them, increased material flexibility is achieved. The hardware design and system operation for a relatively inexpensive system are developed and presented. Crossover interconnects and multiple fluorescent tagged proteins, demonstrating printed electronics and biological sensing applications, respectively. (paper)

  2. Particle distributions in ordered jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarmi, Y.; Kogan, E.

    1978-01-01

    Assuming specific assumptions about the space-time evolution of hadronic jets, within the framework of a Monte-Carlo calculation, the transverse and longitudinal momentum distributins of particles within the jets are obtained. The transverse momentum distributions are sensitive to the space-time evolution picture. The observed energy dependence of the average transverse momentum and the well known seagull effect are qualitatively reproduced within a picture in which Slow particles in a jet are produced First, and Fast ones - Last (SFFL). (author)

  3. Jet substructure with analytical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Mrinal [University of Manchester, Consortium for Fundamental Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); Fregoso, Alessandro; Powling, Alexander [University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); Marzani, Simone [Durham University, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-15

    We consider the mass distribution of QCD jets after the application of jet-substructure methods, specifically the mass-drop tagger, pruning, trimming and their variants. In contrast to most current studies employing Monte Carlo methods, we carry out analytical calculations at the next-to-leading order level, which are sufficient to extract the dominant logarithmic behaviour for each technique, and compare our findings to exact fixed-order results. Our results should ultimately lead to a better understanding of these jet-substructure methods which in turn will influence the development of future substructure tools for LHC phenomenology. (orig.)

  4. Jet Joint Undertaking. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The scientific, technical, experimental and theoretical investigations related to JET tokamak are presented. The JET Joint Undertaking, Volume 2, includes papers presented at: the 15th European Conference on controlled fusion and plasma heating, the 15th Symposium on fusion technology, the 12th IAEA Conference on plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research, the 8th Topical Meeting on technology of fusion. Moreover, the following topics, concerning JET, are discussed: experience with wall materials, plasma performance, high power ion cyclotron resonance heating, plasma boundary, results and prospects for fusion, preparation for D-T operation, active gas handling system and remote handling equipment

  5. The Role of the JET Project in Global Fusion Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1983-01-01

    The aim of nuclear fusion research is to make fusion energy available as a new energy source. Fusion processes occur naturally in the sun, where hydrogen nuclei release energy by combining to form helium. A fusion reactor on earth will require even higher temperatures than in the interior...... of the sun, and it will be based on deuterium and tritium reactions. JET (Joint European Torus) is a major fusion experiment now under construction near Abingdon in the UK It is aimed at producing conditions approximating those necessary in a fusion reactor. The results expected from JET should permit...... a realistic evaluation of the prospects for fusion power and serve as a basis for the design of the next major fusion experiment....

  6. Destructive hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrisse, H; Dufour, L

    1929-01-21

    Oils of high boiling point, e.g. gas oil, lamp oil, schist oil, brown coal tar etc., are converted into motor benzine by heating them at 200 to 500/sup 0/C under pressure of 5 to 40 kilograms/cm/sup 2/ in the presence of ferrous chloride and gases such as hydrogen, or water gas, the desulfurization of the oils proceeding simultaneously. One kilogram of lamp oil and 100 g. ferrous chloride are heated in an autoclave in the presence of water gas under a pressure of 18 kg/cm/sup 2/ to 380 to 400/sup 0/C. The gaseous products are allowed to escape intermittently and are replaced by fresh water gas. A product distilling between 35 and 270/sup 0/C is obtained.

  7. Jet Joint Undertaking. Progress report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This JET Progress Reports provides an overview summary and puts into context the scientific and technical advances made on JET during 1990. In addition, the Report is supplemented by appendices of contributions (in preprint form) of the more important JET articles published during the year, which set out the details of JET activities

  8. Jet reconstruction and heavy jet tagging at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The jet reconstruction and the heavy jet flavour tagging at LHCb will be discussed with focus on the last published measurements such as the measurement of forward tt, W+bb and W+cc production in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV and the search for the SM Higgs boson decaying in bbbar or ccbar in association to W or Z boson.

  9. Annular Impinging Jet Controlled by Radial Synthetic Jets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Tesař, Václav; Broučková, Zuzana; Peszyński, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, 16-17 (2014), s. 1450-1461 ISSN 0145-7632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-08888S; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760801 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : impinging jet * hybrid synthetic jet * flow control Subject RIV: JU - Aeronautics, Aerodynamics, Aircrafts Impact factor: 0.814, year: 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01457632.2014.889467

  10. High kinetic energy plasma jet generation and its injection into the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronin, A.V.; Gusev, V.K.; Petrov, Yu.V.; Sakharov, N.V.; Abramova, K.B.; Sklyarova, E.M.; Tolstyakov, S.Yu.

    2005-01-01

    Progress in the theoretical and experimental development of the plasma jet source and injection of hydrogen plasma and neutral gas jets into the Globus-M spherical tokamak is discussed. An experimental test bed is described for investigation of intense plasma jets that are generated by a double-stage plasma gun consisting of an intense source for neutral gas production and a conventional pulsed coaxial accelerator. A procedure for optimizing the accelerator parameters so as to achieve the maximum possible flow velocity with a limited discharge current and a reasonable length of the coaxial electrodes is presented. The calculations are compared with experiment. Plasma jet parameters, among them pressure distribution across the jet, flow velocity, plasma density, etc, were measured. Plasma jets with densities of up to 10 22 m -3 , total numbers of accelerated particles (1-5) x 10 19 , and flow velocities of 50-100 km s -1 were successfully injected into the plasma column of the Globus-M tokamak. Interferometric and Thomson scattering measurements confirmed deep jet penetration and a fast density rise ( 19 to 1 x 10 19 ) did not result in plasma degradation

  11. Experimental investigation of the formation and propagation of plasma jets created by a power laser: application to laboratory astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loupias, B.

    2008-10-01

    Plasma jets are often observed in the polar regions of Young Stellar Objects (YSO). For a better understanding of the whole processes at the origin of their formation and evolution, this research thesis aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a plasma jet generation by a power laser, and at investigating its characteristics. After a detailed description of Young Stellar Objects jets and an overview of theoretical models, the author describes some experiments performed with gas guns, pulsed machines and power lasers. He describes means of generation of a jet by laser interaction via strong shock propagation. He reports experimental work, describing the target, laser operating conditions and the determination of jet parameters: speed, temperature, density. Then, he introduces results obtained for plasma jet propagation in vacuum, describes their evolution with respect to initial conditions (target type, laser operating conditions), and identifies optimal conditions for generating a jet similar to that in astrophysical conditions. He considers their propagation in ambient medium like for YSO jets in interstellar medium. Two distinct cases are investigated: collision of two successive shocks in a gaseous medium, and propagation of a plasma jet in a gas jet

  12. Characteristics and generation of secondary jets and secondary gigantic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Jou; Huang, Sung-Ming; Chou, Jung-Kung; Kuo, Cheng-Ling; Chen, Alfred B.; Su, Han-Tzong; Hsu, Rue-Rou; Frey, Harald U.; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Lee, Lou-Chuang

    2012-06-01

    Secondary transient luminous events (TLEs) recorded by the ISUAL-FORMOSAT2 mission can either be secondary jets or secondary gigantic jets (GJs), depending on their terminal altitudes. The secondary jets emerge from the cloud top beneath the preceding sprites and extend upward to the base of the sprites at ˜50 km. The secondary jets likely are negative electric discharges with vertically straight luminous columns, morphologically resembling the trailing jet of the type-I GJs. The number of luminous columns in a secondary jet seems to be affected by the size of the effective capacitor plate formed near the base of the preceding sprites and the charge distribution left behind by the sprite-inducing positive cloud-to-ground discharges. The secondary GJs originate from the cloud top under the shielding area of the preceding sprites, and develop upward to reach the lower ionosphere at ˜90 km. The observed morphology of the secondary GJs can either be the curvy shifted secondary GJs extending outside the region occupied by the preceding sprites or the straight pop-through secondary GJs developing through the center of the preceding circular sprites. A key factor in determining the terminal height of the secondary TLEs appears to be the local ionosphere boundary height that established by the preceding sprites. The abundance and the distribution of the negative charge in the thundercloud following the sprite-inducing positive cloud-to-ground discharges may play important role in the generation of the secondary TLEs.

  13. Jets in high energy nucleon-nucleon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1982-01-01

    From the experimental studies of high-energy hardon-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon collisions, by means of nuclear targets applied as detectors, it follows that particles are produced via intermediate objects created first in a 2 → 2 type endoergic reaction. These objects, called generons, decay in flight into finally observed particles and resonances after their lifetime tausub(g) > or approximately 10 - 22 s. The jet structure of the outcome in nucleon-nucleon collisions is a simple and indispensable consequence of this particle production mechanism. The picture of the jet structure in the collision outcome observed in the CMS of the colliding nucleons depends on the energy of these nUcleons. New particle production scheme is proposed, which can be tested experimentally; corresponding simple relations between characteristics of colliding nucleons and of produced jets are proposed for a testing

  14. Searching for jets using a transverse-energy trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.; Fields, T.; Selove, W.

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the question of whether prominent jet structure would be expected in hadron-hadron collision events which are selected on the basis of having a large amount of transverse energy carried by the final-state hadrons. Using a computer simulation based on the Field-Feynman parton scattering model, we find that such a transverse-energy selection does not yield events predominantly having clear jet structure; this finding is in agreement with data from experiment NA5 at CERN. The basic reason for this effect is that high-multiplicity fragmentation of the beam and target spectator partons will contribute a substantial fraction of the transverse energy while also diluting the jet structure

  15. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet as an Accelerator of Tooth Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran Šantak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP jet as a potential accelerator of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in bleaching gels which could lead to better and faster bleaching. Material and Methods: 25 pastilles of hydroxylapatite were colored in green tea for 8 hours and were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5. The bleaching process was performed with 30% and 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP gel alone and in conjunction with helium APP jet. During the bleaching treatment, optical emission spectroscopy and non-contact surface temperature measurement using pyrometer were performed. Color of the pastilles was determined by a red– green–blue (RGB colorimeter. PH values of bleaching gels were measured before and after the plasma treatment on additional 10 pastilles using a pH meter with contact pH electrode. Results: The color measurements of pastilles before and after the treatment showed that treatment with APP jet improved the bleaching effect by 32% and 15% in the case of 30 % and 40% HP gel. Better results were obtained approximately six times faster than with a procedure suggested by the bleaching gel manufacturer. Optical emission spectroscopy proved that plasma has a chemically active role on the gel. After the APP treatment, pH values of bleaching gels dropped to about 50–75% of their initial value while the surface temperature increased by 8–10˚C above baseline. Conclusion: The use of plasma jet provides more effective bleaching results in a shorter period of time without a significant temperature increase which may cause damage of the surrounding tissue.

  16. Equatorial jet - a case study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    analysis of hydrographic data of 1964 is also carried out to understand the response signature of water column to prevailing westerlies. A jet forms in the Central Indian Ocean which gathers momentum as it advances eastward. Sinking of the thermocline...

  17. Jets in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nattrass, Christine

    2017-01-01

    High energy collisions of heavy nuclei permit the study of nuclear matter at temperatures and energy densities so high that the fundamental theory for strong interactions, QCD, predicts a phase transition to a plasma of quarks and gluons. This matter, called a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), has been studied experimentally for the last decade and has been observed to be a strongly interacting liquid with a low viscosity. High energy partons created early in the collision interact with the QGP and provide unique probes of its properties. Hard partons fragment into collimated sprays of particles called jets and have been studied through measurements of single particles, correlations between particles, and measurements of fully reconstructed jets. These measurements demonstrate partonic energy loss in the QGP and constrain the QGP’s properties. Measurements of the jet structure give insight into the mechanism of this energy loss. The information we have learned from studies of jets and challenges for the field will be reviewed. (paper)

  18. Jet-quenching and correlations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-06

    May 6, 2015 ... pseudorapidity (ridge) correlations in small systems. Section 7 ... words of 'jet' and 'parton' are often used interchangeably. ...... [118] STAR Collaboration: Joshua Konzer, Poster presentation at Quark Matter 2012 (2012).

  19. Jet calculus beyond leading logarithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinowski, J.; Konishi, K.; Taylor, T.R.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the evolution of hadronic jets produced in hard processes can be studied in terms of a simple parton branching picture, beyond the leading log approximation of QCD. The jet calculus is generalized to any given order of logs (but always to all orders of αsub(s)). We discuss the general structure of the formalism. Universality of jet evolution is discussed. We consider also a jet calorimetry measure and the multiplicity distribution of final states in a form which allows a systematic improvement of approximation. To the next-to-leading order, we prove the finiteness and elucidate the scheme dependence of parton subprocess probabilities. The physical inclusive cross section is shown to be scheme independent: next-to-leading results for e + e - → q (nonsinglet) + X agree with those of Curci and others. (orig.)

  20. Jets in deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, L.

    1995-01-01

    Jet production in deep inelastic scattering provides a basis for the investigation of various phenomena related to QCD. Two-jet production at large Q 2 has been studied and the distributions with respect to the partonic scaling variables have been compared to models and to next to leading order calculations. The first observations of azimuthal asymmetries of jets produced in first order α s processes have been obtained. The gluon initiated boson-gluon fusion process permits a direct determination of the gluon density of the proton from an analysis of the jets produced in the hard scattering process. A comparison of these results with those from indirect extractions of the gluon density provides an important test of QCD. (author)

  1. Hydrogen peroxide probes directed to different cellular compartments.

    OpenAIRE

    Mikalai Malinouski; You Zhou; Vsevolod V Belousov; Dolph L Hatfield; Vadim N Gladyshev

    2011-01-01

    Background Controlled generation and removal of hydrogen peroxide play important roles in cellular redox homeostasis and signaling. We used a hydrogen peroxide biosensor HyPer, targeted to different compartments, to examine these processes in mammalian cells. Principal Findings Reversible responses were observed to various redox perturbations and signaling events. HyPer expressed in HEK 293 cells was found to sense low micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide. When targeted to various cellular ...

  2. Top Jets at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, L.G.; Lee, S.J.; Perez, G.; Sung, I.; Virzi, J.

    2008-10-06

    We investigatethe reconstruction of high pT hadronically-decaying top quarksat the Large Hadron Collider. One of the main challenges in identifying energetictop quarks is that the decay products become increasingly collimated. This reducesthe efficacy of conventional reconstruction methods that exploit the topology of thetop quark decay chain. We focus on the cases where the decay products of the topquark are reconstructed as a single jet, a"top-jet." The most basic"top-tag" methodbased on jet mass measurement is considered in detail. To analyze the feasibility ofthe top-tagging method, both theoretical and experimental aspects of the large QCDjet background contribution are examined. Based on a factorization approach, wederive a simple analytic approximation for the shape of the QCD jet mass spectrum.We observe very good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation. We consider high pT tt bar production in the Standard Model as an example, and show that our theoretical QCD jet mass distributions can efficiently characterize the background via sideband analyses. We show that with 25 fb-1 of data, our approach allows us to resolve top-jets with pT _> 1 TeV, from the QCD background, and about 1.5 TeV top-jets with 100 fb-1, without relying on b-tagging. To further improve the significancewe consider jet shapes (recently analyzed in 0807.0234 [hep-ph]), which resolve thesubstructure of energy flow inside cone jets. A method of measuring the top quarkpolarization by using the transverse momentum of the bottom quark is also presented.The main advantages of our approach are: (i) the mass distributions are driven byfirst principle calculations, instead of relying solely on Monte Carlo simulation; (ii) for high pT jets (pT _> 1 TeV), IR-safe jet shape variables are robust against detectorresolution effects. Our analysis can be applied to other boosted massive particlessuch as the electroweak gauge bosons and the Higgs.

  3. Radial scaling in inclusive jet production at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Frank E.

    2018-03-01

    Inclusive jet production in p-p and p ¯ -p collisions shows many of the same kinematic systematics as observed in single-particle inclusive production at much lower energies. In an earlier study (1974) a phenomenology, called radial scaling, was developed for the single-particle inclusive cross sections that attempted to capture the essential underlying physics of pointlike parton scattering and the fragmentation of partons into hadrons suppressed by the kinematic boundary. The phenomenology was successful in emphasizing the underlying systematics of the inclusive particle productions. Here we demonstrate that inclusive jet production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in high-energy p-p collisions and at the Tevatron in p ¯ -p inelastic scattering shows similar behavior. The ATLAS inclusive jet production plotted as a function of this scaling variable is studied for √s of 2.76, 7 and 13 TeV and is compared to p ¯ -p inclusive jet production at 1.96 TeV measured at the CDF and D0 at the Tevatron and p-Pb inclusive jet production at the LHC ATLAS at √sNN=5.02 TeV . Inclusive single-particle production at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory fixed target and Intersecting Storage Rings energies are compared to inclusive J /ψ production at the LHC measured in ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. Striking common features of the data are discussed.

  4. Thermal-hydraulic performance of convective boiling jet array impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, R; De Brún, C; Kempers, R; Lupoi, R; Robinson, A J

    2016-01-01

    Jet impingement boiling is investigated with regard to heat transfer and pressure drop performance using a novel laser sintered 3D printed jet impingement manifold design. Water was the working fluid at atmospheric pressure with inlet subcooling of 7 o C. The convective boiling performance of the impinging jet system was investigated for a flat copper target surface for 2700≤Re≤5400. The results indicate that the heat transfer performance of the impinging jet is independent of Reynolds number for fully developed boiling. Also, the investigation of nozzle to plate spacing shows that low spacing delays the onset of nucleate boiling causing a superheat overshoot that is not observed with larger gaps. However, no sensitivity to the gap spacing was measured once boiling was fully developed. The assessment of the pressure drop performance showed that the design effectively transfers heat with low pumping power requirements. In particular, owing to the insensitivity of the heat transfer to flow rate during fully developed boiling, the coefficient of performance of jet impingement boiling in the fully developed boiling regime deteriorates with increased flow rate due to the increase in pumping power flux. (paper)

  5. Centrifuge pellet injector for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Buchelt, E.; Jacobi, D.; Lackner, E.; Schilling, H.B.; Ulrich, M.; Weber, G.

    1983-08-01

    An engineering design of a centrifuge pellet injector for JET is reported as part of the Phase I contract number JE 2/9016. A rather detailed design is presented for the mechanical and electronic features. Stress calculations, dynamic behaviour and life estimates are considered. The interfaces to the JET vacuum system and CODAS are discussed. Proposals for the pellet diagnostics (velocity, mass and shape) are presented. (orig.)

  6. 4-jet events at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Bizouard, M A

    1997-01-01

    Results of a special study made by the four LEP experiments on 4-jet events recorded at Vs = 130 - 136 , 161 and 172 GeV are related. This study concerns the ALEPH analysis which has shown an excess of 4-jet events in data recorded at Vs = 130 - 136 GeV. No significant evidence has been found by the 3 other experiments. Results have been combined after several checks which did not show differences of performance between the four LEP experiments.

  7. Overview of JET results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamela, J.

    2003-01-01

    Scientific and technical activities on JET focus on the issues likely to affect the ITER design and operation. The physics of the ITER reference mode of operation, the ELMy H-mode, has progressed significantly: the extrapolation of ELM size to ITER has been re-evaluated; NTMs have been shown to be metastable in JET, and can be avoided via sawtooth destabilisation by ICRH; α-simulation experiments were carried out by accelerating 4 He beam ions by ICRH, providing a new tool for fast particle and MHD studies with up to 80-90% of plasma heating by fast 4 He ions. With or without impurity seeding, quasi-steady sate high confinement (H 98 =1), high density (n e /n GR = 0.9-1) and high β (β N =2) ELMy H-mode has been achieved by operating near the ITER triangularity (δ∼0.40-0.5) and safety factor (q 95 ∼3), at Z eff ∼1.5-2. In Advanced Tokamak scenarios, internal transport barriers are now characterised in real time with a new criterion ρ* T ; tailoring of the current profile with LHCD provides reliable access to a variety of q profiles, with significantly lowered access power for barrier formation; rational q surfaces appear to be associated with ITB formation; Alfven cascades are observed in RS plasmas, providing an identification of q profile evolution; plasmas with 'current holes' were observed and explained by modelling. Transient high confinement Advanced Tokamak regimes with H89=3.3, β N =2.4 and ITER relevant q<5 are achievable in reversed magnetic shear. Quasistationary internal transport barriers are developed with full non-inductive current drive, including ∼50% bootstrap current. Record duration of ITBs was achieved, up to 11 s, approaching the resistive time. Pressure and current profiles of Advanced Tokamak regimes are controlled by a real time feedback system, in separate experiments. The erosion and co-deposition data base progressed significantly, in particular with a new quartz microbalance diagnostic allowing shot by shot measurements of

  8. Transverse jets and their control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagozian, Ann R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, 48-121 Engineering IV, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The jet in crossflow or transverse jet has been studied extensively because of its relevance to a wide variety of flows in technological systems, including fuel or dilution air injection in gas turbine engines, thrust vector control for high speed airbreathing and rocket vehicles, and exhaust plumes from power plants. These widespread applications have led over the past 50+ years to experimental, theoretical, and numerical examinations of this fundamental flowfield, with and without a combustion reaction, and with single or multi-phase flow. The complexities in this flowfield, whether the jet is introduced flush with respect to the injection wall or from an elevated pipe or nozzle, present challenges in accurately interrogating, analyzing, and simulating important jet features. This review article provides a background on these studies and applications as well as detailed features of the transverse jet, and mechanisms for its control via active means. Promising future directions for the understanding, interrogation, simulation, and control of transverse jet flows are also identified and discussed. (author)

  9. Impurity production and transport at the JET belt limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, C.S.; McCracken, G.M.; Strangeby, P.C.; Toronto Univ., ON; Summers, D.D.R.

    1989-01-01

    Under certain operating conditions in JET the impurity content of the discharge can be high, thus reducing the fusion reaction rate through the dilution of the hydrogenic fuel. The dilution in most discharges is predominantly due to carbon impurities. In order to understand how carbon impurities are produced and transported into the plasma, detailed measurements with interference filters centered on intense spectral lines of the low ionization states of carbon (C I, C II, C III) as well as the fuel species (Dα) and helium (He I). (author) 6 refs., 4 figs

  10. Stanford polarized atomic beam target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavis, D.G.; Dunham, J.S.; Hugg, J.W.; Glavish, H.F.

    1976-01-01

    A polarized atomic beam source was used to produce an atomic hydrogen beam which was in turn used as a polarized proton target. A target density of 2 x 10'' atoms/cm 3 and a target polarization of 0.37 without the use of rf transitions were measured. These measurements indicate that a number of experiments are currently feasible with a variety of polarized target beams

  11. Disruptions in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, J.A.; Gill, R.D.; Hugon, M.

    1989-01-01

    In JET, both high density and low-q operation are limited by disruptions. The density limit disruptions are caused initially by impurity radiation. This causes a contraction of the plasma temperature profile and leads to an MHD unstable configuration. There is evidence of magnetic island formation resulting in minor disruptions. After several minor disruptions, a major disruption with a rapid energy quench occurs. This event takes place in two stages. In the first stage there is a loss of energy from the central region. In the second stage there is a more rapid drop to a very low temperature, apparently due to a dramatic increase in impurity radiation. The final current decay takes place in the resulting cold plasma. During the growth of the MHD instability the initially rotating mode is brought to rest. This mode locking is believed to be due to an electromagnetic interaction with the vacuum vessel and external magnetic field asymmetries. The low-q disruptions are remarkable for the precision with which they occur at q ψ = 2. These disruptions do not have extended precursors or minor disruptions. The instability grows and locks rapidly. The energy quench and current decay are generally similar to those of the density limit. (author). 43 refs, 35 figs, 3 tabs

  12. Modeling the Compression of Merged Compact Toroids by Multiple Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ron; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A fusion propulsion scheme has been proposed that makes use of the merging of a spherical distribution of plasma jets to dynamically form a gaseous liner. The gaseous liner is used to implode a magnetized target to produce the fusion reaction in a standoff manner. In this paper, the merging of the plasma jets to form the gaseous liner is investigated numerically. The Los Alamos SPHINX code, based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to model the interaction of the jets. 2-D and 3-D simulations have been performed to study the characteristics of the resulting flow when these jets collide. The results show that the jets merge to form a plasma liner that converge radially which may be used to compress the central plasma to fusion conditions. Details of the computational model and the SPH numerical methods will be presented together with the numerical results.

  13. Relativistic Hydrodynamics and Spectral Evolution of GRB Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta-Martínez, C.

    2017-09-01

    dynamical details of the jet propagation and connect them to the generation of thermal radiation in GRB events akin to that of the Christmas burst. A comprehensive parameter study of the jet/environment interaction has been performed and synthetic light curves are confronted with the observational data. The thermal emission in our models originates from the interaction between the jet and the hydrogen envelope ejected during the neutron star/He core merger. We find that the lack of a classical afterglow and the accompanying thermal emission in BBD-GRBs can be explained by the interaction of an ultrarelativistic jet with a toroidally shaped ejecta whose axis coincides with the binary rotation axis. We also find that the synchrotron emission of the forward shock of the jet is dominant during the early phases of the evolution, along which that shock is still moderately relativistic. The contribution of the reverse shock is of the same magnitude as that of the forward shock during the first 80 min after the GRB. Later, it quickly fades because the jet/environment interaction chokes the ultrarelativistic jet beam and effectively dumps the reverse shock. We highlight that, in agreement with observations, we obtain rather flat light curves during the first 2 days after the GRB, and a spectral evolution consistent with the observed reddening of the system. Besides, we obtain that this spectral inversion and reddening happening at about 2 days in the Christmas burst can be related to the time at which the massive shell, ejected in an early phase of the common-envelope evolution of the progenitor system, is completely ablated by the ultrarelativistic jet. In the second part of this thesis, we study more canonical progenitor systems of GRBs, namely single massive stars on the brink of collapse. Motivated by the many associations of GRBs with energetic SN explosions, we study the propagation of relativistic jets within the progenitor star and the circumstellar medium. Particular

  14. Forward di-jet production in dilute-dense collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petreska E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We derive a factorization formula for forward production of two jets in dilutedense collisions that is valid for an arbitrary value of the momentum imbalance of the jets, kt. This generalizes the transverse momentum dependent (TMD factorization formula that has been derived before by Dominguez et al. Their formula is valid only for small values of the transverse momentum of the small-x gluon from the target; it has kt dependent TMD gluon distributions, but on-shell hard matrix elements. We extend the TMD formula to all ranges of kt by including off-shell matrix elements. We also add finite Nc corrections. The new formula encompasses both, the TMD factorization for small kt on the order of the saturation scale, and the High Energy Factorization (HEF for large kt on the order of the momentum of the jets. The TMD and HEF factorizations can be derived from the Color Glass Condensate (CGC formula for forward di-jet production in the appropriate limits. We show explicitly the equivalence of HEF and CGC in the dilute target approximation.

  15. Quark and gluon jet properties in symmetric three-jet events

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Quark and gluon jets with the same energy, 24GeV, are compared in symmetric three-jet configurations from hadronic Z decays observed by the ALEPH detector. Jets are defined using the Durham algorithm. Gluon jets are identified using an anti-tag on b jets, based on either a track impact parameter method or a high transverse momentum lepton tag. The comparison of gluon and mixed flavour quark jets shows that gluon jets have a softer fragmentation function, a larger angular width and a higher particle multiplicity. Evidence is also presented which shows that the corresponding differences between gluon and heavy flavour jets are significantly smaller.

  16. Forward Jet Vertex Tagging: A new technique for the identification and rejection of forward pileup jets

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The suppression of pileup forward jets is crucial for a variety of physics analyses at the LHC, ranging from VBF Higgs production to SUSY searches. A novel forward pileup tagging technique that exploits the correlation between central and forward jets originating from pileup interactions is presented. Tracking and vertex information in the central $\\eta$ region is used to indirectly tag and reject forward pileup jets that are back-to-back to central pileup jets. The pileup suppression power observed in Pythia8 simulated events increases with jet \\pt and ranges between a 30\\% and 60\\% pileup jet removal for 90\\% jet selection efficiency for jets between 20 and 50 GeV.

  17. Using neural networks with jet shapes to identify b jets in e+e- interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellantoni, L.; Conway, J.S.; Jacobsen, J.E.; Pan, Y.B.; Wu Saulan

    1991-01-01

    A feed-forward neural network trained using backpropagation was used to discriminate between b and light quark jets in e + e - → Z 0 → qanti q events. The information presented to the network consisted of 25 jet shape variables. The network successfully identified b jets in two- and three-jet events modeled using a detector simulation. The jet identification efficiency for two-jet events was 61% and the probability to call a light quark jet a b jet equal to 20%. (orig.)

  18. Forward Jets and Forward-Central Jets at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00176215

    2012-01-01

    We report on cross section measurements for inclusive forward jet production and for the simultaneous production of a forward and a central jet in sqrt{s} = 7 TeV pp-collisions. Data collected in 2010, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.14 pb^{-1}, is used for the measurements. Jets in the transverse momentum range pT = 35 - 140 GeV/c are reconstructed with the anti-kT (R = 0.5) algorithm. The extended coverage of large pseudo-rapidities is provided by the Hadronic Forward calorimeter (3.2 < \\eta < 4.7), while central jets are limited to \\eta < 2.8, covered by the main detector components. The two differential cross sections are presented as a function of the jet transverse momentum. Comparisons to next-to-leading order perturbative calculations, and predictions from event generators based on different parton showering mechanisms (PYTHIA and HERWIG) and parton dynamics (CASCADE) are shown.

  19. Investigations of needle-free jet injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm-Baxter, J R; Mitragotri, S

    2004-01-01

    Jet injection is a needle-free drug delivery method in which a high-speed stream of fluid impacts the skin and delivers drugs. Although a number of jet injectors are commercially available, especially for insulin delivery, they have a low market share compared to needles possibly due to occasional pain associated with jet injection. Jets employed by the traditional jet injectors penetrate deep into the dermal and sub-dermal regions where the nerve endings are abundantly located. To eliminate the pain associated with jet injections, we propose to utilize microjets that penetrate only into the superficial region of the skin. However, the choice of appropriate jet parameters for this purpose is challenging owing to the multiplicity of factors that determine the penetration depth. Here, we describe the dependence of jet injections into human skin on the power of the jet. Dermal delivery of liquid jets was quantified using two measurements, penetration of a radiolabeled solute, mannitol, into skin and the shape of jet dispersion in the skin which was visualized using sulforhodamine B. The dependence of the amount of liquid delivered in the skin and the geometric measurements of jet dispersion on nozzle diameter and jet velocity was captured by a single parameter, jet power.

  20. The GRB-SLSN connection: misaligned magnetars, weak jet emergence, and observational signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Ben; Metzger, Brian D.; Thompson, Todd A.; Nicholl, Matt; Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2018-04-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support a connection between hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) and long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Both classes of events require a powerful central energy source, usually attributed to a millisecond magnetar or an accreting black hole. The GRB-SLSN link raises several theoretical questions: What distinguishes the engines responsible for these different phenomena? Can a single engine power both a GRB and a luminous SN in the same event? We propose a unifying model for magnetar thermalization and jet formation: misalignment between the rotation (Ω) and magnetic dipole (μ) axes dissipates a fraction of the spin-down power by reconnection in the striped equatorial wind, providing a guaranteed source of `thermal' emission to power the supernova. The remaining unthermalized power energizes a relativistic jet. We show that even weak relativistic jets of luminosity ˜1046 erg s-1 can escape the expanding SN ejecta implying that escaping relativistic jets may accompany many SLSNe. We calculate the observational signature of these jets. We show that they may produce transient ultraviolet (UV) cocoon emission lasting a few hours when the jet breaks out of the ejecta surface. A longer lived optical/UV signal may originate from a mildly relativistic wind driven from the interface between the jet and the ejecta walls, which could explain the secondary early-time maximum observed in some SLSNe light curves, such as LSQ14bdq. Our scenario predicts a population of GRB from on-axis jets with extremely long durations, potentially similar to the population of `jetted-tidal disruption events', in coincidence with a small subset of SLSNe.

  1. Vacuum injection system for hydrogen micro-spheres in the CELSIUS storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, Hernan.

    1990-01-01

    The use of hydrogen micro-spheres as internal targets in the CELSIUS storage ring has been proposed for light meson rare decay measurements. The target generation apparatus design is based on that developed for refueling of fusion tokamak reactors. The micro-spheres are produced by acoustic excitation of a liquid hydrogen jet, and are injected into vacuum for the experiments by means of a hydrogen gas flow through an injection nozzle. The work reported here is an analysis of the gas flow in the injection nozzle, of the entrained motion of the micro-spheres considered as spherical particles, and of the heat transfer between them and the gas. The computation of the heat transfer allows the determination of the conditions under which the evaporation of the micro-spheres is negligible. It is shown that the gas must be cooled to temperatures near that of the micro-spheres for these to survive. Together with the computation of the gas flow and particle motion, the analysis includes the design of the injection nozzle. The requirements of well defined mass flow rate and low perturbation level suggest a nozzle consisting of a contraction region and a straight region with constant cross-sectional area. This nozzle is to be operated with stagnation conditions near the triple point conditions and choked flow at the exit. The condition of a limiting mass flow rate of the order of 10 -6 kg/s together with the operating conditions bound the exit diameter to values of 200-250 μm. Other geometrical parameters have only a subordinate importance on the injection nozzle design

  2. Water testing of the FMIT lithium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassberger, J.A.; Ingham, J.G.

    1981-11-01

    Results of water tests of the lithium target design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility demonstrate hydraulic features essential for acceptable target operation and confirm predictions of the target performance. This high speed, free surface, curved-wall jet has been shown to generate a stable surface shape and to provide the high velocities and pressures within the fluid needed to remove the 3.5 MW of power generated within the jet during FMIT operation. Measurements of the jet performance are found to fall within limits bounded by one- and two-dimensional potential flow predictions. This agreement between measured and predicted performance provides for a significant level of confidence in the ability of the FMIT lithium target to meet its design and functional objectives

  3. LPWA using supersonic gas jet with tailored density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, O.; Bohlen, S.; Dale, J.; D'Arcy, R.; Dinter, M.; Erbe, J. H.; Indorf, G.; di Lucchio, L.; Goldberg, L.; Gruse, J. N.; Karstensen, S.; Libov, V.; Ludwig, K.; Martinez de La Ossa, A.; Marutzky, F.; Niroula, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Quast, M.; Schaper, L.; Schwinkendorf, J.-P.; Streeter, M.; Tauscher, G.; Weichert, S.; Palmer, C.; Horbatiuk, Taras

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven plasma wakefield accelerators have been explored as a potential compact, reproducible source of relativistic electron bunches, utilising an electric field of many GV/m. Control over injection of electrons into the wakefield is of crucial importance in producing stable, mono-energetic electron bunches. Density tailoring of the target, to control the acceleration process, can also be used to improve the quality of the bunch. By using gas jets to provide tailored targets it is possible to provide good access for plasma diagnostics while also producing sharp density gradients for density down-ramp injection. OpenFOAM hydrodynamic simulations were used to investigate the possibility of producing tailored density targets in a supersonic gas jet. Particle-in-cell simulations of the resulting density profiles modelled the effect of the tailored density on the properties of the accelerated electron bunch. Here, we present the simulation results together with preliminary experimental measurements of electron and x-ray properties from LPWA experiments using gas jet targets and a 25 TW, 25 fs Ti:Sa laser system at DESY.

  4. Holographic Jet Quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficnar, Andrej

    In this dissertation we study the phenomenon of jet quenching in quark-gluon plasma using the AdS/CFT correspondence. We start with a weakly coupled, perturbative QCD approach to energy loss, and present a Monte Carlo code for computation of the DGLV radiative energy loss of quarks and gluons at an arbitrary order in opacity. We use the code to compute the radiated gluon distribution up to n=9 order in opacity, and compare it to the thin plasma (n=1) and the multiple soft scattering (n=infinity) approximations. We furthermore show that the gluon distribution at finite opacity depends in detail on the screening mass mu and the mean free path lambda. In the next part, we turn to the studies of how heavy quarks, represented as "trailing strings" in AdS/CFT, lose energy in a strongly coupled plasma. We study how the heavy quark energy loss gets modified in a "bottom-up" non-conformal holographic model, constructed to reproduce some properties of QCD at finite temperature and constrained by fitting the lattice gauge theory results. The energy loss of heavy quarks is found to be strongly sensitive to the medium properties. We use this model to compute the nuclear modification factor RAA of charm and bottom quarks in an expanding plasma with Glauber initial conditions, and comment on the range of validity of the model. The central part of this thesis is the energy loss of light quarks in a strongly coupled plasma. Using the standard model of "falling strings", we present an analytic derivation of the stopping distance of light quarks, previously available only through numerical simulations, and also apply it to the case of Gauss-Bonnet higher derivative gravity. We then present a general formula for computing the instantaneous energy loss in non-stationary string configurations. Application of this formula to the case of falling strings reveals interesting phenomenology, including a modified Bragg-like peak at late times and an approximately linear path dependence. Based

  5. Materials Down Select Decisions Made Within the Department of Energy Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-11-30

    Technical report describing DOE's Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence investigation into various adsorbent and chemisorption materials and progress towards meeting DOE's hydrogen storage targets. The report presents a review of the material status as related to DOE hydrogen storage targets and explains the basis for the down select decisions.

  6. Separation of tritium from other hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes a plant that has been operated at Marcoule for tritium production and used thermal diffusion enrichment, a facility that was built in Saclay to enrich hydrogen in tritium for low level measurements, and the Laue Langevin Institute tritium extraction plant. Details are given on the project under construction for the tritium separation facility at JET using Gas Chromatography, and on proposals for circuits for NET. Studies on catalysers for liquid phase catalytic exchange, on electrolysers, or different gas chromatography arrangements, are described. Systems designed for reprocessing plants, for detritiation of heavy water by distillation are briefly accounted for

  7. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasypin, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  8. Fiscal 1976 Sunshine Project research report. Interim report (hydrogen energy); 1976 nendo chukan hokokushoshu. Suiso energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-11-01

    This report summarizes the Sunshine Project research interim reports on hydrogen energy of every organizations. The report includes research items, laboratories, institutes and enterprises concerned, research targets, research plans, and progress conditions. The research items are as follows. (1) Hydrogen production technology (electrolysis, high- temperature high-pressure water electrolysis, 4 kinds of thermochemical techniques, direct thermolysis). (2) Hydrogen transport and storage technology (2 kinds of solidification techniques). (3) Hydrogen use technology (combustion technology, fuel cell, solid electrolyte fuel cell, fuel cell power system, hydrogen fuel engine). (4) Hydrogen safety measures technology (disaster preventive technology for gaseous and liquid hydrogen, preventing materials from embrittlement due to hydrogen, hydrogen refining, transport and storage systems, their safety technology). (5) Hydrogen energy system (hydrogen energy system, hydrogen use subsystems, peripheral technologies). (NEDO)

  9. Jets from jets: re-clustering as a tool for large radius jet reconstruction and grooming at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachman, Benjamin; Nef, Pascal; Schwartzman, Ariel; Swiatlowski, Maximilian [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj [Center for High Energy Physics, University of Oregon,1371 E. 13th Ave, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)

    2015-02-12

    Jets with a large radius R≳1 and grooming algorithms are widely used to fully capture the decay products of boosted heavy particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Unlike most discriminating variables used in such studies, the jet radius is usually not optimized for specific physics scenarios. This is because every jet configuration must be calibrated, insitu, to account for detector response and other experimental effects. One solution to enhance the availability of large-R jet configurations used by the LHC experiments is jet re-clustering. Jet re-clustering introduces an intermediate scale rjets are calibrated and used as the inputs to reconstruct large radius jets. In this paper we systematically study and propose new jet re-clustering configurations and show that re-clustered large radius jets have essentially the same jet mass performance as large radius groomed jets. Jet re-clustering has the benefit that no additional large-R calibration is necessary, allowing the re-clustered large radius parameter to be optimized in the context of specific precision measurements or searches for new physics.

  10. Jets from jets: re-clustering as a tool for large radius jet reconstruction and grooming at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachman, Benjamin; Nef, Pascal; Schwartzman, Ariel; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj

    2015-01-01

    Jets with a large radius R≳1 and grooming algorithms are widely used to fully capture the decay products of boosted heavy particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Unlike most discriminating variables used in such studies, the jet radius is usually not optimized for specific physics scenarios. This is because every jet configuration must be calibrated, insitu, to account for detector response and other experimental effects. One solution to enhance the availability of large-R jet configurations used by the LHC experiments is jet re-clustering. Jet re-clustering introduces an intermediate scale rjets are calibrated and used as the inputs to reconstruct large radius jets. In this paper we systematically study and propose new jet re-clustering configurations and show that re-clustered large radius jets have essentially the same jet mass performance as large radius groomed jets. Jet re-clustering has the benefit that no additional large-R calibration is necessary, allowing the re-clustered large radius parameter to be optimized in the context of specific precision measurements or searches for new physics.

  11. Microwave Hydrogen Production from Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    combustion NOx control of reciprocating engine exhaust and fuel cell application of biogas . Our target is to obtain the methane conversion efficiency...demonstration of MW technology removing and destroying hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and siloxanes from biogas produced by Sacramento Regional Wastewater...running on biogas and is currently conducting the field demonstration of the unit at Tollenaar Dairy in Elk Grove, CA. SMUD, California Air Resources

  12. Chemical reactions of fission products with ethylene using the gas jet technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contis, E.T.; Rengan, Krish; Griffin, Henry C.

    1994-01-01

    An understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions taking place between fission products and their carrier gases, and the designing of a fast separation procedure were the purposes of this investigation. Chemical reactions of short-lived (less than one minute half-life) fission products with carrier gases lead to various chemical species which can be separated in the gas phase. The Gas Jet Facility at the Ford Nuclear Reactor was used to study the yields of volatile selenium and bromine fission products of 235 U using a semi-automatic batch solvent extraction technique. Heptane and water were used as organic and inorganic solvents. A carrier gas mixture of ethylene to pre-purified nitrogen (1 : 3) was used to sweep the fission products from the target to the chemistry area for analysis. The results indicated that the volatile selenium products generated by the interaction of selenium fission fragments with ethylene were predominantly organic in nature (84%), possibly organoselenides. The selenium values were used to resolve the fractions of the bromine nuclides, which come from two major sources, viz., directly from fission and from the beta-decay of selenium. The data showed that the fractions of independent bromine fission products in the organic phase were much lower compared to selenium; the bromine values range from 10 to 22% and varied with mass number. Results indicated that the bromine products were inorganic in nature, as possibly hydrogen chloride. ((orig.))

  13. Composite hydrogen-solid methane moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picton, D.; Bennington, S.; Ansell, S.; Fernandez-Garcia, J.; Broome, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the results of Monte-Carlo calculations for a coupled moderator on a low-power pulsed neutron spallation source and is part of the design study for a second target station for the ISIS spallation source. Various options were compared including hydrogen, solid methane, grooving the solid methane and compound moderators made of hydrogen in front of solid methane. To maximise the neutron current at low energies two strategies appear to emerge from the calculations. For instruments that view a large area of moderator surface a layer of hydrogen in front of a thin solid-methane moderator is optimum, giving a gain of about a factor 10 relative to the current liquid hydrogen moderator on the existing ISIS tantalum target. For instruments that only view a restricted area higher flux, corresponding to a gain of 13.5, can be achieved with the use of a single groove or re-entrant hole in the moderator. (orig.)

  14. Inclusive jet spectrum for small-radius jets

    CERN Document Server

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Salam, Gavin P.; Soyez, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Following on our earlier work on leading-logarithmic (LLR) resummations for the properties of jets with a small radius, R, we here examine the phenomenological considerations for the inclusive jet spectrum. We discuss how to match the NLO predictions with small-R resummation. As part of the study we propose a new, physically-inspired prescription for fixed-order predictions and their uncertainties. We investigate the R-dependent part of the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) corrections, which is found to be substantial, and comment on the implications for scale choices in inclusive jet calculations. We also examine hadronisation corrections, identifying potential limitations of earlier analytical work with regards to their $p_t$-dependence. Finally we assemble these different elements in order to compare matched (N)NLO+LLR predictions to data from ALICE and ATLAS, finding improved consistency for the R-dependence of the results relative to NLO predictions.

  15. Vortex breakdown in a supersonic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Levey, Brian S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports a study of a vortex breakdown in a supersonic jet. A supersonic vortical jets were created by tangential injection and acceleration through a convergent-divergent nozzle. Vortex circulation was varied, and the nature of the flow in vortical jets was investigated using several types of flow visualization, including focusing schlieren and imaging of Rayleigh scattering from a laser light sheet. Results show that the vortical jet mixed much more rapidly with the ambient air than a comparable straight jet. When overexpanded, the vortical jet exhibited considerable unsteadiness and showed signs of vortex breakdown.

  16. Hydrogen Storage Performance in Pd/Graphene Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunyu; Szpunar, Jerzy A

    2016-10-05

    We have developed a Pd-graphene nanocomposite for hydrogen storage. The spherically shaped Pd nanoparticles of 5-45 nm in size are homogeneously distributed over the graphene matrix. This new hydrogen storage system has favorable features like desirable hydrogen storage capacity, ambient conditions of hydrogen uptake, and low temperature of hydrogen release. At a hydrogen charging pressure of 50 bar, the material could yield a gravimetric density of 6.7 wt % in the 1% Pd/graphene nanocomposite. As we increased the applied pressure to 60 bar, the hydrogen uptake capacity reached 8.67 wt % in the 1% Pd/graphene nanocomposite and 7.16 wt % in the 5% Pd/graphene nanocomposite. This system allows storage of hydrogen in amounts that exceed the capacity of the gravimetric target announced by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  17. Supersonic induction plasma jet modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selezneva, S.E.; Boulos, M.I.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been applied to study the argon plasma flow downstream of the induction plasma torch. It is shown that by means of the convergent-divergent nozzle adjustment and chamber pressure reduction, a supersonic plasma jet can be obtained. We investigate the supersonic and a more traditional subsonic plasma jets impinging onto a normal substrate. Comparing to the subsonic jet, the supersonic one is narrower and much faster. Near-substrate velocity and temperature boundary layers are thinner, so the heat flux near the stagnation point is higher in the supersonic jet. The supersonic plasma jet is characterized by the electron overpopulation and the domination of the recombination over the dissociation, resulting into the heating of the electron gas. Because of these processes, the supersonic induction plasma permits to separate spatially different functions (dissociation and ionization, transport and deposition) and to optimize each of them. The considered configuration can be advantageous in some industrial applications, such as plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition of diamond and polymer-like films and in plasma spraying of nanoscaled powders

  18. Experimental results from magnetized-jet experiments executed at the Jupiter Laser Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rasmus, A. M.; Klein, S. R.; MacDonald, M. J.; Trantham, M. R.; Fein, J. R.; Belancourt, P. X.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.; Pollock, B. B.; Park, J.; Hazi, A. U.; Williams, G. J.; Chen, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility investigated magnetization effects on collimated plasma jets. Laser-irradiated plastic-cone-targets produced collimated, millimeter-scale plasma flows as indicated by optical interferometry. Proton radiography of these jets showed no indication of strong, self-generated magnetic fields, suggesting a dominantly hydrodynamic collimating mechanism. Targets were placed in a custom-designed solenoid capable of generating field strengths up to 5 T. Proton radiographs of the well-characterized B-field, without a plasma jet, suggested an external source of trapped electrons that affects proton trajectories. The background magnetic field was aligned with the jet propagation direction, as is the case in many astrophysical systems. Optical interferometry showed that magnetization of the plasma results in disruption of the collimated flow and instead produces a hollow cavity. This result is a topic of ongoing investigation.

  19. Hydrocarbon bio-jet fuel from bioconversion of poplar biomass: life cycle assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budsberg, Erik; Crawford, Jordan T; Morgan, Hannah; Chin, Wei Shan; Bura, Renata; Gustafson, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Bio-jet fuels compatible with current aviation infrastructure are needed as an alternative to petroleum-based jet fuel to lower greenhouse gas emissions and reduce dependence on fossil fuels. Cradle to grave life cycle analysis is used to investigate the global warming potential and fossil fuel use of converting poplar biomass to drop-in bio-jet fuel via a novel bioconversion platform. Unique to the biorefinery designs in this research is an acetogen fermentation step. Following dilute acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, poplar biomass is fermented to acetic acid and then distilled, hydroprocessed, and oligomerized to jet fuel. Natural gas steam reforming and lignin gasification are proposed to meet hydrogen demands at the biorefineries. Separate well to wake simulations are performed using the hydrogen production processes to obtain life cycle data. Both biorefinery designs are assessed using natural gas and hog fuel to meet excess heat demands. Global warming potential of the natural gas steam reforming and lignin gasification bio-jet fuel scenarios range from CO2 equivalences of 60 to 66 and 32 to 73 g MJ(-1), respectively. Fossil fuel usage of the natural gas steam reforming and lignin gasification bio-jet fuel scenarios range from 0.78 to 0.84 and 0.71 to 1.0 MJ MJ(-1), respectively. Lower values for each impact category result from using hog fuel to meet excess heat/steam demands. Higher values result from using natural gas to meet the excess heat demands. Bio-jet fuels produced from the bioconversion of poplar biomass reduce the global warming potential and fossil fuel use compared with petroleum-based jet fuel. Production of hydrogen is identified as a major source of greenhouse gas emissions and fossil fuel use in both the natural gas steam reforming and lignin gasification bio-jet simulations. Using hog fuel instead of natural gas to meet heat demands can help lower the global warming potential and fossil fuel use at the biorefineries.

  20. Jets from jets: re-clustering as a tool for large radius jet reconstruction and grooming at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, Benjamin; Nef, Pascal; Schwartzman, Ariel; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj

    2015-02-01

    Jets with a large radius R ≳ 1 and grooming algorithms are widely used to fully capture the decay products of boosted heavy particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Unlike most discriminating variables used in such studies, the jet radius is usually not optimized for specific physics scenarios. This is because every jet configuration must be calibrated, insitu, to account for detector response and other experimental effects. One solution to enhance the availability of large- R jet configurations used by the LHC experiments is jet re-clustering. Jet re-clustering introduces an intermediate scale r groomed jets. Jet re-clustering has the benefit that no additional large-R calibration is necessary, allowing the re-clustered large radius parameter to be optimized in the context of specific precision measurements or searches for new physics.