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Sample records for hydrogen ions formirovanie

  1. Hydrogenation of zirconium film by implantation of hydrogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Fang, Kaihong; Lv, Huiyi; Liu, Jiwei; Wang, Boyu

    2017-03-01

    In order to understand the drive-in target in a D-D type neutron generator, it is essential to study the mechanism of the interaction between hydrogen ion beams and the hydrogen-absorbing metal film. The present research concerns the nucleation of hydride within zirconium film implanted with hydrogen ions. Doses of 30 keV hydrogen ions ranging from 4.30 × 1017 to 1.43 × 1018 ions cm-2 were loaded into the zirconium film through the ion beam implantation technique. Features of the surface morphology and transformation of phase structures were investigated with scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and x-ray diffraction. Confirmation of the formation of δ phase zirconium hydride in the implanted samples was first made by x-ray diffraction, and the different stages in the gradual nucleation and growth of zirconium hydride were then observed by atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Ionization of hydrogen and hydrogenic ions by antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. R.; Krstić, P. S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Wells, J. C.

    1996-05-01

    Motivated by earlier theoretical studies which utilized simplified models and by a very recent experiment regarding antiproton-impact of hydrogen, we present a description (D.R. Schultz, P.S. Krstić, C.O. Reinhold, and J.C. Wells, Phys. Rev. Lett. (1996) submitted.) of ionization of hydrogen and hydrogenic ions based on very large scale numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in three spatial dimensions and on analysis of the topology of the electronic eigenenergy surfaces in the plane of complex internuclear distance. It is illustrated how ionization of atomic hydrogen and hydrogenic ions by antiprotons is quite different from that for impact by positively charged particles at low energies. Most significantly, for hydrogen targets, the quasi-molecular electronic eigenenergies approach close to and ultimately merge with the continuum at small distances, leading to a plateau of the low energy ionization cross section. Work supported by US DOE Office of BES through contract No. DE-AC05-84OR21400 managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp.

  3. Sputtering of solid neon by keV hydrogen ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Ole; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1986-01-01

    Sputtering of solid Ne with the hydrogen ions H+1, H+2 and H+3 in the energy range 1–10 keV/atom has been studied by means of a quartz microbalance technique. No enhancement in the yield per atom for molecular ions was found. The results for hydrogen ions are compared with data for keV electrons....

  4. Effects of ion concentration on the hydrogen bonded structure of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular dynamics simulations of dilute and concentrated aqueous NaCl solutions are carried out to investigate the changes of the hydrogen bonded structures in the vicinity of ions for different ion concentrations. An analysis of the hydrogen bond population in the first and second solvation shells of the ions and in the bulk ...

  5. The charge state of hydrogen ions in metals and semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazhukov, S.I.; Kibardin, A.V.; Pyatkova, T.M.; Urmanov, A.R. (Urals Polytechnical Inst., Sverdlovsk (USSR))

    1991-06-01

    The charge state of hydrogen ions in metals and semiconductors has been studied based on a comparison of hydrogen ion stopping cross-sections in metal and semiconductor targets. It is shown that neutralization of the hydrogen ion in metals and semiconductors at ion speeds v{sub i} {proportional to} (1-2)v{sub 0}, where v{sub 0} = 2.2x10{sup 8} cm/s, is due to different mechanisms, i.e. to a bulk effect in metals and to a subsurface effect in semiconductors. (orig.).

  6. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E. [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Peng, S. X., E-mail: sxpeng@pku.edu.cn; Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H{sup +} beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H{sup −} ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  7. Hydrogen Reduction of Ferric Ions for Use in Copper Electrowinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl S. Noah; Debby F. Bruhn; John E. Wey; Robert S. Cherry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional copper electrowinning process uses the water hydrolysis reaction as the anodic source of electrons. However this reaction generates acid mist and requires large quantities of energy. In order to improve energy efficiency and avoid acid mist, an alternative anodic reaction of ferrous ion oxidation has been proposed. This reaction does not involve evolution of acid mist and can be carried out at a lower cell voltage than the conventional process. However, because ferrous ions are converted to ferric ions at the anode in this process, there is a need for reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions to continue this process. The most promising method for this reduction is the use of hydrogen gas since the resulting byproduct acid can be used elsewhere in the process and, unlike other reductants, hydrogen does not introduce other species that need subsequent removal. Because the hydrogen reduction technology has undergone only preliminary lab scale testing, additional research is needed to evaluate its commercial potential. Two issues for this research are the potentially low mass transfer rate of hydrogen into the electrolyte stream because of its low solubility in water, and whether other gaseous reductants less expensive than hydrogen, such as natural gas or syngas, might work. In this study various reductants were investigated to carry out the reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions using a simulated electrolyte solution recycled through a trickle bed reactor packed with catalyst. The gases tested as reductants were hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and a 50/50 mixture of H2 and CO. Nitrogen was also tested as an inert control. These gases were tested because they are constituents in either natural gas or syngas. The catalysts tested were palladium and platinum. Two gas flow rates and five electrolyte flow rates were tested. Pure hydrogen was an effective reductant of ferric ion. The rates were similar with both palladium and platinum. The ferric

  8. Electron elastic scattering resonances in the collision of fast hydrogenic ions with molecular hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, G.; Zavodszky, P.; Bhalla, C.P.; Richard, P.; Grabbe, S.; Aliabadi, H. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2001-07-01

    Absolute double differential cross sections for the electron production at zero degree laboratory observation angle were measured for high velocity hydrogenic carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and fluorine ions on molecular hydrogen. The energies of these ions were chosen so the elastic scattering resonance 2p{sup 2} {sup 1}D for each case can be clearly observed near the peak of the binary encounter electron distribution. Close coupling R-matrix calculations of elastic differential cross sections of electron impact of these ions were related to the measured ion-atom cross sections by using the elastic scattering model (ESM). Excellent agreement was found between theory and experimental data. (orig.)

  9. Negative hydrogen ion sources for accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Peters, J.; /DESY; Sherman, J.; /Los Alamos

    2005-08-01

    A variety of H{sup -} ion sources are in use at accelerator laboratories around the world. A list of these ion sources includes surface plasma sources with magnetron, Penning and surface converter geometries as well as magnetic-multipole volume sources with and without cesium. Just as varied is the means of igniting and maintaining magnetically confined plasmas. Hot and cold cathodes, radio frequency, and microwave power are all in use, as well as electron tandem source ignition. The extraction systems of accelerator H{sup -} ion sources are highly specialized utilizing magnetic and electric fields in their low energy beam transport systems to produce direct current, as well as pulsed and/or chopped beams with a variety of time structures. Within this paper, specific ion sources utilized at accelerator laboratories shall be reviewed along with the physics of surface and volume H{sup -} production in regard to source emittance. Current research trends including aperture modeling, thermal modeling, surface conditioning, and laser diagnostics will also be discussed.

  10. Hydrogen ion (Ph), ammonia, dissolved oxygen and nitrite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogen ion (pH), dissolved oxygen, ammonia and nitrite concentrations were studied monthly in two systems (re-circulatory and semi-intensive of 3 m2 sizes) each for six months. The systems were each stocked with 200 g of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. Results showed that all parameters were within acceptable limits ...

  11. The charge spectrum of positive ions in a hydrogen aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J.; Pulliam, D.; Leach, R.; Scherb, F.

    1976-01-01

    An auroral ion charge spectrometer was flown into a hydrogen aurora on a Javelin sounding rocket launched from Churchill, Manitoba. The instrument contained an electrostatic analyzer which selected particles with incident energy per unit charge up to 20 keV/charge and an 80-kV power supply which accelerated these ions onto an array of solid state detectors. Ions tentatively identified as H(+), He(+2), and O(+) were detected from 225 to 820 km in altitude. The experiment did not discriminate between H(+) and He(+), or between O(+), N(+), and C(+). Upper limits of highly charged heavy ion abundances have been set at 20% of the He(+2) and 0.15% of the H(+). It is concluded that both terrestrial and solar wind sources play significant roles in auroral ion precipitation.

  12. 21 CFR 868.1170 - Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH... Indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer. (a) Identification. An indwelling blood hydrogen ion concentration (pH) analyzer is a device that consists of a catheter-tip pH electrode and that is...

  13. Angle-resolved intensity and energy distributions of positive and negative hydrogen ions released from tungsten surface by molecular hydrogen ion impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S., E-mail: eun1302@mail4.doshsha.ac.jp [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Tanaka, N. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sasao, M. [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M. [University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y. [Tokushima Bunri University, Yamashiro, Tokushima 770-8514 (Japan); Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M. [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Yamaoka, H. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen ion reflection properties have been investigated following the injection of H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} ions onto a polycrystalline W surface. Angle- and energy-resolved intensity distributions of both scattered H{sup +} and H{sup −} ions are measured by a magnetic momentum analyzer. We have detected atomic hydrogen ions reflected from the surface, while molecular hydrogen ions are unobserved within our detection limit. The reflected hydrogen ion energy is approximately less than one-third of the incident beam energy for H{sub 3}{sup +} ion injection and less than a half of that for H{sub 2}{sup +} ion injection. Other reflection properties are very similar to those of monoatomic H{sup +} ion injection. Experimental results are compared to the classical trajectory simulations using the ACAT code based on the binary collision approximation.

  14. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  15. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-07

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution.

  16. Ion Fluence and Energy Effects on the Optical Properties of SS Mirrors Bombarded by Hydrogen Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardamid, A.F. [T. Shevchenko National Univ., Kiev (Ukraine); Belyaeva, A.I. [National Technical Univ. KhPI, Kharkov (Ukraine); Bondarenko, V.N. [NSC KIPT, Kharkov (Ukraine)] (and others)

    2003-04-01

    The effects of hydrogen ion (H{sub 3}{sup +}) bombardment on the optical properties of polycrystal stainless steel (SS) mirrors were investigated. Ellipsometry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, angle distribution of scattered light, and spectral reflectance were used to characterize the surfaces. Results for the bombardment of SS mirrors with ions of fixed energy (0.3, 0.65 and 1.5 keV/H), with ion flux density (0.5-2) x 10{sup 20} H/m{sup 2}/s up to fluences of (1.1-4.3) x 10{sup 24} H/m{sup 2} are presented. The data show that the surface roughness rises with both increasing ion energy and ion fluence, and that surface roughening leads to an increase of the scattered light with a corresponding decrease of reflectance at normal incidence. The thickness of the apparent layer, obtained by ellipsometry, was found to rise with increasing ion energy at fixed ion fluence and with increasing ion fluence at fixed ion energy. Possible mechanisms for the ion energy effect on the degradation rate of stainless steel mirrors and the origin of the apparent layer are discussed.

  17. Ion Fluence and Energy Effects on the Optical Properties of SS Mirrors Bombarded by Hydrogen Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardamid, A. F.; Belyaeva, A. I.; Bondarenko, V. N.; Davis, J. W.; Galuza, A. A.; Garkusha, I. E.; Haasz, A. A.; Konovalov, V. G.; Kudlenko, A. D.; Poon, M.; Ryzhkov, I. V.; Solodovchenko, S. I.; Shtan, A. F.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Yakimov, K. I.

    The effects of hydrogen ion (H3+) bombardment on the optical properties of polycrystal stainless steel (SS) mirrors were investigated. Ellipsometry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, angle distribution of scattered light, and spectral reflectance were used to characterize the surfaces. Results for the bombardment of SS mirrors with ions of fixed energy (0.3, 0.65 and 1.5 keV/H), with ion flux density >(0.5-2) · 1020 H/m2s up to fluences of (1.1-4.3) · 1024 H}/m2 are presented.  The data show that the surface roughness rises with both increasing ion energy and ion fluence, and that surface roughening leads to an increase of the scattered light with a corresponding decrease of reflectance at normal incidence. The thickness of the apparent layer, obtained by ellipsometry, was found to rise with increasing ion energy at fixed ion fluence and with increasing ion fluence at fixed ion energy.  Possible mechanisms for the ion energy effect on the degradation rate of stainless steel mirrors and the origin of the apparent layer are discussed.

  18. Hydrogen ion bombardment damage in stainless steel mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, A.I. [National Technical University ' KhPI' , Kharkov, 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Bardamid, A.F. [T. Shevchenko National University, Kiev (Ukraine); Davis, J.W. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, ON, M3H 5T6 (Canada); Haasz, A.A. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, ON, M3H 5T6 (Canada)]. E-mail: aahaasz@utias.utoronto.ca; Konovalov, V.G. [NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Kudlenko, A.D. [National Technical University ' KhPI' , Kharkov, 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Poon, M. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, ON, M3H 5T6 (Canada); Slatin, K.A. [National Technical University ' KhPI' , Kharkov, 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Voitsenya, V.S. [NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2005-10-15

    Experiments have been performed to evaluate the changes in surface structure and the resulting effects on the optical properties of stainless steel due to hydrogen ion irradiation. Stainless steel (SS) is a standard material used for in-vessel components, including the first mirrors (FMs), in some current generation fusion devices. Optical microscopy, interferometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ellipsometry were used to characterize the surfaces. Results are presented for the bombardment of SS mirrors with H{sub 3}{sup +} ions having various fixed energies (0.3, 0.65, and 1.5keV/H{sup +}), with ion flux densities of (0.5-2)x10{sup 20} H{sup +}/m{sup 2}s and fluences of {approx}2.2x10{sup 24} H{sup +}/m{sup 2}. Variation of the ion energy at a constant fluence had a considerable effect on the damage structure that forms on the SS mirror surfaces. Possible mechanisms for the ion energy effect on the surface are discussed and a model of the damaged surface layer is proposed.

  19. Hydrogen ion bombardment damage in stainless steel mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, A. I.; Bardamid, A. F.; Davis, J. W.; Haasz, A. A.; Konovalov, V. G.; Kudlenko, A. D.; Poon, M.; Slatin, K. A.; Voitsenya, V. S.

    2005-10-01

    Experiments have been performed to evaluate the changes in surface structure and the resulting effects on the optical properties of stainless steel due to hydrogen ion irradiation. Stainless steel (SS) is a standard material used for in-vessel components, including the first mirrors (FMs), in some current generation fusion devices. Optical microscopy, interferometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ellipsometry were used to characterize the surfaces. Results are presented for the bombardment of SS mirrors with H3+ ions having various fixed energies (0.3, 0.65, and 1.5 keV/H+), with ion flux densities of (0.5-2) × 1020 H+/m2s and fluences of ∼2.2 × 1024 H+/m2. Variation of the ion energy at a constant fluence had a considerable effect on the damage structure that forms on the SS mirror surfaces. Possible mechanisms for the ion energy effect on the surface are discussed and a model of the damaged surface layer is proposed.

  20. Hydrogenated carbon clusters produced by highly charged ion impact on solid C-84

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlatholter, T; Newman, MW; Niedermayr, TR; Machicoane, GA; McDonald, JW; Schenkel, T; Hoekstra, R; Hamza, AV

    2000-01-01

    The emission of small (hydrogenated) carbon cluster ions: CnHm+ (n = 2-22) upon highly charged Xeq+ (q = 20- 14) impact on C-84 surfaces is studied by means of time-of-flight secundary ion mass spectrometry. The respective stage of hydrogenation/protonation of a certain carbon cluster ion C-n(+) is

  1. Reconstruction of negative hydrogen ion beam properties from beamline diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruf, Benjamin

    2014-09-25

    (BES). BES measures the beam divergence and beam power losses from heavy-particle collisions by evaluating the spectrum of the Balmer H{sub α} light of the beam. The light is emitted since beam particles are excited by collisions with the hydrogen background gas. For ITER, BES will be the main beam diagnostic tool for beam quality measurements. The main results are, that first of all, the evaluation of the beam divergence from a BES spectrum was improved with the parametrisation method. Furthermore it turned out that the evaluation of stripping losses and beam inhomogeneity in large negative hydrogen ion sources cannot be performed by backward calculations from a BES spectra, i.e. by the analysis of the spectra. This means forward modeling has to be done, which does also include the simulation of other beam diagnostic tools, like the power density profile measured by the calorimeter. Combining all beam diagnostic tools and reconstructing their outcome with a BBC-NI Advanced simulation, gives the possibility to determine the beam parameters by extracting them from the BBC-NI code protocols. This requires a lot of effort and is not well suited for a routine analysis. For ITER this means that solely a BES system for the determination of the beam parameters (i.e. stripping losses and beam inhomogeneity), as it is presently foreseen, is not sufficient. Several beam diagnostic tools, e.g. the calorimeter which can determine the power density profile of the beam, and a code like BBC-NI are necessary. Additionally for the application of BBC-NI Advanced, a beam optic code is needed, which is able to generate a realistic electric field map in the extraction system. Such an optic code is not available so far.

  2. Experimental studies of the Negative Ion of Hydrogen. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Howard C.

    1999-06-30

    This document presents an overview of the results of the DOE'S support of experimental research into the structure and interactions of the negative ion of hydrogen conducted by the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of New Mexico at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The work involves many collaborations with scientists from both institutions, as well as others. Although official DOE support for this work began in 1977, the experiment that led to it was done in 1971, near the time the 800 MeV linear accelerator at Los Alamos (LAMPF) first came on line. Until the mid nineties, the work was performed using the relativistic beam at LAMFF. The most recent results were obtained using the 35 keV injector beam for the Ground Test Accelerator at Los Alamos. A list of all published results from this work is presented.

  3. Blister formation in Mo/Si multilayered structures induced by hydrogen ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Bos, R. A.J.M.; Lee, C. J.; Benschop, J. P.H.; Bijkerk, F.

    2017-01-01

    We report on blister formation in nanometer thick Mo/Si multilayer structures due to exposure to hydrogen ion fluxes. The influence of hydrogen flux and ion energy for blister formation have been measured and compared to a blister model. The blister number density increases significantly around 100

  4. Effects of ion atmosphere on hydrogen-bond dynamics in aqueous electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra

    2000-07-24

    We have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous NaCl and KCl solutions at different concentrations to investigate the effects of ion atmosphere on the dynamics of water-water hydrogen bonds at room temperature. The average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule decreases with increase of ion concentration. The dynamics of hydrogen-bond breaking is found to accelerate somewhat and that of hydrogen-bond structural relaxation, which occurs at a longer time scale, is found to slow down with increasing ion concentration for both NaCl and KCl solutions.

  5. Extraction of negative hydrogen ions from a compact 14 GHz microwave ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, M. [Faculty of Life and Medical Sciences, Doshisha University, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); School of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Kasuya, T.; Nishida, T. [School of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Kenmotsu, T. [Faculty of Life and Medical Sciences, Doshisha University, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Maeno, S. [Novelion Systems Co. Ltd., D-egg Bldg. Kyoto 610-0332 (Japan); Nishiura, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Shinto, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Yamaoka, H. [Riken, Harima, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A pair of permanent magnets has formed enough intensity to realize electron cyclotron resonance condition for a 14 GHz microwave in a 2 cm diameter 9 cm long alumina discharge chamber. A three-electrode extraction system assembled in a magnetic shielding has formed a stable beam of negative hydrogen ions (H{sup -}) in a direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. The measured H{sup -} current density was about 1 mA/cm{sup 2} with only 50 W of discharge power, but the beam intensity had shown saturation against further increase in microwave power. The beam current decreased monotonically against increasing pressure.

  6. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. II. Spectral graph analysis of water hydrogen-bonding network and ion aggregate structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-10-01

    Graph theory in mathematics and computer science is the study of graphs that are structures with pairwise connections between any objects. Here, the spectral graph theory and molecular dynamics simulation method are used to describe both morphological variation of ion aggregates in high salt solutions and ion effects on water hydrogen-bonding network structure. From the characteristic value analysis of the adjacency matrices that are graph theoretical representations of ion clusters, ion networks, and water H-bond structures, we obtained the ensemble average eigenvalue spectra revealing intricate connectivity and topology of ion aggregate structure that can be classified as either ion cluster or ion network. We further show that there is an isospectral relationship between the eigenvalue spectra of ion networks in high KSCN solutions and those of water H-bonding networks. This reveals the isomorphic relationship between water H-bond structure and ion-ion network structure in KSCN solution. On the other hand, the ion clusters formed in high NaCl solutions are shown to be graph-theoretically and morphologically different from the ion network structures in KSCN solutions. These observations support the bifurcation hypothesis on large ion aggregate growth mechanism via either ion cluster or ion network formation. We thus anticipate that the present spectral graph analyses of ion aggregate structures and their effects on water H-bonding network structures in high salt solutions can provide important information on the specific ion effects on water structures and possibly protein stability resulting from protein-water interactions.

  7. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. II. Spectral graph analysis of water hydrogen-bonding network and ion aggregate structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-10-21

    Graph theory in mathematics and computer science is the study of graphs that are structures with pairwise connections between any objects. Here, the spectral graph theory and molecular dynamics simulation method are used to describe both morphological variation of ion aggregates in high salt solutions and ion effects on water hydrogen-bonding network structure. From the characteristic value analysis of the adjacency matrices that are graph theoretical representations of ion clusters, ion networks, and water H-bond structures, we obtained the ensemble average eigenvalue spectra revealing intricate connectivity and topology of ion aggregate structure that can be classified as either ion cluster or ion network. We further show that there is an isospectral relationship between the eigenvalue spectra of ion networks in high KSCN solutions and those of water H-bonding networks. This reveals the isomorphic relationship between water H-bond structure and ion-ion network structure in KSCN solution. On the other hand, the ion clusters formed in high NaCl solutions are shown to be graph-theoretically and morphologically different from the ion network structures in KSCN solutions. These observations support the bifurcation hypothesis on large ion aggregate growth mechanism via either ion cluster or ion network formation. We thus anticipate that the present spectral graph analyses of ion aggregate structures and their effects on water H-bonding network structures in high salt solutions can provide important information on the specific ion effects on water structures and possibly protein stability resulting from protein-water interactions.

  8. An ion species model for positive ion sources - part II analysis of hydrogen isotope effects

    CERN Document Server

    Surrey, E

    2014-01-01

    A one dimensional model of the magnetic multipole volume plasma source has been developed for application to intense ion/neutral atom beam injectors. The model uses plasma transport coefficients for particle and energy flow to create a detailed description of the plasma parameters along an axis parallel to that of the extracted beam. In this paper the isotopic modelling of positive hydrogenic ions is considered and compared with experimental data from the neutral beam injectors of the Joint European Torus. The use of the code to gain insights into the processes contributing to the ratios of the ionic species is demonstrated and the conclusion is drawn that 75% of the atomic ion species arises from ionization of dissociated molecules and 25% from dissociation of the molecular ions. However whilst the former process is independent of the filter field, the latter is sensitive to the change in distribution of fast and thermal electrons produced by the magnetic filter field and an optimum combination of field stre...

  9. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  10. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K+ and SCN- ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions.

  11. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-28

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K(+) and SCN(-) ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions.

  12. Secondary Electron Emission from Solid Hydrogen and Deuterium Resulting from Incidence of keV Electrons and Hydrogen Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.

    1977-01-01

    The secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient δ was measured for solid hydrogen and deuterium resulting from the normal incidence of 0.5–3‐keV electrons and 4–10‐keV H+, H2+, H3+, and D3+ ions. The SEE coefficients for solid hydrogen are 60–70% of those for solid deuterium, and the coefficients...... or the stopping power of the incident particles. Measurements were also made for oblique incidence of H+ ions on solid deuterium for angles of incidence up to 75°. A correction could be made for the emission of secondary ions by also measuring the current calorimetrically. At largest energies, the angular....... The losses to molecular states will be largest for hydrogen, so that the SEE coefficients are smallest for solid hydrogen, as was observed. For the incidence of ions, the values of δ for the different molecular ions agree when the number of secondary electrons per incident atom is plotted versus the velocity...

  13. Size scaling of negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantz, U., E-mail: ursel.fantz@ipp.mpg.de; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Schiesko, L.; Wimmer, C.; Wünderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-08

    The RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source (H{sup −}, D{sup −}) for the international fusion experiment ITER has a width of 0.9 m and a height of 1.9 m and is based on a ⅛ scale prototype source being in operation at the IPP test facilities BATMAN and MANITU for many years. Among the challenges to meet the required parameters in a caesiated source at a source pressure of 0.3 Pa or less is the challenge in size scaling of a factor of eight. As an intermediate step a ½ scale ITER source went into operation at the IPP test facility ELISE with the first plasma in February 2013. The experience and results gained so far at ELISE allowed a size scaling study from the prototype source towards the ITER relevant size at ELISE, in which operational issues, physical aspects and the source performance is addressed, highlighting differences as well as similarities. The most ITER relevant results are: low pressure operation down to 0.2 Pa is possible without problems; the magnetic filter field created by a current in the plasma grid is sufficient to reduce the electron temperature below the target value of 1 eV and to reduce together with the bias applied between the differently shaped bias plate and the plasma grid the amount of co-extracted electrons. An asymmetry of the co-extracted electron currents in the two grid segments is measured, varying strongly with filter field and bias. Contrary to the prototype source, a dedicated plasma drift in vertical direction is not observed. As in the prototype source, the performance in deuterium is limited by the amount of co-extracted electrons in short as well as in long pulse operation. Caesium conditioning is much harder in deuterium than in hydrogen for which fast and reproducible conditioning is achieved. First estimates reveal a caesium consumption comparable to the one in the prototype source despite the large size.

  14. Hydrogen separation by nanocrystalline titanium nitride membranes with high hydride ion conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kura, Chiharu; Kunisada, Yuji; Tsuji, Etsushi; Zhu, Chunyu; Habazaki, Hiroki; Nagata, Shinji; Müller, Michael P.; De Souza, Roger A.; Aoki, Yoshitaka

    2017-10-01

    The production of pure hydrogen for use in energy applications and related industries often relies on the permeation of hydrogen through palladium-based membranes. However, the scarcity of Pd reserves necessitates the development of affordable alternatives with high hydrogen permeability. Here we report room-temperature hydrogen permeability of titanium nitrides (widely used as tough and inert coating materials) enabled by mixed hydride ion-electron conductivity. Combined spectroscopic, permeability and microgravimetric measurements reveal that nanocrystalline TiNx membranes feature enhanced grain-boundary diffusion of hydride anions associated with interfacial Ti cations on nanograins. Since the corresponding activation energies are very low (kJ mol-1), these membranes yield a considerably higher room-temperature hydrogen flux than Pd membranes of equivalent thickness. Overall, the current study establishes general guidelines for developing hydride ion transport membranes based on a simple transition metal nitride for hydrogen purification, membrane reactors and other applications.

  15. A road to hydrogenating graphene by a reactive ion etching plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojtaszek, M.; Tombros, N.; Caretta, A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; van Wees, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    We report the hydrogenation of single and bilayer graphene by an argon-hydrogen plasma produced in a reactive ion etching (RIE) system. Electronic transport measurements in combination with Raman spectroscopy are used to link the electric mean free path to the optically extracted defect

  16. Uptake of hydrogen from some carbon fibres examined by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madronero, A., E-mail: inmac09@cenim.csic.es [CENIM (CSIC), Avda Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Aguado, J. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain); Blanco, J.M. [Department of Electronic Technology, Telecommunications Engineering Faculty, Polytechnic University of Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Lopez, A. [CIEMAT, 04200 Tabernas, Almeria (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    The use of carbonaceous materials for hydrogen storage is not as simple as it may seem. Hydrogen atoms have different bonding energies and are incorporated into different types of these materials. Therefore, it is particularly important to distinguish between the surfacial atoms and those that are embedded in the bulk of the sample. SIMS spectrograph with periodical interruptions of the ion beam enables us to appreciate that at room temperature and in high vacuum, some outgassing of the surfacial hydrogen takes place.

  17. Sputtering of cryogenic films of hydrogen by keV ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Hilleret, Noel

    2009-01-01

    The sputtering yield induced by keV hydrogen ions measured at CERN and at Risø National Laboratory for solid H2 and D2 at temperatures below 4.2 K decreases with increasing film thickness from about 100 x 10(15)molecules/cm2. For a film thickness comparable to or larger than the ion range the dat...

  18. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-01

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  19. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-14

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  20. New hydrogen titanium phosphate sulfate electrodes for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ran; Mieritz, Daniel; Seo, Dong-Kyun; Chan, Candace K.

    2017-03-01

    NASICON-type materials with general formula AxM2(PO4)3 (A = Li or Na, M = Ti, V, and Fe) are promising candidates for Li- and Na-ion batteries due to their open three-dimensional framework structure. Here we report the electrochemical properties of hydrogen titanium phosphate sulfate, H0.4Ti2(PO4)2.4(SO4)0.6 (HTPS), a new mixed polyanion material with NASICON structure. Micron-sized HTPS aggregates with crystallite grain size of ca. 23 nm are synthesized using a sol-gel synthesis in an acidic medium. The properties of the as-synthesized HTPS, ball-milled HTPS, and samples prepared as carbon composites using an in-situ glucose decomposition reaction are investigated. A capacity of 148 mAh g-1 corresponding to insertion of 2 Li+ per formula unit is observed in the ball-milled HTPS over the potential window of 1.5-3.4 V vs. Li/Li+. Lithiation at ca. 2.8 and 2.5 V is determined to occur through filling of the M1 and M2 sites, respectively. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are used characterize the HTPS before and after cycling. Evaluation of the HTPS in a Na-ion cell is also performed. A discharge capacity of 93 mAh g-1 with sodiation at ca. 2.9 and 2.2 V vs. Na/Na+ is observed.

  1. Modulating memristive performance of hexagonal WO3 nanowire by water-oxidized hydrogen ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Peng, Yuehua; Yin, Yanling; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Chang; Ling, Jing; Lei, Le; Zhou, Weichang; Tang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    In a two-terminal Au/hexagonal WO3 nanowire/Au device, ions drifting or carriers self-trapping under external electrical field will modulate the Schottky barriers between the nanowire and electrodes, and then result in memristive effect. When there are water molecules adsorbed on the surface of WO3 nanowire, hydrogen ions will generate near the positively-charged electrode and transport in the condensed water film, which will enhance the memristive performance characterized by analogic resistive switching remarkably. When the bias voltage is swept repeatedly under high relative humidity level, hydrogen ions will accumulate on the surface and then implant into the lattice of the WO3 nanowire, which leads to a transition from semiconducting WO3 nanowire to metallic HxWO3 nanowire. This insulator-metal transition can be realized more easily after enough electron-hole pairs being excited by laser illumination. The concentration of hydrogen ions in HxWO3 nanowire will decrease when the device is exposed to oxygen atmosphere or the bias voltage is swept in atmosphere with low relative humidity. By modulating the concentration of hydrogen ions, conductive hydrogen tungsten bronze filament might form or rupture near electrodes when the polarity of applied voltage changes, which will endow the device with memristive performance characterized by digital resistive switching. PMID:27600368

  2. Near-surface hydrogen depletion of diamond-like carbon films produced by direct ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwitz, Andreas, E-mail: A.Markwitz@gns.cri.nz [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Gupta, Prasanth [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Mohr, Berit [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Hübner, René [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Leveneur, Jerome; Zondervan, Albert [GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Becker, Hans-Werner [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Amorphous atomically flat diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were produced by direct ion deposition using a system based on a Penning ion source, butane precursor gas and post acceleration. Hydrogen depth profiles of the DLC coatings were measured with the 15N R-NRA method using the resonant nuclear reaction {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, αγ){sup 12}C (E{sub res} = 6.385 MeV). The films produced at 3.0–10.5 kV acceleration voltage show two main effects. First, compared to average elemental composition of the film, the near-surface region is hydrogen depleted. The increase of the hydrogen concentration by 3% from the near-surface region towards the bulk is attributed to a growth model which favours the formation of sp{sup 2} hybridised carbon rich films in the film formation zone. Secondly, the depth at which the maximum hydrogen concentration is measured increases with acceleration voltage and is proportional to the penetration depth of protons produced by the ion source from the precursor gas. The observed effects are explained by a deposition process that takes into account the contributions of ion species, hydrogen effusion and preferential displacement of atoms during direct ion deposition.

  3. Modulating memristive performance of hexagonal WO3 nanowire by water-oxidized hydrogen ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Peng, Yuehua; Yin, Yanling; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Chang; Ling, Jing; Lei, Le; Zhou, Weichang; Tang, Dongsheng

    2016-09-01

    In a two-terminal Au/hexagonal WO3 nanowire/Au device, ions drifting or carriers self-trapping under external electrical field will modulate the Schottky barriers between the nanowire and electrodes, and then result in memristive effect. When there are water molecules adsorbed on the surface of WO3 nanowire, hydrogen ions will generate near the positively-charged electrode and transport in the condensed water film, which will enhance the memristive performance characterized by analogic resistive switching remarkably. When the bias voltage is swept repeatedly under high relative humidity level, hydrogen ions will accumulate on the surface and then implant into the lattice of the WO3 nanowire, which leads to a transition from semiconducting WO3 nanowire to metallic HxWO3 nanowire. This insulator-metal transition can be realized more easily after enough electron-hole pairs being excited by laser illumination. The concentration of hydrogen ions in HxWO3 nanowire will decrease when the device is exposed to oxygen atmosphere or the bias voltage is swept in atmosphere with low relative humidity. By modulating the concentration of hydrogen ions, conductive hydrogen tungsten bronze filament might form or rupture near electrodes when the polarity of applied voltage changes, which will endow the device with memristive performance characterized by digital resistive switching.

  4. Production of hydrogen and deuterium negative ions in an electron cyclotron resonance driven plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougar-Jabon, V.D. [Industrial Univ. of Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2001-04-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance source with driven plasma rings for hydrogen isotope ion production is studied. Extracted currents of positive and negative ions depending on gas pressure, microwave power value and extraction voltage are obtained. The study shows that the negative ion yield is an order of magnitude higher than the yield of positive particles when a driven ring is in contact with the surface of the plasma electrode. The production of negative ions of deuterium, D{sup -}, is close to the production of negative ions of light hydrogen isotope, H{sup -}. The comparison of the experimental data with the calculated ones shows that the most probable process of the H{sup -} and D{sup -} ion formation in the electron cyclotron driven plasma is dissociative attachment of electrons to molecules in high Rydberg states. For hydrogen ions and ions of deuterium, the negative current at a microwave power of 200 W through a 3-mm aperture and 8 kV extraction voltage are 4.7 mA and 3.1 mA respectively. (orig.)

  5. Ion-Induced Emission of Charged Particles from Solid Hydrogen and Deuterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, P.; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the emission of both positive and negative particles from solid hydrogen and deuterium for normal incidence of H+, H2+, H+3, D2H+, D3+ and He+ ions up to 10 keV. For positive particles the emission coefficient increased with increasing energy of incidence to reach...... a value of 0.08 per atom for 10 keV H+ onto hydrogen. Apparently the positive particles are sputtered ones. The negative particles emitted are predominantly electrons. The emission coefficient per incident atom as a function of the velocity of the incident particle agrees fairly well with results...... published earlier for incidence of hydrogen and deuterium ions. However, systematic differences of up to 10% are now observed between the coefficients for the different types of ions....

  6. Study of back streaming ion using a slot-type grounded grid in hydrogen negative-ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Kamio, S.; Tsumori, K.; Geng, S.; Takeiri, Y.

    2017-08-01

    The properties of cesium (Cs) recycling due to back-streaming ions have been investigated using an optical emission spec-troscopy in the hydrogen negative ion (H-) source with a slot-type grounded grid (GG). The slot-type GG performed well to enhance the beam performance, and to reduce the thermal loading on GG by high transparency. We clearly observed increase of Cs optical emission intensity during beam extraction owing to the increase of the Cs ions sputtered from the back plate of the source due to the back-streaming positive hydrogen ions. Increase of Cs is closely related with the extracted H- current, but it does not depend on the beam energy. Recycling Cs from the back plate is deeply relevant to the perveance condition of the H- beam, and is minimized at the optimum perveance. Strong Cs recycling from the back plate owing to the back-streaming ions is promoted in the high perveance condition with large divergence, which is consistent with the numerical calculation for the distribution of back streaming ions. This high Cs recycling condition, however, is not suitable for safety beam operation with high energy beam. The output of beam power is saturated by the space charge limitation, and divergent beam is trapped in the grounded grid (GG), which may cause damage on the slot-type GG surface by high thermal loading as large as in the aperture-type GG.

  7. Electron cyclotron resonance discharge as a source for hydrogen and deuterium ions production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon Velasco, A.J. [Universidad de Pamplona, Pamplona (Colombia); Dougar-Jabon, V.D. [Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2004-07-01

    In this report, we describe characteristics of a ring-structure hydrogen plasma heated in electron cyclotron resonance conditions and confined in a mirror magnetic trap and discuss the relative efficiency of secondary electrons and thermo-electrons in negative hydrogen and deuterium ion production. The obtained data and calculations of the balance equations for possible reactions demonstrate that the negative ion production is realized in two stages. First, the hydrogen and deuterium molecules are excited in collisions with the plasma electrons to high-laying Rydberg or vibrational levels in the plasma volume. The second stage leads to the negative ion production through the process of dissociative attachment of low energy electrons. The low energy electrons are originated due to a bombardment of the plasma electrode by ions of one of the driven rings and thermo-emission from heated tungsten filaments. Experiments seem to indicate that the negative ion generation occurs predominantly in the limited volume filled with thermo-electrons. Estimation of the negative ion generation rate shows that the main channel of H{sup -} and D{sup -} ion production involves the process of high Rydberg state excitation. (authors)

  8. The Effects of Hydrogen Band EMIC Waves on Ring Current H+ Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhai, Hao; Gao, Zhuxiu

    2017-12-01

    Hydrogen band electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have received much attention recently because they are found to frequently span larger spatial areas than the other band EMIC waves. Using test particle simulations, we study the nonlinear effects of hydrogen band EMIC waves on ring current H+ ions. A dimensionless parameter R is used to characterize the competition between wave-induced and adiabatic motions. The results indicate that there are three regimes of wave-particle interactions for typical 35 keV H+ ions at L = 5: diffusive (quasi-linear) behavior when αeq ≤ 35° (R ≥ 2.45), the nonlinear phase trapping when 35° < αeq < 50° (0.75 < R < 2.45), and both the nonlinear phase bunching and phase trapping when αeq ≥ 50° (R ≤ 0.75). The phase trapping can transport H+ ions toward large pitch angle, while the phase bunching has the opposite effect. The phase-trapped H+ ions can be significantly accelerated (from 35 keV to over 500 keV) in about 4 min and thus contribute to the formation of high energy components of ring current ions. The results suggest that the effect of hydrogen band EMIC waves is not ignorable in the nonlinear acceleration and resonance scattering of ring current H+ ions.

  9. Research on a New Type of Negative Hydrogen Ion Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    called the hydrogen li- between the piston and the plug which was adjustable down to a length of 0.2 mm. Bobin et al.3 used a solid deuterium pellet...3J. L Bobin , F. Delobeau, G. DeGiovanni, C. Fauquignon, and F. Floux, extension feedthroughs. (One of these feedthroughs labeled Nucl. Fusion 9,115

  10. Trapping of hydrogen atoms inside small beryllium clusters and their ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumkin, F. Y.; Wales, D. J.

    2016-08-01

    Structure, stability and electronic properties are evaluated computationally for small Ben (n = 5-9) cluster cages accommodating atomic H inside and forming core-shell species. These parameters are predicted to vary significantly upon insertion of H, for ionic derivatives, and with the system size. In particular, the energy barrier for H-atom exit from the cage changes significantly for ions compared to the neutral counterparts. The corresponding effects predicted for cage assemblies suggest the possibility of efficient charge-control of hydrogen release. This, together with a high capacity for storing hydrogen in extended such assemblies might indicate a possible way towards feasible hydrogen-storage solutions.

  11. Sputtering of solid nitrogen and oxygen by keV hydrogen ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, O.; Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.

    1994-01-01

    that for nitrogen. The energy distributions of the sputtered N2 and O2 molecules were measured for hydrogen ions in this energy regime as well. The yields from both solids turn out to depend on the sum of the stopping power of all atoms in the ion. The yield increases as a quadratic function of the stopping power......Electronic sputtering of solid nitrogen and oxygen by keV hydrogen ions has been studied at two low-temperature setups. The yield of the sputtered particles has been determined in the energy regime 4-10 keV for H+, H-2+ and H-3+ ions. The yield for oxygen is more than a factor of two larger than...... for oxygen, but slightly slower for nitrogen. The energy distributions do not exhibit strong features, but are similar to those published earlier for electron sputtering....

  12. Hydrogen absorption and lithium ion conductivity in Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, M.A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Clemens, O. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Technical University of Darmstadt, Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials, Jovanka-Bontschits-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Nanotechnology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Slater, P.R. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Anderson, P.A., E-mail: p.a.anderson@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} was synthesized via solid state methods and hydrogenation attempted. • Hydrogenation of a lithium nitride halide was demonstrated for the first time. • Powder XRD and Raman spectroscopy showed that hydrogenation had gone to completion. • The ionic conductivities of Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} and Li{sub 3}N were compared through A.C. impedance spectroscopy. • The lower conductivity of Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} is consistent with its higher hydrogenation temperature. - Abstract: The reaction of lithium amide and imide with lithium halides to form new amide halide or imide halide phases has led to improved hydrogen desorption and absorption properties and, for the amides, lithium ion conductivities. Here we investigate the effect of bromide incorporation on the ionic conductivity and hydrogen absorption properties of lithium nitride. For the first time we show that it is possible for a lithium halide nitride, the cubic bromide nitride Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3}, to take up hydrogen—a necessary condition for potential use as a reversible solid-state hydrogen storage material. Powder X-ray diffraction showed the formation of Li{sub 2}Br(NH{sub 2}) and LiBr, and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that only amide anions were present and that the hydrogen uptake reaction had gone to completion. The lithium ion conductivity of Li{sub 6}NBr{sub 3} at the hydrogenation temperature was found to be less than that of Li{sub 3}N, which may be a significant factor in the kinetics of the hydrogenation process.

  13. Influence of excited states on the energy loss of fast ions in a hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, D-8046 Garching, Germany (DE)); Peter, T. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, D-6500 Mainz, Germany (DE))

    1991-04-01

    Stopping power calculations of fast ions penetrating a hydrogen plasma target in local thermodynamic equilibrium at arbitrary temperatures are performed. Excited state contributions to the energy loss are included in the framework of the Bethe formalism. Average ionization potentials for the excited ions are given in a quasiclassical approximation. It is shown that the net effect is an enhancement of the stopping power compared to the energy loss when assuming all atoms to be in their ground state.

  14. Ion transport in alkaline and earth alkaline hydrogen fluorides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroger, C; Niggemeier, H; Wiemhofer, HD; Glumov, O; Murin, [No Value

    2002-01-01

    The impedance of the hydrogen fluorides KHF2, NH4HF2 and BaHF3 was investigated as a function of temperature and in the presence of HF and H2O. A comparison of results on different electrode materials. (graphite, silver, palladium, Sn \\ SnF2, and Sn \\ SnF2 \\ LaF3) was used to elucidate the

  15. Hydrogen adsorption over Zeolite-like MOF materials modified by ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calleja, G.; Botas, J.A.; Orcajo, M.G. [Department of Chemical and Energy Technology, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Sanchez, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, C/Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Novel porous Zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF) materials with Rho and Sod topologies are promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage due to their high surface area and, more importantly, to their capacity of being ion-exchanged, potentially changing their affinity for hydrogen. In this work, we have successfully synthesized both Rho and SodZMOF materials, optimizing experimental conditions for scaling-up the procedure already published to produce grams of material. The resultant materials were alkaline-cation-exchanged, widely characterized and finally tested as hydrogen adsorbents. RhoZMOF is converted into an amorphous phase during some of the ion-exchange processes, whereas SodZMOF, whose ion-exchange capacity has not been investigated so far, always maintains its topology for any tested exchange cation and conditions. Additionally, thermogravimetric analyses and thermal treatments followed by in-situ powder X-ray diffraction analysis have evidenced a significantly higher thermal stability of both as-prepared and ion-exchanged SodZMOF materials in comparison to their Rho-structured homologues. Moreover, the thermal stability of the cation-exchanged ZMOF samples improves when methanol is the ion-exchange solvent rather than the reported ethanol-water mixture. Nitrogen and hydrogen adsorption isotherms at 77 K suggested that alkali-exchanged materials have lower affinity for hydrogen than the as-prepared samples compensated by imidazolium ion; however, due to the smaller size of Na{sup +} or Li{sup +} cations, their lower affinity is easily compensated by the inherent increase in surface area and pore volume as exchange degree increases. (author)

  16. Cooperative Effect of a Metal Ion and Hydrogen Bonds on Phosphodiester Cleavage in Acetonitrile

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kondo, Shin-ichi; Sakuno, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi; Yano, Yumihiko

    2001-01-01

    Cleavage of an activated phosphodiester by Zn(NO3)2·6H2O was accelerated (9 × 103-fold) by cooperative effect of a metal ion and hydrogen bonds in the presence of a bismelamine derivative bearing a 2,2...

  17. External-field shifts in precision spectroscopy of hydrogen molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakalov, Dimitar, E-mail: dbakalov@inrne.bas.bg [INRNE, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria); Korobov, Vladimir [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Schiller, Stephan [Heinrich-Heine-Universitat Dusseldorf, Institut fur Experimentalphysik (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    The Effective Hamiltonian of the hydrogen molecular ions is a convenient tool for the evaluation of the shift of the energy levels of the ro-vibrational states and the frequencies of the transitions between them, due to external electric and magnetic fields. Using the Effective Hamiltonian, composite frequencies of suppressed susceptibility to external fields are constructed.

  18. Ion effects in hydrogen-induced blistering of Mo/Si multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, Alexey; Gleeson, M.A.; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    The role that energetic (>800 eV) hydrogen ions play in inducing and modifying the formation of blisters in nanoscale Mo/Si multilayer samples is investigated. Such samples are confirmed to be susceptible to blistering by two separate mechanisms. The first is attributed to the segregation of H atoms

  19. Ion effects in hydrogen-induced blistering of Mo/Si multilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Gleeson, M. A.; F. Bijkerk,

    2013-01-01

    The role that energetic (>800 eV) hydrogen ions play in inducing and modifying the formation of blisters in nanoscale Mo/Si multilayer samples is investigated. Such samples are confirmed to be susceptible to blistering by two separate mechanisms. The first is attributed to the segregation of

  20. Role of hydrogen ions in standard and activation heap leaching of gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsov, YuI

    2017-02-01

    The role of hydrogen ions in activation heap leaching of gold from rebellious ore has been studied, which has allowed enhancing gold recovery. The author puts forward a gold leaching circuit with the use of activated oxygen-saturated solutions acidified to pH = 6-9.

  1. Computer simulation of chemical erosion of graphite due to hydrogen ion bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, J H; Roth, J; Eckstein, W

    2003-01-01

    Chemical erosion of graphite due to hydrogen ion bombardment has been investigated theoretically by applying a model of chemical erosion to the TRIDYN code. The model involves the formation of methane at the end of the ion track as well as the kinetic emission of hydrocarbons from the target surface. Model calculations were performed for ion energies ranging from 10 to 1000 eV and at target temperatures ranging from 300 to 900 K. Good agreement between calculated and measured erosion yields is obtained.

  2. Investigation of low-resistivity from hydrogenated lightly B-doped diamond by ion implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Xia Yan et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have implanted boron (B ions (dosage: 5×1014 cm-2 into diamond and then hydrogenated the sample by implantating hydrogen ions at room temperature. A p-type diamond material with a low resistivity of 7.37 mΩ cm has been obtained in our experiment, which suggests that the hydrogenation of B-doped diamond results in a low-resistivity p-type material. Interestingly, inverse annealing, in which carrier concentration decreased with increasing annealing temperature, was observed at annealing temperatures above 600 °C. In addition, the formation mechanism of a low-resistivity material has been studied by density functional theory calculation using a plane wave method.

  3. Changes of structural and hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2 indused by ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurko Sandra V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in structural and hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2 induced by ion irradiation have been investigated. MgH2 powder samples have been irradiated with 45 keV B3+ and 120 keV Ar8+ions, with ion fluence of 1015 ions/cm2. The effects of ion irradiation are estimated by numerical calculations using SRIM package. The induced material modifications and their consequences on hydrogen dynamics in the system are investigated by XRD, particle size distribution and TPD techniques. Changes of TPD spectra with irradiation conditions suggest that there are several mechanisms involved in desorption process which depend on defect concentration and their interaction and ordering. The results confirmed that the near-surface area of MgH2 and formation of a substoichiometric MgHx (x<2 play a crucial role in hydrogen kinetics and that various concentrations of induced defects substantially influence H diffusion and desorption kinetics in MgH2. The results also confirm that there is possibility to control the thermodynamic parameters by controlling vacancies concentration in the system.

  4. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Lettry, Jacques; Midttun, Øystein; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H(-) beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  5. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A., E-mail: cristhian.alfonso.valerio.lizarraga@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico); Midttun, Øystein [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  6. Computer Simulations of Hydrogen Ion Interactions with Rough Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnaev, V.A.; Trifonov, N.N. [Moscow Engineering and Physics Inst. (Russian Federation)

    2003-04-01

    A computer code incorporating real surface reliefs for calculations of integral and differential parameters of particle reflections from solids is briefly described and validated by comparing with experiments and known analytical solutions for ideally smooth surfaces. Calculations of the angular distributions of deuterons reflected from rolled SS surfaces and grinded W samples show differences depending on the angle of irradiation relative to the direction of the relief structure. A comparison of calculations with experimental data on 100 eV deuteron reflection from grinded W shows reasonable agreement for the experimentally investigated interval of angles. Some new features of angular distributions in the plane of incidence and in the perpendicular plane are found. So, the possibility of more accurate account of reflected particles contributing to hydrogen recycling near real PFC of fusion devices is demonstrated.

  7. Absorption of hydrogen in vanadium, enhanced by ion bombardment; Ionenbeschussunterstuetzte Absorption des Wasserstoffs in Vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, H.; Lammers, M. [Inst. fuer Technologie- und Wissenstransfer, Soest (Germany); Mueller, K.H. [Inst. fuer Technologie- und Wissenstransfer, Soest (Germany)]|[Paderborn Univ. (Gesamthochschule), Soest (Germany). Fachbereich 16 - Elektrische Energietechnik; Kiss, G.; Kemeny, Z. [Technical Univ. Budapest (Hungary)

    1998-12-31

    Prior to hydrogen implantation into vanadium, the vanadium specimen usually is exposed to an activation process and is then heated at 1 atm hydrogen to temperatures between 500 and 600 C, subsequently cooled down in several steps. Within this temperature range, hydrogen solubility increases with declining temperature. A decisive factor determining hydrogen absorption is the fact that at temperatures above 250 C, oxygen desorbs from the material surface and thus no longer inhibits hydrogen absorption. Therefore a different approach was chosen for the experiments reported: Hydrogen absorption under UHV conditions at room temperature. After the usual activation process, the vanadium surface was cleaned by 5 keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. Thus oxygen absorption at the specimen surface (and new reactions with oxygen from the remaining gas) could be avoided, or removed. By means of thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS), hydrogen absorption as a function of argon ion dose was analysed. TDMS measurements performed for specimens treated by ion bombardment prior to H{sup 2} exposure showed two H{sup 2} desorption peaks, in contrast to the profiles measured with specimens not exposed to ion bombardment. It is assumed that the ion bombardment disturbs the crystal structure so that further sites for hydrogen absorption are produced. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Bei der Beladung von Vandium mit Wasserstoff wird ueblicherweise die Probe nach einer Aktivierungsprozedur bei 1 atm Wasserstoff auf Temperaturen im Bereich von 500 bis 600 C hochgeheizt und danach schrittweise abgekuehlt. In diesem Temperaturbereich nimmt die Wasserstoffloeslichkeit mit abnehmender Temperatur zu. Entscheidend fuer die Beladung ist aber auch die Tatsache, dass bei Temperaturen groesser 250 C Sauerstoff von der Oberflaeche desorbiert und dadurch die Absorption von Wasserstoff nicht mehr blockieren kann. Im Rahmen der hier beschriebenen Untersuchungen sollte die Wasserstoffbeladung unter UHV-Bedingungen bei

  8. Theoretical predictions of lactate and hydrogen ion distributions in tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maymona Al-Husari

    Full Text Available High levels of lactate and H(+-ions play an important role in the invasive and metastatic cascade of some tumours. We develop a mathematical model of cellular pH regulation focusing on the activity of the Na(+/H(+ exchanger (NHE and the lactate/H(+ symporter (MCT to investigate the spatial correlations of extracellular lactate and H(+-ions. We highlight a crucial role for blood vessel perfusion rates in determining the spatial correlation between these two cations. We also predict critical roles for blood lactate, the activity of the MCTs and NHEs on the direction of the cellular pH gradient in the tumour. We also incorporate experimentally determined heterogeneous distributions of the NHE and MCT transporters. We show that this can give rise to a higher intracellular pH and a lower intracellular lactate but does not affect the direction of the reversed cellular pH gradient or redistribution of protons away from the glycolytic source. On the other hand, including intercellular gap junction communication in our model can give rise to a reversed cellular pH gradient and can influence the levels of pH.

  9. A hydrogen-ferric ion rebalance cell operating at low hydrogen concentrations for capacity restoration of iron-chromium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y. K.; Zhao, T. S.; Zhou, X. L.; Zou, J.; Ren, Y. X.

    2017-06-01

    To eliminate the adverse impacts of hydrogen evolution on the capacity of iron-chromium redox flow batteries (ICRFBs) during the long-term operation and ensure the safe operation of the battery, a rebalance cell that reduces the excessive Fe(III) ions at the positive electrolyte by using the hydrogen evolved from the negative electrolyte is designed, fabricated and tested. The effects of the flow field, hydrogen concentration and H2/N2 mixture gas flow rate on the performance of the hydrogen-ferric ion rebalance cell have been investigated. Results show that: i) an interdigitated flow field based rebalance cell delivers higher limiting current densities than serpentine flow field based one does; ii) the hydrogen utilization can approach 100% at low hydrogen concentrations (≤5%); iii) the apparent exchange current density of hydrogen oxidation reaction in the rebalance cell is proportional to the square root of the hydrogen concentration at the hydrogen concentration from 1.3% to 50%; iv) a continuous rebalance process is demonstrated at the current density of 60 mA cm-2 and hydrogen concentration of 2.5%. Moreover, the cost analysis shows that the rebalance cell is just approximately 1% of an ICRFB system cost.

  10. Range Measurements of keV Hydrogen Ions in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.; Andersen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    Ranges of 1.3–3.5 keV/atom hydrogen and deuterium molecular ions have been measured by a thin-film reflection method. The technique, used here for range measurements in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide targets, is identical to the one used previously for range measurements in hydrogen and nitrogen....... The main aim was to look for phase-effects, i.e. gas-solid differences in the stopping processes. While measured ranges in solid oxygen were in agreement with known gas data, the ranges in solid carbon monoxide were up to 50% larger than those calculated from gas-stopping data. The latter result agrees...

  11. Ion fractions in the scattering of hydrogen on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Evelina A. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, cc91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Gonzalez Pascual, C. [Departamento Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, C-V, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco 28049 (Spain); Bolcatto, P.G. [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santa Fe (Argentina); Faculad de Humanidades y Ciencias, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santa Fe (Argentina); Passeggi, M.C.G. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, cc91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Facultad de Bioquimica y Ciencias Biolologicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santa Fe (Argentina); Goldberg, E.C. [Instituto de Desarrollo Tecnologico para la Industria Quimica (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, cc91, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina); Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2005-08-01

    We present a theoretical calculation of the resonant charge-exchange process occurring in H{sup 0} scattering by Si(100)2 x 1 surfaces. In the atom-surface interacting system the core states of the surface atoms are included and the parameters of the Hamiltonian are calculated in an ab initio basis taking into account the extended features of the surface and the localized atom-atom interactions within a mean-field approximation. The density of states of the surface and sub-surface atoms are obtained from a molecular dynamic-density functional theory in the local density approximation. An elastic binary collision is assumed to fix the projectile trajectory, while the inelastic processes are determined by the interaction of the projectile atom with all the surface atoms 'seen' along its trajectory. The ion fractions are calculated by using the Green-Keldysh formalism to solve the time dependent process. The results, obtained as an average over different possibilities for the scattering center, reproduce the general trends of the experiment. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Hydrogen Reduction in MEP Niobium Studied by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Hryniewicz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Niobium, as pure metal and alloying element, is used in a variety of applications, among them in nuclear industries. Niobium is incorporated into nuclear fission reactors due to its enormous strength and low density. Surface finishing of niobium is often performed in electrochemical polishing processes in view of improving its smoothness, corrosion resistance and its surface cleanability. However, the presently used electropolishing process (EP is intrinsically linked to the subsurface hydrogenation of niobium, which measurably degrades its properties. This is why the annealing operation is used to remove hydrogen from electropolished niobium that is a costly and time-consuming process. The traditional electrolyte consisting of a mixture of 96% H2SO4/49% HF acids by volume in a 9:1 ratio has been substituted for the new one, being a mixture of 70% methanesulfonic acid with 49% hydrofluoric acid by volume in a 3:1 ratio. Moreover, the additional imposition of a magnetic field during the electropolishing process (MEP further increases hydrogen removal, when compared to the hydrogen content achieved by the electropolishing process alone. The aim of the study is to reveal a methodic approach and showing decreasing hydrogenation of niobium samples after consecutive steps of electrochemical polishing. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS was used to measure the hydrogen content in the surface layer of as-received AR niobium and in the samples after EP and MEP processes.

  13. Polymerization effect of electrolytes on hydrogen-bonding cryoprotectants: ion-dipole interactions between metal ions and glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lindong; Elliott, Gloria D

    2014-12-11

    Protectants which are cell membrane permeable, such as glycerol, have been used effectively in the cryopreservation field for a number of decades, for both slow cooling and vitrification applications. In the latter case, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the vitrification composition is key to its application, dictating the ultimate storage conditions. It has been observed that the addition of some electrolytes to glycerol, such as MgCl2, could elevate the Tg of the mixture, thus potentially providing more storage condition flexibility. The microscopic mechanisms that give rise to the Tg-enhancing behavior of these electrolytes are not yet well understood. The current study focuses on molecular dynamics simulation of glycerol mixed with a variety of metal chlorides (i.e., NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), covering a temperature range that spans both the liquid and glassy states. The characteristics of the ion-dipole interactions between metal cations and hydroxyl groups of glycerol were analyzed. The interruption of the original hydrogen-bonding network among glycerol molecules by the addition of ions was also investigated in the context of hydrogen-bonding quantity and lifetime. Divalent metal cations were found to significantly increase the Tg by strengthening the interacting network in the electrolyte/glycerol mixture via strong cation-dipole attractions. In contrast, monovalent cations increased the Tg insignificantly, as the cation-dipole attraction was only slightly stronger than the original hydrogen-bonding network among glycerol molecules. The precursor of crystallization of NaCl and KCl was also observed in these compositions, potentially contributing to weak Tg-enhancing ability. The Tg-enhancing mechanisms elucidated in this study suggest a structure-enhancing role for divalent ions that could be of benefit in the design of protective formulations for biopreservation purposes.

  14. Impact due to impurity contamination upon Cs consumption of a negative hydrogen ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, M.; Doi, K.; Kenmotsu, T.

    2017-08-01

    Positive hydrogen ions in a plasma of negative hydrogen (H-) ion source cannot sputter out Cs on the plasma grid surface with the energy they acquire in the plasma. Oxygen ions (O+) can exist in the source as impurities and have enough momentum to sputter out Cs on the Cs/Mo surface. The Cs sputtering yields for Cs/Mo surface by oxygen ions were calculated with the ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) code to obtain the sputtering yield near the threshold energy. The results showed that the O+ impact with more than 10 eV should cause substantial amount of Cs sputtering yield above 10-6 from the plasma electrode provided the surface binding energy of Cs was only 0.8 V. The yield did not exceed 10-6 below 50 eV O+ incident energy when the Cs binding energy was as high as 3.0 eV. Sputtering yields of Cs on Mo against tungsten ions were also calculated.

  15. Low-energy measurements of electron capture by multicharged ions from excited hydrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havener, C.C. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennesse 37831-6372 (United States)); Haque, M.A. (Alcorn State University, Lorman, Mississippi 39096 (United States)); Smith, A.C.H. (University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)); Urbain, X. (Universite Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)); Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6372 (United States) Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6374 (United States))

    1993-06-05

    For very low collision energies electron capture from excited hydrogen by multicharged ions is characterized by enormous cross sections, the predicted maximum being comparable to the geometric size of the Rydberg atom. The ion-atom merged-beams technique is being used to study these collisions for the variety of charge states and the wide range of energies (0.1 to 1000 eV/amu) accessible to the apparatus. A neutral D beam containing a Rydberg atom population proportional to 1/n[sup 3] is produced by collisional electron detachment of 8 keV D[sup [minus

  16. Measurements of low energy hydrogen ion effective sticking coefficients on titanium in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, H.; Post, R. S.

    1981-02-01

    The effective sticking coefficient for low energy (< 30 eV) hydrogen ions on titanium gettered aluminium walls has been measured in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole. A value of greater than 0.75 was measured. The H/sub 2/ effective sticking coefficient for the same conditions is less than 0.01. Seventy-four percent of the wall area of the Octupole is gettered. The effects of recycling on plasma parameters is also discussed.

  17. Understanding the mechanism of DNA deactivation in ion therapy of cancer cells: hydrogen peroxide action*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatnytskyi, Dmytro V.; Zdorevskyi, Oleksiy O.; Perepelytsya, Sergiy M.; Volkov, Sergey N.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in the medium of biological cells under ion beam irradiation has been considered as a possible cause of cell function disruption in the living body. The interaction of hydrogen peroxide, a long-lived molecular product of water radiolysis, with active sites of DNA macromolecule was studied, and the formation of stable DNA-peroxide complexes was considered. The phosphate groups of the macromolecule backbone were picked out among the atomic groups of DNA double helix as a probable target for interaction with hydrogen peroxide molecules. Complexes consisting of combinations including: the DNA phosphate group, H2O2 and H2O molecules, and Na+ counterion, were considered. The counterions have been taken into consideration insofar as under the natural conditions they neutralise DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. The energy of the complexes have been determined by considering the electrostatic and the Van der Waals interactions within the framework of atom-atom potential functions. As a result, the stability of various configurations of molecular complexes was estimated. It was shown that DNA phosphate groups and counterions can form stable complexes with hydrogen peroxide molecules, which are as stable as the complexes with water molecules. It has been demonstrated that the formation of stable complexes of H2O2-Na+-PO4- may be detected experimentally by observing specific vibrations in the low-frequency Raman spectra. The interaction of H2O2 molecule with phosphate group of the double helix backbone can disrupt DNA biological function and induce the deactivation of the cell genetic apparatus. Thus, the production of hydrogen peroxide molecules in the nucleus of living cells can be considered as an additional mechanism by which high-energy ion beams destroy tumour cells during ion beam therapy. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene

  18. Investigation of hydrogen concentration and hardness of ion irradiated organically modified silicate thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Y.; Prenzel, T.; Harriman, T. A.; Wang, Y. Q.; Lucca, D. A.; Williams, D.; Nastasi, M.; Dong, J.; Mehner, A.

    2010-06-01

    A study of the effects of ion irradiation of organically modified silicate thin films on the loss of hydrogen and increase in hardness is presented. NaOH catalyzed SiNa wO xC yH z thin films were synthesized by sol-gel processing from tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and methyltriethoxysilane (MTES) precursors and spin-coated onto Si substrates. After drying at 300 °C, the films were irradiated with 125 keV H + or 250 keV N 2+ at fluences ranging from 1 × 10 14 to 2.5 × 10 16 ions/cm 2. Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) was used to investigate resulting hydrogen concentration as a function of ion fluence and irradiating species. Nanoindentation was used to measure the hardness of the irradiated films. FT-IR spectroscopy was also used to examine resulting changes in chemical bonding. The resulting hydrogen loss and increase in hardness are compared to similarly processed acid catalyzed silicate thin films.

  19. Studies of an inductively coupled negative hydrogen ion radio frequency source through simulations and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2004-08-24

    In the frame work of a development project for ITER neutral beam injection system a radio frequency (RF) driven negative hydrogen (H-/D-) ion source, (BATMAN ion source) is developed which is designed to produce several 10s of ampere of H-/D- beam current. This PhD work has been carried out to understand and optimize BATMAN ion source. The study has been done with the help of computer simulations, modeling and experiments. The complete three dimensional Monte-Carlo computer simulation codes have been developed under the scope of this PhD work. A comprehensive description about the volume production and the surface production of H- ions is presented in the thesis along with the study results obtained from the simulations, modeling and the experiments. One of the simulations is based on the volume production of H- ions, where it calculates the density profile of the vibrationally excited H2 molecules, the density profile of H- ions and the transport probability of those H- ions along the source axis towards the grid. The other simulation studies the transport of those H- ions which are produced on the surface of the plasma grid. It is expected that if there is a plasma flow in the source, the transport of plasma components (molecules and ions) would be influenced. Experimentally it is observed that there is a convective plasma flow exists in the ion source. A transverse magnetic filter field which is present near the grid inside the ion source reduces the flow velocity. Negative ions and electrons have the same sign of charge; therefore the electrons are co-extracted with the negative ions through the grid system, which is not desirable. It is observed that a magnetic field near the grid, magnetized the electrons and therefore reduce the co-extracted electron current. It is also observed experimentally that if the plasma grid is biased positively with respect to the source body, the electron density near the plasma grid is reduced and therefore the co

  20. Progress of the ''batman'' RF source for negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, P.; Heinemann, B.; Kraus, W.; Probst, F.; Speth, E.; Vollmer, O. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Bucalossi, J.; Trainham, R. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1998-07-01

    The aim of a collaboration between CEA Cadarache and IPP Garching is to investigate the ability of an rf source to produce negative-ion current densities compatible with ITER NBI requirements (20 mA/cm{sup 2} D-). A standard PlNI-size rf source developed for ASDEX-Upgrade and a three-grid extraction system form the basis of BATMAN (Bavarian Test Machine for Negative Ions). In the case of a pure hydrogen plasma a current density of 5.5 mA/cm{sup 2} at elevated pressure (2.4 Pa) can be reached. Adding small amounts of argon (< 15 %) the current density increases up to a maximum of 8.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. In the low pressure range (0.7 Pa) the negative ion yield is strongly reduced, but with an admixture of argon and a cesium injection the current density is higher approx. by a factor 8 (4 mA/cm{sup 2}) compared to the pure hydrogen discharge. The negative ion yield shows a saturation with increasing rf power. (author)

  1. Characterization of All Solid State Hydrogen Ion Selective Electrode Based on PVC-SR Hybrid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Bo Shim

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen ion selective membranes formulated with 3140 RTV silicone rubber (SR in PVC were studied to extend the life time of solid state ion sensors through improved membrane adhesion. All solid state hydrogen ion selective electrodes were prepared by incorporation of tridodecyl amine (TDDA as an ionophore, potassium tetrakis[3.5-bis(p-chlorophenylborate (KTpClPB as a lipophilic additive, bis(2-ethylhexyladipate (DOA as a plasticizer. Their linear dynamic range was pH 2.0-11.0 and showed the near Nernstian slope of 55.1±0.2 mV/pH (r=0.999. The ifluences from alkali and alkaline earth metal ions were studied for the response of the final ISE membrane composition. Impedance spectroscopic data showed that the resistance was increased by increasing SR content in PVC. Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM image showed clear differences according to the SR compositions in PVC. Life time of the all solid state membrane electrode was extended to about 2 months by preparing the membrane with PVC and SR. The standard reference material from NIST (2181 HEPES Free acid and 2182 NaHEPESate was tested for the ISE and it gave good result.

  2. A CW radiofrequency ion source for production of negative hydrogen ion beams for cyclotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.; Tuunanen, J. [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics (Finland); Potkins, D.; Stewart, T.; Dehnel, M. P. [D-Pace, Inc., Nelson, B.C. Canada (Canada)

    2015-04-08

    A CW 13.56 MHz radiofrequency-driven ion source RADIS for production of H{sup −} and D{sup −} beams is under development for replacing the filament-driven ion source of the MCC30/15 cyclotron. The RF ion source has a 16-pole multicusp plasma chamber, an electromagnet-based magnetic filter and an external planar spiral RF antenna behind an AlN window. The extraction is a 5-electrode system with an adjustable puller electrode voltage for optimizing the beam formation, a water-cooled electron dump electrode and an accelerating einzel lens. At 2650 W of RF power, the source produces 1 mA of H{sup −} (2.6 mA/cm{sup 2}), which is the intensity needed at injection for production of 200 µA H{sup +} with the filament-driven ion source. A simple pepperpot device has been developed for characterizing the beam emittance. Plans for improving the power efficiency with the use of a new permanent magnet front plate is discussed.

  3. Sodium-ion electrolytes based on ionic liquids: a role of cation-anion hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Andreeva, Nadezhda A

    2016-08-01

    Recent success of the sodium-ion batteries fosters an academic interest for their investigation. Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) constitute universal solvents providing non-volatility and non-flammability to electrolytes. In the present work, we consider four families of RTILs as prospective solvents for NaBF4 and NaNO3 with an inorganic salt concentration of 25 and 50 mol%. We propose a methodology to rate RTILs according to their solvation capability using parameters of the computed radial distribution functions. Hydrogen bonds between the cations and the anions of RTILs were found to indirectly favor sodium solvation, irrespective of the particular RTIL and its concentration. The best performance was recorded in the case of cholinium nitrate. The reported observations and correlations of ionic structures and properties offer important assistance to an emerging field of sodium-ion batteries. Graphical Abstract Sodium-ion electrolytes.

  4. Construction and test of a high power injector of hydrogen cluster ions

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, E W; Hagena, O F; Henkes, P R W; Klingelhofer, R; Moser, H O; Obert, W; Poth, I

    1979-01-01

    A high power injector of hydrogen cluster ions, rated for 1 MV and 100 kW, is described. The injector is split in three separate tanks connected by a 1 MV transfer line. The cluster ion beam source and all its auxiliary equipment is placed at high voltage, insulated by SF/sub 6/ gas at pressure of 4 bar. The main components of the injector are: The cluster ion beam source with integrated helium cryopumps, the CERN type acceleration tube with 750 mm ID, the beam dump designed to handle the mass and energy flux under DC conditions, a 1 MV high voltage terminal for the auxiliary equipment supplied by its 40 kVA power supply with power, and the 1 MV 120 kW DC high voltage generator. This injector is installed in Karlsruhe. Performance tests were carried out successfully. It is intended to use this injector for refuelling experiments at the ASDEX Tokamak. (12 refs).

  5. Hydrogen peroxide scavenger, catalase, alleviates ion transport dysfunction in murine colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kim E; McCole, Declan F

    2016-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) contribute to epithelial damage and ion transport dysfunction (key events in inflammatory diarrhoea) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify if H2 O2 mediates suppression of colonic ion transport function in the murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model by using the H2 O2 degrading enzyme, catalase. Colitis was induced by administering DSS (4%) in drinking water for 5 days followed by 3 days on normal H2 O. Mice were administered either pegylated catalase or saline at day -1, 0 and +1 of DSS treatment. Ion transport responses to the Ca2+ -dependent agonist, carbachol (CCh), or the cAMP-dependent agonist, forskolin, were measured across distal colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. Parameters of DSS-induced inflammation (loss in body weight, decreased colon length, altered stool consistency), were only partially alleviated by catalase while histology was only minimally improved. However, catalase significantly reversed the DSS-induced reduction in baseline ion transport as well as colonic Isc responses to CCh. However, ion transport responses to forskolin were not significantly restored. Catalase also reduced activation of ERK MAP kinase in the setting of colitis, and increased expression of the Na+ -K+ -2Cl- cotransporter, NKCC1, consistent with restoration of ion transport function. Ex vivo treatment of inflamed colonic mucosae with catalase also partially restored ion transport function. Therefore, catalase partially prevents, and rescues, the loss of ion transport properties in DSS colitis even in the setting of unresolved tissue inflammation. These findings indicate a prominent role for ROS in ion transport dysfunction in colitis and may suggest novel strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diarrhoea. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. In-Situ Cleaning of Metal Cathodes Using a Hydrogen Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Dowell, D H; Kirby, R E; Schmerge, J F

    2005-01-01

    Improving and maintaining the quantum efficiency (qe) of a metal photocathode in an s-band RF gun requires a process for cleaning the surface. In this type of gun, the cathode is typically installed and the system is vacuum baked to ~200°C. If the qe is too low, the cathode is cleaned with the UV-drive laser. While laser cleaning does increase the cathode qe, it requires fluences close to the damage threshold and rastering the small diameter beam, both of which can produce non-uniform electron emission and potentially damage the cathode. This paper investigates the efficacy of a low-energy hydrogen ion beam to produce high-qe metal cathodes. Measurements of the qe vs. wavelength, surface contaminants using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and surface roughness were performed on copper samples, and the results showed a significant increase in qe after cleaning with a 1keV hydrogen ion beam. The H-ion beam cleans an area approximately 1cm in diameter and has no effect on the surface roughness while ...

  7. Electron cyclotron resonance heating by magnetic filter field in a negative hydrogen ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, June Young, E-mail: beacoolguy@snu.ac.kr; Cho, Won-Hwi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Chung, Kyoung-Jae, E-mail: jkjlsh1@snu.ac.kr; Hwang, Y. S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The influence of magnetic filter field on plasma properties in the heating region has been investigated in a planar-type inductively coupled radio-frequency (RF) H{sup −} ion source. Besides filtering high energy electrons near the extraction region, the magnetic filter field is clearly observed to increase the electron temperature in the heating region at low pressure discharge. With increasing the operating pressure, enhancement of electron temperature in the heating region is reduced. The possibility of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating in the heating region due to stray magnetic field generated by a filter magnet located at the extraction region is examined. It is found that ECR heating by RF wave field in the discharge region, where the strength of an axial magnetic field is approximately ∼4.8 G, can effectively heat low energy electrons. Depletion of low energy electrons in the electron energy distribution function measured at the heating region supports the occurrence of ECR heating. The present study suggests that addition of axial magnetic field as small as several G by an external electromagnet or permanent magnets can greatly increase the generation of highly ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in the heating region, thus improving the performance of H{sup −} ion generation in volume-produced negative hydrogen ion sources.

  8. Influence of pressure on ion energy distribution functions in EUV-induced hydrogen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, T. H. M.; Reefman, P.; de Meijere, C. A.; Banine, V. Y.; Beckers, J.

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation lithography tools currently use Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation to create even smaller features on computer chips. The high energy photons (92 eV) induce a plasma in the low pressure background gas by photoionization. Industries have realized that these plasmas are of significant importance with respect to machine lifetime because impacting ions affect exposed surfaces. The mass resolved ion energy distribution function (IEDF) is therefore one of the main plasma parameters of interest. In this research an ion mass spectrometer is used to investigate IEDFs of ions impacting on surfaces in EUV-induced plasmas. EUV radiation is focused into a vessel with a low pressure hydrogen environment. Here, photoionization creates free electrons with energies up to 76 eV, which further ionize the background gas. The influence of the pressure on plasma composition and IEDFs has been investigated in the range 0.1-10 Pa. In general the ion fluxes towards the surface increase with pressure. However, above 5 Pa the flux of H2+ is not affected by the increase in pressure due to the balance between the creation of H2+ and the conversion of H2+ to H3+. These results will be used to benchmark plasma scaling models and verify numerical simulations.

  9. Amorphization and recrystallization of single-crystalline hydrogen titanate nanowires by N{sup +} ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behera, Akshaya K.; Bandyopadyay, Malay K.; Chatterjee, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal@iitbbs.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar, Bhubaneswar 751007 (India); Facsko, Stefan [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Das, Siddhartha [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2014-06-21

    We report on the phase transformation of hydrogen titanate (H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}) nanowires induced by 50 keV N{sup +} ion irradiation at room temperature with fluences of 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} and 1 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Using transmission electron microscopy, the internal structure of the ion irradiated nanowires is analyzed. At low fluence, a transformation from crystalline H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} to amorphous TiO{sub 2} is observed. However, at higher fluence, a remarkable crystalline-amorphous TiO{sub 2} core-shell structure is formed. At this higher fluence, the recrystallization occurs in the core of the nanowire and the outer layer remains amorphous. The phase transformation and formation of core-shell structure are explained using the thermal spike model, radiation enhanced diffusion, and classical theory of nucleation and growth under non-equilibrium thermodynamics. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman scattering reveal further insight into the structure of the nanowires before and after ion irradiation.

  10. DFT study on the interaction between hydrogen sulfide ions and cerussite (110) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qicheng; Wen, Shuming; Deng, Jiushuai; Zhao, Wenjuan

    2017-02-01

    The interaction between hydrogen sulfide ions (HS-) and the cerussite surface was simulated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The calculated results show that Pb atoms are the dominating active sites for the subsequent reaction on the cerussite (110) surface. The S atom in HS- ions can readily interact with the Pb atoms at the cerussite surface layers with the interaction energy of -5.19 eV, resulting in the formation of lead sulfide species. An obvious difference occurs when HS- ions interact with the various Pb atoms on the cerussite surface. The density of state analysis reveals that the Pb 6p orbital at the mineral surface layers and S 3p orbital from HS- ions are overlapped between -1.5 and 0.5 eV near the Fermi level, indicating a stable chemical adsorption. The Mulliken population result suggests that the electron transfer exists between the bonding atoms and the oxidation of the HS- ions is involved in the adsorption process. This study provides an insight into the sulfidization mechanism at an atomic level, and further confirms the experimental phenomenon proposed in our previous work.

  11. Online deuterium hydrogen exchange and protein digestion coupled with ion mobility spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Arndt, James R; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-05-19

    Online deuterium hydrogen exchange (DHX) and pepsin digestion (PD) is demonstrated using drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) coupled with linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometry (MS) with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. DHX of deuterated ubiquitin, followed by subsequent quenching and digestion, is performed within ∼60 s, yielding 100% peptide sequence coverage. The high reproducibility of the IMS separation allows spectral feature matching between two-dimensional IMS-MS datasets (undeuterated and deuterated) without the need for dataset alignment. Extracted ion drift time distributions (XIDTDs) of deuterated peptic peptides are mobility-matched to corresponding XIDTDs of undeuterated peptic peptides that were identified using collision-induced dissociation (CID). Matching XIDTDs allows a straightforward identification and deuterium retention evaluation for labeled peptides. Aside from the mobility separation, the ion trapping capabilities of the LTQ, combined with ETD, are demonstrated to provide single-residue resolution. Deuterium retention for the c- series ions across residues M(1)-L(15) and N(25)-R(42) are in good agreement with the known secondary structural elements within ubiquitin.

  12. Spin effects probed by Rayleigh X-ray scattering off hydrogenic ions

    CERN Document Server

    Safari, Laleh; Amaro, Pedro; Fratini, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    We study the polarization characteristics of x-ray photons scattered by hydrogenic atoms, based on the Dirac equation and second-order perturbation theory. The relativistic states used in calculations are obtained using the finite basis set method and expressed in terms of B-splines and B-polynomials. We derive general analytical expressions for the polarization-dependent total cross sections, which are applicable to any atom and ion, and evaluate them separately for linear and circular polarization of photons. In particular, detailed calculations are performed for the integrated Stokes parameters of the scattered light for hydrogen as well as hydrogenlike neon and argon. Analyzing such integrated Stokes parameters, special attention is given to the electron-photon spin-spin interaction, which mostly stems from the magnetic-dipole contribution of the electron-photon interaction. Subsequently, we find an energy window for the selected targets in which such spin-spin interactions can be probed.

  13. Analysis of the composition of incident hydrogen ion beams accelerated by a Van de Graaff electrostatic accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazhukov, S.I.; Kibardin, A.V.; Pyatkova, T.M. (Urals Polytechnical Inst., Sverdlovsk (USSR))

    1991-06-01

    A new technique is proposed for analysis of the composition of incident hydrogen ion beams accelerated by Van de Graaff electrostatic accelerators. The procedure is based on the analysis of the energy distribution of the neutral fraction of the hydrogen ion beam by a silicon surface barrier detector. It is shown that along with the main beam components (H{sup +}, H{sup 0}) at the energy E{sub 0}, another component exists at the energy 0.25E{sub 0}. This component is brought about through acceleration and breakup of molecular H{sub 2}{sup +} ions. However such inhomogeneities do not play a noticeable role in formation of the low energy tail of hydrogen ions backscattered from thin self-supporting films. (orig.).

  14. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-12-09

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO{sub 2}{sup +} with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H{sub 2} densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 4}{sup +} have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  15. Laser and optical system for laser assisted hydrogen ion beam stripping at SNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Menshov, A.; Webster, A.; Gorlov, T.; Aleksandrov, A.; Cousineau, S.

    2017-03-01

    Recently, a high-efficiency laser assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping was successfully carried out in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator. The experiment was not only an important step toward foil-less H- stripping for charge exchange injection, it also set up a first example of using megawatt ultraviolet (UV) laser source in an operational high power proton accelerator facility. This paper reports in detail the design, installation, and commissioning result of a macro-pulsed multi-megawatt UV laser system and laser beam transport line for the laser stripping experiment.

  16. Spatial distribution of atomic and ion hydrogen flux and its effect on hydrogen recycling in long duration confined and non-confined plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kuzmin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the atomic hydrogen distribution in different kinds of plasma and its influence on the recycling, two kinds of plasmas were used: non-confined annular electron cyclotron resonance (ECR and confined long duration plasmas. The permeation probes are used to measure directly the atomic hydrogen flux at several poloidal positions. The permeation through metals due to the ion and atom component of the hydrogen flux to the wall is indistinguishable. To estimate the contribution of the ions directly, Langmuir probes were used. The Гinc profile behind the plasma facing components (PFCs is almost constant, ∼2 ×1018 H/s/m2.

  17. The relationship between hydrogen and sulphate ions in precipitation-A numerical analysis of rain and snowfall chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefohn, A S; Krupa, S V

    1988-01-01

    Acidic rain has been identified as potentially harmful to the aquatic and terrestrial components of the ecosystem. Sulphate measured in rain and snow has been used as a surrogate indicator of acidic deposition. If sulphur dioxide controls are the means to limit acidic deposition, then the association between sulphate and hydrogen ion concentrations in precipitation is an important factor in establishing such limits. Selected data on rain and snowfall chemistry from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP), the Electric Power Research Institute's SURE, the utility industries' UAPSP, and the Department of Energy's MAP3S were reviewed. Numerical analyses were performed to assess the relationship between hydrogen and sulphate ion concentrations. The strength of the association between hydrogen and sulphate ions varied from site to site. In the Midwestern and Eastern regions, the Pearson correlation coefficient was over 0.50 while in the Central and Upper Midwestern parts of the United States, the correlation coefficients were less than 0.25. Regardless of the strength of the association between hydrogen and sulphate ions, all but one of the NADP/NTN sites used in our analysis exhibited at least 30% of the anions (sulphate, nitrate, and chloride) associated with cations other than hydrogen. For sites where the strength of the association was weak, between 65% and 98% of the anions appeared to be associated with cations other than hydrogen. Because a large percentage of the anions (i.e. sulphate, nitrate, and chloride) appear to be associated with cations other than hydrogen even at those sites where the association between hydrogen and sulphate ions was strong, the complex chemistry controlling the acidity in precipitation may make it difficult to predict the impact of a reduction in sulphate concentration.

  18. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration on metal ion release from dental casting alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salehi, S K; Hatton, P V; Johnson, A; Cox, A G; McLeod, C

    2008-04-01

    There are concerns that tooth bleaching agents may adversely affect dental materials. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) are more effective than water at increasing metal ion release from two typical dental casting alloys during bleaching. Discs (n = 28 for each alloy) were prepared by casting and heat treated to simulate a typical porcelain-firing cycle. Discs (n = 7) of each alloy were immersed in either 0%, 3%, 10% or 30% (w/v) HP solutions for 24 h at 37 degrees C. Samples were taken for metal ion release determination using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and the data analysed using a two-way anova followed by a one-way anova. The surface roughness of each disc was measured using a Talysurf contact profilometer before and after bleaching and the data analysed using a paired t-test. With the exception of gold, the differences in metal ion concentration after treatment with 0% (control) and each of 3%, 10% and 30% HP (w/v) were statistically significant (P 0.05) Exposure of the two dental casting alloys to HP solutions increased metal ion release of all the elements except gold.

  19. In situ cleaning of metal cathodes using a hydrogen ion beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Dowell

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal photocathodes are commonly used in high-field rf guns because they are robust, straightforward to implement, and tolerate relatively poor vacuum compared to semiconductor cathodes. However, these cathodes have low quantum efficiency (QE even at UV wavelengths, and still require some form of cleaning after installation in the gun. A commonly used process for improving the QE is laser cleaning. In this technique the UV-drive laser is focused to a small diameter close to the metal’s damage threshold and then moved across the surface to remove contaminants. This method does improve the QE, but can produce nonuniform emission and potentially damage the cathode. Ideally, an alternative process which produces an atomically clean, but unaltered, surface is needed. In this paper we explore using a hydrogen ion (H-ion beam to clean a copper cathode. We describe QE measurements over the wavelength range of interest as a function of integrated exposure to an H-ion beam. We also describe the data analysis to obtain the work function and derive a formula of the QE for metal cathodes. Our measured work function for the cleaned sample is in good agreement with published values, and the theoretical QE as a function of photon wavelength is in excellent agreement with the cleaned copper experimental results. Finally, we propose an in situ installation of an H-ion gun compatible with existing s-band rf guns.

  20. Optimization of caesium dynamics in large and powerful RF sources for negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimo, Alessandro; Wimmer, Christian; Wuenderlich, Dirk; Fantz, Ursel [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    The development of large and powerful RF sources for negative hydrogen and deuterium ions is mandatory for the realization of the Neutral Beam Injection system at ITER. Caesium seeding into negative ion sources is necessary to obtain the required ion current with a tolerable level of co-extracted electrons. The caesium dynamics, during both plasma and vacuum phases, was investigated by means of the Monte Carlo transport code CsFlow3D, which is used to simulate the time evolution of the distribution of neutral and ionic caesium in the IPP prototype RF ion source. Simulations were performed for different durations of plasma-on and plasma-off phases, with the purpose of understanding how the duty cycle influences the caesium distribution and hence the source performance. In order to investigate asymmetry effects in the caesium distribution, caused by the positioning of caesium evaporator, the caesium coverage on the top and on the bottom part of the plasma grid was simulated and data were compared to the caesium density measured by laser absorption in the prototype source. The next step will be to introduce in the code the simulation of diagnostics such as laser absorption spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy, in order to achieve a direct benchmark of the code with experimental data.

  1. In-ESI source hydrogen/deuterium exchange of carbohydrate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukevich, Yury; Kononikhin, Alexey; Popov, Igor; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2014-03-04

    We present the investigation of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of carbohydrates ions occurring in the electrospray ion source. The shape of the deuterium distribution was observed to be considerably dependent on the temperature of the ion transfer tube and the solvent used. If deuterated alcohol (EtOD or MeOD) or D2O/deuterated alcohol is used as an electrospray solvent, then for high temperatures (>350 °C), intensive back exchange is observed, resulting in ∼30% depth of the deuterium exchange. At low temperatures (deuterium exchange is ∼70%. In the intermediate temperature region (∼250 °C), the deuterium distribution is unusually wide for methanol and bimodal for ethanol. The addition of 1% formic acid results in low (∼30%) depth of the deuterium exchange for any temperature in the operating region. The bimodal distribution for the ethanol can be possibly explained by the presence of differently folded gas-phase ions of carbohydrates.

  2. Development of a high-current hydrogen-negative ion source for LHD-NBI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeiri, Yasuhiko; Osakabe, Masaki; Tsumori, Katsuyoshi; Oka, Yoshihide; Kaneko, Osamu; Asano, Eiji; Kawamoto, Toshikazu; Akiyama, Ryuichi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Tanaka, Masanobu

    1998-08-01

    We have developed a high-current hydrogen-negative ion source for a negative-ion-based NBI system in Large Helical Device (LHD). The ion source is a cesium-seeded volume-production source equipped with an external magnetic filter. An arc chamber is rectangular, the dimensions of which are 35 cm x 145 cm in cross section and 21 cm in depth. A three-grid single-stage accelerator is divided into five sections longitudinally, each of which has 154(14 x 11) apertures in an area of 25 cm x 25 cm. The ion source was tested in the negative-NBI teststand, and 25 A of the negative ion beam is incident on a beamdump 13 m downstream with an energy of 104 keV for 1 sec. Multibeamlets of 770 are focused on a focal point 13 m downstream with an averaged divergence angle of 10 mrad by the geometrical arrangement of five sections of grid and the aperture displacement technique of the grounded grid. A uniform beam in the vertical direction over 125 cm is obtained with uniform plasma production in the arc chamber by balancing individual arc currents flowing through each filament. Long-pulse beam production was performed, and 1.3 MW of the negative ion beam is incident on the beamdump for 10 sec, and the temperature rise of the cooling water is almost saturated for the extraction and the grounded grids. These results satisfy the first-step specification of the LHD-NBI system. (author)

  3. Atomic ionization of hydrogen-like ions by twisted photons: angular distribution of emitted electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matula, O.; Hayrapetyan, A. G.; Serbo, V. G.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the angular distribution of electrons that are emitted in the ionization of hydrogen-like ions by twisted photons. Analysis is performed based on the first-order perturbation theory and the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation. Special attention is paid to the dependence of the electron emission pattern on the impact parameter b of the ion with respect to the centre of the twisted wave front. In order to explore such a dependence, detailed calculations were carried out for the photoionization of the 1s ground and 2 py excited states of neutral hydrogen atoms. Based on these calculations, we argue that for relatively small impact parameters, the electron angular distributions may be strongly affected by altering the position of the atom within the wave front. In contrast, if the atom is placed far from the front centre, the emission pattern of the electrons is independent of the impact parameter b and resembles that observed in the photoionization by plane wave photons.

  4. Hysteresis in the context of hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, Wolfgang; Guhlke, Clemens; Huth, Robert

    2009-07-21

    The processes of reversible storage of hydrogen in a metal by loading and unloading and of charging and discharging of lithium-ion batteries have many things in common. The both processes are accompanied by a phase transition and loading and unloading run along different paths, so that hysteretic behavior is observed. For hydrogen storage we consider a fine powder of magnesium (Mg) particles and lithium storage is studied for iron phosphate (FePO{sub 4}) particles forming the cathode of a lithium-ion battery. The mathematical models describe phase transitions and hysteresis exclusively in a single particle and on that basis they can predict the observed hysteretic plots with almost horizontal plateaus. Interestingly the models predict that the coexistence of a 2-phase system in an individual particle disappears, if its size is below a critical value. However, measurements reveal that this is qualitatively not reflected by the mentioned hysteretic plots of loading and unloading. In other words: The behavior of a storage system consisting of many particles is qualitatively independent of the fact whether the individual particles itself develop a 2-phase system or if they remain in a single phase state. This apparent paradoxical observation is resolved in this article. It is shown that if each of the individual particles homogeneously distributes the supplied matter, nevertheless the many particle ensemble exhibits phase transition and hysteresis, because one of the two phases is realized in some part of the particles while the remaining part is in the other phase. (orig.)

  5. Thermodynamic considerations of arteriovenous gradients of hydrogen ion concentration and carbon dioxide tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakitzis, E T

    2000-03-01

    It is shown that, in a multicompartmental homeostatic system, the extent of interaction between any two compartments can be assessed by determination of the difference in free energy change of one particular reaction, or a series of coupled reactions, operative in both of the compartments under consideration. Hydrogen ion concentration and carbon dioxide tension have been used to determine free energy change difference relationships between the venous and arterial compartments (-deltadeltaG(a-v)) of the circulatory system. Data from the literature (from two studies of congestive heart failure and one study of experimentally induced cardiac arrest) are used to calculate -deltadeltaG(a-v). It was found that in control subjects -deltadeltaG(a-v) is close to zero, whereas in congestive heart failure or cardiac arrest, the value rises to 150 cal mol(-1) or more, whereas in blood, the approach towards equilibrium between hydrogen and bicarbonate ions and dissolved carbon dioxide (aqueous CO2) is known to be only moderately rapid. It is concluded that, in the system under study, and with respect to the reaction H+ + HCO3- = CO2 + H2O, a high value for the free energy change difference between the two compartments (high -deltadeltaG(a-v)) must be due to an insufficient blood circulation rate. Accordingly, -deltadeltaG(a-v) is probably a quantitative measure of cardiac insufficiency.

  6. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H](3-) and [M - 5H](5-) insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å(2) and 808 ± 2 Å(2). [M - 4H](4-) ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å(2)) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å(2)) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H](4-) and [M - 5H](5-) ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis.

  7. Desalination and hydrogen, chlorine, and sodium hydroxide production via electrophoretic ion exchange and precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Bahga, Supreet S; Santiago, Juan G

    2012-08-28

    We demonstrate and analyze a novel desalination method which works by electrophoretically replacing sodium and chloride in feed salt water with a pair of ions, calcium and carbonate, that react and precipitate out. The resulting calcium carbonate precipitate is benign to health, and can be filtered or settled out, yielding low ionic strength product water. The ion exchange and precipitation employs self-sharpening interfaces induced by movement of multiple ions in an electric field to prevent contamination of the product water. Simultaneously, the electrolysis associated with the electromigration produces hydrogen gas, chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide. We conducted an experimental study of this method's basic efficacy to desalinate salt water from 100 to 600 mol m(-3) sodium chloride. We also present physicochemical models of the process, and analyze replacement reagents consumption, permeate recovery ratio, and energy consumption. We hypothesize that the precipitate can be recycled back to replacement reagents using the well-known, commercially implemented Solvay process. We show that the method's permeate recovery ratio is 58% to 46%, which is on par with that of reverse osmosis. We show that the method's energy consumption requirement over and above that necessary to generate electrolysis is 3 to 10 W h l(-1), which is on par with the energy consumed by state-of-the-art desalination methods. Furthermore, the method operates at ambient temperature and pressure, and uses no specialized membranes. The process may be feasible as a part of a desalination-co-generation facility: generating fresh water, hydrogen and chlorine gas, and sodium hydroxide.

  8. Homogeneous reaction rate model for hydrogen production from ion-irradiated polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Lee, E.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Mansur, L.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Coghlan, W.A. (Grand Canyon Univ., Phoenix, AZ (United States))

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical model has been constructed to calculate the time or fluence dependence of G-values for H[sub 2] production, G(H[sub 2]), from the ion irradiation of the polymers polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), and Kapton. Measurements of the G(H[sub 2]) for 1 Mev Ar[sup +] over a fluence range from about 1 x 10[sup 11] to about 5 x 10[sup 13] /mm[sup 2] have been made in order to determine the parameters of the model. The model is based upon rate equations describing the electronic-generation of and the interaction of a uniform distribution of free radicals. Satisfactory fits to the data could be made by adjusting two key parameters - the effective C-H bond energy and the hydrogen-carbon recombination rate constant relative to the hydrogen-hydrogen recombination rate constant. It was found that the effective C-H bond energy varied from the lowest value of [approx]8 eV for PE to the highest value of [approx]100 eV for Kapton. From the effective bond energy, an average value for hydrogen radical production, G(H[sup .]), was deduced. The effects of the parameters on the G-value versus time/fluence curves are shown and the significance of the parameters are discussed. The data was also compared to percolation model predictions, but the deviations between data and this model were seen to be large at high fluence. (orig.)

  9. Characteristics of a high-power RF source of negative hydrogen ions for neutral beam injection into controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdrashitov, G. F.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Gusev, I. A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kondakov, A. A.; Sanin, A. L.; Sotnikov, O. Z., E-mail: O.Z.Sotnikov@inp.nsk.su; Shikhovtsev, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    An injector of hydrogen atoms with an energy of 0.5–1 MeV and equivalent current of up to 1.5 A for purposes of controlled fusion research is currently under design at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. Within this project, a multiple-aperture RF surface-plasma source of negative hydrogen ions is designed. The source design and results of experiments on the generation of a negative ion beam with a current of >1 A in the long-pulse mode are presented.

  10. XUV-exposed, non-hydrostatic hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets. Part II: hydrogen coronae and ion escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislyakova, Kristina G; Lammer, Helmut; Holmström, Mats; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Odert, Petra; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Leitzinger, Martin; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Kulikov, Yuri N; Güdel, Manuel; Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2013-11-01

    We studied the interactions between the stellar wind plasma flow of a typical M star, such as GJ 436, and the hydrogen-rich upper atmosphere of an Earth-like planet and a "super-Earth" with a radius of 2 R(Earth) and a mass of 10 M(Earth), located within the habitable zone at ∼0.24 AU. We investigated the formation of extended atomic hydrogen coronae under the influences of the stellar XUV flux (soft X-rays and EUV), stellar wind density and velocity, shape of a planetary obstacle (e.g., magnetosphere, ionopause), and the loss of planetary pickup ions on the evolution of hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres. Stellar XUV fluxes that are 1, 10, 50, and 100 times higher compared to that of the present-day Sun were considered, and the formation of high-energy neutral hydrogen clouds around the planets due to the charge-exchange reaction under various stellar conditions was modeled. Charge-exchange between stellar wind protons with planetary hydrogen atoms, and photoionization, lead to the production of initially cold ions of planetary origin. We found that the ion production rates for the studied planets can vary over a wide range, from ∼1.0×10²⁵ s⁻¹ to ∼5.3×10³⁰ s⁻¹, depending on the stellar wind conditions and the assumed XUV exposure of the upper atmosphere. Our findings indicate that most likely the majority of these planetary ions are picked up by the stellar wind and lost from the planet. Finally, we estimated the long-time nonthermal ion pickup escape for the studied planets and compared them with the thermal escape. According to our estimates, nonthermal escape of picked-up ionized hydrogen atoms over a planet's lifetime within the habitable zone of an M dwarf varies between ∼0.4 Earth ocean equivalent amounts of hydrogen (EO(H)) to <3 EO(H) and usually is several times smaller in comparison to the thermal atmospheric escape rates.

  11. Measurement of charge exchange cross sections for highly charged xenon and thorium ions with molecular hydrogen in a Penning Ion Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberg, G.M.

    1995-12-01

    Highly charged xenon (35+ to 46+) and thorium (72+ to 79+) ions were produced in an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). The ions were extracted from EBIT in a short pulse. Ions of one charge state were selected using an electromagnet. The ions were recaptured at low energy in a cryogenic Penning trap (RETRAP). As the ions captured electrons from molecular hydrogen, populations of the various charge states were obtained by measuring the image currents induced by the ions on the electrodes of the trap. Data on the number of ions in each charge state vs. time were compared to theoretical rate equations in order to determine the average charge exchange rates. These rates were compared to charge exchange rates of an ion with a known charge exchange cross section (Ar{sup 11+}) measured in a similar manner in order to determine the average charge exchange cross sections for the highly charged ions. The energy of interaction between the highly charged ions and hydrogen was estimated to be 4 eV in the center of mass frame. The mean charge exchange cross sections were 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup 2} for Xe{sup 43+} to Xe{sup 46+} and 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 2} for Th{sup 73+} to Th{sup 79+}. Double capture was approximately 20--25% of the total for both xenon and thorium. A fit indicated that the cross sections were approximately proportional to q. This is consistent with a linear dependence of cross section on q within the measurement uncertainties.

  12. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. VII. The effect of cations on the structures of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Choi, Hyung Ran; Jeon, Jonggu; Cho, Minhaeng

    2017-10-01

    Ions in high salt solutions have a strong propensity to form polydisperse ion aggregates with broad size and shape distributions. In a series of previous comparative investigations using femtosecond IR pump-probe spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulation, and graph theoretical analysis, we have shown that there exists a morphological difference in the structures of ion aggregates formed in various salt solutions. As salt concentration increases, the ions in high salt solutions form either cluster-like structures excluding water molecules or network-like structures entwined with water hydrogen-bonding networks. Interestingly, such morphological characteristics of the ion aggregates have been found to be in correlation with the solubility limits of salts. An important question that still remains unexplored is why certain salts with different cations have notably different solubility limits in water. Here, carrying out a series of molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous salt solutions and analyzing the distributions and connectivity patterns of ion aggregates with a spectral graph analysis method, we establish the relationship between the salt solubility and the ion aggregate morphology with a special emphasis on the cationic effects on water structures and ion aggregation. We anticipate that the understanding of large scale ion aggregate structures revealed in this study will be critical for elucidating the specific ion effects on the solubility and conformational stability of co-solute molecules such as proteins in water.

  13. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H](2-) ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H](3-) ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H](2-) ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H](3-) ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  14. Process of iodine ion slowing down in a hydrogen target; Analyse du processus de ralentissement d`iode dans une cible d`hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardes, D.; Chabot, M.; Nectoux, M. [Experimental Research Division, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France); Mabong, S.; Maynard, G. [LPGP, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France); Roudskoi, I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-11-01

    The stopping power of iodine ions traversing a windowless hydrogen target has been measured varying the gas in a large pressure range (0 to 120 torr). Experimental measurements present the energy losses and the charge distributions of emerging ions. Those results enable us to test stopping power theories at high velocity and large perturbation parameter Z/v. Higher order correction terms for the stopping calculated with point like approximation for the charge or with more realistic atomic potential are compared with experimental energy losses. (authors) 1 ref., 2 figs.

  15. Tethering metal ions to photocatalyst particulate surfaces by bifunctional molecular linkers for efficient hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Weili

    2014-08-19

    A simple and versatile method for the preparation of photocatalyst particulates modified with effective cocatalysts is presented; the method involves the sequential soaking of photocatalyst particulates in solutions containing bifunctional organic linkers and metal ions. The modification of the particulate surfaces is a universal and reproducible method because the molecular linkers utilize strong covalent bonds, which in turn result in modified monolayer with a small but controlled quantity of metals. The photocatalysis results indicated that the CdS with likely photochemically reduced Pd and Ni, which were initially immobilized via ethanedithiol (EDT) as a linker, were highly efficient for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from Na2S-Na2SO3-containing aqueous solutions. The method developed in this study opens a new synthesis route for the preparation of effective photocatalysts with various combinations of bifunctional linkers, metals, and photocatalyst particulate materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Fiber optic picosecond laser pulse transmission line for hydrogen ion beam longitudinal profile measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunning; Liu, Yun; Aleksandrov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    We present a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line for nonintrusive longitudinal profile measurement of the hydrogen ion (H(-)) beam at the front-end of the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator. The 80.5 MHz, 2.5 ps, multikilowatt optical pulses are delivered to the accelerator beam line through a large-mode-area polarization-maintaining optical fiber to ensure high measurement stability. The transmission efficiency, output laser beam quality, pulse jitter, and pulse width broadening over a 30 m long fiber line are experimentally investigated. A successful measurement of the H(-) beam microbunch (~130 ps) profile is obtained. The experiment is the first demonstration to our knowledge of particle beam profile diagnostics using a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line.

  17. Plasma-screening effects on the electron-impact excitation of hydrogenic ions in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Dae

    1993-01-01

    Plasma-screening effects are investigated on electron-impact excitation of hydrogenic ions in dense plasmas. Scaled cross sections Z(exp 4) sigma for 1s yields 2s and 1s yields 2p are obtained for a Debye-Hueckel model of the screened Coulomb interaction. Ground and excited bound wave functions are modified in the screened Coulomb potential (Debye-Hueckel model) using the Ritz variation method. The resulting atomic wave functions and their eigenenergies agree well with the numerical and high-order perturbation theory calculations for the interesting domain of the Debye length not less than 10. The Born approximation is used to describe the continuum states of the projectile electron. Plasma screening effects on the atomic electrons cannot be neglected in the high-density cases. Including these effects, the cross sections are appreciably increased for 1s yields 2s transitions and decreased for 1s yields 2p transitions.

  18. On the influence of hydronium and hydroxide ion diffusion on the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions in aqueous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Gustav Karl Henrik; Arenz, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    We present a study concerning the influence of the diffusion of H+ and OH- ions on the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions (HER and OER) in aqueous electrolyte solutions. Using a rotating disk electrode (RDE), it is shown that at certain conditions the observed current, i.e., the reaction rate...

  19. Formation of Hydrogen-Ion in Isomolar Solution of Hydrochloric and Hydrobromic Acids and Their Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Kovaleva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the presence of a large amount of factual material on thermodynamic parameters of complexation of agents in different solvents, including mixed ones, obtained knowledge is specific in nature. In order to identify more general patterns, studies are relevant that would allow to interpret the obtained data taking into account the interaction between chemical forms in solutions. This paper presents a general approach to studying weak ionic interactions in solutions that allows to simultaneously determine the constants of these interactions and the parameters characterizing the influence of changes in the ionic environment on these constants by the example of chlorides and bromides of alkali metals. The obtained constants for hydrosulfate-ion formation and the imperfection parameters can be a reference material for more accurate calculation of the concentration of hydrogen ions in sulfuric acid solutions. The developed approach and patterns identified in the work can be used to study the balanced states for formation of low and medium stable complexes.

  20. Oxidative damage to collagen and related substrates by metal ion/hydrogen peroxide systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1997-01-01

    (II)-H2O2, evidence has been obtained for: i) altered sites of attack and fragmentation, ii) C-terminal decarboxylation, and iii) hydrogen abstraction at N-terminal alpha-carbon sites. This altered behaviour is believed to be due to the binding of copper ions to some substrates and hence site......'R"), and alpha-carbon[.C(R)(NH-)CO-,R = side-chain]radicals. Reaction with collagen gave both broad anisotropic signals, from high-molecular-weight protein-derived radicals, and isotropic signals from mobile species. The latter may be low-molecular-weight fragments, or mobile side-chain species; these signals...... are similar to those from the alpha-carbon site of peptides and the side-chain of lysine. Enzymatic digestion of the large, protein-derived, species releases similar low-molecular-weight adducts. The metal ion employed has a dramatic effect on the species observed. With Cu(I)-H2O2 or Cu(II)-H2O2 instead of Fe...

  1. Enhancing Hydrogen Diffusion in Silica Matrix by Using Metal Ion Implantation to Improve the Emission Properties of Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bornacelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient silicon-based light emitters continue to be a challenge. A great effort has been made in photonics to modify silicon in order to enhance its light emission properties. In this aspect silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs have become the main building block of silicon photonic (modulators, waveguide, source, and detectors. In this work, we present an approach based on implantation of Ag (or Au ions and a proper thermal annealing in order to improve the photoluminescence (PL emission of Si-NCs embedded in SiO2. The Si-NCs are obtained by ion implantation at MeV energy and nucleated at high depth into the silica matrix (1-2 μm under surface. Once Si-NCs are formed inside the SiO2 we implant metal ions at energies that do not damage the Si-NCs. We have observed by, PL and time-resolved PL, that ion metal implantation and a subsequent thermal annealing in a hydrogen-containing atmosphere could significantly increase the emission properties of Si-NCs. Elastic Recoil Detection measurements show that the samples with an enhanced luminescence emission present a higher hydrogen concentration. This suggests that ion metal implantation enhances the hydrogen diffusion into silica matrix allowing a better passivation of surface defects on Si NCs.

  2. VUV Absorption Spectroscopy of a Penning Surface - Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Eric John

    The demand for energetic, high-current H ^- beams is ever-growing. Because H ^- is efficiently neutralized at high energies, these beams are ideally suited to applications where energetic neutral beams of particles are required to propagate across magnetic fields. Prime examples are neutral-beam heating of magnetic fusion plasmas and directed-energy weapons for ballistic missile defense. Such applications place demanding requirements on sources of H^ - ions, particularly with respect to the parameters of beam current, brightness, quiescence, reliability, and duty-factor. A class of sources that holds great promise for meeting these stringent requirements is the surface-plasma source (SPS), and in particular, the Penning type of SPS. It has long been conjectured that atomic hydrogen plays an important role in both H^- formation and transport in these sources. Understanding the interdependence of atomic hydrogen properties and those of H^ -, and how this relationship might be exploited to improve source performance is the motivation for this research. An overview of SPS's is presented. Previous measurements on the discharge are reviewed. Absorption spectroscopy, the diagnostic technique used to gather all of the data presented here, is discussed. Techniques that may potentially be used to measure the properties of H^ - in the discharge are discussed. The two absorption spectrometers used in this experiment are described. Measurements of ground-state atomic hydrogen density and temperature in a Penning SPS are presented. These measurements are the first of this kind for this type of discharge. An upper limit on the H^- density in the extraction region of the source is measured by the application of a novel diagnostic technique: the hydrogen atom density following H^- photodetachment by a Nd:YAG beam is measured and compared to the equilibrium atomic density. A simple model is derived that describes the dependence of the atomic temperature on the externally

  3. Evaluation of beam divergence of a negative hydrogen ion beam using Doppler shift spectroscopy diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, A. J.; Bharathi, P.; Pandya, K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Bhuyan, M.; Yadav, R. K.; Tyagi, H.; Gahlaut, A.; Chakraborty, A.

    2018-01-01

    The Doppler Shift Spectroscopy (DSS) diagnostic is in the conceptual stage to estimate beam divergence, stripping losses, and beam uniformity of the 100 keV hydrogen Diagnostics Neutral Beam of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. This DSS diagnostic is used to measure the above-mentioned parameters with an error of less than 10%. To aid the design calculations and to establish a methodology for estimation of the beam divergence, DSS measurements were carried out on the existing prototype ion source RF Operated Beam Source in India for Negative ion Research. Emissions of the fast-excited neutrals that are generated from the extracted negative ions were collected in the target tank, and the line broadening of these emissions were used for estimating beam divergence. The observed broadening is a convolution of broadenings due to beam divergence, collection optics, voltage ripple, beam focusing, and instrumental broadening. Hence, for estimating the beam divergence from the observed line broadening, a systematic line profile analysis was performed. To minimize the error in the divergence measurements, a study on error propagation in the beam divergence measurements was carried out and the error was estimated. The measurements of beam divergence were done at a constant RF power of 50 kW and a source pressure of 0.6 Pa by varying the extraction voltage from 4 kV to10 kV and the acceleration voltage from 10 kV to 15 kV. These measurements were then compared with the calorimetric divergence, and the results seemed to agree within 10%. A minimum beam divergence of ˜3° was obtained when the source was operated at an extraction voltage of ˜5 kV and at a ˜10 kV acceleration voltage, i.e., at a total applied voltage of 15 kV. This is in agreement with the values reported in experiments carried out on similar sources elsewhere.

  4. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  5. The creation of strongly coupled plasmas using an intense heavy ion beam: low-entropy compression of hydrogen and the problem of hydrogen metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Varentsov, D; Udrea, S; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Juranek, H; Redmer, R; Portugues, R F; Lomonosov, I V; Fortov, V E

    2003-01-01

    Intense heavy ion beams deposit energy very efficiently over extended volumes of solid density targets, thereby creating large samples of strongly coupled plasmas. Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are therefore an ideal tool to research this interesting field. It is also possible to design experiments using special beam-target geometries to achieve low-entropy compression of samples of matter. This type of experiments is of particular interest for studying the problem of hydrogen metallization. In this paper we present a design study of such a proposed experiment that will be carried out at the future heavy ion synchrotron facility SIS100, at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. This study has been done using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code. The target consists of a solid hydrogen cylinder that is enclosed in a thick shell of lead whose one face is irradiated with an ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot. The beam intensity and other parameters are consider...

  6. Nanoscale Layer Transfer by Hydrogen Ion-Cut Processing: A Brief Review Through Recent U.S. Patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Benjamin T-H

    2017-01-01

    A hydrogen-based Ion-Cut layer-transfer technique, the so-called Ion-Cut or Smart-Cut processing, has been used in transferring a semiconductor membrane onto a desired substrate to reveal unique characteristics on a nanoscale size and to build functional electronic and photonic devices that are used for specific purposes. For example, the sub-100 nm thick silicon membrane transferred onto an insulator became a key substrate for fabricating nanoscale integrated circuit (IC) devices. Recent U.S. patents have exhibited integration of various thinning approaches requiring precision of a few nanometers in fabricating large-area semiconductor nanomembranes, especially for silicon. This paper reviews published patents and work on fabricating sub-100 nm silicon membranes with welldefined features without a chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) thinning process. This included material analysis leads to ultraprecision thickness in the sub-100 nm region. This paper combines an analysis of peer-reviewed articles and issued patents using focused review keywords of hydrogen implantation, wafer bonding, and layer splitting. The quality of selected patents was appraised based on the authors' 20-year research experience in the field of ultrathin silicon layer-transfer technology. The paper covered more than 10 U.S. patents that have been filed on hydrogen-based Ion-Cut layer-transfer techniques. These patents described approaches for inserting hydrogen ions to split at a well-defined location and then transfer the as-split silicon membrane at the nanoscale thickness onto a desired substrate. Hydrogen-trap sites, implantation energy, and interface of the distinct doped regions could define the layer-split location. The insertion of high-dose hydrogen ions could be thoroughly achieved by ion implantation, plasma ion immersion implantation (PIII), plasma diffusion, and electrolysis. The article concludes with the discussion of the patent-orientated review of layer-transfer techniques

  7. [The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electrochemical corrosion properties and metal ions release of nickel-chromium dental alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Qiao, Guang-yan

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the electrochemical corrosion and metal ions release of nickel-chromium dental alloys. The corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium dental alloys was compared by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curve (PD) methods in artificial saliva after immersed in different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for 112 h. The metal ions released from nickel-chromium dental alloys to the artificial saliva were detected after electrochemical measurements using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The data was statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) using SPSS 13.0 software package. The electrochemical experiment showed that the sequence of polarization resistance in equivalent circuit (Rct), corrosion potential (Ecorr), pitting breakdown potential (Eb), and the difference between Ecorr and Eb representing the "pseudo-passivation" (δE) of nickel-chromium alloys in artificial saliva was 30% corrosion resistance of nickel-chromium dental alloys decrease after immersed in different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for 112 h. Nickel-chromium dental alloys are more prone to corrosion in the artificial saliva with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased, and more metal ions are released in the artificial saliva.

  8. Information-theoretic measures of hydrogen-like ions in weakly coupled Debye plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Li Rong; Jiao, Li Guang; Ma, Jia; Ho, Yew Kam

    2017-12-01

    Recent development of information theory provides researchers an alternative and useful tool to quantitatively investigate the variation of the electronic structure when atoms interact with the external environment. In this work, we make systematic studies on the information-theoretic measures for hydrogen-like ions immersed in weakly coupled plasmas modeled by Debye-Hückel potential. Shannon entropy, Fisher information, and Fisher-Shannon complexity in both position and momentum spaces are quantified in high accuracy for the hydrogen atom in a large number of stationary states. The plasma screening effect on embedded atoms can significantly affect the electronic density distributions, in both conjugate spaces, and it is quantified by the variation of information quantities. It is shown that the composite quantities (the Shannon entropy sum and the Fisher information product in combined spaces and Fisher-Shannon complexity in individual space) give a more comprehensive description of the atomic structure information than single ones. The nodes of wave functions play a significant role in the changes of composite information quantities caused by plasmas. With the continuously increasing screening strength, all composite quantities in circular states increase monotonously, while in higher-lying excited states where nodal structures exist, they first decrease to a minimum and then increase rapidly before the bound state approaches the continuum limit. The minimum represents the most reduction of uncertainty properties of the atom in plasmas. The lower bounds for the uncertainty product of the system based on composite information quantities are discussed. Our research presents a comprehensive survey in the investigation of information-theoretic measures for simple atoms embedded in Debye model plasmas.

  9. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  10. Dynamics of the reaction of the N/sup +/ ion with hydrogen isotopes and helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruska, W.E.W.

    1976-06-28

    Molecular beam techniques were used to study the reactive and non-reactive scattering of the nitrogen positive ion from hydrogen isotopes and helium, at energies above the stability limit for spectator stripping. Reactive scattering was observed from H/sub 2/ and HD targets. Non-reactive scattering was observed from H/sub 2/ and D/sub 2/ targets, and from He at one energy. A correlation diagram for the system is presented and compared with the available a priori calculations. Two surfaces are expected to lead to reaction. One is a /sup 3/A/sub 2/ - /sup 3/PI surface, the other, a /sup 3/B/sub 1/ - /sup 3/..sigma../sup -/ surface. Collinear approaches are expected to be most reactive on the /sup 3/B/sub 1/ - /sup 3/..sigma../sup -/ surface; noncollinear, on the /sup 3/A/sub 1/ - /sup 3/PI surface. Theoretical models are presented in which an incident hard sphere A, representing the projectile ion, strikes one of a pair of hard spheres B-C representing the B hydrogen molecule. After an impulsive A-B collision, an impulsive B-C collision may take place. The relative energy of A to B is then examined, and a reactive event is considered to have occurred if the energy is less than the dissociation energy for the A-B molecule. This model is treated both in the collinear case and in three dimensions. A graphical technique for the collinear case is summarized and applied to reaction on the /sup 3/B/sub 1/ - /sup 3/..sigma../sup -/ surface. An integral equation for the three-dimensional case is developed. A synthesis of two treatments, representing the behavior of the system on both reactive surfaces, and considering the charge-exchange channel, correctly predicts the observed product distribution. Predictions are also presented for the as yet unobserved case of reactive scattering from a D/sub 2/ target.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide: role in ion channel and transporter modulation in the eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Fatou eNjie-Mbye

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S, a colorless gas with a characteristic smell of rotten eggs, has been portrayed for decades as a toxic environmental pollutant. Since evidence of its basal production in mammalian tissues a decade ago, H2S has attracted substantial interest as a potential inorganic gaseous mediator with biological importance in cellular functions. Current research suggests that, next to its counterparts nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, H2S is an important multifunctional signaling molecule with pivotal regulatory roles in various physiological and pathophysiological processes as diverse as learning and memory, modulation of synaptic activities, cell survival, inflammation and maintenance of vascular tone in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems. In contrast, there are few reports of a regulatory role of H2S in the eye. Accumulating reports on the pharmacological role of H2S in ocular tissues indicate the existence of a functional trans-sulfuration pathway and a potential physiological role for H2S as a gaseous neuromodulator in the eye. Thus, understanding the role of H2S in vision-related processes is imperative to our expanding knowledge of this molecule as a gaseous mediator in ocular tissues. This review aims to provide a comprehensive and current understanding of the potential role of H2S as a signaling molecule in the eye. This objective is achieved by discussing the involvement of H2S in the regulation of (1 ion channels such as calcium (L-type, T-type and intracellular stores, potassium (KATP and small conductance channels and chloride channels, (2 glutamate transporters such as EAAT1/GLAST and the L-cystine/glutamate antiporter. The role of H2S as an important mediator in cellular functions and physiological processes that are triggered by its interaction with ion channels/transporters in the eye will also be discussed.

  12. Importance of electric field for H(-) extraction in a volume-type hydrogen negative ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Y; Nishiura, M; Sasao, M; Yamaoka, H; Shinto, K; Wada, M

    2008-02-01

    The effect upon extraction of negative hydrogen ions (H(-)) due to electric field near the extractor hole of a H(-) source is studied experimentally and theoretically. Probe measurements show that the extraction electric field penetrates into the plasma in the region near the extractor hole. Based on this observation a three-dimensional H(-) trajectory calculation that takes into account the local electric field distribution near the plasma electrode has been carried out. The validity of the trajectory calculation was examined by comparing the results with experimentally measured changes in H(-) current detected by a Faraday cup due to irradiation of a pulse laser beam in the region close to the extractor hole. The calculation results qualitatively explain the changes in H(-) current observed in the experiment. The calculation results also predict that the amount of H(-) current passing through the extractor hole changes with the electric field: the penetration of the electric field substantially enhances the H(-) extraction current, because it produces an electric field to attract H(-) toward the extraction hole.

  13. Equation of state of metallic hydrogen from coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Miguel A; Pierleoni, Carlo; Ceperley, D M

    2010-02-01

    We present a study of hydrogen at pressures higher than molecular dissociation using the coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo method. These calculations use the accurate reptation quantum Monte Carlo method to estimate the electronic energy and pressure while doing a Monte Carlo simulation of the protons. In addition to presenting simulation results for the equation of state over a large region of the phase diagram, we report the free energy obtained by thermodynamic integration. We find very good agreement with density-functional theory based molecular-dynamics calculations for pressures beyond 600 GPa and densities above rho=1.4 g/cm(3) , both for thermodynamic and structural properties. This agreement provides a strong support to the different approximations employed in the density-functional treatment of the system, specifically the approximate exchange-correlation potential and the use of pseudopotentials for the range of densities considered. We find disagreement with chemical models, which suggests that a reinvestigation of planetary models--previously constructed using the Saumon-Chabrier-Van Horn equations of state--might be needed.

  14. Oxidation of triarylphosphines and aryl methyl sulfides with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by dioxovanadium(V) ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guodong; Espenson, James H

    2005-04-04

    Although neither vanadium(V) ions nor hydrogen peroxide efficiently oxidize the title substrates, they do so in combination, with vanadium(V) as the catalyst in acidic aqueous acetonitrile. The kinetic data show that, of the two peroxovanadium species present, OV(O2)+ and OV(O2)2-, only the latter reacts at a detectable rate. This unanticipated result can be attributed to the weaker O-O and V-O bonds in the diperoxo complex. The rate constants for both series of substrates follow the Hammett correlation, with rhoP = -1.35 and rhoS = -0.83. To analyze properly the kinetic data for the Ar3P compounds, account must be taken of the protonation to Ar3PH+ in acidic solution. In retrospect, our earlier study [Abu-Omar, M. M.; Espenson, J. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1995, 117, 272-280] of phosphine oxidation catalyzed by MeReO3 failed to do so, and the reaction constant must be corrected from the originally reported value to -1.56.

  15. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Metabolomics Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hossein; Karanji, Ahmad K.; Majuta, Sandra; Maurer, Megan M.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2017-09-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) in combination with gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) is evaluated as an analytical method for small-molecule standard and mixture characterization. Experiments show that compound ions exhibit unique HDX reactivities that can be used to distinguish different species. Additionally, it is shown that gas-phase HDX kinetics can be exploited to provide even further distinguishing capabilities by using different partial pressures of reagent gas. The relative HDX reactivity of a wide variety of molecules is discussed in light of the various molecular structures. Additionally, hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS) and HDX kinetics modeling of candidate (in silico) ion structures is utilized to estimate the relative ion conformer populations giving rise to specific HDX behavior. These data interpretation methods are discussed with a focus on developing predictive tools for HDX behavior. Finally, an example is provided in which ion mobility information is supplemented with HDX reactivity data to aid identification efforts of compounds in a metabolite extract. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  17. Ranges, Reflection and Secondary Electron Emission for keV Hydrogen Ions Incident on Solid N2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, P.; Sørensen, H.; Hao-Ming, Chen

    1983-01-01

    Ranges were measured for 0.67–3.3 keV/amu hydrogen and deuterium ions in solid N2. Comparisons with similar results for N2-gas confirm the previously observed large phase effect in the stopping cross section. Measurements of the secondary electron emission coefficient for bulk solid N2 bombarded...... by 0.67–9 keV/amu ions also seem to support such a phase effect. It is argued that we may also extract information about the charge state of reflected projectiles....

  18. H- beam extraction from a cesium seeded field effect transistor based radio frequency negative hydrogen ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, A; Matsuno, T; Funaoi, T; Tanaka, N; Tsumori, K; Takeiri, Y

    2012-02-01

    H(-) beam was successfully extracted from a cesium seeded ion source operated using a field effect transistor inverter power supply as a radio frequency (RF) wave source. High density hydrogen plasma more than 10(19) m(-3) was obtained using an external type antenna with RF frequency of lower than 0.5 MHz. The source was isolated by an isolation transformer and H(-) ion beam was extracted from a single aperture. Acceleration current and extraction current increased with the increase of extraction voltage. Addition of a small amount of cesium vapor into the source enhanced the currents.

  19. Experimental limits on the velocities of sodium atoms sputtered from solid surfaces by hydrogen ions. [Na cloud production around Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, J. O., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Optical emission at 589.0 nm by sodium atoms sputtered from solid targets by hydrogen molecular ions was observed, and no accompanying broadening or shifts of this line could be detected relative to that from a laboratory lamp. This allowed an upper limit of about 500,000 cm/sec on the mean speed of ejected sodium atoms to be calculated. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the atomic sodium cloud surrounding Io is produced by this mechanism.

  20. Time resolved measurements of hydrogen ion energy distributions in a pulsed 2.45 GHz microwave plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megía-Macías, A.; Cortázar, O. D.; Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.

    2017-11-01

    A plasma diagnostic study of the Ion Energy Distribution Functions (IEDFs) of H+, H2+ , and H3+ ions in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen plasma reactor called TIPS is presented. The measurements are conducted by using a Plasma Ion Mass Spectrometer with an energy sector and a quadrupole detector from HIDEN Analytical Limited in order to select an ion species and to measure its energy distribution. The reactor is operated in the pulsed mode at 100 Hz with a duty cycle of 10% (1 ms pulse width). The IEDFs of H+, H2+ , and H3+ are obtained each 5 μs with 1 μs time resolution throughout the entire pulse. The temporal evolution of the plasma potential and ion temperature of H+ is derived from the data. It is shown that the plasma potential is within the range of 15-20 V, while the ion temperature reaches values of 0.25-1 eV during the pulse and exhibits a fast transient peak when the microwave radiation is switched off. Finally, the ion temperatures are used to predict the transverse thermal emittance of a proton beam extracted from 2.45 GHz microwave discharges.

  1. Hydrogen cold plasma for synthesizing Pd/C catalysts: the effect of support–metal ion interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, LI; Xiuling, ZHANG; Yuzhuo, ZHANG; Dongzhi, DUAN; Lanbo, DI

    2018-01-01

    It has been found that cold plasma is a facile and environmentally benign method for synthesizing supported metal catalysts, and great efforts have been devoted to enlarging its applications. However, little work has been done to disclose the influence mechanism, which is significant for controllable synthesis. In this work, hydrogen cold plasma was adopted to synthesize a palladium catalyst supported on activated carbon (Pd/C-P) using H2PdCl4 as a Pd precursor followed by calcination in hydrogen gas to remove the chlorine ions. The Pd/C-P catalyst was found to be made of larger Pd nanoparticles showing a decreased migration to the support outer surface than that prepared by the conventional thermal hydrogen reduction method (Pd/C-C). Meanwhile, the pore diameter of the activated carbon support is small (∼4 nm). Therefore, Pd/C-P exhibits lower CO oxidation activity than Pd/C-C. It was proposed that the strong interaction between the activated carbon and {{{{PdCl}}}4}2-, and the enhanced metal–support interaction caused by hydrogen cold plasma reduction made it difficult for Pd nanoparticles to migrate to the support outer surface. The larger-sized Pd nanoparticles for Pd/C-P may be due to the Coulomb interaction resulting in the disturbance of the metal–support interaction. This work has important guiding significance for the controllable synthesis of supported metal catalysts by hydrogen cold plasma.

  2. Ion Impact Energy Distributions and Properties of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon Thin Films Deposited in a Self-Biased RF Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuta, Toshiaki; Tachibana, Kunihide; Tsuji, Osamu

    1994-11-01

    In a self-biased RF discharge in CH4 we have investigated the relationships between the properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) film and ion impact energy distributions (IIEDs) measured by retarding-type ion energy analyzer at both parallel-plate electrodes. On the RF electrode a high-energy peak (HEP) dur to the ion beam component was observed in IIED. The height of HEP decreased with increasing pressure at a given self-bias voltage (V dc) and the central energy of HEP increased linearly with V dc at a given pressure. The micro hardness of the film increased in proportion to the total incident ion current (TIIC) and central energy of HEP. The hydrogen content decreased and the surface morphology became fine as the central energy of HEP increased. From Raman and IR absorption spectra it turned out that there was an optimal energy of HEP to increase the content of the sp3 bonding structure in the film.

  3. Coupled electron-ion Monte Carlo simulation of hydrogen molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillo, Giovanni; Morales, Miguel A.; Ceperley, David M.; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2018-03-01

    We performed simulations for solid molecular hydrogen at high pressures (250 GPa ≤ P ≤ 500 GPa) along two isotherms at T = 200 K (phase III) and at T = 414 K (phase IV). At T = 200 K, we considered likely candidates for phase III, the C2c and Cmca12 structures, while at T = 414 K in phase IV, we studied the Pc48 structure. We employed both Coupled Electron-Ion Monte Carlo (CEIMC) and Path Integral Molecular Dynamics (PIMD). The latter is based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the van der Waals approximation (vdW-DF). The comparison between the two methods allows us to address the question of the accuracy of the exchange-correlation approximation of DFT for thermal and quantum protons without recurring to perturbation theories. In general, we find that atomic and molecular fluctuations in PIMD are larger than in CEIMC which suggests that the potential energy surface from vdW-DF is less structured than the one from quantum Monte Carlo. We find qualitatively different behaviors for systems prepared in the C2c structure for increasing pressure. Within PIMD, the C2c structure is dynamically partially stable for P ≤ 250 GPa only: it retains the symmetry of the molecular centers but not the molecular orientation; at intermediate pressures, it develops layered structures like Pbcn or Ibam and transforms to the metallic Cmca-4 structure at P ≥ 450 GPa. Instead, within CEIMC, the C2c structure is found to be dynamically stable at least up to 450 GPa; at increasing pressure, the molecular bond length increases and the nuclear correlation decreases. For the other two structures, the two methods are in qualitative agreement although quantitative differences remain. We discuss various structural properties and the electrical conductivity. We find that these structures become conducting around 350 GPa but the metallic Drude-like behavior is reached only at around 500 GPa, consistent with recent experimental claims.

  4. Single-Ion Solvation Free Energies and the Normal Hydrogen Electrode Potential in Methanol, Acetonitrile, and Dimethyl Sulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Casey P.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2008-01-01

    The division of thermodynamic solvation free energies of electrolytes into ionic constituents is conventionally accomplished by using the single-ion solvation free energy of one reference ion, conventionally the proton, to set the single-ion scales. Thus the determination of the free energy of solvation of the proton in various solvents is a fundamental issue of central importance in solution chemistry. In the present article, relative solvation free energies of ions and ion-solvent clusters in methanol, acetonitrile, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) have been determined using a combination of experimental and theoretical gas-phase free energies of formation, solution-phase reduction potentials and acid dissociation constants, and gas-phase clustering free energies. Applying the cluster pair approximation to differences between these relative solvation free energies leads to values of −263.5, −260.2, and −273.3 kcal/mol for the absolute solvation free energy of the proton in methanol, acetonitrile, and DMSO, respectively. The final absolute proton solvation free energies are used to assign absolute values for the normal hydrogen electrode potential and the solvation free energies of other single ions in the above solvents. PMID:17214493

  5. Investigations on Cs-free alternatives for negative ion formation in a low pressure hydrogen discharge at ion source relevant parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurutz, U.; Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2017-07-01

    Caesium (Cs) is applied in high power negative hydrogen ion sources to reduce a converter surface’s work function and thus enabling an efficient negative ion surface formation. Inherent drawbacks with the usage of this reactive alkali metal motivate the search for Cs-free alternative materials for neutral beam injection systems in fusion research. In view of a future DEMOnstration power plant, a suitable material should provide a high negative ion formation efficiency and comply with the RAMI issues of the system: reliability, availability, maintainability, inspectability. Promising candidates, like low work function materials (molybdenum doped with lanthanum (MoLa) and LaB6), as well as different non-doped and boron-doped diamond samples were investigated in this context at identical and ion source relevant parameters at the laboratory experiment HOMER. Negative ion densities were measured above the samples by means of laser photodetachment and compared with two reference cases: pure negative ion volume formation with negative ion densities of about 1× {10}15 {{{m}}}-3 and the effect of H- surface production using an in situ caesiated stainless steel sample which yields 2.5 times higher densities. Compared to pure volume production, none of the diamond samples did exhibit a measurable increase in H- densities, while showing clear indications of plasma-induced erosion. In contrast, both MoLa and LaB6 produced systematically higher densities (MoLa: ×1.60 LaB6: ×1.43). The difference to caesiation can be attributed to the higher work functions of MoLa and LaB6 which are expected to be about 3 eV for both compared to 2.1 eV of a caesiated surface.

  6. Complex Metal Hydrides for hydrogen storage and solid-state ion conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payandeh GharibDoust, SeyedHosein

    and electricity in batteries. However, both hydrogen and electricity must be stored in a very dense way to be useful, e.g. for mobile applications. Complex metal hydrides have high hydrogen density and have been studied during the past twenty years in hydrogen storage systems. Moreover, they have shown high ionic...... conductivities which promote their application as solid electrolytes in batteries. This dissertation presents the synthesis and characterization of a variety of complex metal hydrides and explores their hydrogen storage properties and ionic conductivity. Five halide free rare earth borohydrides RE(BH4)3, (RE...

  7. Towards electronic g-factor measurements in medium-heavy hydrogen-like and lithium-like ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, M. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Alonso, J. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Djekic, S. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Kluge, H.-J. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Quint, W. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: w.quint@gsi.de; Stahl, S. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Verdu, J. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Werth, G. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Measurements of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron bound in hydrogen-like ions with spinless nuclei have proven to be highly sensitive tests of corresponding calculations based on bound-state quantum electrodynamics. Measurements performed on H-like carbon {sup 12}C{sup 5+} and oxygen {sup 16}O{sup 7+} together with bound-state QED calculations on the same level of accuracy have achieved sensitivities around 0.25% of the QED bound state contributions to the calculated electronic g-factors of these ions. Currently, a similar experiment on hydrogen-like calcium {sup 40}Ca{sup 19+}, lithium-like calcium {sup 40}Ca{sup 17+} and other medium-heavy ions is being prepared, which is capable of increasing this sensitivity on the experimental side by more than one order of magnitude. To that end, several novel experimental techniques have been developed. In the following, we will give a motivation for such a measurement, present the experimental requirements and technique and discuss the possible benefits.

  8. Towards electronic g-factor measurements in medium-heavy hydrogen-like and lithium-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, M.; Alonso, J.; Djekic, S.; Kluge, H.-J.; Quint, W.; Stahl, S.; Verdu, J.; Werth, G.

    2005-07-01

    Measurements of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron bound in hydrogen-like ions with spinless nuclei have proven to be highly sensitive tests of corresponding calculations based on bound-state quantum electrodynamics. Measurements performed on H-like carbon 12C5+ and oxygen 16O7+ together with bound-state QED calculations on the same level of accuracy have achieved sensitivities around 0.25% of the QED bound state contributions to the calculated electronic g-factors of these ions. Currently, a similar experiment on hydrogen-like calcium 40Ca19+, lithium-like calcium 40Ca17+ and other medium-heavy ions is being prepared, which is capable of increasing this sensitivity on the experimental side by more than one order of magnitude. To that end, several novel experimental techniques have been developed. In the following, we will give a motivation for such a measurement, present the experimental requirements and technique and discuss the possible benefits.

  9. Hydrogen- and Halogen-Bonds between Ions of like Charges: Are They Anti-Electrostatic in Nature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changwei; Fu, Yuzhuang; Zhang, Lina; Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason; Mo, Yirong

    2018-04-05

    Recent theoretical studies suggested that hydrogen bonds between ions of like charges are of a covalent nature due to the dominating n D →σ* H-A charge-transfer (CT) interaction. In this work, energy profiles of typical hydrogen (H) and halogen (X) bonding systems formed from ions of like charges are explored using the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method, which can derive optimal geometries and wave functions with the CT interaction "turned off." The results demonstrate that the kinetic stability, albeit reduced, is maintained for most investigated systems even after the intermolecular CT interaction is quenched. Further energy decomposition analyses based on the BLW method reveal that, despite a net repulsive Coulomb repulsion, a stabilizing component exists due to the polarization effect that plays significant role in the kinetic stability of all systems. Moreover, the fingerprints of the augmented electrostatic interaction due to polarization are apparent in the variation patterns of the electron density. All in all, much like in standard H- and X-bonds, the stability of such bonds between ions of like charges is governed by the competition between the stabilizing electrostatic and charge transfer interactions and the destabilizing deformation energy and Pauli exchange repulsion. While in most cases of "anti-electrostatic" bonds the CT interaction is of a secondary importance, we also find cases where CT is decisive. As such, this work validates the existence of anti-electrostatic H- and X-bonds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. H$^{-}$ ion source for CERN's Linac4 accelerator: simulation, experimental validation and optimization of the hydrogen plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mattei, Stefano; Lettry, Jacques

    2017-07-25

    Linac4 is the new negative hydrogen ion (H$^-$) linear accelerator of the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Its ion source operates on the principle of Radio-Frequency Inductively Coupled Plasma (RF-ICP) and it is required to provide 50~mA of H$^-$ beam in pulses of 600~$\\mu$s with a repetition rate up to 2 Hz and within an RMS emittance of 0.25~$\\pi$~mm~mrad in order to fullfil the requirements of the accelerator. This thesis is dedicated to the characterization of the hydrogen plasma in the Linac4 H$^-$ ion source. We have developed a Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collision (PIC-MCC) code to simulate the RF-ICP heating mechanism and performed measurements to benchmark the fraction of the simulation outputs that can be experimentally accessed. The code solves self-consistently the interaction between the electromagnetic field generated by the RF coil and the resulting plasma response, including a kinetic description of charged and neutral species. A fully-implicit implementation allowed to si...

  11. Maximum Potential Hydrogen Gas Retention in the sRF Resin Ion Exchange Column for the LAWPS Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Bottenus, Courtney LH; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2018-01-22

    The Low-Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) is being developed to provide treated supernatant liquid from the Hanford tank farms directly to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The design and development of the LAWPS is being conducted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC. A key process in LAWPS is the removal of radioactive Cs in ion exchange (IX) columns filled with spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. One accident scenario being evaluated is the loss of liquid flow through the sRF resin bed after it has been loaded with radioactive Cs and hydrogen gas is being generated by radiolysis. In normal operations, the generated hydrogen is expected to remain dissolved in the liquid and be continuously removed by liquid flow. For an accident scenario with a loss of flow, hydrogen gas can be retained within the IX column both in the sRF resin and below the bottom screen that supports the resin within the column. The purpose of this report is to summarize calculations that estimate the upper-bound volume of hydrogen gas that can be retained in the column and potentially be released to the headspace of the IX column or to process equipment connected to the IX column and, thus, pose a flammability hazard.

  12. NIRS-Derived Tissue Oxygen Saturation and Hydrogen Ion Concentration Following Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. M. C.; Everett, M. E.; Crowell, J. B.; Westby, C. M.; Soller, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term bed rest (BR), a model of spaceflight, results in a decrease in aerobic capacity and altered submaximal exercise responses. The strongest BR-induced effects on exercise appear to be centrally-mediated, but longer BR durations may result in peripheral adaptations (e.g., decreased mitochondrial and capillary density) which are likely to influence exercise responses. PURPOSE: To measure tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) and hydrogen ion concentration ([H+]) in the vastus lateralis (VL) using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during cycle ergometry before and after . 30 d of BR. METHODS: Eight subjects performed a graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer to volitional fatigue 7 d before (pre-BR) and at the end or 1 day after BR (post-BR). NIRS spectra were collected from a sensor adhered to the skin overlying the VL. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured by open circuit spirometry. Blood volume (BV) was measured before and after BR using the carbon monoxide rebreathing technique. Changes in pre- and post-BR SO2 and [H+] data were compared using mixed model analyses. BV and peak exercise data were compared using paired t-tests. RESULTS: BV (pre-BR: 4.3+/-0.3, post-BR: 3.7+/-0.2 L, mean+/-SE, p=.01) and peak VO2 (pre-BR: 1.98+/-0.24, post-BR: 1.48 +/-0.21 L/min, p<.01) were reduced after BR. As expected, SO2 decreased with exercise before and after BR. However, SO2 was lower post compared with pre-BR throughout exercise, including at peak exercise (pre-BR: 50+/-3, post-BR: 43+/-4%, p=.01). After BR, [H+] was higher at the start of exercise and did not increase at the same rate as pre-BR. Peak [H+] was not different from pre to post-BR (pre-BR: 36+/-2; post-BR: 38+/-2 nmol/L). CONCLUSIONS: Lower SO2 during exercise suggests that oxygen extraction in the VL is higher after BR, perhaps due to lower circulating blood volume. The higher [H+] after BR suggests a greater reliance upon glycolysis during submaximal exercise, although [H+] at peak exercise was unchanged

  13. Mechanistic Switching by Hydronium Ion Activity for Hydrogen Evolution and Oxidation over Polycrystalline Platinum Disk and Platinum/Carbon Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2014-07-22

    Fundamental electrochemical reactions, namely the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), are re-evaluated under various pH conditions over polycrystalline Pt disk electrodes and Pt/C electrodes to investigate the overpotential and Tafel relations. Kinetic trends are observed and can be classified into three pH regions: acidic (1-5), neutral (5-9), and alkaline (9-13). Under neutral conditions, in which H2O becomes the primary reactant, substantial overpotential, which is not affected by pH and the supporting electrolyte type, is required for electrocatalysis in both directions. This ion independence, including pH, suggests that HER/HOR performance under neutral conditions solely reflects the intrinsic electrocatalytic activity of Pt in the rate determining steps, which involve electron transfer with water molecules. A global picture of the HER/HOR, resulting from mechanistic switching accompanied by change in pH, is detailed.

  14. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme.

  15. Kinetic-energy release of fragments from electron-impact dissociation of the molecular hydrogen ion and its isotopologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Liam H.; Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2017-08-01

    We calculate the kinetic-energy release distributions of fragments produced for electron-impact dissociation of the vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen ion H2 + and its isotopologues D2 + and T2 +. Here we apply the adiabatic-nuclei convergent close-coupling method and compare results with several different methods, including the δ approximation. Results are presented for a number of dissociative excitation transitions and dissociative ionization as a function of the initial vibrational state of the molecule. We confirm that the square root approximation is a good approximation for the adiabatic-nuclei kinetic-energy release cross sections of H2 +. Agreement with experiment, where available, is good.

  16. Total projectile electron loss cross sections of U^{28+} ions in collisions with gaseous targets ranging from hydrogen to krypton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Beam lifetimes of stored U^{28+} ions with kinetic energies of 30 and 50  MeV/u, respectively, were measured in the experimental storage ring of the GSI accelerator facility. By using the internal gas target station of the experimental storage ring, it was possible to obtain total projectile electron loss cross sections for collisions with several gaseous targets ranging from hydrogen to krypton from the beam lifetime data. The resulting experimental cross sections are compared to predictions by two theoretical approaches, namely the CTMC method and a combination of the DEPOSIT code and the RICODE program.

  17. Performance of a UV/hydrogen peroxide/ion exchange treatment plant on groundwater leaching from mixed waste contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, W.J. [Parsons Engineering Science, Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Cirillo, J.R.; Burmeister, M.C. [Rocky Mountain Remediation, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper summarizes the operation and results of a groundwater treatment plant at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The principal contaminants are volatile organic compounds (VOCs), heavy metals, and radionuclides. The treatment plant uses ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide for destruction of VOCs, and ion exchange for removal of dissolved solids, metals, and uranium. During three years of operation, the treatment plant has achieved typical removal efficiencies of 99% for VOCs, 80% for total dissolved solids, and 98% for radionuclides. Contaminant influent ranges and percent removal are listed.

  18. The use of a bivalent counter anion to control the effective mobility of the hydrogen ion constituent in cationic isotachophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudor, J; Stránský, Z; Chmela, Z; Bocek, P

    1988-12-01

    The use of a bivalent counter anion for cationic isotachophoresis was studied both theoretically and experimentally. A mathematical model was proposed and solved to give the effective mobility of the hydrogen ion constituent, uH,H, in the respective electrolyte systems. The theoretical values agreed well with the experimental data in a series of electrolyte systems. The dependence of uH,H on such parameters as pH of the leading electrolyte, ionic mobilities of leading and counter ions, and dissociation constants was calculated and discussed. A bivalent counter anion will prove useful for the separation of low mobility cations and weak bases, as shown for the separation of substituted anilines in a succinate electrolyte system.

  19. Theoretical study of electronic excitation, ion-pair formation, and mutual neutralization in cesium-hydrogen collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Lepetit, Bruno; Gadéa, Florent Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Inelastic cross sections for the excitation, deexcitation, ion-pair formation, and mutual neutralization processes in cesium-hydrogen collisions Cs (6 s ,6 p ,5 d ,7 s )+H and Cs ++H- are calculated by means of the recently proposed branching-probability-current method and the recently calculated accurate ab initio adiabatic potential energies. Scattering calculations are performed in the low-energy range from 0.01 eV to 1 keV. It is shown that among the endothermic processes, the highest values of the partial cross sections correspond to the ion-pair formation processes with the maximum values up to 23 Å2 . Among the exothermic processes in the low-energy range, the largest partial cross section corresponds to the mutual neutralization process into the Cs (5 d )+H final state.

  20. Time dependence of silica optical properties during the implantation of fast hydrogen ions: Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Barannik, E; Zhurenko, V; Kononenko, S; Kononenko, O

    2015-01-01

    Formation, excitation and passivation of defects by absorbed hydrogen have been extensively reported in the literature. Here we present a basic luminescence-diffusion model to simulate creation and chemical annealing behavior of non-bridging oxygen hole centers in silica by their treatment under a long-time hydrogen implantation. The model is in a good agreement with experimental data and explains the uncommon nonmonotonic time dependence of the non-bridging oxygen hole centers luminescence during the hydrogen implantation. The proposed model establishes the quantitative relation between the intensity dependence of luminescence on its intrinsic diffusivity, hydrogen concentration, defect concentration and cross-section of their creation. Possibilities to estimate these parameters based on the experimental data for the efficiency of silica luminescence are also discussed.

  1. High-precision QED calculations of the hyperfine structure in hydrogen and transition rates in multicharged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volotka, A.V.

    2006-07-01

    Studies of the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen are strongly motivated by the level of accuracy achieved in recent atomic physics experiments, which yield finally model-independent informations about nuclear structure parameters with utmost precision. Considering the current status of the determination of corrections to the hyperfine splitting of the ground state in hydrogen, this thesis provides further improved calculations by taking into account the most recent value for the proton charge radius. Comparing theoretical and experimental data of the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen the proton-size contribution is extracted and a relativistic formula for this contribution is derived in terms of moments of the nuclear charge and magnetization distributions. An iterative scheme for the determination of the Zemach and magnetic radii of the proton is proposed. As a result, the Zemach and magnetic radii are determined and the values are compared with the corresponding ones deduced from data obtained in electron-proton scattering experiments. The extraction of the Zemach radius from a rescaled difference between the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen and in muonium is considered as well. Investigations of forbidden radiative transitions in few-electron ions within ab initio QED provide a most sensitive tool for probing the influence of relativistic electron-correlation and QED corrections to the transition rates. Accordingly, a major part of this thesis is devoted to detailed studies of radiative and interelectronic-interaction effects to the transition probabilities. The renormalized expressions for the corresponding corrections in one- and twoelectron ions as well as for ions with one electron over closed shells are derived employing the two-time Green's function method. Numerical results for the correlation corrections to magnetic transition rates in He-like ions are presented. For the first time also the frequency-dependent contribution is calculated, which has to be

  2. Effect of metal ions on the reactions of the cumyloxyl radical with hydrogen atom donors. Fine control on hydrogen abstraction reactivity determined by Lewis acid-base interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Mangiacapra, Livia; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2013-01-09

    A time-resolved kinetic study on the effect of metal ions (M(n+)) on hydrogen abstraction reactions from C-H donor substrates by the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) was carried out in acetonitrile. Metal salt addition was observed to increase the CumO(•) β-scission rate constant in the order Li(+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+). These effects were explained in terms of the stabilization of the β-scission transition state determined by Lewis acid-base interactions between M(n+) and the radical. When hydrogen abstraction from 1,4-cyclohexadiene was studied in the presence of LiClO(4) and Mg(ClO(4))(2), a slight increase in rate constant (k(H)) was observed indicating that interaction between M(n+) and CumO(•) can also influence, although to a limited extent, the hydrogen abstraction reactivity of alkoxyl radicals. With Lewis basic C-H donors such as THF and tertiary amines, a decrease in k(H) with increasing Lewis acidity of M(n+) was observed (k(H)(MeCN) > k(H)(Li(+)) > k(H)(Mg(2+))). This behavior was explained in terms of the stronger Lewis acid-base interaction of M(n+) with the substrate as compared to the radical. This interaction reduces the degree of overlap between the α-C-H σ* orbital and a heteroatom lone-pair, increasing the C-H BDE and destabilizing the carbon centered radical formed after abstraction. With tertiary amines, a >2-order of magnitude decrease in k(H) was measured after Mg(ClO(4))(2) addition up to a 1.5:1 amine/Mg(ClO(4))(2) ratio. At higher amine concentrations, very similar k(H) values were measured with and without Mg(ClO(4))(2). These results clearly show that with strong Lewis basic substrates variations in the nature and concentration of M(n+) can dramatically influence k(H), allowing for a fine control of the substrate hydrogen atom donor ability, thus providing a convenient method for C-H deactivation. The implications and generality of these findings are discussed.

  3. Damage of alumina films by medium energy hydrogen and helium ions

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, P; Liu, Y; Alexander, M R; Koroleva, E V; Skeldon, P; Thompson, G E; Habazaki, H; Shimizu, K

    2002-01-01

    Following previous observations of detachment of amorphous, anodic alumina films from aluminium by 100 keV H sup + ions, further experiments have been carried out using H sup + , D sup + , sup 3 He sup + and sup 4 He sup + ions, at energies in the range of 0.5-270 keV, to irradiate anodized aluminium with oxides of thickness from 30 to 500 nm. Surface damage was investigated by field-emission-gun scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Detachment of the oxide, which takes place close to, or at, the metal/oxide interface, occurred only following irradiation by H sup + and D sup + ions, with the ions being stopped in the metal rather than the oxide. The threshold fluence for initiation of detachment is approximately 3x10 sup 1 sup 5 ions cm sup - sup 2. No detachment was detected following irradiations by sup 3 He sup + and sup 4 He sup + ions with fluences up to 5x10 sup 1 sup 6 ions cm sup - sup 2 and ranges similar to those of H sup + and D sup + ions, although vacancy production i...

  4. TiO2-Based Nanomaterials for the Production of Hydrogen and the Development of Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinilla, Sergio; Machin, Abniel; Park, Sang Hoon; Arango, Juan Camilo; Nicolosi, Valeria; Marquez-Linares, Francisco M; Morant, Carmen

    2017-10-23

    The photocatalytic activity of different titanium oxide nanowires containing gold (Au@TiO2 NWs), and gold-graphene (Au@TiO2 NWs-graphene), was evaluated by studying the reaction of hydrogen production by water splitting under UV-vis light. The composites showed high surface areas, even after the incorporation of gold and graphene on the surface of titanium oxide nanowires. The highest hydrogen production of Au@TiO2 NWs was 1,436 μmolh-1g-1, under irradiation at 400 nm, and with a gold loading of 10 wt.%. This photocatalytic activity was 11.5 times greater than that shown by the unmodified TiO2 NWs. For the Au@TiO2 NWs-graphene composites, the highest hydrogen amount obtained was 1,689 μmolh-1g-1, at loadings of 10 wt.% and 1 wt.% of gold and graphene, respectively. The photocatalytic activity of the gold-graphene compounds was 1.2 times greater than that shown by the titanium oxide catalysts and 13.5 times higher than the bare TiO2 NWs. Even at wavelengths greater than 500 nm, the compounds exhibited high hydrogen yields, demonstrating the high catalytic activity of the compounds. In addition, TiO2-based materials are of great interest for energy storage and conversion devices, in particular for rechargeable lithium ion batteries. TiO2 has a significant advantage due to its low volume change (electrical conductivity of TiO2 greatly hamper its practical application. In this work, free-standing electrodes composed by TiO2 NWs and carbon nanotubes, CNT@TiO2 NWs, were used as anode materials for Li-ion batteries. As a result, the electronic conductivity and mechanical properties of the composite were greatly improved and a good cycling performance was obtained in these batteries. This research shows the potential of TiO2-based materials for the development of new catalysts for hydrogen production and energy storage systems.

  5. Polymerization Effect of Electrolytes on Hydrogen-Bonding Cryoprotectants: Ion–Dipole Interactions between Metal Ions and Glycerol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Protectants which are cell membrane permeable, such as glycerol, have been used effectively in the cryopreservation field for a number of decades, for both slow cooling and vitrification applications. In the latter case, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the vitrification composition is key to its application, dictating the ultimate storage conditions. It has been observed that the addition of some electrolytes to glycerol, such as MgCl2, could elevate the Tg of the mixture, thus potentially providing more storage condition flexibility. The microscopic mechanisms that give rise to the Tg-enhancing behavior of these electrolytes are not yet well understood. The current study focuses on molecular dynamics simulation of glycerol mixed with a variety of metal chlorides (i.e., NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), covering a temperature range that spans both the liquid and glassy states. The characteristics of the ion–dipole interactions between metal cations and hydroxyl groups of glycerol were analyzed. The interruption of the original hydrogen-bonding network among glycerol molecules by the addition of ions was also investigated in the context of hydrogen-bonding quantity and lifetime. Divalent metal cations were found to significantly increase the Tg by strengthening the interacting network in the electrolyte/glycerol mixture via strong cation–dipole attractions. In contrast, monovalent cations increased the Tg insignificantly, as the cation–dipole attraction was only slightly stronger than the original hydrogen-bonding network among glycerol molecules. The precursor of crystallization of NaCl and KCl was also observed in these compositions, potentially contributing to weak Tg-enhancing ability. The Tg-enhancing mechanisms elucidated in this study suggest a structure-enhancing role for divalent ions that could be of benefit in the design of protective formulations for biopreservation purposes. PMID:25405831

  6. Resonant coherent excitation of hydrogen-like ions planar channeled in a crystal; Transition into the first excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, A.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2012-03-01

    The presented program is designed to simulate the characteristics of resonant coherent excitation of hydrogen-like ions planar-channeled in a crystal. The program realizes the numerical algorithm to solve the Schrödinger equation for the ion-bound electron at a special resonance excitation condition. The calculated wave function of the bound electron defines probabilities for the ion to be in the either ground or first excited state, or to be ionized. Finally, in the outgoing beam the fractions of ions in the ground state, in the first excited state, and ionized by collisions with target electrons, are defined. The program code is written on C++ and is designed for multiprocessing systems (clusters). The output data are presented in the table. Program summaryProgram title: RCE_H-like_1 Catalogue identifier: AEKX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKX_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2813 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 34 667 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ (g++, icc compilers) Computer: Multiprocessor systems (clusters) Operating system: Any OS based on LINUX; program was tested under Novell SLES 10 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Contains MPI directives RAM: C++, Intel C++ compilers Nature of problem: When relativistic hydrogen-like ion moves in the crystal in the planar channeling regime, in the ion rest frame the time-periodic electric field acts on the bound electron. If the frequency of this field matches the transition frequency between electronic energy levels, the resonant coherent excitation can take place. Therefore, ions in the different states may be observed in the outgoing beam behind the crystal. To get the probabilities for the ion to be

  7. Study of negative hydrogen ion beam optics using the 3D3V PIC model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, K., E-mail: kmiyamot@naruto-u.ac.jp [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima, 772-8502 (Japan); Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1, Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, 223-8522 (Japan); Hanada, M.; Kojima, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1,Mukoyama, Naka, 319-0913 (Japan)

    2015-04-08

    The mechanism of negative ion extraction under real conditions with the complex magnetic field is studied by using the 3D PIC simulation code. The extraction region of the negative ion source for the negative ion based neutral beam injection system in fusion reactors is modelled. It is shown that the E x B drift of electrons is caused by the magnetic filter and the electron suppression magnetic field, and the resultant asymmetry of the plasma meniscus. Furthermore, it is indicated that that the asymmetry of the plasma meniscus results in the asymmetry of negative ion beam profile including the beam halo. It could be demonstrated theoretically that the E x B drift is not significantly weakened by the elastic collisions of the electrons with neutral particles.

  8. Development of a novel radio-frequency negative hydrogen ion source in conically converging configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, B K; Dang, J J; An, Y H; Chung, K J; Hwang, Y S

    2014-02-01

    Volume-produced negative ion source still requires enhancement of current density with lower input RF (radio-frequency) power in lower operating pressure for various applications. To confirm recent observation of efficient negative ion production with a short cylindrical chamber with smaller effective plasma size, the RF-driven transformer-coupled plasma H(-) ion source at Seoul National University is modified by adopting a newly designed quartz RF window to reduce the chamber length. Experiments with the reduced chamber length show a few times enhancement of H(-) ion beam current compared to that extracted from the previous chamber design, which is consistent with the measured H(-) ion population. Nevertheless, decrease in H(-) ion beam current observed in low pressure regime below ∼5 mTorr owing to insufficient filtering of high energy electrons in the extraction region needs to be resolved to address the usefulness of electron temperature control by the change of geometrical configuration of the discharge chamber. A new discharge chamber with conically converging configuration has been developed, in which the chamber diameter decreases as approaching to the extraction region away from the planar RF antenna such that stronger filter magnetic field can be utilized to prohibit high energy electrons from transporting to the extraction region. First experimental results for the H(-) ion beam extraction with this configuration show that higher magnetic filter field makes peak negative beam currents happen in lower operating pressure. However, overall decrease in H(-) ion beam current due to the change of chamber geometry still requires further study of geometrical effect on particle transport and optimization of magnetic field in this novel configuration.

  9. Ion source parameters and hydrogen scrambling in the ECD of selectively deuterated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchateau, Magalie; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Robine, Ophélie

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has become an important method to study protein dynamics in solution. Recently, electron-based fragmentation methods (ECD and ETD) have been utilized in HDX-MS/MS experiments as experimental tools to increase the spatial resoluti...

  10. Start Up of Biohydrogen Production System and Effect of Metal Ions on Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, An-ying; Li, Yong-feng; Yue, Li-ran; Yang, Chuan-ping

    2010-11-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production is a promising biochemical route to produce renewable H2. The effect of organic loading rate on the biohydrogen production during the start-up phase and effect of Fe2+ and Mg2+ concentration on biohydrogen production of a continuous stirred tank reactor using molasses wastewater as substrate were investigated. It was found that an initial biomass of 14.07 gVSS/L and an organic loading rate of 6.0 kgCOD/m3ṡd, an equilibrial microbial community in the butyric-type fermentation could be established with in 30 days. It was demonstrated that both Fe2+ and Mg2+ were able to enhance the hydrogen production capacity of microorganism flora. Different concentration of Fe2+ was added to the biohydrogen producing system (50 mg/L, 100 mg/L, 200 mg/L and 500 mg/L), the maximum biogas production yield of 6.78 L/d and the maximum specific hydrogen production rate of 10.1 ml/gVSSṡh were obtained at Fe2+ concentration of 500 mg/L and 200 mg/L, respectively. The maximum biogas production yield of 6.84 L/d and the maximum specific hydrogen production rate of 10.2 ml/gVSSṡh were obtained at Mg2+ concentration of 100 mg/L and 50 mg/L, respectively.

  11. Algebraic tools for dealing with the atomic shell model. I. Wavefunctions and integrals for hydrogen-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surzhykov, Andrey; Koval, Peter; Fritzsche, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    Today, the 'hydrogen atom model' is known to play its role not only in teaching the basic elements of quantum mechanics but also for building up effective theories in atomic and molecular physics, quantum optics, plasma physics, or even in the design of semiconductor devices. Therefore, the analytical as well as numerical solutions of the hydrogen-like ions are frequently required both, for analyzing experimental data and for carrying out quite advanced theoretical studies. In order to support a fast and consistent access to these (Coulomb-field) solutions, here we present the DIRAC program which has been developed originally for studying the properties and dynamical behavior of the (hydrogen-like) ions. In the present version, a set of MAPLE procedures is provided for the Coulomb wave and Green's functions by applying the (wave) equations from both, the nonrelativistic and relativistic theory. Apart from the interactive access to these functions, moreover, a number of radial integrals are also implemented in the DIRAC program which may help the user to construct transition amplitudes and cross sections as they occur frequently in the theory of ion-atom and ion-photon collisions. Program summaryTitle of program:DIRAC Catalogue number: ADUQ Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUQ Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Computer for which the program is designed and has been tested: All computers with a license of the computer algebra package MAPLE [1] Program language used: Maple 8 and 9 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:2186 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 162 591 Distribution format: tar gzip file CPC Program Library subprograms required: None Nature of the physical problem: Analytical solutions of the hydrogen atom are widely used in very different fields of physics [2,3]. Despite of the rather simple structure

  12. Improved beam extraction for a negative hydrogen ion source for the LHC injector chain upgrade, Linac4

    CERN Document Server

    Midttun, Øystein; Scrivens, Richard

    In the scope of an upgrade of the injector chain of CERN’s accelerator complex, a new linear accelerator, Linac4, is under construction. This accelerator will replace the existing 50 MeV proton linac, Linac2. By increasing the beam energy to 160 MeV, Linac4 makes it possible to double the brightness in the PSB, and ultimately increase the luminosity in the LHC. Linac4 will accelerate beams of negative hydrogen (H-) to be injected into the PSB by multi-turn, charge exchange injection. The ion source was initially based on the non-caesiated RF-volume source from DESY. However, the beam extraction from this source could not handle the 45 keV beam energy required by the RFQ. A new beam extraction system has therefore been designed, via IBSimu simulations [1], to extract and transport the H- ion beam respecting the Linac4 requirements. Key features of the extraction system is a tuneable puller voltage to adapt the extraction field to the ion and electron beam currents, and a magnetized Einzel lens to dump the co...

  13. Non-noble metal graphene oxide-copper (II) ions hybrid electrodes for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Muralikrishna, S.

    2015-08-25

    Non-noble metal and inexpensive graphene oxide-copper (II) ions (GO-Cu2+) hybrid catalysts have been explored for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We were able to tune the binding abilities of GO toward the Cu2+ ions and hence their catalytic properties by altering the pH. We have utilized the oxygen functional moieties such as carboxylate, epoxide, and hydroxyl groups on the edge and basal planes of the GO for binding the Cu2+ ions through dative bonds. The GO-Cu2+ hybrid materials were characterized by cyclic voltammetry in sodium acetate buffer solution. The morphology of the hybrid GO-Cu2+ was characterized by atomic force microscopy. The GO-Cu2+ hybrid electrodes show good electrocatalytic activity for HER with low overpotential in acidic solution. The Tafel slope for the GO-Cu2+ hybrid electrode implies that the primary discharge step is the rate determining step and HER proceed with Volmer step. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Environ Prog.

  14. [Noncompetitive immunochemical determination of ribonuclease using transition metal ions and the effect of catalytic hydrogen release].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykhal, Iu I; Mediantseva, E P; Murtazina, N R; Safina, G R; Budnikov, G K; Kalacheva, N V

    2003-01-01

    A noncompetitive variant of immunochemical ribonuclease (RNase) determination has been developed, involving the use of Co(II) as a label. A variety of approaches to labeling the immunological reagent with the metal have been assessed. In the variant proposed, catalytic hydrogen release was used as a means of detecting the label, the amount of which was proportional to RNase concentration. Conditions making it possible to record catalytic hydrogen release fluxes were determined. In the presence of RNase, the electrocatalytic effect was maximum at a concentration of Co(II) in the ammoniac buffer, equal to 2 x 10(-4) M (pH 10.0). The dependence was linear in the range 4-2000 ng/ml RNase concentrations (threshold concentration, 2 ng/ml).

  15. Spectroscopy of prospective interstellar ions and radicals isolated in para-hydrogen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Masashi; Tseng, Chih-Yu; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2017-10-02

    para-Hydrogen (p-H2) serves as a new host in matrix-isolation experiments for an investigation of species of astrochemical interest. Protonated and mono-hydrogenated species are produced upon electron bombardment during deposition of p-H2 containing a precursor in a small proportion. The applications of this novel technique to generate protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (H(+)PAH), protonated polycyclic nitrogen heterocycles (H(+)PANH), and their neutral counterparts, which are important in the identification of interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands, demonstrate its superiority over other methods. The clean production with little fragmentation, ease of distinction between protonated and neutral species, narrow lines and reliable relative infrared intensities of the lines, and broad coverage of the spectral range associated with this method enable us to assign the isomers unambiguously. The application of this method to the protonation of small molecules is more complicated partly because of the feasible fragmentation and reactions, and partly because of the possible proton sharing between the species of interest and H2, but, with isotopic experiments and secondary photolysis, definitive assignments are practicable. Furthermore, the true relative infrared intensities are critical to a comparison of experimental results with data from theoretical calculations. The spectra of a proton-shared species in solid p-H2 might provide insight into a search for spectra of proton-bound species in interstellar media. Investigations of hydrogenated species involving the photolysis of Cl2 or precursors of OH complement those using electron bombardment and provide an improved ratio of signal to noise. With careful grouping of observed lines after secondary photolysis and a comparison with theoretical predictions, various isomers of these species have been determined. This photolytic technique has been applied in an investigation of hydrogenated PAH and PANH, and

  16. Predicted effects of mineral neutralization and bisulfate formation on hydrogen ion concentration for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Todd A; Wyman, Charles E

    2004-01-01

    Dilute acid and water-only hemicellulose hydrolysis are being examined as part of a multiinstitutional cooperative effort to evaluate the performance of leading cellulosic biomass pretreatment technologies on a common basis. Cellulosic biomass, such as agricultural residues and forest wastes, can have a significant mineral content. It has been shown that these minerals neutralize some of the acid during dilute acid pretreatment, reducing its effectiveness, and the higher solids loadings desired to minimize costs will require increased acid use to compensate. However, for sulfuric acid in particular, an equilibrium shift to formation of bisulfate during neutralization can further reduce hydrogen ion concentrations and compound the effect of neutralization. Because the equilibrium shift has a more pronounced effect at lower acid concentrations, additional acid is needed to compensate. Coupled with the effect of temperature on acid dissociation, these effects increase acid requirements to achieve a particular reaction rate unless minerals are removed prior to hydrolysis.

  17. Counteranion Driven Homochiral Assembly of a Cationic C3-Symmetric Gelator through Ion-Pair Assisted Hydrogen Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Arunava; Gangopadhyay, Monalisa; Basu, Arghya; Aute, Sunil; Babu, Sukumaran Santhosh; Das, Amitava

    2016-09-07

    The helical handedness in achiral self-assemblies is mostly complex due to spontaneous symmetry breaking or kinetically controlled random assembly formation. Here an attempt has been made to address this issue through chiral anion exchange. A new class of cationic achiral C3-symmetric gelator devoid of any conventional gelation assisting functional units is found to form both right- and left-handed helical structures. A chiral counteranion exchange-assisted approach is successfully introduced to control the chirality sign and thereby to obtain preferred homochiral assemblies. Formation of anion-assisted chiral assembly was confirmed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, microscopic images, and crystal structure. The X-ray crystal structure reveals the construction of helical assemblies with opposite handedness for (+)- and (-)-chiral anion reformed gelators. The appropriate counteranion driven ion-pair-assisted hydrogen-bonding interactions are found responsible for the helical bias control in this C3-symmetric gelator.

  18. A hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell using an ion-exchange membrane as an electrolyte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duin, P.J. van; Kruissink, C.A.

    1966-01-01

    Using an acidic type of water leached ion exchange membrane, cell current outputs of the order of 100 mA▪cm-2 at 0,6 V cell voltage have been obtained; the removal of produced water largely limits the cell performance. Cells using the alkaline type of membrane exhibit much smaller current densities,

  19. Extracted beam and electrode currents in the inductively driven surface-plasma negative hydrogen ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchenko, Yu.; Ivanov, A.; Sanin, A.; Sotnikov, O.

    2017-08-01

    The data on long-pulsed operation of RF surface-plasma source is presented. The source regularly produces the H- ion beam with current >1A, energy ≥90 keV and pulse duration ≥2 s. The total H- beam curent, transported to the distant Faraday cup and the currents in the circuits of ion-optical system elements were measured. The composition of accelerated and extracted grid currents was clarified. The relatively high level of acceleration grid current 0.4 A was observed. It consists mainly of secondary electrons, emitted from extraction grid apertures and stripped from H- ions and could be decreased by optimization of positive PG bias applied. The test stand experiments on beam transport through the LEBT were carried out. About 90% of the H- ion beam was transported from the source to the distant calorimeter plane. The full size of 93 keV beam, transported to the calorimeter plane, was larger, than the size of the calorimeter inlet window. As a result, ˜ 60% of the initial beam power was registered by the calorimeter with window 24×24 cm2.

  20. Comparison of recombination rate coefficients given by empirical formulas for ions from hydrogen through nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T.; Asano, E. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Recombination rate coefficients based on several empirical formulae are compared for ions of H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, P, Cl, Ar, Ca, Fe and Ni. The total rate coefficients including radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination are shown in graphs. (author)

  1. Inelastic processes in collisions of lithium positive ions with hydrogen anions and atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Yakovleva, Svetlana A.; Kraemer, Wolfgang P.

    2017-11-01

    Inelastic processes in the low-energy collisions Li3+ + H-, Li2+ + H, Li2+ + H- and Li+ + H are investigated for all collisional channels with the excited ionic lithium states Li2+ ( nl) and Li+ (1 s nl) up to and including the corresponding ion-pair states for the temperature range 1000-20 000 K. For all possible processes in the Li3+ + H- and Li2+ + H collisions inelastic cross sections and rate coefficients are calculated for the transitions between the ion-pair channel Li3+ + H- and the 35 below lying contributing Li2+ ( nl) + H channels. It is found that the highest values of cross sections and rate coefficients are obtained for the recombination processes and their inverse, the ion-pair formation processes, involving the Li2+ (3 l), Li2+ (4 l), and Li2+ (5 l) states. For the processes in the Li2+ + H- and Li+ + H collisions, cross sections and rate coefficients are calculated for all transitions between 34 Li+ (1 s nl) + H channels lying below Li2+ + H- plus this ion-pair channel. In this case the highest rate coefficients correspond to the recombination processes with the Li+(1 s3 l 1,3 L) and Li+(1 s4 l 1,3 L) final states, as well as their inverse processes of ion-pair production. Rate coefficient values for these most efficient processes are rather high, of the order of 10-8 cm3/s. This leads to total recombination rate coefficients in Li3+ + H- and Li2+ + H- collisions with values larger than 10-7 cm3/s.

  2. Role of hydrogen bonding in ligand interaction with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor ion channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeson, P.D.; Carling, R.W.; James, K.; Smith, J.D.; Moore, K.W.; Wong, E.H.; Baker, R. (Merck Sharp Laboratory, Harlow, Essex (England))

    1990-05-01

    Displacement of (3H)MK-801 (dizocilpine, 1) binding to rat brain membranes has been used to evaluate the affinities of novel dibenzocycloalkenimines related to 1 for the ion channel binding site (also known as the phencyclidine or PCP receptor) on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of excitory amino acid receptor. In common with many other agents having actions in the central nervous system, these compounds contain a hydrophobic aromatic moiety and a basic nitrogen atom. The conformational rigidity of these ligands provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the importance of specific geometrical properties that influence active-site recognition, in particular the role of the nitrogen atom in hydrogen-bonding interactions. The relative affinities (IC50s) of hydrocarbon-substituted analogues of 1 and ring homologated cyclooctenimines illustrate the importance of size-limited hydrophobic binding of both aryl rings and of the quaternary C-5 methyl group. Analysis of the binding of a series of the 10 available structurally rigid dibenzoazabicyclo(x.y.z)alkanes, by using molecular modeling techniques, uncovered a highly significant correlation between affinity and a proposed ligand-active site hydrogen bonding vector (r = 0.950, p less than 0.001). These results are used to generate a pharmacophore of the MK-801 recognition site/PCP receptor, which accounts for the binding of all of the known ligands.

  3. Hydrogen Bonding in Ion-pair Molecules in Vapors over ionic liquids, studied by Raman Spectroscopy and ab initio Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    The hydrogen bonding interactions in selected archetypal vapor molecules formed in the gas phase over protic ionic liquids are discussed, based on Raman spectroscopy assisted with ab initio molecular orbital DFT-type quantum mechanical calculations (B3LYP with 6-311+G(d,p) basis sets) on assumed......-O distances in the N-H…O bond were found as 1.730 and 1.005 Å. The comparable H-O distance in solid ethanoic acid is ~1.011 Å (neutron diffraction). [1] R. W. Berg, A. Riisager & R. Fehrmann, Formation of an ion pair molecule with a single NH+…Cl- hydrogen bond: Raman spectra of 1,1,3,3-Tetramethylguanidin...... of 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidinium chloride. The optimized N-H distance in the N-H…Cl bond was 1.099 Å. The H-Cl distance was 1.832 Å to compare with the ~1.27 Å in HCl gas. The bromide behaved similarly [ref 2]. Fig. 2. Not so likely 1-methylimidazolium ethanoate gas molecule. The optimized N-H and H...

  4. Young-type interference in collisions between helium and molecular hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, L Ph H; Schoessler, S; Schoeffler, M; Stiebing, K E; Schmidt-Boecking, H; Doerner, R [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Afaneh, F, E-mail: Lothar.Schmidt@atom.uni-frankfurt.d, E-mail: Doerner@atom.uni-frankfurt.d [Physics Department, The Hashemite University, PO Box 150459, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan)

    2009-11-01

    The dissociative electron transfer from He into 10 keV H''+{sub 2} was measured in a kinematically complete experiment. For electron transfer into the dissociative b''3{Sigma}''+{sub u} state of H{sub 2} we find a striking double slit interference pattern in the transverse momentum transfer which we can modify by selecting different internuclear distances of the hydrogen molecule. Compared to an optical double slit, interference minima and maxima are interchanged.

  5. Aluminium and hydrogen ions inhibit a mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    The tension-dependent activity of mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in excised plasmalemmal patches from onion bulb scale epidermis is modulated by pH in the physiologically meaningful range between 4.5 and 7.2. It is rapidly lowered by lowering pH and rapidly raised by raising pH. Channel activity is effectively inhibited by low levels of aluminium ions and activity can be partially restored by washing for a few minutes. We suggest that under normal conditions the sensitivity of the mechanosensory channels to pH of the wall free space plays important roles in regulation of plant activities such as growth. We further suggest that, when levels of acid and aluminium ions in the soil solution are high, they might inhibit similar sensory channels in cells of the root tip, thus contributing critically to the acid soil syndrome.

  6. Metal-Ion- and Hydrogen-Bond-Mediated Interstellar Prebiotic Chemistry: The First Step in the Formose Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thripati, Sorakayala; Ramabhadran, Raghunath O

    2017-11-16

    The formose reaction, which offers a feasible chemical pathway for the prebiotic synthesis of sugars, is a well-studied reaction for over two hundred and 50 years. Yet huge knowledge gaps exist even in the very first step of the formose reaction. In this work, we provide a new and otherwise unintuitive reaction pathway for the gas-phase conversion of formaldehyde to glycolaldehyde (the first step in the formose reaction) occurring in the interstellar medium (ISM). Employing electronic structure calculations (CCSD(T) and DFT methods), we exhaustively probe the role of various metal ions and small molecules detected in the ISM to propose a new mechanism wherein metal-oxygen interactions and hydrogen bonds cooperatively facilitate an otherwise implausible chemical reaction. The reactions involving Mg2+ are throughout found to be barrierless, and those featuring Al+ ions are noted to only have a small barrier. The proton affinities of the small molecules, metal-oxygen interactions, and the extent of C-C-bond formation are found to be the significant factors that influence the barrier heights. The mechanism is also shown to be consistent with well-known experimental details in the terrestrial formose reaction (which could, however, proceed through a different mechanism). Future experimental and theoretical scope arising out of this paper are subsequently discussed.

  7. A Langmuir probe system for the test setup of an RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source at HUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P.; Chen, D. Z.; Li, D.; Zuo, C.

    2017-08-01

    A test setup of an RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source is being constructed at HUST. It is operated at the typical pressure of 0.3 Pa, maximum RF power of 20 kW/1 MHz, with discharge pulse of 6-10 seconds. In order to diagnose the plasma parameters and evaluate the source performance, a highly integrated and automated Langmuir probe system has been developed in-house. It allows for multiple sweeping, mass data acquisition and automatic data evaluation in a fast diagnosis shot of several hundred milliseconds. Various analysis methods are investigated and compared for the ion density determination. Due to the low density and thick sheath in the plasma, OML theory is selected as the applicable one. Preliminary discharge and diagnosis experiments have been carried out in the experimental source. The plasma in the driver exhibits non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution with low density of 1017 m-3 and electron temperature of 59 eV at 20 kW/0.3 Pa.

  8. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with Fe(II) ions at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, K.; Løgager, T.

    1993-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction between Fe(II) ions and H2O2 has been determined at pH 0.4-2 as a function of temperature in the range 5-300-degrees-C. H2O2 was produced by irradiating the aqueous solution with a pulse of electrons. The rate constants at 20 and 300-degrees-C were determined...

  9. Study of beryllium redeposition under bombardment by high intensity -low energy- hydrogen ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gureev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Danelyan, L.S. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1998-01-01

    The results of studying the erosion of beryllium under an effect of intense ion fluxes with the energy of 250 eV, at the fluences {approx}10{sup 2}1 cm{sup -2}, at the MAGRAS-stand are given. The operating conditions under which a practically-complete redeposition of the sputtered beryllium upon the target surface were experimentally-realized. A change in the microstructure of a beryllium target under sputtering and redeposition is analyzed. Some technological applications are considered. (author)

  10. Charge transfer of positive hydrogen ions and Ca vapour at keV energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, H; Amaya-Tapia, A [Centro de Ciencias Fisicas, UNAM, AP 48-3, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62250 (Mexico)

    2003-08-28

    Total and partial single-electron-capture cross sections for H{sup +} + Ca collisions have been calculated by the semiclassical impact-parameter method. A two-centre atomic basis expansion was used in the impact ion energy range 1-100 keV. The present total cross sections are in good agreement with previous experimental data. The most important contributions to the total cross sections come from the capture in the n = 2 shell in almost the entire energy range studied in this work, but the contribution from the n = 1 level is increasingly important at energies higher than 60 keV.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation in Dense Hydrogen: Electronic Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Dai, Jiayu; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-10-01

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation is an important non-equilibrium process in the generation of dense plasmas, particularly in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Classical molecular dynamics considers electrons as point charges, ignoring important quantum processes. We use an Electron Force Field (EFF) method to study the temperature relaxation processes, considering the nuclei as semi-classical point charges and assume electrons as Gaussian wave packets which includes the influences of the size and the radial motion of electrons. At the same time, a Pauli potential is used to describe the electronic exchange effect. At this stage, quantum effects such as exchange, tunneling can be included in this model. We compare the results from EFF and classical molecular dynamics, and find that the relaxation time is much longer with including quantum effects, which can be explained directly by the deference of collision cross sections between quantum particles and classical particles. Further, the final thermal temperature of electron and ion is different compared with classical results that the electron quantum effects cannot be neglected.

  12. A Facile, Nonreactive Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) Detection Method Enabled by Ion Chromatography with UV Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingrui; Wang, Junli; Chen, Baiyang; Wang, Lei

    2017-11-07

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is ubiquitous in the natural environment, and it is now widely used for pollutant control in water and wastewater treatment processes. However, current analytical methods for H2O2 inevitably require reactions between H2O2 and other reactants to yield signals and are thus likely subjective to the interferences of coexisting colored, oxidative, and reductive compounds. In order to overcome these barriers, we herein for the first time propose to analyze H2O2 by ion chromatography (IC) using an ultraviolet (UV) detector. The proposal is based on two principles: first, that H2O2 can deprotonate to hydroperoxyl ion (HO2-) when eluent pH is higher than the acid-dissociation coefficient of H2O2 (pKa = 11.6); and second, that after separation from other compounds via IC column, H2O2 can be quantified by a UV detector. Under favorable operating conditions, this method has successfully achieved acceptable recoveries (>91%) of H2O2 dosed to ultrapure and natural waters, a calibration curve with R2 > 0.99 for a wide range of H2O2 concentrations from 0.1 to 50 mg/L and a method detection limit of 0.027 mg/L. In addition, this approach was shown to be capable of distinguishing H2O2 from anions (e.g., fluoride and chloride) and organics (e.g., glycolate) and monochloramine, suggesting that it is insensitive to many neighboring compounds as long as they do not react quickly with H2O2. Hence, this study proves the combination of IC and UV detector a facile and reliable method for H2O2 measurement.

  13. Ultrafiltration by a compacted clay membrane. I - Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation. II - Sodium ion exclusion at various ionic strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T. B.; Hanshaw, B. B.

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of distilled water and of 0.01N NaCl forced to flow at ambient temperature under a hydraulic pressure drop of 100 bars across a montmorillonite disk compacted to a porosity of 35% by a pressure of 330 bars. The ultrafiltrates in both experiments were depleted in D by 2.5% and in O-18 by 0.8% relative to the residual solution. No additional isotopic fractionation due to a salt-filtering mechanism was observed at NaCl concentrations up to 0.01N. Adsorption is most likely the principal mechanism which produces isotopic fractionation, but molecular diffusion may play a minor role. The results suggest that oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of ground water during passage through compacted clayey sediments should be a common occurrence, in accord with published interpretations of isotopic data from the Illinois and Alberta basins. It is shown how it is possible to proceed from the ion exchange capacity of clay minerals and, by means of the Donnan membrane equilibrium concept and the Teorell-Meyer-Siever theory, develop a theory to explain why and to what extent ultrafiltration occurs when solutions of known concentration are forced to flow through a clay membrane.

  14. Optoelectrochemical Hydrogen-Phosphate Ion Sensor Based on Electrochromism of Spinel-Type Oxide Thin-Film Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Youichi; Shiotsuka, Masayuki

    2002-10-01

    An optoelectrochemical hydrogen-phosphate ion sensor based on the electrochromism of a spinel-type oxide thin-film electrode was developed. The MnCo2O4 thin-film electrode exhibited a marked change of the absorbance at 500 nm, under a positive potential of +0.80 V applied to the Ag/AgCl electrode, that was dependent on HPO42- concentration. The change of the absorbance at 500 nm, the sensor signal, had an almost linear dependence on the logarithm of HPO42- concentration between 1.0× 10-6 and 1.0× 10-2 M. The 90% response time, when the electrode potential was changed from +0.80 to 0 V vs Ag/AgCl electrode at 1.0× 10-2 M, was about 40 s at room temperature. The MnCo2O4-based element also showed high HPO42- selectivity among the tested anions of HPO42-, Cl-, NO3-, and SO42-.

  15. Direct experimental evidence for a negative heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like phase transition in hydrogen cluster ions backbending of the caloric curve

    CERN Document Server

    Gobet, F; Carré, M; Farizon, B; Farizon, M; Gaillard, M J; Maerk, T D; Scheier, P

    2002-01-01

    By (i) selecting specific decay reactions in high energy collisions (60 keV/amu) of hydrogen cluster ions with a helium target (utilizing event-by-event data of a recently developed multi-coincidence experiment) and by (ii) deriving corresponding temperatures for these microcanonical cluster ensembles (analyzing the respective fragment distributions) we are able to construct caloric curves for ii sub 3 sup + (ii sub 2) sub m cluster ions (6 <= m <= 14). All individual curves and the mean of these curves show a backbending in the plateau region thus constituting direct evidence for a negative microcanonical heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like transition of these finite systems.

  16. Amyloid Hydrogen Bonding Polymorphism Evaluated by (15)N{(17)O}REAPDOR Solid-State NMR and Ultra-High Resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Juan; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Filippov, Andrei V; Iuga, Dinu; Lam, Pui Yiu; Barrow, Mark P; Dupree, Ray; Brown, Steven P; O'Connor, Peter B

    2016-04-12

    A combined approach, using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and solid-state NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance), shows a high degree of polymorphism exhibited by Aβ species in forming hydrogen-bonded networks. Two Alzheimer's Aβ peptides, Ac-Aβ(16-22)-NH2 and Aβ(11-25), selectively labeled with (17)O and (15)N at specific amino acid residues were investigated. The total amount of peptides labeled with (17)O as measured by FTICR-MS enabled the interpretation of dephasing observed in (15)N{(17)O}REAPDOR solid-state NMR experiments. Specifically, about one-third of the Aβ peptides were found to be involved in the formation of a specific >C═(17)O···H-(15)N hydrogen bond with their neighbor peptide molecules, and we hypothesize that the rest of the molecules undergo ± n off-registry shifts in their hydrogen bonding networks.

  17. A first principles theoretical study of vibrational spectral diffusion and hydrogen bond dynamics in aqueous ionic solutions: D2O in hydration shells of Cl(-) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Bhabani S; Semparithi, A; Chandra, Amalendu

    2008-11-21

    A theoretical study of vibrational spectral diffusion and hydrogen bond dynamics in aqueous ionic solutions is presented from first principles without employing any empirical potential models. The present calculations are based on ab initio molecular dynamics for trajectory generation and wavelet analysis of the simulated trajectories for time dependent frequency calculations. Results are obtained for two different deuterated aqueous solutions: the first one is a relatively dilute solution of a single Cl(-) ion and the second one is a concentrated solution of NaCl ( approximately 3M) dissolved in liquid D(2)O. It is found that the frequencies of OD bonds in the anion hydration shell, i.e., those which are hydrogen bonded to the chloride ion, have a higher stretch frequency than those in the bulk water. Also, on average, the frequencies of hydration shell OD modes are found to increase with increase in the anion-water hydrogen bond distance. On the dynamical side, when the vibrational spectral diffusion is calculated exclusively for the hydration shell water molecules in the first solution, the dynamics reveals three time scales: a short-time relaxation ( approximately 200 fs) corresponding to the dynamics of intact ion-water hydrogen bonds, a slower relaxation ( approximately 3 ps) corresponding to the lifetimes of chloride ion-water hydrogen bonds, and another longer-time constant ( approximately 20 ps) corresponding to the escape dynamics of water from the anion hydration shell. Existence of such three time scales for hydration shell water molecules was also reported earlier for water containing a single iodide ion using classical molecular dynamics [B. Nigro et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 110, 11237 (2006)]. Hence, the present study confirms the basic results of this earlier work using a different methodology. However, when the vibrational spectral diffusion is calculated over all the OD modes, only two time scales of approximately 150 fs and approximately 2.7 ps are

  18. Observation of hydrogen-deuterium exchange of ubiquitin by direct analysis of electrospray capillary-skimmer dissociation with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, S; Naito, Y; Takio, K

    1999-11-01

    The structure of ubiquitin, a small cytoplasmic protein with an extended beta-sheet and an alpha-helix surrounding a hydrophobic core, has been characterized by hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange labeling in conjunction with successive analysis by capillary-skimmer dissociation with electrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR MS). The deuterium content of each fragment ion was investigated at different times, and the results indicate that the deuterium incorporation rate into the backbone amides of ubiquitin varied depending on the environment of the amide hydrogens. Amide hydrogens of the N-terminal beta-strand showed quite slow exchange while those of the 35-39 loop were exchanged within a short exposure time to deuterium oxide. It was also possible to evaluate the difference in hydrogen-bond stability. The present data are consistent with the structural features obtained by X-Ray and NMR analyses. Although some of the labeling information might be lost by the scrambling of amide protons during capillary-skimmer dissociation, the results demonstrate that the present method provides useful higher-order structural information for proteins.

  19. Reduction of aldehydes and hydrogen cyanide yields in mainstream cigarette smoke using an amine functionalised ion exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duke Martin G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoking is a well recognized cause of diseases such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cardiovascular disease. Of the more than 5000 identified species in cigarette smoke, at least 150 have toxicological activity. For example, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde have been assigned as Group 1 and Group 2B carcinogens by IARC, and hydrogen cyanide has been identified as a respiratory and cardiovascular toxicant. Active carbon has been shown to be an effective material for the physical adsorption of many of the smoke volatile species. However, physical adsorption of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde and also hydrogen cyanide from smoke is less effective using carbon. Alternative methods for the removal of these species from cigarette smoke are therefore of interest. A macroporous, polystyrene based ion-exchange resin (Diaion®CR20 with surface amine group functionality has been investigated for its ability to react with aldehydes and HCN in an aerosol stream, and thus selectively reduce the yields of these compounds (in particular formaldehyde in mainstream cigarette smoke. Results Resin surface chemistry was characterized using vapour sorption, XPS, TOF-SIMS and 15N NMR. Diaion®CR20 was found to have structural characteristics indicating weak physisorption properties, but sufficient surface functionalities to selectively remove aldehydes and HCN from cigarette smoke. Using 60 mg of Diaion®CR20 in a cigarette cavity filter gave reductions in smoke formaldehyde greater than 50% (estimated to be equivalent to >80% of the formaldehyde present in the smoke vapour phase independent of a range of flow rates. Substantial removal of HCN (>80% and acetaldehyde (>60% was also observed. The performance of Diaion®CR20 was found to be consistent over a test period of 6 months. The overall adsorption for the majority of smoke compounds measured appeared to follow a pseudo-first order approximation to second order

  20. Oral calcium supplementation ambulatory blood pressure and relation to changes in intracellular ions and sodium-hydrogen exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikilidou, Maria I; Befani, Christina D; Sarafidis, Pantelis A; Nilsson, Peter M; Koliakos, George G; Tziolas, Ioannis M; Kazakos, Kiriakos A; Yovos, John G; Lasaridis, Anastasios N

    2009-12-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) supplementation has been shown paradoxically to reduce intracellular Ca2+ and induce vascular relaxation. The aim of the study was to assess 24-h blood pressure (BP) change after Ca2+ supplementation and to investigate its relation to changes in intracellular ions and the activity of the first isoform of sodium-hydrogen exchange (NHE-1) in subjects with hypertension and type 2 diabetes. This parallel, randomized controlled, single-blinded trial, consisted of 31 patients with type 2 diabetes, and hypertension who were allocated to receive 1,500 mg of Ca2+ per day (n = 15) or no treatment (n = 16) for 8 weeks. In the Ca2+ group a decrease of 1.7 +/- 2.7 mm Hg (mean +/- SE) P = 0.52 for mean 24-h systolic BP (SBP) and 2.1 +/- 1.5 mm Hg, P = 0.19 for mean 24-h diastolic BP (DBP) was recorded. Whereas in the control group an increase of 1.4 +/- 2.7 mm Hg, P = 0.59 for mean 24-h SBP and 1.2 +/- 2.8 mm Hg, P = 0.83 for mean 24-h DBP was observed. Intraplatelet Ca2+ decreased whereas intraplatelet magnesium (Mg2+) and erythrocyte K+ increased in the intervention group. Change in mean 24-h SBP in the pooled group correlated with both change in intraplatelet Ca2+ (r = 0.49, P < 0.05) and NHE-1 activity (r = 0.6, P < 0.001). The contribution of intraplatelet Ca2+ was attenuated when both parameters were entered in a multivariate regression model. The present study shows a weak, statistically nonsignificant trend towards association of Ca2+ supplementation on 24-h BP in hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes. However, our results indicated an interrelation of [Ca2+]i levels and NHE-1 activity on BP in patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes.

  1. DIRAC: A new version of computer algebra tools for studying the properties and behavior of hydrogen-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Sean; Fritzsche, Stephan; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2010-03-01

    During recent years, the DIRAC package has proved to be an efficient tool for studying the structural properties and dynamic behavior of hydrogen-like ions. Originally designed as a set of MAPLE procedures, this package provides interactive access to the wave and Green's functions in the non-relativistic and relativistic frameworks and supports analytical evaluation of a large number of radial integrals that are required for the construction of transition amplitudes and interaction cross sections. We provide here a new version of the DIRAC program which is developed within the framework of MATHEMATICA (version 6.0). This new version aims to cater to a wider community of researchers that use the MATHEMATICA platform and to take advantage of the generally faster processing times therein. Moreover, the addition of new procedures, a more convenient and detailed help system, as well as source code revisions to overcome identified shortcomings should ensure expanded use of the new DIRAC program over its predecessor. New version program summaryProgram title: DIRAC Catalogue identifier: ADUQ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUQ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 45 073 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 285 828 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica 6.0 or higher Computer: All computers with a license for the computer algebra package Mathematica (version 6.0 or higher) Operating system: Mathematica is O/S independent Classification: 2.1 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADUQ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 165 (2005) 139 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Since the early days of quantum mechanics, the

  2. Formation of an Ion-Pair Molecule with a Single NH+...Cl- Hydrogen Bond: Raman spectra of 1,1,3,3-Tetramethylguanidinium chloride in the solid state, in solution and in the vapor phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    scattering spectra are presented and assigned, by comparing to the quantum mechanical calculations. It is concluded that dimeric molecular ion pairs with four N-H+ · · · Cl- hydrogen bonds probably exist in the solutions and are responsible for the relatively high solubility of the “salt” in ethanol......- hydrogen bond, the stretching band of which is causing the band....

  3. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode conversion electron heating in deuterium-hydrogen plasmas in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Y [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wukitch, S J [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Bonoli, P T [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Marmar, E [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Mossessian, D [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Nelson-Melby, E [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM - Confederation Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Phillips, P [Fusion Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Porkolab, M [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Schilling, G [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Wolfe, S [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wright, J [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Localized direct electron heating (EH) by mode-converted (MC) ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves in D(H) tokamak plasmas has been clearly observed for the first time in Alcator C-Mod. Both on- and off-axis (high field side) mode conversion EH (MCEH) have been observed. The MCEH profile was obtained from a break-in-slope analysis of electron temperature signals in the presence of radio frequency shut-off. The temperature was measured by a 32-channel high spatial resolution ({<=}7 mm) 2nd harmonic heterodyne electron cyclotron emission system. The experimental profiles were compared with the predictions from a toroidal full-wave ICRF code TORIC. Using the hydrogen concentration measured by a high-resolution optical spectrometer, TORIC predictions were shown qualitatively in agreement with the experimental results for both on- and off-axis MC cases. From the simulations, the EH from MC ion cyclotron wave and ion Bernstein wave is examined.

  4. Study of secondary electron emission from thin carbon targets with swift charged particles: heavy ions, hydrogen ions; Etude experimentale de l`emission electronique secondaire de cibles minces de carbone sous l`impact de projectiles rapides: ions lourds, ions hydrogene (atomiques, moleculaires ou sous forme d`agregats)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billebaud, A.

    1995-07-12

    The main subject of this work is the study of electron emission from the two surfaces of thin solid targets bombarded with swift charged particles. The slowing down of swift ions in matter is mainly due to inelastic interaction with target electrons (ionization, excitation): the energy transfer to target electrons is responsible for the secondary electron emission process. The phenomenological and theoretical descriptions of this phenomena are the subject of the first chapter. We focused on secondary electron emission induced by different kind of projectiles on thin carbon foils. In chapter two we describe hydrogen cluster induced electron emission measurement between 40 and 120 keV/proton. These projectiles, composed of several atoms, allowed us to study and highlight collective effects of the electron emission process. We extended our study of electron emission to molecular (H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}) and composite (H{sup -}, H{sup 0}) projectiles at higher energies (<= 2 MeV): we have designed an experimental set-up devoted to electron emission statistics measurements which allowed us to study, among others things, the role of projectile electrons in secondary electron emission. This experiment is described in the third chapter. Finally, the fourth chapter describes new measurements of electron emission induced by energetic (13 MeV/u) and highly charged argon ion provided by the medium energy beam line (SME) of GANIL (Caen), which have been analyzed in the framework of a semi-empirical model of secondary electron emission. This set of experiments brings new results on composite projectile interaction with matter, and on the consequences of high energy deposition in solids. (author).

  5. Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masashi Shimada; Y. Hatano; Y. Oya; T. Oda; M. Hara; G. Cao; M. Kobayashi; M. Sokolov; H. Watanabe; B. Tyburska; Y. Ueda; P. Calderoni

    2011-09-01

    Plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions, and tungsten, a candidate PFC for the divertor in ITER, is expected to receive a neutron dose of 0.7 displacement per atom (dpa) by the end of operation in ITER. The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in PFCs, it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high PKA energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influence the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron irradiation. Therefore, the effort to correlate among high-energy ions, fission neutrons, and fusion neutrons is crucial for accurately estimating tritium retention under a neutron-irradiation environment. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by neutron in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL, at 50 and 300C to 0.025, 0.3, and 1.2 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiation was performed in the INL Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe2+, 20 MeV W2+, and 700 keV H-) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

  6. Collision-Induced Dissociation Study of Strong Hydrogen-Bonded Cluster Ions Y−(HF)n (Y=F, O2) Using Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with a HF Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Sakamoto, Kenya; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) was produced by a homemade HF generator in order to investigate the properties of strong hydrogen-bonded clusters such as (HF)n. The HF molecules were ionized in the form of complex ions associated with the negative core ions Y− produced by atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI). The use of APCDI in combination with the homemade HF generator led to the formation of negative-ion HF clusters Y−(HF)n (Y=F, O2), where larger clusters with n≥4 were not dete...

  7. A comparison of hydrogen ion concentration and pH genetic predictions and fixed effect estimations when assessing pork quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, K J; Saxton, A M; Miller, R K; Goodwin, R N

    2003-03-01

    An evaluation of ultimate pH (pH) and hydrogen ion concentration (H+) was conducted to determine if the mathematical conversion of H+ to pH could affect 1. fixed and random effect inferences and 2. prediction of genetic merit of animals when either pH or H+ is used as an indicator in the assessment of pork quality. Data from 4,262 purebred animals and 577 sires having complete three-generation pedigrees from the 1991 to 2001 National Barrow Show Progeny Tests were utilized in this study. Existing loin muscle pH data were converted to their original H+. Numerical changes in values occurred across all fixed effects and in the case of breed and test, changes in differences among subclasses occurred. These changes may result in differing inferences that can be made depending on whether pH or H+ is used as the dependent variable. Heritability estimates for pH and H+ were 0.52 +/- 0.074 and 0.62 +/- 0.078, respectively. The Pearson correlation between pH and H+ breeding values was -0.92. Spearman Rank correlation of -0.91 between pH and H+ breeding values was calculated and indicates that sires do not rank the same when ordered by breeding values for each trait. When pH is the selection objective, the selection differential reduction in H+ from these data ranges from 3.8 to 9.1%. Additionally, only 77.7% of the estimated genetic progress per generation in H+ is realized when selection (5% selected) is based on pH. The genetic correlation between pH and H+ was -0.96. Changes in the absolute values of the genetic correlations between various pork quality indicator traits and pH or H+ concentration were 0.04 or less. Differences in pH and H+ results could impact decisions made by swine breeders and meat processors who are concerned about pork quality. This, combined with the greater heritability and biochemical reality for H+, indicates that H+ rather than pH is the more appropriate trait breeders and processors should focus on when attempting to improve pork quality.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Study of Twister Ribozyme: Role of Mg(2+) Ions and the Hydrogen-Bonding Network in the Active Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucisik, Melek N; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-07-12

    The recently discovered twister ribozyme is thought to utilize general acid-base catalysis in its self-cleavage mechanism, but the roles of nucleobases and metal ions in the mechanism are unclear. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations of the env22 twister ribozyme are performed to elucidate the structural and equilibrium dynamical properties, as well as to examine the role of Mg(2+) ions and possible candidates for the general base and acid in the self-cleavage mechanism. The active site region and the ends of the pseudoknots were found to be less mobile than other regions of the ribozyme, most likely providing structural stability and possibly facilitating catalysis. A purported catalytic Mg(2+) ion and the closest neighboring Mg(2+) ion remained chelated and relatively immobile throughout the microsecond trajectories, although removal of these Mg(2+) ions did not lead to any significant changes in the structure or equilibrium motions of the ribozyme on the microsecond time scale. In addition, a third metal ion, a Na(+) ion remained close to A1(O5'), the leaving group atom, during the majority of the microsecond trajectories, suggesting that it might stabilize the negative charge on A1(O5') during self-cleavage. The locations of these cations and their interactions with key nucleotides in the active site suggest that they may be catalytically relevant. The P1 stem is partially melted at its top and bottom in the crystal structure and further unwinds in the trajectories. The simulations also revealed an interconnected network comprised of hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking interactions that create a relatively rigid network around the self-cleavage site. The nucleotides involved in this network are among the highly conserved nucleotides in twister ribozymes, suggesting that this interaction network may be important to structure and function.

  9. Development of Low-energy Deuterium Ion Implantation Method to replace Hydrogen Post-metal Annealing (PMA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Do, S. U.; Jeong, N. M.; Jeong, S. K. [Uiduk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Recently, deuterium gas anneal was introduced to replace hydrogen gas anneal. Deuterium incorporation compared with that of hydrogen at Si/SiO{sub 2} interface is known to improve the device reliability characteristics because deuterium desorption is substantially reduced as compared with hydrogen desorption due to isotope effect. Deuterium diffusion takes place primarily through the gate oxide because of the limited permeability of bulk Si, metal, and even poly to deuterium. In the case of large scale ICs, therefore, the ability of deuterium to diffusion within the very thin SiO{sub 2} layer may be severely impeded, impacting the large-area devices used in peripheral circuits.

  10. Investigation of morphological, structural, and mechanical characteristics of Zircaloy-4 irradiated with 3.5 MeV hydrogen ions beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Butt, M. Z.; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2017-09-01

    Zircaloy-4 specimens were irradiated with 3.5 MeV hydrogen ions (dose range: 1  ×  1013 H+1 cm-2 to 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2) using a Pelletron accelerator. FESEM studies reveal formation of hydrogen micro-bubbles, bubbles induced blisters of irregular shapes, and development of cracks on the specimen surface, as in the case of pure zirconium. However, for the highest irradiation dose of 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2, agglomeration of flower-shape blisters is observed. XRD analysis shows that the most preferentially oriented crystallographic plane is (0 0 4) with texture coefficient values 1.832-2.308 depending on the ions dose. Its diffraction peak intensity first decreases with the increase in ions dose up to 5  ×  1013 H+1 cm-2 and later increases up to 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2. Opposite is found in case of diffraction peak width. Crystallite size and lattice strain determined by Williamson-Hall analysis display a linear relationship between the two with positive slope. Mechanical strength, namely yield stress (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and fracture stress (FS), increases sharply with ions dose up to 5  ×  1013 H+1 cm-2. For 1  ×  1014 H+1 cm-2 dose there is a sudden drop of stress to a lowest value and then a slow steady increase in stress up to the highest dose 1  ×  1015 H+1 cm-2. Same pattern is followed by uniform elongation and total elongation. All three stress parameters YS, UTS, and FS follow Inverse Hall-Petch relation.

  11. Profiles of plasma parameters and density of negative hydrogen ions by laser detachment measurements in RF-driven ion sources; Profile der Plasmaparameter und Dichte negativer Wasserstoffionen mittels Laserdetachmentmessungen in HF-angeregten Ionenquellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ-Koch, Sina

    2007-12-20

    This work shows the application of the Laserdetachment method for spatially resolved measurements of negative Hydrogen/Deuterium ion density. It was applied on a high power low pressure RF-driven ion source. The Laser detachment method is based on the measurement of electron currents on a positively biased Langmuir probe before and during/after a laser pulse. The density ratio of negative ions to electrons can be derived from the ratio of currents to the probe. The absolute density of negative ions can be obtained when the electron density is measured with the standard Langmuir probe setup. Measurements with the Langmuir probe additionally yield information about the floating and plasma potential, the electron temperature and the density of positive ions. The Laser detachment setup had to be adapted to the special conditions of the RF-driven source. In particular the existence of RF fields (1 MHz), high source potential (-20 kV), magnetic fields ({proportional_to} 7 mT) and caesium inside the source had to be considered. The density of negative ions could be identified in the range of n(H{sup -})=1.10{sup 17} 1/m{sup 3}, which is in the same order of magnitude as the electron density. Only the application of the Laser detachment method with the Langmuir probe measurements will yield spatially resolved plasma parameters and H- density profiles. The influence of diverse external parameters, such as pressure, RF-power, magnetic fields on the plasma parameters and their profiles were studied and explained. Hence, the measurements lead to a detailed understanding of the processes inside the source. (orig.)

  12. Hydrogen Charging Effects in Pd/Ti/TiO2/Ti Thin Films Deposited on Si(111 Studied by Ion Beam Analysis Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Drogowska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium and titanium dioxide thin films were deposited onto Si(111 substrates by magnetron sputtering from a metallic Ti target in a reactive Ar+O2 atmosphere, the composition of which was controlled by precision gas controllers. For some samples, 1/3 of the surface was covered with palladium using molecular beam epitaxy. Chemical composition, density, and layer thickness of the layers were determined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS. The surface morphology was studied using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM. After deposition, smooth, homogenous sample surfaces were observed. Hydrogen charging for 5 hours under pressure of 1 bar and at temperature of 300°C results in granulation of the surface. Hydrogen depth profile was determined using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS and nuclear Reaction Analysis (N-15 method, using a 15N beam at and above the resonance energy of 6.417 MeV. NRA measurements proved a higher hydrogen concentration in samples with partially covered top layers, than in samples without palladium. The highest value of H concentration after charging was about 50% (in the palladium-covered part and about 40% in titanium that was not covered by Pd. These values are in good agreement with the results of SIMS measurements.

  13. H atom, e{sup -}, and H{sub 6}{sup +} ions produced in irradiated solid hydrogens: An electron spin resonance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumada, Takayuki [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: kumada.takayuki@jaea.go.jp; Shimizu, Yuta; Ushida, Takahiro; Kumagai, Jun [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    We carried out electron spin resonance (ESR) study of irradiated solid H{sub 2} and para-H{sub 2}. H-atom, e{sup -}, and H{sub 6}{sup +} lines were observed. The H-atom radicals diffuse in solid H{sub 2} by the tunneling chemical reaction H+H{sub 2}{yields}H{sub 2}+H below 4 K, and by the thermally activated process above 5 K. These decay via H-H recombination. Yield of trapped electrons e{sup -} produced by the radiolysis of solid para-H{sub 2} increases with increase in the concentration of added isotopic hydrogen, HD or D{sub 2}. These decay via geminate recombination with positive ions with a half-life of 8 h at 4 K. H{sub 6}{sup +} ion is an ionic hydrogen radical whose spectrum has firstly been observed in irradiated solid para-H{sub 2}. H{sub 6}{sup +} ions diffuse in solid H{sub 2} by sequence of H{sub 6}{sup +}+H{sub 2}{yields}H{sub 2}+H{sub 6}{sup +} reactions, and terminate by the isotope-exchange reaction H{sub 6}{sup +}+HD{yields}H{sub 5}D{sup +}+H{sub 2} or H{sub 6}{sup +}+D{sub 2}{yields}H{sub 4}D{sub 2}{sup +}+H{sub 2}. Unlike H{sub 6}{sup +}, isotopically substituted H{sub 5}D{sup +} and H{sub 4}D{sub 2}{sup +} cannot diffuse in solid para-H{sub 2}. Rate-determining step of their decay is charge recombination with e{sup -}.

  14. A visible-light-excited europium(III) complex-based luminescent probe for visualizing copper ions and hydrogen sulfide in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiren; Wang, Huan; Yang, Mei; Yuan, Jingli; Wu, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Development of visible-light-excited lanthanide (III) complex-based luminescent probes is highly appealing due to their superiority of less damage to the living biosystems over the conventional UV-light-excited ones. In this work, a visible-light-excited europium (III) complex-based luminescent probe, BPED-BHHCT-Eu3+-BPT, has been designed and synthesized by conjugating the Cu2+-binding N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethanediamine (BPED) to a tetradentate β-diketone ligand 4,4‧-bis(1″,1″,1″,2″,2″,3″,3″-heptafluoro-4″,6″-hexanedione-6″-yl)chlorosulfo-o-terphenyl (BHHCT) and coordinating with a coligand 2-(N,N-diethylanilin-4-yl)-4,6-bis(pyrazol-1-yl)-1,3,5-triazine) (BPT) for the time-gated luminescence detection of Cu2+ ions and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in living cells. BPED-BHHCT-Eu3+-BPT exhibited a sharp excitation peak at 407 nm and a wide excitation window extending to beyond 460 nm. Upon its reaction with Cu2+ ions, the luminescence of BPED-BHHCT-Eu3+-BPT was efficiently quenched, which could be reversibly restored by the addition of H2S due to the strong affinity between Cu2+ ions and H2S. The "on-off-on" type luminescence behavior of BPED-BHHCT-Eu3+-BPT towards Cu2+ ions and H2S enabled the sensing of the two species with high sensitivity and selectivity. The performances of BPED-BHHCT-Eu3+-BPT for visualizing intracellular Cu2+ ions and H2S were investigated, and the results have demonstrated the practical applicability of the probe for molecular imaging of cells.

  15. Proton-Bridge Motions in Amine Conjugate Acid Ions Having Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds to Hydroxyl and Amine Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ung, H. U.; Moehlig, A. R.; Khodagholian, S.; G. Berden,; Oomens, J.; Morton, T. H.

    2013-01-01

    Vibrational spectra of two gaseous cations having NH center dot center dot center dot O intramolecular ionic hydrogen bonds and of nine protonated di- and polyamines having NH center dot center dot center dot N internal proton bridges, recorded using IR Multiple Photon Dissociation (IRMPD) of

  16. Significant enhanced uranyl ions extraction efficiency with phosphoramidate-functionalized ionic liquids via synergistic effect of coordination and hydrogen bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiang; Qin, Zhen; He, Yao; Xiong, Penghui; Huang, Zeng; Mao, Yiwu; Wei, Hongyuan; Zhuo, Liangang

    2017-11-16

    The influence of the linking group between the phosphoryl and bridging moieties in phosphoryl-containing task-specific ionic liquids (TSILs) on the extraction of uranyl ions was experimentally and theoretically investigated. A novel phosphoramidate-based TSIL with an amine group as the linking moiety resulted in a higher uranyl ion extraction efficiency compared with that of other phosphoryl-based TSILs. A distribution ratio of 4999 ± 51 can be achieved for uranyl ions. The uranyl ions (76.7 ± 1.5%) were stripped from the loaded ionic liquid phase in a single stage using 0.05 M diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid in a 1.0 M guanidine carbonate solution. The extraction stoichiometry of the uranyl ions was determined by a slope analysis of the extraction data. Furthermore, the fundamental nature of the interaction between the phosphoramidate-based TSIL and uranyl ions was theoretically studied for the first time. The theoretical calculations demonstrated that the synergistic effect of the complexation interaction and H-bond formation between the phosphoramidate-functional ionic liquid and uranyl nitrate led to the higher extraction efficiency. These results provide a basis for rational design, synthesis and potential applications of novel TSILs for uranyl extraction.

  17. Ionization of molecular hydrogen and stripping of oxygen atoms and ions in collisions of Oq++H2 (q = 0- 8): Data for secondary electron production from ion precipitation at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. R.; Ozak, N.; Cravens, T. E.; Gharibnejad, H.

    2017-01-01

    Energetic oxygen and sulfur ion precipitation into the atmosphere of Jupiter is thought to produce an X-ray aurora as well as to contribute to ionization, heating, and dissociation of the molecules of the atmosphere. At high energy, stripping of electrons from these ions by atmospheric gas molecules results in the production of high charge states throughout a portion of this passage through the atmosphere. Therefore, to enable modeling of the effects of secondary electrons produced by this ion precipitation, from either the solar wind or magnetospheric sources such as the Galilean moons, a large range of ionization and stripping data is calculated and tabulated here that otherwise is not available. The present data are for the abundant precipitating species, oxygen, colliding with the dominant upper atmosphere gas, molecular hydrogen, and cover the principal reaction channels leading to secondary electron production (single and double ionization, transfer ionization, and double capture followed by autoionization, and single and double stripping of electrons from the projectile). Since the ions possess initial energies at the upper atmosphere in the keV to MeV range, and are then slowed as they pass through the atmosphere, results are calculated for 1-2000 keV/u Oq++H2 (q =0-8). In addition to the total cross sections for ionization and stripping processes, models require the distribution in energy and angle of the ejected electrons, so cross sections differential in these parameters are also calculated. The data may be used to model the energy deposited by ion precipitation in Jupiter's atmosphere and thereby contribute to the elucidation of the ionosphere-atmosphere coupling.

  18. Determination of the stability of the uranyl ion sipped in {tau}-hydrogen phosphate of zirconium in sodic form; Determinacion de la estabilidad del ion uranilo sorbido en {tau}-hidrogenofosfato de zirconio en forma sodica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Fernandez V, S.M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Drot, R.; Simoni, E. [Universite de Paris-Sud-XI, Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Groupe de radiochimie, Bat. 100, 91406 Orsay (France)]. e-mail: edo@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    The stability of the uranyl sipped in the zirconium {tau}-hydrogen phosphate in sodic form ({tau}-NaZrP), was carried out characterizing the complexes formed by Laser spectroscopy in the visible region and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The material was prepared by a new synthesis technique working in nitrogen atmosphere and to low temperatures. The sorption of the uranyl ion was made in acid media with concentrations of 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -5} of uranyl nitrate and with ion forces of 0.1 and 0.5 M of NaClO{sub 4}. The spectra of induced fluorescence with laser (TRLFS) show that the uranyl is fixed in very acid media in three well differentiated species, to pH less acid, the specie of long half life disappears and are only those of short half life. The results of the binding energy obtained by XPS indicate that the binding energy of the uranyl confer it a stable character to the complex formed in the {tau}-NaZP, that makes to this material appropriate to retain to the uranyl in solution to high ion forces and in acid media. (Author)

  19. Experiments and simulations for the dynamics of cesium in negative hydrogen ion sources for ITER N-NBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutser, Raphael

    2010-07-21

    The injection of fast neutral particles (NBI) into a fusion plasma is an important method for plasma heating and current drive. A source for negative deuterium ions delivering an 1 MeV beam that is accelerated to a specific energy and neutralized by a gas target is required for the ITER-NBI. Cesium seeding is required to extract high negative ion current densities from these sources. The optimization of the cesium homogeneity and control are major objectives to achieve the source requirements imposed by ITER. Within the scope of this thesis, the Monte Carlo based numerical transport simulation CsFlow3D was developed, which is the first computer model that is capable of simulating the flux and the accumulation of cesium on the surfaces of negative-ion sources. Basic studies that support the code development were performed at a dedicated experiment at the University of Augsburg. Input parameters of the ad- and desorption of cesium at ion source relevant conditions were taken from systematic measurements with a quartz micro balance, while the injection rate of the cesium oven at the ion source was determined by surface ionization detection. This experimental setup was used for further investigations of the work function of cesium-coated samples during plasma exposure. (orig.)

  20. High effective neutralizer for negative hydrogen and deuterium ion beams on base of nonresonance adiabatic trap of photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, S. S.; Atluhanov, M. G.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kolmogorov, A. V.; Ushkova, M. Yu.

    2017-08-01

    High efficiency of negative ion beam neutralization by using a photon target is presented in this work. The target was designed and manufactured on principles of nonresonance adiabatic confinement of photons. This photon trap shaped a long arc blended with end spherical mirrors. The arc part consists several cylinder mirrors. Trap sizes was about 30×50×250 mm3. A photon flux from an industrial fiber laser (λ =1070 nm, Δλ=7nm, P=2.1 kW) was injected into trap normally to one cylinder mirror through small entrance hole with angular spread about 3 degree. Test negative ion beams were passed through photon confinement region and suppressing ion current was registered. These experiments has been carried out with H-, D- beams. High neutralization degree more than 95% has been demonstrated.

  1. Energy storage mechanism in aqueous fiber-shaped Li-ion capacitors based on aligned hydrogenated-Li4Ti5O12 nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hao; Ma, Xiangwen; Bai, Jinglong; Yang, Zhenyu; Sun, Gengzhi; Zhang, Zhenxing; Pan, Xiaojun; Lan, Wei; Zhou, Jin Yuan; Xie, Erqing

    2017-06-22

    It is reported that Li ions can contribute a lot to the capacitance of aqueous Li-ion capacitors (LICs), which might be due to the intercalation/de-intercalation processes of Li(+) ions that also occur at the anodes. However the energy storage mechanism in the aqueous LIC system still requires further proof. In this work, a type of aqueous fiber-shaped LIC has been designed and developed using hydrogenated Li4Ti5O12 (H-LTO) anodes, active carbon (AC) cathodes, and LiCl/PVA gel electrolytes with a double-helical structure. The obtained single LTO wire electrode exhibits a high specific capacitance in volume (34.1 F cm(-3)) and superior cycling stabilities (∼100% over 100 000 cycles), both of which are due to the formed amorphous layers at the surface of the electrodes. Moreover, it is found via sweep voltammetry analysis that most of the energy stored in an aqueous fiber-shaped capacitor electrode is attributed to the Li ions' intercalation, whose content exceeds 85% at a low scan rate and gradually decreases with increasing scan rate; while the energy stored by the double electric layers remains almost unchanged with different scan rates. Furthermore, the well-matched wearable fiber-shaped LICs show high capacitive behaviors (18.44 μW h cm(-2)) and superior static/dynamic cycling stabilities. This research would provide some insight into the charge storage mechanism in electrodes in the aqueous system, and give more suggestions to develop high-energy-density fiber-shaped energy storage devices.

  2. Unique Fe2P Nanoparticles Enveloped in Sandwichlike Graphited Carbon Sheets as Excellent Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalyst and Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Huijuan; Feng, Yangyang; Liu, Li; Wang, Yu

    2015-12-09

    The novel Fe2P nanoparticles encapsulated in sandwichlike graphited carbon envelope nanocomposite (Fe2P/GCS) that can be first applied in hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) as well as lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) has been designed and fabricated. The unique sandwiched Fe2P/GCS is characterized with several prominent merits, including large specific surface area, nanoporous structure, excellent electronic conductivity, enhanced structural integrity and so on. All of these endow the Fe2P/GCS with brilliant electrochemical performance. When used as a HER electrocatalyst in acidic media, the harvested Fe2P/GCS demonstrates low onset overpotential and Tafel slope as well as particularly outstanding durability. Moreover, as an anode material for LIBs, the sandwiched Fe2P/GCS presents high specific capacity and excellent cyclability and rate capability. As a consequence, the acquired Fe2P/GCS is a promising material for energy applications, especially HER and LIBs.

  3. Hydrogen storage in a potassium-ion-bound metal-organic framework incorporating crown ether struts as specific cation binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dae-Woon; Chyun, Seung An; Suh, Myunghyun Paik

    2014-07-21

    To develop a metal-organic framework (MOF) for hydrogen storage, SNU-200 incorporating a 18-crown-6 ether moiety as a specific binding site for selected cations has been synthesized. SNU-200 binds K(+), NH4(+), and methyl viologen (MV(2+)) through single-crystal to single-crystal transformations. It exhibits characteristic gas-sorption properties depending on the bound cation. SNU-200 activated with supercritical CO2 shows a higher isosteric heat (Qst) of H2 adsorption (7.70 kJ mol(-1)) than other zinc-based MOFs. Among the cation inclusions, K(+) is the best for enhancing the isosteric heat of the H2 adsorption (9.92 kJ mol(-1)) as a result of the accessible open metal sites on the K(+) ion. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. DIFFUSIVE-Magnetoresistance(DMR) Proton(PMR)/Hydrogen-ion WATER: PRE-``Fert''/``Grunberg'' GMR[and CMR]: Quo-Vadis ``Honesty''???: PLAGIARISM!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fart, Albart; Gruntbug, Peter; Siegel, Edward

    2011-03-01

    Proton/Hydrogen-ion Diffusive-Magnetoresistance(DMR) of Siegel[APS March-Mtgs.(70s)] based upon Siegel[Int'l. Conf. Mag.-Alloys and Oxides("ICMAO"), The Technion(77); J. Mag. Mag. Mtls. 7, 312(78)] FIRST experimental-discovery of GMR and FIRST theoretical prediction of CMR[ibid. 7, 338 (78)], facilitates NEW water production in global-warming exacerbated dry arid/semi-arid regions: Only HYDROGEN is/can be "FLYING-WATER"!!! (aka "chemical-rain-in-pipelines"). EMET/TRUTH-in-the-``SEANCES'', would-be "Sciences": C. Perelman-Corredoira [Against the Tide(07)] featuring Martin-Bradshaw ["Healing the SHAME That BINDS You"(80s)] systemic sociological-dysfunctionality(S-D), and Grigory Perelman's HEROIC ETHICS (refusal of both pure-maths Poincare-conjecture proof 2007 Fields-medal and 2010 Clay-Institute so-called/media-hyped/P.Red/spin-doctored millennium-prize million-dollar would-be award, militates as well in the current "SEANCE" of physics/maths politics/media-hype/P.R /spin-doctoring VS. Siegel FIRST experimental GMR a never-acknowledged full decade PRE-"Fert"(88) /"Grunberg(89)" ``Phales-GroPE''/Thompson-CSF/ KFZ-JEWlich 2007 physics Wolf/Japan/Nobel-prizes!!!

  5. Polyvinylpyrrolidone surface modification with SiOx containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/SiOx) and nitrogen-doped a-C:H/SiOx films using Hall-type closed drift ion beam source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazauskas, A.; Grigaliunas, V.; Guobiene, A.; Puiso, J.; Prosycevas, I.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    In this study SiOx containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/SiOx) and nitrogen-doped a-C:H/SiOx (a-C:H:N/SiOx) films were deposited on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) templates of variable thickness using a Hall-type closed drift ion beam source with constant irradiation parameters. A detailed

  6. Anomalously Strong Effect of the Ion Sign on the Thermochemistry of Hydrogen Bonded Aqueous Clusters of Identical Chemical Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey B. Nadykto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The sign preference of hydrogen bonded aqueous ionic clusters Χ±(H2Oi (n =1-5, Χ = F; Cl; Br has been investigated using the Density Functional Theory and ab initio MP2 method. The present study indicates the anomalously large difference in formation free energies between cations and anions of identical chemical composition. The effect of vibrational anharmonicity on stepwise Gibbs free energy changes has been investigated, and possible uncertainties associated with the harmonic treatment of vibrational spectra have been discussed.

  7. Fluorescent sensors based on quinoline-containing styrylcyanine: determination of ferric ions, hydrogen peroxide, and glucose, pH-sensitive properties and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Zhao, Peiliang; Qu, Jinqing; Liu, Ruiyuan

    2015-08-01

    A novel styrylcyanine-based fluorescent probe 1 was designed and synthesized via facile methods. Ferric ions quenched the fluorescence of probe 1, whereas the addition of ferrous ions led to only small changes in the fluorescence signal. When hydrogen peroxide was introduced into the solution containing probe 1 and Fe(2+) , Fe(2+) was oxidized to Fe(3+), resulting in the quenching of the fluorescence. The probe 1/Fe(2+) solution fluorescence could also be quenched by H2 O2 released from glucose oxidation by glucose oxidase (GOD), which means that probe 1/Fe(2+) platform could be used to detect glucose. Probe 1 is fluorescent in basic and neutral media but almost non-fluorescent in strong acidic environments. Such behaviour enables it to work as a fluorescent pH sensor in both the solution and solid states and as a chemosensor for detecting volatile organic compounds with high acidity and basicity. Subsequently, the fluorescence microscopic images of probe 1 in live cells and in zebrafish were achieved successfully, suggesting that the probe has good cell membrane permeability and a potential application for imaging in living cells and living organisms. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. An intravenous clarithromycin lipid emulsion with a high drug loading, H-bonding and a hydrogen-bonded ion pair complex exhibiting excellent antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyu Gong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop an intravenous clarithromycin lipid emulsion (CLE with good stability and excellent antibacterial activity. The CLE was prepared by the thin-film dispersed homogenization method. The interaction between clarithromycin (CLA and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHEMS was confirmed by DSC, FT-IR and 1H NMR analysis. The interfacial drug loading, thermal sterilization, freeze–thaw stability, and in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity were investigated systematically. DSC, FT-IR and 1H NMR spectra showed that CHEMS (CLA: CHEMS, M ratio 1:2 could interact with CLA through H-bonding and a hydrogen-bonded ion pair. The CHEMS was found necessary to maintain the stability of CLE. Ultracentrifugation showed that almost 88% CLA could be loaded into the interfacial layer. The optimized CLE formulation could withstand autoclaving at 121 °C for 10 min and remain stable after three freeze–thaw cycles. The in vitro susceptibility test revealed that the CLA–CHEMS ion-pair and CLE have similar activity to the parent drug against many different bacterial strains. The in vivo antibacterial activity showed that the ED50 of intravenous CLE was markedly lower than that of CLA solution administrated orally. CLE exhibited pronounced antibacterial activity and might be a candidate for a new nanocarrier for CLA with potential advantages over the current commercial formulation.

  9. Energy conservation by oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen via a sodium ion current in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae Kyu; Mayer, Florian; Kang, Sung Gyun; Müller, Volker

    2014-08-05

    Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 is known to grow by the anaerobic oxidation of formate to CO2 and H2, a reaction that operates near thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we demonstrate that this reaction is coupled to ATP synthesis by a transmembrane ion current. Formate oxidation leads to H(+) translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane that then drives Na(+) translocation. The ion-translocating electron transfer system is rather simple, consisting of only a formate dehydrogenase module, a membrane-bound hydrogenase module, and a multisubunit Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module. The electrochemical Na(+) gradient established then drives ATP synthesis. These data give a mechanistic explanation for chemiosmotic energy conservation coupled to formate oxidation to CO2 and H2. Because it is discussed that the membrane-bound hydrogenase with the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module are ancestors of complex I of mitochondrial and bacterial electron transport these data also shed light on the evolution of ion transport in complex I-like electron transport chains.

  10. Ion-pairing of phosphonium salts in solution: C-H⋅⋅⋅halogen and C-H⋅⋅⋅π hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, Johannes; Nolte, Christoph; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Thallmair, Sebastian; Mayer, Peter; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Mayr, Herbert

    2013-10-18

    The (1) H NMR chemical shifts of the C(α)H protons of arylmethyl triphenylphosphonium ions in CD2 Cl2 solution strongly depend on the counteranions X(-) . The values for the benzhydryl derivatives Ph2 CHPPh3 (+)  X(-) , for example, range from δH =8.25 (X(-) =Cl(-) ) over 6.23 (X(-) =BF4 (-) ) to 5.72 ppm (X(-) =BPh4 (-) ). Similar, albeit weaker, counterion-induced shifts are observed for the ortho-protons of all aryl groups. Concentration-dependent NMR studies show that the large shifts result from the deshielding of the protons by the anions, which decreases in the order Cl(-) > Br(-) ≫ BF4 (-) > SbF6 (-) . For the less bulky derivatives PhCH2 PPh3 (+)  X(-) , we also find CH⋅⋅⋅Ph interactions between C(α)H and a phenyl group of the BPh4 (-) anion, which result in upfield NMR chemical shifts of the C(α)H protons. These interactions could also be observed in crystals of (p-CF3 -C6 H4 )CH2 PPh3 (+)  BPh4 (-) . However, the dominant effects causing the counterion-induced shifts in the NMR spectra are the CH⋅⋅⋅X(-) hydrogen bonds between the phosphonium ion and anions, in particular Cl(-) or Br(-) . This observation contradicts earlier interpretations which assigned these shifts predominantly to the ring current of the BPh4 (-) anions. The concentration dependence of the (1) H NMR chemical shifts allowed us to determine the dissociation constants of the phosphonium salts in CD2 Cl2 solution. The cation-anion interactions increase with the acidity of the C(α)H protons and the basicity of the anion. The existence of CH⋅⋅⋅X(-) hydrogen bonds between the cations and anions is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations of the ion pair structures, as well as by X-ray analyses of the crystals. The IR spectra of the Cl(-) and Br(-) salts in CD2 Cl2 solution show strong red-shifts of the CH stretch bands. The CH stretch bands of the tetrafluoroborate salt PhCH2 PPh3 (+)  BF4 (-) in CD2 Cl2

  11. Sub microsecond notching of a negative hydrogen beam at low energy utilizing a magnetron ion source with a split extractor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moehs, Douglas; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A technique for sub-microsecond beam notching is being developed at 20 keV utilizing a Magnetron ion source with a slit extraction system and a split extractor. Each half of the extractor is treated as part of a 50 ohm transmission line which can be pulsed at {+-}700 volts creating a 1400 volt gradient. This system along with the associated electronics is electrically floated on top of a pulsed extraction voltage. A beam reduction of 95% has been observed at the end of the Fermilab 400 MeV Linac and 35% notching has recently been achieved in the Booster.

  12. Intense-laser-field ionization of the hydrogen molecular ions H2+ and D2+ at critical internuclear distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavicić, D; Kiess, A; Hänsch, T W; Figger, H

    2005-04-29

    Fragmentation of H2+ and D2+ in ion beams has been studied with short intense laser pulses (100 fs, I=5x10(13)-1x10(15) W/cm2) and by a high-resolution two-dimensional velocity imaging technique. In the Coulomb explosion channel, at intensities just above the threshold for this process, we observe a clear structure in the kinetic energy spectra not previously found or predicted. The peaks can be attributed to single vibrational levels. We interpret this observation as a dissociative allocation of the electron to a proton followed by enhanced ionization at a well-defined "critical" overstretched internuclear distance. When using longer pulses we observe three separate Coulomb explosion velocity groups corresponding to critical distances of about 8, 11, and 15 a.u.

  13. Combination of cupric ion with hydroxylamine and hydrogen peroxide for the control of bacterial biofilms on RO membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Eun; Lee, Changha

    2017-03-01

    Combinations of Cu(II) with hydroxylamine (HA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (i.e., Cu(II)/HA, Cu(II)/H2O2, and Cu(II)/HA/H2O2 systems) were investigated for the control of P. aeruginosa biofilms on reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. These Cu(II)-based disinfection systems effectively inactivated P. aeruginosa cells, exhibiting different behaviors depending on the state of bacterial cells (planktonic or biofilm) and the condition of biofilm growth and treatment (normal or pressurized condition). The Cu(II)/HA and Cu(II)/HA/H2O2 systems were the most effective reagents for the inactivation of planktonic cells. However, these systems were not effective in inactivating cells in biofilms on the RO membranes possibly due to the interactions of Cu(I) with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), where biofilms were grown and treated in center for disease control (CDC) reactors. Different from the results using CDC reactors, in a pressurized cross-flow RO filtration unit, the Cu(II)/HA/H2O2 treatment significantly inactivated biofilm cells formed on the RO membranes, successfully recovering the permeate flux reduced by the biofouling. The pretreatment of feed solutions by Cu(II)/HA and Cu(II)/HA/H2O2 systems (applied before the biofilm formation) effectively mitigated the permeate flux decline by preventing the biofilm growth on the RO membranes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of UV/hydrogen peroxide and UV/peroxydisulfate processes for the degradation of humic acid in the presence of halide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiaoyi; Xiao, Dongxue; Fang, Changling; Wang, Zhaohui; Liu, Jianshe; Guo, Yaoguang; Lu, Shuyu

    2016-03-01

    This study compared the behaviors of two classic advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), hydroxyl radical-based AOPs ((•)OH-based AOPs) and sulfate radical-based AOPs (SO4 (•-)-based AOPs), represented by UV/ hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and UV/peroxydisulfate (PDS) systems, respectively, to degrade humic acid (HA) in the presence of halide ions (Cl(-) and Br(-)). The effects of different operational parameters, such as oxidant dosages, halide ions concentration, and pH on HA degradation were investigated in UV/H2O2/Cl(-), UV/PDS/Cl(-), UV/H2O2/Br(-), and UV/PDS/Br(-) processes. It was found that the oxidation capacity of H2O2 and PDS to HA degradation in the presence of halides was nearly in the same order. High dosage of peroxides would lead to an increase in HA removal while excess dosage would slightly inhibit the efficiency. Both Cl(-) and Br(-) would have depressing impact on the two AOPs, but the inhibiting effect of Br(-) was more obvious than that of Cl(-), even the concentration of Cl(-) was far above that of Br(-). The increasing pH would have an adverse effect on HA decomposition in UV/H2O2 system, whereas there was no significant impact of pH in UV/PDS process. Furthermore, infrared spectrometer was used to provide the information of degraded HA in UV/H2O2/Cl(-), UV/PDS/Cl(-), UV/H2O2/Br(-), and UV/PDS/Br(-) processes, and halogenated byproducts were identified in using GC-MS analysis in the four processes. The present research might have significant technical implications on water treatment using advanced oxidation technologies.

  15. Protective effect of metallothionein to ras DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide and ferric ion-nitrilotriacetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, K S; Nishida, K; Onosaka, S

    1999-11-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is a strong antioxidant, due to a large number of thiol groups in the MT molecule and MT has been found in the nucleus. To investigate whether MT can directly protect DNA from damage induced by hydroxyl radical, the effects of MTs on DNA strand scission due to incubation with ferric ion-nitrilotriacetic acid and H2O2 (Fe3+ -NTA/H2O2) were studied. The Fe3+-NTA/H2O2 resulted in a higher rate of deoxyribose degradation, compared to incubation of Fe3+/H2O2, presumably mediated by the formation of hydroxyl radicals (*OH). This degradation was inhibited by either Zn-MT or Cd-MT, but not by Zn2+ or Cd2+ at similar concentrations. The Fe3+ -NTA/H2O2 resulted in a concentration dependent of increase in DNA strand scission. Damage to the sugar-phosphodiester chain was predominant over chemical modifications of the base moieties. Incubation with either Zn-MT or Cd-MT inhibited DNA damage by approximately 50%. Preincubation of MT with EDTA and N-ethylmaleimide, to alkylate sulfhydryl groups of MT, resulted in MT that was no longer able to inhibit DNA damage. These results indicates that MT can protect DNA from hydroxyl radical attack and that the cysteine thiol groups of MT may be involved in its nuclear antioxidant properties.

  16. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Y. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  17. The 100th anniversary of pH (1909-2009. Negative logarithms for measuring hydrogen ions: are they essential in medicine? Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Sgambato

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been 100 years since the concept of pH (1909-2009 was ‘‘invented’’ by the Danish chemist-mathematician Søren Peter Lauritz Sørensen (1868-1939 in the chemistry laboratories of the Carlsberg Brewery in Copenhagen. The anniversary provides an opportunity to examine the crucial importance in human life of acid-base balance. Materials and methods: The authors review the historical process that led to the creation of the pH scale, with citation of passages from the original work of Sørensen published 100 years ago. This is followed by a critical analysis of the debate regarding the use of logarithmstomeasure hydrogen ion concentrations based on data from scientific papers published over the past 50 years (1960-2010. Results and discussion: The authors conclude that the concept of acid-base balance can be approached and taught in a simpler, more exciting, and even pleasant fashion without using the infamous and abstruse Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. The whole rationale underlying the understanding and clinical application of this vital topic is clearly and unquestionably inherent simpler, more manageable formula introduced by Henderson (without logs, which is useful and quite adequate for use in medical education.

  18. Potential sputtering of protons from hydrogen- and H sub 2 O-terminated Si(1 0 0) surfaces with slow highly charged ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroki, K; Yamazaki, Y

    2003-01-01

    A potential sputtering mechanism of hydrogen has been studied for impacts of slow highly charged Xe sup q sup + ions (<5 keV, q=4-12) on well-defined H-terminated and water-saturated Si(1 0 0) surfaces. It was found that the sputtering yields of protons were proportional to q supgamma (gamma approx 5) for both the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H and Si(1 0 0)1x1-H surfaces, although the absolute yield for the Si(1 0 0)1x1-H surface was 10 times larger than that for the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H surface, i.e. the sputtering efficiency per one H-Si bond for the Si(1 0 0)1x1-H surface is five times larger that for the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H surface. The proton sputtering efficiency from a H-O-Si bond was extracted from measurements of the water-saturated surface, which was approx 8 times larger than the H-Si bond of the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H surface. An effective distance of the proton from its substrate was proposed to be the key parameter to govern the yield, which also influences the energy distributions of sputtered protons. These findings are con...

  19. Evolution of heavy ions (He{sup 2+}, H{sup +}) radiolytic yield of molecular hydrogen vs. ''Track-Segment'' LET values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crumiere, Francis; Vandenborre, Johan; Blain, Guillaume; Fattahi, Massoud [Nantes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). SUBATECH Unite Mixte de Recherche 6457; Haddad, Ferid [Nantes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). SUBATECH Unite Mixte de Recherche 6457; Cyclotron Arronax, Saint Herblain (France)

    2017-08-01

    Ionizing radiation's effects onto water molecules lead to the ionization and/or the excitation of them. Then, these phenomena are followed by the formation of radicals and molecular products. The linear energy transfer (LET), which defines the energy deposition density along the radiation length, is different according to the nature of ionizing particles. Thus, the values of radiolytic yields, defined as the number of radical and molecular products formed or consumed by unit of deposited energy, evolve according to this parameter. This work consists in following the evolution of radiolytic yield of molecular hydrogen and ferric ions according to the ''Track-Segment'' LET of ionizing particles (protons, helions). Concerning G(Fe{sup 3+}) values, it seems that the energy deposited into the Bragg peak does not play the main role for the Fe{sup 3+} radiolytic formation, whereas for the G(H{sub 2}) it is the case with a component around 40% of the Bragg peak in the dihydrogen production. Therefore, as main results of this work, for high energetic Helion and Proton beams, the G(Fe{sup 3+}) values, which can be used for further dosimetry studies for example during the α radiolysis experiments, and the primary g(H{sub 2}) values for the Track-Segment LET, which can be used to determine the dihydrogen production by α-emitters, are published.

  20. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented.

  1. High-resolution measurement of the time-modulated orbital electron capture and of the $\\beta^+$ decay of hydrogen-like $^{142}$Pm$^{60+}$ ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kienle, P; Bosch, F; Boutin, D; Brandau, C; Bühler, P; Dillmann, I; Dimopoulou, Ch; Faestermann, T; Geissel, H; Hess, R; Hillebrand, P M; Ivanova, V; Izumikawa, T; Knöbel, R; Kurcewicz, J; Kuzminchuk, N; Lestinsky, M; Litvinov, S A; Litvinov, Yu A; Maier, L; Ma, X X W; Mazzocco, M; Mukha, I; Nociforo, C; Nolden, F; Ohtsubo. T; Sanjari, M S; Scheidenberger, Ch; Shubina, D B; Spillmann, U; Steck, M; Stöhlker, Th; Sun, B H; Suzaki, F; Suzuki, T; Torilov, S.Yu; Trassinelli, M; Tu, X L; Wang, M; Weick, H; Winckler, N; Winters, D F F A; Winters, N; Woods, P P J; Yamaguchi, T; Yan, X L; Zhang, G G L

    2013-01-01

    The periodic time modulations, found recently in the two-body orbital electron-capture (EC) decay of both, hydrogen-like $^{140}$Pr$^{58+}$ and $^{142}$Pm$^{60+}$ ions, with periods near to 7s and amplitudes of about 20%, were re-investigated for the case of $^{142}$Pm$^{60+}$ by using a 245 MHz resonator cavity with a much improved sensitivity and time resolution. We observed that the exponential EC decay is modulated with a period $T = 7.11(11)$s, in accordance with a modulation period $T = 7.12(11)$ s as obtained from simultaneous observations with a capacitive pick-up, employed also in the previous experiments. The modulation amplitudes amount to $a_R = 0.107(24)$ and $a_P = 0.134(27)$ for the 245 MHz resonator and the capacitive pick-up, respectively. These new results corroborate for both detectors {\\it exactly} our previous findings of modulation periods near to 7s, though with {\\it distinctly smaller} amplitudes. Also the three-body $\\beta^+$ decays have been analyzed. For a supposed modulation period...

  2. Indigo Carmine-Cu complex probe exhibiting dual colorimetric/fluorimetric sensing for selective determination of mono hydrogen phosphate ion and its logic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Moaddeli, Ali; Asghari, Khadijeh

    2017-08-01

    A new selective probe based on copper complex of Indigo Carmine (IC-Cu2) for colorimetric, naked-eye, and fluorimetric recognition of mono hydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion in H2O/DMSO (4:1 v/v, 1.0 mmol L- 1 HEPES buffer solution pH 7.5) was developed. Detection limit of HPO42 - determination, achieved by fluorimetric and 3lorimetric method, are 0.071 and 1.46 μmol L- 1, respectively. Potential, therefore is clearly available in IC-Cu2 complex to detect HPO42 - in micromolar range via dual visible color change and fluorescence response. Present method shows high selectivity toward HPO42 - over other phosphate species and other anions and was successfully utilized for analysis of P2O5 content of a fertilizer sample. The results obtained by proposed chemosensor presented good agreement with those obtained the colorimetric reference method. INHIBIT and IMPLICATION logic gates operating at molecular level have been achieved using Cu2 + and HPO42 - as chemical inputs and UV-Vis absorbance signal as output.

  3. Influence of the pH on molecular hydrogen primary yields in He{sup 2+} ion tracks in liquid water. A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobut, Vincent [Departement de Chimie, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 5 Mail Gay-Lussac, Neuville/Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise Cedex (France)]. E-mail: vincent.cobut@chim.u-cergy.fr; Corbel, Catherine [CEA-Saclay, DSM/DRECAM/SCM/Laboratoire de Radiolyse, Bat. 546, Piece 5, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Patau, Jean Paul [Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Paul-Sabatier, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2005-02-01

    Monte Carlo calculations are performed to investigate how the acidity of aqueous solutions at room temperature affects the molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) yield as a function of time in 20 MeV-He{sup 2+} ion track segments. For pH values varying from 1 to 13, the time dependence of the calculated yields is nearly independent of pH in the time range 10{sup -12}-10{sup -8} s and only weakly dependent in the time range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} s. To understand this behaviour, the kinetic mechanisms governing H{sub 2} formation are examined as a function of time. It is found that the main reactions responsible for the H{sub 2} yield as a function of time are strongly pH-dependent at low and high pH values. The pH-dependences of the reaction yields are however such that the variations in the yields compensate each other. This is why the time dependence of the H{sub 2} yield is only weakly pH-dependent.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide - cysteine cycle system enhances cadmium tolerance through alleviating cadmium-induced oxidative stress and ion toxicity in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Honglei; Wang, Xiaofeng; Dou, Yanhua; Liu, Dan; Si, Wantong; Fang, Hao; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Shaolin; Xi, Jiejun; Li, Jisheng

    2016-12-22

    Cadmium (Cd2+) is a common toxic heavy metal ion. We investigated the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and cysteine (Cys) in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The expression of H2S synthetic genes LCD and DES1 were induced by Cd2+ within 3 h, and endogenous H2S was then rapidly released. H2S promoted the expression of Cys synthesis-related genes SAT1 and OASA1, which led to endogenous Cys accumulation. The H2S and Cys cycle system was stimulated by Cd2+ stress, and it maintained high levels in plant cells. H2S inhibited the ROS burst by inducing alternative respiration capacity (AP) and antioxidase activity. H2S weakened Cd2+ toxicity by inducing the metallothionein (MTs) genes expression. Cys promoted GSH accumulation and inhibited the ROS burst, and GSH induced the expression of phytochelatin (PCs) genes, counteracting Cd2+ toxicity. In summary, the H2S and Cys cycle system played a key role in plant responses to Cd2+ stress. The Cd2+ tolerance was weakened when the cycle system was blocked in lcddes1-1 and oasa1 mutants. This paper is the first to describe the role of the H2S and Cys cycle system in Cd2+ stress and to explore the relevant and specificity mechanisms of H2S and Cys in mediating Cd2+ stress.

  5. Effects of hydrogen additive on obtaining residue-free reactive ion etching of [beta]-SiC in fluorinated plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yih, P.H.; Steckl, A.J. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the formation and prevention of residues during long-term reactive ion etching (RIE) of [beta]-SiC thin films in a variety of fluorinated gas plasmas mixed with oxygen: CHF[sub 3], CF[sub 4], SF[sub 6], and NF[sub 3]. Without the addition of H[sub 2], all fluorinated plasmas produced significant residue for mixtures with O[sub 2] ranging from 0 to 90%. Only NF[sub 3] and CHF[sub 3] at 0% O[sub 2] showed a low level, or the absence, of residues. The introduction of a relatively small amount of H[sub 2] additive was observed to prevent residue formation in the etched region during the process. In CHF[sub 3] etching, [approximately]10% H[sub 2] was sufficient to prevent residues at all values of O[sub 2]%. A significantly larger (>10%) amount of H[sub 2] is required to prevent residue formation in CF[sub 4]/O[sub 2], SF[sub 6]/O[sub 2], and NF[sub 3]/O[sub 2] plasma. For these gases, the required H[sub 2] additive concentration increases as the oxygen decreases, reaching a maximum for 10% O[sub 2]. Optimum RIE conditions in different fluorinated gas plasmas are presented for SiC homojunction and heterojunction device fabrication. The effects of covering the powered electrode with graphite or Kapton sheets on residue formation and etch rates were investigated with a variety of fluorinated gas plasmas. The mechanisms of residue formation and prevention through the addition of H[sub 2] are discussed.

  6. Raman and DFT Study on N-H+…Cl- Hydrogen Bonding in 1,1,3,3-Tetra-Methylguanidinium Chloride forming an Ion-pair Molecule in the Vapor Phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    that dimeric molecular ion pairs with four N-H+…Cl- hydrogen bonds seem to exist also in the solutions, and probably are responsible for the relatively high solubility of the “salt” in ethanol. The “salt” can be easily sublimed at about 200-230 oC. The Raman spectrum of the vapor at 225 ºC has a characteristic...... strong band at 2229 cm-1 that shows that the gas phase consists of monomeric ion pair “molecules” (Fig.2) held together by one N-H+…Cl- hydrogen bond, the stretching band of which is causing the band (Fig.3).......The chemistry of 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidinium ([TMGH]+) chloride, a low temperature (molten) ionic liquid, is discussed, based on its Raman spectra associated with ab initio molecular orbital DFT-type quantum mechanical calculations (with 6-311+G(d,p) basis sets) on “molecules” in isolated...

  7. Hydrogen and copper ion induced molecular reorganizations in two new scorpiand-like ligands appended with pyridine rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Salvador; Verdejo, Begoña; Clares, M Paz; Castillo, Carmen E; Algarra, Andrés G; Latorre, Julio; Máñez, M Angeles; Basallote, Manuel G; Soriano, Conxa; García-España, Enrique

    2010-08-02

    The synthesis of two new ligands constituted of a tris(2-aminoethyl)amine moiety linked to the 2,6 positions of a pyridine spacer through methylene groups in which the hanging arm is further functionalized with a 2-pycolyl (L1) or 3-pycolyl (L2) group is presented. The protonation of L1 and L2 and formation of Cu(2+) complexes have been studied using potentiometric, NMR, X-ray, and kinetic experiments. The results provide new information about the relevance of molecular movements in the chemistry of this kind of so-called scorpiand ligand. The comparison between these two ligands that only differ in the position of the substituent at the arm reveals important differences in both thermodynamic and kinetic properties. The Cu(2+) complex with L1 is several orders of magnitude more stable than that with L2, surely because in the latter case the pyridine nitrogen at the pendant arm is unable to coordinate to the metal ion with the ligand acting as hexadentate, a possibility that occurs in the case of [CuL1](2+), as demonstrated by its crystal structure. Significant differences are also found between both ligands in the kinetic studies of complex formation and decomposition. For L1, those processes occur in a single kinetic step, whereas for L2 they occur with the formation of a detectable reaction intermediate whose structure corresponds to that resulting from the movement typical of scorpiands. Another interesting conclusion derived from kinetic studies on complex formation is that the reactive form of the ligand is H(3)L(3+) for L1 and H(2)L(2+) for L2. DFT calculations are also reported, and they allow a rationalization of the kinetic results relative to the reactive forms of the ligands in the process of complex formation. In addition, they provide a full picture of the mechanistic pathway leading to the formation of the first Cu-N bond, including outer-sphere complexation, water dissociation, and reorganization of the outer-sphere complex.

  8. Allylammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażej Dziuk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title hydrated molecular salt, C3H8N+·C2HO4−·0.5H2O, the water O atom lies on a crystallographic twofold axis. The C=C—C—N torsion angle in the cation is 2.8 (3° and the dihedral angle between the CO2 and CO2H planes in the anion is 1.0 (4°. In the crystal, the hydrogen oxalate ions are linked by O—H...O hydrogen bonds, generating [010] chains. The allylammonium cations bond to the chains through N—H...O and N—H...(O,O hydrogen bonds. The water molecule accepts two N—H...O hydrogen bonds and makes two O—H...O hydrogen bonds. Together, the hydrogen bonds generate (100 sheets.

  9. Fabrication of Yb:Sc2O3 transparent ceramics from co-precipitated nanopowders: The effect of ammonium hydrogen carbonate to metal ions molar ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhengfa; Liu, Qiang; Hreniak, Dariusz; Dai, Jiawei; Wang, Wei; Li, Jiang

    2018-01-01

    5 at%Yb:Sc2O3 transparent ceramics were fabricated by the co-precipitation and vacuum sintering method. NH4HCO3 and (NH4)2SO4 were used as precipitant and dispersing agent in the precipitation process, respectively. The influence of ammonium hydrogen carbonate to metal ions molar ratio (R value) on the morphology, agglomeration of resultant powders and the optical quality of transparent ceramics was investigated systematically. It was found that all the calcined powders synthesized with different R values exhibited same phase. The morphology of the precursors and calcined powders was investigated by FESEM, and the results show that the R value has a significant influence on the morphology of 5 at%Yb:Sc2O3 precursors and calcined powders. The precursors and resultant powders exhibit a severe agglomeration with R = 4.4 and 4.8. Using these powders as starting materials, 5 at%Yb:Sc2O3 transparent ceramics were successfully fabricated by vacuum sintering at 1850 °C for 10 h. There is only little difference in optical transmittances of 5 at%Yb:Sc2O3 ceramics with R value within the 3.2-4.0 range. The ceramic sample with R = 4.0 possesses the best optical quality with the in-line transmittance of 71.9% at the wavelength of 1100 nm. The microstructures of the 5 at%Yb:Sc2O3 transparent ceramics with different R values were also investigated.

  10. Modeling the adsorption of hydrogen, sodium, chloride and phthalate on goethite using a strict charge-neutral ion-exchange theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndu, Udonna

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous adsorption modeling of four ions was predicted with a strict net charge-neutral ion-exchange theory and its corresponding equilibrium and mass balance equations. An important key to the success of this approach was the proper collection of all the data, particularly the proton adsorption data, and the inclusion of variable concentrations of conjugate ions from the experimental pH adjustments. Using IExFit software, the ion-exchange model used here predicted the competitive retention of several ions on goethite by assuming that the co-adsorption or desorption of all ions occurred in the correct stoichiometries needed to maintain electroneutrality. This approach also revealed that the retention strength of Cl− ions on goethite increases in the presence of phthalate ions. That is, an anion-anion enhancement effect was observed. The retention of Cl− ions was much weaker than phthalate ions, and this also resulted in a higher sensitivity of the Cl− ions toward minor variations in the surface reactivity. The proposed model uses four goethite surface sites. The drop in retention of phthalate ions at low pH was fully described here as resulting from competitive Cl− reactions, which were introduced in increasing concentrations into the matrix as the conjugate base to the acid added to lower the pH. PMID:28464020

  11. Modeling the adsorption of hydrogen, sodium, chloride and phthalate on goethite using a strict charge-neutral ion-exchange theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian P Schulthess

    Full Text Available Simultaneous adsorption modeling of four ions was predicted with a strict net charge-neutral ion-exchange theory and its corresponding equilibrium and mass balance equations. An important key to the success of this approach was the proper collection of all the data, particularly the proton adsorption data, and the inclusion of variable concentrations of conjugate ions from the experimental pH adjustments. Using IExFit software, the ion-exchange model used here predicted the competitive retention of several ions on goethite by assuming that the co-adsorption or desorption of all ions occurred in the correct stoichiometries needed to maintain electroneutrality. This approach also revealed that the retention strength of Cl- ions on goethite increases in the presence of phthalate ions. That is, an anion-anion enhancement effect was observed. The retention of Cl- ions was much weaker than phthalate ions, and this also resulted in a higher sensitivity of the Cl- ions toward minor variations in the surface reactivity. The proposed model uses four goethite surface sites. The drop in retention of phthalate ions at low pH was fully described here as resulting from competitive Cl- reactions, which were introduced in increasing concentrations into the matrix as the conjugate base to the acid added to lower the pH.

  12. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8–12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupriiyanova, Y.E., E-mail: fomenkoj@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Bryk, V.V.; Borodin, O.V.; Kalchenko, A.S.; Voyevodin, V.N.; Tolstolutskaya, G.D. [National Science Centre Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 1, Akademicheskaya St., Kharkov, 61108 (Ukraine); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe–Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr{sup +3}, 40 keV He{sup +}, and 20 keV H{sup +}. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  13. Stark effect in a hydrogenic atom or ion treated by the phase-integral method with adjoined papers by A. Hökback and P. O. Fröman

    CERN Document Server

    Fröman, Nanny

    2008-01-01

    This book treats the Stark effect of a hydrogenic atom or ion in a homogeneous electric field. It begins with a thorough review of previous work in this field since 1926. After the Schrödinger equation has been separated with respect to time dependence, centre of mass motion and internal motion, followed by a discussion of its eigenfunctions, the exact development in time of the probability amplitude for a decaying state is obtained by means of a formula analogous to the Fock-Krylov theorem. From this formula one obtains by means of the phase-integral approximation generated from a particular

  14. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  15. Collision-Induced Dissociation Study of Strong Hydrogen-Bonded Cluster Ions Y−(HF)n (Y=F, O2) Using Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with a HF Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kenya; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) was produced by a homemade HF generator in order to investigate the properties of strong hydrogen-bonded clusters such as (HF)n. The HF molecules were ionized in the form of complex ions associated with the negative core ions Y− produced by atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI). The use of APCDI in combination with the homemade HF generator led to the formation of negative-ion HF clusters Y−(HF)n (Y=F, O2), where larger clusters with n≥4 were not detected. The mechanisms for the formation of the HF, F−(HF)n, and O2−(HF)n species were discussed from the standpoints of the HF generator and APCDI MS. By performing energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments on the cluster ions F−(HF)n (n=1–3), the energies for the loss of HF from F−(HF)3, F−(HF)2, and F−(HF) were evaluated to be 1 eV or lower, 1 eV or higher, and 2 eV, respectively, on the basis of their center-of-mass energy (ECM). These ECM values were consistent with the values of 0.995, 1.308, and 2.048 eV, respectively, obtained by ab initio calculations. The stability of [O2(HF)n]− (n=1–4) was discussed on the basis of the bond lengths of O2H–F−(HF)n and O2−H–F(HF)n obtained by ab initio calculations. The calculations indicated that [O2(HF)4]− separated into O2H and F−(HF)3. PMID:28966900

  16. Collision-Induced Dissociation Study of Strong Hydrogen-Bonded Cluster Ions Y-(HF) n (Y=F, O2) Using Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge Ionization Mass Spectrometry Combined with a HF Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kenya; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) was produced by a homemade HF generator in order to investigate the properties of strong hydrogen-bonded clusters such as (HF) n . The HF molecules were ionized in the form of complex ions associated with the negative core ions Y - produced by atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI). The use of APCDI in combination with the homemade HF generator led to the formation of negative-ion HF clusters Y - (HF) n (Y=F, O 2 ), where larger clusters with n ≥4 were not detected. The mechanisms for the formation of the HF, F - (HF) n , and O 2 - (HF) n species were discussed from the standpoints of the HF generator and APCDI MS. By performing energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments on the cluster ions F - (HF) n ( n =1-3), the energies for the loss of HF from F - (HF) 3 , F - (HF) 2 , and F - (HF) were evaluated to be 1 eV or lower, 1 eV or higher, and 2 eV, respectively, on the basis of their center-of-mass energy ( E CM ). These E CM values were consistent with the values of 0.995, 1.308, and 2.048 eV, respectively, obtained by ab initio calculations. The stability of [O 2 (HF) n ] - ( n =1-4) was discussed on the basis of the bond lengths of O 2 H-F - (HF) n and O 2 - H-F(HF) n obtained by ab initio calculations. The calculations indicated that [O 2 (HF) 4 ] - separated into O 2 H and F - (HF) 3 .

  17. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  18. Evidence for site-specific intra-ionic hydrogen/deuterium exchange in the low-energy collision-induced dissociation product ion spectra of protonated small molecules generated by electrospray ionisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Stephen W; Wright, Patricia; Wells, Neil J; Langley, G John

    2010-04-01

    The experimental investigation of site-specific intra-ionic hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange in the low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) product ion spectra of protonated small molecules generated by electrospray ionisation (ESI) is presented. The observation of intra-ionic H/D exchange in such ions under low-energy CID conditions has hitherto been rarely reported. The data suggest that the intra-ionic H/D exchange takes place in a site-specific manner between the ionising deuteron, localised at either a tertiary amine or a tertiary amine-N-oxide, and a gamma-hydrogen relative to the nitrogen atom. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy measurements showed that no H/D exchange takes place in solution, indicating that the reaction occurs in the gas phase. The compounds analysed in this study suggested that electron-withdrawing groups bonded to the carbon atom bearing the gamma-hydrogen can preclude exchange. The effect of the electron-withdrawing group appears dependent upon its electronegativity, with lower chi value groups still allowing exchange to take place. However, the limited dataset available in this study prevented robust conclusions being drawn regarding the effect of the electron-withdrawing group. The observation of site-specific intra-ionic H/D exchange has application in the area of structural elucidation, where it could be used to introduce an isotopic label into the carbon skeleton of a molecule containing specific structural features. This could increase the throughput, and minimise the cost, of such studies due to the obviation of the need to produce a deuterium-labelled analogue by synthetic means. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Crystal structure of tris(piperidinium hydrogen sulfate sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara J. Lukianova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecular salt, 3C5H12N+·HSO4−·SO42−, each cation adopts a chair conformation. In the crystal, the hydrogen sulfate ion is connected to the sulfate ion by a strong O—H...O hydrogen bond. The packing also features a number of N—H...O hydrogen bonds, which lead to a three-dimensional network structure. The hydrogen sulfate anion accepts four hydrogen bonds from two cations, whereas the sulfate ion, as an acceptor, binds to five separate piperidinium cations, forming seven hydrogen bonds.

  20. Polar Aprotic Modifiers for Chromatographic Separation and Back-Exchange Reduction for Protein Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Monitored by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeja, Santosh G.; Emmett, Mark R.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry is an important non-perturbing tool to study protein structure and protein–protein interactions. However, water in the reversed-phase liquid chromatography mobile phase leads to back-exchange of D for H during chromatographic separation of proteolytic peptides following H/D exchange, resulting in incorrect identification of fast-exchanging hydrogens as unexchanged hydrogens. Previously, fast high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography have been shown to decrease back-exchange. Here, we show that replacement of up to 40% of the water in the LC mobile phase by the modifiers, dimethylformamide (DMF) and N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP) (i.e., polar organic modifiers that lack rapid exchanging hydrogens), significantly reduces back-exchange. On-line LC micro-ESI FT-ICR MS resolves overlapped proteolytic peptide isotopic distributions, allowing for quantitative determination of the extent of back-exchange. The DMF modified solvent composition also improves chromatographic separation while reducing back-exchange relative to conventional solvent. PMID:22298288

  1. Hydrogen ion study by incoherent scatter (IS) method: comparison of results taken by Kharkov IS radar with data from Arecibo and Millstone Hill radars, atmosphere explorer satellites and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, V. I.; Grigorenko, Ye. I.

    2003-04-01

    Investigation of hydrogen ion behavior in topside ionosphere with the Kharkov IS radar is conducted by the POLITE CEDAR program. Program aim is the study of flight ion morphology and dynamics for refinement of the global topside ionosphere models and forecast of the 'space weather'. In this paper, the H+ density data of radars at Kharkov, Arecibo and Millstone Hill are compared at altitudes up to 1000-1300 km for winter and summer, minimum and maximum of solar activity. The measurements showed that height and diurnal variations of H+ concentration over eastern and western hemispheres were generally in close agreement, It is revealed a strong longitudinal variation of H+ ion fraction that is accounted for different magnetic flux tube volumes due to the offset between the geographic and geomagnetic poles. The Kharkov radar data are also compared with results taken from the Atmosphere Explorer (AE) database and FLIP model calculations, for midlatitude region, noon and midnight local time, at solar minimum. Comparisons show that H+ height distributions good agrees and corresponds close conditions of ionosphere-plasmasphere interaction. At the same time the model and AE data are lower than mesaured densities at Kharkov that can be explained by geophysical condition difference.

  2. A novel high energy hybrid Li-ion capacitor with a three-dimensional hierarchical ternary nanostructure of hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanoparticles/conductive polymer/carbon nanotubes anode and an activated carbon cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gang; Cao, Liujun; Xiao, Peng; Zhang, Yunhuai; Liu, Hao

    2017-07-01

    Lithium ion capacitors (LICs) are considered to be high-performance energy storage devices that have stimulated intense attention to bridge the gap between lithium ion battery and supercapacitor. Currently, the major challenge for LICs has been to improve the energy density without sacrificing the high rate of power output performance. Herein, we designed a three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical porous nanostructure of hydrogen-treated TiO2 nanoparticles wrapped conducting polymer polypyrrole (PPy) framework with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) hybrid (denoted as, H-TiO2/PPy/SWCNTs) anode material for LICs through a conventional and green approach. Such a unique network can offer continuous electron transport and reduce the diffusion length of lithium ions. A greatly lithium storage specific capacity is achieved with reversible discharge capacity ∼213 mA h g-1 (based on the mass of TiO2) over 50 cycles (@ 0.1 A g-1), which is almostly three times compared with raw TiO2 (a commercial TiO2 nanoparticles powder). In addition, coupled with commercial activated carbon (AC) cathode, the fully assembled H-TiO2/PPy/SWCNTs//AC LICs delivers a maximum energy and power densities of 31.3 Wh kg-1 and 4 kW kg-1, a reasonably good cycling stability (∼77.8% retention after 3000 cycles) within the voltage range of 1.0-3.0 V.

  3. Studies on the nondestructive emittance measurement at a negative-hydrogen-ion beam; Untersuchungen zur zerstoerungsfreien Emittanzmessung an einem negativen Wasserstoffionenstrahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabor, C.

    2007-07-01

    In the present thesis the already known idea to apply photodetechment for the diagnosis at a H{sup -} beam has be newly interpretated and improved. Thereby a nondestructive emittance measurement method was developed, which is especially suited for future high-current accelerator projects. For emittance measurements thereby mechanical components can be totally abandoned, if at a small part of the H{sup -} ions the additional with only 0.754 eV weak bound electron is separated by photodetachment {Dirac_h}{omega}+H{sup -}{yields}H{sup 0}+e{sup -}. The neutralized H{sup -} ions can be magnetically or electrostatically separated from the electrons and the remaining H{sup -} ions. Especially the neutral particles are offered by their insensitivity against external electromagnetic fields for the determination of the phase-space distribution of the ion beam. Also the momentum transfer by photodetechment can be neglected at the neutralized ions. The detection of the divergence angle has been pursued by a scintillator with a CCD camera. For the calculation of the number of neutralized particles a simplified model under assumption of homogeneous density distributions was developed. The aim of the approximation was to make statements about the requirement on the laser system and the detector. Thereby especially the suitability of the measurement for high beam currents and beam parameters, as they are typically present behind a RFQ. Further aspects like the influence of the angle between laser and ion beams, relativistic ion beam, as well as the position and angular resolution have been also object of the discussion.

  4. The relationship between visible light emission and species fraction of the hydrogen ion beams extracted from 2.45 GHz microwave discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Cortázar, O D; Tarvainen, O; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions with extracted H +, H+2 , and H+3 ions is demonstrated for a 2.45 GHz microwave discharge. Ion mass spectra and optical measurements of Balmer-α and Fulcher-band emissions have been obtained with a Wien Filter having an optical view-port on the plasma chamber axis. The beam of approximately 1 mA is analyzed for different plasma conditions simultaneously with the measurement of light emissions both with temporal resolution. The use of visible light emissions as a valuable diagnostic tool for monitoring the species fraction of the extracted beams is proposed.

  5. Effects of metal ion chelators on DNA strand breaks and inactivation produced by hydrogen peroxide in Escherichia coli: detection of iron-independent lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Asad, N R; Leitão, A C

    1991-01-01

    In order to study the role of metallic ions in the H2O2 inactivation of Escherichia coli cells, H2O2-sensitive mutants were treated with metal ion chelators and then submitted to H2O2 treatment. o-Phenanthroline, dipyridyl, desferrioxamine, and neocuproine were used as metal chelators. Cell sensitivity to H2O2 treatment was not modified by neocuproine, suggesting that copper has a minor role in OH production in E. coli. On the other hand, prior treatment with iron chelators protected the cell...

  6. Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  7. On the role of Fe{sup 3+} ions in Fe{sub x}O{sub y}/C catalysts for hydrogen production from the photodehydrogenation of ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo-Hernández, Félix, E-mail: felixgalindo@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (U.N.A.M.), A.P. 20-364, México City, D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (I.M.P.), Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas Norte 152 Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México City, D.F. 07730 (Mexico); ESIQIE, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Col. Zacatenco, Av. Politécnico s/n, México City, D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Wang, Jin-An; Chen, Lifang [ESIQIE, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Col. Zacatenco, Av. Politécnico s/n, México City, D.F. 07738 (Mexico); Bokhimi, Xim [Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (U.N.A.M.), A.P. 20-364, México City, D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Gómez, Ricardo; Pérez-Larios, Alejandro [Department of Chemistry, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, A.P. 55-534, México City, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Nava Entzana, Noel [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (I.M.P.), Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas Norte 152 Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, México City, D.F. 07730 (Mexico)

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: In Fe{sub x}O{sub y}/C photocatalyts important effect of Fe{sup 3+} ions in the photodehydrogenation of the ethano was noticed. -- Highlights: • Iron oxides supported on carbon are photoactive catalysts. • Photoactivity in dehydrogenation of ethanol depends of the amount of Fe{sup 3+} ions present in the catalysts. • The capacity of UV–vis absorbance by the Fe{sub x}O{sub y}/C catalysts is significantly dependent of the amount of Fe{sup 3+} ions. • A maximum of rate constant, K = 2125 μmol h{sup −1}, was obtained from the sample with 30 wt% Fe. -- Abstract: Fe{sub x}O{sub y}/C photocatalysts at different iron content were prepared by the incipient wet impregnation method and calcined at 773 K. The photocatalysts were characterized by means of nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms, surface fractal dimension, non-local density functional theory, X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refinement and UV–vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated using the photodehydrogenation of ethanol as a model reaction for the production of hydrogen. The specific surface areas of Fe{sub x}O{sub y}/C substrates, with 15, 20 and 30 wt% iron content, diminished from 638 to 490 m{sup 2}/g, as the iron content increased. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that iron oxides coexist as wustite and magnetite in samples with Fe contents of 15 and 20 wt%; for sample with 30 wt% Fe, wustite, magnetite and hematite phases were observed. The photophysical, textural and structural properties were modified by the hematite phase formed by thermal treatment. The Rietveld refinements denoted changes in occupancy of Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} in Fe{sub x}O{sub y} crystallites. A relationship between the Fe{sup 3+} ions content and the reactivity for the hydrogen production from the photodehydrogenation of ethanol (from 1360 to 2125 μmol h{sup −1}), was evidenced.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous hydrogenated carbon under high hydrogen fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, E. D.; von Toussaint, U.; Kleyn, A. W.; W. J. Goedheer,

    2009-01-01

    We study the flux dependence of the carbon erosion yield and the hydrogen enrichment of the surface in the high flux regime at 10(28) ions per m(2) s and higher by using molecular dynamics (MD). We simulate an amorphous hydrogenated carbon sample exposed to high flux hydrogen bombardment with a

  9. Mechanisms of hydrogen retention in metallic beryllium and beryllium oxide and properties of ion-induced beryllium nitride; Rueckhaltemechanismen fuer Wasserstoff in metallischem Beryllium und Berylliumoxid sowie Eigenschaften von ioneninduziertem Berylliumnitrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkofler, Martin

    2011-09-22

    In the framework of this thesis laboratory experiments on atomically clean beryllium surfaces were performed. They aim at a basic understanding of the mechanisms occurring upon interaction of a fusion plasma with a beryllium first wall. The retention and the temperature dependent release of implanted deuterium ions are investigated. An atomistic description is developed through simulations and through the comparison with calculations based on density functional theory. The results of these investigations are compared to the behaviour of hydrogen upon implantation into thermally grown beryllium oxide layers. Furthermore, beryllium nitride is produced by implantation of nitrogen into metallic beryllium and its properties are investigated. The results are interpreted with regard to the use of beryllium in a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  10. Hydrogen Sorption and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, C. J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen is unique among aqueous ions, both in its importance for geochemical reactions, and in its complex transport behavior through reactive media. The structure of hydrogen reaction fronts can be analyzed in the advective limit of the transport equation. At local chemical equilibrium, sorption of hydrogen onto the media surface (sorption isotherm) controls reaction front morphology. Transport modeling thus necessitates accurate knowledge of surface chemistry. Though motivated by transport, sorption models are often parameterized against batch titration experiments. The validity of these parameterizations, in a transport setting, are seldom tested. The analytic solution to the transport equation gives an algebraic relationship between concentration velocity and equilibrium sorption behavior. In this study, we conduct a suite of column flow experiments through quartz sand. Hydrogen concentration breakthrough curves at the column outlet are used to infer the "transport sorption isotherm." These results are compared to the batch titration derived sorption isotherm. We find excellent agreement between the datasets. Our findings suggest that, for aqueous hydrogen, local chemical equilibrium is a valid assumption. With the goal of a predictive transport model, we parameterize various sorption models against this dataset. Models which incorporate electrostatic effects at the surface predict transport well. Nonelectrostatic models such as the Kd, Langmuir, and Freundlich models fail. These results are particularly compelling as nonelectrostatic models are often employed to predict hydrogen transport in many reactive transport code.

  11. Tetramethylammonium hydrogen terephthalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Dolatyari

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C4H12N+·C8H5O4−, contains one half of a tetramethylammonium cation and one half of a hydrogen terephthalate monoanion. The N atom of the ammonium cation lies on a twofold rotation axis and the centre of mass of the terephthalate anion is on a centre of inversion. In the crystal, the centrosymmetric terephthalate ions are linked by a very short symmetric O—H...O hydrogen bond [O...O = 2.4610 (19 Å] into a one-dimensional polymeric chain along [1-12]. The tetramethylammonium cations and terephthalate anions are then connected through a pair of bifurcated acceptor C—H...O hydrogen bonds, generating a three-dimensional supramolecular network. The carboxylate groups at both ends of the terephthalate anion are charge-shared with an equal probability of 0.5.

  12. Automated Data Reduction for Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Experiments, Enabled by High-Resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazazic, Sasa; Zhang, Hui-Min; Schaub, Tanner M.; Emmett, Mark R.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Blakney, Gregory T.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2010-01-01

    Mass analysis of proteolytic fragment peptides following hydrogen/deuterium exchange offers a general measure of solvent accessibility/hydrogen bonding (and thus conformation) of solution-phase proteins and their complexes. The primary problem in such mass analyses is reliable and rapid assignment of mass spectral peaks to the correct charge state and degree of deuteration of each fragment peptide, in the presence of substantial overlap between isotopic distributions of target peptides, autolysis products, and other interferant species. Here, we show that at sufficiently high mass resolving power (m/Δm50% ≥ 100,000), it becomes possible to resolve enough of those overlaps so that automated data reduction becomes possible, based on the actual elemental composition of each peptide without the need to deconvolve isotopic distributions. We demonstrate automated, rapid, reliable assignment of peptide masses from H/D exchange experiments, based on electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectra from H/D exchange of solution-phase myoglobin. Combined with previously demonstrated automated data acquisition for such experiments, the present data reduction algorithm enhances automation (and thus expands generality and applicability) for high-resolution mass spectrometry- based analysis of H/D exchange of solution-phase proteins. PMID:20116280

  13. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  14. Experiments of synchrotron injection using the direct fast chopped H{sup -} beam extracted from surface-plasma-type negative hydrogen ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Takagi, Akira; Machida, Shinji; Mori, Yoshiharu; Yoshii, Masahito; Shirakata, Masashi; Koba, Kiyomi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    An experiment of synchrotron injection using the direct fast chopped H{sup -} beam extracted from a surface-plasma-type H{sup -} ion source has been successfully achieved. The injection phase of the fast chopped beam from linac into the booster synchrotron is adjustable against the center of rf bucket by using this beam. It was obtained that the longitudinal emittance was controlled at the extraction of the booster synchrotron, and that the beam loss during the injection into main ring of the KEK-PS was reduced by this fast chopped beam. (author)

  15. Applications of ion beam technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelerinter, E.; Spielberg, N.

    1980-01-01

    Wire adhesion in steel belted radial tires; carbon fibers and composite; cold welding, brazing, and fabrication; hydrogen production, separation, and storage; membrane use; catalysis; sputtering and texture; and ion beam implantation are discussed.

  16. Comparative study of SOS response induced by hydrogen peroxide in the absence or presence of iron ions, in Escherichia coli; Estudo comparativo da resposta SOS induzida pelo peroxido de hidrogenio em presenca e ausencia de ions ferro, em Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Bonacossa de

    1994-07-01

    The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is an reactive oxygen specie that arises from cell respiration process. It may cause deleterious effects on cell, by reacting with transition metals like iron. In this way it yields free radicals that are able to damage organic molecules, mainly DNA. Recent works have suggested that in the absence of Fe ions H{sub 2}O{sub 2} still damages Escherichia coli DNA. This work presents a comparative analysis of cell SOS responses to DNA damage in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium mutants pretreated or not with a Fe{sup 2+} ion chelator (dipyridyl) and then treated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The systems analysed were the lysogenic induction, Weigle reactivation, mutagenesis and cell inactivation curves. The cell inactivation curves were themselves distinct, in relation to both treatments. The increased sensitivity found in the lexA1 and recA13 mutants, when treated with dipyridyl and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, suggests an important role of SOS response in repairing the lesions caused by this treatment. The profiles of the lysogenic induction and mutagenesis curves were also distinct in both treatments. The results of Weigle reactivation suggest that the products of uvrA and lexA genes have an important role in UV-damaged bacteriophage DNA repair, when dipyridyl-pretreated cells are treated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. All the results suggest that Fe-independent lesions produced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are different from the ones produced in the presence of this ion. (author)

  17. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  18. Hydrogen constituents of the mesosphere inferred from positive ions - H2O, CH4, H2CO, H2O2, and HCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, E.

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations in the mesosphere of H2O, CH4, H2CO, H2O2, and HCN were inferred from data on positive ion compositions, obtained from one mid-latitude and four high-latitude rocket flights. The inferred concentrations were found to agree only partially with the ground-based microwave measurements and/or model prediction by Garcia and Solomon (1985). The CH4 concentration was found to vary between 70 and 4 ppb in daytime and 900 and 100 ppbv at night, respectively. Unexpectedly high H2CO concentrations were obtained, with H2CO/H2O ratios between 0.0006 and 0.1, and a mean HCN volume mixing ratio of 6 x 10 to the -10th was inferred.

  19. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  20. Metal ion roles and the movement of hydrogen during the reaction catalyzed by d-xylose isomerase: a joint X-ray and neutron diffraction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Hanson, Leif; Fisher, S. Zoe; Mustyakimov, Marat; Mason, Sax; Forsyth, Trevor; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Kean, David. A.; Wagner, Trixie; Carrell, H. L.; Katz, Amy K.; Glusker, Jenny P.; Langan, Paul

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Conversion of aldo to keto sugars by the metalloenzyme d-xylose isomerase (XI) is a multi-step reaction involving hydrogen transfer. We have determined the structure of this enzyme by neutron diffraction in order to locate H atoms (or their isotope D). Two studies are presented, one of XI containing cadmium and cyclic d-glucose (before sugar ring opening has occurred), and the other containing nickel and linear d-glucose (after ring opening has occurred but before isomerization). Previously we reported the neutron structures of ligand-free enzyme and enzyme with bound product. Data show that His54 is doubly protonated on the ring N in all four structures. Lys289 is neutral before ring opening, and gains a proton after this, the catalytic metal-bound water is deprotonated to hydroxyl during isomerization and O5 is deprotonated. These results lead to new suggestions as to how changes might take place over the course of the reaction. PMID:20541506

  1. Atomic structure under external confinement: effect of plasma on the spin orbit splitting, relativistic mass correction and Darwin term for hydrogen-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Supriya K.; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.; Fricke, Burkhard

    2017-03-01

    The effect of Debye and quantum plasma environment on the structural properties such as spin orbit splitting, relativistic mass correction and Darwin term for a few iso-electronic members of hydrogen viz. C5 +, O7 +, Ne9 +, Mg11 +, Si13 +, S15 +, Ar17 +, Ca19 + and Ti21 + has been analysed systematically for the first time for a range of coupling strengths of the plasma. The Debye plasma environment has been treated under a standard screened Coulomb potential (SCP) while the quantum plasma has been treated under an exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential (ECSCP). Estimation of the spin orbit splitting under SCP and ECSCP plasma is restricted to the lowest two dipole allowed states while for the other two properties, the ground state as well as the first two excited states have been chosen. Calculations have been extended to nuclear charges for which appreciable relativistic corrections are noted. In all cases calculations have been extended up to such screening parameters for which the respective excitation energies tend towards their stability limit determined by the ionisation potential at that screening parameter. Interesting behavior of the respective properties with respect to the plasma coupling strength has been noted.

  2. 3-Hydroxykynurenine and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid generate hydrogen peroxide and promote alpha-crystallin cross-linking by metal ion reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, L E; Leopold, M C; Huang, X; Atwood, C S; Saunders, A J; Hartshorn, M; Lim, J T; Faget, K Y; Muffat, J A; Scarpa, R C; Chylack, L T; Bowden, E F; Tanzi, R E; Bush, A I

    2000-06-20

    The kynurenine pathway catabolite 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) and redox-active metals such as copper and iron are implicated in cataractogenesis. Here we investigate the reaction of kynurenine pathway catabolites with copper and iron, as well as interactions with the major lenticular structural proteins, the alpha-crystallins. The o-aminophenol kynurenine catabolites 3HK and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3HAA) reduced Cu(II)>Fe(III) to Cu(I) and Fe(II), respectively, whereas quinolinic acid and the nonphenolic kynurenine catabolites kynurenine and anthranilic acid did not reduce either metal. Both 3HK and 3HAA generated superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a copper-dependent manner. In addition, 3HK and 3HAA fostered copper-dependent alpha-crystallin cross-linking. 3HK- or 3HAA-modifed alpha-crystallin showed enhanced redox activity in comparison to unmodified alpha-crystallin or ascorbate-modified alpha-crystallin. These data support the possibility that 3HK and 3HAA may be cofactors in the oxidative damage of proteins, such as alpha-crystallin, through interactions with redox-active metals and especially copper. These findings may have relevance for understanding cataractogenesis and other degenerative conditions in which the kynurenine pathway is activated.

  3. Novel developments in hydrogen storage, hydrogen activation and ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroodian, Amir

    2010-12-03

    This dissertation is divided into three chapters. Recently, metal-free hydrogen activation using phosphorous compounds has been reported in science magazine. We have investigated the interaction between hydrogen and phosphorous compounds in presence of strong Lewis acids (chapter one). A new generation of metal-free hydrogen activation, using amines and strong Lewis acids with sterically demanding nature, was already developed in our group. Shortage of high storage capacity using large substitution to improve sterical effect led us to explore the amine borane derivatives, which are explained in chapter two. Due to the high storage capacity of hydrogen in aminoborane derivatives, we have explored these materials to extend hydrogen release. These compounds store hydrogen as proton and hydride on adjacent atoms or ions. These investigations resulted in developing hydrogen storage based on ionic liquids containing methyl guanidinium cation. Then we have continued to develop ionic liquids based on methyl guanidinium cation with different anions, such as tetrafluoro borate (chapter three). We have replaced these anions with transition metal anions to investigate hydrogen bonding and catalytic activity of ionic liquids. This chapter illustrates the world of ionic liquid as a green solvent for organic, inorganic and catalytic reactions and combines the concept of catalysts and solvents based on ionic liquids. The catalytic activity is investigated particularly with respect to the interaction with CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  4. Phenazin-5-ium hydrogen sulfate monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph deGeorge

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title salt, C12H9N2+·HSO4−·H2O, comprises inversion-related pairs of phenazinium ions linked by C—H...N hydrogen bonds. The phenazinium N—H atoms are hydrogen bonded to the bisulfate anions. The bisulfate anions and water molecules are linked by O—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions into a structural ladder motif parallel to the a axis.

  5. Study of fragmentation pattern and adsorption of 9-O-(triphenylsilyl)-10,11-dihydrocinchonidine on platinum by hydrogen/deuterium exchange using electrospray ionization ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöllosi, György; Bucsi, Imre; Cserényi, Szabolcs; Bartók, Mihály

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption on a platinum (Pt) catalyst of two compounds utilizable as a chiral basic catalyst and a chiral modifier, dihydrocinchonidine (DHCD), and a new cinchona alkaloid derivative containing a bulky group, the Ph3SiO-DHCD molecule. The method of choice was the detection by electrospray ionization (ESI) ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange at room temperature, in tetrahydrofuran, at a D2 pressure of 1 bar. Based on the ESI-MS/MS spectrum of the new compound, we propose a mechanism for the formation of the silatropylium cation containing a Si-O bond. From the fragmentation pattern of Ph3SiO-DHCD it was confirmed that ESI-ion-trap MS/MS can be used to study the adsorption processes of complicated carbon compounds by investigating their H/D exchange reactions. In the case of Ph3SiO-DHCD, the results demonstrate that H/D exchange takes place mainly on the quinoline skeleton. However, the strong pi-bonded adsorption of the quinoline skeleton parallel with the imaginary plane of Pt is not preferred because the bulky Ph3Si group inhibits the multiple pi-bonded adsorption of the Ph3SiO-DHCD. Because of this hindrance the molecule was adsorbed tilted via the nonbonding electron pair of the N atom and C2' atom of the quinoline skeleton; consequently, mainly alkaloid-d1 and alkaloid-d2 are formed. 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Correlation of H/sup -/ production and the work function of a surface in a hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, M.

    1983-03-01

    Surface-plasma negative hydrogen ion sources are being developed as possible parts for future neutral beam systems. In these ion sources, negative hydrogen ions (H/sup -/) are produced at low work function metal surfaces immersed in hydrogen plasmas. To investigate the correlation between the work function and the H/sup -/ production at the surface with a condition similar to the one in the actual plasma ion source, these two parameters were simultaneously measured in the hydrogen plasma environment.

  7. Hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, E.

    1942-10-16

    This report mentioned that not very severe demands for purity were made on the hydrogen used in hydrogenation of coal or similar raw materials, because the catalysts were not very sensitive to poisoning. However, the hydrogenation plants tried to remove most impurities anyway by means of oil washes. The report included a table giving the amount of wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil in order to remove 1% of various impurities from 1000 m/sup 3/ of the circulating gas. The amounts of wash oil used up were 1.1 m/sup 3/ for removing 1% nitrogen, 0.3 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide, 0.03 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane. The amount of hydrogen lost was 28 m/sup 3/ for 1% nitrogen, 9 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane and ranged from 9 m/sup 3/ to 39 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide and 1 m/sup 3/ to 41 m/sup 3/ for carbon dioxide depending on whether the removal was done in liquid phase or vapor phase and with or without reduction of the oxide to methane. Next the report listed and described the major processes used in German hydrogenation plants to produce hydrogen. Most of them produced water gas, which then had its carbon monoxide changed to carbon dioxide, and the carbon oxides washed out with water under pressure and copper hydroxide solution. The methods included the Winkler, Pintsch-Hillebrand, and Schmalfeldt-Wintershall processes, as well as roasting of coke in a rotating generator, splitting of gases formed during hydrogenation, and separation of cokery gas into its components by the Linde process.

  8. Synthesis of high volumetric capacity graphene oxide-supported tellurantimony Na- and Li-ion battery anodes by hydrogen peroxide sol gel processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishanov, Dmitry A; Mikhaylov, Alexey A; Medvedev, Alexander G; Gun, Jenny; Nagasubramanian, Arun; Madhavi, Srinivasan; Lev, Ovadia; Prikhodchenko, Petr V

    2017-10-12

    High-charge-capacity sodium-ion battery anodes made of Sb2Te3@reduced graphene oxide are reported for the first time. Uniform nano-coating of graphene oxide is carried out from common sol of peroxotellurate and peroxoantimonate under room temperature processing. Reduction by hydrazine under glycerol reflux yields Sb2Te3@reduced graphene oxide. The electrodes exhibit exceptionally high volumetric charge capacity, above 2300mAhcm(-3) at 100mAg(-1) current density, showing very good rate capabilities and retaining 60% of this capacity even at 2000mAg(-1). A comparison of sodiation and lithiation shows that lithiation exhibits better volumetric charge capacity, but surprisingly only marginally better relative rate capability retention at 2000mAg(-1). Tellurium-based electrodes are attractive due to the high volumetric charge capacity of Te, its very high electric conductivity, and the low relative expansion upon lithiation/sodiation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. GeO2 Thin Film Deposition on Graphene Oxide by the Hydrogen Peroxide Route: Evaluation for Lithium-Ion Battery Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Alexander G; Mikhaylov, Alexey A; Grishanov, Dmitry A; Yu, Denis Y W; Gun, Jenny; Sladkevich, Sergey; Lev, Ovadia; Prikhodchenko, Petr V

    2017-03-15

    A peroxogermanate thin film was deposited in high yield at room temperature on graphene oxide (GO) from peroxogermanate sols. The deposition of the peroxo-precursor onto GO and the transformations to amorphous GeO2, crystalline tetragonal GeO2, and then to cubic elemental germanium were followed by electron microscopy, XRD, and XPS. All of these transformations are influenced by the GO support. The initial deposition is explained in view of the sol composition and the presence of GO, and the different thermal transformations are explained by reactions with the graphene support acting as a reducing agent. As a test case, the evaluation of the different materials as lithium ion battery anodes was carried out revealing that the best performance is obtained by amorphous germanium oxide@GO with >1000 mAh g(-1) at 250 mA g(-1) (between 0 and 2.5 V vs Li/Li(+) cathode), despite the fact that the material contained only 51 wt % germanium. This is the first demonstration of the peroxide route to produce peroxogermanate thin films and thereby supported germanium and germanium oxide coatings. The advantages of the process over alternative methodologies are discussed.

  10. Semi-automated screen for global protein conformational changes in solution by ion mobility spectrometry-massspectrometry combined with size-exclusion chromatography and differential hydrogen-deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Nicholas A; Makarov, Alexey A; Strulson, Christopher A; Mao, Yun; Mao, Bing

    2017-05-05

    Development of methodologies for studying protein higher-order structure in solution helps to establish a better understanding of the intrinsic link between protein conformational structure and biological function and activity. The goal of this study was to demonstrate a simultaneous screening approach for global protein conformational changes in solution through the combination of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) with differential hydrogen-deuterium exchange (ΔHDX) on the size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) platform in a single on-line workflow. A semi-automated experimental setup based on the use of SEC on-column conditions allowed for tracking of protein conformational changes in solution as a function of acetonitrile concentration. In this setup, the SEC protein elution data was complemented by the ΔHDX profile which showed global protein conformational changes as a difference in the number of deuterons exchanged to protons. The ΔHDX data, in turn, was complemented by the changes in the drift time by IMS-MS. All three orthogonal techniques were applied for studying global higher-order structure of the proteins ubiquitin, cytochrome c and myoglobin, in solution simultaneously. The described approach allows for the use of a crude sample (or mixture of proteins) and could be suitable for rapid comparison of protein batch-to-batch higher-order structure or for optimizing conditions for enzymatic reactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The role of iron compounds and hydrogen peroxideon the oxidation of metallic mercury

    OpenAIRE

    愛甲,博美

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of metallic mercury with ferric and ferrous ions was studied. The results were; (1) Mercury uptake of free ferric ion increased with hydrogen peroxide, the maximum uptake was 1.0 mM. However, ferric ion was not taken up without hydrogen peroxide. (2) In the presence of ferric and ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide, mercury uptake was maximum when the mole ratio (Fe(3+)/Fe(2+)) was 0.1.

  12. Tetraphenylphosphonium hydrogen oxalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. W. Dean

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C24H20P+·C2HO4−, two symmetry-independent ion pairs are present. The cations aggregate into puckered sheets via zigzag infinite chains of sixfold phenyl embraces and parallel fourfold phenyl embraces, while the anions form hydrogen-bonded chains between the sheets of cations. In the two independent oxalate anions, the angles between the normals to the two least-squares carboxylate COO planes are unusually large, viz. 72.5 (1 and 82.1 (1°.

  13. Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWatters, Bruce Ray (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

  14. Hydrogen Energy by Means of Proton Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    If we dare to take serious what we know today about climate issues the challenges to our energy systems are immense. If we really chose - also in practice - to phase out the fossil fuels major changes to the way we handle energy are required. The renewable energy resources are by far sufficient......, but matching supply and demand in time as well as in form calls for new engineering solutions. Hydrogen as energy carrier and energy storage medium has often been mentioned as an option for the future. A protons is an elementary particles, but at the same time the ion of hydrogen. When hydrogen (H2......) is extracted from water (H2O) it can happen via formation of protons (hydrogen ions, H+) which must be transported away by proton conducting materials to form molecular hydrogen (H2). This process is called electrolysis and converts electrical energy into the chemical energy of a fuel. The reverse process...

  15. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  16. Hydrogen usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1942-10-22

    This short tabular report listed the number of m/sup 3/ of hydrogen required for a (metric) ton of product for various combinations of raw material and product in a hydrogenation procedure. In producing auto gasoline, bituminous coal required 2800 m/sup 3/, brown coal required 2400 m/sup 3/, high-temperature-carbonization tar required 2100 m/sup 3/, bituminous coal distillation tar required 1300 m/sup 3/, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 850 m/sup 3/, petroleum residues required 900 m/sup 3/, and gas oil required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, brown coal required 1900 m/sup 3/, whereas petroleum residues required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, lubricants, and paraffin by the TTH (low-temperature-hydrogenation) process, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 550 m/sup 3/. 1 table.

  17. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  18. Versatile Hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen is probably the most intriguing ele- ment in the periodic table. Although it is only the seventh most abundant element on earth, it is the most abundant element in the uni- verse. It combines with almost all the ele- ments of the periodic table, except for a few transition elements, to form binary compounds of the type E.

  19. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hydrogen on various metals and the use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage are discussed. The mechanisms of, and differences between, hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen attack of ferritic steels are compared, common sources...

  20. Biomimetic Production of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Devens

    2004-03-01

    . Subsequent electron transfer reactions further separate the electron and hole spatially, reducing the electronic coupling, slowing charge recombination, and lengthening the useful lifetime of the charge separation.(3) Still following the example of natural bacterial photosynthesis, these artificial reaction centers may be inserted into the lipid bilayer membranes of liposomes. There, they are used to power transmembrane proton pumps based on a redox loop that employs a lipid-soluble quinone molecule to shuttle hydrogen ions across the membrane, acidifying the interior of the liposome.(4) Finally, ATP synthase isolated from spinach can be inserted into the liposomal bilayer. Protons flow out of the liposome through the enzyme, driven by the gradient produced by the proton pump. The energy released is used to convert adenosine diphosphate into adenosine triphosphate, which is a major biological energy currency.(5) The chromophores used in these artificial photosynthetic reaction centers may also be attached to wide band gap nanoparticulate semiconductor electrodes, where their excited states inject electrons into the semiconductor, generating the radical cation of the chromophore. Such electrodes have been incorporated into a photoelectrochemical biofuel cell.(6) In the cell, NADH reduces the radical cation, regenerating the chromophore and ultimately producing NAD+. The NAD+ is recycled by converting it back to NADH via dehydrogenase enzymes that oxidize carbohydrates and similar reduced carbon compounds, including glucose, ethanol and methanol. Addition of a suitable cathode produces a cell that generates electric current through the combined action of light and enzymatic oxidation. The two examples of artificial photosynthesis discussed above are potential sources of the reducing power necessary for hydrogen production. A biomimetic approach to this goal is to couple an artificial photosynthetic system to an enzymatic system for hydrogen production isolated from a suitable

  1. ion with phenolate ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) reaction of homoleptic tris-chelated polypyridine ruthenium(II) complexes with phenolate ions is sensitive to the structure of the ligand of the Ru(II) complex as well as of the phenolate ions 1. In recent years 2 the photophysical and photochemical properties of Ru(II) complexes based on ...

  2. Photoelectrochemical water splitting in separate oxygen and hydrogen cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Avigail; Dotan, Hen; Shter, Gennady E.; Wullenkord, Michael; Houaijia, Anis; Maljusch, Artjom; Grader, Gideon S.; Rothschild, Avner

    2017-06-01

    Solar water splitting provides a promising path for sustainable hydrogen production and solar energy storage. One of the greatest challenges towards large-scale utilization of this technology is reducing the hydrogen production cost. The conventional electrolyser architecture, where hydrogen and oxygen are co-produced in the same cell, gives rise to critical challenges in photoelectrochemical water splitting cells that directly convert solar energy and water to hydrogen. Here we overcome these challenges by separating the hydrogen and oxygen cells. The ion exchange in our cells is mediated by auxiliary electrodes, and the cells are connected to each other only by metal wires, enabling centralized hydrogen production. We demonstrate hydrogen generation in separate cells with solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 7.5%, which can readily surpass 10% using standard commercial components. A basic cost comparison shows that our approach is competitive with conventional photoelectrochemical systems, enabling safe and potentially affordable solar hydrogen production.

  3. Photoelectrochemical water splitting in separate oxygen and hydrogen cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Avigail; Dotan, Hen; Shter, Gennady E; Wullenkord, Michael; Houaijia, Anis; Maljusch, Artjom; Grader, Gideon S; Rothschild, Avner

    2017-06-01

    Solar water splitting provides a promising path for sustainable hydrogen production and solar energy storage. One of the greatest challenges towards large-scale utilization of this technology is reducing the hydrogen production cost. The conventional electrolyser architecture, where hydrogen and oxygen are co-produced in the same cell, gives rise to critical challenges in photoelectrochemical water splitting cells that directly convert solar energy and water to hydrogen. Here we overcome these challenges by separating the hydrogen and oxygen cells. The ion exchange in our cells is mediated by auxiliary electrodes, and the cells are connected to each other only by metal wires, enabling centralized hydrogen production. We demonstrate hydrogen generation in separate cells with solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 7.5%, which can readily surpass 10% using standard commercial components. A basic cost comparison shows that our approach is competitive with conventional photoelectrochemical systems, enabling safe and potentially affordable solar hydrogen production.

  4. Effects of hydrogen isotopes in the irradiation damage of CLAM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, M.Z.; Liu, P.P.; Zhu, Y.M.; Wan, F.R. [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); He, Z.B. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhan, Q., E-mail: qzhan@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-11-15

    The isotope effect of hydrogen in irradiation damage plays an important role in the development of reduced activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels in nuclear reactors. The evolutions of microstructures and mechanical properties of China low active martensitic (CLAM) steel subjected to hydrogen and deuterium ions irradiation are studied comparatively. Under the same irradiation conditions, larger size and smaller density of dislocation loops are generated by deuterium ion than by hydrogen ion. Irradiation hardening occurs under the ion irradiation and the hardening induced by hydrogen ion is higher than by deuterium ion. Moreover, the coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates is observed, which can be explained by the solute drag mechanisms. It turns out that the coarsening induced by deuterium ion irradiation is more distinct than by hydrogen ion irradiation. No distinct variations for the compositions of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates are found by a large number of statistical data after hydrogen isotopes irradiation. - Highlights: • The irradiation hardening caused by hydrogen ion is higher than deuterium ion. • No distinct variations on the composition of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates were found after hydrogen isotopes irradiation. • The coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates in both ion irradiated samples can be explained by the solute drag mechanisms.

  5. The Influence of Small Monovalent Cations on Neighbouring Hydrogen Bonds of Aquo-Protein Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarik, Kritsana P.; Rode, Bernd M.

    1981-12-01

    The influence of small monovalent metal ions on hydrogen bonds of aquo-protein complexes is studied on Li+/HCONH2-OH2 as an example. Using results obtained from ab initio calculations with minimal GLO basis sets, the remarkable changes in the hydrogen bond energy and charge distribution, due to metal ion complex formation, are discussed. The metal ion seems to enhance strongly the donor-acceptor interaction of the O ... H-N-C=0 hydrogen-bonded system.

  6. Hydrogen Stark Broadened Brackett lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stehlé

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark-broadened lines of the hydrogen Brackett series are computed for the conditions of stellar atmospheres and circumstellar envelopes. The computation is performed within the Model Microfield Method, which includes the ion dynamic effects and makes the bridge between the impact limit at low density and the static limit at high density and in the line wings. The computation gives the area normalized line shape, from the line core up to the static line wings.

  7. Stability of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in a multi-ion plasma†

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have studied the stability of the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave in a plasma consisting of isotropic hydrogen ions (H+) and temperature-anisotropic positively. (O+) and negatively (O−) charged oxygen ions, with the electrons drifting parallel to the magnetic field. Analytical expressions have been derived for the ...

  8. Thermal evolution of surface blistering and exfoliation due to ion-implanted hydrogen monomers into Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 1 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, J.H., E-mail: jhliang@ess.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hu, C.H.; Bai, C.Y. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chao, D.S. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.M. [Department of Applied Science, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the dependence of surface blistering and exfoliation phenomena on post-annealing time in H{sup +}-implanted Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 1 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket . Czochralski-grown n-type Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 1 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket wafers were room-temperature ion-implanted with 40 keV hydrogen monomers to a fluence of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, and followed by furnace annealing treatments at 400 and 500 Degree-Sign C for various durations ranging from 0.25 to 3 h. The corresponding analysis results for Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 0 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket (Liang et al., 2008); (Bai, 2007) were adopted in order to make comparisons. The evolution of blister formation and growth for Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 1 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket at 400 Degree-Sign C has a shorter characteristic time compared to Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 0 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket . However, there is a longer characteristic time when annealing takes place at 500 Degree-Sign C. In addition, no craters were observed for Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 1 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket annealed at 400 Degree-Sign C while the opposite is true for Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 0 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket . The evolution of crater development for Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 1 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket annealed at 500 Degree-Sign C has a longer characteristic time compared to Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 0 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket . These results are attributed to the fact that compared to Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 0 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket , Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 1 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket has a smaller surface binding energy of silicon atoms and a larger areal number density of silicon atoms on the plane perpendicular to the incident-ion axis. Furthermore, Si Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 1 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket has a

  9. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  10. Influence of hydrogen on hydrogenated cadmium telluride optical spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pociask, M.; Polit, J.; Sheregii, E.; Cebulski, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Rzeszow (Poland); Kisiel, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Mycielski, A. [Institute of Physics, PAS, Warszawa (Poland); Morgiel, J. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Piccinini, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Dipartimento Scienze Geologiche, Universita Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Marcelli, A.; Robouch, B.; Guidi, M.C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Savchyn, V. [Ivan Franko Lviv National University (Ukraine); Izhnin, I.I. [Institute for Materials SRC ' ' Carat' ' , Lviv (Ukraine); Zajdel, P. [Institute of Fizyki, University of Silesia, 4 Uniwersytecka Str., 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Nucara, A. [Universita' di Roma La Sapienza, P. le Aldo Moro 1, Rome (Italy)

    2009-09-15

    The presence of oxygen impurity in semiconducting materials affects the electrical properties of crystals and significantly limits their application. To remove oxygen impurity, ultra-pure hydrogen is used while growing Te-containing crystals such as CdTe, CdZnTe, and ZnTe. The hydrogenation of CdTe crystals is a technological process that purifies the basic material from oxygen, mainly cadmium and tellurium oxide compounds incorporated in CdTe crystalline lattice. In the present work we analyses the deformations induced by hydrogen and oxygen atoms in CdTe crystals looking at their influence on the near fundamental band (NFB), middle infrared (MIR) and far infrared (FIR) reflectivity spectra as well as on cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra. Comparison of the hydrogenated CdTe phonon structure profiles confirms the presence of hydrogen atoms bounded inside the lattice. The possible localization of hydrogen and oxygen ions within the tetrahedron coordinated lattice is discussed in the framework of a model that shows a good agreement with recent NFB, MIR and FIR experiments carried out on hydrogenated CdTe crystals. Measured reflection spectra in the wavelength range 190-1400 nm (NFB) indicate the appearance in CdTe(H{sub M}) and CdTe(H{sub L}) of additional maxima at 966 nm related to the electron transitions from level about 0.2 eV above the valence band. The CL spectra confirmed existence of this electron level. We present a possible H{sub 2} alignment similar to the single H model i.e., over the face (at about 0.38 Aa). For this model the angle from the central atom to the H atoms is equal to 64 which is also close to the bonding angle of CdH{sub 2} (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of genotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of ions chelator Fe{sup 2+} (2,2'-dipyridyl) and of Cu{sup 2+}(neocuproine), in Escherichia coli: involvement of DNA repair mechanisms in the bacteria survival; Avaliacao da genotoxicidade induzida pelo peroxido de hidrogenio na presenca dos quelantes de ions Fe{sup 2+} (2,2'-dipiridil) e de ions Cu{sup 2+} (neocuproina), em Escherichia coli: envolvimento de mecanismos de reparo de DNA na sobrevivencia bacteriana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Bonacossa de

    1998-07-01

    Prior incubation of the E. coli cultures with the iron ions chelator 2,2'-dipyridyl (1 mM) caused an intensification of the lethality and the mutagenesis induced by the hydrogen peroxide, mainly at high concentrations (20 mM). It was also detected an enhancement of DNA strand breaks in this condition. The addition of the copper ions chelator neocuproine blocked partially this phenomenon. The enzymes XthA and Nfo act alternatively in the repair of the lesions induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the presence of 2,2'-dipyridyl. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} can act synergistically with neocuproine in killing E. coli, causing an enhancement in DNA strand breaks. The recombinational repair, the UvrABC excinuclease and Fpg function appeared to participate in the repair of the synergistic lesions. (author)

  12. Influence of screening effect on hydrogen passivation of hole silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrov, O V

    2002-01-01

    The simulation of hole silicon passivation during hydrogen diffusion with account of hydrogen-acceptor pairs formation, internal electrical field and screening effect has been carried out. Screening by free carriers of hydrogen and acceptor ions results in shortening their interaction radii and slacking the concentration dependence of hydrogen diffusivity at high level of silicon doping. The consistency of simulated and experimental profiles of holes and hydrogen-acceptor pairs is reached in a broad band of doping levels from 4 x 10 sup 1 sup 4 to 1.2 x 10 sup 2 sup 0 cm sup - sup 3 at the pair binding energy of 0.70-0.79 eV while the radius of the Coulomb interaction of hydrogen and boron ions is equal to 35 A under low doping and decrease with increasing doping level

  13. Temperature effects on the pickup process of water group and hydrogen ions - Extensions of 'A theory for low-frequency waves observed at Comet Giacobini-Zinner' by M. L. Goldstein and H. K. Wong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinca, Armando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1988-01-01

    Cometary heavy ions can resonantly excite hydromagnetic wave activity with spacecraft frequency spectra strongly deviating from the ion cyclotron frequency. The influence of the newborn particle temperature on this effect is assessed, its relevance to the interpretation of the observations is discussed, and an alternative, more efficient mechanism to generate spacecraft frequencies of the order of the proton cyclotron frequency is suggested.

  14. Manyparticle interactions and local structure of the metallic hydrogen at zero pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Kaim, S. D.; Kovalenko, N. P.; Vasiliu, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the perturbation expansion for electron gas energy in the third order to the electron-ion potential the pair and irreducible three-ion interaction potentials in metallic hydrogen are calculated. The irreducible potential of three-ion interaction has attractive nature at short interionic separation and oscillates at large ones. The anisotropic character of the three-ion interaction is shown. The potential relief of the pair ions relative to the third ion is constructed. This re...

  15. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One Li

  16. Far-Infrared Signatures of Hydrogen Bonding in Phenol Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Daniël J; Peters, Atze; Yatsyna, Vasyl; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali; Rijs, Anouk M

    2016-04-07

    One of the most direct ways to study the intrinsic properties of the hydrogen-bond interaction is by gas-phase far-infrared (far-IR) spectroscopy because the modes involving hydrogen-bond deformation are excited in this spectral region; however, the far-IR regime is often ignored in molecular structure identification due to the absence of strong far-IR light sources and difficulty in assigning the observed modes by quantum chemical calculations. Far-IR/UV ion-dip spectroscopy using the free electron laser FELIX was applied to directly probe the intramolecular hydrogen-bond interaction in a family of phenol derivatives. Three vibrational modes have been identified, which are expected to be diagnostic for the hydrogen-bond strength: hydrogen-bond stretching and hydrogen-bond-donating and -accepting OH torsion vibrations. Their position is evaluated with respect to the hydrogen bond strength, that is, the length of the hydrogen-bonded OH length. This shows that the hydrogen bond stretching frequency is diagnostic for the size of the ring that is closed by the hydrogen bond, while the strength of the hydrogen bond can be determined from the hydrogen-bond-donating OH torsion frequency. The combination of these two normal modes allows the direct probing of intramolecular hydrogen-bond characteristics using conformation-selective far-IR vibrational spectroscopy.

  17. Ion Implantation and Synthesis of Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Nastasi, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ion implantation is one of the key processing steps in silicon integrated circuit technology. Some integrated circuits require up to 17 implantation steps and circuits are seldom processed with less than 10 implantation steps. Controlled doping at controlled depths is an essential feature of implantation. Ion beam processing can also be used to improve corrosion resistance, to harden surfaces, to reduce wear and, in general, to improve materials properties. This book presents the physics and materials science of ion implantation and ion beam modification of materials. It covers ion-solid interactions used to predict ion ranges, ion straggling and lattice disorder. Also treated are shallow-junction formation and slicing silicon with hydrogen ion beams. Topics important for materials modification, such as ion-beam mixing, stresses, and sputtering, are also described.

  18. Modeling of hydrogen interactions with beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, improved mathematical models are developed for hydrogen interactions with beryllium. This includes the saturation effect observed for high-flux implantation of ions from plasmas and retention of tritium produced from neutronic transmutations in beryllium. Use of the models developed is justified by showing how they can replicated experimental data using the TMAP4 tritium transport code. (author)

  19. Collision cascades enhanced hydrogen redistribution in cobalt implanted hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, P. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand); Becker, H.-W. [RUBION, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Williams, G.V.M. [The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand); Hübner, R.; Heinig, K.-H. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Markwitz, A., E-mail: a.markwitz@gns.cri.nz [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington (New Zealand)

    2017-03-01

    Highlights: • This paper reports for the first time redistribution of hydrogen atoms in diamond like carbon thin films during ion implantation of low energy magnetic ions. • The results point towards new routes of controlling the composition and distribution of elements at the nanoscale within a base matrix without using any heat treatment methods. • Exploring these opportunities can lead to a new horizon of materials and device engineering needed for enabling advanced technologies and applications. - Abstract: Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films produced by C{sub 3}H{sub 6} deposition at 5 kV and implanted at room temperature with 30 keV Co atoms to 12 at.% show not only a bimodal distribution of Co atoms but also a massive redistribution of hydrogen in the films. Resonant nuclear reaction analysis was used to measure the hydrogen depth profiles (15N-method). Depletion of hydrogen near the surface was measured to be as low as 7 at.% followed by hydrogen accumulation from 27 to 35 at.%. A model is proposed considering the thermal energy deposited by collision cascade for thermal insulators. In this model, sufficient energy is provided for dissociated hydrogen to diffuse out of the sample from the surface and diffuse into the sample towards the interface which is however limited by the range of the incoming Co ions. At a hydrogen concentration of ∼35 at.%, the concentration gradient of the mobile unbounded hydrogen atoms is neutralised effectively stopping diffusion towards the interface. The results point towards new routes of controlling the composition and distribution of elements at the nanoscale within a base matrix without using any heat treatment methods. Exploring these opportunities can lead to a new horizon of materials and device engineering needed for enabling advanced technologies and applications.

  20. Discrete kink dynamics in hydrogen-bonded chains: The two-component model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpan, V.M.; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2004-01-01

    -proton interaction in the hydrogen bond. (ii) a harmonic coupling between the protons in adjacent hydrogen bonds, and (iii) a harmonic coupling between the nearest-neighbor heavy ions (an isolated diatomic chain with the lowest acoustic band) or instead a harmonic on-site potential for the heavy ions (a diatomic...

  1. Negative Halogen Ions for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.; Hahto, S.K.; Hahto, S.T.; Leung, K.N.; Westenskow, G.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, advances in hydrogen negative ion sources have extended the usable range of hydrogen isotope neutral beams to energies suitable for large magnetically confined fusion devices. Recently, drawing upon this experience, negative halogen ions have been proposed as an alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers in inertial confinement fusion, because electron accumulation would be prevented in negative ion beams, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. This paper reports the results of an experiment comparing the current density and beam emittance of Cl+ and Cl- extracted from substantially ion-ion plasmas with that of Ar+ extracted from an ordinary electron-ion plasma, all using the same source, extractor, and emittance scanner. At similar discharge conditions, the Cl- current was typically 85 – 90% of the positive chlorine current, with an e-/ Cl- ratio as low as seven without grid magnets. The Cl- was as much as 76% of the Ar+ current from a discharge with the same RF drive. The minimum normalized beam emittance and inferred ion temperatures of Cl+, Cl-, and Ar+ were all similar, so the current density and optical quality of Cl- appear as suitable for heavy ion fusion driver applications as a positive noble gas ion of similar mass. Since F, I, and Br should all behave similarly in an ion source, they should also be suitable as driver beams.

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide and Polysulfide Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hideo

    2017-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been demonstrated to have physiological roles such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection, oxygen sensing, inflammatory regulation, and cell growth. Recently, hydrogen polysulfides (H2Sn) have been found to be produced by 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase and to regulate the activity of ion channels, tumor suppressers, and protein kinases. Furthermore, some of the effects previously reported to be mediated by H2S are now ascribed to H2Sn. Cysteine persulfide and cysteine polysulfide may also be involved in cellular redox regulation. The chemical interaction between H2S and nitric oxide (NO) can also produce H2Sn, nitroxyl, and nitrosopersulfide, suggesting their involvement in the reactions previously thought to be mediated by NO alone. This Forum focuses on and critically discusses the recent progress in the study of H2Sn, H2S, and NO as well as other per- or polysulfide species. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  3. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Schoonman, J.; Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept

  4. Sputtering of solid deuterium by He-ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Pedrys, R.

    2001-01-01

    Sputtering of solid deuterium by bombardment of 3He+ and 4He+ ions was studied. Some features are similar to hydrogen ion bombardment of solid deuterium, but for the He-ions a significant contribution of elastic processes to the total yield can be identified. The thin-film enhancement is more...

  5. Characterization of an atomic hydrogen source for charge exchange experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutenegger, M. A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); CRESST/University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Magee, E. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Betancourt-Martinez, G. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); University of Maryland College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Hell, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg, Sternwartstr. 7, 96049 Bamberg (Germany); Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We characterized the dissociation fraction of a thermal dissociation atomic hydrogen source by injecting the mixed atomic and molecular output of the source into an electron beam ion trap containing highly charged ions and recording the x-ray spectrum generated by charge exchange using a high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer. We exploit the fact that the charge exchange state-selective capture cross sections are very different for atomic and molecular hydrogen incident on the same ions, enabling a clear spectroscopic diagnostic of the neutral species.

  6. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  7. Negative ion beam extraction in ROBIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, Gourab, E-mail: bansal@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Gahlaut, Agrajit; Soni, Jignesh; Pandya, Kaushal; Parmar, Kanu G.; Pandey, Ravi; Vuppugalla, Mahesh; Prajapati, Bhavesh; Patel, Amee; Mistery, Hiren [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Chakraborty, Arun; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Singh, Mahendrajit J.; Phukan, Arindam; Yadav, Ratnakar K.; Parmar, Deepak [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, Sector 25, GIDC, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 380025 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► A RF based negative hydrogen ion beam test bed has been set up at IPR, India. ► Ion source has been successfully commissioned and three campaigns of plasma production have been carried out. ► Extraction system (35 kV) has been installed and commissioning has been initiated. Negative ion beam extraction is immediate milestone. -- Abstract: The RF based single driver −ve ion source experiment test bed ROBIN (Replica Of BATMAN like source in INDIA) has been set up at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India in a technical collaboration with IPP, Garching, Germany. A hydrogen plasma of density 5 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} is expected in driver region of ROBIN by launching 100 kW RF power into the driver by 1 MHz RF generator. The cesiated source is expected to deliver a hydrogen negative ion beam of 10 A at 35 kV with a current density of 35 mA/cm{sup 2} as observed in BATMAN. In first phase operation of the ROBIN ion source, a hydrogen plasma has been successfully generated (without extraction system) by coupling 80 kW RF input power through a matching network with high power factor (cos θ > 0.8) and different plasma parameters have been measured using Langmuir probes and emission spectroscopy. The plasma density of 2.5 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} has been measured in the extraction region of ROBIN. For negative hydrogen ion beam extraction in second phase operation, extraction system has been assembled and installed with ion source on the vacuum vessel. The source shall be first operated in volume mode for negative ion beam extraction. The commissioning of the source with high voltage power supply has been initiated.

  8. Silane Discharge Ion Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatham, Robert Hood, III

    We have studied silane dc, rf and dc proximity discharges, using mass spectroscopic measurements of the positive ions as a detailed diagnostic for the type of discharge used to produce hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar photovoltaic cells. The properties and quality of these films depends in a very complex way upon the interactions of the many reactive neutral and ion species in the discharge. We have developed qualitative models of the ion chemical processes in these discharges from our measurements. Knowledge of the ion-molecule and electron-molecule collision cross sections is important to any attempt at understanding silane discharge chemistry. Consequently, we have measured the electron impact ionization cross sections for silane and disilane, and for comparison purposes also for methane and ethane. In addition, we have measured the rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of He('+), Ne('+), and Ar('+) with silane, disilane, methane, and ethane, as these are important to understanding discharges in inert gas-silane mixtures. We have developed a detailed quantitative model of the cathode sheath region of a silane dc discharge, by extending the best recent calculation of the electron motion in the sheath to a self-consistent form which includes the ion motion. This model is used with comparison of silane dc discharge data to diagnose the ion chemistry occurring in the sheath region of silane dc discharge. The understanding of the discharge ion chemical processes that we have gained in this study represent an important step toward understanding the chemical and physical processes leading to film growth.

  9. Hydrogen nanobubble at normal hydrogen electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, S.; Shinozaki, R.; Senda, Y.; Yoshikawa, H. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Electrochemically formed hydrogen nanobubbles at a platinum rotating disk electrode (RDE) were detected by re-oxidation charge. The dissolution time course of the hydrogen nanobubbles was measured by AFM tapping topography under open-circuit conditions at stationary platinum and gold single-crystal electrodes. The bubble dissolution at platinum was much faster than that at gold because two types of diffusion, bulk and surface diffusion, proceeded at the platinum surface, whereas surface diffusion was prohibited at the gold electrode. These findings indicated that the electrochemical reaction of normal hydrogen electrode partly proceeded heterogeneously on the three-phase boundary around the hydrogen nanobubble.

  10. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  11. Electron capture dissociation proceeds with a low degree of intramolecular migration of peptide amide hydrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Adams, Christopher M; Zubarev, Roman A

    2008-01-01

    scrambling) that occurs during vibrational excitation of gas-phase ions. Unlike traditional collisional ion activation, electron capture dissociation (ECD) is not associated with substantial vibrational excitation. We investigated the extent of intramolecular backbone amide hydrogen (1H/2H) migration upon...... ECD using peptides with a unique selective deuterium incorporation. Our results show that only limited amide hydrogen migration occurs upon ECD, provided that vibrational excitation prior to the electron capture event is minimized. Peptide ions that are excessively vibrationally excited...

  12. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  13. Modeling Mars' Hydrogen Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, M.

    2006-12-01

    Traditionally, exospheric densities and velocity distributions are modelled by spherical symmetric analytical Chamberlain functions, assuming gravity is the only force acting on the neutrals. Planetary exospheres are however not spherical symmetric to any good approximation, as evident from observations, due to non- uniformexobase conditions and effects such as photoionization, radiation pressure, charge exchange, recombination and planetary rotation. To account for these effects numerical simulations are needed. Using Monte Carlo test particle simulations it is possible to account for the above effects (if ion distributions are assumed). Even though neutrals in the exospheres by definition do not collide often, collisions occur. Especially near the exobase the transition is gradual from collision dominated regions at lower heights (with Maxwellian velocity distributions) to essentially collisionless regions at greater heights. We present exospheric simulations that include collisions self consistently using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) approach. The code is three dimensional, parallel and uses an adaptive grid, allowing many particles to be included in the simulations, leading to accurate results. In particular, we here study Mars' hydrogen exosphere and the effects of the above processes, including thermal escape rates.

  14. Preparation by ion exchange and structural simulation of a new hydrogen phosphate of sodium zirconium; Preparacion por intercambio ionico y simulacion estructural de un nuevo hidrogenofosfato de circonio sodio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras R, A.; Fernandez V, S. M.; Ordonez R, E.; Perez A, M. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    It is described the method of synthesis of the {tau}-Zr P and the obtaining of its sodium form by ion exchange, the simulation of crystalline model and their patterns of X-ray diffraction and comparison of these with other compounds reported in the literature. (Author)

  15. HYDROGEN AND ITS DESORPTION IN RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HSEUH,H.C.

    2002-11-11

    Hydrogen is the dominating gas specie in room temperature, ultrahigh vacuum systems of particle accelerators and storage rings, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven. Rapid pressure increase of a few decades in hydrogen and other residual gases was observed during RHIC's recent high intensity gold and proton runs. The type and magnitude of the pressure increase were analyzed and compared with vacuum conditioning, beam intensity, number of bunches and bunch spacing. Most of these pressure increases were found to be consistent with those induced by beam loss and/or electron stimulated desorption from electron multipacting.

  16. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Grisham and J.W. Kwan

    2008-08-12

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1] could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  17. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy,and Related Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisham, L. R.; Kwan, J. W.

    2008-08-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons - can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion - ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  18. Perspective on the Role of Negative Ions and Ion-Ion Plasmas in Heavy Ion Fusion Science, Magnetic Fusion Energy, and Related Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisham, L.R.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-08-01

    Some years ago it was suggested that halogen negative ions [1]could offer a feasible alternative path to positive ions as a heavy ion fusion driver beam which would not suffer degradation due to electron accumulation in the accelerator and beam transport system, and which could be converted to a neutral beam by photodetachment near the chamber entrance if desired. Since then, experiments have demonstrated that negative halogen beams can be extracted and accelerated away from the gas plume near the source with a surviving current density close to what could be achieved with a positive ion of similar mass, and with comparable optical quality. In demonstrating the feasibility of halogen negative ions as heavy ion driver beams, ion - ion plasmas, an interesting and somewhat novel state of matter, were produced. These plasmas, produced near the extractor plane of the sources, appear, based upon many lines of experimental evidence, to consist of almost equal densities of positive and negative chlorine ions, with only a small component of free electrons. Serendipitously, the need to extract beams from this plasma for driver development provides a unique diagnostic tool to investigate the plasma, since each component - positive ions, negative ions, and electrons -- can be extracted and measured separately. We discuss the relevance of these observations to understanding negative ion beam extraction from electronegative plasmas such as halogens, or the more familiar hydrogen of magnetic fusion ion sources. We suggest a concept which might improve negative hydrogen extraction by the addition of a halogen. The possibility and challenges of producing ion-ion plasmas with thin targets of halogens or, perhaps, salt, is briefly addressed.

  19. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  20. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  1. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  2. Hydrogen transport membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  3. (R,R-Disynephrine ether bis(hydrogen sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Arbuckle

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound [systematic name: (R,R-2,4-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl-N,N′-dimethyl-3-oxapentane-1,5-diammonium bis(hydrogen sulfate], C18H26N2O32+·2HSO4−, contains one half-cation and one hydrogen sulfate anion. The cation has crystallographically imposed twofold symmetry with the rotation axis passing through the central ether O atom. Hydrogen bonds between the hydroxy group and amine H atoms of the cation to two hydrogen sulfate anions link the three ions in a ring motif. A three-dimensional network is accomplished by additional O—H...O hydrogen bonds between the anions and by N—H...O hydrogen bonds between the cations. Disorder with equally occupied sites affects the H-atom position in the anion.

  4. Solar hydrogen generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Sabol, A. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus, using solar energy to manufacture hydrogen by dissociating water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen molecules is described. Solar energy is concentrated on a globe containing water thereby heating the water to its dissociation temperature. The globe is pervious to hydrogen molecules permitting them to pass through the globe while being essentially impervious to oxygen molecules. The hydrogen molecules are collected after passing through the globe and the oxygen molecules are removed from the globe.

  5. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  6. The solvation of NaCl in model water with different hydrogen bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, B; Zhang, F S; Wang, Z P; Zhou, H Y

    2008-11-14

    Based on hybrid water models, we design a series of solvent environments with different hydrogen bond strength and study the solvation of NaCl in them. The microstructures and dynamical behaviors of solvents and ion solutes are presented in detail to trace the correlations between the hydrogen bond strength of water and the solvation mechanism of the ions. In the process of the solvation of NaCl, the balance of the competition between breaking original solvent structures and formation of hydration shells around ions is sensitive to the hydrogen bonding ability of water. The results indicate that NaCl is most ideally dissolved in natural water with the strongest hydration effects around both cations and anions. In solvents with both reduced and enhanced hydrogen bond strength, the ions are more inclined to be in contact or aggregate into clusters of different sizes. These phenomena show that appropriate hydrogen bond strength is crucial for water's natural dissolving capacity.

  7. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  8. Laboratory Measurements of Charge Transfer on Atomic Hydrogen at Thermal Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havener, C. C.; Vane, C. R.; Krause, H. F.; Stancil, P. C.; Mroczkowski, T.; Savin, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe our ongoing program to measure velocity dependent charge transfer (CT) cross sections for selected ions on atomic hydrogen using the ion-aloin merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge Natioiial Laboralory. Our focus is on those ions for which CT plays an important role in determining the ionization structure, line emis sion, and thermal structure of observed cosmic photoionized plasmas.

  9. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  10. Safe venting of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  12. Cyclooctanaminium hydrogen succinate monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Khorasani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title hydrated salt, C8H18N+·C4H5O4−·H2O, the cyclooctyl ring of the cation is disordered over two positions in a 0.833 (3:0.167 (3 ratio. The structure contains various O—H.·O and N—H...O interactions, forming a hydrogen-bonded layer of molecules perpendicular to the c axis. In each layer, the ammonium cation hydrogen bonds to two hydrogen succinate anions and one water molecule. Each hydrogen succinate anion hydrogen bonds to neighbouring anions, forming a chain of molecules along the b axis. In addition, each hydrogen succinate anion hydrogen bonds to two water molecules and the ammonium cation.

  13. Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, S [South Jordan, UT; Nair, Balakrishnan G [Sandy, UT; Small, Troy [Midvale, UT; Heck, Brian [Salt Lake City, UT

    2011-09-06

    A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

  14. Optically pumped polarized ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenski, A.N.

    1995-12-31

    Polarization transfer collisions between protons, atomic hydrogen, or deuterium and optically pumped alkali-metal vapour are implemented in the high current optically pumped polarized ion source (OPPIS) and the laser driven source (LDS) of nuclear polarized atoms for target applications. The OPPIS technique overcomes the limitations on intensity of the conventional atomic beam source technique and meets the requirements of the new generation of polarization experiments at multi-GeV accelerators and colliders. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Hydrogen storage methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at Tchemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m-3, approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen is 70.8 kg.m-3, and large volumes, where the thermal losses are small, can cause hydrogen to reach a

  16. Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid WaterMicrojets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2007-05-31

    We describe a method for generating molecular hydrogen directly from the charge separation effected via rapid flow of liquid water through a metal orifice, wherein the input energy is the hydrostatic pressure times the volume flow rate. Both electrokinetic currents and hydrogen production rates are shown to follow simple equations derived from the overlap of the fluid velocity gradient and the anisotropic charge distribution resulting from selective adsorption of hydroxide ions to the nozzle surface. Pressure-driven fluid flow shears away the charge balancing hydronium ions from the diffuse double layer and carries them out of the aperture. Downstream neutralization of the excess protons at a grounded target electrode produces gaseous hydrogen molecules. The hydrogen production efficiency is currently very low (ca. 10-6) for a single cylindrical jet, but can be improved with design changes.

  17. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bonding configuration due to hydrogen migration have been proposed as a mechanism of defect generation in a-Si:H [6,7]. Thus hydrogen plays a dual role in a-Si:H: (1) acting as a .... the sphere of radius R0 and allows to express. ∆F as a function of localization radius R0. Using eqs (10) and (11), the volume integration.

  18. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  19. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  20. Hydrogen Stark broadening by different kinds of model microfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, J.

    1980-07-01

    A new model microfield is defined (the theta process) which in conjunction with the kangaroo process, is used to demonstrate the effects of different model microfields on hydrogen line profiles. The differences in the statistical features of the models give an estimate of the uncertainties associated with the method of model microfields. Stark broadening of hydrogen Lyman lines by either electrons or ions is investigated specifically.

  1. Recent developments of ion sources for life-science studies at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, A; Drentje, A G; Fujita, T; Muramatsu, M; Fukushima, K; Shiraishi, N; Suzuki, T; Takahashi, K; Takasugi, W; Biri, S; Rácz, R; Kato, Y; Uchida, T; Yoshida, Y

    2016-02-01

    With about 1000-h of relativistic high-energy ion beams provided by Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, about 70 users are performing various biology experiments every year. A rich variety of ion species from hydrogen to xenon ions with a dose rate of several Gy/min is available. Carbon, iron, silicon, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, and oxygen ions were utilized between 2012 and 2014. Presently, three electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs) and one Penning ion source are available. Especially, the two frequency heating techniques have improved the performance of an 18 GHz ECRIS. The results have satisfied most requirements for life-science studies. In addition, this improved performance has realized a feasible solution for similar biology experiments with a hospital-specified accelerator complex.

  2. Hydrogen Fuelling Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard

    This thesis concerns hydrogen fuelling stations from an overall system perspective. The study investigates thermodynamics and energy consumption of hydrogen fuelling stations for fuelling vehicles for personal transportation. For the study a library concerning the components in a hydrogen fuelling...... station has been developed in Dymola. The models include the fuelling protocol (J2601) for hydrogen vehicles made by Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the thermodynamic property library CoolProp is used for retrieving state point. The components in the hydrogen fuelling library are building up....... A system consisting of one high pressure storage tank is used to investigate the thermodynamics of fuelling a hydrogen vehicle. The results show that the decisive parameter for how the fuelling proceeds is the pressure loss in the vehicle. The single tank fuelling system is compared to a cascade fuelling...

  3. 2-Methyl-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium hydrogen phthalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YuanQi Yu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C8H9N2+·C8H5O4−, contains two independent ion pairs. In each 2-methyl-1H-benzimidazolium ion, an intramolecular O—H...O bond forms an S(7 graph-set motif. In the crystal, the components are linked by N—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming chains along [210]. Further stabilization is provided by weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  4. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  5. Pathways to Metallic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Deemyad, Shanti

    2008-01-01

    The traditional pathway that researchers have used in the goal of producing atomic metallic hydrogen is to compress samples with megabar pressures at low temperature. A number of phases have been observed in solid hydrogen and its isotopes, but all are in the insulating phase. The results of experiment and theory for this pathway are reviewed. In recent years a new pathway has become the focus of this challenge of producing metallic hydrogen, namely a path along the melting line. It has bee...

  6. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  7. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen is an especially attractive transportation fuel. It is the least polluting fuel available, and can be produced anywhere there is water and a clean source of electricity. A fuel cycle in which hydrogen is produced by solar-electrolysis of water, or by gasification of renewably grown biomass, and then used in a fuel-cell powered electric-motor vehicle (FCEV), would produce little or no local, regional, or global pollution. Hydrogen FCEVs would combine the best features of bat...

  8. A hydrogen sulfate salt of chlordiazepoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Diesen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Crystals of the hydrogen sulfate salt of chlordiazepoxide (systematic name: 7-chloro-N-methyl-5-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-iminium 4-oxide hydrogen sulfate, C16H15ClN3O+·HSO4−, were obtained from a solution of chlordiazepoxide and sulfuric acid in methanol. The structure features chlordiazepoxide molecules that are protonated at the imine N atom. The seven-membered ring adopts a boat conformation with the CH2 group as the prow and the two aryl C atoms as the stern. The dihedral angle between the benzene rings is 72.41 (6°. In the crystal, the HSO4− anion acts as a bridging group between two chlordiazepoxide cations. The H atom of the protonated imino N forms an N—H...O hydrogen bond with a hydrogen sulfate ion. The anion in turn forms two hydrogen bonds, O—H...O with the anion as donor and N—H...O with the anion as acceptor, to generate an R22(10 loop. Each HSO4− anion connects two chlordiazepoxide moieties of the same chirality.

  9. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  10. Hydroxide ion versus chloride and methoxide as an exogenous ligand reveals the influence of hydrogen bonding with second-sphere coordination water molecules in the electron transfer kinetics of Mn complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghachtouli, Sanae; Guillot, Régis; Aukauloo, Ally; Dorlet, Pierre; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, Elodie; Costentin, Cyrille

    2012-03-19

    We recently reported on the synthesis of a new pentadentate N(4)O ligand, tBuL(-), together with the X-ray diffraction structure of the corresponding mononuclear manganese(III)-hydroxo complex namely [(tBuL)Mn(III)OH](ClO(4)), (1 (ClO(4))). [El Ghachtouli et al. Energy Environ. Sci. 2011, 4, 2041.] In the present work, we evidence through electrochemical analysis that complex 1(+), in the presence of water, shows a peculiar behavior toward electron-transfer kinetics. The synthesis, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and EPR spectroscopic characterization of two other mononuclear manganese(III)-chlorido and methoxo complexes-namely, [(tBuL)Mn(III)Cl](PF(6)), (2(PF(6))) and [(tBuL)Mn(III)OMe](ClO(4)), (3(ClO(4)))-are also reported. 2(PF(6)) and 3(ClO(4)) compounds will serve as reference complexes for the electron-transfer kinetics investigation. The peculiar behavior of 1(ClO(4)) is attributed to the specificity of hydroxide anion as ligand presumably allowing intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions and thus affecting electron-transfer properties. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  11. Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity over Electro-synthesized HKUST-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witri Wahyu Lestari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available HKUST-1 [Cu3(1,3,5-BTC2] (BTC = benzene-tri-carboxylate was synthesized using an electrochemical method and tested for hydrogen storage. The obtained material showed a remarkably higher hydrogen uptake over reported HKUST-1 and reached until 4.75 wt% at room temperature and low pressure up to 1.2 bar. This yield was compared to HKUST-1 obtained from the solvothermal method, which showed a hydrogen uptake of only 1.19 wt%. Enhancement of hydrogen sorption of the electro-synthesized product was due to the more appropriate surface area and pore size, effected by the preferable physical interaction between the hydrogen gasses and the copper ions as unsaturated metal centers in the frameworks of HKUST-1.

  12. Elastic recoil detection analysis of hydrogen in polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winzell, T.R.H.; Whitlow, H.J. [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Bubb, I.F.; Short, R.; Johnston, P.N. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) of hydrogen in thick polymeric films has been performed using 2.5 MeV He{sup 2+} ions from the tandem accelerator at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. The technique enables the use of the same equipment as in Rutherford backscattering analysis, but instead of detecting the incident backscattered ion, the lighter recoiled ion is detected at a small forward angle. The purpose of this work is to investigate how selected polymers react when irradiated by helium ions. The polymers are to be evaluated for their suitability as reference standards for hydrogen depth profiling. Films investigated were Du Pont`s Kapton and Mylar, and polystyrene. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T [Ann Arbor, MI; Li, Yingwel [Ann Arbor, MI; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  14. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

    2013-02-12

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  15. Effect of the Hydrogen Bond on Photochemical Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng-jiao; Liu, Lei; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Rui-ling; Ren, Guang-hua; Xu, Da-li; Zhou, Pan-wang; Han, Ke-li

    2015-12-17

    The effect of a hydrogen bond on the photochemical synthesis of silver nanoparticles has been investigated via experimental and theoretical methods. In a benzophenone system, the photochemical synthesis process includes two steps, which are that hydrogen abstraction reaction and the following reduction reaction. We found that for the first step, an intermolecular hydrogen bond enhances the proton transfer. The efficiency of hydrogen abstraction increases with the hydrogen bond strength. For the second step, the hydrogen-bonded ketyl radical complex shows higher reducibility than the ketyl radical. The inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) measurement exhibits a 2.49 times higher yield of silver nanoparticles in the hydrogen bond ketyl radical complex system than that for the ketyl radical system. Theoretical calculations show that the hydrogen bond accelerates electron transfer from the ketyl radical to the silver ion by raising the SOMO energy of the ketyl radical; thus, the SOMO-LUMO interaction is more favorable.

  16. Secondary electron emission of thin carbon foils under the impact of hydrogen atoms, ions and molecular ions, under energies within the MeV range; Multiplicite des electrons secondaires emis par des cibles minces de carbone sous l'impact de projectiles H0, H2+, H3+ d'energie de l'ordre du MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovic, Z

    1997-06-15

    This work focuses on the study of the emission statistics of secondary electrons from thin carbon foils bombarded with H{sup 0}, H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} projectiles in the 0.25-2.2 MeV energy range. The phenomenon of secondary electron emission from solids under the impact of swift ions is mainly due to inelastic interactions with target electrons. The phenomenological and theoretical descriptions, as well as a summary of the main theoretical models are the subject of the first chapter. The experimental set-up used to measure event by event the electron emission of the two faces of a thin carbon foil traversed by an energetic projectile is described in the chapter two. In this chapter are also presented the method and algorithms used to process experimental spectra in order to obtain the statistical distribution of the emitted electrons. Chapter three presents the measurements of secondary electron emission induced by H atoms passing through thin carbon foils. The secondary electron yields are studied in correlation with the emergent projectile charge state. We show the peculiar role of the projectile electron, whether it remains or not bound to the incident proton. The fourth chapter is dedicated to the secondary electron emission induced by H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} polyatomic ions. The results are interpreted in terms of collective effects in the interactions of these ions with solids. The role of the proximity of the protons, molecular ion fragments, upon the amplitude of these collective effects is evidenced from the study of the statistics of forward emission. These experiences allowed us to shed light on various aspects of atom and polyatomic ion inter-actions with solid surfaces. (author)

  17. Second-harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating scenarios of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    at high field side. Direct electron heating experiment on the Aditya tokamak using fast waves (FW) in the IC frequency range has already been carried out in [3] and ... 1Spec (solid line) shows the power deposition profile of ions due to ... The vertical line indicates the second-harmonic resonance layer for hydrogen ions. 716.

  18. Biologically produced sulfur particles and polysulfide ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis deals with the effects of particles of biologically produced sulfur (or 'biosulfur') on a biotechnological process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams. Particular emphasis is given to the role of polysulfide ions in such a process. These

  19. Biologically produced sulfur particles and polysulfide ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis deals with the effects of particles of biologically produced sulfur (or 'biosulfur') on a biotechnological process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams. Particular emphasis is given to the role of polysulfide ions in such a process. These

  20. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofronis, Petros [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Robertson, Ian M [University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2013-08-01

    Fundamental studies of hydrogen embrittlement of materials using both experimental observations and numerical simulations of the hydrogen/deformation interactions have been conducted. Our approach integrates mechanical property testing at the macro-scale, microstructural analyses and TEM observations of the deformation processes at the micro- and nano-scale, first-principles calculations of interfacial cohesion at the atomic scale, and finite element simulation and modeling at the micro- and macro-level. Focused Ion Beam machining in conjunction with Transmission Electron Microscopy were used to identify the salient micro-mechanisms of failure in the presence of hydrogen. Our analysis of low strength ferritic steels led to the discovery that “quasi-cleavage” is a dislocation plasticity controlled failure mode in agreement with the hydrogen enhanced plasticity mechanism. The microstructure underneath the fracture surface of 304 and 316 stainless steels was found to be significantly more complex than would have been predicted by the traditional models of fatigue. The general refinement of the microstructure that occurred near the fracture surface in the presence of hydrogen was such that one may argue that hydrogen stabilizes microstructural configurations to an extent not achievable in its absence. Finite element studies of hydrogen and deformation field similitude for cracks in real-life pipelines and laboratory fracture specimens yielded that the Single Edge Notch Tension specimen can be used to reliably study hydrogen material compatibility for pipeline structures. In addition, simulation of onset of crack propagation in low strength ferritic systems by void growth indicated that hydrogen can reduce the fracture toughness of the material by as much as 30%. Both experimental observations and numerical studies of hydrogen transport on hydrogen accumulations ahead of a crack tip yielded that dislocation transport can markedly enhance hydrogen populations which

  1. Hydrogen Storage Tank

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This huge stainless steel reservoir,placed near an end of the East Hall, was part of the safety equipment connected to the 2 Metre liquid hydrogen Bubble Chamber. It could store all the hydrogen in case of an emergency. The picture shows the start of its demolition.

  2. Metastable ultracondensed hydrogenous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellis, W. J.

    2017-12-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to stimulate theoretical predictions of how to retain metastably hydrogenous materials made at high pressure P on release to ambient. Ultracondensed metallic hydrogen has been made at high pressures in the fluid and reported made probably in the solid. Because the long quest for metallic hydrogen is likely to be concluded in the relatively near future, a logical question is whether another research direction, comparable in scale to the quest for metallic H, will arise in high pressure research. One possibility is retention of metastable solid metallic hydrogen and other hydrogenous materials on release of dynamic and static high pressures P to ambient. If hydrogenous materials could be retained metastably on release, those materials would be a new class of materials for scientific investigations and technological applications. This paper is a review of the current situation with the synthesis of metallic hydrogen, potential technological applications of metastable metallic H and other hydrogenous materials at ambient, and general background of published experimental and theoretical work on what has been accomplished with metastable phases in the past and thus what might be accomplished in the future.

  3. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  4. Dark hydrogen fermentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrije, de G.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The production of hydrogen is a ubiquitous, natural phenomenon under anoxic or anaerobic conditions. A wide variety of bacteria, in swamps, sewage, hot springs, the rumen of cattle etc. is able to convert organic matter to hydrogen, CO2 and metabolites like acetic acid, lactate, ethanol and alanine.

  5. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipp, Ludwig [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Torrington, CT (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Conventional compressors have not been able to meet DOE targets for hydrogen refueling stations. They suffer from high capital cost, poor reliability and pose a risk of fuel contamination from lubricant oils. This project has significantly advanced the development of solid state hydrogen compressor technology for multiple applications. The project has achieved all of its major objectives. It has demonstrated capability of Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) technology to potentially meet the DOE targets for small compressors for refueling sites. It has quantified EHC cell performance and durability, including single stage hydrogen compression from near-atmospheric pressure to 12,800 psi and operation of EHC for more than 22,000 hours. Capital cost of EHC was reduced by 60%, enabling a path to meeting the DOE cost targets for hydrogen compression, storage and delivery ($2.00-2.15/gge by 2020).

  6. Chlorific efficiency of coal hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schappert, H.

    1942-10-20

    In studies on the calorific efficiency of coal hydrogenation, the efficiency for H/sub 2/ production was calculated to be 26%, the efficiency for hydrogenation was calculated to be 49%, and the efficiency of hydrogenation including H/sub 2/ production was 27.2%. The efficiency of hydrogenation plus hydrogen production was almost equal to the efficiency of hydrogen production alone, even though this was not expected because of the total energy calculated in the efficiency of hydrogenation proper. It was entirely possible, but did not affect computations, that the efficiency of one or the other components of hydrogenation process differed somewhat from 49%. The average efficiency for all cases was 49%. However, when hydrogen was not bought, but was produced--(efficiency of hydrogen production was 26%, not 100%-- then the total energy changed and the efficiency of hydrogen production and combination was not 26%, but 13%. This lower value explained the drop of hydrogenation efficiency to 27.2%.

  7. The effect of ammonia upon the electrocatalysis of hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction on polycrystalline platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Hernandez-Fernandez, Patricia; Stephens, Ifan E.L.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ammonium ions on the catalysis of hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction is studied by means of rotating ring-disk electrode experiments on polycrystalline platinum in perchloric acid. While ammonium does not affect the hydrogen oxidation reaction, the oxygen reduction reaction...

  8. Catalytic currents of hydrogen in solutions of W(VI) and mandelic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikryzova, E.G.; Mashinskaya, S.Ya.

    1986-04-10

    An investigation was made of catalytic polarographic currents of hydrogen in acid dilute solutions of W(VI) with excess of mandelic acid. The nature of the current was studied, and a scheme for the catalytic process is proposed. The reduction of hydrogen ions is catalyzed by the complex (W(OH)HM)/sup 2 +/ adsorbed on the dropping mercury electrode.

  9. Hydrogen generation from aqueous acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jae [Clean Fuels and Catalysis Program, The EMS Energy Institute, and Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Jong; Han, M.K. [Surface technology team, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hansung; Shul, Yong-Gun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyeong Taek [Cheil Industries Co. LTD, 437-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    In this study, the hydrogen feed from both Ru-catalyzed and organic acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} was studied in terms of hydrogen generation rate and integrated PEMFC performance. Hydrogen feed generated from the conventional Ru-catalyzed hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} caused a drastic loss of PEMFC performance. It was found that the presence of sodium ion in hydrogen feed was a main factor that increased the interfacial resistance of fuel cell and, consequently, reduced the performance. Acid-catalyzed hydrolysis with powder form of NaBH{sub 4} was adopted in order to minimize the detrimental effect of sodium ion. The hydrogen feed from acid-catalyzed hydrolysis was quite dry so that even water vapor, the carrier of sodium ion, was not detected after condensation of hydrogen feed. It was confirmed by the several experiments that the hydrogen release rate can be controlled by varying the injection rate and concentration of aqueous acid. Various organic acids were employed in the production of hydrogen and found that acidity, acid type and chemical structure are also important factors on hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4}. The performance from the integrated acid-catalyzed hydrogen generation system with PEMFC was quite stable and no significant loss was observed contrary to that from the integrated Ru-catalyzed hydrogen generation system-PEMFC test. This result also clarified that the detrimental effect of sodium ion could be removed by minimizing the water vapor in this manner. Based on the experiment of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis, a small-scale hydrogen-generating device was designed and fabricated, from which hydrogen release was controlled by the acid concentration and injection rate of aqueous acid solution. (author)

  10. The hydrogen highway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, A. [Fuel Cells Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  11. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.; Misra, A.; Miller, E. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A significant component of the US DOE Hydrogen Program is the development of a practical technology for the direct production of hydrogen using a renewable source of energy. High efficiency photoelectrochemical systems to produce hydrogen directly from water using sunlight as the energy source represent one of the technologies identified by DOE to meet this mission. Reactor modeling and experiments conducted at UH provide strong evidence that direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency greater than 10% can be expected using photoelectrodes fabricated from low-cost, multijunction (MJ) amorphous silicon solar cells. Solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8% have been achieved using a 10.3% efficient MJ amorphous silicon solar cell. Higher efficiency can be expected with the use of higher efficiency solar cells, further improvement of the thin film oxidation and reduction catalysts, and optimization of the solar cell for hydrogen production rather than electricity production. Hydrogen and oxygen catalysts developed under this project are very stable, exhibiting no measurable degradation in KOH after over 13,000 hours of operation. Additional research is needed to fully optimize the transparent, conducting coatings which will be needed for large area integrated arrays. To date, the best protection has been afforded by wide bandgap amorphous silicon carbide films.

  12. A green hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, W.W. II [Clark Communications, Beverly Hills, CA (United States). Green Hydrogen Scientific Advisory Committee; Rifkin, J. [The Foundation on Economic Trends (United States)

    2006-11-15

    This paper is the result of over a dozen scholars and practitioners who strongly felt that a hydrogen economy and hence the future is closer than some American politicians and bureaucrats state. Moreover, when seen internationally, there is strong evidence, the most recent and obvious ones are the proliferation of hybrid vehicles, that for any nation-state to be energy independent it must seek a renewable or green hydrogen future in the near term. The State of California has once again taken the lead in this effort for both an energy-independent future and one linked strongly to the hydrogen economy. Then why a hydrogen economy in the first instance? The fact is that hydrogen most likely will not be used for refueling of vehicles in the near term. The number of vehicles to make hydrogen commercially viable will not be in the mass market by almost all estimates until 2010. However, it is less than a decade away. The time frame is NOT 30-40 years as some argue. The hydrogen economy needs trained people, new ventures and public-private partnerships now. The paper points out how the concerns of today, including higher costs and technologies under development, can be turned into opportunities for both the public and private sectors. It was not too long ago that the size of a mobile phone was that of a briefcase, and then almost 10 years ago, the size of a shoe box. Today, they are not only the size of a man's wallet but also often given away free to consumers who subscribe or contract for wireless services. While hydrogen may not follow this technological commercialization exactly, it certainly will be on a parallel path. International events and local or regional security dictate that the time for a hydrogen must be close at hand. (author)

  13. Ordered ground states of metallic hydrogen and deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, N. W.

    1981-01-01

    The physical attributes of some of the more physically distinct ordered states of metallic hydrogen and metallic deuterium at T = 0 and nearby are discussed. The likelihood of superconductivity in both is considered with respect to the usual coupling via the density fluctuations of the ions.

  14. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M; Lien, S; Weaver, P F

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  15. Photobiological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibert, M.; Lien, S.; Weaver, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen production by phototrophic organisms, which has been known since the 1930's, occurs at the expense of light energy and electron-donating substrates. Three classes of organisms, namely, photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae carry out this function. The primary hydrogen-producing enzyme systems, hydrogenase and nitrogenase, will be discussed along with the manner in which they couple to light-driven electron transport. In addition, the feasibility of using in vivo and in vitro photobiological hydrogen producing systems in future solar energy conversion applications will be examined.

  16. Biological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  17. Chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Frederick T.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the CaCu.sub.5 type of crystal structure, particularly LaNiCo.sub.4 and CaNi.sub.5, exhibit high separation factors and fast equilibrium times and therefore are useful for packing a chromatographic hydrogen isotope separation colum. The addition of an inert metal to dilute the hydride improves performance of the column. A large scale mutli-stage chromatographic separation process run as a secondary process off a hydrogen feedstream from an industrial plant which uses large volumes of hydrogen can produce large quantities of heavy water at an effective cost for use in heavy water reactors.

  18. Color Changing Hydrogen Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha; Captain, Janine E.; Mohajeri, Nahid; Raissi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Program, one of the most hazardous operation that occurred was the loading of liquid hydrogen (LH2) during fueling operations of the spacecraft. Due to hydrogen's low explosive limit, any amount leaked could lead to catastrophic event. Hydrogen's chemical properties make it ideal as a rocket fuel; however, the fuel is deemed unsafe for most commercial use because of the inability to easily detect the gas leaking. The increased use of hydrogen over traditional fossil fuels would reduce greenhouse gases and America's dependency on foreign oil. Therefore a technology that would improve safety at NASA and in the commercial sector while creating a new economic sector would have a huge impact to NASA's mission. The Chemochromic Detector for sensing hydrogen gas leakage is a color-changing detector that is useful in any application where it is important to know not only the presence but also the location of the hydrogen gas leak. This technology utilizes a chemochromicpigment and polymer matrix that can be molded or spun into rigid or pliable shapes useable in variable temperature environments including atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases. A change in color of the detector material indicates where gaseous hydrogen leaks are occurring. The irreversible sensor has a dramatic color change from beige to dark grey and remains dark grey after exposure. A reversible pigment changes from white to blue in the presence of hydrogen and reverts back to white in the presence of oxygen. Both versions of the sensor's pigments were comprised of a mixture of a metal oxide substrate and a hydro-chromic compound (i.e., the compound that changed color in the presence of hydrogen) and immediately notified the operator of the presence of low levels of hydrogen. The detector can be used in a variety of formats including paint, tape, caulking, injection molded parts, textiles and fabrics, composites, and films. This technology brings numerous

  19. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  20. Biomimetic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  1. Bacterial metabarcoding by 16S rRNA gene ion torrent amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Elio; Gianese, Giulio; Giuliano, Giovanni; Fiore, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    Ion Torrent is a next generation sequencing technology based on the detection of hydrogen ions produced during DNA chain elongation; this technology allows analyzing and characterizing genomes, genes, and species. Here, we describe an Ion Torrent procedure applied to the metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene amplicons to study the bacterial diversity in food and environmental samples.

  2. Nanostructure, hydrogen bonding and rheology in choline chloride deep eutectic solvents as a function of the hydrogen bond donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovic, Ryan; Ludwig, Michael; Webber, Grant B; Atkin, Rob; Page, Alister J

    2017-01-25

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are a mixture of a salt and a molecular hydrogen bond donor, which form a eutectic liquid with a depressed melting point. Quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) simulations have been used to probe the 1 : 2 choline chloride-urea (ChCl : U), choline chloride-ethylene glycol (ChCl : EG) and choline chloride-glycerol (ChCl : Gly) DESs. DES nanostructure and interactions between the ions is used to rationalise differences in DES eutectic point temperatures and viscosity. Simulations show that the structure of the bulk hydrogen bond donor is largely preserved for hydroxyl based hydrogen bond donors (ChCl:Gly and ChCl:EG), resulting in a smaller melting point depression. By contrast, ChCl:U exhibits a well-established hydrogen bond network between the salt and hydrogen bond donor, leading to a larger melting point depression. This extensive hydrogen bond network in ChCl:U also leads to substantially higher viscosity, compared to ChCl:EG and ChCl:Gly. Of the two hydroxyl based DESs, ChCl:Gly also exhibits a higher viscosity than ChCl:EG. This is attributed to the over-saturation of hydrogen bond donor groups in the ChCl:Gly bulk, which leads to more extensive hydrogen bond donor self-interaction and hence higher cohesive forces within the bulk liquid.

  3. Hydrogen-enhanced-plasticity mediated decohesion for hydrogen-induced intergranular and ``quasi-cleavage'' fracture of lath martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Akihide; Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Somerday, Brian P.; Sofronis, Petros; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of lath martenistic steels is characterized by intergranular and "quasi-cleavage" transgranular fracture. Recent transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses (Nagao et al., 2012a, 2014a, 2014b, 2014c) of samples lifted from beneath fracture surfaces through focused ion beam machining (FIB) revealed a failure mechanism that can be termed hydrogen-enhanced-plasticity mediated decohesion. Fracture occurs by the synergistic action of the hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity and decohesion. In particular, intergranular cracking takes place by dislocation pile-ups impinging on prior austenite grain boundaries and "quasi-cleavage" is the case when dislocation pile-ups impinge on block boundaries. These high-angle boundaries, which have already weakened by the presence of hydrogen, debond by the pile-up stresses. The micromechanical model of Novak et al. (2010) is used to quantitatively describe and predict the hydrogen-induced failure of these steels. The model predictions verify that introduction of nanosized (Ti,Mo)C precipitates in the steel microstructure enhances the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. The results are used to discuss microstructural designs that are less susceptible to hydrogen-induced failure in systems with fixed hydrogen content (closed systems).

  4. Low Z impurity ion extraction from TFTR ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Newman, R.A.; O' Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.; Wright, K.E.

    1993-04-01

    TFTR deuterium neutral beams have been operated unintentionally with significant quantities of extracted water ions. Water has been observed with an Optical Multichannel Analyzer (OMA) during beam extraction when small water leaks were present within the arc chamber. These leaks were thermally induced with the contamination level increasing linearly with pulse length. 6% of the beam current was attributed to water ions for the worst leak, corresponding to an instantaneous value of 12% at the end of a 1.5 s pulse. A pre-calorimeter collimator was damaged as a result of this operation. A similar contamination is observed during initial operation of ion sources exposed to air. This latter contamination is attributed to the synthesis, from adsorbed air, of either D[sub 2]O or the indistinguishable ND[sub 3]. Initial operation of new ion sources typically produces a contamination level of [approximately]2%. These impurities are reduced to undetectable levels after 50 to 100 beam pulses. Once a water molecule is present in the plasma generator, it is predominantly ionized rather than dissociated, resulting in the extraction of only trace amounts of hydrogenated ions. The addition of water to the extracted beam also reduces the optimum perveance, moving the typical underdense operating point closer to optimum, causing the frequency of grid faults to increase. Close to 90% of the water extracted from ion sources with water leaks was deuterated, implying that the potential exists for the production of tritiated water during TFTR's forthcoming DT operation. Isotope exchange in the plasma generator takes place rapidly and is believed to be surface catalyzed. The primary concern is with O implanted into beam absorbers recombining with tritium, and the subsequent hold up of T[sub 2]O on cryopanels. Continuous surveillance with the OMA diagnostic during DT operation will ensure that ion sources with detectable water are not operated with tritium.

  5. Low Z impurity ion extraction from TFTR ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Newman, R.A.; O`Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.; Wright, K.E.

    1993-04-01

    TFTR deuterium neutral beams have been operated unintentionally with significant quantities of extracted water ions. Water has been observed with an Optical Multichannel Analyzer (OMA) during beam extraction when small water leaks were present within the arc chamber. These leaks were thermally induced with the contamination level increasing linearly with pulse length. 6% of the beam current was attributed to water ions for the worst leak, corresponding to an instantaneous value of 12% at the end of a 1.5 s pulse. A pre-calorimeter collimator was damaged as a result of this operation. A similar contamination is observed during initial operation of ion sources exposed to air. This latter contamination is attributed to the synthesis, from adsorbed air, of either D{sub 2}O or the indistinguishable ND{sub 3}. Initial operation of new ion sources typically produces a contamination level of {approximately}2%. These impurities are reduced to undetectable levels after 50 to 100 beam pulses. Once a water molecule is present in the plasma generator, it is predominantly ionized rather than dissociated, resulting in the extraction of only trace amounts of hydrogenated ions. The addition of water to the extracted beam also reduces the optimum perveance, moving the typical underdense operating point closer to optimum, causing the frequency of grid faults to increase. Close to 90% of the water extracted from ion sources with water leaks was deuterated, implying that the potential exists for the production of tritiated water during TFTR`s forthcoming DT operation. Isotope exchange in the plasma generator takes place rapidly and is believed to be surface catalyzed. The primary concern is with O implanted into beam absorbers recombining with tritium, and the subsequent hold up of T{sub 2}O on cryopanels. Continuous surveillance with the OMA diagnostic during DT operation will ensure that ion sources with detectable water are not operated with tritium.

  6. Carbon Mineralization Using Phosphate and Silicate Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokturk, H.

    2013-12-01

    ions would enhance the absorption of CO2 into the aerosol even more than the singly or doubly charged ions. Ion containing aerosols also help to catalyze reactions between water and CO2. Hydrated phosphate and silicate ions tend to attract hydrogen atoms from neighboring water molecules to reduce the charged state. When there is CO2 in the vicinity of the ion, the remainder of the water molecule which loses the hydrogen(s) reacts with CO2 to form carbonates. (PO4---) + H2O + CO2 -> (HPO3--) + (HCO3-) (SiO4----) + H2O + CO2 -> (HSiO4---) + (HCO3-) (SiO4----) + H2O + CO2 -> (H2SiO4--) + (CO3--) In conclusion, highly charged phosphate and silicate ions dissolved in water and aerosolized into small droplets can facilitate both the capture and the mineralization of CO2. This method would be especially effective in a CO2 rich environment such as the exhaust gas of a combustion process. [1] H. Gokturk, "Geoengineering with Charged Droplets," AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco 2011 [2] H. Gokturk, "Atomistic Simulation of Sea Spray Particles," AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco 2012

  7. Tailoring the properties of semiconductor nanowires using ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, C.; Borschel, C.; Geburt, S.; Niepelt, R. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena (Germany); Mueller, S.; Stichtenoth, D. [II. Institute of Physics, University of Goettingen (Germany); Richters, J.P.; Dev, A.; Voss, T. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen (Germany); Chen, L.; Heimbrodt, W. [Department of Physics and Material Sciences, Philipps-University of Marburg (Germany); Gutsche, C.; Prost, W. [Institute for Semiconductor Technology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    This review demonstrates that ion irradiation is a very useful tool in order to tailor the properties of semiconductor nanowires. Besides optical and electrical doping provided by adequate ion species and ion energies, one can use ion beams also for the controlled shaping of the morphology of nanostructures. Here, one utilizes the commonly as 'negative' described characteristics of ion implantation: defect formation and sputtering. We show that ion beams can be even used for an alignment of the nanowires. Furthermore, we report here on several successful experiments in order to modify the electrical and optical properties in a controlled manner of ZnO semiconductor nanowires by the use of transition metals, rare earth elements and hydrogen ions. Schematic illustration of ion beam doping of a single contacted nanowire. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  9. Hydrogen Recovery System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Liquid hydrogen is used extensively by NASA to support cryogenic rocket testing. In addition, there are many commercial applications in which delivery and use of...

  10. Hydrogen Recovery System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rocket test operations at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) result in substantial quantities of hydrogen gas that is flared from the facility and helium gas that is...

  11. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Miller, E.; Misra, A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing energy provided by a renewable source to split water is one of the most ambitious long-term goals of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. One promising option to meet this goal is direct photoelectrolysis in which light absorbed by semiconductor-based photoelectrodes produces electrical power internally to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Under this program, direct solar-to-chemical conversion efficiencies as high as 7.8 % have been demonstrated using low-cost, amorphous-silicon-based photoelectrodes. Detailed loss analysis models indicate that solar-to-chemical conversion greater than 10% can be achieved with amorphous-silicon-based structures optimized for hydrogen production. In this report, the authors describe the continuing progress in the development of thin-film catalytic/protective coatings, results of outdoor testing, and efforts to develop high efficiency, stable prototype systems.

  12. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperature...

  13. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauf, R.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Fleming, P.H.

    1994-11-22

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed. 6 figs.

  14. Hydrogenated TiO2 nanobelts as highly efficient photocatalytic organic dye degradation and hydrogen evolution photocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jian; Leng, Yanhua; Cui, Hongzhi; Liu, Hong

    2015-12-15

    TiO2 nanobelts have gained increasing interest because of its outstanding properties and promising applications in a wide range of fields. Here we report the facile synthesis of hydrogenated TiO2 (H-TiO2) nanobelts, which exhibit excellent UV and visible photocatalytic decomposing of methyl orange (MO) and water splitting for hydrogen production. The improved photocatalytic property can be attributed to the Ti(3+) ions and oxygen vacancies in TiO2 nanobelts created by hydrogenation. Ti(3+) ions and oxygen vacancies can enhance visible light absorption, promote charge carrier trapping, and hinder the photogenerated electron-hole recombination. This work offers a simple strategy for the fabrication of a wide solar spectrum of active photocatalysts, which possesses significant potential for more efficient photodegradation, photocatalytic water splitting, and enhanced solar cells using sunlight as light source. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The hydrogen issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2011-01-17

    Hydrogen is often proposed as the fuel of the future, but the transformation from the present fossil fuel economy to a hydrogen economy will need the solution of numerous complex scientific and technological issues, which will require several decades to be accomplished. Hydrogen is not an alternative fuel, but an energy carrier that has to be produced by using energy, starting from hydrogen-rich compounds. Production from gasoline or natural gas does not offer any advantage over the direct use of such fuels. Production from coal by gasification techniques with capture and sequestration of CO₂ could be an interim solution. Water splitting by artificial photosynthesis, photobiological methods based on algae, and high temperatures obtained by nuclear or concentrated solar power plants are promising approaches, but still far from practical applications. In the next decades, the development of the hydrogen economy will most likely rely on water electrolysis by using enormous amounts of electric power, which in its turn has to be generated. Producing electricity by burning fossil fuels, of course, cannot be a rational solution. Hydroelectric power can give but a very modest contribution. Therefore, it will be necessary to generate large amounts of electric power by nuclear energy of by renewable energies. A hydrogen economy based on nuclear electricity would imply the construction of thousands of fission reactors, thereby magnifying all the problems related to the use of nuclear energy (e.g., safe disposal of radioactive waste, nuclear proliferation, plant decommissioning, uranium shortage). In principle, wind, photovoltaic, and concentrated solar power have the potential to produce enormous amounts of electric power, but, except for wind, such technologies are too underdeveloped and expensive to tackle such a big task in a short period of time. A full development of a hydrogen economy needs also improvement in hydrogen storage, transportation and distribution

  16. Cryogenic hydrogen release research.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this project was to devolop a plan for modifying the Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) with the necessary infrastructure to produce a cold (near liquid temperature) hydrogen jet. The necessary infrastructure has been specified and laboratory modifications are currently underway. Once complete, experiments from this platform will be used to develop and validate models that inform codes and standards which specify protection criteria for unintended releases from liquid hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery infrastructure.

  17. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  18. Cytosinium hydrogen selenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhwane Takouachet

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title salt, C4H6N3O+·HSeO3−, systematic name 6-amino-2-methylidene-2,3-dihydropyrimidin-1-ium hydrogen selenite, the hydrogenselenite anions and the cytosinium cations are linked via N—H...O, N—H...Se, O—H...O, O—H··Se and C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional framework.

  19. Ash removal by hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rank, V.; von Hartmann, G.B.

    1942-10-17

    This method for the production of high-quality electrode coke involved the hydrogenation of coal to a filterable bitumen product. The hydrogenation and splitting processes were carried out to end at high-molecular-weight bitumens with some lighter oils produced. Variations in temperature, pressure, and throughput determined the type and amount of bitumens. Proper conditions allowed sufficient middle oil for recirculation as pasting oil as well as for increasing filterability by dilution. This partial hydrogenation could be performed without the addition of hydrogen, if hydrogen-producing aromatic compounds, such as tetraline or cresol, were used as pasting oils. For 700-atm hydrogenation, it was found that the Upper Silesian coal was the best with respect to yield, filterability, and recovery of the recycle oils. The lower pressures gave a better filterability while sacrificing yield and recycle oil. The more severe the hydrogenating conditions, the lighter the bitumens and the lower the melting point. For the range of 300 to 600 atm, it was found that filterability improved with increased temperature and decreased with a pressure gain. Larger throughputs caused relatively moderate decreases in filterability. The use of iron catalysts decreased filterability while changing gas and pasting-oil content had little effect. The optimum conditions established a pasting-oil equilibrium with the best filterability. Greater degrees of hydrogenation or splitting produced more recycle middle oils but decreased filterability, thus only the necessary paste oil was produced. By selecting proper conditions, an ashfree bituminous binder could be produced, as used in the production of the Soederberg electrode. 2 tables, 2 graphs

  20. Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team (HDTT) is to enable the development of hydrogen delivery technologies, which will allow for fuel cell competitiveness with gasoline and hybrid technologies by achieving an as-produced, delivered, and dispensed hydrogen cost of $2-$4 per gallon of gasoline equivalent of hydrogen.

  1. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not

  2. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  3. From lattice ion ion-exchanger to ion memorizing ion-exchanger; Koshi ion ion kokantai kara ion kioku ion kokantai e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, T. [Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-05

    Introduced in this report is the lattice-ion ion exchanger and ion-memorizing ion exchanger that have of late developed into key words. The former is the name given to inorganic ion exchangers, such as hydroxyapatite (hereinafter to be shortened to HAp), which selectively exchange ions for other ions in a water solution, at the ordinary temperature and atmospheric pressure off the common knowledge in inorganic structural chemistry. HAp is an example different from the conventional counter-ion ion exchangers as represented by zeolite, in terms of the order of selectiveness it demonstrates when encountering various cations. HAp and the same with its PO4{sup 3-} ion group replaced with a CO3{sup 2-} or SiO4{sup 4-} group is effective in removing dangerous ions and in sterilizing. The ion-memorizing ion exchanger is a development from the lattice-ion ion exchanger, and is capable of very selectively collecting and removing specified ions as if it remembered the specified ions. The Li- or K-ion-memorizing ion exchanger is a typical example. 17 refs., 4 figs, 4 tabs.

  4. Hydrogen supplies for SPFC vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, D.; Bauen, A.; Fouquet, R.; Leach, M.; Pearson, P.; Anderson, D.

    2000-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a study investigating the potential of using hydrogen fuel for fuel cell-powered fleet vehicles based at a depot in a range of counties. An overview of current hydrogen supply and demand is presented, and research already carried out on potential hydrogen refuelling infrastructures, and the costs of producing hydrogen as a transportation fuel are examined. Hydrogen demand modelling, and supplying hydrogen to fleet vehicles, alternative hydrogen supply options, energy and emissions comparison with competing fuels, and health and safety standards are discussed.

  5. Characterization of hydrogen-bonded supramolecular assemblies by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry after Ag+ labeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolliffe, K.A.; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Fokkens, R.H.; Nibbering, N.M.M.; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    The high affinity of Ag+ ions for aromatic pi donors and cyano groups is exploited in a novel MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric method for the identification of hydrogen-bonded assemblies. The interaction with the Ag+ ions - which, for example, can be complexed by two phenyl groups in a sandwich-type

  6. Multiscale modelling of the interaction of hydrogen with interstitial defects and dislocations in BCC tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A.; Mason, D. R.; Domain, C.; Nguyen-Manh, D.; Marinica, M.-C.; Ventelon, L.; Becquart, C. S.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2018-01-01

    In a fusion tokamak, the plasma of hydrogen isotopes is in contact with tungsten at the surface of a divertor. In the bulk of the material, the hydrogen concentration profile tends towards dynamic equilibrium between the flux of incident ions and their trapping and release from defects, either native or produced by ion and neutron irradiation. The dynamics of hydrogen exchange between the plasma and the material is controlled by pressure, temperature, and also by the energy barriers characterizing hydrogen diffusion in the material, trapping and de-trapping from defects. In this work, we extend the treatment of interaction of hydrogen with vacancy-type defects, and investigate how hydrogen is trapped by self-interstitial atom defects and dislocations. The accumulation of hydrogen on dislocation loops and dislocations is assessed using a combination of density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamics with empirical potentials, and linear elasticity theory. The equilibrium configurations adopted by hydrogen atoms in the core of dislocations as well as in the elastic fields of defects, are modelled by DFT. The structure of the resulting configurations can be rationalised assuming that hydrogen atoms interact elastically with lattice distortions and that they interact between themselves through short-range repulsion. We formulate a two-shell model for hydrogen interaction with an interstitial defect of any size, which predicts how hydrogen accumulates at defects, dislocation loops and line dislocations at a finite temperature. We derive analytical formulae for the number of hydrogen atoms forming the Cottrell atmosphere of a mesoscopic dislocation loop or an edge dislocation. The solubility of hydrogen as a function of temperature, pressure and the density of dislocations exhibits three physically distinct regimes, dominated by the solubility of hydrogen in a perfect lattice, its retention at dislocation cores, and trapping by long-range elastic fields of

  7. California Hydrogen Infrastructure Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydorn, Edward C

    2013-03-12

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has completed a comprehensive, multiyear project to demonstrate a hydrogen infrastructure in California. The specific primary objective of the project was to demonstrate a model of a real-world retail hydrogen infrastructure and acquire sufficient data within the project to assess the feasibility of achieving the nation's hydrogen infrastructure goals. The project helped to advance hydrogen station technology, including the vehicle-to-station fueling interface, through consumer experiences and feedback. By encompassing a variety of fuel cell vehicles, customer profiles and fueling experiences, this project was able to obtain a complete portrait of real market needs. The project also opened its stations to other qualified vehicle providers at the appropriate time to promote widespread use and gain even broader public understanding of a hydrogen infrastructure. The project engaged major energy companies to provide a fueling experience similar to traditional gasoline station sites to foster public acceptance of hydrogen. Work over the course of the project was focused in multiple areas. With respect to the equipment needed, technical design specifications (including both safety and operational considerations) were written, reviewed, and finalized. After finalizing individual equipment designs, complete station designs were started including process flow diagrams and systems safety reviews. Material quotes were obtained, and in some cases, depending on the project status and the lead time, equipment was placed on order and fabrication began. Consideration was given for expected vehicle usage and station capacity, standard features needed, and the ability to upgrade the station at a later date. In parallel with work on the equipment, discussions were started with various vehicle manufacturers to identify vehicle demand (short- and long-term needs). Discussions included identifying potential areas most suited for hydrogen fueling

  8. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  9. Hydrogen as an energy vector

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela Ortega, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Study of the use of the Hydrogen to storage big amounts of energy. In this project there will be an study about the different energies that are profitable to use them to obtain hydrogen, the study of the different technologies to obtain hydrogen (electrolysis, gasification, etc.), the study of the technologies for storage the hydrogen and the study of the different ways to obtain final energy with the hydrogen. There will be also an overall analysis of the efficiency of the process a...

  10. [The Effect of Hydrogen Bonding on the Spectrum of HPAM in Various Systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    IR and UV-Vis was employed to analyzed the spectrum effect of hydrogen bonding on the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide polymer(HPAM). The study reveals that, the characteristic absorption peak of free amino group moves to the low frequency due to the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding between amide group and carboxyl group. In the water solution, intramolecular hydrogen bonding is the main factor that shifted maximal absorption towards long wavelength. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding and intermolecular hydrogen bonds exist at the same time in the water solution contains intermediate sodium and calcium ions. While in the high concentration solution, the main form between amide group and carboxyl group is intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The effect of hydrogen bonding on the spectrum of HPAM demonstrates different extent in various systems. In the water solution, the maximum absorption wavelength red shifts 8 nm. In the system contains sodium ions, this shift is 4 nm. And this shift is only 2 nm in the solution contains both sodium ions and calcium ions.

  11. ION VATAMANU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    l. Povar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ion Vatamanu was a chemist, writer and public figure. He was equally passionate about both his chosen fields of activity: chemistry and poetry. Chemistry, with its perfect equilibrium of logic and precision, provided inspiration for lyrical creativity, whereas poetry writing enlivened his imagination and passion for chemistry. He loved his parents. He adored his wife Elena, whom he often gifted a sea of flowers. He loved his daughters Mihaela, Mariana, and Leontina. He loved life, and he loved people.

  12. Ion Beam Extraction by Discrete Ion Focusing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    An apparatus (900) and methods are disclosed for ion beam extraction. In an implementation, the apparatus includes a plasma source (or plasma) (802) and an ion extractor (804). The plasma source is adapted to generate ions and the ion extractor is immersed in the plasma source to extract a fraction...... of the generated ions. The ion extractor is surrounded by a space charge (810) formed at least in part by the extracted ions. The ion extractor includes a biased electrode (806) forming an interface with an insulator (808). The interface is customized to form a strongly curved potential distribution (812......) in the space-charge surrounding the ion extractor. The strongly curved potential distribution focuses the extracted ions towards an opening (814) on a surface of the biased electrode thereby resulting in an ion beam....

  13. Hydrogen Contractors Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, Tim [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering

    2006-05-16

    This volume highlights the scientific content of the 2006 Hydrogen Contractors Meeting sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (DMS&E) on behalf of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Hydrogen Contractors Meeting held from May 16-19, 2006 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott Hotel Arlington, Virginia. This meeting is the second in a series of research theme-based Contractors Meetings sponsored by DMS&E held in conjunction with our counterparts in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the first with the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The focus of this year’s meeting is BES funded fundamental research underpinning advancement of hydrogen storage. The major goals of these research efforts are the development of a fundamental scientific base in terms of new concepts, theories and computational tools; new characterization capabilities; and new materials that could be used or mimicked in advancing capabilities for hydrogen storage.

  14. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. David Swank

    2007-02-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant’s absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  15. The hydrogen laminar jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanz, M. [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidomecanica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rosales, M. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain); Instituto de Innovacion en Mineria y Metalurgia, Avenida del Valle 738, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, A.L. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Numerical and asymptotic methods are used to investigate the structure of the hydrogen jet discharging into a quiescent air atmosphere. The analysis accounts in particular for the variation of the density and transport properties with composition. The Reynolds number of the flow R{sub j}, based on the initial jet radius a, the density {rho}{sub j} and viscosity {mu}{sub j} of the jet and the characteristic jet velocity u{sub j}, is assumed to take moderately large values, so that the jet remains slender and stable, and can be correspondingly described by numerical integration of the continuity, momentum and species conservation equations written in the boundary-layer approximation. The solution for the velocity and composition in the jet development region of planar and round jets, corresponding to streamwise distances of order R{sub j}a, is computed numerically, along with the solutions that emerge both in the near field and in the far field. The small value of the hydrogen-to-air molecular weight ratio is used to simplify the solution by considering the asymptotic limit of vanishing jet density. The development provides at leading-order explicit analytical expressions for the far-field velocity and hydrogen mass fraction that describe accurately the hydrogen jet near the axis. The information provided can be useful in particular to characterize hydrogen discharge processes from holes and cracks. (author)

  16. Hydrogen in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.; Hervig, R.; Irving, T.

    2017-01-01

    Most volatile studies of Mars have targeted its surface via spacecraft and rover data, and have evidenced surficial water in polar caps and the atmosphere, in the presence of river channels, and in the detection of water bearing minerals. The other focus of Martian volatile studies has been on Martian meteorites which are all from its crust. Most of these studies are on hydrous phases like apatite, a late-stage phase, i.e. crystallizing near the end of the differentiation sequence of Martian basalts and cumulates. Moreover, calculating the water content of the magma a phosphate crystallized from is not always possible, and yet is an essential step to estimate how much water was present in a parent magma and its source. Water, however, is primarily dissolved in the interiors of differentiated planets as hydrogen in lattice defects of nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, feldspar) of the crust and mantle. This hydrogen has tremendous influence, even in trace quantities, on a planet's formation, geodynamics, cooling history and the origin of its volcanism and atmosphere as well as its potential for life. Studies of hydrogen in nominally anhydrous phases of Martian meteorites are rare. Measuring water contents and hydrogen isotopes in well-characterized nominally anhydrous minerals of Martian meteorites is the goal of our study. Our work aims at deciphering what influences the distribution and origin of hydrogen in Martian minerals, such as source, differentiation, degassing and shock.

  17. Microfabricated hydrogen sensitive membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddaf, A.; Kraetz, L. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern (Germany); Detemple, P.; Schmitt, S.; Hessel, V. [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, Mainz (Germany); Faqir, N. [University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Bart, H.J.

    2009-01-15

    Thin, defect-free palladium, palladium/copper and palladium/silver hydrogen absorbing membranes were microfabricated. A dual sputtering technique was used to deposit the palladium alloy membranes of only 1 {mu}m thickness on a nonporous silicon substrate. Advanced silicon etching (ASE) was applied on the backside to create a mechanically stable support structure for the thin films. Performance evaluation was carried out for different gases in a temperature range of 20 C to 298 C at a constant differential pressure of 110 kPa at the two sides of the membrane. The composite membranes show an excellent permeation rate of hydrogen, which appears to be 0.05 Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} and 0.01.10{sup -3} Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 20 C for the microfabricated 23 % silver and the 53 % copper composite membranes, respectively. The selectivity to hydrogen over a gas mixture containing, in addition to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen was measured. The mass spectrometer did not detect any CO{sub 2} or CO, showing that the membrane is completely hydrogen selective. The microfabricated membranes exhibit both high mechanical strength (they easily withstand pressures up to 4 bar) and high thermal stability (up to 650 C). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Hydrogen gas detector card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Sánchez Niño

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A small card used for detecting hydrogen gas in a crystal growth system by the liquid phase epitaxy technique was designed and built. The small size of the card enables its portability to other laboratories where leakage detection of hydrogen or other flammable gas is required. Card dimensions are approximately 10 cm long and 5 cm wide enabling easy transportation. The design is based on a microcontroller which reads the signal from the hydrogen sensor and internally compares the read value with preset values. Depending on the signal voltage a red, yellow or green LED will light to indicate the levels of concentration of the flammable gas. The card is powered by a 9 V battery.

  19. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Kjøller, John; Larsen, B.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast at tempe......A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast...... at temperatures around 600 K and above, but the reversed reaction showed somewhat slower kinetics around 600 K. At higher temperatures the opposite was found. The enthalpy and entropy change by the hydrogenation, derived from pressure-concentration isotherms, agree fairly well with those reported earlier....

  20. Nanostructured targets for TNSA laser ion acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured targets, based on hydrogenated polymers with embedded nanostructures, were prepared as thin micrometric foils for high-intensity laser irradiation in TNSA regime to produce high-ion acceleration. Experiments were performed at the PALS facility, in Prague, by using 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and an intensity of 1016 W/cm2 and at the IPPLM, in Warsaw, by using 800 nm wavelength, 40 fs pulse duration, and an intensity of 1019 W/cm2. Forward plasma diagnostic mainly uses SiC detectors and ion collectors in time of flight (TOF configuration. At these intensities, ions can be accelerated at energies above 1 MeV per nucleon. In presence of Au nanoparticles, and/or under particular irradiation conditions, effects of resonant absorption can induce ion acceleration enhancement up to values of the order of 4 MeV per nucleon.

  1. Oxygen ion source and RFQ for Linac 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1986-01-01

    As injector to the PS Booster, Linac 1 was replaced by Linac 2 in 1980. It continued to be used for the acceleration of oxygen and sulfur ions. In 1984, its Cockcroft-Walton preinjector was replaced by an RFQ. In the foreground at the right is the oxygen ion source. A 90 deg bending magnet selects O6+ ions which are preaccelerated in an RFQ and enter Linac 1, at the far left. In the background is the proton and negative hydrogen ion source, followed by the 520 keV RFQ-1 and a bending magnet towards the entrance of Linac 1.

  2. Communication: Nanoscale ion fluctuations in Nafion polymer electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumberger, Brant; Bennett, Mackenzie; Zhang, Jingyun; Israeloff, N. E. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Dura, J. A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Center for Neutron Research, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-08-21

    Ion conduction mechanisms and the nanostructure of ion conduction networks remain poorly understood in polymer electrolytes which are used as proton-exchange-membranes (PEM) in fuel cell applications. Here we study nanoscale surface-potential fluctuations produced by Brownian ion dynamics in thin films of low-hydration Nafion™, the prototype PEM. Images and power spectra of the fluctuations are used to derive the local conductivity-relaxation spectrum, in order to compare with bulk behavior and hopping-conductivity models. Conductivity relaxation-times ranged from hours to milliseconds, depending on hydration and temperature, demonstrating that the observed fluctuations are produced by water-facilitated hydrogen-ion hopping within the ion-channel network. Due to the small number of ions probed, non-Gaussian statistics of the fluctuations can be used to constrain ion conduction parameters and mechanisms.

  3. Communication: nanoscale ion fluctuations in Nafion polymer electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumberger, Brant; Bennett, Mackenzie; Zhang, Jingyun; Dura, J A; Israeloff, N E

    2014-08-21

    Ion conduction mechanisms and the nanostructure of ion conduction networks remain poorly understood in polymer electrolytes which are used as proton-exchange-membranes (PEM) in fuel cell applications. Here we study nanoscale surface-potential fluctuations produced by Brownian ion dynamics in thin films of low-hydration Nafion™, the prototype PEM. Images and power spectra of the fluctuations are used to derive the local conductivity-relaxation spectrum, in order to compare with bulk behavior and hopping-conductivity models. Conductivity relaxation-times ranged from hours to milliseconds, depending on hydration and temperature, demonstrating that the observed fluctuations are produced by water-facilitated hydrogen-ion hopping within the ion-channel network. Due to the small number of ions probed, non-Gaussian statistics of the fluctuations can be used to constrain ion conduction parameters and mechanisms.

  4. High Intensity High Charge State ECR Ion Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Leitner, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    The next-generation heavy ion beam accelerators such as the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), the Radioactive Ion Beam Factory at RIKEN, the GSI upgrade project, the LHC-upgrade, and IMP in Lanzhou require a great variety of high charge state ion beams with a magnitude higher beam intensity than currently achievable. High performance Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources can provide the flexibility since they can routinely produce beams from hydrogen to uranium. Over the last three decades, ECR ion sources have continued improving the available ion beam intensities by increasing the magnetic fields and ECR heating frequencies to enhance the confinement and the plasma density. With advances in superconducting magnet technology, a new generation of high field superconducting sources is now emerging, designed to meet the requirements of these next generation accelerator projects. The talk will briefly review the field of high performance ECR ion sources and the latest developments for high intens...

  5. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.

  6. Hydrogen: Fueling the Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leisch, Jennifer

    2007-02-27

    As our dependence on foreign oil increases and concerns about global climate change rise, the need to develop sustainable energy technologies is becoming increasingly significant. Worldwide energy consumption is expected to double by the year 2050, as will carbon emissions along with it. This increase in emissions is a product of an ever-increasing demand for energy, and a corresponding rise in the combustion of carbon containing fossil fuels such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Undisputable scientific evidence indicates significant changes in the global climate have occurred in recent years. Impacts of climate change and the resulting atmospheric warming are extensive, and know no political or geographic boundaries. These far-reaching effects will be manifested as environmental, economic, socioeconomic, and geopolitical issues. Offsetting the projected increase in fossil energy use with renewable energy production will require large increases in renewable energy systems, as well as the ability to store and transport clean domestic fuels. Storage and transport of electricity generated from intermittent resources such as wind and solar is central to the widespread use of renewable energy technologies. Hydrogen created from water electrolysis is an option for energy storage and transport, and represents a pollution-free source of fuel when generated using renewable electricity. The conversion of chemical to electrical energy using fuel cells provides a high efficiency, carbon-free power source. Hydrogen serves to blur the line between stationary and mobile power applications, as it can be used as both a transportation fuel and for stationary electricity generation, with the possibility of a distributed generation energy infrastructure. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies will be presented as possible pollution-free solutions to present and future energy concerns. Recent hydrogen-related research at SLAC in hydrogen production, fuel cell catalysis, and hydrogen

  7. Some Particularities of Operation of Sputter Ion Pumps and Non-Evaporable Getters

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, A V

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that hydrogen is the main component of the residual gases in a sputter ion pump which is not baked after a contact with the atmosphere. This makes it appropriate to use a sputter ion pump and a non-evaporate getter simultaneously. Pumping of a sputter ion pump by a non-evaporate getter followed by their simultaneous operation leads to a considerable decrease in the ultimate pressure of the sputter ion pump.

  8. Hydrogen production from microbial strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Caroline S; Rey, Federico E

    2012-09-18

    The present invention is directed to a method of screening microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. This method involves inoculating one or more microbes in a sample containing cell culture medium to form an inoculated culture medium. The inoculated culture medium is then incubated under hydrogen producing conditions. Once incubating causes the inoculated culture medium to produce hydrogen, microbes in the culture medium are identified as candidate microbe strains capable of generating hydrogen. Methods of producing hydrogen using one or more of the microbial strains identified as well as the hydrogen producing strains themselves are also disclosed.

  9. Polyhydride complexes for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application in hydrogen storage. Efforts have focused on developing complexes with improved available hydrogen weight percentages. We have explored the possibility that complexes containing aromatic hydrocarbon ligands could store hydrogen at both the metal center and in the ligands. We have synthesized novel indenyl hydride complexes and explored their reactivity with hydrogen. The reversible hydrogenation of [IrH{sub 3}(PPh{sub 3})({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 10}H{sub 7})]{sup +} has been achieved. While attempting to prepare {eta}{sup 6}-tetrahydronaphthalene complexes, we discovered that certain polyhydride complexes catalyze both the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of tetrahydronaphthalene.

  10. Electrocatalysts for hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Losiewicz, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    This special topic volume deals with the development of novel solid state electrocatalysts of a high performance to enhance the rates of the hydrogen or oxygen evolution. It contains a description of various types of metals, alloys and composites which have been obtained using electrodeposition in aqueous solutions that has been identified to be a technologically feasible and economically superior technique for the production of the porous electrodes. The goal was to produce papers that would be useful to both the novice and the expert in hydrogen technologies. This volume is intended to be us

  11. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular materials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date text covering topics in utilizing hydrogen bonding for constructing functional architectures and supramolecular materials. The first chapter addresses the control of photo-induced electron and energy transfer. The second chapter summarizes the formation of nano-porous materials. The following two chapters introduce self-assembled gels, many of which exhibit unique functions. Other chapters cover the advances in supramolecular liquid crystals and the versatility of hydrogen bonding in tuning/improving the properties and performance of materials. This book is designed

  12. Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, A.B.; Varela Gasque, Ana Sofia; Dionigi, F.

    2012-01-01

    The electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is growing in significance as society begins to rely more on renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. Thus, research on designing new, inexpensive, and abundant HER catalysts is important. Here, we describe how a simple experiment....... The curve visually shows students that the best HER catalysts are characterized by an optimal hydrogen binding energy (reactivity), as stated by the Sabatier principle. In addition, students may use this volcano curve to predict the activity of an untested catalyst solely from the catalyst reactivity...

  13. Hydrogen Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-27

    Schoeppei, R.J. and Gray, C.L., "The Hydrogen Engine in P^srectl^e", Proceedings 7th international Energy Conversion Encrineering C^ference.: San Dxego...Conversion Engineering Conference, San Diego, Sept. 19/^, pp. 1349-1354. 10. Hausz, W., Leeth, G., and Meyer, C., "Eco-Energy", ibid, pp. 1316-1322. II...75114, . 24. ^schütz, R.H., "Hydrogen Burning Engine Experience", presented at Symposium, see Ref. 8. 25. A. Presto filipo (Pnblio Service’Electric S

  14. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-04-28

    The design and characterization of new materials for hydrogen storage is an important area of research, as the ability to store hydrogen at lower pressures and higher temperatures than currently feasible would lower operating costs for small hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. In particular, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) represent promising materials for use in storing hydrogen in this capacity. MOFs are highly porous, three-dimensional crystalline solids that are formed via linkages between metal ions (e.g., iron, nickel, and zinc) and organic molecules. MOFs can store hydrogen via strong adsorptive interactions between the gas molecules and the pores of the framework, providing a high surface area for gas adsorption and thus the opportunity to store hydrogen at significantly lower pressures than with current technologies. By lowering the energy required for hydrogen storage, these materials hold promise in rendering hydrogen a more viable fuel for motor vehicles, which is a highly desirable outcome given the clean nature of hydrogen fuel cells (water is the only byproduct of combustion) and the current state of global climate change resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels. The work presented in this report is the result of collaborative efforts between researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and General Motors Corporation (GM) to discover novel MOFs promising for H2 storage and characterize their properties. Described herein are several new framework systems with improved gravimetric and volumetric capacity to strongly bind H2 at temperatures relevant for vehicle storage. These materials were rigorously characterized using neutron diffraction, to determine the precise binding locations of hydrogen within the frameworks, and high-pressure H2 adsorption measurements, to provide a comprehensive picture of H2 adsorption at all relevant pressures. A

  15. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-07

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  16. Proton emission from a laser ion sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Cutroneo, M.; Margarone, D.; Gammino, S.

    2012-02-01

    At intensities of the order of 1010 W/cm2, ns pulsed lasers can be employed to ablate solid bulk targets in order to produce high emission of ions at different charge state and kinetic energy. A special interest is devoted to the production of protons with controllable energy and current from a roto-translating target irradiated in repetition rate at 1-10 Hz by a Nd:Yag pulsed laser beam. Different hydrogenated targets based on polymers and hydrates were irradiated in high vacuum. Special nanostrucutres can be embedded in the polymers in order to modify the laser absorption properties and the amount of protons to be accelerated in the plasma. For example, carbon nanotubes may increase the laser absorption and the hydrogen absorption to generate high proton yields from the plasma. Metallic nanostrucutres may increase the electron density of the plasma and the kinetic energy of the accelerated protons. Ion collectors, ion energy analyzer, and mass spectrometers, used in time-of-flight configuration, were employed to characterize the ion beam properties. A comparison with traditional proton ion source is presented and discussed.

  17. Proton emission from a laser ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dip.to di Fisica, Universita di Messina, V.le F.S. D' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Cavallaro, S.; Gammino, S. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Dip.to di Fisica, Universita di Messina, V.le F.S. D' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Margarone, D. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2012-02-15

    At intensities of the order of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}, ns pulsed lasers can be employed to ablate solid bulk targets in order to produce high emission of ions at different charge state and kinetic energy. A special interest is devoted to the production of protons with controllable energy and current from a roto-translating target irradiated in repetition rate at 1-10 Hz by a Nd:Yag pulsed laser beam. Different hydrogenated targets based on polymers and hydrates were irradiated in high vacuum. Special nanostrucutres can be embedded in the polymers in order to modify the laser absorption properties and the amount of protons to be accelerated in the plasma. For example, carbon nanotubes may increase the laser absorption and the hydrogen absorption to generate high proton yields from the plasma. Metallic nanostrucutres may increase the electron density of the plasma and the kinetic energy of the accelerated protons. Ion collectors, ion energy analyzer, and mass spectrometers, used in time-of-flight configuration, were employed to characterize the ion beam properties. A comparison with traditional proton ion source is presented and discussed.

  18. Proton emission from a laser ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L; Cavallaro, S; Cutroneo, M; Margarone, D; Gammino, S

    2012-02-01

    At intensities of the order of 10(10) W∕cm(2), ns pulsed lasers can be employed to ablate solid bulk targets in order to produce high emission of ions at different charge state and kinetic energy. A special interest is devoted to the production of protons with controllable energy and current from a roto-translating target irradiated in repetition rate at 1-10 Hz by a Nd:Yag pulsed laser beam. Different hydrogenated targets based on polymers and hydrates were irradiated in high vacuum. Special nanostrucutres can be embedded in the polymers in order to modify the laser absorption properties and the amount of protons to be accelerated in the plasma. For example, carbon nanotubes may increase the laser absorption and the hydrogen absorption to generate high proton yields from the plasma. Metallic nanostrucutres may increase the electron density of the plasma and the kinetic energy of the accelerated protons. Ion collectors, ion energy analyzer, and mass spectrometers, used in time-of-flight configuration, were employed to characterize the ion beam properties. A comparison with traditional proton ion source is presented and discussed.

  19. ECR ion source for high current linac

    CERN Document Server

    Cui Bao Qun; Jiang Wei; LiLiQiang; WangRongWen

    2002-01-01

    An intense ECR ion source for ADS (accelerator driven sub-critical system) is described. Two configurations of the source has been developed and tested. 100 mA hydrogen beam has been extracted from the ion source at 30 keV, the proton ratio is greater than 85%, estimated emittance is 0.11 pi mm centre dot mrad, the maximum extracted beam density is 340 mA/cm sup 2 . A 100 hours reliability test of the source is also described

  20. Hydrogen in tungsten as plasma-facing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joachim; Schmid, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Materials facing plasmas in fusion experiments and future reactors are loaded with high fluxes (1020-1024 m-2 s-1) of H, D and T fuel particles at energies ranging from a few eV to keV. In this respect, the evolution of the radioactive T inventory in the first wall, the permeation of T through the armour into the coolant and the thermo-mechanical stability after long-term exposure are key parameters determining the applicability of a first wall material. Tungsten exhibits fast hydrogen diffusion, but an extremely low solubility limit. Due to the fast diffusion of hydrogen and the short ion range, most of the incident ions will quickly reach the surface and recycle into the plasma chamber. For steady-state operation the solute hydrogen for the typical fusion reactor geometry and wall conditions can reach an inventory of about 1 kg. However, in short-pulse operation typical of ITER, solute hydrogen will diffuse out after each pulse and the remaining inventory will consist of hydrogen trapped in lattice defects, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and irradiation-induced traps. In high-flux areas the hydrogen energies are too low to create displacement damage. However, under these conditions the solubility limit will be exceeded within the ion range and the formation of gas bubbles and stress-induced damage occurs. In addition, simultaneous neutron fluxes from the nuclear fusion reaction D(T,n)α will lead to damage in the materials and produce trapping sites for diffusing hydrogen atoms throughout the bulk. The formation and diffusive filling of these different traps will determine the evolution of the retained T inventory. This paper will concentrate on experimental evidence for the influence different trapping sites have on the hydrogen inventory in W as studied in ion beam experiments and low-temperature plasmas. Based on the extensive experimental data, models are validated and applied to estimate the contribution of different traps to the tritium inventory in

  1. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in methane plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, François; Derenne, Sylvie; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled; Michau, Armelle; Reinhardt, Peter; Duhamel, Rémi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Biron, Kasia

    2017-01-01

    The hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) is commonly used to reconstruct the chemical processes at the origin of water and organic compounds in the early solar system. On the one hand, the large enrichments in deuterium of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from the carbonaceous meteorites are interpreted as a heritage of the interstellar medium or resulting from ion-molecule reactions taking place in the diffuse part of the protosolar nebula. On the other hand, the molecular structure of this IOM suggests that organic radicals have played a central role in a gas-phase organosynthesis. So as to reproduce this type of chemistry between organic radicals, experiments based on a microwave plasma of CH4 have been performed. They yielded a black organic residue in which ion microprobe analyses revealed hydrogen isotopic anomalies at a submicrometric spatial resolution. They likely reflect differences in the D/H ratios between the various CHx radicals whose polymerization is at the origin of the IOM. These isotopic heterogeneities, usually referred to as hot and cold spots, are commensurable with those observed in meteorite IOM. As a consequence, the appearance of organic radicals in the ionized regions of the disk surrounding the Sun during its formation may have triggered the formation of organic compounds.

  2. Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers (LOHCs): Toward a Hydrogen-free Hydrogen Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuster, Patrick; Papp, Christian; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-17

    The need to drastically reduce CO 2 emissions will lead to the transformation of our current, carbon-based energy system to a more sustainable, renewable-based one. In this process, hydrogen will gain increasing importance as secondary energy vector. Energy storage requirements on the TWh scale (to bridge extended times of low wind and sun harvest) and global logistics of renewable energy equivalents will create additional driving forces toward a future hydrogen economy. However, the nature of hydrogen requires dedicated infrastructures, and this has prevented so far the introduction of elemental hydrogen into the energy sector to a large extent. Recent scientific and technological progress in handling hydrogen in chemically bound form as liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) supports the technological vision that a future hydrogen economy may work without handling large amounts of elemental hydrogen. LOHC systems are composed of pairs of hydrogen-lean and hydrogen-rich organic compounds that store hydrogen by repeated catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation cycles. While hydrogen handling in the form of LOHCs allows for using the existing infrastructure for fuels, it also builds on the existing public confidence in dealing with liquid energy carriers. In contrast to hydrogen storage by hydrogenation of gases, such as CO 2 or N 2 , hydrogen release from LOHC systems produces pure hydrogen after condensation of the high-boiling carrier compounds. This Account highlights the current state-of-the-art in hydrogen storage using LOHC systems. It first introduces fundamental aspects of a future hydrogen economy and derives therefrom requirements for suitable LOHC compounds. Molecular structures that have been successfully applied in the literature are presented, and their property profiles are discussed. Fundamental and applied aspects of the involved hydrogenation and dehydrogenation catalysis are discussed, characteristic differences for the catalytic conversion of

  3. Effective Extraction Mechanism of Volume-Produced Ions in the NIPPER I Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Ramos

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available A mass spectrometer system is developed to extract and analyze hydrogen ions from a volume plasma hydrogen ion source. A 180° magnetic deflection-type mass analyzer is coupled to NIPPER I (National Institute of Physics Plasma Experimental Rig I, a negative ion source. Hydrogen plasma is produced from a low pressure gas (10-2 Torr with a transition of the glow discharge (254 volts, 75 mA to an arc plasma (78 volts, 14 amperes in a few seconds. The usually cylindrical plasma is converted into a sheet configuration using a pair of Sm-Co magnets. This optimizes ion current extraction by reducing (a the ion loss to the discharge anode and (b the decay of the ion current produced in the plasma. Negative hydrogen ions (H- are volume-produced by dissociative attachment of low energy electrons to highly vibrational excited hydrogen molecules.The extraction of H- ions from this volume source is optimized by the proper choice of apertures of the limiting electrodes and of the applied bias potential. A proper combination of extraction electrodes gives an optimum H- current extracted without the electrons. When one of the extraction electrodes is biased negatively near the value of the plasma floating potential, a maximum H- current is also obtained. The methods of effective extraction of H- are discussed.

  4. Hydrogen-promoted oxygen activation by free gold cluster cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Sandra M; Bernhardt, Thorsten M; Barnett, Robert N; Yoon, Bokwon; Landman, Uzi

    2009-07-01

    Small gas-phase gold cluster cations are essentially inert toward molecular oxygen. Preadsorption of molecular hydrogen, however, is found to cooperatively activate the binding of O(2) to even-size Au(x)(+) (x = 2, 4, 6) clusters. Measured temperature- and reaction-time-dependent ion intensities, obtained by ion trap mass spectrometry, in conjunction with first-principles density-functional theory calculations, reveal promotion and activation of molecular oxygen by preadsorbed hydrogen. These processes lead to the formation of a hydroperoxo intermediate on Au(4)(+) and Au(6)(+) and culminate in the dissociation of O(2) via the release of H(2)O. Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction mechanisms involving the coadsorption of both of the reactant molecules are discussed for both cluster sizes, and an alternative Eley-Rideal mechanism involving hydrogen molecules adsorbed on a Au(6)(+) cluster reacting with an impinging gaseous oxygen molecule is analyzed. Structural fluctionality of the gold hexamer cation, induced by the adsorption of hydrogen molecules, and resulting in structural isomerization from a ground-state triangular structure to an incomplete hexagonal one, is theoretically predicted. Bonding of H(2) on cationic gold clusters is shown to involve charge transfer to the clusters. This serves to promote the bonding of coadsorbed oxygen through occupation of the antibonding 2pi* orbitals, resulting in excess electronic charge accumulation on the adsorbed molecule and weakening of the O-O bond. The theoretical results for hydrogen saturation coverages and reaction characteristics between the coadsorbed hydrogen and oxygen molecules are found to agree with the experimental findings. The joint investigations provide insights regarding hydrogen and oxygen cooperative adsorption effects and consequent reaction mechanisms.

  5. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    temperature T, by an equation analogous to the ideal gas law: π V=iRT. (1). R is the gas .... vehicular applications. Nanomaterials are a ... development of materials for hydrogen storage are the low rate of bulk hydride sorption and the high temperatures required for gas release. 3.0. Bulk material. <100 nm. Nanoparticles.

  6. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 5. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage - The van't Hoff Connection. C S Sunandana. General Article Volume 12 Issue 5 May 2007 pp 31-36. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Hydrogen storage for automobiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strickland, G.

    1979-01-01

    Results of an analysis of hydrogen-fueled automobiles are presented as a part of a continuing study conducted by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) on Energy Storage Systems for Automobile Propulsion. The hydrogen is stored either as a metal hydride at moderate pressure in TiFe/sub 0/ /sub 9/Mn/sub 0/ /sub 1/H/sub x/ and at low pressure in MgH/sub x/ catalyzed with 10 wt % Ni, or it is stored in hollow glass microspheres at pressures up to about 400 atm. Improved projections are given for the two hydrides, which are used in combination to take advantage of their complementary properties. In the dual-hydride case and in the microsphere case where Ti-based hydride is used for initial operation, hydrogen is consumed in an internal-combustion engine; whereas in the third case, hydrogen from Ti-based hydride is used with air in an alkaline fuel cell/Ni-Zn battery combination which powers an electric vehicle. Each system is briefly described; and the results of the vehicle analysis are compared with those for the conventional automobile and with electric vehicles powered by Pb-acid or Ni-Zn batteries. Comparisons are made on the basis of automobile weight, initial user cost, and life-cycle cost. In this report, the results are limited to those for the 5-passenger vehicle in the period 1985-1990, and are provided as probable and optimistic values.

  8. Economic data on hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-07-22

    General information is recorded about hydrogenation plants and their operation up to July 1943. For 12 German plants, there is a table indicating date of beginning construction, start of operation, and production capacity, including gas. Another chart gives the same data for foreign plants, in the United States, England, Italy, Iran and Holland. Domestic and foreign partners and agreements are also listed, as well as license returns from hydrogenation. Extent of I.G. Farben patent ownership is given in a short list. Development of production costs for liquid products is indicated for the years 1927-1941. Data on test costs are also given. Production figures for hydrogenation are shown, as well as the share of Farben synthetics in total German fuel production. The report gives a breakdown for requirements of raw materials, manpower, capital, and construction steels for production of four million metric tons of fuels from hydrogenation. Finally, the report lists the special areas in which Farben was carrying on work related to synthetic fuels. The data are given mostly in tabular form.

  9. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  10. Onboard hydrogen generation for automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Problems concerning the use of hydrogen as a fuel for motor vehicles are related to the storage of the hydrogen onboard a vehicle. The feasibility is investigated to use an approach based on onboard hydrogen generation as a means to avoid these storage difficulties. Two major chemical processes can be used to produce hydrogen from liquid hydrocarbons and methanol. In steam reforming, the fuel reacts with water on a catalytic surface to produce a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. In partial oxidation, the fuel reacts with air, either on a catalytic surface or in a flame front, to yield a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. There are many trade-offs in onboard hydrogen generation, both in the choice of fuels as well as in the choice of a chemical process. Attention is given to these alternatives, the results of some experimental work in this area, and the combustion of various hydrogen-rich gases in an internal combustion engine.

  11. Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

    2010-07-31

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with

  12. The role of grain boundaries in the mechanism of plasma immersion hydrogenation of nanocrystalline magnesium films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pranevicius, L. [Vytautas Magnus University, Physics Department, 58 K. Donelaicio St., 44248 Kaunas (Lithuania)]. E-mail: l.pranevicius@gmf.vdu.lt; Milcius, D. [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Surface Treatment Laboratory, 3 Breslaujos St., 44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Pranevicius, L.L. [Vytautas Magnus University, Physics Department, 58 K. Donelaicio St., 44248 Kaunas (Lithuania); Lithuanian Energy Institute, Surface Treatment Laboratory, 3 Breslaujos St., 44403 Kaunas (Lithuania); Templier, C. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique, Universite de Poitiers, Bd. 3, Teleport 2, B.P. 179, 86960 Futuroscope (France); Bobrovaite, B. [Vytautas Magnus University, Physics Department, 58 K. Donelaicio St., 44248 Kaunas (Lithuania); Barnackas, I. [Vytautas Magnus University, Physics Department, 58 K. Donelaicio St., 44248 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2006-04-15

    In this paper, attention in focused on the nanostructured magnesium films for hydrogen storage. It is shown that 2 {mu}m thick Mg film is transformed into MgH{sub 2} film under high-flux and fluence hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation at 450 K for 15 min. All hydrogen desorbs at temperature about 530 K, which corresponds to the decomposition of MgH{sub 2} {sup {yields}} Mg + H{sub 2}{up_arrow}. The macroscopic and microscopic observations show that magnesium film undergoes a high deformation and restructuring during hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reaction. The suggested hydrogenation model is based upon the incorporation of excess of hydrogen atoms in grain boundaries of nanocrystalline Mg film driven by the increase in surface chemical potential associated with the implantation flux. The results provide new aspects of hydriding of thin nanocrystalline film materials under highly non-equalibrium conditions on the surface.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Ion Rings and Ion Beam Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankofsky, Alan

    included. CIDER has been used to simulate the propagation of an intense ion beam through a z-pinch plasma channel. We find that transport efficiencies in the 75% range are possible using 5-7 MeV, 1-2 MA proton beams with initial divergences in the range 1.5(DEGREES)-7(DEGREES) in a 4 m hydrogen channel. Current neutralization in excess of 99% is found, and no gross axisymmetric instabilities are observed.

  14. Photovoltaic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiser, H.W.; Memory, S.B.; Veziroglu, T.N.; Padin, J. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This is a new project, which started in June 1995, and involves photovoltaic hydrogen production as a fuel production method for the future. In order to increase the hydrogen yield, it was decided to use hybrid solar collectors to generate D.C. electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. In this way, some of the energy needed to dissociate the water is supplied in the form of heat (or low grade energy), to generate steam, which results in a reduction of electrical energy (or high grade energy) needed. As a result, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency is increased. In the above stated system, the collector location, the collector tracking sub-system (i.e., orientation/rotation), and the steam temperature have been taken as variables. Five locations selected - in order to consider a variety of latitudes, altitudes, cloud coverage and atmospheric conditions - are Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Phoenix and Salt Lake City. Plain PV and hybrid solar collectors for a stationary south facing system and five different collector rotation systems have been analyzed. Steam temperatures have been varied between 200{degrees}C and 1200{degrees}C. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The results show that higher steam temperatures, 2 dimensional tracking system, higher elevations and dryer climates causes higher conversion efficiencies. Cost effectiveness of the sub-systems and of the overall system will be analyzed during the second year. Also, initial studies will be made of an advanced high efficiency hybrid solar hydrogen production system.

  15. Task D: Hydrogen safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, M.R.; Sievert, B.G. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States); Swain, M.N. [Analytical Technologies, Inc., Miami, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This report covers two topics. The first is a review of codes, standards, regulations, recommendations, certifications, and pamphlets which address safety of gaseous fuels. The second is an experimental investigation of hydrogen flame impingement. Four areas of concern in the conversion of natural gas safety publications to hydrogen safety publications are delineated. Two suggested design criteria for hydrogen vehicle fuel systems are proposed. It is concluded from the experimental work that light weight, low cost, firewalls to resist hydrogen flame impingement are feasible.

  16. Hydrogen Fire Spectroscopy Issues Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    The detection of hydrogen fires is important to the aerospace community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has devoted significant effort to the development, testing, and installation of hydrogen fire detectors based on ultraviolet, near-infrared, mid-infrared, andor far-infrared flame emission bands. Yet, there is no intensity calibrated hydrogen-air flame spectrum over this range in the literature and consequently, it can be difficult to compare the merits of different radiation-based hydrogen fire detectors.

  17. Wind Energy and Transport Synergy: Electric Vehicle or Hydrogen Vehicle?; Sinergia Energia Eolica Transporte: vehiculo electrico o vehiculo de hidrogeno?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, I.

    2009-07-01

    This article briefly analyzes the potential uses of hydrogen as a form of energy from wind power. It also briefly describes the different experiences gained in wind energy-based hydrogen production by water hydrolysis, and finally it concludes with a brief analysis of the competition between hydrogen and the new ion-lithium batteries used in motor vehicles as potential solutions to support wind energy management. (Author)

  18. Magnetic levitation of condensed hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, C. G.; Seidel, G. M.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid and solid molecular hydrogen has been levitated using a pair of small superconducting solenoids. The hydrogen samples, up to 3 mm in dimension, were trapped in a magnetic potential having either a discrete minimum or a minimum in the form of a ring 1 cm in diameter. The hydrogen could be moved about in the magnetic trap by applying an electric field.

  19. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN MOLYBDENUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abd El Keriem, M.S.; van der Werf, D.P.; Pleiter, F

    1993-01-01

    Vacancy-hydrogen interaction in molybdenum was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. The complex InV2 turned out to trap up to two hydrogen atoms: trapping of a single hydrogen atom gives rise to a decrease of the quadrupole

  20. Muonic processes in solid hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G.M.; Beveridge, J.L. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology, Chester (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Maier, M.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Porcelli, T.A. [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Mulhauser, F.; Schaller, L.A. [University of Fribourg, Fribourg (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National University, Jeonju City, S. (Korea); Kunselman, A.R. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming (United States); Petitjean, C. [PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Zmeskal, J. [IMEP, Vienna (Austria)

    1998-08-01

    Muonic hydrogen participates in many different interactions, including muon induced fusion of hydrogen nuclei. Conventional experimental techniques cannot always unravel and separate the processes of interest. Some of the most important measurements may be more reliably accomplished with the use of a unique and versatile target consisting of layers of different solid hydrogen isotope mixtures. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Realizing a hydrogen future: Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel recommendations (brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, G.

    1999-08-01

    When generated from renewable sources, hydrogen production and use is part of a clean, cyclic process. Hydrogen can be used to generate electricity, heat homes and businesses, fuel vehicles, and produce commodities used every day. The Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel's (HTAP) primary functions are to advise the Secretary of Energy on the implementation of the U.S.DOE programs in hydrogen RD and D and to review and make recommendations on the economic, technical, and environmental consequences of deploying safe hydrogen energy systems.

  2. Influence of demetallization of hydrogenated sunflower oil on changes in the forms of heavy metals and their pro-oxidative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianov, K; Maneva, D; Ivanov, S

    1992-11-01

    The effect of removing heavy metals from hydrogenated sunflower oil using a method based on changes in the contents of the various forms of the heavy metals copper, iron, zinc and nickel and their respective pro-oxidative effects was studied. A high degree of removal of dissociated and bounded ions was observed for hydrogenated oil, while there was no change in the contents of the co-ordination form. The pro-oxidative effect of the dissociated ions and of the bound metal ions in hydrogenated oil decreased nine-fold and seven-fold, respectively, compared with that of the non-hydrogenated oil, as a result of which the oxidation stability of hydrogenated oil increased two-fold. Comparative studies confirmed as appropriate the use of wash waters and auxiliary solutions that do not contain heavy metals for the processing of the hydrogenate after the classical technology.

  3. Hydrogen molecule binding to unsaturated metal sites in metal-organic frameworks studied by neutron powder diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Brown, Craig; Neumann, Dan; Dinca, Mircea; Long, Jeffrey; Peterson, Vanessa; Kepert, Cameron

    2007-03-01

    Metal organic framework (MOF) materials have shown considerable potential for hydrogen storage arising from very large surface areas. However, the low binding energy of hydrogen molecules limits its storage capability to very low temperatures (hydrogen adsorption sites in a selected series of MOF materials with exposed unsaturated metal ions. Direct binding between the unsaturated metal ions and hydrogen molecules is observed and responsible for the enhanced initial hydrogen adsorption enthalpy. The different metals centers in these MOFs show different binding strength and interaction distances between the hydrogen molecule and metal ions. The organic linker also affects the overall H2 binding strength. Inelastic neutron scattering spectra of H2 in these MOFs are also discussed.

  4. Relation between Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrodesulfurization Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Šaric, Manuel; Moses, Poul Georg; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A relation between hydrogen evolution and hydrodesulfurization catalysis was found by density functional theory calculations. The hydrogen evolution reaction and the hydrogenation reaction in hydrodesulfurization share hydrogen as a surface intermediate and, thus, have a common elementary step...

  5. International Space Station Lithium-Ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Penni J.; Schwanbeck, Eugene; North, Tim; Balcer, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) primary Electric Power System (EPS) currently uses Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) batteries to store electrical energy. The electricity for the space station is generated by its solar arrays, which charge batteries during insolation for subsequent discharge during eclipse. The Ni-H2 batteries are designed to operate at a 35 depth of discharge (DOD) maximum during normal operation in a Low Earth Orbit. Since the oldest of the 48 Ni-H2 battery Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs) has been cycling since September 2006, these batteries are now approaching their end of useful life. In 2010, the ISS Program began the development of Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion) batteries to replace the Ni-H2 batteries and concurrently funded a Li-Ion ORU and cell life testing project. When deployed, they will be the largest Li-Ion batteries ever utilized for a human-rated spacecraft. This paper will include an overview of the ISS Li-Ion battery system architecture, the Li-Ion battery design and development, controls to limit potential hazards from the batteries, and the status of the Li-Ion cell and ORU life cycle testing.

  6. Role of positive ions on the surface production of negative ions in a fusion plasma reactor type negative ion source—Insights from a three dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2013-11-15

    Results from a 3D self-consistent Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC MCC) model of a high power fusion-type negative ion source are presented for the first time. The model is used to calculate the plasma characteristics of the ITER prototype BATMAN ion source developed in Garching. Special emphasis is put on the production of negative ions on the plasma grid surface. The question of the relative roles of the impact of neutral hydrogen atoms and positive ions on the cesiated grid surface has attracted much attention recently and the 3D PIC MCC model is used to address this question. The results show that the production of negative ions by positive ion impact on the plasma grid is small with respect to the production by atomic hydrogen or deuterium bombardment (less than 10%)

  7. Adsorption of hydrogen gas and redox processes in clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Mathilde; Leone, Laura; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Giffaut, Eric; Charlet, Laurent

    2012-03-20

    In order to assess the adsorption properties of hydrogen gas and reactivity of adsorbed hydrogen, we measured H(2)(g) adsorption on Na synthetic montmorillonite-type clays and Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clayrock using gas chromatography. Synthetic montmorillonites with increasing structural Fe(III) substitution (0 wt %, 3.2 wt %, and 6.4 wt % Fe) were used. Fe in the synthetic montmorillonites is principally present as structural Fe(III) ions. We studied the concomitant reduction of structural Fe(III) in the clays using (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The COx, which mainly contains smectite/illite and calcite minerals, is also studied together with the pure clay fraction of this clayrock. Experiments were performed with dry clay samples which were reacted with hydrogen gas at 90 and 120 °C for 30 to 45 days at a hydrogen partial pressure close to 0.45 bar. Results indicate that up to 0.11 wt % of hydrogen is adsorbed on the clays at 90 °C under 0.45 bar of relative pressure. (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry shows that up to 6% of the total structural Fe(III) initially present in these synthetic clays is reduced upon adsorption of hydrogen gas. No reduction is observed with the COx sample in the present experimental conditions.

  8. Hydrogen attack - Influence of hydrogen sulfide. [on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliezer, D.; Nelson, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted on 12.5-mm-thick SAE 1020 steel (plain carbon steel) plate to assess hydrogen attack at room temperature after specimen exposure at 525 C to hydrogen and a blend of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen at a pressure of 3.5 MN/sq m for exposure times up to 240 hr. The results are discussed in terms of tensile properties, fissure formation, and surface scales. It is shown that hydrogen attack from a high-purity hydrogen environment is severe, with the formation of numerous methane fissures and bubbles along with a significant reduction in the room-temperature tensile yield and ultimate strengths. However, no hydrogen attack is observed in the hydrogen/hydrogen sulfide blend environment, i.e. no fissure or bubble formation occurred and the room-temperature tensile properties remained unchanged. It is suggested that the observed porous discontinuous scale of FeS acts as a barrier to hydrogen entry, thus reducing its effective equilibrium solubility in the iron lattice. Therefore, hydrogen attack should not occur in pressure-vessel steels used in many coal gasification processes.

  9. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  10. Tethered Transition Metals Promoted Photocatalytic System for Efficient Hydrogen Evolutions

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-03-05

    The present invention is directed, at least in part, to a process for improving the efficiency of a photocatalyst (a semiconductor photocatalyst) by tethering (depositing) a metal (e.g., metal ions of a late transition metal, such as nickel) to the semiconductor (photocatalyst) surface through the use of an organic ligand. More specifically, 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) functions as an excellent molecular linker (organic ligand) to attach a transition metal complex (e.g., nickel (Ni.sup.2+ ions)) to the semiconductor surface, which can be in the form of a cadmium sulfide surface. The photocatalyst has particular utility in generating hydrogen from H.sub.2S.

  11. Radiation Shielding Materials Containing Hydrogen, Boron, and Nitrogen: Systematic Computational and Experimental Study. Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Sheila A.; Fay, Catharine C.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Earle, Kevin D.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kang, Jin Ho; Park, Cheol; McMullen, Amelia M.

    2012-01-01

    than possible with hydrogen storage; however, a systematic experimental hydrogenation study has not been reported. A combination of the two approaches may be explored to provide yet higher hydrogen content. The hydrogen containing BNNT produced in our study will be characterized for hydrogen content and thermal stability in simulated space service environments. These new materials systems will be tested for their radiation shielding effectiveness against high energy protons and high energy heavy ions at the HIMAC facility in Japan, or a comparable facility. These high energy particles simulate exposure to SEP and GCR environments. They will also be tested in the LaRC Neutron Exposure Laboratory for their neutron shielding effectiveness, an attribute that determines their capability to shield against the secondary neutrons found inside structures and on lunar and planetary surfaces. The potential significance is to produce a radiation protection enabling technology for future exploration missions. Crew on deep space human exploration missions greater than approximately 90 days cannot remain below current crew Permissible Exposure Limits without shielding and/or biological countermeasures. The intent of this research is to bring the Agency closer to extending space missions beyond the 90-day limit, with 1 year as a long-term goal. We are advocating a systems solution with a structural materials component. Our intent is to develop the best materials system for that materials component. In this Phase I study, we have shown, computationally, that hydrogen containing BNNT is effective for shielding against GCR, SEP, and neutrons over a wide range of energies. This is why we are focusing on hydrogen containing BNNT as an innovative advanced concept. In our future work, we plan to demonstrate, experimentally, that hydrogen, boron, and nitrogen based materials can provide mechanically strong, thermally stable, structural materials with effective radiation shielding against GCR

  12. Hydrogen adsorption on rhodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, M.E.; Michri, A.A.; Kalish, T.V.; Pshenichnikov, A.G.; Kazarinov, V.E.

    1987-09-01

    Measurements of thermal desorption and electron work function were used to investigate the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption from the gas phase on rhodium single-crystal faces and on a polycrystalline rhodium sample at room temperatures over the pressure range from 1.3-10/sup -3/ to 1.3 x 10/sup -5/ Pa. It was found that dipoles oriented with their negative ends toward the gas phase (dipoles of type I) form more rapidly than dipoles having the opposite orientation (dipoles of type II). For formation of the latter, a mechanism is proposed according to which the rate-determining step of the overall process is the transition of reversibly adsorbed hydrogen to dipoles of type II (the spillover), which occurs at surface defects. It was shown that the kinetics of this process with respect to the individual defect obeys an equation which is zeroth order in theta/sub H/ and pressure.

  13. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, James A [Lexington, SC; Wang, Tao [Columbia, SC; Ebner, Armin D [Lexington, SC; Holland, Charles E [Cayce, SC

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  14. Offshore Facilities to Produce Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Blanco-Fernández

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As a result of international agreements on the reduction of CO2 emissions, new technologies using hydrogen are being developed. Hydrogen, despite being the most abundant element in Nature, cannot be found in its pure state. Water is one of the most abundant sources of hydrogen on the planet. The proposal here is to use energy from the sea in order to obtain hydrogen from water. If plants to obtain hydrogen were to be placed in the ocean, the impact of long submarines piping to the coast will be reduced. Further, this will open the way for the development of ships propelled by hydrogen. This paper discusses the feasibility of an offshore installation to obtain hydrogen from the sea, using ocean wave energy.

  15. On the Mechanisms of Hydrogen Implantation Induced Silicon Surface Layer Cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbauer, Tobias [Univ. of Marburg (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    The “Ion-Cut”, a layer splitting process by hydrogen ion implantation and subsequent annealing is a versatile and efficient technique of transferring thin silicon surface layers from bulk substrates onto other substrates, thus enabling the production of silicon-oninsulator (SOI) materials. Cleavage is induced by the coalescence of the highly pressurized sub-surface H2-gas bubbles, which form upon thermal annealing. A fundamental understanding of the basic mechanisms on how the cutting process occurs is still unclear, inhibiting further optimization of the Ion-Cut process. This work elucidates the physical mechanisms behind the Ion-Cut process in hydrogen-implanted silicon. The investigation of the cleavage process reveals the cut to be largely controlled by the lattice damage, generated by the hydrogen ion irradiation process, and its effects on the local stress field and the fracture toughness within the implantation zone rather than by the depth of maximum H-concentration. Furthermore, this work elucidates the different kinetics in the H-complex formations in silicon crystals with different conductivity types, and examines the mechanically induced damage accumulation caused by the crack propagation through the silicon sample in the splitting step of the Ion-Cut process. Additionally, the influence of boron pre-implantation on the Ion-Cut in hydrogen implanted silicon is investigated. These studies reveal, that both, the atomic interaction between the boron implant and the hydrogen implant and the shift of the Fermi level due to the electrical activation of the implanted boron have a tremendous enhancing effect on the Ion-Cut process.

  16. On the Mechanisms of Hydrogen Implantation Induced Silicon Surface Layer Cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbauer, Tobias Franz [Univ. of Marburg (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    The “Ion-Cut”, a layer splitting process by hydrogen ion implantation and subsequent annealing is a versatile and efficient technique of transferring thin silicon surface layers from bulk substrates onto other substrates, thus enabling the production of silicon-oninsulator (SOI) materials. Cleavage is induced by the coalescence of the highly pressurized sub-surface H2-gas bubbles, which form upon thermal annealing. A fundamental understanding of the basic mechanisms on how the cutting process occurs is still unclear, inhibiting further optimization of the Ion-Cut process. This work elucidates the physical mechanisms behind the Ion-Cut process in hydrogen-implanted silicon. The investigation of the cleavage process reveals the cut to be largely controlled by the lattice damage, generated by the hydrogen ion irradiation process, and its effects on the local stress field and the fracture toughness within the implantation zone rather than by the depth of maximum H-concentration. Furthermore, this work elucidates the different kinetics in the H-complex formations in silicon crystals with different conductivity types, and examines the mechanically induced damage accumulation caused by the crack propagation through the silicon sample in the splitting step of the Ion-Cut process. Additionally, the influence of boron pre-implantation on the Ion-Cut in hydrogen implanted silicon is investigated. These studies reveal, that both, the atomic interaction between the boron implant and the hydrogen implant and the shift of the Fermi level due to the electrical activation of the implanted boron have a tremendous enhancing effect on the Ion-Cut process.

  17. Molecular and Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    Livermore Laboratory, Dr. J. C. Raich of the Colorado State University, and Dr. R. H. Wentorf, Jr., of the General Electric Company for their reviews...investigated by Raich and Etters [8], who have made ground-state energy calculations for hydrogen molecules retaining the orientation dependence of the...consistent with work of Raich and Etters [8], who have made similar calculations during the course of their work on the rotational transition in solid

  18. Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Harvey D.

    1985-01-01

    The coal liquefaction process disclosed uses three stages. The first stage is a liquefaction. The second and third stages are hydrogenation stages at different temperatures and in parallel or in series. One stage is within 650.degree.-795.degree. F. and optimizes solvent production. The other stage is within 800.degree.-840.degree. F. and optimizes the C.sub.5 -850.degree. F. product.

  19. HEATHER - HElium Ion Accelerator for RadioTHERapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Jordan [Huddersfield U.; Edgecock, Thomas [Huddersfield U.; Green, Stuart [Birmingham U.; Johnstone, Carol [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    A non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient (nsFFAG) accelerator is being designed for helium ion therapy. This facility will consist of 2 superconducting rings, treating with helium ions (He²⁺ ) and image with hydrogen ions (H + 2 ). Currently only carbon ions are used to treat cancer, yet there is an increasing interest in the use of lighter ions for therapy. Lighter ions have reduced dose tail beyond the tumour compared to carbon, caused by low Z secondary particles produced via inelastic nuclear reactions. An FFAG approach for helium therapy has never been previously considered. Having demonstrated isochronous acceleration from 0.5 MeV to 900 MeV, we now demonstrate the survival of a realistic beam across both stages.

  20. Efficient generation of energetic ions in multi-ion plasmas by radio-frequency heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Lerche, E.; Mantsinen, M. J.; van Eester, D.; Craciunescu, T.; Kiptily, V. G.; Lin, Y.; Nocente, M.; Nabais, F.; Nave, M. F. F.; Baranov, Y.; Bielecki, J.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Crombé, K.; Czarnecka, A.; Faustin, J. M.; Felton, R.; Fitzgerald, M.; Gallart, D.; Giacomelli, L.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Jacquet, Ph.; Johnson, T.; Lennholm, M.; Loarer, T.; Porkolab, M.; Sharapov, S. E.; Valcarcel, D.; van Schoor, M.; Weisen, H.; Marmar, E. S.; Baek, S. G.; Barnard, H.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Candy, J.; Canik, J.; Churchill, R. M.; Cziegler, I.; Dekow, G.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diallo, A.; Edlund, E.; Ennever, P.; Faust, I.; Fiore, C.; Gao, Chi; Golfinopoulos, T.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Holland, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Irby, J.; Labombard, B.; Lin, Yijun; Lipschultz, B.; Loarte, A.; Mumgaard, R.; Parker, R. R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; Scott, S.; Shiraiwa, S.; Snyder, P.; Sorbom, B.; Terry, D.; Terry, J. L.; Theiler, C.; Vieira, R.; Walk, J. R.; Wallace, G. M.; White, A.; Whyte, D.; Wolfe, S. M.; Wright, G. M.; Wright, J.; Wukitch, S. J.; Xu, P.; Abduallev, S.; Abhangi, M.; Abreu, P.; Afzal, M.; Aggarwal, K. M.; Ahlgren, T.; Ahn, J. H.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Aiba, N.; Airila, M.; Albanese, R.; Aldred, V.; Alegre, D.; Alessi, E.; Aleynikov, P.; Alfier, A.; Alkseev, A.; Allinson, M.; Alper, B.; Alves, E.; Ambrosino, G.; Ambrosino, R.; Amicucci, L.; Amosov, V.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Angelone, M.; Anghel, M.; Angioni, C.; Appel, L.; Appelbee, C.; Arena, P.; Ariola, M.; Arnichand, H.; Arshad, S.; Ash, A.; Ashikawa, N.; Aslanyan, V.; Asunta, O.; Auriemma, F.; Austin, Y.; Avotina, L.; Axton, M. D.; Ayres, C.; Bacharis, M.; Baciero, A.; Baião, D.; Bailey, S.; Baker, A.; Balboa, I.; Balden, M.; Balshaw, N.; Bament, R.; Banks, J. W.; Baranov, Y. F.; Barnard, M. A.; Barnes, D.; Barnes, M.; Barnsley, R.; Wiechec, A. Baron; Orte, L. Barrera; Baruzzo, M.; Basiuk, V.; Bassan, M.; Bastow, R.; Batista, A.; Batistoni, P.; Baughan, R.; Bauvir, B.; Baylor, L.; Bazylev, B.; Beal, J.; Beaumont, P. S.; Beckers, M.; Beckett, B.; Becoulet, A.; Bekris, N.; Beldishevski, M.; Bell, K.; Belli, F.; Bellinger, M.; Belonohy, É.; Ayed, N. Ben; Benterman, N. A.; Bergsåker, H.; Bernardo, J.; Bernert, M.; Berry, M.; Bertalot, L.; Besliu, C.; Beurskens, M.; Bieg, B.; Bielecki, J.; Biewer, T.; Bigi, M.; Bílková, P.; Binda, F.; Bisoffi, A.; Bizarro, J. P. S.; Björkas, C.; Blackburn, J.; Blackman, K.; Blackman, T. R.; Blanchard, P.; Blatchford, P.; Bobkov, V.; Boboc, A.; Bodnár, G.; Bogar, O.; Bolshakova, I.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonanomi, N.; Bonelli, F.; Boom, J.; Booth, J.; Borba, D.; Borodin, D.; Borodkina, I.; Botrugno, A.; Bottereau, C.; Boulting, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Bowden, M.; Bower, C.; Bowman, C.; Boyce, T.; Boyd, C.; Boyer, H. J.; Bradshaw, J. M. A.; Braic, V.; Bravanec, R.; Breizman, B.; Bremond, S.; Brennan, P. D.; Breton, S.; Brett, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Bright, M. D. J.; Brix, M.; Broeckx, W.; Brombin, M.; Brosławski, A.; Brown, D. P. D.; Brown, M.; Bruno, E.; Bucalossi, J.; Buch, J.; Buchanan, J.; Buckley, M. A.; Budny, R.; Bufferand, H.; Bulman, M.; Bulmer, N.; Bunting, P.; Buratti, P.; Burckhart, A.; Buscarino, A.; Busse, A.; Butler, N. K.; Bykov, I.; Byrne, J.; Cahyna, P.; Calabrò, G.; Calvo, I.; Camenen, Y.; Camp, P.; Campling, D. C.; Cane, J.; Cannas, B.; Capel, A. J.; Card, P. J.; Cardinali, A.; Carman, P.; Carr, M.; Carralero, D.; Carraro, L.; Carvalho, B. B.; Carvalho, I.; Carvalho, P.; Casson, F. J.; Castaldo, C.; Catarino, N.; Caumont, J.; Causa, F.; Cavazzana, R.; Cave-Ayland, K.; Cavinato, M.; Cecconello, M.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Cecil, E.; Cenedese, A.; Cesario, R.; Challis, C. D.; Chandler, M.; Chandra, D.; Chang, C. S.; Chankin, A.; Chapman, I. T.; Chapman, S. C.; Chernyshova, M.; Chitarin, G.; Ciraolo, G.; Ciric, D.; Citrin, J.; Clairet, F.; Clark, E.; Clark, M.; Clarkson, R.; Clatworthy, D.; Clements, C.; Cleverly, M.; Coad, J. P.; Coates, P. A.; Cobalt, A.; Coccorese, V.; Cocilovo, V.; Coda, S.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Coffey, I.; Colas, L.; Collins, S.; Conka, D.; Conroy, S.; Conway, N.; Coombs, D.; Cooper, D.; Cooper, S. R.; Corradino, C.; Corre, Y.; Corrigan, G.; Cortes, S.; Coster, D.; Couchman, A. S.; Cox, M. P.; Craciunescu, T.; Cramp, S.; Craven, R.; Crisanti, F.; Croci, G.; Croft, D.; Crombé, K.; Crowe, R.; Cruz, N.; Cseh, G.; Cufar, A.; Cullen, A.; Curuia, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Dabirikhah, H.; Dalgliesh, P.; Dalley, S.; Dankowski, J.; Darrow, D.; Davies, O.; Davis, W.; Day, C.; Day, I. E.; de Bock, M.; de Castro, A.; de La Cal, E.; de La Luna, E.; Masi, G. De; de Pablos, J. L.; de Temmerman, G.; de Tommasi, G.; de Vries, P.; Deakin, K.; Deane, J.; Agostini, F. Degli; Dejarnac, R.; Delabie, E.; den Harder, N.; Dendy, R. O.; Denis, J.; Denner, P.; Devaux, S.; Devynck, P.; Maio, F. Di; Siena, A. Di; Troia, C. Di; Dinca, P.; D'Inca, R.; Ding, B.; Dittmar, T.; Doerk, H.; Doerner, R. P.; Donné, T.; Dorling, S. E.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Doswon, S.; Douai, D.; Doyle, P. T.; Drenik, A.; Drewelow, P.; Drews, P.; Duckworth, Ph.; Dumont, R.; Dumortier, P.; Dunai, D.; Dunne, M.; Ďuran, I.; Durodié, F.; Dutta, P.; Duval, B. P.; Dux, R.; Dylst, K.; Dzysiuk, N.; Edappala, P. V.; Edmond, J.; Edwards, A. M.; Edwards, J.; Eich, Th.; Ekedahl, A.; El-Jorf, R.; Elsmore, C. G.; Enachescu, M.; Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, F.; Eriksson, J.; Eriksson, L. G.; Esposito, B.; Esquembri, S.; Esser, H. G.; Esteve, D.; Evans, B.; Evans, G. E.; Evison, G.; Ewart, G. D.; Fagan, D.; Faitsch, M.; Falie, D.; Fanni, A.; Fasoli, A.; Faustin, J. M.; Fawlk, N.; Fazendeiro, L.; Fedorczak, N.; Felton, R. C.; Fenton, K.; Fernades, A.; Fernandes, H.; Ferreira, J.; Fessey, J. 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    2017-10-01

    We describe a new technique for the efficient generation of high-energy ions with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in multi-ion plasmas. The discussed `three-ion' scenarios are especially suited for strong wave absorption by a very low number of resonant ions. To observe this effect, the plasma composition has to be properly adjusted, as prescribed by theory. We demonstrate the potential of the method on the world-largest plasma magnetic confinement device, JET (Joint European Torus, Culham, UK), and the high-magnetic-field tokamak Alcator C-Mod (Cambridge, USA). The obtained results demonstrate efficient acceleration of 3He ions to high energies in dedicated hydrogen-deuterium mixtures. Simultaneously, effective plasma heating is observed, as a result of the slowing-down of the fast 3He ions. The developed technique is not only limited to laboratory plasmas, but can also be applied to explain observations of energetic ions in space-plasma environments, in particular, 3He-rich solar flares.