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Sample records for hydrogen iodide decomposer

  1. Materials study supporting thermochemical hydrogen cycle sulfuric acid decomposer design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Michael S.

    Increasing global climate change has been driven by greenhouse gases emissions originating from the combustion of fossil fuels. Clean burning hydrogen has the potential to replace much of the fossil fuels used today reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere. The sulfur iodine and hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles coupled with high temperature heat from advanced nuclear reactors have shown promise for economical large-scale hydrogen fuel stock production. Both of these cycles employ a step to decompose sulfuric acid to sulfur dioxide. This decomposition step occurs at high temperatures in the range of 825°C to 926°C dependent on the catalysis used. Successful commercial implementation of these technologies is dependent upon the development of suitable materials for use in the highly corrosive environments created by the decomposition products. Boron treated diamond film was a potential candidate for use in decomposer process equipment based on earlier studies concluding good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. However, little information was available relating the interactions of diamond and diamond films with sulfuric acid at temperatures greater than 350°C. A laboratory scale sulfuric acid decomposer simulator was constructed at the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute at the University of Missouri-Columbia. The simulator was capable of producing the temperatures and corrosive environments that process equipment would be exposed to for industrialization of the sulfur iodide or hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles. A series of boron treated synthetic diamonds were tested in the simulator to determine corrosion resistances and suitability for use in thermochemical process equipment. These studies were performed at twenty four hour durations at temperatures between 600°C to 926°C. Other materials, including natural diamond, synthetic diamond treated with titanium, silicon carbide, quartz, aluminum nitride, and Inconel

  2. Two dimensional simulation of hydrogen iodide decomposition reaction using fluent code for hydrogen production using nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Jung Sik [The Institute of Machinery and Electronic Technology, Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Young Joon; Lee, Ki Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Hyuk [Division of Marine Engineering System, Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The operating characteristics of hydrogen iodide (HI) decomposition for hydrogen production were investigated using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code, and various factors, such as hydrogen production, heat of reaction, and temperature distribution, were studied to compare device performance with that expected for device development. Hydrogen production increased with an increase of the surface-to-volume (STV) ratio. With an increase of hydrogen production, the reaction heat increased. The internal pressure and velocity of the HI decomposer were estimated through pressure drop and reducing velocity from the preheating zone. The mass of H2O was independent of the STV ratio, whereas that of HI decreased with increasing STV ratio.

  3. Natural manganese deposits as catalyst for decomposing hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, A.H.; Lekkerkerker-Teunissen, K.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking water companies (are intending to) implement advanced oxidation processes (AOP) in their treatment schemes to increase the barrier against organic micropollutants (OMPs). It is necessary to decompose the excessive hydrogen peroxide after applying AOP to avoid negative effects in the

  4. Two-dimensional simulation of hydrogen iodide decomposition reaction using fluent code for hydrogen production using nuclear technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Sik Choi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The operating characteristics of hydrogen iodide (HI decomposition for hydrogen production were investigated using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code, and various factors, such as hydrogen production, heat of reaction, and temperature distribution, were studied to compare device performance with that expected for device development. Hydrogen production increased with an increase of the surface-to-volume (STV ratio. With an increase of hydrogen production, the reaction heat increased. The internal pressure and velocity of the HI decomposer were estimated through pressure drop and reducing velocity from the preheating zone. The mass of H2O was independent of the STV ratio, whereas that of HI decreased with increasing STV ratio.

  5. Oxygen-hydrogen fuel cell with an iodine-iodide cathode - A concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javet, P.

    1970-01-01

    Fuel cell uses a porous cathode through which is fed a solution of iodine in aqueous iodide solution, the anode is a hydrogen electrode. No activation polarization appears on the cathode because of the high exchange-current density of the iodine-iodide electrode.

  6. Conversion of Aryl Iodides into Aryliodine(III Dichlorides by an Oxidative Halogenation Strategy Using 30% Aqueous Hydrogen Peroxide in Fluorinated Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Podgoršek

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative chlorination with HCl/H2O2 in 1,1,1-trifluoroethanol was used to transform aryl iodides into aryliodine(III dihalides. In this instance 1,1,1-trifluoroethanol is not only the reaction medium, but is also an activator of hydrogen peroxide for the oxidation of hydrochloric acid to molecular chlorine. Aryliodine(III dichlorides were formed in 72–91% isolated yields in the reaction of aryl iodides with 30% aqueous hydrogen peroxide and hydrochloric acid at ambient temperature. A study of the effect that substituents on the aromatic ring have on the formation and stability of aryliodine(III dichlorides shows that the transformation is easier to achieve in the presence of the electron-donating groups (i.e. methoxy, but in this case the products rapidly decompose under the reported reaction conditions to form chlorinated arenes. The results suggest that oxidation of hydrogen chloride with hydrogen peroxide is the initial reaction step, while direct oxidation of aryl iodide with hydrogen peroxide is less likely to occur.

  7. Natural manganese deposits as catalyst for decomposing hydrogen peroxide (discussion paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, A.H.; Lekkerkerker-Teunissen, K.; Van Dijk, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking water companies more and more implement Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOP) in their treatment schemes to increase the barrier against organic micropollutants (OMPs). It is necessary to decompose the excessive hydrogen peroxide after applying AOP to avoid negative effects in the following,

  8. Numerical Analysis on Thermochemical Characteristics of a Hydrogen Iodine Decomposer in Sulfur-Iodine cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T. H.; Lee, K. Y.; Shin, Y. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, J. S.; Choi, J. H. [Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In this study, to develop optimum decomposition reactor of HI to apply hydrogen process in thermochemical VHTR-SI cycle, operating characteristics of the HI decomposition reaction were investigated using the CFD code as a commercial program. Several factors, such as hydrogen production, heat of reaction, and temperature distribution, were studied to compare the device performance with that expected for device development. The CFD analysis for HI decomposition simulation was performed by applying the actual operation conditions and HI decomposer design. The hydrogen production depended on the STV ratio. In this study, predicted hydrogen production was 1.12, 1.99, and 3.10 mol/h for STV ratios of 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5, respectively. The hydrogen production at an STV ratio of 0.5 was higher than that at 0.3 by 2 mol/h. The inner temperature of the HI decomposer was studied in the form of contour images at ITC 1-5.

  9. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation from hydriodic acid using methylammonium lead iodide in dynamic equilibrium with aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunghak; Chang, Woo Je; Lee, Chan Woo; Park, Sangbaek; Ahn, Hyo-Yong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2017-01-01

    The solar-driven splitting of hydrohalic acids (HX) is an important and fast growing research direction for H2 production. In addition to the hydrogen, the resulting chemicals (X2/X3-) can be used to propagate a continuous process in a closed cycle and are themselves useful products. Here we present a strategy for photocatalytic hydrogen iodide (HI) splitting using methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) in an effort to develop a cost-effective and easily scalable process. Considering that MAPbI3 is a water-soluble ionic compound, we exploit the dynamic equilibrium of the dissolution and precipitation of MAPbI3 in saturated aqueous solutions. The I- and H+ concentrations of the aqueous solution are determined to be the critical parameters for the stabilization of the tetragonal MAPbI3 phase. Stable and efficient H2 production under visible light irradiation was demonstrated. The solar HI splitting efficiency of MAPbI3 was 0.81% when using Pt as a cocatalyst.

  10. Detailed kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis of hydrogen iodide decomposition in sulfur-iodine cycle for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Zhou, Junhu; Wang, Zhihua; Cen, Kefa [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2008-01-15

    A new detailed kinetic modeling was developed for homogeneous decomposition of hydrogen iodide (HI) in the sulfur-iodine cycle. Results show the HI decomposition reaction is sensitive to temperature, and the response time of reaction reduces from 1 s to 10 ms as temperature increases from 500 to 800 {sup circle} C. The decomposition is also improved as pressure increased. Kinetic calculations are also compared with the experimental data, and all trends of the experiment can be reproduced by the model. Sensitivity analysis shows that the reactions of HI with HI, H and I play a major role in the hydrogen production process and the hydrogen consumption occurs primarily by reaction of H with I{sub 2} and reaction of I with H{sub 2} to form HI. As temperature increases, different reactions play a dominant role in HI decomposition process. Based on the detailed kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis results, the HI decomposition reaction path diagram was constructed in this paper. (author)

  11. Research paper effects of 13-HPODE on expression of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis, iodide uptake and formation of hydrogen peroxide in porcine thyrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luci, Sebastian; Bettzieche, Anja; Brandsch, Corinna; Eder, Klaus

    2006-11-01

    It has been shown that dietary oxidized fats influence thyroid function in rats and pigs. Mechanism underlying this phenomenon are unknown. This study was performed to investigate whether 13-hydroperoxy-9,11 -octadecadienic acid (13-HPODE), a primary oxidation product of linoleic acid, affects expression of gene involved in thyroid hormone synthesis and formation of hydrogen peroxide in primary porcine thyrocytes. Thyrocytes were treated with 13-HPODE in concentrations between 20 and 100 microM. Cells treated with vehicle alone ("control cells") or with equivalent concentrations of linoleic acid were considered as controls. Treatment of cells with 13-HPODE did not affect cell viability but increased the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (p < 0.05) compared to control cells or cells treated with linoleic acid. Relative mRNA concentrations of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis like sodium iodide symporter, thyrotropin receptor, and thyroid peroxidase, as well as iodide uptake, did not differ between cells treated with 13-HPODE and control cells or cells treated with linoleic acid. Treatment of cells with 13-HPODE, however, reduced the relative mRNA concentrations of dual oxidase-2 and the formation of hydrogen peroxide compared to control cells or cells treated with linoleic acid (p < 0.05). Because the production of hydrogen peroxide is rate-limiting for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, it is suggested that 13-HPODE could have an impact on the formation of thyroid hormones in the thyroid gland.

  12. Materials Development for the Sulfuric Acid Decomposer in Iodine-Sulfur(IS)cycle for Nuclear Hydrogen Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Won; Kim, Hyung Jin; Hong, Sung Deok; Kim, Yong Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The material used for the sulfuric acid gas channels for a mass production of hydrogen is of importance because it is subjected to severe corrosion environment. Consideration is being given to surface modification of metallic materials. We selected Hastelloy X as the metallic substrate due to its good mechanical properties at a high temperature and SiC as a corrosion inhibiting coating material. In developing a surface coated metallic system, consideration needs to be given to how best to ensure the adhesion of the coating layer and how to reduce the defects in the coating. However we have solved this problem by employing an ion beam mixing (IBM). Other potential problems include the possible sublimation of the deposited film during a high temperature annealing in vacuum. This sublimation certainly gives arise to adverse effects such as loss of the film and/or its deterioration and non-stoichiometric structure formation. In this paper, we show a result of in-depth sublimation suppression study of the SiC coated layer, and the corrosion study results of an immersion test in a 98 % sulfuric acid at 300

  13. Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Reduction of Methyl Iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1999-01-01

    a-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE's) have been determined for the reaction of methyl iodide with a series of reducing agents. Reagents which transfer hydride ion in an SN2 reaction show small inverse or small normal KIE's. Reagents which transfer an electron to methyl iodide to produce...... methyl radical show large normal KIE's up to 20 % per a-D. Large KIE's were found for the reaction of methyl iodide with sodium, for Pd-catalyzed reaction of methyl iodide with hydrogen, for ET at a platinum cathode, for ET from benzophenone ketyl or from sodium naphthalenide, for iron catalyzed ET from...... a Grignard reagent to methyl iodide, and for reduction of methyl iodide with tributyltin hydride or with gaseous hydrogen iodide. Very small KIE's were found for electron transfer to methyl iodide from magnesium in ether or from sodium in ammonia. The reason may be that these reactions are transport...

  14. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  15. Effect of nitrogen and oxygen on radiolysis of iodide solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasawa, H.; Endo, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Power and Industrial System R+D Divisions, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    The effect of nitrogen and oxygen on radiolysis of iodide solution was examined. Direct decomposition of nitrogen by {gamma}-radiation produced nitric acid to decrease a water pH. This resulted in the iodine formation in the radiolysis of iodide solution. Hydrogen peroxide was produced by the radiolysis of water containing oxygen. This worked a reducing agent to suppress the formation of iodine in the radiolysis of iodide solution. In the analytical model, fourteen iodine species were considered and reaction scheme consisted in 124 reactions. The analytical model could estimate the oxidation state of iodide ions. (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  16. 2-Hydroxymethyl-1,3-dimethylimidazolium iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Chelghoum

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The crystal packing of the title compound, C6H11N2O+·I−, can be described as intercalated layers lying parallel to (010, with the iodide ions located between the cations. A weak intramolecular C—H...O hydrogen bond occurs within the cation. In the crystal, intermolecular O—H...I hydrogen bonds result in the formation of a three-dimensional network and reinforce the cohesion of the ionic structure.

  17. Solid electrolyte membranes and the system to produce hydrogen from thermally decomposed water by solar energy; Taiyo energy riyo ni yoru mizu no chokusetsu netsubunkai kara no suiso seizoyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigara, K.; Watanabe, K.; Kawamura, K.; Kawada, T.; Mizusaki, J.; Ishigame, M. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Research Institute for Scientific Measurements

    1996-10-27

    For conversion of solar heat to transportable energy, hydrogen production by direct thermal decomposition of water using concentrated high-temperature solar heat was studied. Water vapor is injected into the tubular target with high melting point and high oxygen permeability at high temperature while heating the target by concentrated solar heat over 2000K. Oxygen in decomposed gas is discharged through an oxygen permeable membrane to extract hydrogen. Solid electrolyte is used as one of the target materials. Oxygen gas in the high-oxygen partial pressure site changes into oxygen ion by accepting two electrons at the target surface, and returns to neutral oxygen gas in the low-oxygen partial pressure site by discharging two electrons at the surface after permeation through oxygen vacancy. In the case of n-type solid electrolyte, to obtain constant permeation of a large amount of oxygen, flow of a large amount of electrons is indispensable in the opposite direction to oxygen ion. Among [(ZrO2)(1-x)(CeO2)x](0.9)(CaO)(0.1), materials of 0.4-0.5 in x seems to be useful as the target material. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Kinetics of gold dissolution in iodide solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kang

    Cyanide has been used as a lixiviant for free milling gold ores for a long time. Cyanide solutions are highly toxic and their use poses long term environmental problems. Cyanidation process is efficient for oxide gold ores but it is ineffective for gold ores containing sulfides. Among the noncyanide based lixiviants, iodide has the potential of replacing cyanide due to its ability to leach gold at a wider pH range and higher rate of gold dissolution. The emerging technology of bio-oxidation is an accepted process for pretreatment of sulfide gold ores. The bio-oxidation is conducted at acidic pH which makes direct cyanidation without pH adjustment impractical. On the contrary, iodide leaching of gold from the bio-oxidized ore can be accomplished without any pH adjustment. The present study was undertaken in order to investigate the kinetics of gold dissolution in various iodide-oxidant solutions under conditions similar to those prevailing in a solution containing bio-oxidized ore. The thermodynamic study indicated that gold can be spontaneously dissolved in iodide-hydrogen peroxide, iodide-ferric ion and iodide-persulfate solutions. Dissolution of gold powder was carried out in these solutions and the results showed that the gold dissolution was dependent on solution pH, concentrations of iodide, oxidants and temperature. Gold dissolution was found to increase with decreasing pH and substantial gold dissolution could be achieved at pH ≤ 2. Increasing concentration of oxidant till an optimum oxidant/iodide molar ratio increased gold dissolution and much higher concentration of oxidant would result in a decrease in gold dissolution. With increasing iodide concentration and temperature, gold dissolution increased significantly. The activation energy data which ranged between 9.6 and 13.6 kcal/mole for various oxidants indicated that surface reaction was the rate controlling step. At higher temperatures a change in rate limiting step with passage of time was observed

  19. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  20. Catalytic cartridge SO/sub 3/ decomposer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1980-11-18

    A catalytic cartridge surrounding a heat pipe driven by a heat source is utilized as a SO/sub 3/ decomposer for thermochemical hydrogen production. The cartridge has two embodiments, a cross-flow cartridge and an axial flow cartridge. In the cross-flow cartridge, SO/sub 3/ gas is flowed through a chamber and incident normally to a catalyst coated tube extending through the chamber, the catalyst coated tube surrounding the heat pipe. In the axial-flow cartridge, SO/sub 3/ gas is flowed through the annular space between concentric inner and outer cylindrical walls, the inner cylindrical wall being coated by a catalyst and surrounding the heat pipe. The modular cartridge decomposer provides high thermal efficiency, high conversion efficiency, and increased safety. A fusion reactor may be used as the heat source.

  1. Decomposing Multifractal Crossovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Nagy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Physiological processes—such as, the brain's resting-state electrical activity or hemodynamic fluctuations—exhibit scale-free temporal structuring. However, impacts common in biological systems such as, noise, multiple signal generators, or filtering by transport function, result in multimodal scaling that cannot be reliably assessed by standard analytical tools that assume unimodal scaling. Here, we present two methods to identify breakpoints or crossovers in multimodal multifractal scaling functions. These methods incorporate the robust iterative fitting approach of the focus-based multifractal formalism (FMF. The first approach (moment-wise scaling range adaptivity allows for a breakpoint-based adaptive treatment that analyzes segregated scale-invariant ranges. The second method (scaling function decomposition method, SFD is a crossover-based design aimed at decomposing signal constituents from multimodal scaling functions resulting from signal addition or co-sampling, such as, contamination by uncorrelated fractals. We demonstrated that these methods could handle multimodal, mono- or multifractal, and exact or empirical signals alike. Their precision was numerically characterized on ideal signals, and a robust performance was demonstrated on exemplary empirical signals capturing resting-state brain dynamics by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, electroencephalography (EEG, and blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI-BOLD. The NIRS and fMRI-BOLD low-frequency fluctuations were dominated by a multifractal component over an underlying biologically relevant random noise, thus forming a bimodal signal. The crossover between the EEG signal components was found at the boundary between the δ and θ bands, suggesting an independent generator for the multifractal δ rhythm. The robust implementation of the SFD method should be regarded as essential in the seamless processing of large volumes of bimodal f

  2. Decomposing Multifractal Crossovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zoltan; Mukli, Peter; Herman, Peter; Eke, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Physiological processes—such as, the brain's resting-state electrical activity or hemodynamic fluctuations—exhibit scale-free temporal structuring. However, impacts common in biological systems such as, noise, multiple signal generators, or filtering by transport function, result in multimodal scaling that cannot be reliably assessed by standard analytical tools that assume unimodal scaling. Here, we present two methods to identify breakpoints or crossovers in multimodal multifractal scaling functions. These methods incorporate the robust iterative fitting approach of the focus-based multifractal formalism (FMF). The first approach (moment-wise scaling range adaptivity) allows for a breakpoint-based adaptive treatment that analyzes segregated scale-invariant ranges. The second method (scaling function decomposition method, SFD) is a crossover-based design aimed at decomposing signal constituents from multimodal scaling functions resulting from signal addition or co-sampling, such as, contamination by uncorrelated fractals. We demonstrated that these methods could handle multimodal, mono- or multifractal, and exact or empirical signals alike. Their precision was numerically characterized on ideal signals, and a robust performance was demonstrated on exemplary empirical signals capturing resting-state brain dynamics by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), electroencephalography (EEG), and blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI-BOLD). The NIRS and fMRI-BOLD low-frequency fluctuations were dominated by a multifractal component over an underlying biologically relevant random noise, thus forming a bimodal signal. The crossover between the EEG signal components was found at the boundary between the δ and θ bands, suggesting an independent generator for the multifractal δ rhythm. The robust implementation of the SFD method should be regarded as essential in the seamless processing of large volumes of bimodal fMRI-BOLD imaging data for

  3. Decomposable log-linear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Poul Svante

    can be characterized by a structured set of conditional independencies between some variables given some other variables. We term the new model class decomposable log-linear models, which is illustrated to be a much richer class than decomposable graphical models.It covers a wide range of non...

  4. Iodide handling disorders (NIS, TPO, TG, IYD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targovnik, Héctor M; Citterio, Cintia E; Rivolta, Carina M

    2017-03-01

    Iodide Handling Disorders lead to defects of the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones (thyroid dyshormonogenesis, TD) and thereafter congenital hypothyroidism (CH), the most common endocrine disease characterized by low levels of circulating thyroid hormones. The prevalence of CH is 1 in 2000-3000 live births. Prevention of CH is based on prenatal diagnosis, carrier identification, and genetic counseling. In neonates a complete diagnosis of TD should include clinical examination, biochemical thyroid tests, thyroid ultrasound, radioiodine or technetium scintigraphy and perchlorate discharge test (PDT). Biosynthesis of thyroid hormones requires the presence of iodide, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), a supply of hydrogen peroxide (DUOX system), an iodine acceptor protein, thyroglobulin (TG), and the rescue and recycling of iodide by the action of iodotyrosine deiodinase or iodotyrosine dehalogenase 1 (IYD or DEHAL1). The iodide transport is a two-step process involving transporters located either in the basolateral or apical membranes, sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and pendrin (PDS), respectively. TD has been linked to mutations in the solute carrier family 5, member 5 transporter (SLC5A5, encoding NIS), solute carrier family 26, member 4 transporter (SLC26A4, encoding PDS), TPO, DUOX2, DUOXA2, TG and IYD genes. These mutations produce a heterogeneous spectrum of CH, with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Thereafter, the patients are usually homozygous or compound heterozygous for the gene mutations and the parents, carriers of one mutation. In the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in identifying the genetic and molecular causes of TD. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology allow the massive screening and facilitate the studies of phenotype variability. In this article we included the most recent data related to disorders caused by mutations in NIS, TPO, TG and IYD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Potassium Iodide Potentiates Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation Mediated by Rose Bengal in In Vitro and In Vivo Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaoshen; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; El-Hussein, Ahmed; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sarna, Tadeusz; Hamblin, Michael R

    2017-07-01

    Rose bengal (RB) is a halogenated xanthene dye that has been used to mediate antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation for several years. While RB is highly active against Gram-positive bacteria, it is largely inactive in killing Gram-negative bacteria. We have discovered that addition of the nontoxic salt potassium iodide (100 mM) potentiates green light (540-nm)-mediated killing by up to 6 extra logs with the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Gram-positive bacterium methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and the fungal yeast Candida albicans The mechanism is proposed to be singlet oxygen addition to iodide anion to form peroxyiodide, which decomposes into radicals and, finally, forms hydrogen peroxide and molecular iodine. The effects of these different bactericidal species can be teased apart by comparing the levels of killing achieved in three different scenarios: (i) cells, RB, and KI are mixed together and then illuminated with green light; (ii) cells and RB are centrifuged, and then KI is added and the mixture is illuminated with green light; and (iii) RB and KI are illuminated with green light, and then cells are added after illumination with the light. We also showed that KI could potentiate RB photodynamic therapy in a mouse model of skin abrasions infected with bioluminescent P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Forensic entomology of decomposing humans and their decomposing pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Michelle R

    2015-02-01

    Domestic pets are commonly found in the homes of decedents whose deaths are investigated by a medical examiner or coroner. When these pets become trapped with a decomposing decedent they may resort to feeding on the body or succumb to starvation and/or dehydration and begin to decompose as well. In this case report photographic documentation of cases involving pets and decedents were examined from 2009 through the beginning of 2014. This photo review indicated that in many cases the pets were cats and dogs that were trapped with the decedent, died and were discovered in a moderate (bloat to active decay) state of decomposition. In addition three cases involving decomposing humans and their decomposing pets are described as they were processed for time of insect colonization by forensic entomological approach. Differences in timing and species colonizing the human and animal bodies were noted as was the potential for the human or animal derived specimens to contaminate one another at the scene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Decomposing change in life expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W.; Canudas Romo, Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    at all ages, and the second term captures the effect of heterogeneity in the pace of improvement in mortality at different ages. We extend the formula to decompose change in life expectancy into age-specific and cause-specific components, and apply the methods to analyze changes in life expectancy......We extend Nathan Keyfitz's research on continuous change in life expectancy over time by presenting and proving a new formula for decomposing such change. The formula separates change in life expectancy over time into two terms. The first term captures the general effect of reduction in death rates...

  8. Simulation of a Heat Transfer between Gases in SO3 Decomposer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. H.; Lee, T.H.; Lee, K.Y.; Kim, Y. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is developing hydrogen production process called thermochemical SI(Sulfur Iodine) cycle utilizing the heat from the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) with outlet coolant temperature up to 950 .deg. C, which is considered as an efficient reactor for the hydrogen production. The sulfur trioxide decomposer is one of the key components in SI cycle, because the sulfur trioxide is decomposed into sulfur dioxide and oxygen by a heat transferred from the helium gas. In this paper, the sulfur-trioxide decomposer was simulated with a chemical process simulator. A standard shell-and-tube heat exchanger model in the simulator was chosen for the simulation

  9. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  10. Composing and decomposing data types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    data types and to define extensible functions on data types in an ad hoc manner. The implementation makes essential use of closed type families in Haskell. The use of closed type families instead of type classes comes with a set of trade-offs, which we review in detail. Finally, we show that our......Wouter Swierstra's data types à la carte is a technique to modularise data type definitions in Haskell. We give an alternative implementation of data types à la carte that offers more flexibility in composing and decomposing data types. To achieve this, we refine the subtyping constraint, which...... is at the centre of data types à la carte. On the one hand this refinement is more general, allowing subtypings that intuitively should hold but were not derivable beforehand. This aspect of our implementation removes previous restrictions on how data types can be combined. On the other hand our refinement is more...

  11. Formamidinium iodide: crystal structure and phase transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A. Petrov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available At a temperature of 100 K, CH5N2+·I− (I, crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c. The formamidinium cation adopts a planar symmetrical structure [the r.m.s. deviation is 0.002 Å, and the C—N bond lengths are 1.301 (7 and 1.309 (8 Å]. The iodide anion does not lie within the cation plane, but deviates from it by 0.643 (10 Å. The cation and anion of I form a tight ionic pair by a strong N—H...I hydrogen bond. In the crystal of I, the tight ionic pairs form hydrogen-bonded zigzag-like chains propagating toward [20-1] via strong N—H...I hydrogen bonds. The hydrogen-bonded chains are further packed in stacks along [100]. The thermal behaviour of I was studied by different physicochemical methods (thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and powder diffraction. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed three narrow endothermic peaks at 346, 387 and 525 K, and one broad endothermic peak at ∼605 K. The first and second peaks are related to solid–solid phase transitions, while the third and fourth peaks are attributed to the melting and decomposition of I. The enthalpies of the phase transitions at 346 and 387 K are estimated as 2.60 and 2.75 kJ mol−1, respectively. The X-ray powder diffraction data collected at different temperatures indicate the existence of I as the monoclinic (100–346 K, orthorhombic (346–387 K and cubic (387–525 K polymorphic modifications.

  12. Oxidation of metal sulfites by iodine for use in thermochemical hydrogen cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, C. F. V.; Bowman, M. G.

    1981-09-01

    It is noted that thermochemical hydrogen cycles involving metal sulfates offer an alternative to sulfuric acid which is corrosive and has high energy requirements for drying prior to its thermal decomposition. The formation of such metal sulfates in conjunction with a low temperature hydrogen formation step is discussed. The following reaction was studied: MgSO3(c) + MgO(c) + I2(g) yields MgSO4(c) + MgI2(c). Although magnesium sulfite appears promising for this oxidation, a search was conducted for alternative metal sulfites which fit the following criteria for use: (1) sulfate must decompose in the temperature range available ( 1400 K); (2) iodide must hydrolyze easily; and (3) salts must not be rare, toxic, or expensive. Lanthanum and titanium fit these criteria.

  13. Decomposing global crop yield variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Tamara; Makowski, David

    2014-11-01

    Recent food crises have highlighted the need to better understand the between-year variability of agricultural production. Although increasing future production seems necessary, the globalization of commodity markets suggests that the food system would also benefit from enhanced supplies stability through a reduction in the year-to-year variability. Here, we develop an analytical expression decomposing global crop yield interannual variability into three informative components that quantify how evenly are croplands distributed in the world, the proportion of cultivated areas allocated to regions of above or below average variability and the covariation between yields in distinct world regions. This decomposition is used to identify drivers of interannual yield variations for four major crops (i.e., maize, rice, soybean and wheat) over the period 1961-2012. We show that maize production is fairly spread but marked by one prominent region with high levels of crop yield interannual variability (which encompasses the North American corn belt in the USA, and Canada). In contrast, global rice yields have a small variability because, although spatially concentrated, much of the production is located in regions of below-average variability (i.e., South, Eastern and South Eastern Asia). Because of these contrasted land use allocations, an even cultivated land distribution across regions would reduce global maize yield variance, but increase the variance of global yield rice. Intermediate results are obtained for soybean and wheat for which croplands are mainly located in regions with close-to-average variability. At the scale of large world regions, we find that covariances of regional yields have a negligible contribution to global yield variance. The proposed decomposition could be applied at any spatial and time scales, including the yearly time step. By addressing global crop production stability (or lack thereof) our results contribute to the understanding of a key

  14. Strontium Iodide Radiation Instrumentation (SIRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lee J.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Woolf, Richard S.; Finne, Theodore T.; Johnson, W. Neil; Jackson, Emily G.

    2017-08-01

    The Strontium Iodide Radiation Instrumentation (SIRI) is designed to space-qualify new gamma-ray detector technology for space-based astrophysical and defense applications. This new technology offers improved energy resolution, lower power consumption and reduced size compared to similar systems. The SIRI instrument consists of a single europiumdoped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu) scintillation detector. The crystal has an energy resolution of 3% at 662 keV compared to the 6.5% of traditional sodium iodide and was developed for terrestrial-based weapons of mass destruction (WMD) detection. SIRI's objective is to study the internal activation of the SrI2:Eu material and measure the performance of the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readouts over a 1-year mission. The combined detector and readout measure the gammaray spectrum over the energy range of 0.04 - 4 MeV. The SIRI mission payoff is a space-qualified compact, highsensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer with improved energy resolution relative to previous sensors. Scientific applications in solar physics and astrophysics include solar flares, Gamma Ray Bursts, novae, supernovae, and the synthesis of the elements. Department of Defense (DoD) and security applications are also possible. Construction of the SIRI instrument has been completed, and it is currently awaiting integration onto the spacecraft. The expected launch date is May 2018 onboard STPSat-5. This work discusses the objectives, design details and the STPSat-5 mission concept of operations of the SIRI spectrometer.

  15. Tomographic Reconstruction Methods for Decomposing Directional Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas; Dong, Yiqiu

    X-ray computed tomography technique has many different practical applications. In this paper, we propose two new reconstruction methods that can decompose objects at the same time. By incorporating direction information, the proposed methods can decompose objects into various directional components...

  16. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Decomposability queueing and computer system applications

    CERN Document Server

    Courtois, P J

    1977-01-01

    Decomposability: Queueing and Computer System Applications presents a set of powerful methods for systems analysis. This 10-chapter text covers the theory of nearly completely decomposable systems upon which specific analytic methods are based.The first chapters deal with some of the basic elements of a theory of nearly completely decomposable stochastic matrices, including the Simon-Ando theorems and the perturbation theory. The succeeding chapters are devoted to the analysis of stochastic queuing networks that appear as a type of key model. These chapters also discuss congestion problems in

  18. Modeling of the Sulfuric Acid and Sulfur Trioxide Decomposer using Aspen Plus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong Un; Park, G. C. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, C. S.; Yoo, T. H.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, Y. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    A hydrogen production system using VHTR, which was combined with a Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle, is a good candidate for massive hydrogen production. It is being investigated for Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration (NHDD) project in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The SI thermo-chemical cycle is a good promise for the economical and eco-friendly hydrogen production. In SI cycle, the decomposition of a sulfuric acid is main concern for the material corrosion and mechanical stress on high temperature and pressure operation condition. KAERI has designed and constructed a small-scale gas loop that included sulfuric acid experimental facilities as a secondary loop. The main objectives of the loop are to monitor and validate the performances of NHDD component such as the Process Heat Exchanger (PHE) and sulfuric acid decomposer. In this paper, we discussed the results of the modeling of the sulfuric acid and sulfur trioxide decomposer using Aspen plus process simulator

  19. Decomposed and non-decomposed bodies retrieved from water: a comparative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambade, Vipul Namdeorao; Kukde, Hemant Ghanshyam; Malani, Ajit; Tumram, Nilesh Keshav; Borkar, Jaydeo Laxman; Batra, Anil Krishnaram; Meshram, Satin Kalidas

    2013-01-01

    The cause and manner of death in submersion cases are a routine challenge for forensic pathologists as they present considerable diagnostic difficulties. The present study was undertaken with a view to determine the characteristic pattern in bodies retrieved from water. From a total of 6779 medicolegal deaths reported at an Apex Medical Centre, Yeotmal, a rural district of Maharashtra over a 10-year study period, only 110 cases (1.6%) were decomposed and 243 cases (3.6%) were non-decomposed bodies retrieved from water with a rate of 0.6 decomposed body as compared with 1.4 non-decomposed bodies per 100,000 population per year. However, out of total 353 bodies retrieved from water, 31.2% were decomposed and 68.8% non-decomposed. Male predominance was seen in both groups with peak at 31-40 years. The cause and manner of death were ascertained as 89.9% and 82.7%, respectively, in decomposed bodies as compared with 100% and 96.3%, respectively, in non-decomposed bodies. Drowning was the commonest cause of death in both groups with suicide as the commonest manner of death in decomposed bodies in contrast to accidental in non-decomposed bodies. Excessive amount of pleural fluid, aquatic animal activity and mud/vegetation in lower respiratory tract was more commonly encountered in decomposed bodies. However, fine white froth was not seen in any of the cases in contrast to 81% non-decomposed bodies. Bodies were commonly recovered from wells in both groups. Most of the bodies were retrieved in the rainy season followed by summer and winter seasons in both groups.

  20. Efficient photoreductive decomposition of N-nitrosodimethylamine by UV/iodide process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhuyu; Zhang, Chaojie, E-mail: myrazh@tongji.edu.cn; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Qi

    2017-05-05

    Highlights: • N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was effectively decomposed by UV/iodide process. • NDMA was completely converted to nontoxic end products by UV/iodide process. • The photoreductive process was mainly attributed to the attack of hydrated electrons on the photoexcited NDMA. • The elimination of toxic intermediates was greatly enhanced as pH increased, but its effect on NDMA removal was negligible. - Abstract: N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) has aroused extensive concern as a disinfection byproduct due to its high toxicity and elevated concentration levels in water sources. This study investigates the photoreductive decomposition of NDMA by UV/iodide process. The results showed that this process is an effective strategy for the treatment of NDMA with 99.2% NDMA removed within 10 min. The depletion of NDMA by UV/iodide process obeyed pseudo-first-order kinetics with a rate constant (k{sub 1}) of 0.60 ± 0.03 min{sup −1}. Hydrated electrons (e{sub aq}{sup −}) generated by the UV irradiation of iodide were proven to play a critical role. Dimethylamine (DMA) and nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup −}) were formed as the main intermediate products, which completely converted to formate (HCOO{sup −}), ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}). Therefore, not only the high efficiencies in NDMA destruction, but the elimination of toxic intermediates make UV/iodide process advantageous. A photoreduction mechanism was proposed: NDMA initially absorbed photons to a photoexcited state, and underwent a cleavage of N−NO bond under the attack of e{sub aq}{sup −}. The solution pH had little impact on NDMA removal. However, alkaline conditions were more favorable for the elimination of DMA and NO{sub 2}{sup −}, thus effectively reducing the secondary pollution.

  1. Contrasting the surface ocean distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide; implications for boundary layer physics, chemistry and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, C J, E-mail: carl.j.palmer@gmail.co [Department of Oceanography, University of Cape Town, 7701 (South Africa)

    2010-08-15

    Bromoform and methyl iodide are both methane-like hydrocarbons with a halogen atom replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms. Both of these compounds occur naturally in the environment as a result of their production from seaweed and kelp. They are of interest to climate science as a result of their catalytic destruction of boundary layer ozone (a potent greenhouse gas) and, specifically for methyl iodide, the proposed role in the formation of new cloud condensation nuclei with implications for climate. In this paper, the currently available data on the distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide are analysed and contrasted to show that the concentrations of bromoform and methyl iodide do not correlate, that, in contrast to bromoform, the parameterization of sea surface methyl iodide concentrations demands only the sea surface temperature, and that the pelagic distribution of methyl iodide appears to follow the solar zenith angle. These three observations together suggest that, while the pelagic source of bromoform is mostly biogenic, the source of methyl iodide is photochemical. This has implications for the understanding of planetary boundary layer chemistry and potential organohalogen mediated feedbacks to climate.

  2. On decomposing languages defined by parallel devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Sven

    1975-01-01

    In this paper we give a method for decomposing subclasses of different families of languages, into other possibly smaller families. This method can be used to produce languages not in a family by using known examples of languages not belonging to other families....

  3. Creating and decomposing vector Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available -1 58th Annual SAIP Conference, Richards Bay, 8-12 July 2013 Creating and decomposing vector Bessel beams Angela Dudley1,*, Yanming Li2, Thandeka Mhlanga1, Michael Escuti2 and Andrew Forbes1 1 CSIR National Laser Centre, Pretoria, South...

  4. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Matthew Joseph [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-12-05

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation.

  5. A perchlorate sensitive iodide transporter in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Deborah L; Carr, James A; Willis, Ray E; Pressley, Thomas A

    2008-03-01

    Nucleotide sequence comparisons have identified a gene product in the genome database of African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) as a probable member of the solute carrier family of membrane transporters. To confirm its identity as a putative iodide transporter, we examined the function of this sequence after heterologous expression in mammalian cells. A green monkey kidney cell line transfected with the Xenopus nucleotide sequence had significantly greater (125)I uptake than sham-transfected control cells. The uptake in carrier-transfected cells was significantly inhibited in the presence of perchlorate, a competitive inhibitor of mammalian Na(+)/iodide symporter. Tissue distributions of the sequence were also consistent with a role in iodide uptake. The mRNA encoding the carrier was found to be expressed in the thyroid gland, stomach, and kidney of tadpoles from X. laevis, as well as the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. The ovaries of adult X. laevis also were found to express the carrier. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the putative X. laevis iodide transporter is orthologous to vertebrate Na(+)-dependent iodide symporters. We conclude that the amphibian sequence encodes a protein that is indeed a functional Na(+)/iodide symporter in X. laevis, as well as R. catesbeiana.

  6. A Combined Experimental and Molecular Dynamics Study of Iodide-Based Ionic Liquid and Water Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Stella D; Nofen, Elizabeth M; Chen, Haobo; Ngan, Miranda; Shindel, Benjamin; Yu, Hongyu; Dai, Lenore L

    2015-07-16

    Iodide-based ionic liquids have been widely employed as iodide sources in electrolytes for applications utilizing the triiodide/iodide redox couple. While adding a low-viscosity solvent such as water to ionic liquids can greatly enhance their usefulness, mixtures of highly viscous iodide-containing ILs with water have never been studied. This paper investigates, for the first time, mixtures of water and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide ([BMIM][I]) through a combined experimental and molecular dynamics study. The density, melting point, viscosity, and conductivity of these mixtures were measured by experiment. The composition region below 50% water by mole was found to differ dramatically from the region above 50% water, with trends in density and melting point differing before and after that point. Water was found to have a profound effect on viscosity and conductivity of the IL, and the effect of hydrogen bonding was discussed. Molecular dynamics simulations representing the same mixture compositions were performed. Molecular ordering was observed, as were changes in this ordering corresponding to water content. Molecular ordering was related to the experimentally measured mixture properties, providing a possible explanation for the two distinct composition regions identified by experiment.

  7. A note on arbitrarily vertex decomposable graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Marczyk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A graph \\(G\\ of order \\(n\\ is said to be arbitrarily vertex decomposable if for each sequence \\((n_{1},\\ldots,n_k\\ of positive integers such that \\(n_{1}+\\ldots+n_{k}=n\\ there exists a partition \\((V_{1},\\ldots,V_{k}\\ of the vertex set of \\(G\\ such that for each \\(i \\in \\{1,\\ldots,k\\}\\, \\(V_{i}\\ induces a connected subgraph of \\(G\\ on \\(n_i\\ vertices. In this paper we show that if \\(G\\ is a two-connected graph on \\(n\\ vertices with the independence number at most \\(\\lceil n/2\\rceil\\ and such that the degree sum of any pair of non-adjacent vertices is at least \\(n-3\\, then \\(G\\ is arbitrarily vertex decomposable. We present another result for connected graphs satisfying a similar condition, where the bound \\(n-3\\ is replaced by \\(n-2\\.

  8. Optimal decomposable witnesses without the spanning property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusiak, Remigiusz [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Sarbicki, Gniewomir [Insitute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudzicdzka 5, PL-87-100 Torun (Poland); Lewenstein, Maciej [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, Lluis Companys 23, E-08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    One of the unsolved problems in the characterization of the optimal entanglement witnesses is the existence of optimal witnesses acting on bipartite Hilbert spaces H{sub m,n}=C{sup m} x C{sup n} such that the product vectors obeying =0 do not span H{sub m,n}. So far, the only known examples of such witnesses were found among indecomposable witnesses, one of them being the witness corresponding to the Choi map. However, it remains an open question whether decomposable witnesses exist without the property of spanning. Here we answer this question affirmatively, providing systematic examples of such witnesses. Then, we generalize some of the recently obtained results on the characterization of 2 x n optimal decomposable witnesses [R. Augusiak et al., J. Phys. A 44, 212001 (2011)] to finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces H{sub m,n} with m,n{>=}3.

  9. Multiple decomposability of probabilities on contractible locally ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Definition 3.1). As mentioned before, μ is n-times τ-decomposable iff μ has a representation as (n + 1)-times iterated convolution product. To be allowed to ..... Then the classical version of the equivalence theorem holds: If νi , i ≥ 0, ν, are probabilities and Xi ,i ≥ 0, Y are independent G-valued random variables with ...

  10. Signature wood modifications reveal decomposer community history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Schilling

    Full Text Available Correlating plant litter decay rates with initial tissue traits (e.g. C, N contents is common practice, but in woody litter, predictive relationships are often weak. Variability in predicting wood decomposition is partially due to territorial competition among fungal decomposers that, in turn, have a range of nutritional strategies (rot types and consequences on residues. Given this biotic influence, researchers are increasingly using culture-independent tools in an attempt to link variability more directly to decomposer groups. Our goal was to complement these tools by using certain wood modifications as 'signatures' that provide more functional information about decomposer dominance than density loss. Specifically, we used dilute alkali solubility (DAS; higher for brown rot and lignin:density loss (L:D; higher for white rot to infer rot type (binary and fungal nutritional mode (gradient, respectively. We first determined strength of pattern among 29 fungi of known rot type by correlating DAS and L:D with mass loss in birch and pine. Having shown robust relationships for both techniques above a density loss threshold, we then demonstrated and resolved two issues relevant to species consortia and field trials, 1 spatial patchiness creating gravimetric bias (density bias, and 2 brown rot imprints prior or subsequent to white rot replacement (legacy effects. Finally, we field-tested our methods in a New Zealand Pinus radiata plantation in a paired-plot comparison. Overall, results validate these low-cost techniques that measure the collective histories of decomposer dominance in wood. The L:D measure also showed clear potential in classifying 'rot type' along a spectrum rather than as a traditional binary type (brown versus white rot, as it places the nutritional strategies of wood-degrading fungi on a scale (L:D=0-5, in this case. These information-rich measures of consequence can provide insight into their biological causes, strengthening the

  11. Decomposed Implicit Models of Piecewise - Linear Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brzobohaty

    1992-05-01

    Full Text Available The general matrix form of the implicit description of a piecewise-linear (PWL network and the symbolic block diagram of the corresponding circuit model are proposed. Their decomposed forms enable us to determine quite separately the existence of the individual breakpoints of the resultant PWL characteristic and their coordinates using independent network parameters. For the two-diode and three-diode cases all the attainable types of the PWL characteristic are introduced.

  12. The pseudosymmetric structure of bis(pentane-1,5-diaminium iodide tris(triiodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido J. Reiss

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [H3N(CH25NH3]2I[I3]3 or 2C5H16N22+·3I3−·I−, consists of two crystallographically independent pentane-1,5-diaminium dications and two triiodide anions in general positions besides two additional triiodide and two iodide anions located on twofold axes. The compound crystallizes in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group P2/n. The structure refinement was handicapped by the pseudosymmetry (pseudo-centering of the structure and by twinning. The crystal structure is composed of two alternate layers, which differ in their arrangement of the pentane-1,5-diaminium dications and the iodide/triiodide anions and which are connected via weak to medium–strong N—H...I hydrogen bonds, constructing a complex hydrogen-bonded network.

  13. The pseudosymmetric structure of bis-(pentane-1,5-diaminium) iodide tris-(triiodide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Megen, Martin; Reiss, Guido J

    2012-05-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [H(3)N(CH(2))(5)NH(3)](2)I[I(3)](3) or 2C(5)H(16)N(2) (2+)·3I(3) (-)·I(-), consists of two crystallographically independent pentane-1,5-diaminium dications and two triiodide anions in general positions besides two additional triiodide and two iodide anions located on twofold axes. The compound crystallizes in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group P2/n. The structure refinement was handicapped by the pseudosymmetry (pseudo-centering) of the structure and by twinning. The crystal structure is composed of two alternate layers, which differ in their arrangement of the pentane-1,5-diaminium dications and the iodide/triiodide anions and which are connected via weak to medium-strong N-H⋯I hydrogen bonds, constructing a complex hydrogen-bonded network.

  14. Decomposing Cross-Country Differences in Skills:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten; Rosdahl, Anders

    2017-01-01

    among Finns with high school and less than high school education. The Finnish average score is pulled substantially downwards as a consequence of the low numeracy skill level among older Finns, which is consistent with an increase in the quantity or quality of Finnish education over time, relative......This paper performs multivariate analysis of skill differences in the Nordic countries as assessed by OECD’s PIACC survey of adults aged 16-65. We decompose the differences in average skills between Finland and each of the three Scandinavian countries into a component that is due to different skill...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary...

  16. Inclusion complexation of tetrabutylammonium iodide by cyclodextrins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Host-guest inclusion complex of an ionic solid (tetrabutyl ammonium iodide) with α- and β- cyclodextrin has been explored by various physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. Surface tension and conductivity studies indicated 1:1 stoichiometry of the inclusion complexes and ¹H NMR and FT-IR studies substantiated ...

  17. 21 CFR 172.375 - Potassium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... added to a food as a source of the essential mineral iodine, provided the maximum intake of the food as... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium iodide. 172.375 Section 172.375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  18. Electrosorption of tetraalkylammonium ions on silver iodide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, de A.

    1981-01-01

    The object of the present investigations was to study the ef fect of the adsorption of charged organic ions on electrically charged, solid-liquid interfaces. To that end, symmetrical quater nary ammonium ions were adsorbed on a silver iodide-electrolyte interface at various

  19. Barium iodide and strontium iodide crystals andd scintillators implementing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Stephen A; Cherepy, Nerine J; Hull, Giulia E; Drobshoff, Alexander D; Burger, Arnold

    2013-11-12

    In one embodiment, a material comprises a crystal comprising strontium iodide providing at least 50,000 photons per MeV. A scintillator radiation detector according to another embodiment includes a scintillator optic comprising europium-doped strontium iodide providing at least 50,000 photons per MeV. A scintillator radiation detector in yet another embodiment includes a scintillator optic comprising SrI.sub.2 and BaI.sub.2, wherein a ratio of SrI.sub.2 to BaI.sub.2 is in a range of between 0:1 A method for manufacturing a crystal suitable for use in a scintillator includes mixing strontium iodide-containing crystals with a source of Eu.sup.2+, heating the mixture above a melting point of the strontium iodide-containing crystals, and cooling the heated mixture near the seed crystal for growing a crystal. Additional materials, systems, and methods are presented.

  20. Electrochemical reaction rates in a dye sentisised solar cell - the iodide/tri-iodide redox system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse; West, Keld; Winter-Jensen, Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction rate of the redox couple iodide / tri-iodide in acetonitrile is characterised by impedance spectroscopy. Different electrode materials relevant for the function of dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC) are investigated. Preferably, the reaction with the iodide / tri......-iodide couple should be fast at the counter electrode, i.e. this electrode must have a high catalytic activity towards the redox couple, and the same reaction must be slow on the photo electrode. The catalytic activity is investigated for platinum, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), polypyrrole (PPy......), and polyaniline (PANI) - all deposited onto fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. Both Pt and PEDOT are found to have sufficiently high catalytic activities for practical use as counter electrode in DSSC. The reaction resistance on FTO and anatase confirmed the beneficial effect of a compact anatase layer on top...

  1. Supporting Knowledge Transfer through Decomposable Reasoning Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, William A.; May, Richard A.; Turner, Alan E.

    2007-01-03

    Technology to support knowledge transfer and cooperative inquiry must offer its users the ability to effectively interpret knowledge structures produced by collaborators. Communicating the reasoning processes that underlie a finding is one method for enhancing interpretation, and can result in more effective evaluation and application of shared knowledge. In knowledge management tools, interpretation is aided by creating knowledge artifacts that can expose their provenance to scrutiny and that can be transformed into diverse representations that suit their consumers’ perspectives and preferences. We outline the information management needs of inquiring communities characterized by hypothesis generation tasks, and propose a model for communication, based in theories of hermeneutics, semiotics, and abduction, in which knowledge structures can be decomposed into the lower-level reasoning artifacts that produced them. We then present a proof-of-concept implementation for an environment to support the capture and communication of analytic products, with emphasis on the domain of intelligence analysis.

  2. Decomposability and mental representation of French verbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estivalet, Gustavo L; Meunier, Fanny E

    2015-01-01

    In French, regardless of stem regularity, inflectional verbal suffixes are extremely regular and paradigmatic. Considering the complexity of the French verbal system, we argue that all French verbs are polymorphemic forms that are decomposed during visual recognition independently of their stem regularity. We conducted a behavioral experiment in which we manipulated the surface and cumulative frequencies of verbal inflected forms and asked participants to perform a visual lexical decision task. We tested four types of verbs with respect to their stem variants: a. fully regular (parler "to speak," [parl-]); b. phonological change e/E verbs with orthographic markers (répéter "to repeat," [répét-] and [répèt-]); c. phonological change o/O verbs without orthographic markers (adorer "to adore," [ador-] and [adOr-]); and d. idiosyncratic (boire "to drink," [boi-] and [buv-]). For each type of verb, we contrasted four conditions, forms with high and low surface frequencies and forms with high and low cumulative frequencies. Our results showed a significant cumulative frequency effect for the fully regular and idiosyncratic verbs, indicating that different stems within idiosyncratic verbs (such as [boi-] and [buv-]) have distinct representations in the mental lexicon as different fully regular verbs. For the phonological change verbs, we found a significant cumulative frequency effect only when considering the two forms of the stem together ([répét-] and [répèt-]), suggesting that they share a single abstract and under specified phonological representation. Our results also revealed a significant surface frequency effect for all types of verbs, which may reflect the recombination of the stem lexical representation with the functional information of the suffixes. Overall, these results indicate that all inflected verbal forms in French are decomposed during visual recognition and that this process could be due to the regularities of the French inflectional verbal

  3. Decomposability and mental representation of French verbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Lopez Estivalet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In French, regardless of stem regularity, inflectional verbal suffixes are extremely regular and paradigmatic. Considering the complexity of the French verbal system, we argue that all French verbs are polymorphemic forms that are decomposed during visual recognition independently of their stem regularity. We conducted a behavioural experiment in which we manipulated the surface and cumulative frequencies of verbal inflected forms and asked participants to perform a visual lexical decision task. We tested four types of verbs with respect to their stem variants: a. fully regular (parler ‘to speak’, [parl-]; b. phonological change e/E verbs with orthographic markers (répéter ‘to repeat’, [répét-] and [répèt-]; c. phonological change o/O verbs without orthographic markers (adorer ‘to adore’, [ador-] and [adOr-]; and d. idiosyncratic (boire ‘to drink’, [boi-] and [buv-]. For each type of verb, we contrasted four conditions, forms with high and low surface frequencies and forms with high and low cumulative frequencies. Our results showed a significant cumulative frequency effect for the fully regular and idiosyncratic verbs, indicating that different stems within idiosyncratic verbs (such as [boi-] and [buv-] have distinct representations in the mental lexicon as different fully regular verbs. For the phonological change verbs, we found a significant cumulative frequency effect only when considering the two forms of the stem together ([répét-] and [répèt-], suggesting that they share a single abstract and underspecified phonological representation. Our results also revealed a significant surface frequency effect for all types of verbs, which may reflect the recombination of the stem lexical representation with the functional information of the suffixes. Overall, these results indicate that all inflected verbal forms in French are decomposed during visual recognition and that this process could be due to the regularities of

  4. DCMDSM: a DICOM decomposed storage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaris, Alexandre; Härder, Theo; von Wangenheim, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    To design, build, and evaluate a storage model able to manage heterogeneous digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) images. The model must be simple, but flexible enough to accommodate variable content without structural modifications; must be effective on answering query/retrieval operations according to the DICOM standard; and must provide performance gains on querying/retrieving content to justify its adoption by image-related projects. The proposal adapts the original decomposed storage model, incorporating structural and organizational characteristics present in DICOM image files. Tag values are stored according to their data types/domains, in a schema built on top of a standard relational database management system (RDBMS). Evaluation includes storing heterogeneous DICOM images, querying metadata using a variable number of predicates, and retrieving full-content images for different hierarchical levels. When compared to a well established DICOM image archive, the proposal is 0.6-7.2 times slower in storing content; however, in querying individual tags, it is about 48.0% faster. In querying groups of tags, DICOM decomposed storage model (DCMDSM) is outperformed in scenarios with a large number of tags and low selectivity (being 66.5% slower); however, when the number of tags is balanced with better selectivity predicates, the performance gains are up to 79.1%. In executing full-content retrieval, in turn, the proposal is about 48.3% faster. DCMDSM is a model built for the storage of heterogeneous DICOM content, based on a straightforward database design. The results obtained through its evaluation attest its suitability as a storage layer for projects where DICOM images are stored once, and queried/retrieved whenever necessary. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Process for decomposing lignin in biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Kirk Davin; Lucas, Marcel; Wagner, Gregory Lawrence; Kimball, David Bryan; Hanson, Susan Kloek

    2014-10-28

    A mild inexpensive process for treating lignocellulosic biomass involves oxidative delignification of wood using an aqueous solution prepared by dissolving a catalytic amount of manganese (III) acetate into water and adding hydrogen peroxide. Within 4 days and without agitation, the solution was used to convert poplar wood sections into a fine powder-like delignified, cellulose rich materials that included individual wood cells.

  6. Thallium bromide iodide crystal acoustic anisotropy examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantsevich, S N

    2017-03-01

    Thallium bromide iodide crystal also known as KRS-5 is the well known material used in far infrared radiation applications for optical windows and lenses fabrication. The main advantage of this material is the transparency in wide band of wavelengths from 0.53 to 50μm. Despite such advantages as transparency and large acousto-optic figure of merit values, KRS-5 is rarely used in acousto-optics. Nevertheless this material seems to be promising for far infrared acousto-optic applications. The acoustic and acousto-optic properties of KRS-5 needed for the full use in optoelectronics are not well understood to date. In this paper the detailed examination of thallium bromide iodide crystal acoustic properties is presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrosorption of tetraalkylammonium ions on silver iodide

    OpenAIRE

    Keizer, de, R.J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The object of the present investigations was to study the ef fect of the adsorption of charged organic ions on electrically charged, solid-liquid interfaces. To that end, symmetrical quater nary ammonium ions were adsorbed on a silver iodide-electrolyte interface at various surface charges. The electrochemistry of this model interface is well developed in comparison with other solid liquid interfaces and it is very suited for fundamental electrosorption studies. Special a...

  8. A Study of Decomposer and Related Functions on Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Hooshmand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Decomposer functions in algebraic structures are studied in many recent papers. They have close relations to factorization by two subsets. Also, idempotent endomorphisms form a class of (strong decomposer functions in groups. Now, if the algebraic structure is a group, then by introducing a type of local homomorphisms we obtain several properties and equivalent conditions for many classes of decomposer functions and get a new result regarding to factorization of a group by its two subsets. Moreover, we prove existence of (two-sided decomposer type functions in non-simple groups

  9. Decomposing the misery index: A dynamic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan K. Cohen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The misery index (the unweighted sum of unemployment and inflation rates was probably the first attempt to develop a single statistic to measure the level of a population’s economic malaise. In this letter, we develop a dynamic approach to decompose the misery index using two basic relations of modern macroeconomics: the expectations-augmented Phillips curve and Okun’s law. Our reformulation of the misery index is closer in spirit to Okun’s idea. However, we are able to offer an improved version of the index, mainly based on output and unemployment. Specifically, this new Okun’s index measures the level of economic discomfort as a function of three key factors: (1 the misery index in the previous period; (2 the output gap in growth rate terms; and (3 cyclical unemployment. This dynamic approach differs substantially from the standard one utilised to develop the misery index, and allow us to obtain an index with five main interesting features: (1 it focuses on output, unemployment and inflation; (2 it considers only objective variables; (3 it allows a distinction between short-run and long-run phenomena; (4 it places more importance on output and unemployment rather than inflation; and (5 it weights recessions more than expansions.

  10. Integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer for sulfuric acid decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert [Edgewood, NM; Pickard, Paul S [Albuquerque, NM; Parma, Jr., Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E [Albuquerque, NM; Gelbard, Fred [Albuquerque, NM; Lenard, Roger X [Edgewood, NM

    2010-01-12

    A method and apparatus, constructed of ceramics and other corrosion resistant materials, for decomposing sulfuric acid into sulfur dioxide, oxygen and water using an integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer unit comprising a bayonet-type, dual-tube, counter-flow heat exchanger with a catalytic insert and a central baffle to increase recuperation efficiency.

  11. Global change effects on a mechanistic decomposer food web model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, L.D.J.; Berg, M.P.; Morrien, E.; Kooi, B.W.; Verhoef, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Global change may affect the structure and functioning of decomposer food webs through qualitative changes in freshly fallen litter. We analyzed the predicted effects of a changing environment on a dynamic model of a donor-controlled natural decomposer ecosystem near Wekerom, the Netherlands. This

  12. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  13. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  14. Electronic and optical properties of lead iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahuja, R.; Arwin, H.; Ferreira da Silva, A.

    2002-01-01

    The electronic properties and the optical absorption of lead iodide (PbI2) have been investigated experimentally by means of optical absorption and spectroscopic ellipsometry, and theoretically by a full-potential linear muffin-tin-orbital method. PbI2 has been recognized as a very promising...... detector material with a large technological applicability. Its band-gap energy as a function of temperature has also been measured by optical absorption. The temperature dependence has been fitted by two different relations, and a discussion of these fittings is given. ©2002 American Institute of Physics....

  15. The pseudosymmetric structure of bis­(pentane-1,5-diaminium) iodide tris­(triiodide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Megen, Martin; Reiss, Guido J.

    2012-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [H3N(CH2)5NH3]2I[I3]3 or 2C5H16N2 2+·3I3 −·I−, consists of two crystallographically independent pentane-1,5-diaminium dications and two triiodide anions in general positions besides two additional triiodide and two iodide anions located on twofold axes. The compound crystallizes in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group P2/n. The structure refinement was handicapped by the pseudosymmetry (pseudo-centering) of the structure and by twinning. The crystal structure is composed of two alternate layers, which differ in their arrangement of the pentane-1,5-diaminium dications and the iodide/triiodide anions and which are connected via weak to medium–strong N—H⋯I hydrogen bonds, constructing a complex hydrogen-bonded network. PMID:22590232

  16. Potassium Iodide ("KI"): Instructions to Make Potassium Iodide Solution for Use During a Nuclear Emergency (Liquid Form)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products ... it Email Print Instructions to Make Potassium Iodide Solution for Use During a Nuclear ...

  17. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Nick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, Tony [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  18. Evaluating iodide recycling inhibition as a novel molecular initiating event for thyroid axis disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    The enzyme iodotyrosine deiodinase (dehalogenase, IYD) catalyzes iodide recycling and promotes iodide retention in thyroid follicular cells. Loss of function or chemical inhibition of IYD reduces available iodide for thyroid hormone synthesis, which leads to hormone insufficiency...

  19. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.763 Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. ...

  20. 21 CFR 520.763b - Dithiazanine iodide powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide powder. 520.763b Section 520.763b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... of use. (1) Dithiazanine iodide powder is administered to dogs by mixing the proper dosage in the dog...

  1. Coulomb explosion of methyl iodide clusters using giga watt laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    (9⋅54 eV). This higher ionization potential of water decreases the multiphoton ionization probability of the water molecules/clusters as compared to that of methyl iodide molecules/clusters under identical laser excitation conditions. Further, the water has much lower vapour pressure as compared to that of methyl iodide.

  2. Photoluminescence Enhancement in Formamidinium Lead Iodide Thin Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Feng; Adjokatse, Sampson; Zhao, Ni; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Formamidinium lead iodide (FAPbI(3)) has a broader absorption spectrum and better thermal stability than the most famous methylammonium lead iodide, thus exhibiting great potential for photovoltaic applications. In this report, the light-induced photoluminescence (PL) evolution in FAPbI(3) thin

  3. Ferroelastic Fingerprints in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite

    KAUST Repository

    Hermes, Ilka M.

    2016-02-12

    Methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) perovskite materials show an outstanding performance in photovoltaic devices. However, certain material properties, especially the possible ferroic behavior, remain unclear. We observed distinct nanoscale periodic domains in the piezoresponse of MAPbI3(Cl) grains. The structure and the orientation of these striped domains indicate ferroelasticity as their origin. By correlating vertical and lateral piezoresponse force microscopy experiments performed at different sample orientations with x-ray diffraction, the preferred domain orientation was suggested to be the a1-a2-phase. The observation of these ferroelastic fingerprints appears to strongly depend on the film texture and thus the preparation route. The formation of the ferroelastic twin domains could be induced by internal strain during the cubic-tetragonal phase transition.

  4. Flavonoid rutin increases thyroid iodide uptake in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Frederico Lima Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Thyroid iodide uptake through the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS is not only an essential step for thyroid hormones biosynthesis, but also fundamental for the diagnosis and treatment of different thyroid diseases. However, part of patients with thyroid cancer is refractory to radioiodine therapy, due to reduced ability to uptake iodide, which greatly reduces the chances of survival. Therefore, compounds able to increase thyroid iodide uptake are of great interest. It has been shown that some flavonoids are able to increase iodide uptake and NIS expression in vitro, however, data in vivo are lacking. Flavonoids are polyhydroxyphenolic compounds, found in vegetables present in human diet, and have been shown not only to modulate NIS, but also thyroperoxidase (TPO, the key enzyme in thyroid hormones biosynthesis, besides having antiproliferative effect in thyroid cancer cell lines. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of some flavonoids on thyroid iodide uptake in Wistar rats in vivo. Among the flavonoids tested, rutin was the only one able to increase thyroid iodide uptake, so we decided to evaluate the effect of this flavonoid on some aspects of thyroid hormones synthesis and metabolism. Rutin led to a slight reduction of serum T4 and T3 without changes in serum thyrotropin (TSH, and significantly increased hypothalamic, pituitary and brown adipose tissue type 2 deiodinase and decreased liver type 1 deiodinase activities. Moreover, rutin treatment increased thyroid iodide uptake probably due to the increment of NIS expression, which might be secondary to increased response to TSH, since TSH receptor expression was increased. Thus, rutin might be useful as an adjuvant in radioiodine therapy, since this flavonoid increased thyroid iodide uptake without greatly affecting thyroid function.

  5. Flavonoid rutin increases thyroid iodide uptake in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Carlos Frederico Lima; Lima Gonçalves, Carlos Frederico; Santos, Maria Carolina de Souza dos; de Souza dos Santos, Maria Carolina; Ginabreda, Maria Gloria; Fortunato, Rodrigo Soares; Soares Fortunato, Rodrigo; Carvalho, Denise Pires de; Pires de Carvalho, Denise; Freitas Ferreira, Andrea Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid iodide uptake through the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is not only an essential step for thyroid hormones biosynthesis, but also fundamental for the diagnosis and treatment of different thyroid diseases. However, part of patients with thyroid cancer is refractory to radioiodine therapy, due to reduced ability to uptake iodide, which greatly reduces the chances of survival. Therefore, compounds able to increase thyroid iodide uptake are of great interest. It has been shown that some flavonoids are able to increase iodide uptake and NIS expression in vitro, however, data in vivo are lacking. Flavonoids are polyhydroxyphenolic compounds, found in vegetables present in human diet, and have been shown not only to modulate NIS, but also thyroperoxidase (TPO), the key enzyme in thyroid hormones biosynthesis, besides having antiproliferative effect in thyroid cancer cell lines. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of some flavonoids on thyroid iodide uptake in Wistar rats in vivo. Among the flavonoids tested, rutin was the only one able to increase thyroid iodide uptake, so we decided to evaluate the effect of this flavonoid on some aspects of thyroid hormones synthesis and metabolism. Rutin led to a slight reduction of serum T4 and T3 without changes in serum thyrotropin (TSH), and significantly increased hypothalamic, pituitary and brown adipose tissue type 2 deiodinase and decreased liver type 1 deiodinase activities. Moreover, rutin treatment increased thyroid iodide uptake probably due to the increment of NIS expression, which might be secondary to increased response to TSH, since TSH receptor expression was increased. Thus, rutin might be useful as an adjuvant in radioiodine therapy, since this flavonoid increased thyroid iodide uptake without greatly affecting thyroid function.

  6. Peroxynitrite does not decompose to singlet oxygen (1ΔgO2) and nitroxyl (NO−)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Glaucia R.; Di Mascio, Paolo; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Augusto, Ohara; Briviba, Karlis; Sies, Helmut; Maurer, Patrick; Röthlisberger, Ursula; Herold, Susanna; Koppenol, Willem H.

    2000-01-01

    According to Khan et al. [Khan, A. U., Kovacic, D., Kolbanovskiy, A., Desai, M., Frenkel, K. & Geacintov, N. E. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 2984–2989], peroxynitrite (ONOO−) decomposes after protonation to singlet oxygen (1ΔgO2) and singlet oxonitrate (nitroxyl, 1NO−) in high yield. They claimed to have observed nitrosyl hemoglobin from the reaction of NO− with methemoglobin; however, contamination with hydrogen peroxide gave rise to ferryl hemoglobin, the spectrum of which was mistakenly assigned to nitrosyl hemoglobin. We have carried out UV–visible and EPR experiments with methemoglobin and hydrogen peroxide-free peroxynitrite and find that no NO− is formed. With this peroxynitrite preparation, no light emission from singlet oxygen at 1270 nm is observed, nor is singlet oxygen chemically trapped; however, singlet oxygen was trapped when hydrogen peroxide was also present, as previously described [Di Mascio, P., Bechara, E. J. H., Medeiros, M. H. G., Briviba, K. & Sies, H. (1994) FEBS Lett. 355, 287–289]. Quantum mechanical and thermodynamic calculations show that formation of the postulated intermediate, a cyclic form of peroxynitrous acid (trioxazetidine), and the products 1NO− and 1ΔgO2 requires Gibbs energies of ca. +415 kJ⋅mol−1 and ca. +180 kJ⋅mol−1, respectively. Our results show that the results of Khan et al. are best explained by interference from contaminating hydrogen peroxide left from the synthesis of peroxynitrite. PMID:10973492

  7. Expression of the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) in xenotransplanted human thyroid carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J.W.A.; Schröder - van der Elst, J.P.; Karperien, M.; Que, I.; Romijn, J.A.; Heide, van der D.

    2001-01-01

    The uptake of iodide in thyroid epithelial cells is mediated by the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS). The uptake of iodide is of vital importance for thyroid physiology and is a prerequisite for radioiodine therapy in thyroid cancer. Loss of iodide uptake due to diminished expression of the human NIS

  8. Decomposing Oriented Graphs into Six Locally Irregular Oriented Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensmail, Julien; Renault, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    An undirected graph G is locally irregular if every two of its adjacent vertices have distinct degrees. We say that G is decomposable into k locally irregular graphs if there exists a partition E1∪E2∪⋯∪Ek of the edge set E(G) such that each Ei induces a locally irregular graph. It was recently...... conjectured by Baudon et al. that every undirected graph admits a decomposition into at most three locally irregular graphs, except for a well-characterized set of indecomposable graphs. We herein consider an oriented version of this conjecture. Namely, can every oriented graph be decomposed into at most...... three locally irregular oriented graphs, i.e. whose adjacent vertices have distinct outdegrees? We start by supporting this conjecture by verifying it for several classes of oriented graphs. We then prove a weaker version of this conjecture. Namely, we prove that every oriented graph can be decomposed...

  9. Reaction of N-sulfonyltellurimides with methyl iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddaka, V.I.; Avanesyan, K.V.; Cherkinskaya, M.L.; Minkin, V.I.

    1987-09-20

    While developing researches into the reactivity of tellurimides, the authors studied the previously unknown reaction of N-sulonyltellurimides with methyl iodide. The authors established that bis(diphenyltellurium) oxide and N-methyl-p-toluenesulfonamide are formed when the tellurimide is boiled in methyl iodide. Such a direction is evidently due to the fact that the telluronium salt produced during the reaction is readily hydrolyzed at the Te-N bond on account of the presence of traces of moisture in the methyl iodide. However, the heating of the tellurimides with an excess of anhydrous methyl iodide in a sealed tube leads to diaryltellurium diiodides and N,N-dimethylsulfonamides. The PMR spectra of solutions of the substances in deuterochloroform were recorded on a Tesla-BS-487 spectrometer at 80 MHz with HMDS as internal standard. The IR spectra were obtained on a Specord 71-IR instrument in Vaseline oil.

  10. Radiative efficiency of lead iodide based perovskite solar cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Malinkiewicz, Olga; Baumann, Andreas; Deibel, Carsten; Snaith, Henry J; Dyakonov, Vladimir; Bolink, Henk J

    2014-01-01

    .... We herein determine the important figure of merit of radiative efficiency for Methylammonium Lead Iodide perovskite solar cells and, to put in context, relate it to an organic photovoltaic (OPV) model device...

  11. Improved Stability of Mercuric Iodide Detectors for Anticoincidence Shields Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize guard ring electrode structures and a new film growth technique to create improved polycrystalline mercuric iodide detectors for background...

  12. Fluoride, bromide and iodide in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, F.P.

    fairly constant ratio to chlorinity. Concentrations of iodide were small (0.01-0.024 mg/l) with higher concentration occurring at the surface and bottom layers. Results suggested the semi-conservative, conservative and non-conservative characters...

  13. Accelerated degradation of methyl iodide by agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Papiernik, Sharon K; Guo, Mingxin; Yates, Scott R

    2003-01-29

    The fumigant methyl iodide (MeI, iodomethane) is considered a promising alternative to methyl bromide (MeBr) for soil-borne pest control in high-cash-value crops. However, the high vapor pressure of MeI results in emissions of a significant proportion of the applied mass into the ambient air, and this may lead to pollution of the environment. Integrating the application of certain agrochemicals with soil fumigation provides a novel approach to reduce excessive fumigant emissions. This study investigated the potential for several agrochemicals that are commonly used in farming operations, including fertilizers and nitrification inhibitors, to transform MeI in aqueous solution. The pseudo-first-order hydrolysis half-life (t(1/2)) of MeI was approximately 108 d, while the transformation of MeI in aqueous solutions containing selected agrochemicals was more rapid, with t(1/2) nitrification inhibitors). The influence of these agrochemicals on the rate of MeI degradation in soil was also determined. Adsorption to soil apparently reduced the availability of some nitrification inhibitors in the soil aqueous phase and lowered the degradation rate in soil. In contrast, addition of the nitrification inhibitors thiourea and allylthiourea to soil significantly accelerated the degradation of MeI, possibly due to soil surface catalysis. The t(1/2) of MeI was 300 h).

  14. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2016-09-27

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  15. Prevention of organic iodide formation in BWR`s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karjunen, T. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland); Laitinen, T.; Piippo, J.; Sirkiae, P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    During an accident, many different forms of iodine may emerge. Organic iodides, such as methyl iodide and ethyl iodide, are relatively volatile, and thus their appearance leads to increased concentration of gaseous iodine. Since organic iodides are also relatively immune to most accident mitigation measures, such as sprays and filters, they can affect the accident source term significantly even when only a small portion of iodine is in organic form. Formation of organic iodides may not be limited by the amount of organic substances available. Excessive amounts of methane can be produced, for example, during oxidation of boron carbide, which is used in BWR`s as a neutron absorber material. Another important source is cable insulation. In a BWR, a large quantity of cables is placed below the pressure vessel. Thus a large quantity of pyrolyse gases will be produced, should the vessel fail. Organic iodides can be formed as a result of many different reactions, but at least in certain conditions the main reaction takes place between an organic radical produced by radiolysis and elemental iodine. A necessary requirement for prevention of organic iodide production is therefore that the pH in the containment water pools is kept high enough to eliminate formation of elemental iodine. In a typical BWR the suppression pool water is usually unbuffered. As a result, the pH may be dominated by chemicals introduced during an accident. If no system for adding basic chemicals is operable, the main factor affecting pool water pH may be hydrochloric acid released during cable degradation. Should this occur, the conditions could be very favorable for production of elemental iodine and, consequently, formation of organic iodides. Although high pH is necessary for iodine retention, it could have also adverse effects. High pH may, for example, accelerate corrosion of containment materials and alter the characteristics of the solid corrosion products. (author) 6 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs.

  16. Decomposing demographic change into direct vs. compositional components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W.; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    We present and prove a formula for decomposing change in a population average into two components. One component captures the effect of direct change in the characteristic of interest, and the other captures the effect of compositional change. The decomposition is applied to time derivatives of a...... is also presented. Other examples concern global life expectancy and the growth rate of the population of the world.......We present and prove a formula for decomposing change in a population average into two components. One component captures the effect of direct change in the characteristic of interest, and the other captures the effect of compositional change. The decomposition is applied to time derivatives...

  17. Electrochemical reaction rates in a dye-sensitised solar cell - the iodide/tri-iodide redox system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, L.; West, K.; Winther-Jensen, B.

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction rate of the redox couple iodide/tri-iodide in acetonitrile is characterised by impedance spectroscopy. Different electrode materials relevant for the function of dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC) are investigated. Preferably, the reaction with the iodide....../tri-iodide couple should be fast at the counter electrode, i.e. this electrode must have a high catalytic activity towards the redox couple, and the same reaction must be slow on the photo electrode. The catalytic activity is investigated for platinum, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), polypyrrole (PPy......), and polyaniline (PANI)-all deposited onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass. Both Pt and PEDOT are found to have sufficiently high catalytic activities for practical use as counter electrodes in DSSC. The reaction resistance on FTO and anatase confirmed the beneficial effect of a compact anatase layer on top...

  18. Decomposing changes in life expectancy: Compression versus shifting mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron Boucher, Marie-Pier; Ebeling, Marcus; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Shifting and compression of mortality have been studied through two components of mortality: modal age at death and variability of the age at death. These two components inform us about the timing and age patterns of mortality respectively. The aim of this study is to decompose changes in life...

  19. Decomposing graphs into a constant number of locally irregular subgraphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensmail, Julien; Merker, Martin; Thomassen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    A graph is locally irregular if no two adjacent vertices have the same degree. The irregular chromatic index χirr′(G) of a graph G is the smallest number of locally irregular subgraphs needed to edge-decompose G. Not all graphs have such a decomposition, but Baudon, Bensmail, Przybyło, and Woźnia...

  20. Allelopathic effects of Juglone and decomposed walnut leaf juice on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, effects of juglone and decomposed walnut leaf juice on muskmelon (Cucumis melo cv. Galia) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus cv. Beith Alpha) seed germination percentage and postgermination seedling growth were investigated. Decomposition was carried out by keeping the leaves in distilled water.

  1. A (de)composable theory of rhythm perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desain, P.

    1992-01-01

    A definition is given of expectancy of events projected into the future by a complex temporal sequence. The definition can be decomposed into basic expectancy components projected by each time interval implicit in the sequence. A preliminary formulation of these basic curves is proposed and the

  2. Decomposing preference shifts for meat and fish in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangen, M.J.J.; Burrell, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    The changing preferences of Dutch consumers for meat and fish are investigated using a switching almost ideal demand system. Structural change in demand between January 1994 and May 1998 is decomposed into underlying trends, temporarily irreversible preference shifts triggered by the BSE crisis of

  3. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Copyright © 2013 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular imaging using sodium iodide symporter (NIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Je Yoel [School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Radioiodide uptake in thyroid follicular epithelial cells, mediated by a plasma membrane transporter, sodium iodide symporter (NIS), provides a first step mechanism for thyroid cancer detection by radioiodide injection and effective radioiodide treatment for patients with invasive, recurrent, and/or metastatic thyroid cancers after total thyroidectomy. NIS gene transfer to tumor cells may significantly and specifically enhance internal radioactive accumulation of tumors following radioiodide administration, and result in better tumor control. NIS gene transfers have been successfully performed in a variety of tumor animal models by either plasmid-mediated transfection or virus (adenovirus or retrovirus)-mediated gene delivery. These animal models include nude mice xenografted with human melanoma, glioma, breast cancer of prostate cancer, rats with subcutaneous thyroid tumor implantation, as well as the rat intracranial glioma model. In these animal models, non-invasive imaging of in vivo tumors by gamma camera scintigraphy after radioiodide or technetium injection has been performed successfully, suggesting that the NIS can serve as an imaging reporter gene for gene therapy trials. In addition, the tumor killing effects of I-131, ReO4-188 and At-211 after NIS gene transfer have been demonstrated in in vitro clonogenic assays and in vivo radioiodide therapy studies, suggesting that NIS gene can also serve as a therapeutic requires a more efficient and specific system of gene delivery with better retention of radioiodide in tumor. Results thus far are, however, promising, and suggest that NIS gene transfer followed by radioiodide treatment will allow non-invasive in vivo imaging to assess the outcome of gene therapy and provide a therapeutic strategy for a variety of human diseases.

  5. Iodide kinetics and experimental I-131 therapy in a xenotransplanted human sodium-iodide symporter-transfected human follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J.W.A.; Elst, van der J.P.; Karperien, M.; Que, I.; Stokkel, M.; Heide, van der D.; Romijn, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Uptake of iodide is a prerequisite for radioiodide therapy in thyroid cancer. However, loss of iodide uptake is frequently observed in metastasized thyroid cancer, which may be explained by diminished expression of the human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS). We studied whether transfection of hNIS

  6. Iodide kinetics and experimental (131)I therapy in a xenotransplanted human sodium-iodide symporter-transfected human follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jan W. A.; Schröder-van der Elst, Janny P.; Karperien, Marcel; Que, Ivo; Stokkel, Marcel; van der Heide, Daan; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2002-01-01

    Uptake of iodide is a prerequisite for radioiodide therapy in thyroid cancer. However, loss of iodide uptake is frequently observed in metastasized thyroid cancer, which may be explained by diminished expression of the human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS). We studied whether transfection of hNIS

  7. A Simple and Safe Spectrophotometric Method for Iodide Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermin Sulistyarti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to practice green chemistry, a simple and safe spectrophotometric method for iodide determination has been successfully developed based on the formation of a blue starch-iodine complex. Iodide was oxidized to form iodine prior to the addition of a starch solution, and the blue starch-iodine complex was directly detected spectrophoto-metrically at a wavelength of 615 nm. The chemical parameters, such as type, reaction time, as well as concentration of oxidizing agents and solution pH were optimized with respect to sensitivity and analysis time. The method showed optimum results under iodate oxidant with a mol ratio of IO3-:I- =1:3, reaction time of 5 minutes, and solution pH of 5. Under these optimum conditions, the method showed linierity measurements from 5-40 mg/L iodide with a correlation (R2 of 0.9889. This technique offers a simple, safe, accurate, and relatively fast method for iodide determination, which is prospective for monitoring iodide samples.

  8. Characteristics of the iodide/triiodide redox mediator in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschloo, Gerrit; Hagfeldt, Anders

    2009-11-17

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have gained widespread interest because of their potential for low-cost solar energy conversion. Currently, the certified record efficiency of these solar cells is 11.1%, and measurements of their durability and stability suggest lifetimes exceeding 10 years under operational conditions. The DSC is a photoelectrochemical system: a monolayer of sensitizing dye is adsorbed onto a mesoporous TiO(2) electrode, and the electrode is sandwiched together with a counter electrode. An electrolyte containing a redox couple fills the gap between the electrodes. The redox couple is a key component of the DSC. The reduced part of the couple regenerates the photo-oxidized dye. The formed oxidized species diffuses to the counter electrode, where it is reduced. The photovoltage of the device depends on the redox couple because it sets the electrochemical potential at the counter electrode. The redox couple also affects the electrochemical potential of the TiO(2) electrode through the recombination kinetics between electrons in TiO(2) and oxidized redox species. This Account focuses on the special properties of the iodide/triiodide (I(-)/I(3)(-)) redox couple in dye-sensitized solar cells. It has been the preferred redox couple since the beginning of DSC development and still yields the most stable and efficient DSCs. Overall, the iodide/triiodide couple has good solubility, does not absorb too much light, has a suitable redox potential, and provides rapid dye regeneration. But what distinguishes I(-)/I(3)(-) from most redox mediators is the very slow recombination kinetics between electrons in TiO(2) and the oxidized part of the redox couple, triiodide. Certain dyes adsorbed at TiO(2) catalyze this recombination reaction, presumably by binding iodine or triiodide. The standard potential of the iodide/triiodide redox couple is 0.35 V (versus the normal hydrogen electrode, NHE), and the oxidation potential of the standard DSC-sensitizer (Ru(dcbpy)(2

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis and solid-state structures of polynuclear technetium iodide compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerlin, William M.; Poineau, Frederic; Forster, Paul M.; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.

    2015-01-01

    Two new technetium iodide compounds, Tc-2(O2CCH3)(4)I and K[Tc-8(mu-I)(8)I-4] I, were synthesized in an autoclave from the reaction of KTcO4 in glacial acetic acid with hydroiodic acid and/or alkali metal iodide salts at 210 degrees C under 60-70 atm hydrogen pressure. The structures of Tc-2(O2CCH3)(4)I and K[Tc-8(mu-I)(8)I-4] I were solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound Tc-2(O2CCH3)(4)I crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/m with a = 7.1194(6) angstrom, b = 14.5851(13) angstrom, c = 7.1586(6) angstrom, and beta = 110.9540(10)degrees. The structure of Tc-2(O2CCH3)(4)I consists of infinite chains of Tc-2(O2CCH3)(4)(+) units linked by bridging iodides, an arrangement similar to the one found in Tc-2(O2CCH3)(4)X (X = Cl, Br). The TcATc separation in Tc-2 (O2CCH3)(4)I (i.e., 2.1146(4) angstrom) is consistent with the presence of a TcATc bond of order 3.5. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal Tc-2(O2CCH3)(4)I to be paramagnetic (mu(eff) = 1.84 B.M.) and support the electronic configuration sigma(2)pi(2)delta(2)delta*(1) for the Tc-2(5+) unit in the compound. The compound K[Tc-8(mu-I)(8)I-4]I crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n with a = 8.0018(5) angstrom, b = 14.5125(10) angstrom, c = 13.1948(9) angstrom, and beta = 102.3090(10) degrees, and is the first octanuclear technetium iodide cluster to be reported. The Tc-Tc separations in the [Tc-8(mu-I)(8)I-4] cluster (i.e., 2.164(3) angstrom, 2.5308(8) angstrom and 2.72(3) angstrom suggest the presence of Tc equivalent to Tc triple bonds, Tc=Tc double bonds and Tc-Tc single bonds.

  10. Phase 1 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Nick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, Tony [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-22

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent [Jubin 2012b]. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the first phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 and early FY-2014. Testing has been performed to address questions posed in the test plan, and followed the testing outline in the test plan. Tests established detection limits, developed procedures for sample analysis with minimal analytical interferences, and confirmed earlier results that show that the methyl iodide reacts when in contact with the AgZ sorbent, and not significantly in the gas flow upstream of the sorbent. The reaction(s) enable separation of the iodine from the organic moiety, so that the iodine can chemisorb onto the sorbent. The organic moiety can form other compounds, some of which are organic compounds that are detected and can be tentatively identified using GC-FID and GCMS. Test results also show that other gas constituents (NOx and/or H2O) can affect the methyl iodide reactions. With NOx and H2O present in the gas stream, the majority of uncaptured iodine exiting iodine-laden sorbent beds is in the form of I2 or HI, species that

  11. Standard free energy of formation of iron iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandkar, A.; Tare, V. B.; Wagner, J. B., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment is reported where silver iodide is used to determine the standard free energy of formation of iron iodide. By using silver iodide as a solid electrolyte, a galvanic cell, Ag/AgI/Fe-FeI2, is formulated. The standard free energy of formation of AgI is known, and hence it is possible to estimate the standard free energy of formation of FeI2 by measuring the open-circuit emf of the above cell as a function of temperature. The free standard energy of formation of FeI2 determined by this method is -38784 + 24.165T cal/mol. It is estimated that the maximum error associated with this method is plus or minus 2500 cal/mol.

  12. Characteristics of Three Decomposer Accelerators on Maize Straw Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUANG En-jun

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to make sure the effect of straw decomposer accelerators on the maize straws in Northeast of China, mesh bag method was used to determine the decomposition characteristics of maize straw biomass amount and nutrition release regularity in one year. The results showed that after 100 days, decomposition rates of maize straws biomass amount were between 57.1%-64.1%. The highest decomposition rate of 64.1% was the treatment with the 3rd decomposer accelerator. The nutrition release rates of N, P and K were 35.1%-57.2%, 44.2%-59.6%,and 77.4%-89.7% at the end of period, respectively. And the 3rd decomposer accelerator treatment had a better effect on the release rate of P and K. All treatments had the same trend of organic C mineralization rate which increased with the time extending, at last the organic C min-eralization rate was between 65.3% and 69.1%. The results showed the 3rd decomposition accelerator had better effect than others.

  13. Growth and characterization of bis thiourea cadmium iodide: A semiorganic single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caroline, M. Lydia [Department of Physics, Bharath University, Selaiyur, Chennai 600073 (India)], E-mail: lydiacaroline2006@yahoo.co.in; Vasudevan, S. [Department of Physics, Easwari Engineering College, Ramapuram, Chennai 600089 (India)], E-mail: profsvasu@hotmail.com

    2009-02-15

    Single crystals of bis thiourea cadmium iodide[CdI{sub 2}(CH{sub 4}N{sub 2}S){sub 2}], abbreviated as BTCI, a semiorganic material has been successfully grown by both slow evaporation and slow cooling methods. Crystal of dimensions up to 3.3 x 1.0 x 1.5 cm{sup 3} is reported. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis has been carried out to confirm monoclinic system and etching studies for their perfection. The morphology of the grown crystal was also identified by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The powder X-ray diffractogram of the crystal has been recorded and the various planes of reflection are identified. The presence of functional groups and the coordination of metal ions to thiourea were confirmed by FTIR analysis. Transmission spectra reveals that the crystal has low UV cutoff of 324 nm and has a good transmittance in the entire visible region enabling its use in optical applications. The thermal behaviour of the crystal has been investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA), which indicates that the material does not decompose before melting. Studies of dielectric properties (dielectric constant and dielectric loss) both as function of frequencies (100 Hz to 5 MHz) for varying temperatures in the range 308-348 K suggests good candidate for electro optic modulators.

  14. Enhanced Olefin Cross Metathesis Reactions: The Copper Iodide Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigtritter, Karl; Ghorai, Subir

    2011-01-01

    Copper iodide has been shown to be an effective co-catalyst for the olefin cross metathesis reaction. In particular, it has both a catalyst stabilizing effect due to iodide ion, as well as copper(I)-based phosphine-scavenging properties that apply to use of the Grubbs-2 catalyst. A variety of Michael acceptors and olefinic partners can be cross-coupled under mild conditions in refluxing diethyl ether that avoid chlorinated solvents. This effect has also been applied to chemistry in water at room temperature using the new surfactant TPGS-750-M. PMID:21528868

  15. Study of potential inhibitors of thyroid iodide uptake by using CHO cells stably expressing the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agretti, P; Dimida, A; De Marco, G; Ferrarini, E; Rodrìguez Gonzàlez, J C; Santini, F; Vitti, P; Pinchera, A; Tonacchera, M

    2011-03-01

    Thyroid gland is highly dependent on dietary intake of iodine for normal function, so it is particularly subjected to "endocrine disruptor" action. The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) is an integral plasma membrane glycoprotein mediating the active transport of iodide into thyroid follicular cells, a crucial step for thyroid hormone biosynthesis. Beyond to perchlorate and thyocianate ions a few other inhibitors of iodide uptake have been described. The aim of this study was to investigate if 10 substances usually used as drugs in clinical practice were able to inhibit NIS-mediated iodide uptake in vitro. A CHO cell line stably expressing hNIS was used to test any inhibition of NIS-mediated iodide uptake exerted by drugs. Perchlorate and thyocianate ions were used as positive controls. None of the analyzed substances was able to significantly inhibit iodide uptake in our system. As we expected, perchlorate and thyocianate ions were able to inhibit iodide uptake in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, we carried out an in vitro assay to evaluate the potential inhibitory effect of common drugs on NISmediated iodide uptake by using CHO-hNIS cells. None of the analyzed substances was able to inhibit iodide uptake; only perchlorate and thyocianate were able to inhibit iodide uptake in a dose-dependent manner.

  16. Functional diversity of microbial decomposers facilitates plant coexistence in a plant–microbe–soil feedback model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takeshi Miki; Masayuki Ushio; Shin Fukui; Michio Kondoh; Simon A. Levin

    2010-01-01

    .... However, the role of microbial decomposers in PSF function is often overlooked, and it remains unclear whether decomposers reinforce or weaken litter-mediated plant control over nutrient cycling...

  17. Role of -methyl-8-(alkoxy) quinolinium iodide in suppression of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There is a great deal of interest in developing small molecule inhibitors of protein misfolding and aggregation due to a growing number of pathologic states known as amyloid disorders. ... -methyl-8-(alkoxy)quinolinium iodide on aggregation behaviour of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) at alkaline pH has been studied.

  18. Detection of apoptotic cells using propidium iodide staining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newbold, Andrea; Martin, Ben P.; Cullinane, Carleen; Bots, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Flow cytometry assays are often used to detect apoptotic cells in in vitro cultures. Depending on the experimental model, these assays can also be useful in evaluating apoptosis in vivo. In this protocol, we describe a propidium iodide (PI) flow cytometry assay to evaluate B-cell lymphomas that have

  19. Silver iodide nanoparticle as an efficient and reusable catalyst for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 125; Issue 5. Silver iodide nanoparticle as an efficient and reusable catalyst for the one-pot synthesis of benzofurans under aqueous conditions. Javad Safaei-Ghomi Mohammad Ali Ghasemzadeh. Volume 125 Issue 5 September 2013 pp 1003-1008 ...

  20. Confinement Effects in Low-Dimensional Lead Iodide Perovskite Hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Machteld E.; Fang, Honghua; Filip, Marina R.; Giustino, Feliciano; Baas, Jacobus; Blake, Graeme R.; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Palstra, Thomas T. M.

    2016-01-01

    We use a layered solution crystal growth technique to synthesize high-quality single crystals of phenylalkylammonium lead iodide organic/inorganic hybrid compounds. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals low-dimensional structures consisting of inorganic sheets separated by bilayers of the organic

  1. Temperature Dependent Charge Carrier Dynamics in Formamidinium Lead Iodide Perovskite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelvez Rueda, M.C.; Renaud, N.; Grozema, F.C.

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental opto-electronic properties of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are strongly affected by their structural parameters. These parameters are particularly critical in formamidinium lead iodide (FAPbI3), in which its large structural disorder leads to a non-perovskite

  2. Impact of potassium iodide on thyroidectomy for Graves' disease: Implications for safety and operative difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randle, Reese W; Bates, Maria F; Long, Kristin L; Pitt, Susan C; Schneider, David F; Sippel, Rebecca S

    2018-01-01

    Potassium iodide often is prescribed prior to thyroidectomy for Graves' disease, but the effect of potassium iodide on the ease and safety of thyroidectomy for Graves' is largely unknown. We conducted a prospective, cohort study of patients with Graves' disease undergoing thyroidectomy. For the first 8 months, no patients received potassium iodide; for the next 8 months, potassium iodide was added to the preoperative protocol for all patients. Outcomes included operative difficulty (based on the Thyroidectomy Difficulty Scale) and complications. We included a total of 31 patients in the no potassium iodide group and 28 in the potassium iodide group. According to the Thyroidectomy Difficulty Scale, gland vascularity decreased in the potassium iodide group (mean score 2.6 vs 3.3, P = .04), but there were no differences in friability, fibrosis, or size of the thyroid or in overall difficulty of operation (P = not significant for all). Despite similar operative difficulty, patients prescribed potassium iodide were less likely to experience transient hypoparathyroidism (7% vs 26%, P = .018) and transient hoarseness (0% vs 16%, P = .009) compared with the no potassium iodide group. Potassium iodide administration decreases gland vascularity, but does not change the overall difficulty of thyroidectomy. Preoperative use of potassium iodide solution was, however, associated with less transient hypoparathyroidism and transient hoarseness, suggesting that potassium iodide improves the safety of thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Decomposing Borel functions using the Shore-Slaman join theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Kihara, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    Jayne and Rogers proved that every function from an analytic space into a separable metric space is decomposable into countably many continuous functions with closed domains if and only if the preimage of each $F_\\sigma$ set under it is again $F_\\sigma$. Many researchers conjectured that the Jayne-Rogers theorem can be generalized to all finite levels of Borel functions. In this paper, by using the Shore-Slaman join theorem on the Turing degrees, we show the following variant of the Jayne-Rog...

  4. Towards using the chordal graph polytope in learning decomposable models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Studený, Milan; Cussens, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 1 (2017), s. 259-281 ISSN 0888-613X. [8th International Conference of Probabilistic Graphical Models. Lugano, 06.09.2016-09.09.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12010S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : learning decomposable models * integer linear programming * characteristic imset * chordal graph polytope * clutter inequalities * separation problem Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.845, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/MTR/studeny-0475614.pdf

  5. FY-2015 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Nicholas Ray [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, Tony Leroy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Nuclear fission produces fission and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2015 according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. Updates to the deep-bed test system have also been performed to enable the inclusion of evaporated HNO3 and increased NO2 concentrations in future tests. This report summarizes the result of those activities. Test results showed that iodine adsorption from gaseous methyl iodide using reduced silver zeolite (AgZ) resulted in initial iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) under 1,000 for the conditions of the long-duration test performed this year (45 ppm CH3I, 1,000 ppm each NO and NO2, very low H2O levels [3 ppm] in balance air). The mass transfer zone depth exceeded the cumulative 5-inch depth of 4 bed segments, which is deeper than the 2-4 inch depth estimated for the mass transfer zone for adsorbing I2 using AgZ in prior deep-bed tests. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity for the AgZ under the conditions of this test was 6.2% (6.2 g adsorbed I per 100 g sorbent). The maximum Ag utilization was 51%. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  6. Catalytic hydrogen peroxide decomposition La1-xSrxCoO3-δ perovskite oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, T.V.A.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet; van den Berg, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Lanthanide perovskite oxides are mentioned as material for hydrogen peroxide sensor because they can catalytically decompose hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous medium. The catalytic properties of these perovskite oxides to hydrogen peroxide are suggested due to their oxygen vacancies influenced by the

  7. Functional diversity of terrestrial microbial decomposers and their substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hättenschwiler, Stephan; Fromin, Nathalie; Barantal, Sandra

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between biodiversity and biogeochemical processes gained much interest in light of the rapidly decreasing biodiversity worldwide. In this article, we discuss the current status, challenges and prospects of functional concepts to plant litter diversity and microbial decomposer diversity. We also evaluate whether these concepts permit a better understanding of how biodiversity is linked to litter decomposition as a key ecosystem process influencing carbon and nutrient cycles. Based on a literature survey, we show that plant litter and microbial diversity matters for decomposition, but that considering numbers of taxonomic units appears overall as little relevant and less useful than functional diversity. However, despite easily available functional litter traits and the well-established theoretical framework for functional litter diversity, the impact of functional litter diversity on decomposition is not yet well enough explored. Defining functional diversity of microorganisms remains one of the biggest challenges for functional approaches to microbial diversity. Recent developments in microarray and metagenomics technology offer promising possibilities in the assessment of the functional structure of microbial communities. This might allow significant progress in measuring functional microbial diversity and ultimately in our ability to predict consequences of biodiversity loss in the decomposer system for biogeochemical processes. Copyright © 2011 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Method of carbon dioxide-free hydrogen production from hydrocarbon decomposition over metal salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlebacher, Jonah; Gaskey, Bernard

    2017-10-03

    A process to decompose methane into carbon (graphitic powder) and hydrogen (H.sub.2 gas) without secondary production of carbon dioxide, employing a cycle in which a secondary chemical is recycled and reused, is disclosed.

  9. Bacterial succession on decomposing leaf litter exhibits a specific occurrence pattern of cellulolytic taxa and potential decomposers of fungal mycelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tláskal, Vojtěch; Voříšková, Jana; Baldrian, Petr

    2016-11-01

    The decomposition of dead plant biomass contributes to the carbon cycle and is one of the key processes in temperate forests. While fungi in litter decomposition drive the chemical changes occurring in litter, the bacterial community appears to be important as well, especially later in the decomposition process when its abundance increases. In this paper, we describe the bacterial community composition in live Quercus petraea leaves and during the subsequent two years of litter decomposition. Members of the classes Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria and the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Acidobacteria were dominant throughout the experiment. Bacteria present in the oak phyllosphere were rapidly replaced by other taxa after leaf senescence. There were dynamic successive changes in community composition, in which the early-stage (months 2-4), mid-stage (months 6-8) and late-stage (months 10-24) decomposer communities could be distinguished, and the diversity increased with time. Bacteria associated with dead fungal mycelium were important during initial decomposition, with sequence relative abundances of up to 40% of the total bacterial community in months 2 and 4 when the highest fungal biomass was observed. Cellulose-decomposing bacteria were less frequent, with abundance ranging from 4% to 15%. The bacterial community dynamics reflects changes in the availability of possible resources either of the plant or microbial origin. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Iodide kinetics and experimental (131)I therapy in a xenotransplanted human sodium-iodide symporter-transfected human follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Jan W A; Schröder-van der Elst, Janny P; Karperien, Marcel; Que, Ivo; Stokkel, Marcel; van der Heide, Daan; Romijn, Johannes A

    2002-03-01

    Uptake of iodide is a prerequisite for radioiodide therapy in thyroid cancer. However, loss of iodide uptake is frequently observed in metastasized thyroid cancer, which may be explained by diminished expression of the human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS). We studied whether transfection of hNIS into the hNIS-deficient follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line FTC133 restores the in vivo iodide accumulation in xenografted tumors and their susceptibility to radioiodide therapy. In addition, the effects of low-iodide diets and thyroid ablation on iodide kinetics were investigated. Tumors were established in nude mice injected with the hNIS-transfected cell line FTC133-NIS30 and the empty vector transfected cell line FTC133-V4 as a control. Tumors derived from FTC133-NIS30 in mice on a normal diet revealed a high peak iodide accumulation (17.4% of administered activity, measured with an external probe) as compared with FTC133-V4 (4.6%). Half-life in FTC133-NIS30 tumors was 3.8 h. In mice kept on a low-iodide diet, peak activity in FTC133-NIS30 tumors was diminished (8.1%), whereas thyroid iodide accumulation was increased. In thyroid-ablated mice kept on a low-iodide diet, half-life of radioiodide was increased considerably (26.3 h), leading to a much higher area under the time-radioactivity curve than in FTC133-NIS30 tumors in mice on a normal diet without thyroid ablation. Experimental radioiodide therapy with 2 mCi (74 MBq) in thyroid-ablated nude mice, kept on a low-iodide diet, postponed tumor development (4 wk after therapy, one of seven animals revealed tumor vs. five of six animals without therapy). However, 9 wk after therapy, tumors had developed in four of the seven animals. The calculated tumor dose was 32.2 Gy. We conclude that hNIS transfection into a hNIS-defective thyroid carcinoma cell line restores the in vivo iodide accumulation. The unfavorable iodide kinetic characteristics (short half-life) can be partially improved by conventional conditioning with

  11. Iodide and albumin kinetics in normal canine wrists and knees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simkin, P.A.; Benedict, R.S. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The clearance rates of free iodide and of radioiodinated serum albumin were measured in the knee and wrist joints of 9 normal adult dogs. Iodide clearance from the knee was 3 times greater than that from the wrist. In contrast, radioiodinated serum albumin clearance from the knee was only slightly greater than that from the wrist. Interpreted as respective indices of effective synovial plasma flow and lymphatic drainage, these values indicate that the filtration fraction is normally greater in microvessels of the wrist than in those of the knee. These findings complement the results of companion studies of Starling forces that indicate a higher pressure microvascular bed in the wrist than in the knee.

  12. Decomposing the Differences in Cancer Mortality between Denmark and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron Boucher, Marie-Pier; Wensink, Maarten Jan; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune

    mortality. Preliminary results suggest that diagnosis at a later stage could be the only reason why Danes suffer higher mortality from breast cancer. Later stage diagnosis explains 37% of the difference in mortality from lung cancer. Higher mortality from lung cancer is observed at each stage in Denmark......Cancer survival tends to be lower in Denmark than in comparable countries like Sweden. It has been suggested that this difference can be partly explained by higher tobacco use by Danes than Swedes and a more adverse stage at diagnosis distribution. In this paper, we aim to decompose the difference...... in cancer mortality between Denmark and Sweden by their differences in 1) age composition at diagnosis, 2) stage composition at diagnosis and 3) the force of mortality by age and stage. This procedure allows quantification of the contribution of each of these factors to the overall difference in cancer...

  13. Comparison of bacterial communities in leachate from decomposing bovine carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hak Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective Burial is associated with environmental effects such as the contamination of ground or surface water with biological materials generated during the decomposition process. Therefore, bacterial communities in leachates originating from the decomposing bovine carcasses were investigated. Methods To understand the process of bovine (Hanwoo carcass decomposition, we simulated burial using a lab-scale reactor with a volume of 5.15 m3. Leachate samples from 3 carcasses were collected using a peristaltic pump once a month for a period of 5 months, and bacterial communities in samples were identified by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Results We obtained a total of 110,442 reads from the triplicate samples of various sampling time points (total of 15 samples, and found that the phylum Firmicutes was dominant at most sampling times. Differences in the bacterial communities at the various time points were observed among the triplicate samples. The bacterial communities sampled at 4 months showed the most different compositions. The genera Pseudomonas and Psychrobacter in the phylum Proteobacteria were dominant in all of the samples obtained after 3 months. Bacillaceae, Clostridium, and Clostridiales were found to be predominant after 4 months in the leachate from one carcass, whereas Planococcaceae was found to be a dominant in samples obtained at the first and second months from the other two carcasses. The results showed that potentially pathogenic microbes such as Clostridium derived from bovine leachate could dominate the soil environment of a burial site. Conclusion Our results indicated that the composition of bacterial communities in leachates of a decomposing bovine shifted continuously during the experimental period, with significant changes detected after 4 months of burial.

  14. Thermally decomposed ricebran oil as a diesel fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megahed, O. A.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Ricebran oil; a non edible oil, was thermally decomposed using different loads of calcium oxide as catalyst. The fuel properties of the cracked product were evaluated as compared to those of diesel fuel. The considered properties included the calorific value, flash point, viscosity, pour point, distillation characteristics, cetane number in addition to some other fuel properties. The results had shown that the fuel properties of the decomposed oil were quite similar to those of standard diesel fuel. The calorific value was 80-90% that of diesel fuel and the viscosity was sligthy higher. The prepared fuel was advantageous over diesel fuel as the former was completely free from sulfur, which on fuel combustion produces corrosive gases of sulfur oxides.

    Aceite de germen de arroz, un aceite no comestible, fue descompuesto térmicamente usando diferentes cantidades de óxido cálcico como catalizador. Las propiedades combustibles del producto craqueado fueron evaluadas comparándolas con las del gasóleo. Las propiedades consideradas incluyeron el poder calorífico, punto de inflamación, viscosidad, temperatura de fluidez crítica, características de destilación, número de cetano y otras propiedades de los combustibles. Los resultados han mostrado que las propiedades combustibles del aceite descompuesto fueron bastantes similares a la de los gasóleos estándar. El poder calorífico fue del 80-90% de la del gasóleo y la viscosidad ligeramente mayor. El combustible preparado fue ventajoso sobre el gasóleo ya que el primero estaba completamente libre de sulfuro, el cual produce en la combustión del carburante gases corrosivos de óxido de azufre.

  15. FY-2016 Methyl Iodide Higher NOx Adsorption Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Nicholas Ray [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, Tony Leroy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2016 under the Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) Program Offgas Sigma Team to further research and advance the technical maturity of solid sorbents for capturing iodine-129 in off-gas streams during used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Adsorption testing with higher levels of NO (approximately 3,300 ppm) and NO2 (up to about 10,000 ppm) indicate that high efficiency iodine capture by silver aerogel remains possible. Maximum iodine decontamination factors (DFs, or the ratio of iodine flowrate in the sorbent bed inlet gas compared to the iodine flowrate in the outlet gas) exceeded 3,000 until bed breakthrough rapidly decreased the DF levels to as low as about 2, when the adsorption capability was near depletion. After breakthrough, nearly all of the uncaptured iodine that remains in the bed outlet gas stream is no longer in the form of the original methyl iodide. The methyl iodide molecules are cleaved in the sorbent bed, even after iodine adsorption is no longer efficient, so that uncaptured iodine is in the form of iodine species soluble in caustic scrubber solutions, and detected and reported here as diatomic I2. The mass transfer zone depths were estimated at 8 inches, somewhat deeper than the 2-5 inch range estimated for both silver aerogels and silver zeolites in prior deep-bed tests, which had lower NOx levels. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity and silver utilization for these higher NOx tests, at about 5-15% of the original sorbent mass, and about 12-35% of the total silver, respectively, were lower than for trends from prior silver aerogel and silver zeolite tests with lower NOx levels. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to expand the database for organic iodide adsorption and increase the technical maturity if iodine adsorption processes.

  16. Absence of ferroelectricity in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sajedi Alvar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ferroelectricity has been proposed as one of the potential origins of the observed hysteresis in photocurrent-voltage characteristics of perovskite based solar cells. Measurement of ferroelectric properties on perovskite solar cells is hindered by the presence of (inorganic charge transport layers. Here we fabricate metal-perovskite-metal capacitors and unambiguously show that methylammonium lead iodide is not ferroelectric at room temperature. We propose that the hysteresis originates from the movement of positive ions rather than ferroelectric switching.

  17. Chemical storage of hydrogen in few-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, K. S.; Kumar, Prashant; Maitra, Urmimala; Govindaraj, A.; Hembram, K. P. S. S.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2011-01-01

    Birch reduction of few-layer graphene samples gives rise to hydrogenated samples containing up to 5 wt % of hydrogen. Spectroscopic studies reveal the presence of sp3 C-H bonds in the hydrogenated graphenes. They, however, decompose readily on heating to 500 °C or on irradiation with UV or laser radiation releasing all the hydrogen, thereby demonstrating the possible use of few-layer graphene for chemical storage of hydrogen. First-principles calculations throw light on the mechanism of dehydrogenation that appears to involve a significant reconstruction and relaxation of the lattice. PMID:21282617

  18. Automatic titrimetric determination of iodide in some pharmaceutical contrasting preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramović, B; Horváth, K; Gaál, F

    1993-06-01

    Automatic titrimetric methods with catalytic, spectrophotometric and potentiometric monitoring of the course of titration were applied for determination of iodide content in iopanoic acid, 2-(3-amino-2,4,6-tri-iodobenzyl)butyric acid, as well as in the mixture of sodium amidotrizoate (sodium 3,5-diacetamido-2,4,6-tri-iodobenzoate), and meglumine amidotrizoate (N-methylglucamine salt of 3,5-diacetamido-2,4,6-tri-iodobenzoic acid), in some pharmaceutical contrasting preparations. After combustion of the sample in an oxygen atmosphere and absorption of products in hydrazine sulphate solution, the iodide present was titrated with a standard solution of silver nitrate. In catalytic titrations, the system persulphate-sulphanilic acid (acetate buffer pH 4.35) in the presence of 2,2'-bipyridine as an activator served as the indicator reaction. The results obtained were compared with those of the official methods. Amounts of iodide of about 1.2 mg per aliquot of analyte were determined with a standard deviation less than 1.9%.

  19. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  20. Laccase-catalyzed oxidation of iodide and formation of organically bound iodine in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Miharu; Oikawa, Jun-ichi; Taguchi, Taro; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Sakamoto, Kazunori; Amachi, Seigo

    2013-01-02

    Laccase oxidizes iodide to molecular iodine or hypoiodous acid, both of which are easily incorporated into natural soil organic matter. In this study, iodide sorption and laccase activity in 2 types of Japanese soil were determined under various experimental conditions to evaluate possible involvement of this enzyme in the sorption of iodide. Batch sorption experiment using radioactive iodide tracer ((125)I(-)) revealed that the sorption was significantly inhibited by autoclaving (121 °C, 40 min), heat treatment (80 and 100 °C, 10 min), γ-irradiation (30 kGy), N(2) gas flushing, and addition of reducing agents and general laccase inhibitors (KCN and NaN(3)). Interestingly, very similar tendency of inhibition was observed in soil laccase activity, which was determined using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as a substrate. The partition coefficient (K(d): mL g(-1)) for iodide and specific activity of laccase in soils (Unit g(-1)) showed significant positive correlation in both soil samples. Addition of a bacterial laccase with an iodide-oxidizing activity to the soils strongly enhanced the sorption of iodide. Furthermore, the enzyme addition partially restored iodide sorption capacity of the autoclaved soil samples. These results suggest that microbial laccase is involved in iodide sorption on soils through the oxidation of iodide.

  1. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamic, M.L., E-mail: Mary.Adamic@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Lister, T.E.; Dufek, E.J.; Jenson, D.D.; Olson, J.E. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Vockenhuber, C. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Watrous, M.G. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for {sup 129}I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  2. Decomposing ability of filamentous fungi on litter is involved in a subtropical mixed forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fuqiang; Tian, Xingjun; Fan, Xiaoxu; He, Xingbing

    2010-01-01

    The abilities of 10 filamentous fungi, isolated from Pinus massoniana-Liquidambar formasana mixed forest (PLF), to decompose fresh, fallen needle and leaf litter were studied with pure-culture tests. The results showed that all fungi except Mucor sp. and Chaetomium bostrychodes could drive mass loss of L. formasana leaf litter significantly more than that of P. massoniasa. Mass loss of litter in the first 5 wk of the study was higher than that in the last 5 wk. The decomposition rate was negatively correlated to the original lignin/nitrogen (L/N) and carbohydrate/nitrogen (C/N) ratios. Based on the mass loss of litter (W), carbohydrate (C) and lignin (L), and the mutual relationship between L/W and L/C ratio, we concluded that Mucor sp. had the lowest decomposing ability on P. Massoniana and L. formasana litter and that it could not use lignin. The Chaetomium bostrychodes were lignin and carbohydrate decomposers but preferred lignin. Trichoderma sp. 1 and Cladosporium herbarum were carbohydrate-decomposing fungi. Trichoderma sp. 2, Aspergillus fumigatus, Alternaria sp. and Penicillium sp. 2 were able to decompose lignin and carbohydrate but preferred carbohydrate and had high ability to decompose litter. Aspergillus niger and Penicillium sp. 1 were able to decompose lignin and carbohydrate only in the early phase of the study. The decomposing ability of fungi varied even within genus. No direct relationship was found between the frequency of isolation and the decomposing ability of fungi.

  3. Transformation rules for decomposing heterogeneous data into triples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrityunjay Singh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to fulfill the vision of a dataspace system, it requires a flexible, powerful and versatile data model that is able to represent a highly heterogeneous mix of data such as databases, web pages, XML, deep web, and files. In literature, the triple model was found a suitable candidate for a dataspace system, and able to represent structured, semi-structured and unstructured data into a single model. A triple model is based on the decomposition theory, and represents variety of data into a collection of triples. In this paper, we have proposed a decomposition algorithm for expressing various heterogeneous data models into the triple model. This algorithm is based on the decomposition theory of the triple model. By applying the decomposition algorithm, we have proposed a set of transformation rules for the existing data models. The transformation rules have been categorized for structured, semi-structured, and unstructured data models. These rules are able to decompose most of the existing data models into the triple model. We have empirically verified the algorithm as well as the transformation rules on different data sets having different data models.

  4. Decomposing socioeconomic inequality in child vaccination: results from Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Edel; Walsh, Brendan; O'Neill, Ciaran

    2014-06-05

    There is limited knowledge of the extent of or factors underlying inequalities in uptake of childhood vaccination in Ireland. This paper aims to measure and decompose socioeconomic inequalities in childhood vaccination in the Republic of Ireland. The analysis was performed using data from the first wave of the Growing Up in Ireland survey, a nationally representative survey of the carers of over 11,000 nine-month old babies collected in 2008 and 2009. Multivariate analysis was conducted to explore the child and parental factors, including socioeconomic factors that were associated with non-vaccination of children. A concentration index was calculated to measure inequality in childhood vaccination. Subsequent decomposition analysis identified key factors underpinning observed inequalities. Overall the results confirm a strong socioeconomic gradient in childhood vaccination in the Republic of Ireland. Concentration indices of vaccination (CI=-0.19) show a substantial pro-rich gradient. Results from the decomposition analysis suggest that a substantial proportion of the inequality is explained by household level variables such as socioeconomic status, household structure, income and entitlement to publicly funded care (29.9%, 24% 30.6% and 12.9% respectively). Substantial differences are also observed between children of Irish mothers and immigrant mothers from developing countries. Vaccination was less likely in lower than in higher income households. Access to publicly funded services was an important factor in explaining inequalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Decomposing socioeconomic inequalities in childhood obesity: evidence from Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brendan; Cullinan, John

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to quantify and decompose the socioeconomic gradient in childhood obesity in the Republic of Ireland. The analysis is performed using data from the first wave of the Growing Up in Ireland survey, a nationally representative survey of 8568 nine-year-old children conducted in 2007 and 2008. We estimate concentration indices to quantify the extent of the socioeconomic gradient in childhood obesity and undertake a subsequent decomposition analysis to pinpoint the key factors underpinning the observed inequalities. Overall the results confirm a strong socioeconomic gradient in childhood obesity in the Republic of Ireland. Concentration indices of obesity (CI=-0.168) and overweight/obese (CI=-0.057) show that the gradient is more pronounced in obese children, while results from the decomposition analysis suggest that the majority of the inequality in childhood obesity is explained by parental level variables. Our findings suggest that addressing childhood obesity inequalities requires coordinated policy responses at both the child and parental level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Decomposing phylogenetic entropy into α, β and γ components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchet, Maud A; Mouillot, David

    2011-04-23

    Measuring the phylogenetic diversity of communities has become a key issue for biogeography and conservation. However, most diversity indices that rely on interspecies phylogenetic distances may increase with species loss and thus violate the principle of weak monotonicity. Moreover, most published phylogenetic diversity indices ignore the abundance distribution along phylogenetic trees, even though lineage abundances are crucial components of biodiversity. The recently introduced concept of phylogenetic entropy overcomes these limitations, but has not been decomposed across scales, i.e. into α, β and γ components. A full understanding of mechanisms sustaining biological diversity within and between communities needs such decomposition. Here, we propose an additive decomposition framework for estimating α, β and γ components of phylogenetic entropy. Based on simulated trees, we demonstrate its robustness to phylogenetic tree shape and species richness. Our decomposition fulfils the requirements of both independence between components and weak monotonicity. Finally, our decomposition can also be adapted to the partitioning of functional diversity across different scales with the same desirable properties.

  7. Nonmonotone systems decomposable into monotone systems with negative feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso, G. A.; Smith, H. L.; Sontag, E. D.

    Motivated by the work of Angeli and Sontag [Monotone control systems, IEEE Trans. Automat. Control 48 (2003) 1684-1698] and Enciso and Sontag [On the global attractivity of abstract dynamical systems satisfying a small gain hypothesis, with applications to biological delay systems, Discrete Continuous Dynamical Systems, to appear] in control theory, we show that certain finite and infinite dimensional semi-dynamical systems with "negative feedback" can be decomposed into a monotone "open-loop" system with "inputs" and a decreasing "output" function. The original system is reconstituted by "plugging the output into the input". Employing a technique of Gouzé [A criterion of global convergence to equilibrium for differential systems with an application to Lotka-Volterra systems, Rapport de Recherche 894, INRIA] and Cosner [Comparison principles for systems that embed in cooperative systems, with applications to diffusive Lotka-Volterra models, Dynam. Cont., Discrete Impulsive Systems 3 (1997) 283-303] of imbedding the system into a larger symmetric monotone system, we are able to obtain information on the asymptotic behavior of solutions, including existence of positively invariant sets and global convergence.

  8. Communities of fungi in decomposed wood of oak and pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaśna Hanna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The abundance and diversity of wood decomposing fungi were investigated by isolating and cultivating filamentous fungi from wood and by detection of fruit bodies of ascomycetous and basidiomycetous fungi. The objective was to study the impact of forest management on fungi in 100-year-old oak and 87-year-old Scots pine forests in Northern Poland. Fungi were found on coarse woody debris of decayed stumps and fallen logs, boughs and branches in each of the three (managed and unmanaged examined stands. In total, 226 species of Oomycota and fungi were recorded. Oak wood was colonized by one species of Oomycota and 141 species of fungi including Zygomycota (19 species, Ascomycota (103 species and Basidiomycota (19 species. Scots pine wood was also colonized by one species of Oomycota and 138 species of fungi including Zygomycota (19 species, Ascomycota (90 species and Basidiomycota (29 species. In the first, second and third stages of decomposition, the oak wood was colonized by 101, 89 and 56 species of fungi respectively and pine wood was colonized by 82, 103 and 47 species respectively. Eighty three of the observed species (37% occurred on both types of wood, while the other species displayed nutritional preferences. A decrease in the number of species with advancing decay indicates the necessity for a continuous supply of dead wood to the forest ecosystem.

  9. 6 Iodo-delta-lactone reproduces many but not all the effects of iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasz, Lisa; Oglio, Romina; Dagrosa, María A; Krawiec, León; Pisarev, Mario A; Juvenal, Guillermo J

    2010-07-29

    Iodide has direct effects on thyroid function. Several iodinated lipids are biosynthesized by the thyroid and they were postulated as intermediaries in the action of iodide. Among them 6 iodo-delta-lactone (IL-delta) has been identified and proposed to play a role in thyroid autoregulation. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of iodide and IL-delta on several thyroid parameters. Thyroid bovine follicles were incubated with the different compounds during three days. KI and IL-delta inhibited iodide uptake, total protein and Tg synthesis but only KI had an effect on NIS and Tg mRNAs levels. Both compounds inhibited Na+/K+ ATPase and deoxy-glucose uptake. As PAX 8, FOXE 1 and TITF1 are involved in the regulation of thyroid specific genes their mRNA levels were measured. While iodide inhibited the expression of the first two, the expression of TITF1 was stimulated by iodide and IL-delta had no effect on these parameters. These findings indicate that IL-delta reproduces some but not all the effects of excess iodide. These observations apply for higher micromolar concentrations of iodide while no such effects could be demonstrated at nanomolar iodide concentrations. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Methyl Iodide Exposure Presenting as Severe Chemical Burn Injury with Neurological Complications and Prolonged Respiratory Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Manuel; Medved, Fabian; Rothenberger, Jens; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard

    Methyl iodide (iodomethane) is a monohalomethane that is mainly used as an intermediate in the manufacturing of different pharmaceuticals and pesticides. Until now, only 13 cases of methyl iodide poisoning have been described in the literature. The authors present the first case of severe chemical burn injury due to methyl iodide exposure in a 36-year-old Caucasian man who suffered superficial to partial-thickness burn injuries over 75% of his BSA and developed neurological malfunctions and prolonged respiratory insufficiency. Human poisoning with methyl iodide is very rare. In addition to the already described neurological symptoms and respiratory insufficiency, severe chemical burn injury can cause a life-threatening medical emergency.

  11. 1-(Ferrocen-1-ylmethyl-3-methylimidazol-3-ium iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent O. Nyamori

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the title compound, [Fe(C5H5(C10H12N2]I, consists of a 1-(ferrocen-1-ylmethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation which is counter-balanced by an iodide anion. The cyclopentadienyl (Cp rings of the ferrocene unit have a slightly staggered conformation skewed from an ideal eclipsed conformation by an angle of 3.5 (6°. The interplanar angle between the Cp and the imidazole ring is 67.94 (2°.

  12. Decomposer diversity and identity influence plant diversity effects on ecosystem functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Reich, Peter B; Isbell, Forest

    2012-10-01

    Plant productivity and other ecosystem functions often increase with plant diversity at a local scale. Alongside various plant-centered explanations for this pattern, there is accumulating evidence that multi-trophic interactions shape this relationship. Here, we investigated for the first time if plant diversity effects on ecosystem functioning are mediated or driven by decomposer animal diversity and identity using a double-diversity microcosm experiment. We show that many ecosystem processes and ecosystem multifunctionality (herbaceous shoot biomass production, litter removal, and N uptake) were affected by both plant and decomposer diversity, with ecosystem process rates often being maximal at intermediate to high plant and decomposer diversity and minimal at both low plant and decomposer diversity. Decomposers relaxed interspecific plant competition by enlarging chemical (increased N uptake and surface-litter decomposition) and spatial (increasing deep-root biomass) habitat space and by promoting plant complementarity. Anecic earthworms and isopods functioned as key decomposers; although decomposer diversity effects did not solely rely on these two decomposer species, positive plant net biodiversity and complementarity effects only occurred in the absence of isopods and the presence of anecic earthworms. Using a structural equation model, we explained 76% of the variance in plant complementarity, identified direct and indirect effect paths, and showed that the presence of key decomposers accounted for approximately three-quarters of the explained variance. We conclude that decomposer animals have been underappreciated as contributing agents of plant diversity-ecosystem functioning relationships. Elevated decomposer performance at high plant diversity found in previous experiments likely positively feeds back to plant performance, thus contributing to the positive relationship between plant diversity and ecosystem functioning.

  13. Nematophagous fungi from decomposing cattle faeces in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saumell, Carlos Alfredo; Fernández, Alicia Silvina; Fusé, Luis Alberto; Rodríguez, Manuela; Sagüés, María Federica; Iglesias, Lucía Emilia

    2015-01-01

    Biological control of gastrointestinal nematodes of ruminants by use of nematophagous fungi would become part of any livestock parasite integral control system. Identifying autochthonous species that could then be selected for mass production is an important phase in the practical use of biological control. To search for nematophagous fungi with potential use as biological control agents against gastrointestinal nematodes in Argentina. Decomposing cattle faeces sampled in different locations were incubated in water agar 2% with Panagrellus sp. The developed nematophagous fungi were transferred to new water agar 2% plates and then to corn meal agar plates in order to carry out their identification. Fungal diversity and richness were also assessed. Seventeen species from nine genera of nematophagous fungi were found. Twelve species were nematode-trapping fungi and three species plus two fungi identified to genus level corresponded to endoparasitic fungi. Arthrobotrys conoides, Arthrobotrys oligospora, Duddingtonia flagrans, Monacrosporium doedycoides, Arthrobotrys robusta and Drechmeria coniospora were the most frequently isolated species overall in the whole study (6.6%, 5.7%, 5.7%, 5.7%, 4.7% and 4.7%, respectively) although other species were more frequently recorded at local levels such as Arthrobotrys pyriformis (18.8%). Only A. conoides has been previously isolated from ruminant faecal samples in Argentina. Five nematode-trapping fungal species are mentioned for the first time in the Americas D. flagrans and A. conoides, both identified in the present study, are among the most promising ones as biological control agents against gastrointestinal nematodes of ruminants. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. 1-Heptyl-1,3,6,8-tetraazatricyclo[4.3.1.13,8]undecan-1-ium iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Fejfarová

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound C14H29N4+·I− salt, was obtained by the reaction of cage adamanzane-type aminal 1,3,6,8-tetraazatricyclo[4.3.1.13,8]undecane with heptyl iodide. In the cation, the bond lengths and angles are within normal ranges, except for one N—C(ring bond distance of 1.542 (3 Å, which is unexpectedly long compared with related compounds. In the crystal, ions are linked through C—H...I hydrogen bonds. The crystal studied was a non-merohedral twin with a minor twin domain of 6.56 (5%.

  15. ALPHA-HYDROGEN, BETA-HYDROGEN AND DELTA-HYDROGEN ABSTRACTION IN THE THERMOLYSIS OF PARAMAGNETIC VANADIUM(III) DIALKYL COMPLEXES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HESSEN, B; BUIJINK, JKF; MEETSMA, A; TEUBEN, JH; HELGESSON, G; HAKANSSON, M; JAGNER, S; SPEK, AL

    Electron deficient paramagnetic vanadium(III) dialkyls CpV(CH2CMe2R)2(PMe3) (14 electron, R = Me (2), Ph (3)) and CpV[CH(SiMe3)2]2 (12 electron, 4) have been synthesized. At ambient temperature 2 decomposes through a-hydrogen abstraction to produce, in the presence of dmpe

  16. 8a-Methyl-5,6,8,8a,9,10-hexahydro-10,12a-epoxyisoindolo[1,2-a]isoquinolinium iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien A. A. Toze

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C17H18NO+·I−, is an adduct resulting from an intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction of methallyl chloride with 3,4-dihydro-1-furylisoquinoline. The cation comprises a fused pentacyclic system containing three five-membered rings (dihydropyrrole, dihydrofuran and tetrahydrofuran and two six-membered rings (tetrahydropyridine and benzene. The five-membered rings have the usual envelope conformations, and the central six-membered tetrahydropyridine ring adopts the unsymmetrical half-boat conformation. In the crystal, cations and iodide anions are bound by weak intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions into a three-dimensional framework.

  17. Limited transfer of nitrogen between wood decomposing and ectomycorrhizal mycelia when studied in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallander, Håkan; Lindahl, Björn D.; Nilsson, Lars Ola

    2006-01-01

    Transfer of 15N between interacting mycelia of a wood-decomposing fungus (Hypholoma fasciculare) and an ectomycorrhizal fungus (Tomentellopsis submollis) was studied in a mature beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest. The amount of 15N transferred from the wood decomposer to the ectomycorrhizal fungus...

  18. Experimental evidence that the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model best describes the evolution of leaf litter decomposability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xu; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Prinzing, Andreas; Dong, Ming; Cornwell, William K

    2014-09-01

    Leaf litter decomposability is an important effect trait for ecosystem functioning. However, it is unknown how this effect trait evolved through plant history as a leaf 'afterlife' integrator of the evolution of multiple underlying traits upon which adaptive selection must have acted. Did decomposability evolve in a Brownian fashion without any constraints? Was evolution rapid at first and then slowed? Or was there an underlying mean-reverting process that makes the evolution of extreme trait values unlikely? Here, we test the hypothesis that the evolution of decomposability has undergone certain mean-reverting forces due to strong constraints and trade-offs in the leaf traits that have afterlife effects on litter quality to decomposers. In order to test this, we examined the leaf litter decomposability and seven key leaf traits of 48 tree species in the temperate area of China and fitted them to three evolutionary models: Brownian motion model (BM), Early burst model (EB), and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model (OU). The OU model, which does not allow unlimited trait divergence through time, was the best fit model for leaf litter decomposability and all seven leaf traits. These results support the hypothesis that neither decomposability nor the underlying traits has been able to diverge toward progressively extreme values through evolutionary time. These results have reinforced our understanding of the relationships between leaf litter decomposability and leaf traits in an evolutionary perspective and may be a helpful step toward reconstructing deep-time carbon cycling based on taxonomic composition with more confidence.

  19. Nuclear detonation, thyroid cancer and potassium iodide prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent nuclear disaster at Japan has raised global concerns about effects of radioactive leakage in the environment, associated hazards, and how they can be prevented. In this article, we have tried to explain about the guidelines laid down by World Health Organization for a potassium iodide prophylaxis following a nuclear disaster, and its mechanism of action in preventing thyroid cancer. Data was collected mainly from the studies carried out during the Chernobyl disaster of Russia in 1986 and the hazardous effects especially on the thyroid gland were studied. It was seen that radioactive iodine leakage from the nuclear plants mainly affected the thyroid gland, and especially children were at a higher risk at developing the cancers. Potassium Iodide prophylaxis can be administered in order to prevent an increase in the incidence of thyroid cancers in the population of an area affected by a nuclear disaster. However, one has to be cautious while giving it, as using it without indication has its own risks.

  20. Numerical modelling of methyl iodide in the eastern tropical Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Stemmler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Methyl iodide (CH3I is a volatile organic halogen compound that contributes significantly to the transport of iodine from the ocean to the atmosphere, where it plays an important role in tropospheric chemistry. CH3I is naturally produced and occurs in the global ocean. The processes involved in the formation of CH3I, however, are not fully understood. In fact, there is an ongoing debate whether production by phytoplankton or photochemical degradation of organic matter is the main source term. Here, both the biological and photochemical production mechanisms are considered in a biogeochemical module that is coupled to a one-dimensional water column model for the eastern tropical Atlantic. The model is able to reproduce observed subsurface maxima of CH3I concentrations. But, the dominating source process cannot be clearly identified as subsurface maxima can occur due to both direct biological and photochemical production. However, good agreement between the observed and simulated difference between surface and subsurface methyl iodide concentrations is achieved only when direct biological production is taken into account. Production rates for the biological CH3I source that were derived from published laboratory studies are shown to be inappropriate for explaining CH3I concentrations in the eastern tropical Atlantic.

  1. Inconsistent impacts of decomposer diversity on the stability of aboveground and belowground ecosystem functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Schädler, Martin

    2011-02-01

    The intensive discussion on the importance of biodiversity for the stability of essential processes in ecosystems has prompted a multitude of studies since the middle of the last century. Nevertheless, research has been extremely biased by focusing on the producer level, while studies on the impacts of decomposer diversity on the stability of ecosystem functions are lacking. Here, we investigate the impacts of decomposer diversity on the stability (reliability) of three important aboveground and belowground ecosystem functions: primary productivity (shoot and root biomass), litter decomposition, and herbivore infestation. For this, we analyzed the results of three laboratory experiments manipulating decomposer diversity (1-3 species) in comparison to decomposer-free treatments in terms of variability of the measured variables. Decomposer diversity often significantly but inconsistently affected the stability of all aboveground and belowground ecosystem functions investigated in the present study. While primary productivity was mainly destabilized, litter decomposition and aphid infestation were essentially stabilized by increasing decomposer diversity. However, impacts of decomposer diversity varied between plant community and fertility treatments. There was no general effect of the presence of decomposers on stability and no trend toward weaker effects in fertilized communities and legume communities. This indicates that impacts of decomposers are based on more than effects on nutrient availability. Although inconsistent impacts complicate the estimation of consequences of belowground diversity loss, underpinning mechanisms of the observed patterns are discussed. Impacts of decomposer diversity on the stability of essential ecosystem functions differed between plant communities of varying composition and fertility, implicating that human-induced changes of biodiversity and land-use management might have unpredictable effects on the processes mankind relies on

  2. Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  3. Thyroid hormones and iodide in the near-term pregnant rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versloot, P.

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid hormones, thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), are produced by the thyroid gland. To synthesize thyroid hormones the thyroid needs iodide. The uptake of iodide as well as the production and secretion of T4 and T3 by the thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin (TSH),

  4. Effects of radiation and temperature on iodide sorption by surfactant-modified bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choung, Sungwook; Kim, Minkyung; Yang, Jung-Seok; Kim, Min-Gyu; Um, Wooyong

    2014-08-19

    Bentonite, which is used as an engineered barrier in geological repositories, is ineffective for sorbing anionic radionuclides because of its negatively charged surface. This study modified raw bentonite using a cationic surfactant (i.e., hexadecyltrimethylammonium [HDTMA]-Br) to improve its sorption capability for radioactive iodide. The effects of temperature and radiation on the iodide sorption of surfactant-modified bentonite (SMB) were also evaluated under alkaline pH condition similar to that found in repository environments. Different amounts of surfactant, equivalent to the 50, 100, and 200% cation-exchange capacity of the bentonite, were used to produce the HDTMA-SMB for iodide sorption. The sorption reaction of the SMB with iodide reached equilibrium rapidly within 10 min regardless of temperature and radiation conditions. The rate of iodide sorption increased as the amount of the added surfactant was increased and nonlinear sorption behavior was exhibited. However, high temperature and γ-irradiation ((60)Co) resulted in significantly (∼2-10 times) lower iodide Kd values for the SMB. The results of FTIR, NMR, and XANES spectroscopy analysis suggested that the decrease in iodide sorption may be caused by weakened physical electrostatic force between the HDTMA and iodide, and by the surfactant becoming detached from the SMB during the heating and irradiation processes.

  5. Iodide and triiodide anion complexes involving anion-π interactions with a tetrazine-based receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savastano, Matteo; Bazzicalupi, Carla; García, Celeste; Gellini, Cristina; López de la Torre, María Dolores; Mariani, Palma; Pichierri, Fabio; Bianchi, Antonio; Melguizo, Manuel

    2017-04-05

    Protonated forms of the tetrazine ligand L2 (3,6-bis(morpholin-4-ylethyl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine) interact with iodide in aqueous solution forming relatively stable complexes (ΔG° = -11.6(4) kJ mol(-1) for HL2(+) + I(-) = (HL2)I and ΔG° = -13.4(2) kJ mol(-1) for H2L2(2+) + I(-) = [(H2L2)I](+)). When solutions of [(H2L2)I](+) are left in contact with air, crystals of the oxidation product (H2L2)2(I3)3I·4H2O are formed. Unfortunately, the low solubility of I3(-) complexes prevents the determination of their stability constants. The crystal structures of H2L2I2·H2O (1), H2L2(I3)2·2H2O (2) and (H2L2)2(I3)3I·4H2O (3) were determined by means of X-ray diffraction analyses. In all crystal structures, it was found that the interaction between I(-) and I3(-) with H2L2(2+) is dominated by anion interactions with the π electron density of the receptor. Only in the case of 1, the iodide anions involved in close anion-π interactions with the ligand tetrazine ring form an additional H-bond with the protonated morpholine nitrogen of an adjacent ligand molecule. Conversely, in crystals of 2 and 3 there are alternate segregated planes which contain only protonated ligands hydrogen-bonded to cocrystallized water molecules or I3(-) and I(-) forming infinite two-dimensional networks established through short interhalogen contacts, making these crystalline products good candidates to behave as solid conductors. In the solid complexes, the triiodide anion displays both end-on and side-on interaction modes with the tetrazine ring, in agreement with density functional theory calculations indicating a preference for the alignment of the I3(-) molecular axis with the molecular axis of the ligand. Further information about geometries and structures of triiodide anions in 2 and 3 was acquired by the analysis of their Raman spectra.

  6. High-temperature metal corrosion tests for HI decomposer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Young Soo; Sah, In Jin; No, Hee Cheon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical Nuclear hydrogen production process is composed of three parts, Bunsen reaction, sulfuric acid decomposition reaction and hydriodic acid decomposition reaction. Among them, hydriodic acid decomposition reaction has low kinetics and equilibrium yield is poor, being an efficiency-determining step.1) Thus, many efforts are tried to raise the reaction rate and yield, such as extractive/reactive distillation or EED method. High temperature decomposition process,2) another candidate of HI decomposition method nowadays, has a simple process but due to highly corrosive environment, a material problem is one of crucial obstacles. In this paper, a number of structure material candidates are tested at high temperature for HI decomposition process

  7. Determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Bodiroga Milanka; Ognjanović Jasminka

    2002-01-01

    Iodometric and permanganometric titrations were used for determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the mixture. Two procedures were described and compared. Titrations could be done in only one vessel, in the same reaction mixture, when iodometric titration of peracetic acid was continued after the permanganometric titration of H2O2, (procedure A). Peracetic acid and H2O2, as oxidizing agents, reacted with potassium iodide in an acid medium, evolving iodine. This reaction...

  8. Linking loss of sodium-iodide symporter expression to DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén [Sahlgrenska Cancer Center, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (Sweden); Department of Medical Chemistry and Cell Biology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (Sweden); Kapoor, Nirmal [Department of Medical Chemistry and Cell Biology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (Sweden); Ingeson-Carlsson, Camilla; Carlsson, Therese [Sahlgrenska Cancer Center, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (Sweden); Department of Medical Chemistry and Cell Biology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (Sweden); Karlsson, Jan-Olof [Department of Medical Chemistry and Cell Biology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (Sweden); Postgård, Per; Himmelman, Jakob; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (Sweden); Hammarsten, Ola [Department of Clinical Chemistry, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (Sweden); Nilsson, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.nilsson@gu.se [Sahlgrenska Cancer Center, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (Sweden); Department of Medical Chemistry and Cell Biology, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg (Sweden)

    2016-05-15

    Radiotherapy of thyroid cancer with I-131 is abrogated by inherent loss of radioiodine uptake due to loss of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expression in poorly differentiated tumor cells. It is also known that ionizing radiation per se down-regulates NIS (the stunning effect), but the mechanism is unknown. Here we investigated whether loss of NIS-mediated iodide transport may be elicited by DNA damage. Calicheamicin, a fungal toxin that specifically cleaves double-stranded DNA, induced a full scale DNA damage response mediated by the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase in quiescent normal thyrocytes. At sublethal concentrations (<1 nM) calicheamicin blocked NIS mRNA expression and transepithelial iodide transport as stimulated by thyrotropin; loss of function occurred at a much faster rate than after I-131 irradiation. KU-55933, a selective ATM kinase inhibitor, partly rescued NIS expression and iodide transport in DNA-damaged cells. Prolonged ATM inhibition in healthy cells also repressed NIS-mediated iodide transport. ATM-dependent loss of iodide transport was counteracted by IGF-1. Together, these findings indicate that NIS, the major iodide transporter of the thyroid gland, is susceptible to DNA damage involving ATM-mediated mechanisms. This uncovers novel means of poor radioiodine uptake in thyroid cells subjected to extrinsic or intrinsic genotoxic stress. - Highlights: • DNA damage inhibits polarized iodide transport in normal thyroid cells. • Down-regulation of NIS expression is mediated by activation of the ATM kinase. • Long-term ATM inhibition also represses NIS-mediated iodide transport. • IGF-1 rescues NIS expression and iodide transport in DNA-damaged cells.

  9. Balance of Plant Requirements for a Nuclear Hydrogen Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley Ward

    2006-04-01

    This document describes the requirements for the components and systems that support the hydrogen production portion of a 600 megawatt thermal (MWt) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These systems, defined as the "balance-of-plant" (BOP), are essential to operate an effective hydrogen production plant. Examples of BOP items are: heat recovery and heat rejection equipment, process material transport systems (pumps, valves, piping, etc.), control systems, safety systems, waste collection and disposal systems, maintenance and repair equipment, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical supply and distribution, and others. The requirements in this document are applicable to the two hydrogen production processes currently under consideration in the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. These processes are the sulfur iodide (S-I) process and the high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process. At present, the other two hydrogen production process - the hybrid sulfur-iodide electrolytic process (SE) and the calcium-bromide process (Ca-Br) -are under flow sheet development and not included in this report. While some features of the balance-of-plant requirements are common to all hydrogen production processes, some details will apply only to the specific needs of individual processes.

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIii of... - Work Practice Standards-Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks 3 Table 3 to... Standards—Required Actions for Liquid Mercury Spills and Accumulations and Hydrogen and Mercury Vapor Leaks... cell back into service until the leaking equipment is repaired. 3. A decomposer or hydrogen system...

  11. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  12. Decomposing developmental differences in probabilistic feedback learning: A combined performance and heart-rate analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijvenvoorde, A.C.K.; Jansen, B.R.J.; Griffioen, E.S.; van der Molen, M.W.; Huizenga, H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Learning on the basis of outcome feedback shows pronounced developmental changes, however, much is still unknown about its underlying processes. In the current study, we aimed at decomposing how value updating, feedback monitoring and executing behavioral control contribute to children's

  13. Conversion efficiency in the shrimp, Metapenaeus monoceros (Fabricius), fed on decomposed mangrove leaves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan; Ramadhas, V.

    Feeding experiments were carried out with Metapenaeus monoceros using mangrove leaves at different stages of decomposition, in combination with rice bran. Maximum conversion efficiency was found in shrimps fed completely decomposed mangrove leaves...

  14. Methodology for assaying iodide conductance in proteoliposomes: specific induction by thyroid membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golstein, P E; Sener, A; Beauwens, R

    1995-12-01

    A sensitive assay is developed to assess the existence of an iodide channel in a fraction of solubilized membrane proteins. This step is critical when considering various procedures for purification of this channel. Sodium cholate is used as a detergent as it does not denature the iodide channel. A simple and rapid method involving gel-filtration chromatography is used simultaneously to remove the detergent and to adjust the buffer composition, before protein insertion into liposomes. The presence of an iodide channel is investigated by measuring the iodide conductance of these proteoliposomes at 4 degrees C. An outward iodide gradient is set up across the proteoliposomal membrane by anion-exchange chromatography, allowing uptake of radiolabelled iodide. This uptake is conductive as it is abolished by valinomycin in the presence of potassium. It is specifically mediated by a thyroid plasma-membrane protein inserted into liposomes, as its denaturation before insertion totally abolished uptake. It was observed only within a well-defined fraction of thyroid membrane proteins collected by size-exclusion chromatography (molecular mass between 100 and 200 kDa). Furthermore, it was not observed with other membrane proteins such as ileal brush-border-membrane proteins or bacteriorhodopsin. Like many anion channels, this conductance was also inhibited by N-phenylanthranilic acid. Optimization of the assay is described, validating the measurement of conductive iodide uptake at 30 s by proteoliposomes reconstituted in a ratio of 10 micrograms of protein to 90 micrograms of lipid, with an outward iodide gradient (KI 15 mM inside and 1 microM outside). This assay provides a test of the biological activity of the iodide channel at each step of the purification; it can be applied to any anionic channel.

  15. 4-(2-Carb-oxy-vin-yl)pyridinium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dong-Yue

    2010-06-16

    In the crystal structure of the title salt, C(8)H(8)NO(2) (+)·I(-), the cations and anions are linked by bifurcated N-H⋯(O,I) hydrogen bonds. A near-linear O-H⋯I hydrogen bond also exists between the cation and anion, resulting in a two-dimensional network. In the cation, the carboxyl group is twisted with respect to the pyridine ring at a dihedral angle of 15.34 (17)°.

  16. [Effect of cellulose-decomposing strain on microbial community of cow manure compost].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Li, Wan; Xu, Xiu-Hong; Li, Hong-Tao

    2011-10-01

    Taking the cow dung and straw as composting raw materials, effect of cellulose-decomposing strain on microbial community of cow manure compost was investigated with the traditional culture method and PCR-DGGE technique. The results showed that the microbiological inocula showed a more rapid rate of temperature elevation at the start of composting and prolonged the time of high-temperature process and increased the number of microbial. The DGGE map of cellulose-decomposing strain compost was different from natural compost, the succession of microbial community in cellulose-decomposing strain was faster than natural compost. Sequence comparison revealed that the Pseudomonas sp. of bacterial appeared at the initial stage and Acinetobacter sp., Flavobacteria were existed at the high-temperature process in natural compost; while Arthrobacter sp. was appeared at the high-temperature process in cellulose-decomposing strain compost. Bacillus sp. was dominant species at middle and later stage in natural compost and cellulose-decomposing strain compost. Eimeriidae of fungal appeared in compost materials, Aspergillus and thermophilic fungi were dominant species at the high-temperature process in natural compost and cellulose-decomposing strain compost. Ascomycota appeared at middle and later stage in natural compost; while Basidiomycetes in cellulose-decomposing strain compost. Aspergillus was found throughout the process. This result suggested that the microbiological inocula were able to facilitate the bacterial microbial diversity of the compost; reduced the fungal microbial diversity of the compost. The aims of this study were to provide a scientific basis to the diversity of microbial community by monitoring the dynamics of microbial community in cellulose-decomposing strain compost and represent an important step towards the understanding of microbiological inocula and its function in the degradation process of compost.

  17. Decomposing a planar graph into an independent set and a 3-degenerate graph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2001-01-01

    We prove the conjecture made by O. V. Borodin in 1976 that the vertex set of every planar graph can be decomposed into an independent set and a set inducing a 3-degenerate graph. (C) 2001 Academic Press.......We prove the conjecture made by O. V. Borodin in 1976 that the vertex set of every planar graph can be decomposed into an independent set and a set inducing a 3-degenerate graph. (C) 2001 Academic Press....

  18. Decomposing a planar graph into an independent set and a 3-degenerate graph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2000-01-01

    We prove the conjecture made by O.V.Borodin in 1976 that the vertex set of every planar graph can be decomposed into an independent set and aset inducing a $3$-degenerate graph.......We prove the conjecture made by O.V.Borodin in 1976 that the vertex set of every planar graph can be decomposed into an independent set and aset inducing a $3$-degenerate graph....

  19. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  20. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  1. An organic redox electrolyte to rival triiodide/iodide in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingkui; Chamberland, Nathalie; Breau, Livain; Moser, Jacques-E; Humphry-Baker, Robin; Marsan, Benoît; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have achieved impressive conversion efficiencies for solar energy of over 11% with an electrolyte that contains triiodide/iodide as a redox couple. Although triiodide/iodide redox couples work efficiently in DSCs, they suffer from two major disadvantages: electrolytes that contain triiodide/iodide corrode electrical contacts made of silver (which reduces the options for the scale up of DSCs to module size) and triiodide partially absorbs visible light. Here, we present a new disulfide/thiolate redox couple that has negligible absorption in the visible spectral range, a very attractive feature for flexible DSCs that use transparent conductors as current collectors. Using this novel, iodide-free redox electrolyte in conjunction with a sensitized heterojunction, we achieved an unprecedented efficiency of 6.4% under standard illumination test conditions. This novel redox couple offers a viable pathway to develop efficient DSCs with attractive properties for scale up and practical applications.

  2. Application of Mercuric Iodide Detectors to the Monitoring and Evaluation of Stored Special Nuclear Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van den Berg, L; Proctor, A. E; Pohl, K. R

    2001-01-01

    Mercuric iodide is a very promising material for the monitoring of stored nuclear materials that can be characterized by the energies and relative intensities of the gamma ray spectra that the materials produce...

  3. Slow hot carrier cooling in cesium lead iodide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qing; Ripolles, Teresa S.; Even, Jacky; Ogomi, Yuhei; Nishinaka, Koji; Izuishi, Takuya; Nakazawa, Naoki; Zhang, Yaohong; Ding, Chao; Liu, Feng; Toyoda, Taro; Yoshino, Kenji; Minemoto, Takashi; Katayama, Kenji; Hayase, Shuzi

    2017-10-01

    Lead halide perovskites are attracting a great deal of interest for optoelectronic applications such as solar cells, LEDs, and lasers because of their unique properties. In solar cells, heat dissipation by hot carriers results in a major energy loss channel responsible for the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit. Hot carrier solar cells offer the possibility to overcome this limit and achieve energy conversion efficiency as high as 66% by extracting hot carriers. Therefore, fundamental studies on hot carrier relaxation dynamics in lead halide perovskites are important. Here, we elucidated the hot carrier cooling dynamics in all-inorganic cesium lead iodide (CsPbI3) perovskite using transient absorption spectroscopy. We observe that the hot carrier cooling rate in CsPbI3 decreases as the fluence of the pump light increases and the cooling is as slow as a few 10 ps when the photoexcited carrier density is 7 × 1018 cm-3, which is attributed to phonon bottleneck for high photoexcited carrier densities. Our findings suggest that CsPbI3 has a potential for hot carrier solar cell applications.

  4. Polycrystalline Mercuric Iodide Films on CMOS Readout Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsough, Neal E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygard, Einar; Malakhov, Nail; Barber, William C.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan

    2009-08-01

    We have created high-resolution x-ray imaging devices using polycrystalline mercuric iodide (HgI2) films grown directly onto CMOS readout chips using a thermal vapor transport process. Images from prototype 400 times 400 pixel HgI2-coated CMOS readout chips are presented, where the pixel grid is 30 mum times 30 mum. The devices exhibited sensitivity of 6.2 muC/Rcm2 with corresponding dark current of 2.7 nA/cm2, and a 80 mum FWHM planar image response to a 50 mum slit aperture. X-ray CT images demonstrate a point spread function sufficient to obtain a 50 mum spatial resolution in reconstructed CT images at a substantially reduced dose compared to phosphor-coated readouts. The use of CMOS technology allows for small pixels (30 mum), fast readout speeds (8 fps for a 3200 times 3200 pixel array), and future design flexibility due to the use of well-developed fabrication processes.

  5. A simple sperm nuclear vacuole assay with propidium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W-J; Li, J

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to develop a new simple sperm nuclear vacuole assay (SNVA) with propidium iodide (PI) to determine the status of nuclear vacuole (NV) of individual spermatozoa. After PI staining, sperm nuclei were classified into the 14 categories according to both nuclear morphology and the status of NV. The incidence was 57.8% (range 28-84%) in fertile controls (n = 40), and 85.1% (range 67-99%) in men with varicocele (n = 40). In the fertile group, normal nuclear-shaped spermatozoa without NV or with one small NV located in the ante-nuclear region were significantly more in comparison with the varicocele group. In the varicocele group, abnormal nuclear-shaped spermatozoa with one large NV and with multiple NVs located in the ante-nuclear region were most frequent findings. Besides, spermatozoa with NVs in both ante- and post-nuclear regions in the varicocele group were significantly more than those in the fertile group. In both fertile and varicocele groups, normal or abnormal nuclear-shaped spermatozoa with one or more vacuoles only located in the post-nuclear region occurred sparingly. The SNVA provides a useful additional approach to identify the status of NV in human spermatozoa for diagnostic purposes. A good sperm sample would have more spermatozoa without NV or with one small NV located in the ante-nuclear region. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Persistent photovoltage in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baumann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We herein perform open circuit voltage decay (OCVD measurements on methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells to increase the understanding of the charge carrier recombination dynamics in this emerging technology. Optically pulsed OCVD measurements are conducted on CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells and compared to results from another type of thin-film photovoltaics, namely, the two reference polymer–fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cell devices based on P3HT:PC60BM and PTB7:PC70BM blends. We observe two very different time domains of the voltage transient in the perovskite solar cell with a first drop on a short time scale that is similar to the decay in the studied organic solar cells. However, 65%–70% of the maximum photovoltage persists on much longer timescales in the perovskite solar cell than in the organic devices. In addition, we find that the recombination dynamics in all time regimes are dependent on the starting illumination intensity, which is also not observed in the organic devices. We then discuss the potential origins of these unique behaviors.

  7. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2014-08-26

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  8. Persistent photovoltage in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, A.; Tvingstedt, K.; Heiber, M. C.; Väth, S.; Momblona, C.; Bolink, H. J.; Dyakonov, V.

    2014-08-01

    We herein perform open circuit voltage decay (OCVD) measurements on methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite solar cells to increase the understanding of the charge carrier recombination dynamics in this emerging technology. Optically pulsed OCVD measurements are conducted on CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells and compared to results from another type of thin-film photovoltaics, namely, the two reference polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cell devices based on P3HT:PC60BM and PTB7:PC70BM blends. We observe two very different time domains of the voltage transient in the perovskite solar cell with a first drop on a short time scale that is similar to the decay in the studied organic solar cells. However, 65%-70% of the maximum photovoltage persists on much longer timescales in the perovskite solar cell than in the organic devices. In addition, we find that the recombination dynamics in all time regimes are dependent on the starting illumination intensity, which is also not observed in the organic devices. We then discuss the potential origins of these unique behaviors.

  9. Permeation of iodide from iodine-enriched yeast through porcine intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryszka, Florian; Dolińska, Barbara; Zieliński, Michał; Chyra, Dagmara; Dobrzański, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a common phenomenon, threatening the whole global human population. Recommended daily intake of iodine is 150 μg for adults and 250 μg for pregnant and breastfeeding women. About 50% of human population can be at risk of moderate iodine deficiency. Due to this fact, increased iodine supplementation is recommended, through intake of iodized mineral water and salt iodization. The aim of this study was to investigate permeation and absorption of iodide from iodine bioplex (experimental group) in comparison with potassium iodide (controls). Permeation and absorption processes were investigated in vitro using a porcine intestine. The experimental model was based on a standard Franz diffusion cell (FD-Cell). The iodine bioplex was produced using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and whey powder: iodine content - 388 μg/g, total protein - 28.5%, total fat - 0.9%., glutamic acid - 41.2%, asparaginic acid - 29.4%, lysine - 24.8%; purchased from: F.Z.N.P. Biochefa, Sosnowiec, Poland. Potassium iodide was used as controls, at 388 μg iodine concentration, which was the same as in iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. A statistically significant increase in iodide permeation was observed for iodine-enriched yeast bioplex in comparison with controls - potassium iodide. After 5h the total amount of permeated iodide from iodine-enriched yeast bioplex was 85%, which is ~ 2-fold higher than controls - 37%. Iodide absorption was by contrast statistically significantly higher in controls - 7.3%, in comparison with 4.5% in experimental group with iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. Presented results show that iodide permeation process dominates over absorption in case of iodine-enriched yeast bioplex.

  10. Methodology for assaying iodide conductance in proteoliposomes: specific induction by thyroid membrane protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Golstein, P E; SENER, A.; Beauwens, R.

    1995-01-01

    A sensitive assay is developed to assess the existence of an iodide channel in a fraction of solubilized membrane proteins. This step is critical when considering various procedures for purification of this channel. Sodium cholate is used as a detergent as it does not denature the iodide channel. A simple and rapid method involving gel-filtration chromatography is used simultaneously to remove the detergent and to adjust the buffer composition, before protein insertion into liposomes. The pre...

  11. Suitability of III-V [XH4][YH4] materials for hydrogen storage: A density functional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuliani, F.; Gotz, A.W.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; Baerends, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    In the search for novel hydrogen storage media, the III-V hydridic material [NH4] [BH4] is a natural candidate. It can store a high wt% of hydrogen and has a favorable volumetric density. Unfortunately it was found to decompose slowly at room temperature. It is of interest to consider chemically

  12. A Selective Iodide Ion Sensor Electrode Based on Functionalized ZnO Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Willander

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, ZnO nanotubes were fabricated on a gold coated glass substrate through chemical etching by the aqueous chemical growth method. For the first time a nanostructure-based iodide ion selective electrode was developed. The ZnO nanotubes were functionalized with miconazole ion exchanger and the electromotive force (EMF was measured by the potentiometric method. The iodide ion sensor exhibited a linear response over a wide range of concentrations (1 × 10−6 to 1 × 10−1 M and excellent sensitivity of –62 ± 1 mV/decade. The detection limit of the proposed sensor was found to be 5 × 10−7 M. The effects of pH, temperature, additive, plasticizer and stabilizer on the potential response of iodide ion selective electrode were also studied. The proposed iodide ion sensor demonstrated a fast response time of less than 5 s and high selectivity against common organic and the inorganic anions. All the obtained results revealed that the iodide ion sensor based on functionalized ZnO nanotubes may be used for the detection of iodide ion in environmental water samples, pharmaceutical products and other real samples.

  13. A selective iodide ion sensor electrode based on functionalized ZnO nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Khun, Kimleang; Willander, Magnus

    2013-02-04

    In this research work, ZnO nanotubes were fabricated on a gold coated glass substrate through chemical etching by the aqueous chemical growth method. For the first time a nanostructure-based iodide ion selective electrode was developed. The ZnO nanotubes were functionalized with miconazole ion exchanger and the electromotive force (EMF) was measured by the potentiometric method. The iodide ion sensor exhibited a linear response over a wide range of concentrations (1 × 10-6 to 1 × 10-1 M) and excellent sensitivity of -62 ± 1 mV/decade. The detection limit of the proposed sensor was found to be 5 × 10-7 M. The effects of pH, temperature, additive, plasticizer and stabilizer on the potential response of iodide ion selective electrode were also studied. The proposed iodide ion sensor demonstrated a fast response time of less than 5 s and high selectivity against common organic and the inorganic anions. All the obtained results revealed that the iodide ion sensor based on functionalized ZnO nanotubes may be used for the detection of iodide ion in environmental water samples, pharmaceutical products and other real samples.

  14. Modelling iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol: Contributions of inorganic and organic iodine chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pechtl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The speciation of iodine in atmospheric aerosol is currently poorly understood. Models predict negligible iodide concentrations but accumulation of iodate in aerosol, both of which is not confirmed by recent measurements. We present an updated aqueous phase iodine chemistry scheme for use in atmospheric chemistry models and discuss sensitivity studies with the marine boundary layer model MISTRA. These studies show that iodate can be reduced in acidic aerosol by inorganic reactions, i.e., iodate does not necessarily accumulate in particles. Furthermore, the transformation of particulate iodide to volatile iodine species likely has been overestimated in previous model studies due to negligence of collision-induced upper limits for the reaction rates. However, inorganic reaction cycles still do not seem to be sufficient to reproduce the observed range of iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol. Therefore, we also investigate the effects of the recently suggested reaction of HOI with dissolved organic matter to produce iodide. If this reaction is fast enough to compete with the inorganic mechanism, it would not only directly lead to enhanced iodide concentrations but, indirectly via speed-up of the inorganic iodate reduction cycles, also to a decrease in iodate concentrations. Hence, according to our model studies, organic iodine chemistry, combined with inorganic reaction cycles, is able to reproduce observations. The presented chemistry cycles are highly dependent on pH and thus offer an explanation for the large observed variability of the iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol.

  15. Hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, E.

    1942-10-16

    This report mentioned that not very severe demands for purity were made on the hydrogen used in hydrogenation of coal or similar raw materials, because the catalysts were not very sensitive to poisoning. However, the hydrogenation plants tried to remove most impurities anyway by means of oil washes. The report included a table giving the amount of wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil in order to remove 1% of various impurities from 1000 m/sup 3/ of the circulating gas. The amounts of wash oil used up were 1.1 m/sup 3/ for removing 1% nitrogen, 0.3 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide, 0.03 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane. The amount of hydrogen lost was 28 m/sup 3/ for 1% nitrogen, 9 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane and ranged from 9 m/sup 3/ to 39 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide and 1 m/sup 3/ to 41 m/sup 3/ for carbon dioxide depending on whether the removal was done in liquid phase or vapor phase and with or without reduction of the oxide to methane. Next the report listed and described the major processes used in German hydrogenation plants to produce hydrogen. Most of them produced water gas, which then had its carbon monoxide changed to carbon dioxide, and the carbon oxides washed out with water under pressure and copper hydroxide solution. The methods included the Winkler, Pintsch-Hillebrand, and Schmalfeldt-Wintershall processes, as well as roasting of coke in a rotating generator, splitting of gases formed during hydrogenation, and separation of cokery gas into its components by the Linde process.

  16. MicroCT detection of gunshot residue in fresh and decomposed firearm wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchetto, Giovanni; Amagliani, Alessandro; Giraudo, Chiara; Fais, Paolo; Cavarzeran, Fabiano; Montisci, Massimo; Feltrin, Giampietro; Viel, Guido; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2012-05-01

    Gunshot residue (GSR) evidence may be altered or obscured by after-death events such as putrefaction, autolysis, and/or damage by animals. The present study aimed at evaluating and comparing the amount and differential distribution of GSR utilizing microcomputed tomography (microCT) analysis of fresh and decomposed gunshot wounds. A total of 60 experimental shootings at three different firing distances (5, 15, and 30 cm) were performed on human calves surgically amputated for medical reasons. Thirty specimens (10 for each tested distance) were immediately formalin-fixed, while the other 30 specimens were enclosed in a cowshed for 15 days, before formalin fixation (air temperature ranging from 11°C to 38°C). MicroCT analysis with three-dimensional image reconstruction detected GSR particles in all the investigated entrance wounds. In fresh specimens, GSR was concentrated on the skin surface around the entrance hole and in the epidermis and dermis layers around the cavity, while in decomposed specimens, the high density particles were detected only in the dermis layer. No GSR was detected in exit wounds of both fresh and decomposed specimens regardless of the tested firing distance. Statistical analysis demonstrated that also in decomposed wounds the amount of GSR roughly correlated with the distance from which the gun was fired, exhibiting, however, a higher variability than in fresh samples. The obtained results suggest that microCT analysis can be a valid screening tool for differentiating decomposed entrance and exit gunshot wounds.

  17. Carbon and nitrogen status of decomposing roots in three adjacent coniferous plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyeob Jeong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the carbon (C and nitrogen (N status of decomposing roots in three adjacent plantations consisting of one deciduous (larch: Larix leptolepis and two evergreen (red pine: Pinus densiflora; rigitaeda pine: P. rigitaeda species planted in the same year (1963 under similar site conditions. The mass loss rates and C and N status of three diameter classes of roots (UF < 2 mm, F 2-5 mm, CF 5-10 mm in diameter were examined in the upper 15 cm of the mineral soil using in situ buried root bags for 496 days.The remaining mass of decomposing roots was significantly higher for larch (69.0% than for red pine (59.6% or rigitaeda pine (59.1% over 496 days. The mass loss rates of decomposing roots did not differ significantly among the three root diameter classes, but the C and N status of decomposing roots was affected by the tree species. The larch roots showed low C concentrations but high N concentrations, C and N remaining compared to the pine roots over the study period. The results indicate that the substrate quality indicators of roots were not attributed to the mass loss rates, C and N status of decomposing roots in three coniferous tree species grown under similar environmental conditions.

  18. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, Tee L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a hazard primarily in the oil and gas industry, agriculture, sewage and animal waste handling, construction (asphalt operations and disturbing marshy terrain), and other settings where organic material decomposes under reducing conditions, and in geothermal operations. It is an insoluble gas, heavier than air, with a very low odor threshold and high toxicity, driven by concentration more than duration of exposure. Toxicity presents in a unique, reliable, and characteristic toxidrome consisting, in ascending order of exposure, of mucosal irritation, especially of the eye ("gas eye"), olfactory paralysis (not to be confused with olfactory fatigue), sudden but reversible loss of consciousness ("knockdown"), pulmonary edema (with an unusually favorable prognosis), and death (probably with apnea contributing). The risk of chronic neurcognitive changes is controversial, with the best evidence at high exposure levels and after knockdowns, which are frequently accompanied by head injury or oxygen deprivation. Treatment cannot be initiated promptly in the prehospital phase, and currently rests primarily on supportive care, hyperbaric oxygen, and nitrite administration. The mechanism of action for sublethal neurotoxicity and knockdown is clearly not inhibition of cytochrome oxidase c, as generally assumed, although this may play a role in overwhelming exposures. High levels of endogenous sulfide are found in the brain, presumably relating to the function of hydrogen sulfide as a gaseous neurotransmitter and immunomodulator. Prevention requires control of exposure and rigorous training to stop doomed rescue attempts attempted without self-contained breathing apparatus, especially in confined spaces, and in sudden release in the oil and gas sector, which result in multiple avoidable deaths. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of silver, antimony, bismuth, copper, cadmium and indium in ores, concentrates and related materials by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after methyl isobutyl ketone extraction as iodides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, E M; Wang, M

    1986-03-01

    Methods for determining ~ 0.2 mug g or more of silver and cadmium, ~ 0.5 mug g or more of copper and ~ 5 mug g or more of antimony, bismuth and indium in ores, concentrates and related materials are described. After sample decomposition and recovery of antimony and bismuth retained by lead and calcium sulphates, by co-precipitation with hydrous ferric oxide at pH 6.20 +/- 0.05, iron(III) is reduced to iron(II) with ascorbic acid, and antimony, bismuth, copper, cadmium and indium are separated from the remaining matrix elements by a single methyl isobutyl ketone extraction of their iodides from ~2M sulphuric acid-0.1M potassium iodide. The extract is washed with a sulphuric acid-potassium iodide solution of the same composition to remove residual iron and co-extracted zinc, and the extracted elements are stripped from the extract with 20% v v nitric acid-20% v v hydrogen peroxide. Alternatively, after the removal of lead sulphate by filtration, silver, copper, cadmium and indium can be extracted under the same conditions and stripped with 40% v v nitric acid-25% v v hydrochloric acid. The strip solutions are treated with sulphuric and perchloric acids and ultimately evaporated to dry ness. The individual elements are determined in a 24% v v hydrochloric acid medium containing 1000 mug of potassium per ml by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with an air-acetylene flame. Tin, arsenic and molybdenum are not co-extracted under the conditions above. Results obtained for silver, antimony, bismuth and indium in some Canadian certified reference materials by these methods are compared with those obtained earlier by previously published methods.

  1. Into the decomposed body-forensic digital autopsy using multislice-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thali, M J; Yen, K; Schweitzer, W; Vock, P; Ozdoba, C; Dirnhofer, R

    2003-07-08

    It is impossible to obtain a representative anatomical documentation of an entire body using classical X-ray methods, they subsume three-dimensional bodies into a two-dimensional level. We used the novel multislice-computed tomography (MSCT) technique in order to evaluate a case of homicide with putrefaction of the corpse before performing a classical forensic autopsy. This non-invasive method showed gaseous distension of the decomposing organs and tissues in detail as well as a complex fracture of the calvarium. MSCT also proved useful in screening for foreign matter in decomposing bodies, and full-body scanning took only a few minutes. In conclusion, we believe postmortem MSCT imaging is an excellent vizualisation tool with great potential for forensic documentation and evaluation of decomposed bodies.

  2. A glucose bio-battery prototype based on a GDH/poly(methylene blue) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Yuan; Nien, Po-Chin; Chen, Chien-Hsiao; Chen, Lin-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2012-07-01

    A glucose bio-battery prototype independent of oxygen is proposed based on a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple. At the bioanode, a NADH electrocatalyst, poly(methylene blue) (PMB), which can be easily grown on the electrode (screen-printed carbon paste electrode, SPCE) by electrodeposition, is harnessed and engineered. We find that carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are capable of significantly increasing the deposition amount of PMB and thus enhancing the PMB's electrocatalysis of NADH oxidation and the glucose bio-battery's performance. The choice of the iodide/tri-iodide redox couple eliminates the dependence of oxygen for this bio-battery, thus enabling the bio-battery with a constant current-output feature similar to that of the solar cells. The present glucose bio-battery prototype can attain a maximum power density of 2.4 μW/cm(2) at 25 °C. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite 2.5%, iodide potassium iodide 2%, and chlorhexidine 2% on the enterococcus faecalis after root canal filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mokhtari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Bacteria and their products have a major role in pulp and periapical diseases. The purpose of this study was to compare the antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite, iodide potassium iodide and chlorhexidine on the enterococcus faecalis after root canal filling. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 95 single canal human teeth were collected. Then after washing and cleaning and filing, the sterilization done using an autoclave. The teeth were smeared with enterococcus faecalis except five which selected as controls and then divided them into 3 groups which A randomly represented the irrigation by sodium hypochlorite, iodide potassium iodide (IKI and chlorhexidine solution were done. The teeth were filled with gutta-percha and then incubated in a incubator for 90 days at a temperature of 37° C. The specimens were analyzed for Colony Count. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test and Chi-Square. Results: According to the results of this study, the correlation between the 3 groups of cultured teeth were not significant (P=0.812.The specimens which were washed by IKI had the most positive amount of cultures (23.3% and the specimens which washed by chlorhexidine had the lowest (16.7%. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that after the use of different wash solutions, no statistically significant difference exist in their antimicrobial activity after root canal therapy.

  4. THERAPY OF GRAVES’ DISEASE WITH SODIUM IODIDE-131

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Hartadi Noor

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Graves’ disease is the most common form of thyrotoxicosis, with a peak incidence in the 20-40 year of age group. Females are involved about five times more commonly than male. The easiest sign to recognize patients with Graves’ disease is the present of Graves’ ophthalmopathy. The diagnosis of Graves’ disease may sometimes base only on a physical examination and a medical history. Diffuse thyroid enlargement and sign of thyrotoxicosis, mainly ophthalmopathy and to lesser extent dermopathy, usually adequate for diagnosis. TSH test combined with FT4 test is usually the first laboratory test performs in these patients. The patients suffered Graves’ disease can be treated with antithyroid drug therapy or undergo subtotal Thyroidectomy. Another therapy is by using sodium iodide-131, where this therapy has advantages including easy administration, effectiveness, low expense, and absence of pain. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  5. Short-term responses of decomposers and vegetation to stump removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataja-aho, S.

    2011-07-01

    Stump removal has become a common practice to produce raw material for bioenergy production. It was hypothesized that stump removal is an extensive and more intense disturbance for forest ecosystems (soil decomposer organisms and vegetation) compared to traditional site preparation after clear cutting. Therefore, the effects of stump harvesting on forest soil decomposers, vegetation and nutrient dynamics in undisturbed patches of the forest soil and in exposed mineral soil were compared to the effects of the traditional site preparation method, mounding. Nematodes and enchytraeids were the only decomposer groups that were directly affected (negatively) by the stump removal. Regardless of the treatment, the abundances of most of the decomposer groups were consistently lower in the exposed mineral soil than in the intact forest soil. There was 2-3 times more exposed mineral soil in stump removal sites compared to mounding sites. When this was taken into account, the decomposer community was negatively affected by the stump removal at the forest stand level. However, the greater soil disturbance at the stump harvesting sites enhanced CO{sub 2} production, net nitrogen mineralisation and nitrification. The increased N availability and the changes in microclimate due to the disturbance probably explained the vegetation increase at the stump harvested sites. Planted Norway spruce seedlings grew faster during the first two growing periods at the stump removal sites than at the mounding sites. The seedlings had high and similar ectomycorrhizal colonization rate in both treatments. In the short-term, it is probably not the resources removed in the stumps themselves, but the degree and amount of soil disturbance during the stump harvesting procedure that affects the decomposer community and its function in the clear-felled stands. (orig.)

  6. Continuous selections of multivalued maps with non-convex non-closed decomposable values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstonogov, A. A.

    1996-06-01

    A class of multivalued maps with non-convex non-closed decomposable values is distinguished, and theorems are proved on the existence of continuous selections for such maps. This class contains multivalued maps whose values are extreme points of continuous multivalued maps with closed convex decomposable values in a Banach space of Bochner-integrable functions. The proofs are based on the Baire category theorem. It is known that the set of extreme points of a closed convex set is in general not closed. Hence the results or paper answer the question of the existence of continuous selections for multivalued maps with non-convex non-closed values.

  7. An initial study of insect succession on decomposing rabbit carrions in Harare, Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Mabika, Nyasha; Masendu, Ron; Mawera, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate insects visiting sun exposed and shaded decomposing rabbit carcasses and to establish the relationship between insects and carcasses which may be of forensic importance in Harare. Methods: Two rabbits weighing 2.3 kg and 2.5 kg were killed by sharp blows on the head. One was exposed to the sun while the other was placed under shade. The carcasses were allowed to decompose and insects were collected twice a day for the first week and thereafter once a day up to the...

  8. Mechanism and Application of Carbon Nanotube Sensors in SF6 Decomposed Production Detection: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cui, Hao; Gui, Yingang; Tang, Ju

    2017-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have aroused extensive attentions as a new category of gas sensor materials owing to their outstanding performance for detecting specific gas among a variety of ones through diverse gas responses. This review summarizes the adsorption mechanism of CNTs and their properties related to the detection of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) decomposed gases that generated in gas insulation switchgear (GIS) of power system. Their performances as sensors of both experimental analysis and theoretical calculation for various kinds of decomposed gases are summarized, and the further research trend on CNTs in the detection of SF6 decomposition components is also put forward.

  9. Carbamazepine (Tegretol) inhibits in vivo iodide uptake and hormone synthesis in rat thyroid glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, S.M.; Alexander, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    Decreased serum concentrations of T3 and T4 occur in patients treated with the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine (CBZ), but with rare exception, these patients remain euthyroid. The mechanism that accounts for diminished hormone levels is unknown, and our objective was to study the direct effect of CBZ on iodide uptake and hormone synthesis in thyroid glands of CBZ-treated and pair-fed control rats. Chronic ingestion (per os) of CBZ in male rats reduced the four hour thyroid 131I-iodide uptake by approximately 60%. This inhibition occurred after the animals had received sufficient CBZ to attain plasma CBZ concentrations of 0.8 microgram/ml. Continued treatment with CBZ ranging from 560 to 800 mg/kg/day for 14 days did not result in further inhibition of iodide uptake even though the plasma CBZ concentrations had increased 6-20 fold. No inhibition of iodide uptake was apparent when the animals initially received CBZ ranging from 40 to 152 mg/kg body weight for 22 days when there were no detectable levels of plasma CBZ. Overall growth rates of CBZ-treated rats were slightly (6-10%) less than the pair-fed control animals. Plasma T4 concentrations were reduced by 18% (p less than 0.05) in the CBZ-fed animals, while T3 concentrations were diminished by 53% (p less than 0.01). CBZ appeared to alter thyroidal iodide transport because the thyroid:plasma iodide ratios were decreased by 26% in the drug-treated rats. The distribution of radioiodine in thyroidal iodoamino acids was essentially the same in both groups of rats but the absolute quantities of radioiodine were more than 2.5 times greater in the control rats. CBZ failed to inhibit peroxidase-catalyzed iodide and guaiacol oxidation in vitro.

  10. Influence of iodide and iodolactones on thyroid apoptosis. Evidence that apoptosis induced by iodide is mediated by iodolactones in intact porcine thyroid follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, R; Burzler, C; Bechtner, G; Gärtner, R

    2003-09-01

    Iodine induced thyroid involution is caused by apoptosis rather than necrosis. This effect of iodide on apoptosis of thyroid epithelial cells may be not a direct one but mediated by iodinated derivatives i.e. of polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially of iodolactones, which have previously shown to inhibit thyroid cell proliferation. We studied the influence on apoptosis of iodide (2 microM and 20 microM) and iodolactone (0.05 microM and 0.5 microM), with and without TSH (1 mU/ml), using a well characterized ex vivo- culture system of intact porcine thyroid follicles in three-dimensional culture. Apoptosis and necrosis was evaluated by electron-microscopy. Stimulation with 2 and 20 microM iodide rapidly induced a rate of apoptosis (4 - 6 %) comparable to about 40-fold lower doses of delta-iodolactone (0.05 microM and 0.5 microM). Addition of TSH (1 mU/ml) caused a slight but not significant further increase of the incidence of apoptotic cells. The rate of necrotic thyroid epithelial cells (1 - 2 %) was similar in all experiments. As delta-iodolactone in very low concentrations--comparable to iodide in higher concentrations--not only inhibits growth but also induces apoptosis, it has to be supposed that the effect of iodide is mediated by this iodinated compound. However, further experiments are necessary to confirm this hypothesis. In addition it could be demonstrated, that apoptosis is a very rapid and limited process in intact follicles. This also may explain, why iodine supplementation even in high doses does not lead to thyroid atrophy but only normalisation of thyroid size. These results confirm that apoptosis is an important regulated and limited mechanism in goiter involution.

  11. Study on the continous generation of hydrogen by decomposing steam with metals. Studie zur kontinuierlichen Wasserstoffgewinnung durch Wasserdampfzersetzung an Metallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, F.R.; Ahlers, M.; Behr, A.; Gorny, R.; Speicher, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    The study firstly deals with the state of technology in the iron-steam process, as well as with new technically tested methods to reduce iron oxides and their usefulness for the metal-steam process. Model calculations are performed a) for the reduction of iron oxide and the oxidation of iron in a shaft furnace, as well as b) for the reduction in a rotary furnace and oxidation in the shaft furnace. Reducing gases from an external coal gasification are used for the reduction steps or the circuit material is directly mixed with coal.

  12. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  13. Processes of adsorption/desorption of iodides and cadmium cations onto/from Ag(111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR D. JOVIĆ

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the adsorption/desorption processes of iodides and cadmium cations in the presence of iodides onto/from Ag(111 were investigated. It was shown that both processes were complex, characterized by several peaks on the cyclic voltammograms (CVs. By PeakFit analysis of the recorded CVs and subsequent fitting of the obtained peaks by the Frumkin adsorption isotherm, the interaction parameter (f and the Gibbs energy of adsorption (DGads for each adsorbed phase were determined. In the case of iodide adsorption, four peaks were characterized by negative values of f, indicating attractive lateral interaction between the adsorbed anions, while two of them possessed value of f < –4, indicating phase transition processes. The adsorption/desorption processes of cadmium cations (underpotential deposition – UPD of cadmium in the presence of iodide anions was characterized by two main peaks, each of them being composed of two or three peaks with negative values of f. By the analysis of charge vs. potential dependences obtained either from the CVs or current transients on potentiostatic pulses, it was concluded that adsorbed iodides did not undergo desorption during the process of Cd UPD, but became replaced by Cd ad-atoms and remained adsorbed on top of a Cd layer and/or in between Cd the ad-atoms.

  14. Capture of organic iodides from nuclear waste by metal-organic framework-based molecular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baiyan; Dong, Xinglong; Wang, Hao; Ma, Dingxuan; Tan, Kui; Jensen, Stephanie; Deibert, Benjamin J; Butler, Joseph; Cure, Jeremy; Shi, Zhan; Thonhauser, Timo; Chabal, Yves J; Han, Yu; Li, Jing

    2017-09-07

    Effective capture of radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste remains a significant challenge due to the drawbacks of current adsorbents such as low uptake capacity, high cost, and non-recyclability. We report here a general approach to overcome this challenge by creating radioactive organic iodide molecular traps through functionalization of metal-organic framework materials with tertiary amine-binding sites. The molecular trap exhibits a high CH 3 I saturation uptake capacity of 71 wt% at 150 °C, which is more than 340% higher than the industrial adsorbent Ag 0 @MOR under identical conditions. These functionalized metal-organic frameworks also serve as good adsorbents at low temperatures. Furthermore, the resulting adsorbent can be recycled multiple times without loss of capacity, making recyclability a reality. In combination with its chemical and thermal stability, high capture efficiency and low cost, the adsorbent demonstrates promise for industrial radioactive organic iodides capture from nuclear waste. The capture mechanism was investigated by experimental and theoretical methods.Capturing radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste is important for safe nuclear energy usage, but remains a significant challenge. Here, Li and co-workers fabricate a stable metal-organic framework functionalized with tertiary amine groups that exhibits high capacities for radioactive organic iodides uptake.

  15. Trapping radiodine, in the form of methyl iodide, on nuclear carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nacapricha, D. [Mahidol Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Taylor, C. [John Moores Univ., Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    Studies have been performed on potassium-iodide-impregnated charcoals of the type used in the nuclear industry for trapping radioiodine released during nuclear fission. The effects of various parameters on the trapping efficiency of methyl iodide have been investigated. A variation in particle size within a bulk charcoal caused poor precision in K value measurements because of differences in surface area, pore volume, and bed density, leading to differences in the deposition of the impregnant. Precision is improved by sieving the charcoal to a narrower size because smaller particles have a higher porosity. This finding is supported by surface area and pore measurements. Two methods of impregnation are compared by measuring K values and the deposition of potassium iodide. Charcoal impregnated by rotary evaporation exhibits both higher K values and higher potassium iodide contents than sprayed charcoal. Two designs of spraying drum are compared: a drum with helical vanes allows more efficient deposition and more uniform distribution of impregnant than a drum with axial vanes. A decrease in the K value with increasing humidity correlates with the available surface area. A similar correlation exists between water content and available pore volume. Aging of potassium-iodide-impregnated charcoal, caused by the formation of oxygen complexes on the surface, is associated with significant falls in K value. K values of charcoals also can be restored to at least their original values by heat treatment in the absence of air. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Capture of organic iodides from nuclear waste by metal-organic framework-based molecular traps

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Baiyan

    2017-09-01

    Effective capture of radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste remains a significant challenge due to the drawbacks of current adsorbents such as low uptake capacity, high cost, and non-recyclability. We report here a general approach to overcome this challenge by creating radioactive organic iodide molecular traps through functionalization of metal-organic framework materials with tertiary amine-binding sites. The molecular trap exhibits a high CH3I saturation uptake capacity of 71 wt% at 150 °C, which is more than 340% higher than the industrial adsorbent Ag0@MOR under identical conditions. These functionalized metal-organic frameworks also serve as good adsorbents at low temperatures. Furthermore, the resulting adsorbent can be recycled multiple times without loss of capacity, making recyclability a reality. In combination with its chemical and thermal stability, high capture efficiency and low cost, the adsorbent demonstrates promise for industrial radioactive organic iodides capture from nuclear waste. The capture mechanism was investigated by experimental and theoretical methods.Capturing radioactive organic iodides from nuclear waste is important for safe nuclear energy usage, but remains a significant challenge. Here, Li and co-workers fabricate a stable metal-organic framework functionalized with tertiary amine groups that exhibits high capacities for radioactive organic iodides uptake.

  17. Hydrogen usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1942-10-22

    This short tabular report listed the number of m/sup 3/ of hydrogen required for a (metric) ton of product for various combinations of raw material and product in a hydrogenation procedure. In producing auto gasoline, bituminous coal required 2800 m/sup 3/, brown coal required 2400 m/sup 3/, high-temperature-carbonization tar required 2100 m/sup 3/, bituminous coal distillation tar required 1300 m/sup 3/, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 850 m/sup 3/, petroleum residues required 900 m/sup 3/, and gas oil required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, brown coal required 1900 m/sup 3/, whereas petroleum residues required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, lubricants, and paraffin by the TTH (low-temperature-hydrogenation) process, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 550 m/sup 3/. 1 table.

  18. DC Analysis of an Ideal Diode Network Using Its Decomposed Piecevise-Linear Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Kolka

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available A new method of finding the operating points in circuits containing ideal diodes which utilizes the decomposed form of the state model of an one-dimensional piecewise-linear (PWL system is developed. The universal procedure shown gives all the existing solutions quite automatically.

  19. The chemical convergence and decomposer control hypotheses explain solid cattle manure decomposition in production grasslands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Lantinga, Egbert A.; Brussaard, Lijbert; Goede, de Ron G.M.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we reported for the first time that home field advantage (HFA) of litter decomposition also exists in agricultural production systems, in addition to earlier reports from natural ecosystems. Here, we provide evidence that adaptation of the soil decomposer community to differences in the

  20. Screening of Cultivatable Indigenous Fungi which Responsible for Decomposing of Rice Straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to screen potentials indigenous fungi for rapid decomposing of rice straw. Sevenisolates of dominant fungi were isolated from the burying rice straw on the 2.5 cm soil depth after 30 days incubationon the paddy fields. Five dominant isolates were tested for their potential to decompose rice straw by assessingtheir value of decreasing C/N ratio and dry weight of rice straw. Fungal inoculums treatments were arranged in aCompletely Randomized Design with four replications. The results showed that the dominant cultivable fungi thatisolated from decomposed rice straw were Trichoderma sp., Fusarium sp., Mucor sp., Aspergillus sp., and Penicilliumsp. Among the tested fungi, Trichoderma sp. had the biggest ability to decompose rice straw compared to othersindigenous fungi. The C/N ratio was reduced to 39.47 from an initial value of 73.33 of control treatment in 10 days ofbiodegradation process in laboratory scale, thus showing the potential of indigenous Trichoderma sp. for use inlarge-scale composting of rice straw.

  1. Food Preference of Fresh-Water Invertebrates - Comparing Fresh and Decomposed Angiosperm and a Filamentous Alga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornijow, R.; Gulati, R.D.; Ozimek, T.

    1995-01-01

    1. Fresh and decomposed Mougeotia sp. (a filamentous green alga) and Elodea nuttallii (a vascular plant) were offered as food to three species of aquatic macroinvertebrates (Lymnnea peregra, Asellus meridianus and Endochironomus albipennis) to test: (i) if filamentous algae are preferred to aquatic

  2. Experimental evidence that the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model best describes the evolution of leaf litter decomposability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Xu; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Zhao, W.; Liu, Guo-Fang; Hu, Yu-Kun; Prinzing, A.; Dong, Ming; Cornwell, W.K.

    2014-01-01

    Leaf litter decomposability is an important effect trait for ecosystem functioning. However, it is unknown how this effect trait evolved through plant history as a leaf 'afterlife' integrator of the evolution of multiple underlying traits upon which adaptive selection must have acted. Did

  3. Effects of different levels of decomposed poultry manure on yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... the Vegetable Evaluation and Research Station, Anse Boileau,. Mahe, Seychelles on soil classified as sandy to evaluate the effects of different levels of decomposed poultry manure on yield of musk- melon. The variety of muskmelon used was Hales Best. It is com- monly grown by farmers and shows good ...

  4. The plant cell wall--decomposing machinery underlies the functional diversity of forest fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel C. Eastwood; Dimitrios Floudas; Manfred Binder; Andrzej Majcherczyk; Patrick Schneider; Andrea Aerts; Fred O. Asiegbu; Scott E. Baker; Kerrie Barry; Mika Bendiksby; Melanie Blumentritt; Pedro M. Coutinho; Dan Cullen; Ronald P. de Vries; Allen Gathman; Barry Goodell; Bernard Henrissat; Katarina Ihrmark; Havard Kauserud; Annegret Kohler; Kurt LaButti; Alla Lapidus; Jose L. Lavin; Yong-Hwan Lee; Erika Lindquist; Walt Lilly; Susan Lucas; Emmanuelle Morin; Claude Murat; Jose A. Oguiza; Jongsun Park; Antonio G. Pisabarro; Robert Riley; Anna Rosling; Asaf Salamov; Olaf Schmidt; Jeremy Schmutz; Inger Skrede; Jan Stenlid; Ad Wiebenga; Xinfeng Xie; Ursula Kues; David S. Hibbett; Dirk Hoffmeister; Nils Hogberg; Francis Martin; Igor V. Grigoriev; Sarah C. Watkinson

    2011-01-01

    Brown rot decay removes cellulose and hemicelluloses from wood, residual lignin contributing up to 30% of forest soil carbon, and is derived from an ancestral white rot saprotrophy where both lignin and cellulose are decomposed. Comparative and functional genomics of the “dry rot” fungus Serpula lacrymans, derived from forest ancestors, demonstrated that the evolution...

  5. Novel view on predicting acute toxicity: Decomposing toxicity data in species vulnerability and chemical potency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, D.T.; Posthuma, L.; Zwart, D.D.; van de Meent, D.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical risk assessment usually applies empirical methods to predict toxicant effects on different species. We propose a more mechanism-oriented approach, and introduce a method to decompose toxicity data in a contribution from the chemical (potency) and from the exposed species (vulnerability). We

  6. Effects of decomposing Rhizophora apiculata leaves on larvae of the shrimp Penaeus monodon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roijackers, R.M.M.; Nghia, T.T.; Ut, V.N.; Scheffer, M.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effects of different concentrations of decomposing Rhizophora apiculata leaves and their leachates on larvae of the shrimp Penaeus monodon under laboratory conditions. Shrimp mortality was highly dependent on the concentration of oxygen in the water, which in turn was strongly

  7. FLORA: A framework for decomposing software architecture to introduce local recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sözer, Hasan; Tekinerdogan, B.; Aksit, Mehmet

    The decomposition of software architecture into modular units is usually driven by the required quality concerns. In this paper we focus on the impact of local recovery concern on the decomposition of the software system. For achieving local recovery, the system needs to be decomposed into separate

  8. Gaze Fluctuations Are Not Additively Decomposable: Reply to Bogartz and Staub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelty-Stephen, Damian G.; Mirman, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work interpreted single-lognormal fits to inter-gaze distance (i.e., "gaze steps") histograms as evidence of multiplicativity and hence interactions across scales in visual cognition. Bogartz and Staub (2012) proposed that gaze steps are additively decomposable into fixations and saccades, matching the histograms better and…

  9. Burn or rot: leaf traits explain why flammability and decomposability are decoupled across species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootemaat, S.; Wright, I.J.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Cornwell, W.K.

    2015-01-01

    In fireprone ecosystems, two important alternative fates for leaves are burning in a wildfire (when alive or as litter) or they get consumed (as litter) by decomposers. The influence of leaf traits on litter decomposition rate is reasonably well understood. In contrast, less is known about the

  10. An optimality framework to predict decomposer carbon-use efficiency trends along stoichiometric gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, S.; Capek, P.; Mooshammer, M.; Lindahl, B.; Richter, A.; Santruckova, H.

    2016-12-01

    Litter and soil organic matter decomposers feed on substrates with much wider C:N and C:P ratios then their own cellular composition, raising the question as to how they can adapt their metabolism to such a chronic stoichiometric imbalance. Here we propose an optimality framework to address this question, based on the hypothesis that carbon-use efficiency (CUE) can be optimally adjusted to maximize the decomposer growth rate. When nutrients are abundant, increasing CUE improves decomposer growth rate, at the expense of higher nutrient demand. However, when nutrients are scarce, increased nutrient demand driven by high CUE can trigger nutrient limitation and inhibit growth. An intermediate, `optimal' CUE ensures balanced growth at the verge of nutrient limitation. We derive a simple analytical equation that links this optimal CUE to organic substrate and decomposer biomass C:N and C:P ratios, and to the rate of inorganic nutrient supply (e.g., fertilization). This equation allows formulating two specific hypotheses: i) decomposer CUE should increase with widening organic substrate C:N and C:P ratios with a scaling exponent between 0 (with abundant inorganic nutrients) and -1 (scarce inorganic nutrients), and ii) CUE should increase with increasing inorganic nutrient supply, for a given organic substrate stoichiometry. These hypotheses are tested using a new database encompassing nearly 2000 estimates of CUE from about 160 studies, spanning aquatic and terrestrial decomposers of litter and more stabilized organic matter. The theoretical predictions are largely confirmed by our data analysis, except for the lack of fertilization effects on terrestrial decomposer CUE. While stoichiometric drivers constrain the general trends in CUE, the relatively large variability in CUE estimates suggests that other factors could be at play as well. For example, temperature is often cited as a potential driver of CUE, but we only found limited evidence of temperature effects

  11. Colimitation of decomposition by substrate and decomposers – a comparison of model formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reichstein

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM is limited by both the available substrate and the active decomposer community. The understanding of this colimitation strongly affects the understanding of feedbacks of soil carbon to global warming and its consequences. This study compares different formulations of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition. We compiled formulations from literature into groups according to the representation of decomposer biomass on the SOM decomposition rate a non-explicit (substrate only, b linear, and c non-linear. By varying the SOM decomposition equation in a basic simplified decomposition model, we analyzed the following questions. Is the priming effect represented? Under which conditions is SOM accumulation limited? And, how does steady state SOM stocks scale with amount of fresh organic matter (FOM litter inputs? While formulations (a did not represent the priming effect, with formulations (b steady state SOM stocks were independent of amount of litter input. Further, with several formulations (c there was an offset of SOM that was not decomposed when no fresh OM was supplied. The finding that a part of the SOM is not decomposed on exhaust of FOM supply supports the hypothesis of carbon stabilization in deep soil by the absence of energy-rich fresh organic matter. Different representations of colimitation of decomposition by substrate and decomposers in SOM decomposition models resulted in qualitatively different long-term behaviour. A collaborative effort by modellers and experimentalists is required to identify formulations that are more or less suitable to represent the most important drivers of long term carbon storage.

  12. Ionic conductivity, infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies of 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide ionic liquid with added iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerman, I.; Jovanovski, V.; Surca Vuk, A.; Hocevar, S.B.; Gaberscek, M. [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jesih, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Orel, B. [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: boris.orel@ki.si

    2008-01-01

    Polyiodides (I{sub x}{sup -}, x = 3 and 5) and 2I{sup -}...I{sub 2} adducts were established from the Raman spectra study of 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPIm{sup +}I{sub x}{sup -}; 1 {<=} x {<=} 5) ionic liquids containing various amounts of iodine (0 mol {<=} I{sub 2} {<=} 2 mol). The existence of I{sub 3}{sup -} and 2I{sup -}...I{sub 2} was established for 1 {<=} x {<=} 2.5, symmetric I{sub 3}{sup -} ions for x = 3, while linear and discrete I{sub 5}{sup -} was substantiated for 3 {<=} x {<=} 5. The presence of polyiodide species in MPIm{sup +}I{sub x}{sup -} (1 {<=} x {<=} 5) was correlated with an enhanced ionic conductivity, attributed to the established relay-type Grotthus mechanism. Two-step conductivity increase was also reflected in decrease of the hydrogen bond interactions between the C-H ring groups and polyiodides. While in the concentration range 1 {<=} x {<=} 3 (triiodides and tetraiodides) IR bands changed only slightly in intensity, in the concentration range x > 3 the C-H stretching bands (3040-3170 cm{sup -1}) split and the new band at 1585 cm{sup -1} appeared in the IR spectra beside the already existing Im{sup +} ring stretching mode at 1566 cm{sup -1}.

  13. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Nonthermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris Argyle; John Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Gui-Bing Zhao; Sanil John; Ji-Jun Zhang; Linna Wang

    2007-09-30

    The goal of this experimental project was to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a nonthermal plasma and to recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), but it was not achieved at the moderate pressure conditions used in this study. However, H{sub 2}S was successfully decomposed at energy efficiencies higher than any other reports for the high H{sub 2}S concentration and moderate pressures (corresponding to high reactor throughputs) used in this study.

  14. Silver (I-coordinated bis(trimethoxysilylpropylamine Polycondensate for Adsorptive Removal of Iodide from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver-coordinated bis(trimethoxysilylpropylamine polycondensate (TSPA-AgNO3 was prepared and used to adsorb iodide ions in aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies were performed to investigate the effects of pH, temperature and coexisting NaCl on adsorption behavior. The results show that TSPA-AgNO3 is easy to prepare and remarkably efficient in adsorbing iodide in water, especially in acidic solutions. Furthermore, increased temperature accelerated the adsorption, while coexisting NaCl inhibited the adsorption. TSPA-AgNO3 also proved to be chemically stable in simulated environmental situations, which reveals a promising potential for applying this method to the disposal of radioactive iodide in environment water.

  15. Polymer electrolytes from PEO and novel quaternary ammonium iodides for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, J.; Li, W.; Wang, X.; Lin, Y.; Xiao, X.; Fang, S. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Institute of Chemistry

    2003-07-15

    Polymer electrolytes were prepared by blending high molecular weight poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and a series of novel quaternary ammonium iodides, the polysiloxanes with oligo (oxyethylene) side chains and quaternary ammonium groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements ensured relatively low crystallinity when the quaternary ammonium iodides were incorporated into the PEO host. The ionic conductivity of these complexes was improved with the addition of plasticizers. The improvement in the ionic conductivity was determined by the polarity, viscosity and amounts of plasticizers. A plasticized electrolyte containing the novel quaternary ammonium iodide was successfully used in fabricating a quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell for first time. The fill factor and energy conversion efficiency of the cell were calculated to be 0.68 and 1.39%, respectively. (author)

  16. Simultaneous detection of iodine and iodide on boron doped diamond electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Stéphane; Comninellis, Christos; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2013-01-15

    Individual and simultaneous electrochemical detection of iodide and iodine has been performed via cyclic voltammetry on boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes in a 1M NaClO(4) (pH 8) solution, representative of typical environmental water conditions. It is feasible to compute accurate calibration curve for both compounds using cyclic voltammetry measurements by determining the peak current intensities as a function of the concentration. A lower detection limit of about 20 μM was obtained for iodide and 10 μM for iodine. Based on the comparison between the peak current intensities reported during the oxidation of KI, it is probable that iodide (I(-)) is first oxidized in a single step to yield iodine (I(2)). The latter is further oxidized to obtain IO(3)(-). This technique, however, did not allow for a reasonably accurate detection of iodate (IO(3)(-)) on a BDD electrode. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Versatile Hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen is probably the most intriguing ele- ment in the periodic table. Although it is only the seventh most abundant element on earth, it is the most abundant element in the uni- verse. It combines with almost all the ele- ments of the periodic table, except for a few transition elements, to form binary compounds of the type E.

  18. Chlorine-free pyrotechnics: copper(I) iodide as a "green" blue-light emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapötke, Thomas M; Rusan, Magdalena; Sabatini, Jesse J

    2014-09-01

    The generation of blue-light-emitting pyrotechnic formulations without the use of chlorine-containing compounds is reported. Suitable blue-light emission has been achieved through the generation of molecular emitting copper(I) iodide. The most optimal copper(I) iodide based blue-light-emitting formulation was found to have performances exceeding those of chlorine-containing compositions, and was found to be insensitive to various ignition stimuli. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. [The genetic action of ammonium molybdate and cadmium chloride and iodide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopikashvili, L V; Bobyleva, L A; Shapiro, A N

    1991-01-01

    Ammonium molybdate cadmium iodide and cadmium chloride have been studied in test for their genotoxic effect on induction of DNA-cellular bonding, extrasynthesis of DNA in spermatozoa of mice as well as in test to estimate a fertility criterion of Drosophila males. Ammonium molybdate, cadmium iodide and cadmium chloride are stated to be able to induce injuries of native DNA in test on induction of DNA-cellular bonding and DNA-sex cells of mice and Drosophila melanogaster in dominant-lethal test and in experiments on estimation of a fertility coefficient of Drosophila males, respectively.

  20. Samarium(II) iodide-mediated intramolecular conjugate additions of alpha,beta-unsaturated lactones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molander, Gary A; St Jean, David J

    2002-05-31

    Samarium(II) iodide, in the presence of catalytic amounts of nickel(II) iodide, has been used to promote intramolecular conjugate additions of alkyl halides onto alpha,beta-unsaturated lactones. This process has been shown to be applicable to a number of alpha,beta-unsaturated lactones, including tetrasubstituted olefins, and has been demonstrated to be quite general for the formation of saturated bicyclic and tricyclic lactones. The method presented herein provides a mild, efficient process to form structurally complex lactones from simple precursors.

  1. Tris(1,2-dimethoxyethane-κ2O,O′iodidocalcium iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siou-Wei Ou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [CaI(C4H10O23]I, the CaII atom is seven-coordinated by six O atoms from three 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME ligands and one iodide anion in a distorted pentagonal–bipyramidal geometry. The I atom and one of the O atoms from a DME ligand lie in the axial positions while the other O atoms lie in the basal plane. The other iodide anion is outside the complex cation.

  2. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hydrogen on various metals and the use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage are discussed. The mechanisms of, and differences between, hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen attack of ferritic steels are compared, common sources...

  3. (Asynchronous availabilities of N and P regulate the activity and structure of the microbial decomposer community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eFanin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P availability both control microbial decomposers and litter decomposition. However, these two key nutrients show distinct release patterns from decomposing litter and are unlikely available at the same time in most ecosystems. Little is known about how temporal differences in N and P availability affect decomposers and litter decomposition, which may be particularly critical for tropical rainforests growing on old and nutrient-impoverished soils. Here we used three chemically contrasted leaf litter substrates and cellulose paper as a widely accessible substrate containing no nutrients to test the effects of temporal differences in N and P availability in a microcosm experiment under fully controlled conditions. We measured substrate mass loss, microbial activity (by substrate induced respiration, SIR as well as microbial community structure (using phospholipid fatty acids, PLFAs in the litter and the underlying soil throughout the initial stages of decomposition. We generally found a stronger stimulation of substrate mass loss and microbial respiration, especially for cellulose, with simultaneous NP addition compared to a temporally separated N and P addition. However, litter types with a relatively high N to P availability responded more to initial P than N addition and vice versa. A third litter species showed no response to fertilization regardless of the sequence of addition, likely due to strong C limitation. Microbial community structure in the litter was strongly influenced by the fertilization sequence. In particular, the fungi to bacteria ratio increased following N addition alone, a shift that was reversed with complementary P addition. Opposite to the litter layer microorganisms, the soil microbial community structure was more strongly influenced by the identity of the decomposing substrate than by fertilization treatments, reinforcing the idea that C availability can strongly constrain decomposer

  4. Studying Equilibrium in the Chemical Reaction between Ferric and Iodide Ions in Solution Using a Simple and Inexpensive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaychuk, Pavel Anatolyevich; Kuvaeva, Alyona Olegovna

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment on the study of the chemical equilibrium based on the reaction between ferric and iodide ions in solution with the formation of ferrous ions, free iodine, and triiodide ions is developed. The total concentration of iodide and triiodide ions in the reaction mixture during the reaction is determined by the argentometric…

  5. The BLI-3/TSP-15/DOXA-1 dual oxidase complex is required for iodide toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaofa; Luo, Jintao; Li, Yu; Ma, Long

    2014-12-04

    Iodine is an essential trace element for life. Iodide deficiency can lead to defective biosynthesis of thyroid hormones and is a major cause of hypothyroidism and mental retardation. Excess iodide intake, however, has been linked to different thyroidal diseases. How excess iodide causes harmful effects is not well understood. Here, we found that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits developmental arrest and other pleiotropic defects when exposed to excess iodide. To identify the responsible genes, we performed a forward genetic screen and isolated 12 mutants that can survive in excess iodide. These mutants define at least four genes, two of which we identified as bli-3 and tsp-15. bli-3 encodes the C. elegans ortholog of the mammalian dual oxidase DUOX1 and tsp-15 encodes the tetraspanin protein TSP-15, which was previously shown to interact with BLI-3. The C. elegans dual oxidase maturation factor DOXA-1 is also required for the arresting effect of excess iodide. Finally, we detected a dramatically increased biogenesis of reactive oxygen species in animals treated with excess iodide, and this effect can be partially suppressed by bli-3 and tsp-15 mutations. We propose that the BLI-3/TSP-15/DOXA-1 dual oxidase complex is required for the toxic pleiotropic effects of excess iodide. Copyright © 2015 Xu et al.

  6. Hydrogenation of Amorphous and Crystalline RE-Ni Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    AOKI, Kiyoshi; Shirakawa, Kiwamu; MASUMOTO, Tsuyoshi

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous alloys with the combination of a rare earth metal(RE=Y, La, Ce, Pr and Sm) and nickel were prepared around the composition at an eutectic point by the melt-quenching technique. Amorphous Y-Ni and Sm-Ni alloys absorbed a large amount of hydrogen even in the amorphous state, while the the other alloys in La-Ni, Ce-Ni and Pr-Ni systems were decomposed to a mixture of crystalline phase and hydride during hydrogenation at 323 K. An amorphous SmNi_2 phase was also synthesized by reaction ...

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator Cycle with a Reciprocating Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C

    2002-06-11

    A four-chamber piston pump is powered by decomposed 85% hydrogen peroxide. The performance envelope of the evolving 400 gram pump has been expanded to 172 cc/s water flow at discharge pressures near 5 MPa. A gas generator cycle system using the pump has been tested under similar conditions of pressure and flow. The powerhead gas is derived from a small fraction of the pumped hydrogen peroxide, and the system starts from tank pressures as low as 0.2 MPa. The effects of steam condensation on performance have been evaluated.

  8. Root-induced decomposer growth and plant N uptake are not positively associated among a set of grassland plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saj, S.; Mikola, J.; Ekelund, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    It is known that plant species can induce development of different soil decomposer communities and that they differ in their influence on organic matter decomposition and N mineralization in soil. However, no study has so far assessed whether these two observations are related to each other. Based...... on the hypothesis that root-induced growth of soil decomposers leads to accelerated decomposition of SOM and increased plant N availability in soil, we predicted that (1) among a set of grassland plants the abundance of soil decomposers in the plant rhizosphere is positively associated with plant N uptake from soil...... organic matter. To test this, we established grassland microcosms consisting of two plant individuals, a natural soil decomposer community and 15N-labelled plant litter as organic N source, and compared the rhizosphere decomposer communities and litter-N uptake of a grass Holcus lanatus, an herb Plantago...

  9. Analysis of iodide and iodate in Lake Mead, Nevada using a headspace derivatization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, James W; Steinberg, Spencer M

    2010-02-01

    We report here a derivatization headspace method for the analysis of inorganic iodine in water. Samples from Lake Mead, the Las Vegas Wash, and from Las Vegas tap water were examined. Lake Mead and the Las Vegas Wash contained a mixture of both iodide and iodate. The average concentration of total inorganic iodine (TII) for Lake Mead was approximately 90 nM with an iodide-to-iodate ratio of approximately 1. The TII concentration (approximately 160 nM) and the ratio of iodide to iodate were higher for the Las Vegas Wash (approximately 2). The TII concentration for tap water was close to that of Lake Mead (approximately 90 nM); however, tap water contained no detectable iodide as a result of ozonation and chlorine treatment which converts all of the iodide to iodate.

  10. HOW DO DEGRADABLE/BIODEGRADABLE PLASTIC MATERIALS DECOMPOSE IN HOME COMPOSTING ENVIRONMENT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Vaverková

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides information about biodegradability of polymeric (biodegradable/degradable materials advertised as 100%-degradable or certified as compostable, which may be a part of biodegradable waste, in home composting conditions. It describes an experiment that took place in home wooden compost bins and contained 9 samples that are commonly available in retail chains in the Czech Republic and Poland. The experiment lasted for the period of 12 weeks. Based on the results thereof it can be concluded that polyethylene samples with additive (samples 2, 4, 7 have not decomposed, their color has not changed and that no degradation or physical changes have occurred. Samples 1, 3 and 5 certified as compostable have not decomposed. Sample 6 exhibited the highest decomposition rate. Samples 8, 9 (tableware exhibited high degree of decomposition. The main conclusion from this study is that degradable/biodegradable plastics or plastics certified as compostable are not suitable for home composting.

  11. Decomposing series-parallel graphs into paths of length 3 and triangles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    An old conjecture by Jünger, Reinelt and Pulleyblank states that every 2-edge-connected planar graph can be decomposed into paths of length 3 and triangles, provided its size is divisible by 3. We prove the conjecture for a class of planar graphs including all 2-edge-connected series-parallel gra......An old conjecture by Jünger, Reinelt and Pulleyblank states that every 2-edge-connected planar graph can be decomposed into paths of length 3 and triangles, provided its size is divisible by 3. We prove the conjecture for a class of planar graphs including all 2-edge-connected series......-parallel graphs. We also present a 2-edge-connected non-planar graph that can be embedded on the torus and admits no decomposition into paths of length 3 and triangles....

  12. Kill the song—steal the show: what does distinguish predicative metaphors from decomposable idioms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillies, Stéphanie; Declercq, Christelle

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the semantic processing difference between decomposable idioms and novel predicative metaphors. It was hypothesized that idiom comprehension results from the retrieval of a figurative meaning stored in memory, that metaphor comprehension requires a sense creation process and that this process difference affects the processing time of idiomatic and metaphoric expressions. In the first experiment, participants read sentences containing decomposable idioms, predicative metaphors or control expressions and performed a lexical decision task on figurative targets presented 0, 350, and 500 ms, or 750 after reading. Results demonstrated that idiomatic expressions were processed sooner than metaphoric ones. In the second experiment, participants were asked to assess the meaningfulness of idiomatic, metaphoric and literal expressions after reading a verb prime that belongs to the target phrase (identity priming). The results showed that verb identity priming was stronger for idiomatic expressions than for metaphor ones, indicating different mental representations.

  13. A domain decomposed finite element method for solving Darcian velocity in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yifan; Wu, Jichun; Xue, Yuqun; Xie, Chunhong; Ji, Haifeng

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a domain decomposed finite element method (DDFEM) for groundwater flow velocity simulation, which can effectively and efficiently deal with arbitrarily oriented or intersected material interfaces in heterogeneous porous media. The main idea of this problem is to employ domain decompose technique to break the velocity problem down to subproblems by material interfaces, thereby achieving high accuracy at interface nodes and improving the velocity computation efficiency. By solving the global flow field by FEM before velocity computation, this method can capture the global information of the whole study region so as to ensure the subproblem solution accuracy by Yeh's model. After one subproblem has been solved, the DDFEM employs refraction law to obtain the Dirichlet boundary velocities of the adjacent subdomains. Numerical examples have been done to demonstrate the applicability and accuracy of the proposed method. Comparison between the DDFEM and two classical methods shows that the DDFEM can indeed save much computational cost, while achieving high accuracy.

  14. Decomposed energy management of a multi-source fuel cell vehicle using Energetic Macroscopic Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Castaings, Ali; Lhomme, Walter; Trigui, Rochdi; Bouscayrol, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Energy management of multi-sources vehicles is a complex task. The higher the number of sources becomes, the higher the complexity is. In this study, a decomposed energy management strategy is used for a vehicle fed by three energy sources: a fuel-cell, a battery and Supercapacitors (SCs). The decomposition allows simplifying the synthesis of the Energy Management Strategy. A comparison with a fuel cell (alone) vehicle is performed by simulation. By imposing a constant current to the fuel-cel...

  15. Approach to calculate normal modes by decomposing the dyadic Green's function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenhai; Yue, Wencheng; Yao, Peijun; Lu, Yonghua; Liu, Wen

    2014-11-03

    Normal mode is a very fundamental notion in quantum and classical optics. In this paper, we present a method to calculate normal modes by decomposing dyadic Green's function, where the modes are excited by dipoles. The modes obtained by our method can be directly normalized and their degeneracies can be easily removed. This method can be applied to many theoretical descriptions of cavity electrodynamics and is of interest to nanophotonics.

  16. Mechanism and Application of Carbon Nanotube Sensors in SF6 Decomposed Production Detection: a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cui, Hao; Gui, Yingang; Tang, Ju

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have aroused extensive attentions as a new category of gas sensor materials owing to their outstanding performance for detecting specific gas among a variety of ones through diverse gas responses. This review summarizes the adsorption mechanism of CNTs and their properties related to the detection of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) decomposed gases that generated in gas insulation switchgear (GIS) of power system. Their performances as sensors of both experimental analysis a...

  17. Different pathways but same result? Comparing chemistry and biological effects of burned and decomposed litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Stefano; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; El-Gawad, Ahmed M. Abd; Sarker, Tushar Chandra; Cesarano, Gaspare; Saulino, Luigi; Saracino, Antonio; Castro Rego, Francisco

    2017-04-01

    Litter burning and biological decomposition are oxidative processes co-occurring in many terrestrial ecosystems, producing organic matter with different chemical properties and differently affecting plant growth and soil microbial activity. Here, we tested the chemical convergence hypothesis (i.e. materials with different initial chemistry tend to converge towards a common profile, with similar biological effects, as the oxidative process advances) for burning and decomposition. We compared the molecular composition of 63 organic materials - 7 litter types either fresh, decomposed for 30, 90, 180 days, or heated at 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 °C - as assessed by 13C NMR. We used litter water extracts (5% dw) as treatments in bioassays on plant (Lepidium sativum) and fungal (Aspergillus niger) growth, and a washed quartz sand amended with litter materials (0.5 % dw) to assess heterotrophic respiration by CO2 flux chamber. We observed different molecular variations for materials either burning (i.e. a sharp increase of aromatic C and a decrease of most other fractions above 200 °C) or decomposing (i.e. early increase of alkyl, methoxyl and N-alkyl C and decrease of O-alkyl and di-O-alkyl C fractions). Soil respiration and fungal growth progressively decreased with litter age and temperature. Plant growth underwent an inhibitory effect by untreated litter, more and less rapidly released over decomposing and burning materials, respectively. Correlation analysis between NMR and bioassay data showed that opposite responses for soil respiration and fungi, compared to plants, are related to essentially the same C molecular types. Our findings suggest a functional convergence of decomposed and burnt organic substrates, emerging from the balance between the bioavailability of labile C sources and the presence of recalcitrant and pyrogenic compounds, oppositely affecting different trophic levels.

  18. Laboratory Simulation of Rolling Contact Fatigue Cracks in Wind Turbine Bearings Using Hydrogen Infused 100Cr6 Bearing Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janakiraman, Shravan; West, Ole; Klit, Peder

    Premature fatigue failure is observed in rolling element bearings used in wind turbine components. It is believed that decomposed hydrogen from the lubricant diffuses into the surface of the bearing inner ring making it susceptible to failure. An attempt is made to simulate the formation of these......Premature fatigue failure is observed in rolling element bearings used in wind turbine components. It is believed that decomposed hydrogen from the lubricant diffuses into the surface of the bearing inner ring making it susceptible to failure. An attempt is made to simulate the formation...

  19. Studies on membrane acid electrolysis for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marco Antonio Oliveira da; Linardi, Marcelo; Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Celulas a Combustivel e Hidrogenio], Email: saliba@ipen.br

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen represents great opportunity to be a substitute for fossil fuels in the future. Water as a renewable source of hydrogen is of great interest, since it is abundant and can decompose, producing only pure H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. This decomposition of water can be accomplished by processes such as electrolysis, thermal decomposition and thermochemical cycles. The electrolysis by membrane has been proposed as a viable process for hydrogen production using thermal and electrical energy derived from nuclear energy or any renewable source like solar energy. In this work, within the context of optimization of the electrolysis process, it is intended to develop a mathematical model that can simulate and assist in parameterization of the electrolysis performed by polymer membrane electrolytic cell. The experimental process to produce hydrogen via the cell membrane, aims to optimize the amount of gas produced using renewable energy with noncarbogenic causing no harm by producing gases deleterious to the environment. (author)

  20. An initial study of insect succession on decomposing rabbit carrions in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabika, Nyasha; Masendu, Ron; Mawera, Gilbert

    2014-07-01

    To investigate insects visiting sun exposed and shaded decomposing rabbit carcasses and to establish the relationship between insects and carcasses which may be of forensic importance in Harare. Two rabbits weighing 2.3 kg and 2.5 kg were killed by sharp blows on the head. One was exposed to the sun while the other was placed under shade. The carcasses were allowed to decompose and insects were collected twice a day for the first week and thereafter once a day up to the end of the 7 weeks. Maggots were also collected from the decomposing carcasses and reared. Five dipteran families (Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Sarcophagidae, Phoridae and Drosophilidae) were identified from the sun-exposed carcass. Species collected included Lucilia cuprina (L. cuprina), Chrysomya albiceps (C. albiceps), Musca domestica, Sarcophaga sp. and Drosophila sp. Four families (Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Phoridae, Anthomyiidae) were identified from the shaded carcass. Representatives of these families included L. cuprina, C. albiceps, Musca domestica, and Hydrotaea sp. Three Coleopteran families (Histeridae, Cleridae and Dermestidae) were identified from both carcasses. The observed species were Saprinus sp., Necrobia rufipes and Dermestes sp. Formicidae (Hymenoptera) was represented by only one species (Pheidole sp.). Flies which emerged from the rearing units were L. cuprina, Lucilia sp., C. albiceps, Sarcophaga sp. and Sepsis sp.). Of the dipteran species collected during the study, L. cuprina and C. albiceps could be important for further forensic studies since they were collected from the carcasses and also observed from the rearing units.

  1. Estimating biological elementary flux modes that decompose a flux distribution by the minimal branching property

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Siu Hung Joshua; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2014-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Elementary flux mode (EFM) is a useful tool in constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks. The property that every flux distribution can be decomposed as a weighted sum of EFMs allows certain applications of EFMs to studying flux distributions. The existence of biologically infea...... knowledge, which facilitates interpretation. Comparison of the methods applied to a complex flux distribution in Lactococcus lactis similarly showed the advantages of MBD. The minimal branching EFM concept underlying MBD should be useful in other applications.......MOTIVATION: Elementary flux mode (EFM) is a useful tool in constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks. The property that every flux distribution can be decomposed as a weighted sum of EFMs allows certain applications of EFMs to studying flux distributions. The existence of biologically......, i.e. minimal branching. RESULTS: We developed the concept of minimal branching EFM and derived the minimal branching decomposition (MBD) to decompose flux distributions. Testing in the core Escherichia coli metabolic network indicated that MBD can distinguish branches at branch points and greatly...

  2. Ecotoxicological impact of the fungicide tebuconazole on an aquatic decomposer-detritivore system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrod, Jochen P; Bundschuh, Mirco; Feckler, Alexander; Englert, Dominic; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-12-01

    Leaf litter breakdown is a fundamental process in aquatic ecosystems that is realized by microbial decomposers and invertebrate detritivores. Although this process may be adversely affected by fungicides, among other factors, no test design exists to assess combined effects on such decomposer-detritivore systems. Hence, the present study assessed effects of the model fungicide tebuconazole (65 µg/L) on the conditioning of leaf material (by characterizing the associated microbial community) as well as the combined effects (i.e., direct toxicity and food quality-related effects (=indirect)) on the energy processing of the leaf-shredding amphipod Gammarus fossarum using a five-week semistatic test design. Gammarids exposed to tebuconazole produced significantly less feces (≈ 20%), which in turn significantly increased their assimilation (≈ 30%). Moreover, a significantly reduced lipid content (≈ 20%) indicated lower physiological fitness. The conditioning process was altered as well, which was indicated by a significantly reduced fungal biomass (≈ 40%) and sporulation (≈ 30%) associated with the leaf material. These results suggest that tebuconazole affects both components of the investigated decomposer-detritivore system. However, adverse effects on the level of detritivores cannot be explicitly attributed to direct or indirect pathways. Nevertheless, as the endpoints assessed are directly related to leaf litter breakdown and associated energy transfer processes, the protectiveness of environmental risk assessment for this ecosystem function may be more realistically assessed in future studies by using this or comparable test designs. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  3. Electrical double layer on silver iodide and overcharging in the presence of hydrolyzable cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyklema, J.; Golub, T.P.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies on the surface charge and electrokinetic charge on silver iodide as a function of the pAg in the presence of some monovalent and trivalent cations as the counterions were extended to include the influence of pH. The main reason for this study was to investigate the possible

  4. Calibration and Performance Testing of Sodium Iodide, NaI (Tl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performance testing of a newly acquired sodium iodide detector (NaI), (Tl)) at Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) was investigated by carrying out energy and efficiency calibration on the detector, as well as validation of its calibration. The energy and efficiency calibrations were performed using mixed ...

  5. The Reaction between Iron(II) Iodide and Potassium Dichromate(VI) in Acidified Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This "Science note" teaching lesson explores the possible reaction between the ions in a reaction mixture consisting of iron(II) iodide and potassium dichromate(VI) in acidified aqueous solution. The electrode potentials will be used to deduce any spontaneous reactions under standard thermodynamic conditions (298 K, 1 bar (approximately…

  6. Vapour-Deposited Cesium Lead Iodide Perovskites : Microsecond Charge Carrier Lifetimes and Enhanced Photovoltaic Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutter, E.M.; Sutton, Rebecca J.; Chandrashekar, Sanjana; Abdi-Jalebi, Mojtaba; Stranks, Samuel D.; Snaith, Henry J.; Savenije, T.J.

    2017-01-01

    Metal halide perovskites such as methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) are highly promising materials for photovoltaics. However, the relationship between the organic nature of the cation and the optoelectronic quality remains debated. In this work, we investigate the optoelectronic properties of

  7. Distribution of bromine in mixed iodide-bromide organolead perovskites and its impact on photovoltaic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Yang; Wang, Feng; Fang, Hong-Hua; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Xie, Fang-Yan; Zhao, Ni; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Mixed iodide-bromide (I-Br) organolead perovskites are of great interest for both single junction and tandem solar cells since the optical bandgap of the materials can be tuned by varying the bromine to iodine ratio. Yet, it remains unclear how bromine incorporation modifies the properties of the

  8. Regioselective conversion of primary alcohols into iodides in unprotected methyl furanosides and pyranosides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaanderup, Philip Robert; Poulsen, Carina Storm; Hyldtoft, Lene

    2002-01-01

    Two methods are described for the regioselective displacement of the primary hydroxy group in methyl glycosides with iodide. The first method is a modification of a literature procedure employing triphenylphosphine and iodine, where purification has been carried out on a reverse phase column...

  9. Relaxation of the silver/silver iodide electrode in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peverelli, K.J.

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this study is to detect and characterize relaxation processes on silver/silver iodide electrodes in aqueous electrolyte solution. The information obtained is to be used for an estimation of the consequences of similar processes on colloidal AgI

  10. Photoexcitation dynamics in solution-processed formamidinium lead iodide perovskite thin films for solar cell applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Feng; Adjokatse, Sampson; Zhao, Ni; Even, Jacky; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    Formamidinium lead iodide (FAPbI(3)) is a newly developed hybrid perovskite that potentially can be used in high-efficiency solution-processed solar cells. Here, the temperature-dependent dynamic optical properties of three types of FAPbI(3) perovskite films (fabricated using three different

  11. Effect of Excess Iodide Intake on Salivary Glands in a Swiss Albino Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Romina Ross

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is an important micronutrient required for nutrition. Excess iodine has adverse effects on thyroid, but there is not enough information regarding its effect on salivary glands. In addition to food and iodized salt, skin disinfectants and maternal nutritional supplements contain iodide, so its intake could be excessive during pregnancy, lactation, and infancy. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of excess iodide ingestion on salivary glands during mating, gestation, lactation, and postweaning period in mouse. During assay, mice were allocated into groups: control and treatment groups (received distilled water with NaI 1 mg/mL. Water intake, glandular weight, and histology were analyzed. Treatment groups showed an increase in glandular weight and a significantly (p < 0.05 higher water intake than control groups. Lymphocyte infiltration was observed in animals of treatment groups, while there was no infiltration in glandular sections of control groups. Results demonstrated that a negative relationship could exist between iodide excess and salivary glands. This work is novel evidence that high levels of iodide intake could induce mononuclear infiltration in salivary glands. These results should be considered, especially in pregnant/lactating women, to whom a higher iodine intake is usually recommended.

  12. Electrokinetic properties and conductance relaxation of polystyrene and silver iodide plugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoven, van den J.J.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis describes an experimental study on the electrokinetic and electrical properties of concentrated polystyrene and silver iodide dispersions. The purpose of the study is to obtain information on the structure of the electrical double layer at the solid-liquid interface. Special

  13. Iodide Residues in Milk Vary between Iodine-Based Teat Disinfectants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    French, Elizabeth A; Mukai, Motoko; Zurakowski, Michael; Rauch, Bradley; Gioia, Gloria; Hillebrandt, Joseph R; Henderson, Mark; Schukken, Ynte H; Hemling, Thomas C

    Majority of iodine found in dairy milk comes from the diet and teat disinfection products used during milking process. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of 4 iodine-based teat dips on milk iodide concentrations varying in iodine level (0.25% vs. 0.5%, w/w), normal low viscosity

  14. Growth and properties of lead iodide thin films by spin coating

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    solar cell [5], one of the highest solution-processed solar cells reported so far. Lead iodide exists in hexagonal crystalline structure having an intrinsic bandgap of .... According to spin coating theory [12], during spinning due to the centrifugal force most of the PbI2 solution is ejected from the substrate leaving a thin liquid film ...

  15. Real-Time Observation of Organic Cation Reorientation in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakulin, Artem A.; Selig, Oleg; Bakker, Huib J.; Rezus, Yves L. A.; Mueller, Christian; Glaser, Tobias; Lovrincic, Robert; Sun, Zhenhua; Chen, Zhuoying; Walsh, Aron; Frost, Jarvist M.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of a mobile and polarized organic moiety as a cation in 3D lead-iodide perovskites brings fascinating optoelectronic properties to these materials. The extent and the time scales of the orientational mobility of the organic cation and the molecular mechanism behind its motion remain

  16. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and potential regulators in normal, benign and malignant human breast tissue.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, James

    2011-01-01

    The presence, relevance and regulation of the Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS) in human mammary tissue remains poorly understood. This study aimed to quantify relative expression of NIS and putative regulators in human breast tissue, with relationships observed further investigated in vitro.

  17. A portable multi-syringe flow system for spectrofluorimetric determination of iodide in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzarin, Rejane M; Aguado, Enrique; Portugal, Lindomar A; Moreno, Daniel; Estela, José M; Rocha, Fábio R P; Cerdà, Victor

    2015-11-01

    A miniaturized analyzer encompassing a poly(methyl methacrylate) chip with integrated spectrofluorimetric detection and solutions propelling by a multi-syringe module is proposed. Iodide was determined through its catalytic effect on the reaction between Ce(IV) and As(III). Matrix isopotential synchronous fluorescence was explored to set the excitation and emission wavelengths. A two-level full factorial design allowed to evaluate the significance of variables (Ce(IV), As(III) and H2SO4 concentrations) and their interaction effects in the experimental domain. A Doehlert Matrix was applied to identify the critical values. The optimized procedure showed a linear response from 1 to 100 μg L(-1) (S=53.7+2.61C, in which S is the net fluorescence and C is iodide concentration in μg L(-1)). Detection limit, coefficient of variation (n=6) and sampling rate were estimated at 0.3 μg L(-1), 0.8% and 20 h(-1), respectively. Recoveries within 90-117% were estimated for iodide spiked to seawater samples. The proposed procedure stands out because of the portability, robustness, and simplicity for in-field analysis of iodide in seawater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Extension of HPM Pulse Duration by Cesium Iodide Cathodes in Crossed Field Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benford, James

    1998-01-01

    .... The introduction of cathodes made from Cesium Iodide-coated (CsI) carbon fiber has shown plasma speeds reduced by factors of a few from uncoated carbon fiber, but previous work was at low diode fields of a few 10's of kV/cm...

  19. Experimental study on iodine chemistry (EXSI) - Containment experiments with methyl iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, J.; Ekberg, C. (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A. (VTT, Espoo (Finland)); Glaenneskog, H. (Vattenfall Power Consultant, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2011-05-15

    An experimental study on radiolytic decomposition of methyl iodide was conducted in co-operation between VTT and Chalmers University of Technology as a part of the NKS-R programs. In year 2008 the NROI project, a Nordic collaboration studying iodine chemistry in the containment, was started. During year 2008 (NROI-1) the radiolytic oxidation of elemental iodine was investigated and during 2009 (NROI-2), the radiolytic oxidation of organic iodine was studied. This project (NROI-3) is a continuation of the investigation of the oxidation of organic iodine. The project has been divided into two parts. 1. The aims of the first part were to investigate the effect of ozone and UV-radiation, in dry and humid conditions, on methyl iodide. 2. The second project was about gamma radiation (approx20 kGy/h) and methyl iodide in dry and humid conditions. 1. Experimental results showed that the methyl iodide concentration in the facility was reduced with increasing temperature and increasing UV-radiation intensity. Similar behaviour occurred when ozone was present in the system. Formed organic gas species during the decomposition of methyl iodide was mainly formaldehyde and methanol. The particle formation was instant and extensive when methyl iodide was exposed to ozone and/or radiation at all temperatures. The size of the formed primary particles was about 10 nm and the size of secondary particles was between 50-200 nm. From the SEM-EDX analyses of the particles, the conclusion was drawn that these were some kind of iodine oxides (I{sub xO{sub y}). However, the correct speciation of the formed particles was difficult to obtain because the particles melted and fused together under the electron beam. 2. The results from this sub-project are more inconsistent and hard to interpret. The particle formation was significant lesser than corresponding experiments when ozone/UV-radiation was used instead of gamma radiation. The transport of gaseous methyl iodide through the facility was

  20. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  1. Iodine from bacterial iodide oxidization by Roseovarius spp. inhibits the growth of other bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Lim, Choon-Ping; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Tanji, Yasunori

    2013-03-01

    Microbial activities in brine, seawater, or estuarine mud are involved in iodine cycle. To investigate the effects of the microbiologically induced iodine on other bacteria in the environment, a total of 13 bacteria that potentially participated in the iodide-oxidizing process were isolated from water or biofilm at a location containing 131 μg ml(-1) iodide. Three distinct strains were further identified as Roseovarius spp. based on 16 S rRNA gene sequences after being distinguished by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Morphological characteristics of these three Roseovarius spp. varied considerably across and within strains. Iodine production increased with Roseovarius spp. growth when cultured in Marine Broth with 200 μg ml(-1) iodide (I(-)). When 10(6) CFU/ml Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus pumilus were exposed to various concentrations of molecular iodine (I(2)), the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were 0.5, 1.0, and 1.0 μg ml(-1), respectively. However, fivefold increases in the MICs for Roseovarius spp. were obtained. In co-cultured Roseovarius sp. IOB-7 and E. coli in Marine Broth containing iodide (I(-)), the molecular iodine concentration was estimated to be 0.76 μg ml(-1) after 24 h and less than 50 % of E. coli was viable compared to that co-cultured without iodide. The growth inhibition of E. coli was also observed in co-cultures with the two other Roseovarius spp. strains when the molecular iodine concentration was assumed to be 0.52 μg ml(-1).

  2. Composite material systems for hydrogen management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangborn, R. N.; Queeney, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The task of managing hydrogen entry into elevated temperature structural materials employed in turbomachinery is a critical engineering area for propulsion systems employing hydrogen or decomposable hydrocarbons as fuel. Extant structural materials, such as the Inconel series, are embrittled by the ingress of hydrogen in service, leading to a loss of endurance and general deterioration of load-bearing dependability. Although the development of hydrogen-insensitive material systems is an obvious engineering option, to date insensitive systems cannot meet the time-temperature-loading service extremes encountered. A short-term approach that is both feasible and technologically sound is the development and employment of hydrogen barrier coatings. The present project is concerned with developing, analyzing, and physically testing laminate composite hydrogen barrier systems, employing Inconel 718 as the structural material to be protected. Barrier systems will include all metallic, metallic-to-ceramic, and, eventually, metallic/ceramic composites as the lamellae. Since space propulsion implies repetitive engine firings without earth-based inspection and repair, coating durability will be closely examined, and testing regimes will include repetitive thermal cycling to simulate damage accumulation. The target accomplishments include: generation of actual hydrogen permeation data for metallic, ceramic-metallic, and hybrid metallic/ceramic composition barrier systems, practically none of which is currently extant; definition of physical damage modes imported to barrier systems due to thermal cycling, both transient temperature profiles and steady-state thermal mismatch stress states being examined as sources of damage; and computational models that incorporate general laminate schemes as described above, including manufacturing realities such as porosity, and whatever defects are introduced through service and characterized during the experimental programs.

  3. Domination of thermodynamically demanding oxidative processes in reaction of iodine with hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanović, Kristina Z.; Bubanja, Itana Nuša M.; Stanisavljev, Dragomir R.

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the degree of isothermal iodine conversion to iodate as one of the most intriguing steps of the Bray-Liebhafsky oscillator. The amount of the produced iodate, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, was determined by the stopped-flow titration with iodide ions. From five different experiments, high degree of iodine conversion to iodate (95.4 ± 0.6)% is obtained. It confirmed that, after the induction period of spontaneous hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition, reaction dynamics is dominated by thermodynamically demanding oxidative processes. Isothermal change of the reaction dynamics introduces some specific energy redistribution as a possible initiator of oxidizing radicals.

  4. Hydrogen reduction of molybdenum oxide at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgschulte, Andreas; Sambalova, Olga; Delmelle, Renaud; Jenatsch, Sandra; Hany, Roland; Nüesch, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The color changes in chemo- and photochromic MoO3 used in sensors and in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells can be traced back to intercalated hydrogen atoms stemming either from gaseous hydrogen dissociated at catalytic surfaces or from photocatalytically split water. In applications, the reversibility of the process is of utmost importance, and deterioration of the layer functionality due to side reactions is a critical challenge. Using the membrane approach for high-pressure XPS, we are able to follow the hydrogen reduction of MoO3 thin films using atomic hydrogen in a water free environment. Hydrogen intercalates into MoO3 forming HxMoO3, which slowly decomposes into MoO2 +1/2 H2O as evidenced by the fast reduction of Mo6+ into Mo5+ states and slow but simultaneous formation of Mo4+ states. We measure the decrease in oxygen/metal ratio in the thin film explaining the limited reversibility of hydrogen sensors based on transition metal oxides. The results also enlighten the recent debate on the mechanism of the high temperature hydrogen reduction of bulk molybdenum oxide. The specific mechanism is a result of the balance between the reduction by hydrogen and water formation, desorption of water as well as nucleation and growth of new phases.

  5. Synergistic Effect of Azadirachta Indica Extract and Iodide Ions on the Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminium in Acid Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arab, S. T.; Al- Turkustani, A. M.; Al- Dhahiri, R. H. [King Abd El- Aziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-06-15

    The synergistic action caused by iodide ions on the corrosion inhibition of aluminium (Al) in 0.5 M HCl in the presence of Azadirachta Indica (AZI) plant extract has been investigated using potintiodynamic polarization and impedance techniques. It is found that AZI extract inhibits the corrosion of aluminium in 0.5 M HCl. The inhibition efficiency increases with the increase in AZI extract concentration, until 24% v/v of AZI extract, then Inh.% is decreased with father increase in AZI extract concentration. The adsorption of this extract in the studied concentration is found to obey Frewendlish adsorption isotherm. The addition of iodide ions enhances the inhibition efficiency to a considerable extent. The increase in Inh.% values in presence of fixed concentration of iodide ions indicates that AZI extract forms an insoluble complex at lower AZI extract concentrations by undergoing a joint adsorption. But at higher concentrations of AZI extract, competitive adsorption is found between iodide ions and the formed complex leading to less Inh.%. The Inh.% decreased in presence of iodide ions with AZI extract than in presence of AZI extract alone at all studied iodide concentrations. The synergism parameter S {sub θ} is defined and calculated from surface coverage values. This parameter in the case of AZI extract is found to be more than unity, indicating that the enhanced inhibition efficiency caused by the addition of iodide ions.

  6. Determination of iodide, iodate and organo-iodine in waters with a new total organic iodine measurement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tingting; Zhang, Xiangru

    2013-11-01

    The dissolved iodine species that dominate aquatic systems are iodide, iodate and organo-iodine. These species may undergo transformation to one another and thus affect the formation of iodinated disinfection byproducts during disinfection of drinking waters or wastewater effluents. In this study, a fast, sensitive and accurate method for determining these iodine species in waters was developed by derivatizing iodide and iodate to organic iodine and measuring organic iodine with a total organic iodine (TOI) measurement approach. Within this method, organo-iodine was determined directly by TOI measurement; iodide was oxidized by monochloramine to hypoiodous acid and then hypoiodous acid reacted with phenol to form organic iodine, which was determined by TOI measurement; iodate was reduced by ascorbic acid to iodide and then determined as iodide. The quantitation limit of organo-iodine or sum of organo-iodine and iodide or sum of organo-iodine, iodide and iodate was 5 μg/L as I for a 40 mL water sample (or 2.5 μg/L as I for an 80 mL water sample, or 1.25 μg/L as I for a 160 mL water sample). This method was successfully applied to the determination of iodide, iodate and organo-iodine in a variety of water samples, including tap water, seawater, urine and wastewater. The recoveries of iodide, iodate and organo-iodine were 91-109%, 90-108% and 91-108%, respectively. The concentrations and distributions of iodine species in different water samples were obtained and compared. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous reductive dissolution of iron oxide and oxidation of iodide in ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kitae; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-04-01

    Iron is an important trace element controlling the metabolism and growth of all kinds of living species. Especially, the bio-availability of iron has been regarded as the limiting factor for primary productivity in HNLC (High Nutrients Low Chlorophyll) regions including Southern ocean. The dissolution of iron oxide provides enhanced the bio-availability of iron for phytoplankton growth. The halogen chemistry in polar regions is related to various important environmental processes such as Antarctic Ozone Depletion Event(ODE), mercury depletion, oxidative processes in atmosphere, and the formation of CCN (Cloud Condensation Nuclei). In this study, we investigated the reductive dissolution of iron oxide particles to produce Fe(II)aq and simultaneous oxidation of I- (iodide) to I3- (tri-iodide) in ice phase under UV irradiation or dark condition. The reductive generation of Fe(II)aq from iron oxides and oxidation of iodide to I3- were negligible in water but significantly accelerated in frozen solution both in the presence and absence of light. The enhanced reductive generation of Fe(II)aq and oxidative formation of I3- in ice were observed regardless of the various types of iron oxides [hematite (α-Fe2O3) maghemite (γ- Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and, magnetite (Fe3O4)]. We explained that the enhanced redox production of Fe(II)aq and I3- in ice is contributed to the freeze concentration of iodides, protons, and dissolved oxygen in the unfrozen solution. When the concentration of both iodides and protons were raised by 10-fold each, the formation of Fe(II)aq in water under UV irradiation was approached to those in ice. The outdoor experiments were carried out under ambient solar radiation in winter season of mid-latitude (Pohang, Korea: 36°N latitude) and also confirmed that the production of Fe(II)aq via reductive dissolution of iron oxide and I3- generation via I- oxidation were enhanced in frozen solution. These results suggest that iron

  8. Experimental study on iodine chemistry (EXSI) - Containment experiments with methyl iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, J.; Glaenneskog, H.; Ekberg, C. (Chalmers Univ. of Technology (Sweden)); Kaerkelae, T.; Auvinen, A. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2010-05-15

    An experimental study on radiolytic decomposition of methyl iodide was conducted in co-operation between VTT and Chalmers University of Technology as a part of the NKS-R programs. The behaviour of iodine during a severe accident has been studied in several experimental programs, ranging from the large-scale PHEBUS FP tests and intermediate-scale ThAI tests to numerous separate effect studies. In year 2008 the NROI project, a Nordic collaboration studying iodine chemistry in the containment was started. During 2009, oxidation of iodine, especially organic iodine, was studied within the NROI project. The chemistry of organic iodine in the gas phase is still one of the greatest remaining uncertainties concerning iodine behaviour during a severe accident. During the first year of the NROI project the oxidation of elemental iodine, I2, with ozone and UV-light was investigated. In this study organic iodide, in this case methyl iodide, was investigated in similar conditions as in the NROI-1 project. The experimental facility applied in this study is based on the sampling system built at VTT for the ISTP project CHIP conducted by IRSN. The experimental facility and the measuring technology are sophisticated and unique in the area of nuclear research as well as in the field of aerosol science. Experimental results showed that the methyl iodide concentration in the facility was reduced with increasing temperature and increasing UVC intensity. Similar behaviour occurred when ozone was present in the system. Formed organic gas species during the decomposition of methyl iodide was mainly formaldehyde and methanol. Instant and extensive particle formation occurred when methyl iodide was transported through a UVC radiation field and/or when ozone was present. The size of the formed primary particles was about 10 nm and the size of secondary particles was between 50-150 nm. From the SEM-EDX analyses of the particles, the conclusion was drawn that these were some kind of iodine

  9. In situ investigation of the formation and metastability of formamidinium lead tri-iodide perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Wozny, Sarah; Holesinger, Terry G.; Aoki, Toshihiro; Patel, Maulik K.; Yang, Mengjin; Berry, Joseph J.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Zhou, Weilie; Zhu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic perovskites have emerged as an important class of next generation solar cells due to their remarkably low cost, band gap, and sub-900 nm absorption onset. Here, we show a series of in situ observations inside electron microscopes and X-ray diffractometers under device-relevant synthesis conditions focused on revealing the crystallization process of the formamidinium lead-triiodide perovskite at the optimum temperature of 175 degrees C. Direct in situ observations of the structure and chemistry over relevant spatial, temporal, and temperature scales enabled identification of key perovskite formation and degradation mechanisms related to grain evolution and interface chemistry. The lead composition was observed to fluctuate at grain boundaries, indicating a mobile lead-containing species, a process found to be partially reversible at a key temperature of 175 degrees C. Using low energy electron microscopy and valence electron energy loss spectroscopy, lead is found to be bonded in the grain interior with iodine in a tetrahedral configuration. At the grain boundaries, the binding energy associated with lead is consequently shifted by nearly 2 eV and a doublet peak is resolved due presumably to a greater degree of hybridization and the potential for several different bonding configurations. At the grain boundaries there is adsorption of hydrogen and OH- ions as a result of residual water vapor trapped as a non-crystalline material during formation. Insights into the relevant formation and decomposition reactions of formamidinium lead iodide at low to high temperatures, observed metastabilities, and relationship with the photovoltaic performance were obtained and used to optimize device processing resulting in conversion efficiencies of up to 17.09% within the stability period of the devices.

  10. Decomposing certain equipartite graphs into sunlet graphs of length 2p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolape D. Akwu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For any integer r≥3, we define the sunlet graph of order 2r, denoted L2r, as the graph consisting of a cycle of length r together with r pendant vertices, each adjacent to exactly one vertex of the cycle. In this paper, we give necessary and sufficient conditions for decomposing the lexicographic product of the complete graph and the complete graph minus a 1-factor, with complement of the complete graph Km, (that is Kn⊗K̄m and Kn−I⊗K̄m, respectively into sunlet graphs of order twice a prime.

  11. Design of the Decomposed State Model of an One-Dimensional Piecewise-Linear System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Kolka

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available Present paper deals with the problem of automatic design of the implicit state model (in its decomposed parametric form of any one-dimensional piecewise-linear (PWL system. This model consists of the internal and the external parts which provides the possibility to find the model parameters, i.e. to solve separately the two main problems of an one-dimensional PWL model design: (i existence of the individual breakpoints of the resultant PWL characteristic (determined by the internal block; (ii setting of the breakpoint co-ordinates (determined by the external block.

  12. Hydrogen production through sorption enhanced reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reijers, H.T.J.; Roskam-Bakker, D.F.; Dijkstra, J.W.; Smidt, R.P. de; Groot, A. de; Van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands, ECN, Petten (Netherlands)

    2003-09-01

    Introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier offers an opportunity to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission from diffuse sources, like vehicles and newly built residential districts. In the long term, it is expected that a hydrogen infrastructure will contribute to CO{sub 2} reduction. In the short term, hydrogen will likely play a role where the application, especially fuel cells, asks for hydrogen. These applications include the transport sector and small-scale combined heat and power. On-site hydrogen production on a gas station or in a residential district requires an average hydrogen production rate between 1000 and 4000 Nm{sup 3}/hour. At the moment, hydrogen is produced industrially in large-scale steam-reformers at rates in the order of 100,000 Nm{sup 3}/hour and at high pressures (20 - 40 bar) and high temperatures (800 - 950 degrees C). To withstand these extreme conditions, expensive materials are required. Besides, a considerable amount of export steam is produced, which cannot be used in the small-scale hydrogen energy systems mentioned before. So there is a need for hydrogen production units operating at milder conditions, while maintaining a high system efficiency. One of the technologies currently investigated at ECN for this purpose is sorption enhanced reforming (SER). Here the methane steam reforming process is conducted in the presence of a CO{sub 2} sorbent. By removing reaction product CO{sub 2}, the equilibrium is shifted to the product side, yielding a relatively pure hydrogen stream. The system is operated periodically in two modes: an sorption cycle during which natural gas and steam are fed to the SER reactor, and a desorption cycle in which the sorbent is regenerated. The CO{sub 2} that is released during regeneration could possibly be used for CO{sub 2} sequestration. The CO{sub 2} sorbent should fulfill the following requirements: high CO{sub 2} uptake, rapid kinetics, chemical stability at high H{sub 2}O concentrations and low costs. A

  13. Saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima Invasion Alters Decomposer Fauna and Plant Litter Decomposition in a Temperate Xerophytic Deciduous Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Camilo Bedano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant invasions may alter the soil system by changing litter quality and quantity, thereby affecting soil community and ecosystem processes. We investigated the effect of Tamarix ramosissima invasion on the decomposer fauna and litter decomposition process, as well as the importance of litter quality in decomposition. Litter decomposition and decomposer communities were evaluated in two monospecific saltcedar forests and two native forests in Argentina, in litterbags containing either local litter (saltcedar or dominant native species or a control litter. Saltcedar invasion produced an increase in Collembola, Acari, and total mesofauna abundance, regardless of the litter type. Control litter decomposition was higher in the native forest than in the saltcedar forest, showing that increased abundance of decomposer fauna does not necessarily accelerate decomposition processes. Local litter decomposition was not different between forests, suggesting that decomposer fauna of both ecosystems is adapted to efficiently decompose the autochthonous litter. Our results suggest that the introduction of a resource with higher quality than the local one has a negative effect on decomposition in both ecosystems, which is more pronounced in the invaded forest than in the native forest. This finding stresses the low plasticity of saltcedar decomposer community to adapt to short-term environmental changes.

  14. Efficacy of propidium iodide and FUN-1 stains for assessing viability in basidiospores of Rhizopogon roseolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Miranda, Elena; Majada, Juan; Casares, Abelardo

    2017-01-01

    The use of spores in applications of ectomycorrhizal fungi requires information regarding spore viability and germination, especially in genera such as Rhizopogon with high rates of spore dormancy. The authors developed a protocol to assess spore viability of Rhizopogon roseolus using four vital stains to quantify spore viability and germination and to optimize storage procedures. They showed that propidium iodide is an excellent stain for quantifying nonviable spores. Observing red fluorescent intravacuolar structures following staining with 2-chloro-4-(2,3-dihydro-3-methyl-(benzo-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)-methylidene)-1-phenylquinolinium iodide (FUN-1) can help identify viable spores that are activated. At 6 mo and 1 y, the spores kept in a water suspension survived better than those left within intact, dry gasterocarps. Our work highlights the importance of temperature, nutrients, and vitamins for maturation and germination of spores of R. roseolus during 1 y of storage.

  15. Gap energy studied by optical transmittance in lead iodide monocrystals grown by Bridgman's Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veissid N.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The bandgap energy as a function of temperature has been determined for lead iodide. The monocrystal was obtained in a vacuum sealed quartz ampoule inside a vertical furnace by Bridgman's method. The optical transmittance measurement enables to evaluate the values of Eg. By a fitting procedure of Eg as a function of temperature is possible to extract the parameters that govern its behavior. The variation of Eg with temperature was determined as: Eg(T = Eg(0 - aT2/(a + T, with: Eg(0 = (2.435 ± 0.008 eV, a = (8.7 ± 1.3 x 10-4 eV/K and a = (192 ± 90 K. The bandgap energy of lead iodide at room temperature was found to be 2.277 ± 0.007 eV.

  16. Induction of iodide uptake in transformed thyrocytes: a compound screening in cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froehlich, Eleonore [University of Tuebingen, Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism, Nephrology and Clinical Chemistry, Internal Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany); Brossart, Peter [University of Tuebingen, Department of Haematology, Oncology, Immunology and Rheumatology, Internal Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany); Wahl, Richard [University of Tuebingen, Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism, Nephrology and Clinical Chemistry, Internal Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany); Department IV, Internal Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    Retinoic acid presently is the most advanced agent able to improve the efficacy of radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma. In order to identify compounds with higher efficacy a panel of pharmacologically well-characterized compounds with antitumour action in solid cancer cell lines was screened. The effects of the compounds on iodide uptake, cell number, proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated. In general, compounds were more effective in cell lines derived from more aggressive tumours. The effectiveness in terms of number of responsive cell lines and maximal increase in iodide uptake achieved decreased in the order: APHA > valproic acid {approx} sirolimus {approx} arsenic trioxide > retinoic acid {approx} lovastatin > apicidine {approx} azacytidine {approx} retinol {approx} rosiglitazone {approx} bortezomib. We hypothesize that testing of cells from primary tumours or metastases in patients may be a way to identify compounds with optimum therapeutic efficacy for individualized treatment. (orig.)

  17. Synthesis, spectral, and anti-microbial studies of thioiminium iodides and amine hydrochlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Sebastian; Renaud, Philippe; Nallu, Maruthai

    2014-01-01

    To avoid the undesired deprotonation during the addition of organolithium and organomagnesium reagents to ketones, the thioiminium salts, easily prepared from lactams and amides are converted into 2,2-disubstituted and 2-monosubstituted amines by reaction with simple nucleophiles such as organocerium and organocopper reagents. The reaction of thioiminium iodides with organocerium reagents derived by transmetalation of corresponding lithium reagents with anhydrous cerium(III) chloride has been investigated. These thioiminium iodides act as good electrophiles and accept alkylceriums towards bisaddition. The newly synthesized amines have been characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, IR and mass spectra. The amines have been converted into their hydrochlorides and characterized by COSY. These hydrochlorides have been subjected to antimicrobial screening with clinically isolated microorganisms, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Candida albicans. The hydrochlorides show quite good activity against these bacteria and fungus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A SCREENING APPROACH TO DETECT THYROID DISRUPTING CHEMICALS THAT INHIBIT THE HUMAN SODIUM IODIDE SYMPORTER (NIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data pertaining to a NIS-expressing cell line, hNIS-HEK293T-EPA, and its screening capabilities for determining inhibitors of NIS-mediated iodide uptake. This...

  19. Cooperative effect of silver in copper-catalyzed trifluoromethylation of aryl iodides using Me3SiCF3

    KAUST Repository

    Weng, Zhiqiang

    2011-06-13

    An effective model of cooperative effect of silver for the coppercatalyzed trifluoromethylation of activated and unactivated aryl iodides to trifluoromethylated arenes using Me3SiCF3 was achieved with a broad substrate scope. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Kinetic-Spectrophotometric Determination of Iodide Based on its Inhibitory Effect on the Decolorization Reaction of Methyl Orange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyhaneh Rahnama Kozani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, sensitive, rapid and reliable method has been developed for spectrophotometric determination of iodide based on its inhibition effect on the redox reaction between bromate and hydrochloric acid. The decolorization of methyl orange by the reaction products was used to monitor the reaction spectrophotometrically at 525 nm. The variables affecting the rate of the reaction were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection is 1.5 × 10-7 mol L-1 and calibration range is 2.0 × 10-6–1.3 × 10-4 mol L-1 of iodide. The linearity range of the calibration graph is depends on bromate concentration. The relative standard deviation of ten-replication determination of 8.2 × 10-5 mol L-1 iodide was 1.4%. The proposed method was applied to the determination of iodide in natural water samples with satisfactory results.

  1. A Microscale Approach to Chemical Kinetics in the General Chemistry Laboratory: The Potassium Iodide Hydrogen Peroxide Iodine-Clock Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattsangi, Prem D.

    2011-01-01

    A microscale laboratory for teaching chemical kinetics utilizing the iodine clock reaction is described. Plastic pipets, 3 mL volume, are used to store and deliver precise drops of reagents and the reaction is run in a 24 well plastic tray using a total 60 drops of reagents. With this procedure, students determine the rate of reaction and the…

  2. Studies on the Mechanisms of Methyl Iodide Adsorption and Iodine Retention on Silver-Mordenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenoff, Tina Maria [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Soelberg, Nick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Silver-containing mordenite (MOR) is a longstanding benchmark for radioiodine capture, reacting with molecular iodine (I2) to form AgI. However the mechanisms for organoiodine capture are not well understood. Here we investigate the capture of methyl iodide from complex mixed gas streams by combining chemical analysis of the effluent gas stream with in depth characterization of the recovered sorbent.

  3. Methyl Iodide Oxidative Addition to Rhodium(I) Complexes: a DFT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    Isomerization via an acyl intermediate leads to a second octahedral alkyl product with the PPh3 group and the iodide above ... erties of the different ligands to determine the relative rates of the two most important steps of the ...... V.G. Zakrzewski, S. Dapprich, A.D. Daniels, M.C. Strain, O. Farkas,. D.K. Malick, A.D. Rabuck, ...

  4. Samarium(II) iodide-mediated reductive annulations of ketones bearing a distal vinyl epoxide moiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molander, G.A.; Shakya, S.R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-08-23

    It was found that samarium (II) iodide promotes the intramolecular coupling of ketones with distal epoxy olefins while in the presence of hexamethylphosphoramide (HPMA). A number of epoxide compounds (1 a-k) fragment to form carbocycles with allylic alcohol side chains with high diastereoselectivity (2 a-k). Substituting tetramethylguanidine for HPMA reduces the diastereoselectivity. Adding Pd(0) as a catalyst reverses the diastereoselective sense. 40 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Palladium(II)-catalyzed regioselective arylation of naphthylamides with aryl iodides utilizing a quinolinamide bidentate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lehao; Li, Qian; Wang, Chen; Qi, Chenze

    2013-04-05

    A palladium(II)-catalyzed quinolinamide-directed 8-arylation of 1-naphthylamides with aryl iodides is reported. The bidentate directing group (quinolinamide) proved to be crucial for a highly regioselective transformation. In addition, the amide directing group can be easily hydrolyzed under basic conditions to offer a range of 8-aryl-1-naphthylamine derivatives. The theoretical calculations suggest that the C-H arylation reaction proceeds through a sequential C-H activation/oxidative addition pathway.

  6. ' FLUORIDE (STFZ) AND Bl'§RYi_.§?.ll't/I IODIDE (Belg) THIN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ohm-cm)“. ', film thickness 0.013 to 0. ()74pm and band gap 2.65 to 2. 75 j; 0. 05eV. For berylium iodide films the absorbance ranges from 0.204 to 0.302, transmittance 0.499 to 0.625, refractive index 2.41 to. 2.61, electrical conductivity 0.62 to 0.

  7. Self-assembly of Silver Nanoparticles and Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes on Decomposed GaAs Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harthi, S. H.; Revathy, K. P.; Gard, F.; Mesli, A.; George, A. K.; Bartringer, J.; Mamor, M.; Unnikrishnan, N. V.

    2010-11-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy complemented by Photoluminescence and Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction has been used to study self-assembly of silver nanoparticles and multiwall carbon nanotubes on thermally decomposed GaAs (100) surfaces. It has been shown that the decomposition leads to the formation of arsenic plate-like structures. Multiwall carbon nanotubes spin coated on the decomposed surfaces were mostly found to occupy the depressions between the plates and formed boundaries. While direct casting of silver nanoparticles is found to induce microdroplets. Annealing at 300°C was observed to contract the microdroplets into combined structures consisting of silver spots surrounded by silver rings. Moreover, casting of colloidal suspension consists of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silver nanoparticles is observed to cause the formation of 2D compact islands. Depending on the multiwall carbon nanotubes diameter, GaAs/multiwall carbon nanotubes/silver system exhibited photoluminescence with varying strength. Such assembly provides a possible bottom up facile way of roughness controlled fabrication of plasmonic systems on GaAs surfaces.

  8. Experimentally simulated global warming and nitrogen enrichment effects on microbial litter decomposers in a marsh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Sabine; Gessner, Mark O

    2011-02-01

    Atmospheric warming and increased nitrogen deposition can lead to changes of microbial communities with possible consequences for biogeochemical processes. We used an enclosure facility in a freshwater marsh to assess the effects on microbes associated with decomposing plant litter under conditions of simulated climate warming and pulsed nitrogen supply. Standard batches of litter were placed in coarse-mesh and fine-mesh bags and submerged in a series of heated, nitrogen-enriched, and control enclosures. They were retrieved later and analyzed for a range of microbial parameters. Fingerprinting profiles obtained by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) indicated that simulated global warming induced a shift in bacterial community structure. In addition, warming reduced fungal biomass, whereas bacterial biomass was unaffected. The mesh size of the litter bags and sampling date also had an influence on bacterial community structure, with the apparent number of dominant genotypes increasing from spring to summer. Microbial respiration was unaffected by any treatment, and nitrogen enrichment had no clear effect on any of the microbial parameters considered. Overall, these results suggest that microbes associated with decomposing plant litter in nutrient-rich freshwater marshes are resistant to extra nitrogen supplies but are likely to respond to temperature increases projected for this century.

  9. Shared processing of perception and imagery of music in decomposed EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Rebecca S; Desain, Peter; Farquhar, Jason

    2013-04-15

    The current work investigates the brain activation shared between perception and imagery of music as measured with electroencephalography (EEG). Meta-analyses of four separate EEG experiments are presented, each focusing on perception and imagination of musical sound, with differing levels of stimulus complexity. Imagination and perception of simple accented metronome trains, as manifested in the clock illusion, as well as monophonic melodies are discussed, as well as more complex rhythmic patterns and ecologically natural music stimuli. By decomposing the data with principal component analysis (PCA), similar component distributions are found to explain most of the variance in each experiment. All data sets show a fronto-central and a more central component as the largest sources of variance, fitting with projections seen for the network of areas contributing to the N1/P2 complex. We expanded on these results using tensor decomposition. This allows us to add in the tasks to find shared activation, but does not make assumptions of independence or orthogonality and calculates the relative strengths of these components for each task. The components found in the PCA were shown to be further decomposable into parts that load primarily on to the perception or imagery task, or both, thereby adding more detail. It is shown that the frontal and central components have multiple parts that are differentially active during perception and imagination. A number of possible interpretations of these results are discussed, taking into account the different stimulus materials and measurement conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Decomposing Socioeconomic Inequality Determinants in Suicide Deaths in Iran: A Concentration Index Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veisani, Yousef; Delpisheh, Ali; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Moradi, Ghobad; Hassanzadeh, Jafar

    2017-05-01

    It is recognized that socioeconomic status (SES) has a significant impact on health and wellbeing; however, the effect of SES on suicide is contested. This study explored the effect of SES in suicide deaths and decomposed inequality into its determinants to calculate relative contributions. Through a cross-sectional study, 546 suicide deaths and 6,818 suicide attempts from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2014 in Ilam Province, Western Iran were explored. Inequality was measured by the absolute concentration index (ACI) and decomposed contributions were identified. All analyses were performed using STATA ver. 11.2 (Stata Corp., College Station, TX, USA). The overall ACI for suicide deaths was -0.352 (95% confidence interval, -0.389 to -0.301). According to the results, 9.8% of socioeconomic inequality in suicide deaths was due to addiction in attempters. ACI ranged from -0.34 to -0.03 in 2010-2014, showing that inequality in suicide deaths declined over time. Findings showed suicide deaths were distributed among the study population unequally, and our results confirmed a gap between advantaged and disadvantaged attempters in terms of death. Socioeconomic inequalities in suicide deaths tended to diminish over time, as suicide attempts progressed in Ilam Province.

  11. Mycorrhiza-mediated competition between plants and decomposers drives soil carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, Colin; Turner, Benjamin L; Finzi, Adrien C

    2014-01-23

    Soil contains more carbon than the atmosphere and vegetation combined. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the accumulation and stability of soil carbon is critical to predicting the Earth's future climate. Recent studies suggest that decomposition of soil organic matter is often limited by nitrogen availability to microbes and that plants, via their fungal symbionts, compete directly with free-living decomposers for nitrogen. Ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal (EEM) fungi produce nitrogen-degrading enzymes, allowing them greater access to organic nitrogen sources than arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. This leads to the theoretical prediction that soil carbon storage is greater in ecosystems dominated by EEM fungi than in those dominated by AM fungi. Using global data sets, we show that soil in ecosystems dominated by EEM-associated plants contains 70% more carbon per unit nitrogen than soil in ecosystems dominated by AM-associated plants. The effect of mycorrhizal type on soil carbon is independent of, and of far larger consequence than, the effects of net primary production, temperature, precipitation and soil clay content. Hence the effect of mycorrhizal type on soil carbon content holds at the global scale. This finding links the functional traits of mycorrhizal fungi to carbon storage at ecosystem-to-global scales, suggesting that plant-decomposer competition for nutrients exerts a fundamental control over the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  12. [Determination of polymorphic DNA sequences STR-PCR in decomposed human tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecka-Pazik, Dorota; Szczerkowska, Zofia

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the possibility of DNA profiling obtained from soft tissues influenced by the decomposition process: heart, kidney, liver collected during autopsy. As a control DNA, profile from blood was determined. DNA was extracted by the phenol-chloroform method. Amplification was performed with the use of the GenePrintSTR Multiplex (CSF1PO, TPOX, TH01) system, Promega and AmpF[symbol: see text]STR Identifier, Applied Biosystems. PCR products of the CTT system were separated by electrophoresis on denaturing polyacrylamide gels and visualized by silver staining. The 16 loci of AmpF[symbol: see text]STR Identifier products were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis on an ABI PRISM 310 sequencer. The results from both methods were compared. Electrophoresis of the CTT products showed clear results for DNA extracted from blood and decomposed tissues, particularly from the heart and kidney. The capillary electrophoresis method gave a positive signal for all 16 loci of AmpF[symbol: see text]STR Identifier for DNA extracted from heart, kidney and blood. Worse results similar to the manual method were obtained for DNA extracted from the liver. The soft tissues, also decomposed by putrefaction can be a useful source of genomic DNA in personal identification and paternity testing.

  13. Nitro-Grela-type complexes containing iodides - robust and selective catalysts for olefin metathesis under challenging conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracz, Andrzej; Matczak, Mateusz; Urbaniak, Katarzyna; Skowerski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Iodide-containing nitro-Grela-type catalysts have been synthesized and applied to ring closing metathesis (RCM) and cross metathesis (CM) reactions. These new catalysts have exhibited improved efficiency in the transformation of sterically, non-demanding alkenes. Additional steric hindrance in the vicinity of ruthenium related to the presence of iodides ensures enhanced catalyst stability. The benefits are most apparent under challenging conditions, such as very low reaction concentrations, protic solvents or with the occurrence of impurities.

  14. Nitro-Grela-type complexes containing iodides – robust and selective catalysts for olefin metathesis under challenging conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Tracz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Iodide-containing nitro-Grela-type catalysts have been synthesized and applied to ring closing metathesis (RCM and cross metathesis (CM reactions. These new catalysts have exhibited improved efficiency in the transformation of sterically, non-demanding alkenes. Additional steric hindrance in the vicinity of ruthenium related to the presence of iodides ensures enhanced catalyst stability. The benefits are most apparent under challenging conditions, such as very low reaction concentrations, protic solvents or with the occurrence of impurities.

  15. Gas-phase pesticide measurement using iodide ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murschell, Trey; Fulgham, S. Ryan; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2017-06-01

    Volatilization and subsequent processing in the atmosphere are an important environmental pathway for the transport and chemical fate of pesticides. However, these processes remain a particularly poorly understood component of pesticide lifecycles due to analytical challenges in measuring pesticides in the atmosphere. Most pesticide measurements require long (hours to days) sampling times coupled with offline analysis, inhibiting observation of meteorologically driven events or investigation of rapid oxidation chemistry. Here, we present chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with iodide reagent ions as a fast and sensitive measurement of four current-use pesticides. These semi-volatile pesticides were calibrated with injections of solutions onto a filter and subsequently volatilized to generate gas-phase analytes. Trifluralin and atrazine are detected as iodide-molecule adducts, while permethrin and metolachlor are detected as adducts between iodide and fragments of the parent analyte molecule. Limits of detection (1 s) are 0.37, 0.67, 0.56, and 1.1 µg m-3 for gas-phase trifluralin, metolachlor, atrazine, and permethrin, respectively. The sensitivities of trifluralin and metolachlor depend on relative humidity, changing as much as 70 and 59, respectively, as relative humidity of the sample air varies from 0 to 80 %. This measurement approach is thus appropriate for laboratory experiments and potentially near-source field measurements.

  16. Toxic impact of bromide and iodide on drinking water disinfected with chlorine or chloramines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Komaki, Yukako; Kimura, Susana Y; Hu, Hong-Ying; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Mariñas, Benito J; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-10-21

    Disinfectants inactivate pathogens in source water; however, they also react with organic matter and bromide/iodide to form disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Although only a few DBP classes have been systematically analyzed for toxicity, iodinated and brominated DBPs tend to be the most toxic. The objectives of this research were (1) to determine if monochloramine (NH2Cl) disinfection generated drinking water with less toxicity than water disinfected with free chlorine (HOCl) and (2) to determine the impact of added bromide and iodide in conjunction with HOCl or NH2Cl disinfection on mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genomic DNA damage induction. Water disinfected with chlorine was less cytotoxic but more genotoxic than water disinfected with chloramine. For both disinfectants, the addition of Br(-) and I(-) increased cytotoxicity and genotoxicity with a greater response observed with NH2Cl disinfection. Both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were highly correlated with TOBr and TOI. However, toxicity was weakly and inversely correlated with TOCl. Thus, the forcing agents for cytotoxicity and genotoxicity were the generation of brominated and iodinated DBPs rather than the formation of chlorinated DBPs. Disinfection practices need careful consideration especially when using source waters containing elevated bromide and iodide.

  17. Grotthuss Transport of Iodide in EMIM/I3 Ionic Crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Jesse Gatten; Yethiraj, Arun

    2017-12-01

    Highly ionic environments can mediate unusual chemical reactions that would otherwise be considered impossible based on chemical intuition. For example, the formation of a chemical bond between two iodide anions to form a divalent polyiodide anion is seemingly prohibited due to Coulombic repulsion. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we show that in the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (EMIM)/I3 ionic crystal, the reactive formation of divalent and even trivalent polyiodide anions occurs with extremely small energetic barriers, due to the electrostatic field of the ionic lattice. A practical consequence of this anomalous reactivity is that iodide anions are efficiently transported within the crystal through a "Grotthuss-exchange" mechanism involving bond-breaking and forming events. We characterize two distinct transport pathways, involving both I2- 4 and I3- 7 intermediates, with fast transport of iodide resulting from the release of an I- anion on the opposite side of the intermediate species from the initial bond formation. The ordered cation arrangement in the crystal provides the necessary electrostatic screening for close approach of anions, suggesting a new counter-intuitive approach to obtain high ionic conductivity. This new design principle could be used to develop better solid-state electrolytes for batteries, fuel cells and super-capacitors.

  18. A reversible fluorescent logic gate for sensing mercury and iodide ions based on a molecular beacon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2013-09-21

    A simple, rapid, and reversible fluorescent DNA INHIBIT logic gate has been developed for sensing mercury (Hg(2+)) and iodide (I(-)) ions based on a molecular beacon (MB). In this logic gate, a mercury ion was introduced as the first input into the MB logic gate system to assist in the hybridization of the MB with an assistant DNA probe through the thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine interaction, which eventually restored the fluorescence of MB as the output. With this signal-on process, mercury ions can be detected with a limit of detection as low as 7.9 nM. Furthermore, when iodide ions were added to the Hg(2+)/MB system as the second input, the fluorescence intensity decreased because Hg(2+) in the thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine complex was grabbed by I(-) due to a stronger binding force. Iodide ions can be detected with a limit of detection of 42 nM. Meanwhile, we studied the feasibility and basic performance of the DNA INHIBIT logic gate, optimized the logic gate conditions, and investigated its sensitivity and selectivity. The results showed that the MB based logic gate is highly selective and sensitive for the detection of Hg(2+) and I(-) over other interfering cations and anions.

  19. Ab initio calculation of transport properties between PbSe quantum dots facets with iodide ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Patterson, R.; Chen, W.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, J.; Huang, S.; Shrestha, S.; Conibeer, G.

    2018-01-01

    The transport properties between Lead Selenide (PbSe) quantum dots decorated with iodide ligands has been studied using density functional theory (DFT). Quantum conductance at each selected energy levels has been calculated along with total density of states and projected density of states. The DFT calculation is carried on using a grid-based planar augmented wave (GPAW) code incorporated with the linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) mode and Perdew Burke Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional. Three iodide ligand attached low index facets including (001), (011), (111) are investigated in this work. P-orbital of iodide ligand majorly contributes to density of state (DOS) at near top valence band resulting a significant quantum conductance, whereas DOS of Pb p-orbital shows minor influence. Various values of quantum conductance observed along different planes are possibly reasoned from a combined effect electrical field over topmost surface and total distance between adjacent facets. Ligands attached to (001) and (011) planes possess similar bond length whereas it is significantly shortened in (111) plane, whereas transport between (011) has an overall low value due to newly formed electric field. On the other hand, (111) plane with a net surface dipole perpendicular to surface layers leading to stronger electron coupling suggests an apparent increase of transport probability. Apart from previously mentioned, the maximum transport energy levels located several eVs (1 2 eVs) from the edge of valence band top.

  20. A Role for Iodide and Thyroglobulin in Modulating the Function of Human Immune Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Y. Bilal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is an essential element required for the function of all organ systems. Although the importance of iodine in thyroid hormone synthesis and reproduction is well known, its direct effects on the immune system are elusive. Human leukocytes expressed mRNA of iodide transporters (NIS and PENDRIN and thyroid-related proteins [thyroglobulin (TG and thyroid peroxidase (TPO]. The mRNA levels of PENDRIN and TPO were increased whereas TG transcripts were decreased post leukocyte activation. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that both PENDRIN and NIS were expressed on the surface of leukocyte subsets with the highest expression occurring on monocytes and granulocytes. Treatment of leukocytes with sodium iodide (NaI resulted in significant changes in immunity-related transcriptome with an emphasis on increased chemokine expression as probed with targeted RNASeq. Similarly, treatment of leukocytes with NaI or Lugol’s iodine induced increased protein production of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. These alterations were not attributed to iodide-induced de novo thyroid hormone synthesis. However, upon incubation with thyroid-derived TG, primary human leukocytes but not Jurkat T cells released thyroxine and triiodothyronine indicating that immune cells could potentially influence thyroid hormone balance. Overall, our studies reveal the novel network between human immune cells and thyroid-related molecules and highlight the importance of iodine in regulating the function of human immune cells.

  1. Iodide, bromide, and ammonium in hydraulic fracturing and oil and gas wastewaters: environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Jennifer S; Dwyer, Gary S; Warner, Nathaniel R; Parker, Kimberly M; Mitch, William A; Vengosh, Avner

    2015-02-03

    The expansion of unconventional shale gas and hydraulic fracturing has increased the volume of the oil and gas wastewater (OGW) generated in the U.S. Here we demonstrate that OGW from Marcellus and Fayetteville hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids and Appalachian conventional produced waters is characterized by high chloride, bromide, iodide (up to 56 mg/L), and ammonium (up to 420 mg/L). Br/Cl ratios were consistent for all Appalachian brines, which reflect an origin from a common parent brine, while the I/Cl and NH4/Cl ratios varied among brines from different geological formations, reflecting geogenic processes. There were no differences in halides and ammonium concentrations between OGW originating from hydraulic fracturing and conventional oil and gas operations. Analysis of discharged effluents from three brine treatment sites in Pennsylvania and a spill site in West Virginia show elevated levels of halides (iodide up to 28 mg/L) and ammonium (12 to 106 mg/L) that mimic the composition of OGW and mix conservatively in downstream surface waters. Bromide, iodide, and ammonium in surface waters can impact stream ecosystems and promote the formation of toxic brominated-, iodinated-, and nitrogen disinfection byproducts during chlorination at downstream drinking water treatment plants. Our findings indicate that discharge and accidental spills of OGW to waterways pose risks to both human health and the environment.

  2. The chlorination transformation characteristics of benzophenone-4 in the presence of iodide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Wei, Dongbin; Xiao, Ming; Sun, Xuefeng; Guo, Qiaorong; Liu, Yi; Du, Yuguo

    2017-08-01

    Benzophenone-type UV filters are a group of compounds widely used to protect human skin from damage of UV irradiation. Benzophenone-4 (BP-4) was targeted to explore its transformation behaviors during chlorination disinfection treatment in the presence of iodide ions. With the help of ultra performance liquid phase chromatograph and high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer, totally fifteen halogenated products were identified, and five out of them were iodinated products. The transformation mechanisms of BP-4 involved electrophilic substitution generating mono- or di-halogenated products, which would be oxidized into esters and further hydrolyzed into phenolic derivatives. The desulfonation and decarboxylation were observed in chlorination system either. Obeying the transformation pathways, five iodinated products formed. The pH conditions of chlorination system determined the reaction types of transformation and corresponding species of products. The more important was that, the acute toxicity had significant increase after chlorination treatment on BP-4, especially in the presence of iodide ions. When the chlorination treatment was performed on ambient water spiked with BP-4 and iodide ions, iodinated by-products could be detected. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Simple and rapid determination of iodide in table salt by stripping potentiometry at a carbon-paste electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svancara, Ivan; Ogorevc, Bozidar; Nović, Milko; Vytras, Karel

    2002-04-01

    A simple and rapid procedure, utilising constant-current stripping analysis (CCSA) at a carbon-paste electrode containing tricresyl phosphate as a pasting liquid (TCP-CPE), has been developed for the determination of iodide in table salt. Because of a synergistic accumulation mechanism based on ion-pairing and extraction of iodide in combination with electrolytic pretreatment of the TCP-CPE, the method is selective for iodide and enables direct determination of iodide in samples of table salt containing anti-caking agents such as K(4)[Fe(CN)(6)] (food additive "E 536") or MgO. The iodide content (calculated as KI) can be determined in a concentration range of 2 to 100 mg kg(-1) salt, with a detection limit (S/N=3) of 1 mg kg(-1), and a recovery from 90 to 115%. The proposed method has been used to determine iodide in several types of artificially iodised table salt and in one sample of natural sea salt. The results obtained agreed well with those obtained by use of three independent reference methods (titration, spectrophotometry, and ICP-MS) used to validate the CCSA method, indicating that the developed method is applicable as a routine procedure for rapid testing in salt production process control and in the analysis of marketed table salts.

  4. Identification of delta-iodolactone in iodide treated human goiter and its inhibitory effect on proliferation of human thyroid follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugrillon, A; Uedelhoven, W M; Pisarev, M A; Bechtner, G; Gärtner, R

    1994-10-01

    There is evidence that iodoarachidonates are mediators of iodide in thyroid autoregulation, however, their occurrence in vivo has not yet been demonstrated. We therefore tried to identify delta-iodolactone (5-Hydroxy-6-iodo-8,11,14-eicosatrienoic delta-lactone, IL-delta) in thyroid tissue from a patient with Graves' disease treated with high doses of iodide. Lipids were extracted from thyroid tissue, purified by reversed phase chromatography and analyzed by gas chromatography--tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MSMS). The retention time in gas chromatography and fragmentation pattern in tandem mass spectrometry were determined with biochemically synthesized non-deuterated and deuterated IL-delta. According to retention time (13.44 min) and specific fragments (m/z 303, m/z 259) the occurrence of IL-delta could be demonstrated in the extract of iodide treated goiter. In vitro, potassium iodide (40 microM) as well as IL-delta (1.0 microM) significantly inhibited the proliferation of human thyroid follicular cells induced by phorbol ester TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate). These results demonstrate for the first time that Il-delta is present in iodide treated human thyroid. As cell proliferation is under negative control of IL-delta, a crucial role in thyroid involution following iodide treatment may be possible.

  5. In situ catalytic hydrogenation of model compounds and biomass-derived phenolic compounds for bio-oil upgrading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng Feng; Zhongzhi Yang; Chung-yun Hse; Qiuli Su; Kui Wang; Jianchun Jiang; Junming Xu

    2017-01-01

    The renewable phenolic compounds produced by directional liquefaction of biomass are a mixture of complete fragments decomposed from native lignin. These compounds are unstable and difficult to use directly as biofuel. Here, we report an efficient in situ catalytic hydrogenation method that can convert phenolic compounds into saturated cyclohexanes. The process has...

  6. Hydrogen Peroxide: A Key Chemical for Today's Sustainable Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriminna, Rosaria; Albanese, Lorenzo; Meneguzzo, Francesco; Pagliaro, Mario

    2016-12-20

    The global utilization of hydrogen peroxide, a green oxidant that decomposes in water and oxygen, has gone from 0.5 million tonnes per year three decades ago to 4.5 million tonnes per year in 2014, and is still climbing. With the aim of expanding the utilization of this eminent green chemical across different industrial and civil sectors, the production and use of hydrogen peroxide as a green industrial oxidant is reviewed herein to provide an overview of the explosive growth of its industrial use over the last three decades and of the state of the art in its industrial manufacture, with important details of what determines the viability of the direct production from oxygen and hydrogen compared with the traditional auto-oxidation process. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Production of hydrogen from methane without CO{sub 2}-emission mediated by indium oxide and iron oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Kiyoshi; Mito, Aiko; Takenaka, Sakae; Yamanaka, Ichiro [Tokyo Institute of Tech., Ookayama, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2001-03-01

    Production of hydrogen without CO{sub 2}-emission and a safe storage method of hydrogen are expected for the fuel-cell era in the next century. In order to meet this expectation, the authors proposed a new method for the storage and production of hydrogen from methane mediated by indium and iron oxides. First, methane is decomposed into carbon and hydrogen on a Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalyst at >673 K. The hydrogen is used for the reduction of metal oxides into reduced metal oxides. The reducing potential of hydrogen is preserved in the reduced oxides that can be stored under open-air at room temperature and transported safely. The contact of the reduced oxides with water vapor at 673 K quickly regenerates pure hydrogen without carbon oxides (CO, CO{sub 2}). (author)

  8. Reduction of stimulated sodium iodide symporter expression by estrogen receptor ligands in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Su-Jin; Jang, DooRye; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Lim, Seok Tae; Sohn, Myung-Hee [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron Research Center, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Katzenellenbogen, John A., E-mail: jkatzene@illinois.ed [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kim, Dong Wook, E-mail: kimdw@chonbuk.ac.k [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron Research Center, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) mediates active iodide uptake in lactating breast tissue, and when its levels are enhanced by all-trans retinoic acid (atRA), NIS has been proposed as a target for the imaging and radiotherapy of breast cancer. Importantly, the estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) is an important regulator of atRA induced NIS gene expression in breast cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of an ER agonist (17{beta}-estradiol, E{sub 2}) or antagonist [trans-hydroxytamoxifen (TOT) or raloxifene (RAL)] treatment on the regulation of NIS gene expression and iodide uptake in an ER{alpha}-positive breast cancer (MCF-7) model. Methods: NIS functional activity was measured in vitro by {sup 125}I uptake assay after incubation with E{sub 2} (from 10{sup -15} to 10{sup -5} M), TOT (from 5x10{sup -8} to 5x10{sup -6} M), or RAL (from 5x10{sup -8} to 5x10{sup -6} M) in the presence or absence of atRA (10{sup -7} M). Under the same conditions, NIS mRNA expression was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Athymic mice with MCF-7 xenograft tumors were treated with atRA alone or atRA together with E{sub 2} to evaluate the change of {sup 125}I uptake in tumor tissues in vivo. Results: In the iodide uptake study in cells, E{sub 2}, TOT, or RAL treatment alone did not stimulate {sup 125}I uptake. However, when iodide uptake was stimulated by atRA, cotreatment with E{sub 2}, TOT or RAL decreased {sup 125}I uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. The hormone effects on NIS mRNA expression levels in MCF-7 cells were similar. The results of the in vivo biodistribution study showed that {sup 125}I uptake was reduced 50% in tumor tissues of mice treated with atRA/E{sub 2} as compared to tumors treated only with atRA. Conclusion: Our results suggest that combination treatment of atRA and ER ligands could limit the functional activity of the NIS gene induced by atRA, thereby compromising its use as a target for diagnosis

  9. Hydrogenated TiO2 nanobelts as highly efficient photocatalytic organic dye degradation and hydrogen evolution photocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jian; Leng, Yanhua; Cui, Hongzhi; Liu, Hong

    2015-12-15

    TiO2 nanobelts have gained increasing interest because of its outstanding properties and promising applications in a wide range of fields. Here we report the facile synthesis of hydrogenated TiO2 (H-TiO2) nanobelts, which exhibit excellent UV and visible photocatalytic decomposing of methyl orange (MO) and water splitting for hydrogen production. The improved photocatalytic property can be attributed to the Ti(3+) ions and oxygen vacancies in TiO2 nanobelts created by hydrogenation. Ti(3+) ions and oxygen vacancies can enhance visible light absorption, promote charge carrier trapping, and hinder the photogenerated electron-hole recombination. This work offers a simple strategy for the fabrication of a wide solar spectrum of active photocatalysts, which possesses significant potential for more efficient photodegradation, photocatalytic water splitting, and enhanced solar cells using sunlight as light source. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparing chemistry and bioactivity of burned versus decomposed plant litter: different pathways but same result?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanomi, Giuliano; Incerti, Guido; Abd El-Gawad, Ahmed M; Cesarano, Gaspare; Sarker, Tushar C; Saulino, Luigi; Lanzotti, Virginia; Saracino, Antonio; Rego, Francisco C; Mazzoleni, Stefano

    2017-10-24

    Litter burning and biological decomposition are oxidative processes co-occurring in many terrestrial ecosystems, producing organic matter with different chemical properties and differently affecting plant growth and soil microbial activity. We tested the chemical convergence hypothesis i.e. materials with different initial chemistry converge towards a common profile, with similar biological effects, as the oxidative process advances, for burning and decomposition. We compared the molecular composition, assessed by (13) C NMR, of 7 plant litter types either fresh, decomposed for 30, 90, 180 days in a microcosms incubation experiment, or heated at 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 °C for thirty minutes. We used litter water extracts (5% dw) as treatments in bioassays on plant (Lepidium sativum) and fungal (Aspergillus niger) growth, and a washed quartz sand amended with litter (0.5% dw) to assess heterotrophic respiration by flux chamber (i.e. μg of CO2 released per g of added litter per day). We observed different molecular variations for materials either burning (i.e. a sharp increase of aromatic C and a decrease of other fractions above 200 °C) or decomposing (i.e. early increase of alkyl, methoxyl and N-alkyl C and decrease of O-alkyl and di-O-alkyl C fractions). Soil respiration and fungal growth decreased with litter age and heating severity, down to 20% relative to fresh litter. Plant was inhibited on fresh litter (on average 13% of the control), but recovered on aged (180 days) and heated (30 minutes at 500°C) materials, up to 126% and 63% of the control, respectively. Correlation between the intensity of (13) C NMR signals in litter spectra and bioassay results showed that O-alkyl, methoxyl, and aromatic C fractions are crucial to understand organic matter effects, with plant response negatively affected by labile C but positively associated to lignification and pyrogenic C. The pattern of association of soil respiration and fungal growth to these C fractions was

  11. Double decomposition: decomposing the variance in subcomponents of male extra-pair reproductive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losdat, Sylvain; Arcese, Peter; Reid, Jane M

    2015-09-01

    1. Extra-pair reproductive success (EPRS) is a key component of male fitness in socially monogamous systems and could cause selection on female extra-pair reproduction if extra-pair offspring (EPO) inherit high value for EPRS from their successful extra-pair fathers. However, EPRS is itself a composite trait that can be fully decomposed into subcomponents of variation, each of which can be further decomposed into genetic and environmental variances. However, such decompositions have not been implemented in wild populations, impeding evolutionary inference. 2. We first show that EPRS can be decomposed into the product of three life-history subcomponents: the number of broods available to a focal male to sire EPO, the male's probability of siring an EPO in an available brood and the number of offspring in available broods. This decomposition of EPRS facilitates estimation from field data because all subcomponents can be quantified from paternity data without need to quantify extra-pair matings. Our decomposition also highlights that the number of available broods, and hence population structure and demography, might contribute substantially to variance in male EPRS and fitness. 3. We then used 20 years of complete genetic paternity and pedigree data from wild song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to partition variance in each of the three subcomponents of EPRS, and thereby estimate their additive genetic variance and heritability conditioned on effects of male coefficient of inbreeding, age and social status. 4. All three subcomponents of EPRS showed some degree of within-male repeatability, reflecting combined permanent environmental and genetic effects. Number of available broods and offspring per brood showed low additive genetic variances. The estimated additive genetic variance in extra-pair siring probability was larger, although the 95% credible interval still converged towards zero. Siring probability also showed inbreeding depression and increased with male age

  12. Peat decomposability in managed organic soils in relation to land use, organic matter composition and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bader

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Organic soils comprise a large yet fragile carbon (C store in the global C cycle. Drainage, necessary for agriculture and forestry, triggers rapid decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM, typically increasing in the order forest < grassland < cropland. However, there is also large variation in decomposition due to differences in hydrological conditions, climate and specific management. Here we studied the role of SOM composition on peat decomposability in a variety of differently managed drained organic soils. We collected a total of 560 samples from 21 organic cropland, grassland and forest soils in Switzerland, monitored their CO2 emission rates in lab incubation experiments over 6 months at two temperatures (10 and 20 °C and related them to various soil characteristics, including bulk density, pH, soil organic carbon (SOC content and elemental ratios (C / N, H / C and O / C. CO2 release ranged from 6 to 195 mg CO2-C g−1 SOC at 10 °C and from 12 to 423 mg g−1 at 20 °C. This variation occurring under controlled conditions suggests that besides soil water regime, weather and management, SOM composition may be an underestimated factor that determines CO2 fluxes measured in field experiments. However, correlations between the investigated chemical SOM characteristics and CO2 emissions were weak. The latter also did not show a dependence on land-use type, although peat under forest was decomposed the least. High CO2 emissions in some topsoils were probably related to the accrual of labile crop residues. A comparison with published CO2 rates from incubated mineral soils indicated no difference in SOM decomposability between these soil classes, suggesting that accumulation of recent, labile plant materials that presumably account for most of the evolved CO2 is not systematically different between mineral and organic soils. In our data set, temperature sensitivity of decomposition (Q10 on average 2.57

  13. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Schoonman, J.; Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept

  14. AC-93253 iodide, a novel Src inhibitor, suppresses NSCLC progression by modulating multiple Src-related signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hua Lai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tyrosine kinase Src is involved in the progression of many cancers. Moreover, inhibiting Src activity has been shown to obstruct several signaling pathways regulated by the EGFR. Thus, Src is a valuable target molecule in drug development. The purpose of this study was to identify compounds that directly or indirectly modulate Src to suppress lung cancer cell growth and motility and to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of these compounds. Methods Human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines (PC9, PC9/gef, A549, and H1975 with different EGFR statuses were tested by cytotoxicity and proliferation assays after AC-93253 iodide treatment. Src and Src-related protein expression in AC-93253 iodide-treated PC9, PC9/gef, and A549 cells were assessed by western blotting. The effects of AC-93253 iodide on cancer cell colony formation, invasion, and migration were assessed in PC9 and PC9/gef cells. The synergistic effects of gefitinib and AC-93253 iodide were evaluated by combination index (CI-isobologram analysis in gefitinib-resistant cell lines. The efficacy of AC-93253 iodide in vivo was determined using nude mice treated with either the compound or the vehicle. Results Among the compounds, AC-93253 iodide exhibited the most potent dose-independent inhibitory effects on the activity of Src as well as on that of the Src-related proteins EGFR, STAT3, and FAK. Furthermore, AC-93253 iodide significantly suppressed cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion, and migration in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. AC-93253 iodide sensitized tumor cells to gefitinib treatment regardless of whether the cells were gefitinib-sensitive (PC9 or resistant (H1975 and PC9/gef, indicating that it may exert synergistic effects when used in combination with established therapeutic agents. Our findings also suggested that the inhibitory effects of AC-93253 iodide on lung cancer progression may be attributable to

  15. The plant cell wall-decomposing machinery underlies the functional diversity of forest fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Daniel C; Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Majcherczyk, Andrzej; Schneider, Patrick; Aerts, Andrea; Asiegbu, Fred O; Baker, Scott E; Barry, Kerrie; Bendiksby, Mika; Blumentritt, Melanie; Coutinho, Pedro M; Cullen, Dan; de Vries, Ronald P; Gathman, Allen; Goodell, Barry; Henrissat, Bernard; Ihrmark, Katarina; Kauserud, Hävard; Kohler, Annegret; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lavin, José L; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Lindquist, Erika; Lilly, Walt; Lucas, Susan; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Oguiza, José A; Park, Jongsun; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Riley, Robert; Rosling, Anna; Salamov, Asaf; Schmidt, Olaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Skrede, Inger; Stenlid, Jan; Wiebenga, Ad; Xie, Xinfeng; Kües, Ursula; Hibbett, David S; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Högberg, Nils; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor V; Watkinson, Sarah C

    2011-08-05

    Brown rot decay removes cellulose and hemicellulose from wood--residual lignin contributing up to 30% of forest soil carbon--and is derived from an ancestral white rot saprotrophy in which both lignin and cellulose are decomposed. Comparative and functional genomics of the "dry rot" fungus Serpula lacrymans, derived from forest ancestors, demonstrated that the evolution of both ectomycorrhizal biotrophy and brown rot saprotrophy were accompanied by reductions and losses in specific protein families, suggesting adaptation to an intercellular interaction with plant tissue. Transcriptome and proteome analysis also identified differences in wood decomposition in S. lacrymans relative to the brown rot Postia placenta. Furthermore, fungal nutritional mode diversification suggests that the boreal forest biome originated via genetic coevolution of above- and below-ground biota.

  16. Diversity and dynamics of the microbial community on decomposing wheat straw during mushroom compost production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Zhong, Yaohua; Yang, Shida; Zhang, Weixin; Xu, Meiqing; Ma, Anzhou; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Chen, Guanjun; Liu, Weifeng

    2014-10-01

    The development of communities of three important composting players including actinobacteria, fungi and clostridia was explored during the composting of wheat straw for mushroom production. The results revealed the presence of highly diversified actinobacteria and fungal communities during the composting process. The diversity of the fungal community, however, sharply decreased in the mature compost. Furthermore, an apparent succession of both actinobacteria and fungi with intensive changes in the composition of communities was demonstrated during composting. Notably, cellulolytic actinomycetal and fungal genera represented by Thermopolyspora, Microbispora and Humicola were highly enriched in the mature compost. Analysis of the key cellulolytic genes revealed their prevalence at different composting stages including several novel glycoside hydrolase family 48 exocellulase lineages. The community of cellulolytic microbiota also changed substantially over time. The prevalence of the diversified cellulolytic microorganisms holds the great potential of mining novel lignocellulose decomposing enzymes from this specific ecosystem. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The plant cell wall decomposing machinery underlies the functional diversity of forest fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastwood, Daniel C.; Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Majcherczyk, Andrzej; Schneider, Patrick; Aerts, Andrea; Asiegbu, Fred O.; Baker, Scott E.; Barry, Kerrie; Bendiksby, Mika; Blumentritt, Melanie; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Cullen, Dan; Vries, Ronald P. de; Gathman, Allen; Goodell, Barry; Henrissat, Bernard; Ihrmark, Katarina; Kauserud, Hä; vard,; Kohler, Annegret; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lavin, José; L.; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Lindquist, Erika; Lilly, Walt; Lucas, Susan; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Oguiza, José; A.; Park, Jongsun; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Riley, Robert; Rosling, Anna; Salamov, Asaf; Schmidt, Olaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Skrede, Inger; Stenlid, Jan; Wiebenga, Ad; Xie, Xinfeng; Kü; es, Ursula; Hibbett, David S.; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Hö; gberg, Nils; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Watkinson, Sarah C.

    2011-05-01

    Brown rot decay removes cellulose and hemicellulose from wood?residual lignin contributing up to 30percent of forest soil carbon?and is derived from an ancestral white rot saprotrophy in which both lignin and cellulose are decomposed. Comparative and functional genomics of the ?dry rot? fungus Serpula lacrymans, derived from forest ancestors, demonstrated that the evolution of both ectomycorrhizal biotrophy and brown rot saprotrophy were accompanied by reductions and losses in specific protein families, suggesting adaptation to an intercellular interaction with plant tissue. Transcriptome and proteome analysis also identified differences in wood decomposition in S. lacrymans relative to the brown rot Postia placenta. Furthermore, fungal nutritional mode diversification suggests that the boreal forest biome originated via genetic coevolution of above- and below-ground biota

  18. Long-term stabilization of organic solar cells using hydroperoxide decomposers as additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkovic, Vida; Engmann, Sebastian; Tsierkezos, Nikos; Hoppe, Harald; Madsen, Morten; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Ritter, Uwe; Gobsch, Gerhard

    2016-03-01

    Stability of organic solar cells (OPV) remains a big problem on the way to their commercialization. Different approaches are being investigated: development of intrinsically more photochemically stable materials, optimization of encapsulation, and implementation of getter and UV blocking layers. In this study, we investigate stabilization of OPV devices using hydroperoxide decomposers as stabilizing additives. A set of five commercially available additives of organophosphorus, organosulfur, Ni chelate, and blocked thiol type are compared, ternary blended into the active layer, under exposure to aging under ISOS-3 degradation conditions. Improvements in long-term performance of OPV devices were observed upon stabilization with Advapak NEO-1120, lifetime was prolonged by a factor of 1.7, and accumulated power generation increased by a factor of 1.4. The stabilizing mechanisms are discussed using spectroscopic and microscopic measurements.

  19. Decomposing highly edge-connected graphs into homomorphic copies of a fixed tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merker, Martin

    2016-01-01

    far this conjecture has only been verified for paths, stars, and a family of bistars. We prove a weaker version of the Tree Decomposition Conjecture, where we require the subgraphs in the decomposition to be isomorphic to graphs that can be obtained from T by vertex-identifications. We call......The Tree Decomposition Conjecture by Barát and Thomassen states that for every tree T there exists a natural number k(T) such that the following holds: If G is a k(T)-edge-connected simple graph with size divisible by the size of T, then G can be edge-decomposed into subgraphs isomorphic to T. So...... such a subgraph a homomorphic copy of T. This implies the Tree Decomposition Conjecture under the additional constraint that the girth of G is greater than the diameter of T. As an application, we verify the Tree Decomposition Conjecture for all trees of diameter at most 4....

  20. Trend Prediction and Decomposed Driving Factors of Carbon Emissions in Jiangsu Province during 2015–2020

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decai Tang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available According to the economic and energy consumption statistics in Jiangsu Province, we combined the GM (1, 1 grey model and polynomial regression to forecast carbon emissions. Historical and projected emissions were decomposed using the Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI approach to assess the relative contribution of different factors to emission variability. The results showed that carbon emissions will continue to increase in Jiangsu province during 2015–2020 period and cumulative carbon emissions will increase by 39.5487 million tons within the forecast period. The growth of gross domestic product (GDP per capita plays the greatest positive role in driving carbon emission growth. Furthermore, the improvement of energy usage efficiency is the primary factor responsible for reducing carbon emissions. Factors of population, industry structure adjustment and the optimization of fuel mix also help to reduce carbon emissions. Based on the LMDI analysis, we provide some advice for policy-makers in Jiangsu and other provinces in China.

  1. Decomposing race and gender differences in underweight and obesity in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averett, Susan L; Stacey, Nicholas; Wang, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Using data from the National Income Dynamics Study, we document differentials in both underweight and obesity across race and gender in post-Apartheid South Africa. Using a nonlinear decomposition method, we decompose these differences across gender within race and then across race within gender. Less than one third of the differences in obesity and underweight across gender are explained by differences in covariates. In contrast, at least 70% of the obesity differences across race are explained by differences in covariates. Behavioral variables such as smoking and exercise explain the largest part of the bodyweight differentials across gender. For bodyweight differentials across race within gender, however, socioeconomic status and background variables have the largest explanatory power for obesity differentials, while background variables play the key role in explaining the underweight differentials. These results indicate that eradicating obesity and underweight differentials will require targeting policies to specific groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel view on predicting acute toxicity: decomposing toxicity data in species vulnerability and chemical potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Tjalling; Posthuma, Leo; de Zwart, Dick; van de Meent, Dik

    2007-07-01

    Chemical risk assessment usually applies empirical methods to predict toxicant effects on different species. We propose a more mechanism-oriented approach, and introduce a method to decompose toxicity data in a contribution from the chemical (potency) and from the exposed species (vulnerability). We use a database for acute aquatic toxicity, and focus on some well-defined chemical classes. Potency is strongly related to hydrophobicity and vulnerability differences between species are small for narcotic compounds. Potencies show less relation with hydrophobicity and interspecies differences are larger for organophosphate- and carbamate insecticides. Photosynthesis inhibitors generally act narcotic to animals, but were more potent for algae. Using these potencies and vulnerabilities, acute toxicity values were well predicted by the proposed approach (within a factor of 3-6). The proposed approach has potential for predicting toxicity for untested species-compound combinations; however, there is a need for a better definition of 'mode of action' in ecotoxicology.

  3. Synthesis of Graphene-Based Sensors and Application on Detecting SF6 Decomposing Products: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based materials have aroused enormous focus on a wide range of engineering fields because of their unique structure. One of the most promising applications is gas adsorption and sensing. In electrical engineering, graphene-based sensors are also employed as detecting devices to estimate the operation status of gas insulated switchgear (GIS. This paper reviews the main synthesis methods of graphene, gas adsorption, and sensing mechanism of its based sensors, as well as their applications in detecting SF6 decomposing products, such as SO2, H2S, SO2F2, and SOF2, in GIS. Both theoretical and experimental researches on gas response of graphene-based sensors to these typical gases are summarized. Finally, the future research trend about graphene synthesis technique and relevant perspective are also given.

  4. Bacteria in decomposing wood and their interactions with wood-decay fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Sarah R; Boddy, Lynne; Weightman, Andrew J

    2016-11-01

    The fungal community within dead wood has received considerable study, but far less attention has been paid to bacteria in the same habitat. Bacteria have long been known to inhabit decomposing wood, but much remains underexplored about their identity and ecology. Bacteria within the dead wood environment must interact with wood-decay fungi, but again, very little is known about the form this takes; there are indications of both antagonistic and beneficial interactions within this fungal microbiome. Fungi are hypothesised to play an important role in shaping bacterial communities in wood, and conversely, bacteria may affect wood-decay fungi in a variety of ways. This minireview considers what is currently known about bacteria in wood and their interactions with fungi, and proposes possible associations based on examples from other habitats. It aims to identify key knowledge gaps and pressing questions for future research. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Decomposed Sliding Mode Control of the Drive with Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor and Flexible Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Vittek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A decomposed sliding mode control of the drive with an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor and flexible coupling is presented. Decomposition exploits principles of vector control to divide motor into channel for control of magnetic flux and channel for control of torque separately. Sliding mode control principles are exploited to keep demanded value of magnetic flux and to control load angle in the presence of vibration modes and external disturbances. To obtain continues voltage as a control variable a smoothing integrator follows signum function in both channels. As a modification the switching governed by signum function is replaced by the high gain including rearrangement of the control system block diagram. The simulations indicate that the control system yields the desired robustness and further investigations are recommended.

  6. The applications of a higher-dimensional Lie algebra and its decomposed subalgebras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhang; Zhang, Yufeng

    2009-01-15

    With the help of invertible linear transformations and the known Lie algebras, a higher-dimensional 6 x 6 matrix Lie algebra smu(6) is constructed. It follows a type of new loop algebra is presented. By using a (2 + 1)-dimensional partial-differential equation hierarchy we obtain the integrable coupling of the (2 + 1)-dimensional KN integrable hierarchy, then its corresponding Hamiltonian structure is worked out by employing the quadratic-form identity. Furthermore, a higher-dimensional Lie algebra denoted by E, is given by decomposing the Lie algebra smu(6), then a discrete lattice integrable coupling system is produced. A remarkable feature of the Lie algebras smu(6) and E is used to directly construct integrable couplings.

  7. May Ingestion of Leachate from Decomposed Corpses Cause Appendicitis? A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Domingues-Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The general consensus is that appendicitis is basically provoked by fecaliths or lymphoid hyperplasic obstruction. Several studies based on histological diagnosis have not confirmed this hypothesis. On the contrary, obstruction has been proved in only a minority of cases. Diverse infections by parasites, bacteria, fungus, and noninfective agents have been associated with appendicitis in the medical literature. We describe a firefighter, who ingested a small quantity of leachate from decomposing corpses while working and developed enteritis a few hours later, which lasted several days and evolved to appendicitis. This case raises the possibility that the high quantity of bacteria concentration present in the leachate could have provoked enteritis and the subsequent appendicitis due to a direct effect of the bacteria on the appendix.

  8. Aqueous photochemical reactions of chloride, bromide, and iodide ions in a diode-array spectrophotometer. Autoinhibition in the photolysis of iodide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, József; Dóka, Éva; Lente, Gábor; Fábián, István

    2014-03-28

    The aqueous photoreactions of three halide ions (chloride, bromide and iodide) were studied using a diode array spectrophotometer to drive and detect the process at the same time. The concentration and pH dependences of the halogen formation rates were studied in detail. The experimental data were interpreted by improving earlier models where the cage complex of a halogen atom and an electron has a central role. The triiodide ion was shown to exert a strong inhibiting effect on the reaction sequence leading to its own formation. An assumed chemical reaction between the triiodide ion and the cage complex interpreted the strong autoinhibition effect. It is shown that there is a real danger of unwanted interference from the photoreactions of halide ions when halide salts are used as supporting electrolytes in spectrophotometric experiments using a relatively high intensity UV light source.

  9. Contrasting patterns of litterfall seasonality and seasonal changes in litter decomposability in a tropical rainforest region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, S. A.; Valdez-Ramirez, V.; Congdon, R. A.; Williams, S. E.

    2014-09-01

    The seasonality of litter inputs in forests has important implications for understanding ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycles. We quantified the drivers of seasonality in litterfall and leaf decomposability using plots throughout the Australian wet tropical region. Litter fell mostly in the summer (wet, warm) months in the region, but other peaks occurred throughout the year. Litterfall seasonality was modelled well with the level of deciduousness of the site (plots with more deciduous species had lower seasonality than evergreen plots), temperature (higher seasonality in the uplands), disturbance (lower seasonality with more early secondary species) and soil fertility (higher seasonality with higher N : P/P limitation) (SL total litterfall model 1 = deciduousness + soil N : P + early secondary sp.: r2 = 0.63, n = 30; model 2 = temperature + early secondary sp. + soil N : P: r2 = 0.54, n = 30; SL leaf = temperature + early secondary sp. + rainfall seasonality: r2 = 0.39, n = 30). Leaf litter decomposability was lower in the dry season than in the wet season, driven by higher phenolic concentrations in the dry, with the difference exacerbated particularly by lower dry season moisture. Our results are contrary to the global trend for tropical rainforests; in that seasonality of litterfall input was generally higher in wetter, cooler, evergreen forests, compared to generally drier, warmer, semi-deciduous sites that had more uniform monthly inputs. We consider this due to more diverse litter shedding patterns in semi-deciduous and raingreen rainforest sites, and an important consideration for ecosystem modellers. Seasonal changes in litter quality are likely to have impacts on decomposition and biogeochemical cycles in these forests due to the litter that falls in the dry season being more recalcitrant to decay.

  10. Drivers of inter-year variability of plant production and decomposers across contrasting island ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, David A; Jonsson, Micael; Kalela-Brundin, Maarit; Lagerström, Anna; Bardgett, Richard D; Yeates, Gregor W; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte

    2012-03-01

    Despite the likely importance of inter-year dynamics of plant production and consumer biota for driving community- and ecosystem-level processes, very few studies have explored how and why these dynamics vary across contrasting ecosystems. We utilized a well-characterized system of 30 lake islands in the boreal forest zone of northern Sweden across which soil fertility and productivity vary considerably, with larger islands being more fertile and productive than smaller ones. In this system we assessed the inter-year dynamics of several measures of plant production and the soil microbial community (primary consumers in the decomposer food web) for each of nine years, and soil microfaunal groups (secondary and tertiary consumers) for each of six of those years. We found that, for measures of plant production and each of the three consumer trophic levels, inter-year dynamics were strongly affected by island size. Further, many variables were strongly affected by island size (and thus bottom-up regulation by soil fertility and resources) in some years, but not in other years, most likely due to inter-year variation in climatic conditions. For each of the plant and microbial variables for which we had nine years of data, we also determined the inter-year coefficient of variation (CV), an inverse measure of stability. We found that CVs of some measures of plant productivity were greater on large islands, whereas those of other measures were greater on smaller islands; CVs of microbial variables were unresponsive to island size. We also found that the effects of island size on the temporal dynamics of some variables were related to inter-year variability of macroclimatic variables. As such, our results show that the inter-year dynamics of both plant productivity and decomposer biota across each of three trophic levels, as well as the inter-year stability of plant productivity, differ greatly across contrasting ecosystems, with potentially important but largely overlooked

  11. Climatic effects on decomposing litter and substrate chemistry along climatological gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, B.

    2009-04-01

    Climatic effects on decomposing litter and substrate chemistry along climatological gradients. B. Berg, Dipartimento Biologia Strutturale e Funzionale, Complesso Universitario, Monte San Angelo, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli, Italy and Department of Forest Ecology, P.O. Box 27, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland. Studies of several processes, using climatic gradients do provide new information as compared with studies at e.g. a single site. Decomposition of plant litter in such gradients give response in decomposition rates to natural climate conditions. Thus Scots pine needle litter incubated in a climate gradient with annual average temperature (AVGT) ranging from -0.5 to 6.8oC had a highly significant increase in initial mass-loss rate with R2 = 0.591 (p<0.001) and a 5o increase in temperature doubled the mass-loss rate. As a contrast - needle litter of Norway spruce incubated in the same transect had no significant response to climate and for initial litter a 5o increase increased mass-loss rate c. 6%. For more decomposed Scots pine litter we could see that the effect of temperature on mass-loss rate gradually decreased until it disappeared. Long-term decomposition studies revealed differences in litter decomposition patterns along a gradient, even for the same type of litter. This could be followed by using an asymptotic function that gave, (i) a measure a maximum level of decomposition, (ii) the initial decomposition rate. Over a gradient the calculated maximum level of decomposition decreased with increasing AVGT. Other gradient studies revealed an effect of AVGT on litter chemical composition. Pine needle litter from stands under different climate conditions had nutrient concentrations related to AVGT. Thus N, P, K, and S were positively related to AVGT and Mn negatively, all of them significantly. This information may be used to explain the changing pattern in decomposition over the gradient.

  12. Growth and hydrogenation of ultra-thin Mg films on Mo(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Christopher Worsøe; Davies, Jonathan Conrad; Vegge, Tejs

    2005-01-01

    The growth and hydrogenation of ultra-thin magnesium overlayers have been investigated on a Mo(1 1 1) single crystal substrate. For increasing magnesium coverages we observe intermediate stages in the TPD and LEISS profiles, which illustrate the transition from one monolayer to multilayer growth....... Hydrogen cannot be adsorbed on magnesium films under UHV conditions. However, when evaporating Mg in a hydrogen background, a hydrogen overlayer is seen to adsorb at the Mg surface, due to the catalytic interaction with the Mo(1 1 1) substrate and subsequent spill-over. We show that two monolayers of Mg...... are necessary to sustain this purely adsorbed state. Using predissociated hydrogen we show that the hydride formation is self-stabilizing and the hydride only decomposes at a temperature where a considerable desorption of magnesium occurs....

  13. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  14. Hydrogen nanobubble at normal hydrogen electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, S.; Shinozaki, R.; Senda, Y.; Yoshikawa, H. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Electrochemically formed hydrogen nanobubbles at a platinum rotating disk electrode (RDE) were detected by re-oxidation charge. The dissolution time course of the hydrogen nanobubbles was measured by AFM tapping topography under open-circuit conditions at stationary platinum and gold single-crystal electrodes. The bubble dissolution at platinum was much faster than that at gold because two types of diffusion, bulk and surface diffusion, proceeded at the platinum surface, whereas surface diffusion was prohibited at the gold electrode. These findings indicated that the electrochemical reaction of normal hydrogen electrode partly proceeded heterogeneously on the three-phase boundary around the hydrogen nanobubble.

  15. Leaf traits capture the effects of land use changes and climate on litter decomposability of grasslands across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunel, Claire; Garnier, Eric; Joffre, Richard; Kazakou, Elena; Quested, Helen; Grigulis, Karl; Lavorel, Sandra; Ansquer, Pauline; Castro, Helena; Cruz, Pablo; Dolezal, Jirí; Eriksson, Ove; Freitas, Helena; Golodets, Carly; Jouany, Claire; Kigel, Jaime; Kleyer, Michael; Lehsten, Veiko; Leps, Jan; Meier, Tonia; Pakeman, Robin; Papadimitriou, Maria; Papanastasis, Vasilios P; Quétier, Fabien; Robson, Matt; Sternberg, Marcelo; Theau, Jean-Pierre; Thébault, Aurélie; Zarovali, Maria

    2009-03-01

    Land use and climate changes induce shifts in plant functional diversity and community structure, thereby modifying ecosystem processes. This is particularly true for litter decomposition, an essential process in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nutrients. In this study, we asked whether changes in functional traits of living leaves in response to changes in land use and climate were related to rates of litter potential decomposition, hereafter denoted litter decomposability, across a range of 10 contrasting sites. To disentangle the different control factors on litter decomposition, we conducted a microcosm experiment to determine the decomposability under standard conditions of litters collected in herbaceous communities from Europe and Israel. We tested how environmental factors (disturbance and climate) affected functional traits of living leaves and how these traits then modified litter quality and subsequent litter decomposability. Litter decomposability appeared proximately linked to initial litter quality, with particularly clear negative correlations with lignin-dependent indices (litter lignin concentr tion, lignin:nitrogen ratio, and fiber component). Litter quality was directly related to community-weighted mean traits. Lignin-dependent indices of litter quality were positively correlated with community-weighted mean leaf dry matter content (LDMC), and negatively correlated with community-weighted mean leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC). Consequently, litter decomposability was correlated negatively with community-weighted mean LDMC, and positively with community-weighted mean LNC. Environmental factors (disturbance and climate) influenced community-weighted mean traits. Plant communities experiencing less frequent or less intense disturbance exhibited higher community-weighted mean LDMC, and therefore higher litter lignin content and slower litter decomposability. LDMC therefore appears as a powerful marker of both changes in land use and of the

  16. Towards a biochemical and structural characterisation of the sodium-iodide sym-porter (Nis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrouzet, E.; Marcellin, D.; Huc, S.; Quemeneur, E. [CEA Centre de Marcoule (SBTN), 30 - Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Pourcher, T. [Nice Univ., TIRO CEA, Sophia Antipolis, 06 - Nice (France)

    2006-07-01

    Iodide is essential for thyroid hormone biosynthesis in mammals, and therefore for the control of cell metabolism and the development of the central nervous system in the foetus and newborns, but is relatively scarce element in the environment. To ensure its accumulation, the thyroid gland has evolved a remarkably efficient system, the sodium-iodide sym-porter (NIS), that was first characterized at the molecular level 10 years ago (1). NIS is an intrinsic protein mainly located in the basolateral membrane of thyroid follicular cells where it actively transports iodide ions using the sodium gradient as a driving force (2,3). In addition, this transporter has been found in lactating mammary gland, stomach, and salivary glands, and its mRNA was detected in brain, ovaries, testis. To date, the physiological role of NIS in these organs is not yet identified (3,4).The capacity of NIS to mediate the accumulation of radioactive iodide has been exploited for many years in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer as well as for the detection and radiotherapy of derived metastases. Moreover, the presence of NIS in some breast tumours and the possibility to express it by targeted gene therapy in tumour cells where it is not naturally present could also widen its medical application (4-7). In case of accidental contamination, NIS would also be responsible for accumulation of radioisotopes in the thyroid and for their transfer to the milk and the newborn, eventually causing thyroid cancers. This has motivated our research program in the perspective of designing novel specific therapeutics. During the last decade, the gene encoding the thyroid NIS has been identified and sequenced in various species including rat, mouse and human (1, 8). It was also demonstrated that the protein expression and activity are highly regulated both at the transcriptional and post-translational levels (3). A preliminary topological mode could be drawn from the protein sequence. It proposes a general

  17. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  18. Thermophysicochemical Reaction of ZrCo-Hydrogen-Helium System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwangjin; Kang, Hee-Seok; Yun, Sei-Hun; Chung, Hongsuk

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear fusion energy, which is clean and infinite, has been studied for more than half a century. Efforts are in progress worldwide for the demonstration and validation of nuclear fusion energy. Korea has been developing hydrogen isotope storage and delivery system (SDS) technologies including a basic scientific study on a hydrogen storage medium. An SDS bed, which is a key component of the SDS, is used for storing hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride form and supplying them to a tokamak. Thermophysicochemical properties of the ZrCo-H2-He system are investigated for the practical utilization of a hydriding alloy system. The hydriding reaction, in which ZrCoHx is composed as ZrCo absorbing hydrogen, is exothermic. The dehydriding reaction, in which ZrCoHx decomposes into ZrCo and hydrogen, is endothermic. The heat generated through the hydriding reaction interrupts the hydriding progress. The heat loss by a dehydriding reaction impedes the dehydriding progress. The tritium decay product, helium-3, covers the ZrCo and keeps the hydrogen from contact with ZrCo in the SDS bed. In this study, we designed and fabricated a ZrCo bed and its performance test rig. The helium blanketing effect on a ZrCo hydrogen reaction with 0 % to 20 % helium content in a gaseous phase and a helium blanket removal method were studied experimentally. In addition, the volumetric flow rates and temperature at the beginning of a ZrCo hydrogen reaction in a hydrogen or helium atmosphere, and the cooling of the SDS bed by radiation only and by both radiation and natural convection related to the reuse cycle, were obtained.

  19. [The analysis for silver iodide fine particles of TLC/FTIR matrix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing; Su, Xiao; Wu, Hai-Jun; Zhai, Yan-Jun; Xia, Jin-Ming; Buhebate; Xu, Yi-Zhuang; Wu, Jin-Guang

    2012-07-01

    In situ TLC/FTIR technique has tremendous potential in the analysis of complex mixtures. However, the progress in this technique was quite slow. The reason is that conventional stationary phase has strong absorption in FTIR spectrum and thus brings about severe interference in the detection of samples. To solve the problem, the authors propose to use AgI fine particles as stationary phase of TLC plate. The reasons are as follows: Silver iodide fine particles have no absorbance in an IR region between 4 000 and 800 cm(-1), therefore, the interference caused by IR absorption of stationary phase can be removed. Moreover, silver iodide is stable and insolvable in water and organic solvents and thus it will not be destroyed by mobile phase or react with samples during the TLC separation. To improve TLC separation efficiency and quality of FTIR spectra during the TLC/FTIR analysis, the size of AgI particles should be below 500 nm. We used orthogonal design approach to optimize the experimental condition to AgI particles so that the average size of AgI particles is around 100 nm. No absorption of impurity or adsorbed water were observed in FTIR spectrum of the AgI particles the authors used "settlement volatilization method" to prepare TLC plate without using polymeric adhesive that may bring about significant interference in FTIR analysis. Preliminary TLC experiments proved that the TLC plate using AgI fine particles as stationary phase can separate mixtures of rhodamine B and bromophenol blue successfully. Applications of silver iodide fine particles as stationary phase have bright perspective in the development of in-situ TLC/FTIR analysis techniques.

  20. Titrimetric and spectrophotometric assay of diethylcarbamazine citrate in formulations using iodate and iodide mixture as reagents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraju Swamy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available One titrimetric and two spectrophotometric methods are proposed for the determination of diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC in bulk drug and in formulations using potassium iodate and potassium iodide as reagent. The methods employ the well-known analytical reaction between iodate and iodide in the presence of acid. In titrimetry (method A, the drug was treated with a measured excess of thiosulfate in the presence of unmeasured excess of iodate-iodide mixture and after a standing time of 10 min, the surplus thiosulfate was determined by back titration with iodine towards starch end point. Titrimetric assay is based on a 1:3 reaction stoichiometry between DEC and iodine and the method is applicable over 2.0-10.0 mg range. The liberated iodine is measured spectrophotometrically at 370 nm (method B or the iodine-starch complex measured at 570 nm (method C. In both methods, the absorbance is found to be linearly dependent on the concentration of iodine, which in turn is related to DEC concentration. The calibration curves are linear over 2.5-50 and 2.5-30 µg mL-1 DEC for method B and method C, respectively. The calculated molar absorptivity and Sandell sensitivity values were 6.48×103 L mol-1 cm-1 and 0.0604 µg cm-2, respectively, for method B, and their respective values for method C are 9.96×103 L mol-1 cm-1 and 0.0393 µg cm-2. The intra-day and inter-day accuracy and precision studies were carried out according to the ICH guidelines. The methods were successfully applied to the analysis of DEC formulations.

  1. Molecular sexing of tucuxi dolphins (Sotalia guianensis and Sotalia fluviatilis using samples from biopsy darting and decomposed carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haydée A. Cunha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We tested the zinc-finger sex chromosome-linked genes Zfx/Zfy and the sex-determining region Y (Sry genes for gender determination of biopsy samples from marine and riverine tucuxi dolphins (Sotalia guianensis and S. fluviatilis. We also evaluated the performance of these genes with decomposed carcasses, for which sexing cannot rely on the direct examination of the reproductive tract. Both systems proved reliable for sexing 46 fresh and decomposed samples, making them especially useful when biopsy darting is coupled with photo-identification studies.

  2. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  3. Halogen-Bond-Promoted Photoactivation of Perfluoroalkyl Iodides: A Photochemical Protocol for Perfluoroalkylation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaxin; Wang, Junhua; Li, Guo-Xing; He, Gang; Chen, Gong

    2017-03-17

    A new protocol for photochemical perfluoroalkylation reactions using perfluoroalkyl iodide, amine additive, and THF solvent is reported. This protocol does not require a photoredox catalyst and proceeds at ambient temperature with irradiation from a compact fluorescent lamp, low-intensity UV lamp, or sunlight. This protocol can be applied to the synthesis of perfluoroalkyl-substituted phenanthridines as well as effect the iodo-perfluoroalkylation of alkenes/alkynes and the C-H perfluoroalkylation of electron-rich arenes and heteroarenes. This C-H perfluoroalkylation reaction offers a unique method for site-selective labeling of oligopeptides at the tryptophan residue.

  4. Atypical cutaneous sporotrichosis in an immunocompetent adult: Response to potassium iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Gandhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous sporotrichosis, also known as “Rose Gardener's disease,” caused by dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenkii, is usually characterized by indolent nodular or nodulo-ulcerative lesions arranged in a linear pattern. We report bizarre nonlinear presentation of Sporotrichosis, in an immunocompetent adult occurring after a visit to Amazon rain forest, speculating infection with more virulent species of Sporothrix. The diagnosis was reached with the help of periodic acid-Schiff positive yeast cells and cigar shaped bodies seen in skin biopsy along with the therapeutic response to potassium iodide.

  5. Towards Renewable Iodide Sources for Electrolytes in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Sagaidak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel family of iodide salts and ionic liquids based on different carbohydrate core units is herein described for application in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC. The influence of the molecular skeleton and the cationic structure on the electrolyte properties, device performance and on interfacial charge transfer has been investigated. In combination with the C106 polypyridyl ruthenium sensitizer, power conversion efficiencies lying between 5.0% and 7.3% under standard Air Mass (A.M. 1.5G conditions were obtained in association with a low volatile methoxypropionitrile (MPN-based electrolyte.

  6. Effects of Aromatic Ammoniums on Methyl Ammonium Lead Iodide Hybrid Perovskite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of bulky ammoniums into methyl ammonium lead iodide hybrid perovskites (MAPbI3 has emerged as a promising strategy to improve the properties of these materials. In the present work, we studied the effects of several aromatic ammoniums onto the structural, electronic, and optical properties of MAPbI3. Although powder XRD data suggest that the bulky cations are not involved in the bulk phase of the MAPbI3, a surprisingly large effect of the bulky cations onto the photoluminescence properties was observed.

  7. Crystal Growth and Dissolution of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite in Sequential Deposition: Correlation between Morphology Evolution and Photovoltaic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Huang, Chi-Kai; Su, Tzu-Sen; Hong, Cheng-You; Wei, Tzu-Chien

    2017-03-15

    Crystal morphology and structure are important for improving the organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite semiconductor property in optoelectronic, electronic, and photovoltaic devices. In particular, crystal growth and dissolution are two major phenomena in determining the morphology of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite in the sequential deposition method for fabricating a perovskite solar cell. In this report, the effect of immersion time in the second step, i.e., methlyammonium iodide immersion in the morphological, structural, optical, and photovoltaic evolution, is extensively investigated. Supported by experimental evidence, a five-staged, time-dependent evolution of the morphology of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite crystals is established and is well connected to the photovoltaic performance. This result is beneficial for engineering optimal time for methylammonium iodide immersion and converging the solar cell performance in the sequential deposition route. Meanwhile, our result suggests that large, well-faceted methylammonium lead iodide perovskite single crystal may be incubated by solution process. This offers a low cost route for synthesizing perovskite single crystal.

  8. Development of a screening approach to detect thyroid disrupting chemicals that inhibit the human sodium iodide symporter (NIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinger, Daniel R; Murr, Ashley S; Buckalew, Angela R; Simmons, Steven O; Stoker, Tammy E; Laws, Susan C

    2017-04-01

    The U.S. EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program aims to use high-throughput assays and computational toxicology models to screen and prioritize chemicals that may disrupt the thyroid signaling pathway. Thyroid hormone biosynthesis requires active iodide uptake mediated by the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS). Monovalent anions, such as the environmental contaminant perchlorate, are competitive inhibitors of NIS, yet limited information exists for more structurally diverse chemicals. A novel cell line expressing human NIS, hNIS-HEK293T-EPA, was used in a radioactive iodide uptake (RAIU) assay to identify inhibitors of NIS-mediated iodide uptake. The RAIU assay was optimized and performance evaluated with 12 reference chemicals comprising known NIS inhibitors and inactive compounds. An additional 39 chemicals including environmental contaminants were evaluated, with 28 inhibiting RAIU over 20% of that observed for solvent controls. Cell viability assays were performed to assess any confounding effects of cytotoxicity. RAIU and cytotoxic responses were used to calculate selectivity scores to group chemicals based on their potential to affect NIS. RAIU IC50 values were also determined for chemicals that displayed concentration-dependent inhibition of RAIU (≥50%) without cytotoxicity. Strong assay performance and highly reproducible results support the utilization of this approach to screen large chemical libraries for inhibitors of NIS-mediated iodide uptake. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Elucidating the effect of the lead iodide complexation degree behind the morphology and performance of perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastria, R; Colella, S; Qualtieri, A; Listorti, A; Gigli, G; Rizzo, A

    2017-03-17

    The inclusion of iodide additives in hybrid perovskite precursor solutions has been successfully exploited to improve the solar cell efficiency but their impact on perovskite formation, morphology and photovoltaic performance is still not clear. Here an extensive analysis of the effect of iodide additives in the solution-phase and during the perovskite film formation, as well as their effect on device performance is provided. The results demonstrate that in the solution-phase the additives promote the formation of lead poly-iodide species resulting in the disaggregation of the inorganic lead iodide framework and in the formation of smaller nuclei inducing the growth of uniform and smooth perovskite films. Most importantly, the complexation capability of different iodide additives does not only directly affect film morphology but also influences the density of defect states by varying the stoichiometry of precursors. These findings demonstrate that the fine control of the interactions of the chemical species in the solution-phase is essential for the precise control of the morphology at the nanoscale and the growth of the perovskite films with a reduced density of defect states. Therefore, the in-depth understanding of all the processes involved in the solution-phase is the first step for the development of a facile and reproducible approach for the fabrication of hybrid perovskite solar cells with enhanced photovoltaic performance.

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Pseudomonas spp. Strains That Efficiently Decompose Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa M. Furmanczyk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their particular properties, detergents are widely used in household cleaning products, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and in agriculture as adjuvants tailoring the features of pesticides or other crop protection agents. The continuously growing use of these various products means that water soluble detergents have become one of the most problematic groups of pollutants for the aquatic and terrestrial environments. Thus it is important to identify bacteria having the ability to survive in the presence of large quantities of detergent and efficiently decompose it to non-surface active compounds. In this study, we used peaty soil sampled from a surface flow constructed wetland in a wastewater treatment plant to isolate bacteria that degrade sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. We identified and initially characterized 36 Pseudomonas spp. strains that varied significantly in their ability to use SDS as their sole carbon source. Five isolates having the closest taxonomic relationship to the Pseudomonas jessenii subgroup appeared to be the most efficient SDS degraders, decomposing from 80 to 100% of the SDS present in an initial concentration 1 g/L in less than 24 h. These isolates exhibited significant differences in degree of SDS degradation, their resistance to high detergent concentration (ranging from 2.5 g/L up to 10 g/L or higher, and in chemotaxis toward SDS on a plate test. Mass spectrometry revealed several SDS degradation products, 1-dodecanol being dominant; however, traces of dodecanal, 2-dodecanol, and 3-dodecanol were also observed, but no dodecanoic acid. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis zymography revealed that all of the selected isolates possessed alkylsulfatase-like activity. Three isolates, AP3_10, AP3_20, and AP3_22, showed a single band on native PAGE zymography, that could be the result of alkylsulfatase activity, whereas for isolates AP3_16 and AP3_19 two bands were observed. Moreover, the AP3_22 strain exhibited a band

  11. Effects of lithium iodide doping on devolatilization characteristics of brown coals; Yoka lithium no tenka ga kattan no kanetsu henka katei ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muraoka, J.; Kumagai, H.; Hayashi, J.; Chiba, T. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    In order to discuss effects of lithium iodide (LiI) doping on condensation structure of brown coals during heating, spectral changes were measured by using an in-situ FT-IR. It was found that the LiI doping accelerates weight reduction due to heating, and the doping effect is affected by coal structure. Both of Loy Yang (LY) coal and its LiI doped coal (DLY) had absorption intensity of the FT-IR spectra decreased with rising temperature, and the absorption center belonging to an OH group shows different shifts between the LY and DLY coals. This indicates that the LiI doping has affected the change in hydrogen bonding patterns associated with heating. Both of South Banko (SB) and LY coals had the absorption spectral intensity in the OH group decreased as the weight reduction (conversion) rate increased. Reduction in the OH groups associated with heating is caused by volatilization and condensation reaction in light-gravity fraction. However, in the case of equal conversion rate, the LiI doped coal shows higher spectral intensity than the original coal, with the LiI doping suppressing reduction in the OH groups. It appears that the doping suppresses the condensation reaction between the OH groups. 2 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  13. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  14. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  15. Hydrogen transport membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  16. Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction for the Measurement of Total I (Iodine, Iodide, and Triiodide) in Spacecraft Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipert, Robert J.; Porter, Marc D.; Siperko, Lorraine M.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Rutz, Jeff A.; Schultz, John R.; Carrizales, Stephanie M.; McCoy, J. Torin

    2009-01-01

    An experimental drinking water monitoring kit for the measurement of iodine and silver(I) was recently delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). The kit is based on Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (CSPE) technology, which measures the change in diffuse reflectance of indicator disks following exposure to a water sample. To satisfy additional spacecraft water monitoring requirements, CSPE has now been extended to encompass the measurement of total I (iodine, iodide, and triiodide) through the introduction of an oxidizing agent, which converts iodide and triiodide to iodine, for measurement using the same indicator disks currently being tested on ISS. These disks detect iodine, but are insensitive to iodide and triiodide. We report here the operational considerations, design, and ground-based performance of the CSPE method for total I. The results demonstrate that CSPE technology is poised to meet NASA's total I monitoring requirements.

  17. Potentiation of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by a cationic fullerene by added iodide: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Dai, Tianhong; Wang, Min; Vecchio, Daniela; Chiang, Long Y; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation with fullerenes bearing cationic charges may overcome resistant microbes. We synthesized C60-fullerene (LC16) bearing decaquaternary chain and deca-tertiary-amino groups that facilitates electron-transfer reactions via the photoexcited fullerene. Addition of the harmless salt, potassium iodide (10 mM) potentiated the ultraviolet A (UVA) or white light-mediated killing of Gram-negative bacteria Acinetobacter baumannii, Gram-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and fungal yeast Candida albicans by 1-2+ logs. Mouse model infected with bioluminescent Acinetobacter baumannii gave increased loss of bioluminescence when iodide (10 mM) was combined with LC16 and UVA/white light. The mechanism may involve photoinduced electron reduction of (1)(C60>)* or (3)(C60>)* by iodide producing I· or I2 followed by subsequent intermolecular electron-transfer events of (C60>)-· to produce reactive radicals.

  18. Solar hydrogen generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Sabol, A. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus, using solar energy to manufacture hydrogen by dissociating water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen molecules is described. Solar energy is concentrated on a globe containing water thereby heating the water to its dissociation temperature. The globe is pervious to hydrogen molecules permitting them to pass through the globe while being essentially impervious to oxygen molecules. The hydrogen molecules are collected after passing through the globe and the oxygen molecules are removed from the globe.

  19. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  20. Species-specific effects of live roots and shoot litter on soil decomposer abundances do not forecast plant litter-nitrogen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saj, Stéphane; Mikola, Juha; Ekelund, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    Plant species produce litter of varying quality and differ in the quality and quantity of compounds they release from live roots, which both can induce different decomposer growth in the soil. To test whether differences in decomposer growth can forecast the amount of N species acquire from plant...... microbes and their protozoan and nematode feeders, and to link decomposer growth and plant nutrient uptake, we measured the amount of N taken up by plants from the added litter. We hypothesised that those species that induce the highest growth of microbes, and especially that of microbial feeders......-specific ability of plants to induce decomposer growth....

  1. The effect of potassium iodide on the production of acid phosphatase by Sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Grover

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to find out the in vitro effect of potassium iodide (KI on the production of acid phosphatase by fully characterized strain of S.schenckii isolated from a patient of Cutaneous Sporotrichosis. The enzyme acid phosphatase was estimated during the 3 phases of growth of S.schenckii, without and with three concentrations of KI incorporated in the culture medium. In the control and in the test proper, with various concentrations of KI, no adverse effect of KI was observed on the production of acid phosphatase in early and mid log phase of fungal growth. Whereas in the exponential phase in test proper, there was a statistical significant decrease in the enzyme production with 0.8% and 3.2% of KI. The low activity at 0.8% and 3.2% KI indicates that KI has inhibitory effect on the growth of S.schenckii and has led to decrease in the activity of the enzyme. (Med J Indones 2003; 12: 65-8 Keywords: S.schenckii, acid phosphatase, potassium iodide

  2. A study of the homogeneity and deviations from stoichiometry in mercuric iodide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, A.; Morgan, S.; He, C.; Silberman, E.; van den Berg, L.; Ortale, C.; Franks, L.; Schieber, M.

    1989-01-01

    We have been able to determine the deviations from stoichiometry of mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) by using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Mercury excess or iodine deficiency in mercuric iodide can be evaluated from the eutectic melting of HgI/sub 2/-- Hg/sub 2/I/sub 2/ at 235/degree/C which appears as an additional peak in DSC thermograms. I/sub 2/ excess can be found from the existence of the I/sub 2/--HgI/sub 2/ eutectic melting at 103/degree/C. An additional DSC peak appears in some samples around 112/degree/C that could be explained by the presence of iodine inclusions. Using Resonance Fluorescence Spectroscopy (RFS) we have been able to determine the presence of free I/sub 2/ that is released by samples during the heating at 120/degree/C (crystal growth temperature) thus giving additional support to the above DSC results. 19 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Non-triiodide based autoinhibition by iodide ion in the trithionate-iodine reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseko, György; Horváth, Attila K

    2010-06-17

    The trithionate-iodine reaction has been studied spectrophotometrically in a slightly acidic medium at 25.0 +/- 0.1 degrees C in acetate/acetic acid buffer monitoring the absorbance at 468 nm at the isosbestic point of the iodine-triiodide ion system in the absence and presence of initially added iodide ion at I = 0.5 M ionic strength adjusted by sodium perchlorate. The stoichiometry of the reaction was found to be S(3)O(6)(2-) + 4I(2) + 6H(2)O --> 3SO(4)(2-) + 8I(-) + 12H(+). It is also shown that the consumption of iodine is inhibited by iodide ion, but it cannot be simply explained via the fast equilibrium formation of triiodide ion. A five-step kinetic model with four fitted and fixed kinetic parameters is proposed and discussed in detail, on the basis of which all the most important characteristics of the measured kinetic curves are adequately explained.

  4. Solution- and solid-phase oligosaccharide synthesis using glucosyl iodides: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Son N; Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2002-11-19

    Glycosyl iodide donors have been used in both solid- and solution-phase syntheses yielding alpha-(1 --> 6)-linked glucosyl oligomers in highly efficient protocols. While the solid-phase strategy offers advantages in terms of ease of purification, it requires a total of 7.5 equiv of donor and approximately 12 h to complete the incorporation of one monosaccharide unit. In contrast, solution-phase methods require only 2.5 equiv of donor and 2-3 h reaction time per glycosylation. Moreover, since the reactions are virtually quantitative (> 90%) column chromatography of the material is facile. The overall advantages of solution-phase oligosaccharide synthesis were further illustrated in the convergent synthesis of a hexamer (methoxycarbonylmethyl 6-O-acetyl-2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 6)-tetrakis-(2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 --> 6))-2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-1-thio-alpha-D-glucopyranoside) that was constructed from dimer donor iodides in a two-plus-two and a two-plus-four fashion. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  5. Functionalized metal organic frameworks for effective capture of radioactive organic iodides

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Baiyan

    2017-06-27

    Highly efficient capture of radioactive organic iodides (ROIs) from off-gas mixtures remains a substantial challenge for nuclear waste treatment. Current materials utilized for ROI sequestration suffer from low capacity, high cost (e.g. use of noble metals), and poor recyclability. Recently, we have developed a new strategy to tackle this challenge by functionalizing MOF materials with tertiary amines to create molecular traps for the effective capture and removal of ROIs (e.g. radioactive methyl iodide) from nuclear wastes. To further enhance the uptake capacity and performance of CH3I capture by ROI molecular traps, herein, we carry out a systematic study to investigate the effect of different amine molecules on ROI capture. The results demonstrate a record-high CH3I saturation uptake capacity of 80% for MIL-101-Cr-DMEDA at 150 °C, which is 5.3 times that of Ag0@MOR (15 wt%), a leading adsorbent material for capturing ROIs during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Furthermore, the CH3I decontamination factors (DFs) for MIL-101-Cr-DMEDA are as high as 5000 under simulated reprocessing conditions, largely exceeding that of facility regulatory requirements (DF = 3000). In addition, MIL-101-Cr-DMEDA can be recycled without loss of capacity, illustrating yet another advantage compared to known industrial adsorbents, which are typically of a

  6. Flow cytometric determination of basophils in whole blood with n-propyl Astra Blue iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, M J; Hwang, D R; Ben-David, D

    1986-07-01

    Within the past year, it has become apparent, in connection with its use on automatic flow cytometers, that the quality of commercially available Alcian Blue has significantly declined. A homologous series of alkylated (C1-C7) Astra Blue quaternary ammonium halides was prepared, characterized, and evaluated for the detection of basophils in whole blood. On the Technicon H6000 flow cytometer, the resolution of the basophil cluster from the main population of unstained white blood cells was found to depend on the chain length of the quaternizing alkyl group. Optimal basophil resolution was observed for the n-propyl derivative. Correlation of the new method vs Alcian Blue as the reference on the H6000 was expressed as follows: %Baso (Astra Blue) = 0.89% Baso (Alcian Blue) + 0.12% for 180 fresh whole blood samples. Within-run precision at a basophil differential count of 0.73% was characterized by SD = 0.11, identical to that obtained for Alcian Blue. Aqueous solutions of n-propyl Astra Blue iodide, in contrast to Alcian Blue, are thermally stable. Heating the reagent for 1 h at 100 degrees C did not alter solubility or cytochemical behavior. In contrast, parallel treatment of Alcian Blue yielded insoluble material by hydrolysis of the isothiouronium groups. The reagent for basophil detection comprises n-propyl Astra Blue iodide, lanthanum chloride, sodium chloride, Tween 20, and cetylpyridinium chloride. The Astra Blue derivatives were characterized by uv-vis, ir, percentage halide, paper chromatography, and 13C NMR.

  7. Safe disposal of radioactive iodide ions from solutions by Ag2O grafted sodium niobate nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wanjun; Li, Xingliang; Liu, Guoping; Yu, Qianhong; Xie, Xiang; Wei, Hongyuan; Jian, Yuan

    2016-01-14

    Radioactive iodine isotopes are released into the environment by the nuclear industry and medical research institutions using radioactive materials, and have negative effects on organisms living within the ecosystem. Thus, safe disposal of radioactive iodine is necessary and crucial. For this reason, the uptake of iodide ions was investigated in Ag2O nanocrystal grafted sodium niobate nanofibers, which were prepared by forming a well-matched phase coherent interface between them. The resulting composite was applied as an efficient adsorbent for I(-) anions by forming an AgI precipitate, which also remained firmly attached to the substrates. Due to their one-dimensional morphology, the new adsorbents can be easily dispersed in liquids and readily separated after purification. This significantly enhances the adsorption efficiency and reduces the separation costs. The change in structure from the pristine sodium niobate to Ag2O anchored sodium niobate and to the used adsorbent was examined by using various characterization techniques. The effects of Ag(+) concentration, pH, equilibration time, ionic strength and competing ions on the iodide ion removal ability of the composite were studied. The Ag2O nanocrystal grafted sodium niobate adsorbent showed a high adsorption capacity and excellent selectivity for I(-) anions in basic solutions. Our results are useful for the further development of improved adsorbents for removing I(-) anions from basic wastewater.

  8. Chitosan finishing nonwoven textiles loaded with silver and iodide for antibacterial wound dressing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert-Viard, François; Martin, Adeline; Chai, Feng; Neut, Christel; Tabary, Nicolas; Martel, Bernard; Blanchemain, Nicolas

    2015-03-02

    Polyethylene terephtalate (PET) and Polypropylene (PP) textiles are widely used in biomedical application such as wound dressings and implants. The aim of this work was to develop an antibacterial chitosan (CHT) coating activated by silver or by iodine. Chitosan was immobilized onto PET and PP supports using citric acid (CTR) as a crosslinking agent through a pad-dry-cure textile finishing process. Interestingly, depending on the CHT/CTR molar ratio, two different systems were obtained: rich in cationic ammonium groups when the CTR concentration was 1%w/v, and rich in anionic carboxylate groups when the CTR concentration was 10%w/v. As a consequence, such samples could be selectively loaded with iodine and silver nitrate, respectively.Both types of coatings were analyzed using SEM and FTIR, their sorption capacities were evaluated toward iodide/iodate anions (I(-)/IO3(-)) and the silver cations (Ag(+)) were evaluated using elemental analysis. Finally, in vitro evaluations were carried out to evaluate the cytocompatibility on the epithelial cell line. The silver loaded textile reported a stronger antibacterial effect against E.coli (5 log10 reduction) than toward S. aureus (3 log10) while the antibacterial effect of the iodide loaded textiles was limited to 1 log10 to 2 log10 on both strains.

  9. Gas-phase pesticide measurement using iodide ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Murschell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Volatilization and subsequent processing in the atmosphere are an important environmental pathway for the transport and chemical fate of pesticides. However, these processes remain a particularly poorly understood component of pesticide lifecycles due to analytical challenges in measuring pesticides in the atmosphere. Most pesticide measurements require long (hours to days sampling times coupled with offline analysis, inhibiting observation of meteorologically driven events or investigation of rapid oxidation chemistry. Here, we present chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with iodide reagent ions as a fast and sensitive measurement of four current-use pesticides. These semi-volatile pesticides were calibrated with injections of solutions onto a filter and subsequently volatilized to generate gas-phase analytes. Trifluralin and atrazine are detected as iodide–molecule adducts, while permethrin and metolachlor are detected as adducts between iodide and fragments of the parent analyte molecule. Limits of detection (1 s are 0.37, 0.67, 0.56, and 1.1 µg m−3 for gas-phase trifluralin, metolachlor, atrazine, and permethrin, respectively. The sensitivities of trifluralin and metolachlor depend on relative humidity, changing as much as 70 and 59, respectively, as relative humidity of the sample air varies from 0 to 80 %. This measurement approach is thus appropriate for laboratory experiments and potentially near-source field measurements.

  10. (E)-1-Methyl-4-[2-(2-naphth-yl)vin-yl]pyridinium iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fun, Hoong-Kun; Chanawanno, Kullapa; Chantrapromma, Suchada

    2009-05-29

    In the title compound, C(18)H(16)N(+)·I(-), the cation is disordered over two orientations related by a 180° rotation about its long axis with occupancies of 0.554 (7) and 0.446 (7). Both disorder components exist in an E configuration. The dihedral angle between the pyridinium ring and the naphthalene ring system is 4.7 (6)° in the major disorder component and 1.6 (8)° in the minor component. In the crystal structure, centrosymmetrically related cations are stacked along the a axis, with significant π-π inter-actions between the pyridinium ring and the naphthalene ring system [centroid-centroid distance = 3.442 (9) Å]. The iodide ions are located between adjacent columns of cations. The cations are linked to the iodide ions by C-H⋯I inter-actions. Weak C-H⋯π inter-actions involving the methyl group are also observed.

  11. First-Principles Identification of Iodine Exchange Mechanism in Iodide Ionic Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Ranjit; Park, Noejung

    2012-10-18

    We investigated the microscopic mechanism of ion transport in iodide ionic liquid, using first-principles calculations. We show that the desorption barrier of polyiodides (I3(-) or I5(-)) from the cation is in a similar energy range as or higher than the barrier for the bond dissociation and ensued desorption of neutral iodine (I2). This suggests that, instead of the physical diffusion of such a negatively charged multiatomic species, the exchange of neutral iodine (I2) between the polyiodides can be an easier channel for the movement of polyiodide. For the transport of the monoiodide anion (I(-)), we suggest the contribution of the Grotthuss-type ion exchange through the intermediately formed even-member anion (I2n(-)), in addition to drift and diffusion. As a result, we suggest that, instead of the commonly cited diffusion of the triiodide/iodide (I3(-)/I(-)) redox couple, the exchange of neutral iodine (I2) and the Grotthuss-type transport (I(-)) constitute the dominant ion transport mechanism.

  12. Observation of crystallization and characterizations on thiourea cadmium iodide: A semi-organic optical material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Preeti; Hasmuddin, Mohd. [Crystal Growth and XRD Lab, Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Abdullah, M.M. [Crystal Growth and XRD Lab, Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices (PCSED), Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Najran University, P.O. Box 1988, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Shkir, Mohd. [Crystal Growth and XRD Lab, Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India) and Department of Physics, ARSD College, University of Delhi, New Delhi 110021 (India); Wahab, M.A., E-mail: aries.pre84@gmail.com [Crystal Growth and XRD Lab, Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Thiourea cadmium iodide (TCI) was grown by slow evaporation solution technique. • Morphology and growth rate of the grown compound are determined with the help of inverted microscope. • Optical band gap has been determined. • Microstructure analysis has been reported. • Electrical study has been reported and discussed. - Abstract: In this work, the single crystals of thiourea cadmium iodide were grown by slow evaporation solution technique in two different ratios 2:1 and 1:1. During the formation of their single crystals the morphological features and its live growth process were recorded with the help of inverted microscope. Structural studies of the grown crystals have been carried out by powder X-ray diffraction to confirm the crystal system and vibrational modes by Raman spectroscopy. The optical energy band gaps were investigated through UV–vis spectroscopy study. The surface morphology of the grown single crystals was analyzed by using Scanning Electron Microscope and thermal analysis was carried out by using thermogravimetric analysis. The electrical properties were also studied as a function of frequency and the obtained results are discussed.

  13. Decomposing the time-frequency representation of EEG using non-negative matrix and multi-way factorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai; Parnas, Josef

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate how non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) can be used to decompose the inter trial phase coherence (ITPC) of multi-channel EEG to yield a unique decomposition of time-frequency signatures present in various degrees in the recording channels. The NMF optimization is easily...

  14. Decomposing the Triple-Helix synergy into the regional innovation systems of Norway: Firm data and patent networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strand, Ø.; Ivanova, I.; Leydesdorff, L.

    The Triple Helix model of university-industry-government relations allows us to use mutual information among geographical, sectorial, and size distribution of firms to measure synergy at various geographical scales in a nation. In this paper we decompose the synergy in Triple Helix relations and

  15. Understanding E-Learning Adoption among Brazilian Universities: An Application of the Decomposed Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Luiz Miguel Renda; Okazaki, Shintaro

    2013-01-01

    This study sheds light on the organizational dimensions underlying e-learning adoption among Brazilian universities. We propose an organizational e-learning adoption model based on the decomposed theory of planned behavior (TPB). A series of hypotheses are posited with regard to the relationships among the proposed constructs. The model is…

  16. Leaf traits capture the effects of land use changes and climate on litter decomposability of grasslands across Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fortunel, C.; Garnier, E.; Joffre, R.; Kazakou, E.; Quested, H.; Grigulis, K.; Lavorel, S.; Ansquer, P.; Castro, H.; Cruz, P.; Doležal, Jiří; Eriksson, O.; Freitas, H.; Golodets, C.; Jouany, C.; Kigel, J.; Kleyer, M.; Lehsten, V.; Lepš, J.; Meier, T.; Pakeman, R.; Papadimitriou, M.; Papanastasis, V. P.; Quétier, F.; Robson, M.; Sternberg, M.; Theau, J.-P.; Thébault, A.; Zarovali, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 3 (2009), s. 598-611 ISSN 0012-9658 Grant - others:EU(XE) EVK2-2001-000356 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : litter decomposability * disturbance * leaf traits Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.411, year: 2009

  17. Decomposing change in life expectancy : A bouquet of formulas in honor of Nathan Keyfitz's 90th birthday

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaupel, JW; Romo, VC

    We extend Nathan Keyfitz research on continuous change in life expectancy over time by presenting and proving a new formula for decomposing such change. The formula separates change in life expectancy over time into two terms. The first term captures the general effect of reduction in death rates at

  18. Using Mid Infrared Spectroscopy to Predict the Decomposability of Soil Organic Matter Stored in Arctic Tundra Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The large amounts of organic matter stored in permafrost-region soils are preserved in a relatively undecomposed state by the cold and wet environmental conditions limiting decomposer activity. With pending climate changes and the potential for warming of Arctic soils, there is a need to better unde...

  19. A domain-decomposed multi-model plasma simulation of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, I. A. M.; Shumlak, U.; Ho, A.; Miller, S. T.

    2017-10-01

    Collisionless magnetic reconnection is a process relevant to many areas of plasma physics in which energy stored in magnetic fields within highly conductive plasmas is rapidly converted into kinetic and thermal energy. Both in natural phenomena such as solar flares and terrestrial aurora as well as in magnetic confinement fusion experiments, the reconnection process is observed on timescales much shorter than those predicted by a resistive MHD model. As a result, this topic is an active area of research in which plasma models with varying fidelity have been tested in order to understand the proper physics explaining the reconnection process. In this research, a hybrid multi-model simulation employing the Hall-MHD and two-fluid plasma models on a decomposed domain is used to study this problem. The simulation is set up using the WARPXM code developed at the University of Washington, which uses a discontinuous Galerkin Runge-Kutta finite element algorithm and implements boundary conditions between models in the domain to couple their variable sets. The goal of the current work is to determine the parameter regimes most appropriate for each model to maintain sufficient physical fidelity over the whole domain while minimizing computational expense. This work is supported by a Grant from US AFOSR.

  20. Contrasting effects of elevated temperature and invertebrate grazing regulate multispecies interactions between decomposer fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Donald A'Bear

    Full Text Available Predicting the influence of biotic and abiotic factors on species interactions and ecosystem processes is among the primary aims of community ecologists. The composition of saprotrophic fungal communities is a consequence of competitive mycelial interactions, and a major determinant of woodland decomposition and nutrient cycling rates. Elevation of atmospheric temperature is predicted to drive changes in fungal community development. Top-down regulation of mycelial growth is an important determinant of, and moderator of temperature-driven changes to, two-species interaction outcomes. This study explores the interactive effects of a 4 °C temperature increase and soil invertebrate (collembola or woodlice grazing on multispecies interactions between cord-forming basidiomycete fungi emerging from colonised beech (Fagus sylvatica wood blocks. The fungal dominance hierarchy at ambient temperature (16 °C; Phanerochaete velutina > Resinicium bicolor > Hypholoma fasciculare was altered by elevated temperature (20 °C; R. bicolor > P. velutina > H. fasciculare in ungrazed systems. Warming promoted the competitive ability of the fungal species (R. bicolor that was preferentially grazed by all invertebrate species. As a consequence, grazing prevented the effect of temperature on fungal community development and maintained a multispecies assemblage. Decomposition of fungal-colonised wood was stimulated by warming, with implications for increased CO2 efflux from woodland soil. Analogous to aboveground plant communities, increasing complexity of biotic and abiotic interactions appears to be important in buffering climate change effects on soil decomposers.

  1. Cellulose utilization in forest litter and soil: identification of bacterial and fungal decomposers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stursová, Martina; Zifčáková, Lucia; Leigh, Mary Beth; Burgess, Robert; Baldrian, Petr

    2012-06-01

    Organic matter decomposition in the globally widespread coniferous forests has an important role in the carbon cycle, and cellulose decomposition is especially important in this respect because cellulose is the most abundant polysaccharide in plant litter. Cellulose decomposition was 10 times faster in the fungi-dominated litter of Picea abies forest than in the bacteria-dominated soil. In the soil, the added (13)C-labelled cellulose was the main source of microbial respiration and was preferentially accumulated in the fungal biomass and cellulose induced fungal proliferation. In contrast, in the litter, bacterial biomass showed higher labelling after (13)C-cellulose addition and bacterial biomass increased. While 80% of the total community was represented by 104-106 bacterial and 33-59 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs), 80% of the cellulolytic communities of bacteria and fungi were only composed of 8-18 highly abundant OTUs. Both the total and (13)C-labelled communities differed substantially between the litter and soil. Cellulolytic bacteria in the acidic topsoil included Betaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Acidobacteria, whereas these typically found in neutral soils were absent. Most fungal cellulose decomposers belonged to Ascomycota; cellulolytic Basidiomycota were mainly represented by the yeasts Trichosporon and Cryptococcus. Several bacteria and fungi demonstrated here to derive their carbon from cellulose were previously not recognized as cellulolytic. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacteria associated with decomposing dead wood in a natural temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tláskal, Vojtech; Zrustová, Petra; Vrška, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2017-11-08

    Dead wood represents an important pool of organic matter in forests and is one of the sources of soil formation. It has been shown to harbour diverse communities of bacteria, but their roles in this habitat are still poorly understood. Here, we describe the bacterial communities in the dead wood of Abies alba, Picea abies and Fagus sylvatica in a temperate natural forest in Central Europe. An analysis of environmental factors showed that decomposing time along with pH and water content were the strongest drivers of community composition. Bacterial biomass positively correlated with N content and increased with decomposition along with the concurrent decrease in the fungal/bacterial biomass ratio. Rhizobiales and Acidobacteriales were abundant bacterial orders throughout the whole decay process, but many bacterial taxa were specific either for young ( decomposition, bacterial genera able to fix N2 and to use simple C1 compounds (e.g. Yersinia and Methylomonas) were frequent, while wood in advanced decay was rich in taxa typical of forest soils (e.g. Bradyrhizobium and Rhodoplanes). Although the bacterial contribution to dead wood turnover remains unclear, the community composition appears to reflect the changing conditions of the substrate and suggests broad metabolic capacities of its members. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Decomposing the space of protein quaternary structures with the interface fragment pair library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Zhao, Yilin; Wu, Yinghao

    2015-01-16

    The physical interactions between proteins constitute the basis of protein quaternary structures. They dominate many biological processes in living cells. Deciphering the structural features of interacting proteins is essential to understand their cellular functions. Similar to the space of protein tertiary structures in which discrete patterns are clearly observed on fold or sub-fold motif levels, it has been found that the space of protein quaternary structures is highly degenerate due to the packing of compact secondary structure elements at interfaces. Therefore, it is necessary to further decompose the protein quaternary structural space into a more local representation. Here we constructed an interface fragment pair library from the current structure database of protein complexes. After structural-based clustering, we found that more than 90% of these interface fragment pairs can be represented by a limited number of highly abundant motifs. These motifs were further used to guide complex assembly. A large-scale benchmark test shows that the native-like binding is highly likely in the structural ensemble of modeled protein complexes that were built through the library. Our study therefore presents supportive evidences that the space of protein quaternary structures can be represented by the combination of a small set of secondary-structure-based packing at binding interfaces. Finally, after future improvements such as adding sequence profiles, we expect this new library will be useful to predict structures of unknown protein-protein interactions.

  4. High-throughput nucleotide sequence analysis of diverse bacterial communities in leachates of decomposing pig carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hak Yang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The leachate generated by the decomposition of animal carcass has been implicated as an environmental contaminant surrounding the burial site. High-throughput nucleotide sequencing was conducted to investigate the bacterial communities in leachates from the decomposition of pig carcasses. We acquired 51,230 reads from six different samples (1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 14 week-old carcasses and found that sequences representing the phylum Firmicutes predominated. The diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences in the leachate was the highest at 6 weeks, in contrast to those at 2 and 14 weeks. The relative abundance of Firmicutes was reduced, while the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria increased from 3–6 weeks. The representation of phyla was restored after 14 weeks. However, the community structures between the samples taken at 1–2 and 14 weeks differed at the bacterial classification level. The trend in pH was similar to the changes seen in bacterial communities, indicating that the pH of the leachate could be related to the shift in the microbial community. The results indicate that the composition of bacterial communities in leachates of decomposing pig carcasses shifted continuously during the study period and might be influenced by the burial site.

  5. Annual Production of Decomposer Fungi Associated With Standing-Dead Litter of Typha angustifolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsowski, B. M.; Collins, M. D.; Tarry, D.; Francoeur, S. N.; Neely, R. K.; Kuehn, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    Microbial decomposition of standing-dead plant litter is an important process in wetlands dominated by emergent macrophytes. We determined the annual fungal biomass (ergosterol) and production (14C-acetate incorporation) associated with decaying standing litter (leaves and shoots) of the emergent macrophyte Typha angustifolia in small lake littoral wetland in southeastern Michigan. Mean annual detrital mass of standing-dead leaf and shoot litter was 656±238 g/m2 (range 284-873) and 1184±280 g/m2 (range 522-1525), respectively, during study period. Mean annual fungal biomass associated with decaying standing litter was 46 and 15 g/m2 for leaves and shoots, respectively. Annual fungal biomass production associated with leaves and shoots was 168 and 78 g/m2, respectively, with maximum production /m2 occurring during the summer season. These production estimates account for diel periodicity in water availability and the consequent periodicity in microbial activities that are characteristic of the standing litter environment. A partial organic matter budget constructed for this littoral wetland indicates that 9.4% of the annual aboveground production of T. angustifolia went into the production of fungal biomass. These results provide additional evidence indicating considerable carbon flow from emergent plant matter to fungal decomposers while in the standing-decay phase.

  6. Litter decomposing fungi in sal (Shorea robusta forests of central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAM KEERTI VERMA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Soni KK, Pyasi A, Verma RK. 2011. Litter decomposing fungi in sal (Shorea robusta forests of central India. Nusantara Bioscience 3: 136-144. The present study aim on isolation and identification of fungi associated with decomposition of litter of sal forest in central India. Season wise successional changes in litter mycoflora were determined for four main seasons of the year namely, March-May, June-August, September-November and December-February. Fungi like Aspergillus flavus, A. niger and Rhizopus stolonifer were associated with litter decomposition throughout the year, while Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium cladosporioides, C. oxysporum, Curvularia indica, and C. lunata were recorded in three seasons. Some fungi including ectomycorrhiza forming occur only in the rainy season (June-August these are Astraeus hygrometricus, Boletus fallax, Calvatia elata, Colletotrichum dematium, Corticium rolfsii, Mycena roseus, Periconia minutissima, Russula emetica, Scleroderma bovista, S. geaster, S. verrucosum, Scopulariopsis alba and four sterile fungi. Fungi like Alternaria citri, Gleocladium virens, Helicosporium phragmitis and Pithomyces cortarum were rarely recorded only in one season.

  7. Profiler - A Fast and Versatile New Program for Decomposing Galaxy Light Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciambur, Bogdan C.

    2016-12-01

    I introduce Profiler, a user-friendly program designed to analyse the radial surface brightness profiles of galaxies. With an intuitive graphical user interface, Profiler can accurately model galaxies of a broad range of morphological types, with various parametric functions routinely employed in the field (Sérsic, core-Sérsic, exponential, Gaussian, Moffat, and Ferrers). In addition to these, Profiler can employ the broken exponential model for disc truncations or anti-truncations, and two special cases of the edge-on disc model: along the disc's major or minor axis. The convolution of (circular or elliptical) models with the point spread function is performed in 2D, and offers a choice between Gaussian, Moffat or a user-provided profile for the point spread function. Profiler is optimised to work with galaxy light profiles obtained from isophotal measurements, which allow for radial gradients in the geometric parameters of the isophotes, and are thus often better at capturing the total light than 2D image-fitting programs. Additionally, the 1D approach is generally less computationally expensive and more stable. I demonstrate Profiler's features by decomposing three case-study galaxies: the cored elliptical galaxy NGC 3348, the nucleated dwarf Seyfert I galaxy Pox 52, and NGC 2549, a double-barred galaxy with an edge-on, truncated disc.

  8. High-quality AlN grown on a thermally decomposed sapphire surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, S.; Knauer, A.; Brunner, F.; Mogilatenko, A.; Zeimer, U.; Weyers, M.

    2017-12-01

    In this study we show how to realize a self-assembled nano-patterned sapphire surface on 2 inch diameter epi-ready wafer and the subsequent AlN overgrowth both in the same metal-organic vapor phase epitaxial process. For this purpose in-situ annealing in H2 environment was applied prior to AlN growth to thermally decompose the c-plane oriented sapphire surface. By proper AlN overgrowth management misoriented grains that start to grow on non c-plane oriented facets of the roughened sapphire surface could be overcome. We achieved crack-free, atomically flat AlN layers of 3.5 μm thickness. The layers show excellent material quality homogeneously over the whole wafer as proved by the full width at half maximum of X-ray measured ω-rocking curves of 120 arcsec to 160 arcsec for the 002 reflection and 440 arcsec to 550 arcsec for the 302 reflection. The threading dislocation density is 2 ∗ 109 cm-2 which shows that the annealing and overgrowth process investigated in this work leads to cost-efficient AlN templates for UV LED devices.

  9. Adsorption performance of Rh decorated SWCNT upon SF6 decomposed components based on DFT method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cui, Hao; Dong, Xingchen; Chen, Dachang; Tang, Ju

    2017-10-01

    Transition metal decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) applied in the field of gas adsorption and storage have in recent years accepted considerable attentions because of their superior adsorbing performance. In electrical engineering, they are employed as adsorbents to remove the decomposed products of SF6 caused by partial discharge, for guaranteeing the insulation status of gas insulation switchgear (GIS). In this paper, Rh doped SWCNT is introduced to investigate its adsorption properties towards typical gases of SF6 based on density functional theory (DFT) method. Both single and double molecules adsorbing systems were performed to investigate the adsorption ability of proposed material. Results indicate that Rh-CNT, which has strong interaction with defined gas molecules, is a promising material for SF6 decompositions adsorption especially SO2 and SOF2 that exhibit topmost sensitivity to the modified surface. Therefore, we suggest the Rh-CNT to be an adsorbent to be applied in GIS for guaranteeing the operation state of such devices and even to be exploited as gas sensor to evaluate the insulation state of the power system. Our calculations would provide experimentalist with a first insight into physicochemical properties of this material.

  10. Decomposable quantum-dots/DNA nanosphere for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of extracellular respiring bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Junhua; Yang, Guiqin; Tang, Jia

    2018-02-15

    Extracellular respiring bacteria (ERB) are a group of bacteria capable of transferring electrons to extracellular acceptors and have important application in environmental remediation. In this study, a decomposable quantum-dots (QDs)/DNA nanosphere probe was developed for rapid and ultrasensitive detection of ERB. The QDs/DNA nanosphere was self-assembled from QDs-streptavidin conjugate (QDs-SA) and Y-shaped DNA nanostructure that is constructed based on toehold-mediated strand displacement. It can release numerous fluorescent QDs-SA in immunomagnetic separation (IMS)-based immunoassay via simple biotin displacement, which remarkably amplifies the signal of antigen-antibody recognizing event. This QDs/DNA-nanosphere-based IMS-fluorescent immunoassay is ultrasensitive for model ERB Shewanella oneidensis, showing a wide detection range between 1.0 cfu/mL and 1.0 × 108 cfu/mL with a low detection limit of 1.37 cfu/mL. Moreover, the proposed IMS-fluorescent immunoassay exhibits high specificity, acceptable reproducibility and stability. Furthermore, the proposed method shows acceptable recovery (92.4-101.4%) for detection of S. oneidensis spiked in river water samples. The proposed IMS-fluorescent immunoassay advances an intelligent strategy for rapid and ultrasensitive quantitation of low-abundance analyte and thus holds promising potential in food, medical and environmental applications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Particle Communication and Domain Neighbor Coupling: Scalable Domain Decomposed Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, M. J.; Brantley, P. S.

    2015-01-20

    In order to run Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on new supercomputers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken to implement scalable algorithms. This means that the algorithms must continue to perform well as the processor count increases. In this paper, we examine the scalability of:(1) globally resolving the particle locations on the correct processor, (2) deciding that particle streaming communication has finished, and (3) efficiently coupling neighbor domains together with different replication levels. We have run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on up to 221 = 2,097,152 MPI processes on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia supercomputer and observed scalable results that agree with our theoretical predictions. These calculations were carefully constructed to have the same amount of work on every processor, i.e. the calculation is already load balanced. We also examine load imbalanced calculations where each domain’s replication level is proportional to its particle workload. In this case we show how to efficiently couple together adjacent domains to maintain within workgroup load balance and minimize memory usage.

  12. The Effect of Visual and Etymological Treatments on Learning Decomposable Idioms among EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassim Golaghaei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study endeavors to investigate the impact of visual and etymological treatments on learning idioms among English language learners. Seventy-nine intermediate students at Rooz Academy Language School in Babol were selected from among a total number of 116 learners based on their performances on the Longman complete course for the TOEFL test to fulfill the purpose of the study. The students were then assigned into three experimental groups. Initially, a pre-test of idiomatic expressions including 48 idiomatic items was administered to the participants in all groups. During the instructional period, the groups were taught a group of abnormally decomposable idioms through different treatments, namely, visual, etymological, and a combination of visual-etymological elaboration. At the end of the instructional period, the participants in all groups were given a posttest which was the same as the pretest. The design of this study is quasi-experimental. The data obtained was analyzed using one-way ANOVA analysis. The results of data analysis revealed that the etymological treatment was more effective than visual aids on learning idioms among intermediate English language learners. However, the visual-etymological treatment was the most effective one. The findings of this study have implications for EFL teachers, students, and materials developers.

  13. A decomposable silica-based antibacterial coating for percutaneous titanium implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Wu, Guofeng; Liu, Xiangwei; Sun, Guanyang; Li, Dehua; Wei, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Although percutaneous titanium implants have become one of the best choices as retainers in the facial defects, peri-implantitis still occurs at a significant rate. This unwanted complication occurs due to adhesion of bacteria and subsequent biofilm formation. To solve this problem, we have developed a novel antibiotic nanodelivery system based on self-decomposable silica nanoparticles. In this study, silica-gentamycin (SG) nanoparticles were successfully fabricated using an innovative one-pot solution. The nanoparticles were incorporated within a gelatin matrix and cross-linked on microarc-oxidized titanium. To characterize the SG nanoparticles, their particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, in vitro drug release, and decomposition process were sequentially evaluated. The antibacterial properties against the gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, including bacterial viability, antibacterial rate, and bacteria morphology, were analyzed using SG-loaded titanium specimens. Any possible influence of released gentamycin on the viability of human fibroblasts, which are the main component of soft tissues, was investigated. SG nanoparticles from the antibacterial titanium coating continuously released gentamycin and inhibited S. aureus growth. In vitro investigation showed that the obtained nanodelivery system has good biocompatibility. Therefore, this design can be further investigated as a method to prevent infection around percutaneous implants.

  14. Utility of forensic detection of rabies virus in decomposed exhumed dog carcasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Markotter

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This report describes four suspected rabies cases in domestic dogs that were involved inhuman exposures. In all these cases, the animals were buried for substantial times beforerabies testing was performed. Animal rabies is endemic in South Africa and domestic dogsare the main vector for transmission to humans. Diagnosis of rabies in humans is complicated,and diagnosis in the animal vector can provide circumstantial evidence to support clinicaldiagnosis of rabies in humans. The gold standard diagnostic method, fluorescent antibodytest (FAT, only delivers reliable results when performed on fresh brain material and thereforedecomposed samples are rarely submitted for diagnostic testing. Severely decomposed brainmaterial was tested for the presence of rabies virus genomic material using a quantitativereal-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (q-real-time RT-PCR assaywhen conventional molecular methods were unsuccessful. This may be a useful tool in theinvestigation of cases where the opportunity to sample the suspected animals post mortem wasforfeited and which would not be possible with conventional testing methodologies becauseof the decomposition of the material.

  15. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  16. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Y. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  17. Analysis of perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate and iodide in human amniotic fluid using ion chromatography and electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blount, Benjamin C. [Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States)]. E-mail: bblount@cdc.gov; Valentin-Blasini, Liza [Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341 (United States)

    2006-05-10

    Because of health concerns surrounding in utero exposure to perchlorate, we developed a sensitive and selective method for quantifying iodide, as well as perchlorate and other sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) inhibitors in human amniotic fluid using ion chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Iodide and NIS inhibitors were quantified using a stable isotope-labeled internal standards (Cl{sup 18}O{sub 4} {sup -}, S{sup 13}CN{sup -} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3} {sup -} with excellent assay accuracy of 100%, 98%, 99%, 95% for perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate and iodide, respectively, in triplicate analysis of spiked amniotic fluid sample). Excellent analytical precision (<5.2% RSD for all analytes) was found when amniotic fluid quality control pools were repetitively analyzed for iodide and NIS-inhibitors. Selective chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry reduced the need for sample cleanup, resulting in a rugged and rapid method capable of routinely analyzing 75 samples/day. Analytical response was linear across the physiologically relevant concentration range for the analytes. Analysis of a set of 48 amniotic fluid samples identified the range and median levels for perchlorate (0.057-0.71, 0.18 {mu}g/L), thiocyanate (<10-5860, 89 {mu}g/L), nitrate (650-8900, 1620 {mu}g/L) and iodide (1.7-170, 8.1 {mu}g/L). This selective, sensitive, and rapid method will help assess exposure of the developing fetus to low levels of NIS-inhibitors and their potential to inhibit thyroid function.

  18. Analysis of heterogeneous water vapor uptake by metal iodide cluster ions via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberreit, Derek [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Fluid Measurement Technologies, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota 55110 (United States); Rawat, Vivek K.; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Ouyang, Hui; McMurry, Peter H.; Hogan, Christopher J., E-mail: hogan108@umn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    The sorption of vapor molecules onto pre-existing nanometer sized clusters is of importance in understanding particle formation and growth in gas phase environments and devising gas phase separation schemes. Here, we apply a differential mobility analyzer-mass spectrometer based approach to observe directly the sorption of vapor molecules onto iodide cluster ions of the form (MI){sub x}M{sup +} (x = 1-13, M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs) in air at 300 K and with water saturation ratios in the 0.01-0.64 range. The extent of vapor sorption is quantified in measurements by the shift in collision cross section (CCS) for each ion. We find that CCS measurements are sensitive enough to detect the transient binding of several vapor molecules to clusters, which shift CCSs by only several percent. At the same time, for the highest saturation ratios examined, we observed CCS shifts of up to 45%. For x < 4, cesium, rubidium, and potassium iodide cluster ions are found to uptake water to a similar extent, while sodium iodide clusters uptake less water. For x ≥ 4, sodium iodide cluster ions uptake proportionally more water vapor than rubidium and potassium iodide cluster ions, while cesium iodide ions exhibit less uptake. Measured CCS shifts are compared to predictions based upon a Kelvin-Thomson-Raoult (KTR) model as well as a Langmuir adsorption model. We find that the Langmuir adsorption model can be fit well to measurements. Meanwhile, KTR predictions deviate from measurements, which suggests that the earliest stages of vapor uptake by nanometer scale species are not well described by the KTR model.

  19. Using SF6 Decomposed Component Analysis for the Diagnosis of Partial Discharge Severity Initiated by Free Metal Particle Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The decomposition characteristics of a SF6 gas-insulated medium were used to diagnose the partial discharge (PD severity in DC gas-insulated equipment (DC-GIE. First, the PD characteristics of the whole process were studied from the initial PD to the breakdown initiated by a free metal particle defect. The average discharge magnitude in a second was used to characterize the PD severity and the PD was divided into three levels: mild PD, medium PD, and dangerous PD. Second, two kinds of voltage in each of the above PD levels were selected for the decomposition experiments of SF6. Results show that the negative DC-PD in these six experiments decomposes the SF6 gas and generates five stable decomposed components, namely, CF4, CO2, SO2F2, SOF2, and SO2. The concentrations and concentration ratios of the SF6 decomposed components can be associated with the PD severity. A minimum-redundancy-maximum-relevance (mRMR-based feature selection algorithm was used to sort the concentrations and concentration ratios of the SF6 decomposed components. Back propagation neural network (BPNN and support vector machine (SVM algorithms were used to diagnose the PD severity. The use of C(CO2/CT1, C(CF4/C(SO2, C(CO2/C(SOF2, and C(CF4/C(CO2 shows good performance in diagnosing PD severity. This finding serves as a foundation in using the SF6 decomposed component analysis (DCA method to diagnose the insulation faults in DC-GIE and assess its insulation status.

  20. How resonance assists hydrogen bonding interactions: an energy decomposition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, John Frederick; Mo, Yirong

    2007-01-15

    Block-localized wave function (BLW) method, which is a variant of the ab initio valence bond (VB) theory, was employed to explore the nature of resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHBs) and to investigate the mechanism of synergistic interplay between pi delocalization and hydrogen-bonding interactions. We examined the dimers of formic acid, formamide, 4-pyrimidinone, 2-pyridinone, 2-hydroxpyridine, and 2-hydroxycyclopenta-2,4-dien-1-one. In addition, we studied the interactions in beta-diketone enols with a simplified model, namely the hydrogen bonds of 3-hydroxypropenal with both ethenol and formaldehyde. The intermolecular interaction energies, either with or without the involvement of pi resonance, were decomposed into the Hitler-London energy (DeltaEHL), polarization energy (DeltaEpol), charge transfer energy (DeltaECT), and electron correlation energy (DeltaEcor) terms. This allows for the examination of the character of hydrogen bonds and the impact of pi conjugation on hydrogen bonding interactions. Although it has been proposed that resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds are accompanied with an increasing of covalency character, our analyses showed that the enhanced interactions mostly originate from the classical dipole-dipole (i.e., electrostatic) attraction, as resonance redistributes the electron density and increases the dipole moments in monomers. The covalency of hydrogen bonds, however, changes very little. This disputes the belief that RAHB is primarily covalent in nature. Accordingly, we recommend the term "resonance-assisted binding (RAB)" instead of "resonance-assisted hydrogen bonding (RHAB)" to highlight the electrostatic, which is a long-range effect, rather than the electron transfer nature of the enhanced stabilization in RAHBs. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  2. Hydrogen storage and delivery: the carbon dioxide - formic acid couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenczy, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and the carbonates, the available natural C1 sources, can be easily hydrogenated into formic acid and formates in water; the rate of this reduction strongly depends on the pH of the solution. This reaction is catalysed by ruthenium(II) pre-catalyst complexes with a large variety of water-soluble phosphine ligands; high conversions and turnover numbers have been realised. Although ruthenium(II) is predominant in these reactions, the iron(II) - tris[(2-diphenylphosphino)-ethyl]phosphine (PP3) complex is also active, showing a new perspective to use abundant and inexpensive iron-based compounds in the CO2 reduction. In the catalytic hydrogenation cycles the in situ formed metal hydride complexes play a key role, their structures with several other intermediates have been proven by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. In the other hand safe and convenient hydrogen storage and supply is the fundamental question for the further development of the hydrogen economy; and carbon dioxide has been recognised to be a viable H2 vector. Formic acid--containing 4.4 weight % of H2, that is 53 g hydrogen per litre--is suitable for H2 storage; we have shown that in aqueous solutions it can be selectively decomposed into CO-free (CO carbonate solution, opening the way to use cheap, non-noble metal based catalysts for this reaction, too.

  3. Solid-State Autocatalysis and Oscillatory Reactions in Thermally Processed Hydrogen Loaded Germanosilicate Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canning, John; Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Kristensen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Solid-state autocatalysis leading to oscillatory behaviour in GeOH and SiOH formation is demonstrated in optical fibres processed at 500o C. The results confirm the proposed view that hydrogen accelerates change in processed optical fibres principally through autocatalysis. Diffusion of OH through...... hydrogen hopping is thought to be instrumental in terminating this process. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of solid-state autocatalysis in a non-decomposing medium. The demonstration of complexity offers potentially much more sophisticated tailoring of thermally processed and UV processed...... device properties....

  4. Safe venting of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  6. Cyclooctanaminium hydrogen succinate monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Khorasani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title hydrated salt, C8H18N+·C4H5O4−·H2O, the cyclooctyl ring of the cation is disordered over two positions in a 0.833 (3:0.167 (3 ratio. The structure contains various O—H.·O and N—H...O interactions, forming a hydrogen-bonded layer of molecules perpendicular to the c axis. In each layer, the ammonium cation hydrogen bonds to two hydrogen succinate anions and one water molecule. Each hydrogen succinate anion hydrogen bonds to neighbouring anions, forming a chain of molecules along the b axis. In addition, each hydrogen succinate anion hydrogen bonds to two water molecules and the ammonium cation.

  7. Decomposing variation in dairy profitability: the impact of output, inputs, prices, labour and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P

    2011-08-01

    The UK dairy sector has undergone considerable structural change in recent years, with a decrease in the number of producers accompanied by an increased average herd size and increased concentrate use and milk yields. One of the key drivers to producers remaining in the industry is the profitability of their herds. The current paper adopts a holistic approach to decomposing the variation in dairy profitability through an analysis of net margin data explained by physical input-output measures, milk price variation, labour utilization and managerial behaviours and characteristics. Data are drawn from the Farm Business Survey (FBS) for England in 2007/08 for 228 dairy enterprises. Average yields are 7100 litres/cow/yr, from a herd size of 110 cows that use 0·56 forage ha/cow/yr and 43·2 labour h/cow/yr. An average milk price of 22·57 pence per litre (ppl) produced milk output of £1602/cow/yr, which after accounting for calf sales, herd replacements and quota leasing costs, gave an average dairy output of £1516/cow/yr. After total costs of £1464/cow/yr this left an economic return of £52/cow/yr (0·73 ppl) net margin profit. There is wide variation in performance, with the most profitable (as measured by net margin per cow) quartile of producers achieving 2000 litres/cow/yr more than the least profitable quartile, returning a net margin of £335/cow/yr compared to a loss of £361/cow/yr for the least profitable. The most profitable producers operate larger, higher yielding herds and achieve a greater milk price for their output. In addition, a significantly greater number of the most profitable producers undertake financial benchmarking within their businesses and operate specialist dairy farms. When examining the full data set, the most profitable enterprises included significantly greater numbers of organic producers. The most profitable tend to have a greater reliance on independent technical advice, but this finding is not statistically significant

  8. Decomposing variation in dairy profitability: the impact of output, inputs, prices, labour and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    WILSON, P.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The UK dairy sector has undergone considerable structural change in recent years, with a decrease in the number of producers accompanied by an increased average herd size and increased concentrate use and milk yields. One of the key drivers to producers remaining in the industry is the profitability of their herds. The current paper adopts a holistic approach to decomposing the variation in dairy profitability through an analysis of net margin data explained by physical input–output measures, milk price variation, labour utilization and managerial behaviours and characteristics. Data are drawn from the Farm Business Survey (FBS) for England in 2007/08 for 228 dairy enterprises. Average yields are 7100 litres/cow/yr, from a herd size of 110 cows that use 0·56 forage ha/cow/yr and 43·2 labour h/cow/yr. An average milk price of 22·57 pence per litre (ppl) produced milk output of £1602/cow/yr, which after accounting for calf sales, herd replacements and quota leasing costs, gave an average dairy output of £1516/cow/yr. After total costs of £1464/cow/yr this left an economic return of £52/cow/yr (0·73 ppl) net margin profit. There is wide variation in performance, with the most profitable (as measured by net margin per cow) quartile of producers achieving 2000 litres/cow/yr more than the least profitable quartile, returning a net margin of £335/cow/yr compared to a loss of £361/cow/yr for the least profitable. The most profitable producers operate larger, higher yielding herds and achieve a greater milk price for their output. In addition, a significantly greater number of the most profitable producers undertake financial benchmarking within their businesses and operate specialist dairy farms. When examining the full data set, the most profitable enterprises included significantly greater numbers of organic producers. The most profitable tend to have a greater reliance on independent technical advice, but this finding is not statistically significant

  9. Decomposing metaphor processing at the cognitive and neural level through functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambini, Valentina; Gentili, Claudio; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Bertinetto, Pier Marco; Pietrini, Pietro

    2011-10-10

    Prior neuroimaging studies on metaphor comprehension have tended to focus on the role of the right hemisphere, without reaching consensus and leaving aside the functional architecture of this process. The present work aimed to break down metaphor comprehension into its functional components. The study rationale is two-fold: on the one hand, the large-scale network model as emerging in cognitive neuroscience led us to a consideration of metaphor as supported by a distributed and bilateral network; on the other hand, we based on the accounts of figurative language put forward in pragmatics and cognitive science to postulate a decomposition of such a network into multiple sub-systems. During scanning, participants implicitly processed metaphorical (familiar and unfamiliar) and non-metaphorical passages, while being explicitly involved in an adjective matching task to be performed after reading the target passages. Several regions showed greater activity to metaphors as compared to non-metaphors, including left and right inferior frontal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus, left angular gyrus, and anterior cingulate. This pattern of activations, markedly bilateral, can be decomposed into circumscribed functional sub-systems mediating different aspects of metaphor resolution, as foreseen in the pragmatic and cognitive literature: (a) the conceptual/pragmatic machinery in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and in the left angular gyrus, which supports the integration of linguistic material and world knowledge in context; (b) the attentional component in the anterior cingulate and prefrontal areas, which is set to monitor and filter for the relevant aspects of context and for the appropriate meanings; (c) the Theory of Mind system along the right superior temporal sulcus, which deals with the recognition of speakers' communicative intentions and is more extensively activated by unfamiliar metaphors. The results have several implications for the field of neuropragmatics

  10. Ecological Dynamics of Two Distinct Viruses Infecting Marine Eukaryotic Decomposer Thraustochytrids (Labyrinthulomycetes, Stramenopiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitake Takao

    Full Text Available Thraustochytrids are cosmopolitan osmotrophic or heterotrophic microorganisms that are considered as important decomposers in coastal ecosystems. However, because of a lack of estimation method for each genus or systematic group of them, relatively little is known about their ecology in situ. Previously, we reported two distinct types of virus infecting thraustochytrids (AuRNAV: reported as SssRNAV, and SmDNAV suggesting they have wide distributions in the host-virus systems of coastal environments. Here we conducted a field survey from 2004 through 2005 to show the fluctuation pattern of thraustochytrids and their viruses in Hiroshima Bay, Japan. During the field survey, we monitored the dynamics of the two types of thraustochytrid-infecting virus: small viruses causing lysis of Aurantiochytrium sp. NIBH N1-27 (identified as AuRNAV and the large viruses of Sicyoidochytrium minutum NBRC 102975 (similar to SmDNAV in physiology and morphology. Fluctuation patterns of the two distinct types of virus were different from each other. This may reflect the difference in the preference of organic substrates; i.e., it may be likely the host of AuRNAV (Aurantiochytrium sp. increases utilizing algal dead bodies or feeble cells as the virus shows a large increase in abundance following raphidophyte blooms; whereas, the trophic nutrient supply for S. minutum may primarily depend on other constantly-supplied organic compounds because it did not show any significant change in abundance throughout the survey. Further study concerning the population composition of thraustochytrids and their viruses may demonstrate the microbial ecology (especially concerning the detrital food web of marine environments.

  11. Sensitivity of laccase activity to the fungicide tebuconazole in decomposing litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, J; Rossi, F; Gerphagnon, M; Mallet, C

    2017-04-15

    The present study investigates the sensitivity of laccase activity to the fungicide tebuconazole (TBZ) in order to seek for new functional toxicity descriptors in aquatic microbial communities associated to decomposing litter. With this aim, we analyzed the sensitivity of laccase from the different microbial components (fungi and bacteria growing separately and in co-existence), as well as that of their corresponding enzyme fractions (cell bound and diffusible), forming microbial communities in Alnus glutinosa leaves. Results show that fungi are pivotal for laccase activity in leaves and that their activity is repressed when they co-exist with bacteria. The sensitivity of laccase activity to the TBZ was only detectable in leaves colonized by fungi separately (Alatospora acuminata populations), but absent in those colonized by bacteria separately and/or mixed fungi plus bacteria. Specifically, the increase of TBZ concentration enhances laccase activity in Alatospora acuminata populations but decreases ergosterol concentration as well as the amount of 18S RNA gene copies. This activity response suggests a detoxification mechanism employed by the fungus in order to reduce TBZ toxicity. Besides, enzyme fractioning showed that laccase activity in the cell bound fraction (76% of the total activity) was sensitive to the fungicide, but not that in the diffusible fraction (24% of total activity). Hence, TBZ would influence laccase activity in the presence of fungal cells but not in enzymes already synthesized in the extracellular space. The present study highlights the importance of the biological complexity level (i. e. population, community, ecosystem) when seeking for appropriate functional ecotoxicity descriptors in aquatic microbial communities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ecological Dynamics of Two Distinct Viruses Infecting Marine Eukaryotic Decomposer Thraustochytrids (Labyrinthulomycetes, Stramenopiles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Yoshitake; Tomaru, Yuji; Nagasaki, Keizo; Honda, Daiske

    2015-01-01

    Thraustochytrids are cosmopolitan osmotrophic or heterotrophic microorganisms that are considered as important decomposers in coastal ecosystems. However, because of a lack of estimation method for each genus or systematic group of them, relatively little is known about their ecology in situ. Previously, we reported two distinct types of virus infecting thraustochytrids (AuRNAV: reported as SssRNAV, and SmDNAV) suggesting they have wide distributions in the host-virus systems of coastal environments. Here we conducted a field survey from 2004 through 2005 to show the fluctuation pattern of thraustochytrids and their viruses in Hiroshima Bay, Japan. During the field survey, we monitored the dynamics of the two types of thraustochytrid-infecting virus: small viruses causing lysis of Aurantiochytrium sp. NIBH N1-27 (identified as AuRNAV) and the large viruses of Sicyoidochytrium minutum NBRC 102975 (similar to SmDNAV in physiology and morphology). Fluctuation patterns of the two distinct types of virus were different from each other. This may reflect the difference in the preference of organic substrates; i.e., it may be likely the host of AuRNAV (Aurantiochytrium sp.) increases utilizing algal dead bodies or feeble cells as the virus shows a large increase in abundance following raphidophyte blooms; whereas, the trophic nutrient supply for S. minutum may primarily depend on other constantly-supplied organic compounds because it did not show any significant change in abundance throughout the survey. Further study concerning the population composition of thraustochytrids and their viruses may demonstrate the microbial ecology (especially concerning the detrital food web) of marine environments.

  13. Decomposing the land-use specific response of plant functional traits along environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Veronika; Kohler, Marina; Niedrist, Georg; Bahn, Michael; Tappeiner, Ulrike; Frenck, Georg

    2017-12-01

    Environmental conditions affect functional trait variability within communities and thus shape ecosystem properties. With the ability of plants to adapt morphologically and physiologically to changing abiotic conditions, gradient analysis was shown to be a suitable tool to identify the drivers which determine trait values. Apart from direct environmental drivers and indirect gradients such as elevation, also anthropogenic effects (e.g. irrigation, grazing) can influence trait variability. Our aim was to assess the interactive effects of different environmental drivers on major plant traits and to investigate how these are modulated within two different land-use types (hay meadow vs. pasture). An elevational gradient spanning 1000m was decomposed into its underlying direct components (temperature, water input, length of growing season) for the investigation of gradual responses of five prominent functional traits (aboveground dry weight (AGDW), vegetative height (VegHt), specific leaf area (SLA), leaf dry matter content (LDMC), leaf nitrogen concentration (LNC)) for key species from two functional groups (grasses, forbs) in the two land-use/management regimes. The present study revealed that the detailed analysis of single direct gradients provides substantial additional information on trait response which remains hidden or is even reversed if only indirect gradients such as elevation are analysed. However, trait response to the combination of the three direct gradients aligned surprisingly well with trait response to the indirect gradient underpinning the adequate representation of temperature, water input and length of growing season by elevation. The response of traits significantly depended on the management regime and corresponding intensity which was shown to play an overriding role and constrained and attenuated response ranges of traits to climatic gradients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional and Structural Succession of Soil Microbial Communities below Decomposing Human Cadavers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L Cobaugh

    Full Text Available The ecological succession of microbes during cadaver decomposition has garnered interest in both basic and applied research contexts (e.g. community assembly and dynamics; forensic indicator of time since death. Yet current understanding of microbial ecology during decomposition is almost entirely based on plant litter. We know very little about microbes recycling carcass-derived organic matter despite the unique decomposition processes. Our objective was to quantify the taxonomic and functional succession of microbial populations in soils below decomposing cadavers, testing the hypotheses that a periods of increased activity during decomposition are associated with particular taxa; and b human-associated taxa are introduced to soils, but do not persist outside their host. We collected soils from beneath four cadavers throughout decomposition, and analyzed soil chemistry, microbial activity and bacterial community structure. As expected, decomposition resulted in pulses of soil C and nutrients (particularly ammonia and stimulated microbial activity. There was no change in total bacterial abundances, however we observed distinct changes in both function and community composition. During active decay (7 - 12 days postmortem, respiration and biomass production rates were high: the community was dominated by Proteobacteria (increased from 15.0 to 26.1% relative abundance and Firmicutes (increased from 1.0 to 29.0%, with reduced Acidobacteria abundances (decreased from 30.4 to 9.8%. Once decay rates slowed (10 - 23 d postmortem, respiration was elevated, but biomass production rates dropped dramatically; this community with low growth efficiency was dominated by Firmicutes (increased to 50.9% and other anaerobic taxa. Human-associated bacteria, including the obligately anaerobic Bacteroides, were detected at high concentrations in soil throughout decomposition, up to 198 d postmortem. Our results revealed the pattern of functional and compositional

  15. Treatment of post harvest residues with cellulose decomposing preparations I. Effect on grain yield from wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Milev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. During 2010 – 2013 an experiment was carried out in the trial field of Dobrudzha Agricultural Institute with the aim to find out what is the effect of stubble cellulose decomposition products (microbial-based or other on the grain yield from winter wheat. The crop was grown in a stationary field trial in crop rotation with three spring crops – bean, maize and sunflower. Three cellulose decomposition products, Bactofil С, Nutri-Life Accelerate (NLA and Amalgerol premium were tested against the background of plots without mineral fertilizers treatment. The post harvest residue was chopped with the equipment of the harvester combine to suitable pieces and evenly spread on the soil surface. The above cellulose decomposition products were applied by sprinkling the area of the stubble in autumn, one month before sowing of wheat. The norm of the working solution was 400 l/ha, and the doses of the respective products were according to the recommendations of the manufacturers. Immediately after sprinkling the post harvest residue from the previous crops, it was incorporated in soil using disking soil tillage machines. On the basis of the averaged 4-year results, the following conclusions were drawn: the cellulose decomposition products Bactopfil C and NLA had well expressed positive effect on grain yield (relatively expressed, the increase varied from 7.0 to 18.0%; the structural components of yield and 1000 grain weight; the conditions of application of the cellulose decomposition products; the initial soil moisture and the moisture of the plant residues themselves in particular, were very important for the efficiency of the preparations; the nature of the tested cellulose decomposers makes them suitable for organic agriculture where the short-term immobilization of nutrients (especially the nitrogen-containing ones is a common and typical process.

  16. Hydrogen storage methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at Tchemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m-3, approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen is 70.8 kg.m-3, and large volumes, where the thermal losses are small, can cause hydrogen to reach a

  17. Preparation and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Mg-Rich Mg-Ni Ultrafine Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Zou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, Mg-rich Mg-Ni ultrafine powders were prepared through an arc plasma method. The phase components, microstructure, and hydrogen storage properties of the powders were carefully investigated. It is found that Mg2Ni and MgNi2 could be obtained directly from the vapor state reactions between Mg and Ni, depending on the local vapor content in the reaction chamber. A nanostructured MgH2 + Mg2NiH4 hydrogen storage composite could be generated after hydrogenation of the Mg-Ni ultrafine powders. After dehydrogenation, MgH2 and Mg2NiH4 decomposed into nanograined Mg and Mg2Ni, respectively. Thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry (TG/DSC analyses showed that Mg2NiH4 phase may play a catalytic role in the dehydriding process of the hydrogenated Mg ultrafine particles.

  18. Demonstrating hydrogen production from ammonia using lithium imide - Powering a small proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Hazel M. A.; Makepeace, Joshua W.; Wood, Thomas J.; Mylius, O. Simon; Kibble, Mark G.; Nutter, Jamie B.; Jones, Martin O.; David, William I. F.

    2016-10-01

    Accessing the intrinsic hydrogen content within ammonia, NH3, has the potential to play a very significant role in the future of a CO2-free sustainable energy supply. Inexpensive light metal imides and amides are effective at decomposing ammonia to hydrogen and nitrogen (2NH3 → 3H2 + N2), at modest temperatures, and thus represent a low-cost approach to on-demand hydrogen production. Building upon this discovery, this paper describes the integration of an ammonia cracking unit with a post-reactor gas purification system and a small-scale PEM fuel cell to create a first bench-top demonstrator for the production of hydrogen using light metal imides.

  19. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bonding configuration due to hydrogen migration have been proposed as a mechanism of defect generation in a-Si:H [6,7]. Thus hydrogen plays a dual role in a-Si:H: (1) acting as a .... the sphere of radius R0 and allows to express. ∆F as a function of localization radius R0. Using eqs (10) and (11), the volume integration.

  20. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  1. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  2. Inner Sphere and Outer Sphere Electron Transfer to Methyl Iodide. Deuterium and 13C Kinetic Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil; Crossland, Ingolf

    1996-01-01

    Deuterium and 13C kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) have been determined for the conversion of methyl iodide into methyl radical via inner sphere ET (electron transfer) and via outer sphere ET. The alfa-deuterium KIE was found to be very high for in...

  3. High-performance rechargeable lithium-iodine batteries using triiodide/iodide redox couples in an aqueous cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Lina; Byon, Hye Ryung

    2013-01-01

    Development of promising battery systems is being intensified to fulfil the needs of long-driving-ranged electric vehicles. The successful candidates for new generation batteries should have higher energy densities than those of currently used batteries and reasonable rechargeability. Here we report that aqueous lithium-iodine batteries based on the triiodide/iodide redox reaction show a high battery performance. By using iodine transformed to triiodide in an aqueous iodide, an aqueous cathode involving the triiodide/iodide redox reaction in a stable potential window avoiding water electrolysis is demonstrated for lithium-iodine batteries. The high solubility of triiodide/iodide redox couples results in an energy density of ~ 0.33 kWh kg(-1), approximately twice that of lithium-ion batteries. The reversible redox reaction without the formation of resistive solid products promotes rechargeability, demonstrating 100 cycles with negligible capacity fading. A low cost, non-flammable and heavy-metal-free aqueous cathode can contribute to the feasibility of scale-up of lithium-iodine batteries for practical energy storage.

  4. The Impact of Iodide-Mediated Ozone Deposition and Halogen Chemistry on Surface Ozone Concentrations Across the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The air quality of many large coastal areas in the United States is affected by the confluence of polluted urban and relatively clean marine airmasses, each with distinct atmospheric chemistry. In this context, the role of iodide-mediated ozone (O3) deposition over seawater and m...

  5. The lactoperoxidase system : the influence of iodide and the chemical and antimicrobial stability over the period of about 18 months

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, EH; Van Doorne, H; De Vries, S

    The lactoperoxidase (LP) system is a natural antimicrobial system, the use of which has been suggested as a preservative in foods and pharmaceuticals. The effect of adding iodide to the LP system, the chemical stability and the change in antimicrobial effectiveness during storage was studied.

  6. Polymer adsorption and its effect on the Stability of hydrophobic colloids. III. Kinetics of th Flocculation of silver iodide sols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, G.J.; Lyklema, J.

    1976-01-01

    In a previous study on the flocculation of silver iodide sols by polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) it was demonstrated that the extent of flocculation depends critically on the way in which sol particles and polymer are mixed. Optimal flocculation was shown to occur if a two-portion method of mixing is

  7. Perfluoroalkylation of Aryl-N,N-dimethyl Hydrazones Using Hypervalent Iodine(III) Reagents or Perfluoroalkyl Iodides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janhsen, Benjamin; Studer, Armido

    2017-11-17

    Radical trifluoromethylation of aryl N,N-dimethyl hydrazones using TBAI as an initiator and Togni's reagent as a trifluoromethyl radical source is described. Cascades proceed via electron-catalysis; this approach is generally more applicable to hydrazone perfluoroalkylation using perfluoroalkyl iodides as the radical precursors in combination with a base under visible-light initiation.

  8. 10 CFR 35.392 - Training for the oral administration of sodium iodide I-131 requiring a written directive in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... classroom and laboratory training, applicable to the medical use of sodium iodide I-131 for procedures...) Chemistry of byproduct material for medical use; and (v) Radiation biology; and (2) Has work experience... millicuries). 35.392 Section 35.392 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL...

  9. Congenital Hypothyroidism Caused by a PAX8 Gene Mutation Manifested as Sodium/Iodide Symporter Gene Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakako Jo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations of the PAX8 gene are considered to mainly cause congenital hypothyroidism (CH due to thyroid hypoplasia. However, some patients with PAX8 mutation have demonstrated a normal-sized thyroid gland. Here we report a CH patient caused by a PAX8 mutation, which manifested as iodide transport defect (ITD. Hypothyroidism was detected by neonatal screening and L-thyroxine replacement was started immediately. Although 123I scintigraphy at 5 years of age showed that the thyroid gland was in the normal position and of small size, his iodide trapping was low. The ratio of the saliva/plasma radioactive iodide was low. He did not have goiter; however laboratory findings suggested that he had partial ITD. Gene analyses showed that the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS gene was normal; instead, a mutation in the PAX8 gene causing R31H substitution was identified. The present report demonstrates that individuals with defective PAX8 can have partial ITD, and thus genetic analysis is useful for differential diagnosis.

  10. Evaluation of iodide deficiency in the lactating rat and pup using a biologically based dose response (BBDR) Model***

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biologically-based dose response (BBDR) model for the hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis in the lactating rat and nursing pup was developed to describe the perturbations caused by iodide deficiency on the 1-IPT axis. Model calibrations, carried out by adjusting key model...

  11. Evaluation of iodide deficiency in the lactating rat and pup using a biologically based dose-response model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biologically-based dose response (BBDR) model for the hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid (BPT) axis in the lactating rat and nursing pup was developed to describe the perturbations caused by iodide deficiency on the HPT axis. Model calibrations, carried out by adjusting key model p...

  12. Pd-Catalyzed Conversion of Aryl Iodides to Sulfonyl Fluorides Using SO2 Surrogate DABSO and Selectfluor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribby, Ariana L; Rodríguez, Ismeraí; Shariffudin, Shamira; Ball, Nicholas D

    2017-02-17

    A one-pot Pd-catalyzed conversion of aryl iodide to aryl sulfonyl fluorides using DABSO and Selectfluor has been developed generating aryl sulfonyl fluorides in good to excellent yields. The reaction results in the generation of electronically and sterically diverse sulfonyl fluorides. Additionally, sulfonyl fluorides can be converted to aryl sulfonamides and sulfonic esters using Cs2CO3 under mild conditions.

  13. Preparation of glycosyl thiourea derivatives from glycosyl azides using sulfamic acid and sodium iodide in one-pot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucchait, Arin; Jana, Manas; Jana, Kuladip; Misra, Anup Kumar

    2016-11-03

    Novel one-pot reaction conditions have been developed for the preparation of glycosyl thiourea derivatives directly from glycosyl azides mediated by a combination of sulfamic acid and sodium iodide. The reaction conditions were clean, non-toxic and the products were isolated in good to excellent yield. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Supercritical fluid chemical deposition of Pd nanoparticles on magnesium–scandium alloy for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couillaud, Samuel; Kirikova, Marina [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Zaïdi, Warda; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre [LRCS, UMR CNRS 6007, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039-Amiens (France); Marre, Samuel; Aymonier, Cyril [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Zhang, Junxian; Cuevas, Fermin; Latroche, Michel [ICMPE, CNRS-UPEC, UMR 7182, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320-Thiais (France); Aymard, Luc [LRCS, UMR CNRS 6007, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039-Amiens (France); Bobet, Jean-Louis, E-mail: bobet@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Nanoparticles of Pd were deposed on the binary compound Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} using the Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition (SFCD) method. •Numerous parameters were tested and optimized in order to obtain a homogeneous deposition. •At the first step, Pd@Mg0.65Sc0.35 decomposes into ScH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} under hydrogen pressure (1 MPa) at 330 °C. •The mixture, after decomposition absorbs hydrogen reversibly on Mg/MgH{sub 2} couple with good kinetics. -- Abstract: The deposition of Pd nanoparticles on the binary compound Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} using the Supercritical Fluid Chemical Deposition (SFCD) method was performed. There, the SFCD operating parameters (co-solvent, temperature, CO{sub 2} and hydrogen pressure, reaction time) have been optimized to obtain homogeneous deposition of Pd nanoparticles (around 10 nm). The hydrogenation properties of the optimized Pd@Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} material were determined and compared to those of Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35}Pd{sub 0.024}. The latter compound forms at 300 °C and 1 MPa of H{sub 2} a hydride that crystallizes in the fluorite structure, absorbs reversibly 1.5 wt.% hydrogen and exhibits fast kinetics. In contrast, Pd@Mg{sub 0.65}Sc{sub 0.35} compound decomposes into ScH{sub 2} and MgH{sub 2} during hydrogen absorption under the same conditions. However, reversible sorption reaches 3.3 wt.% of hydrogen while keeping good kinetics. The possible roles of Pd on the hydrogen-induced alloy decomposition are discussed.

  15. Efficient organic solar cells using copper(I) iodide (CuI) hole transport layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Ying [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Perumal, Ajay K.; Faber, Hendrik A.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D., E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Vourlias, George; Patsalas, Panos A. [Department of Physics, Laboratory of Applied Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); He, Zhiqun, E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2015-06-15

    We report the fabrication of high power conversion efficiency (PCE) polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic cells using solution-processed Copper (I) Iodide (CuI) as hole transport layer (HTL). Our devices exhibit a PCE value of ∼5.5% which is equivalent to that obtained for control devices based on the commonly used conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate as HTL. Inverted cells with PCE >3% were also demonstrated using solution-processed metal oxide electron transport layers, with a CuI HTL evaporated on top of the BHJ. The high optical transparency and suitable energetics of CuI make it attractive for application in a range of inexpensive large-area optoelectronic devices.

  16. Diphenyleneiodonium, an inhibitor of NOXes and DUOXes, is also an iodide-specific transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Massart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidases (NOXes and dual oxidases (DUOXes generate O2.− and H2O2. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI inhibits the activity of these enzymes and is often used as a specific inhibitor. It is shown here that DPI, at concentrations similar to those which inhibit the generation of O2 derivatives, activated the efflux of radioiodide but not of its analog 99mTcO4− nor of the K+ cation mimic 86Rb+ in thyroid cells, in the PCCl3 rat thyroid cell line and in COS cell lines expressing the iodide transporter NIS. Effects obtained with DPI, especially in thyroid cells, should therefore be interpreted with caution.

  17. Electron and hole drift mobility measurements on methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, Brian; Long, Qi; Schiff, Eric A. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Yang, Mengjin; Zhu, Kai [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Kottokkaran, Ranjith; Abbas, Hisham; Dalal, Vikram L. [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2016-04-25

    We report nanosecond domain time-of-flight measurements of electron and hole photocarriers in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The mobilities ranged from 0.06 to 1.4 cm{sup 2}/Vs at room temperature, but there is little systematic difference between the two carriers. We also find that the drift mobilities are dispersive (time-dependent). The dispersion parameters are in the range of 0.4–0.7, and they imply that terahertz domain mobilities will be much larger than nanosecond domain mobilities. The temperature-dependences of the dispersion parameters are consistent with confinement of electron and hole transport to fractal-like spatial networks within nanoseconds of their photogeneration.

  18. Efficient organic solar cells using copper(I) iodide (CuI) hole transport layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Perumal, Ajay K.; Faber, Hendrik A.; Vourlias, George; Patsalas, Panos A.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; He, Zhiqun; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2015-06-01

    We report the fabrication of high power conversion efficiency (PCE) polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic cells using solution-processed Copper (I) Iodide (CuI) as hole transport layer (HTL). Our devices exhibit a PCE value of ˜5.5% which is equivalent to that obtained for control devices based on the commonly used conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate as HTL. Inverted cells with PCE >3% were also demonstrated using solution-processed metal oxide electron transport layers, with a CuI HTL evaporated on top of the BHJ. The high optical transparency and suitable energetics of CuI make it attractive for application in a range of inexpensive large-area optoelectronic devices.

  19. Lead iodide films as X-ray sensors tested in the mammography energy region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condeles, J.F. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: fernando_condeles@pg.ffclrp.usp.br; Ghilardi Netto, T. [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14048-900 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Mulato, M. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-11

    We present an alternative method for the deposition of thin films of lead iodide (PbI{sub 2}), which is a promising semiconductor candidate for applications in medical digital radiography. The spray pyrolysis technique enables the fabrication of thick films with a deposition rate of about 3.3 As{sup -1}. We investigate the influence of the main deposition parameters on the final properties of the films. They were substrate temperature from 150 up to 270 {sup o}C and nozzle-spray distance to substrate from 13.0 to 16.5 cm. The films were mainly investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Also, electrical characterizations were made in the dark as a function of temperature, and with the samples submitted to X-ray exposures in the energy range of mammography diagnosis.

  20. Highly Nuclear-Spin-Polarized Deuterium Atoms from the UV Photodissociation of Deuterium Iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofikitis, Dimitris; Glodic, Pavle; Koumarianou, Greta; Jiang, Hongyan; Bougas, Lykourgos; Samartzis, Peter C.; Andreev, Alexander; Rakitzis, T. Peter

    2017-06-01

    We report a novel highly spin-polarized deuterium (SPD) source, via the photodissociation of deuterium iodide at 270 nm. I (P2 3 /2) photofragments are ionized with m -state selectivity, and their velocity distribution measured via velocity-map slice imaging, from which the D polarization is determined. The process produces ˜100 % electronically polarized D at the time of dissociation, which is then converted to ˜60 % nuclear D polarization after ˜1.6 ns . These production times for SPD allow collision-limited densities of ˜1 018 cm-3 and at production rates of ˜1 021 s-1 which are 1 06 and 1 04 times higher than conventional (Stern-Gerlach separation) methods, respectively. We discuss the production of SPD beams, and combining high-density SPD with laser fusion, to investigate polarized D-T, D -He 3 , and D-D fusion.

  1. Characteristics of organic light emitting diodes with copper iodide as injection layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakhira, P., E-mail: stakhira@polynet.lviv.u [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera, 12, Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Cherpak, V.; Volynyuk, D.; Ivastchyshyn, F. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera, 12, Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Hotra, Z. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera, 12, Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Rzeszow University of Technology, W. Pola 2, Rzeszow, 35-959 (Poland); Tataryn, V. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, S. Bandera, 12, Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Luka, G. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-09-30

    We have studied the use of a thin copper iodide (CuI) film as an efficient injection layer of holes from indium tin oxide (ITO) anode in a light-emitting diode structure based on tris-8-hydroxyquinoline aluminium (Alq3). The results of impedance analysis of two types of diode structures, ITO/CuI/Alq3/poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether/Al and ITO/Alq3/poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether/Al, are presented. Comparative analysis of their current density-voltage, luminance-voltage and impedance characteristics shows that presence of CuI layer facilitates injection of holes from ITO anode into the light-emitting layer Alq3 and increases electroluminescence efficiency of the organic light emitting diodes.

  2. Luminescent Properties of Cerium Doped Potassium Iodide Single Crystals in Response to γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangaru, S; Saradha, K; Muralidharan, G

    2015-05-01

    Potassium iodide doped with cerium ions were prepared by Bridgemann Stockbarger technique and investigated by optical absorption, Photoluminescence(PL), Thermoluminescence(TL), Photostimulated Luminescence(PSL) and TL emission. The optical absorption measurement indicates that F and V centers are formed in the crystals during the γ-ray irradiation process. Optical absorption and Photoluminescence studies confirm the presence of cerium ions in the trivalent state. Spectral distribution under the Thermoluminescence Emission(TLE) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence(OSL) support the idea that the defect annihilation process to be due to thermal release of F-electron in KI:Ce(3+) crystals. Both Ce(3+) and Ce(2+) emissions were observed in the Thermoluminescence emission of the crystals. Thermoluminescence(TL) has been identified to be due to thermal release of electron produced during colouration process.

  3. Characterization of Resolution and Efficiency of Sodium Iodide Detectors for Reaction Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Deion; Carls, Alex; Thompson, Paul; Hertz-Kintish, Daniel; G. R. A. N. D. D. A. D Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The study of nuclear physics with radioactive ion beams requires the understanding of detectors to be used for measuring all types of radiation. Several thallium-activated sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors were characterized with gamma-ray sources to better understand their properties so they may be utilized for future experiments. A detailed understanding of the resolution and efficiency of the detectors as a function of distance from the sources to the detector, allow us to optimize the detector placement in an experimental setup. Details of the procedure and results will be presented. Work supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. Gamma Ray Analysis of NaI Detectors by Daniel Alex and Deion.

  4. Palladium-Catalyzed Reactions of Arylindium Reagents Prepared Directly from Aryl Iodides and Indium Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoian, Vardan

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of aryl iodides with indium metal in the presence of lithium chloride leads to the formation of an organoindium reagent capable of participating in cross-coupling reactions under transition-metal catalysis. Combination with aryl halides in the presence of 5 mol% Cl2Pd(dppf) furnishes biaryl compounds in good yields; similarly, reaction with acyl halides or allylic acetates/carbonates in the presence of 5–10 mol % palladium catalyst leads to arylketones and allylic substitution products, respectively, in moderate yields. The reactions are tolerant of the presence of protic solvents, and ~85% of the indium metal employed can be recovered by reduction of the residual indium salts with zinc(0). PMID:18722408

  5. Molten phosphonium iodides as electrolytes in dye-sensitized nanocrystalline solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Rosa E.; Sanchez, Eduardo M. [Laboratorio de Investigacion del Vidrio, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Pedro de Alba S/N, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico)

    2006-09-22

    We have synthesized new room temperature ionic liquids and test them as new potential electrolytes for dye-sensitized nanocrystalline solar cells (DNSCs) of Gratzel type based on asymmetric tetraalkylphosphonium iodides. A systematic study on the conductivity behavior of BH{sub 3}PI, iBH{sub 3}PI, OH{sub 3}PI and iBO{sub 3}PI molten salts and the effect of the addition of low concentrations of iodine with and without 3-methoxypropionitrile is presented. Solar cells using iBH{sub 3}PI-based electrolyte reached an overall light-to-electricity efficiency of 5.7% under moderate light intensity (27000lx) conditions and those results are compared to similar systems using alternative ionic liquids as electrolytes. (author)

  6. Rain on Methylammonium Lead Iodide Based Perovskites: Possible Environmental Effects of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailegnaw, Bekele; Kirmayer, Saar; Edri, Eran; Hodes, Gary; Cahen, David

    2015-05-07

    The great promise of hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite (HOIP)-based solar cells is being challenged by its Pb content and its sensitivity to water. Here, the impact of rain on methylammonium lead iodide perovskite films was investigated by exposing such films to water of varying pH values, simulating exposure of the films to rain. The amount of Pb loss was determined using both gravimetric and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurements. Using our results, the extent of Pb loss to the environment, in the case of catastrophic module failure, was evaluated. Although very dependent on module siting, even total destruction of a large solar electrical power generating plant, based on HOIPs, while obviously highly undesirable, is estimated to be far from catastrophic for the environment.

  7. Temperature-Dependent Polarization in Field-Effect Transport and Photovoltaic Measurements of Methylammonium Lead Iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labram, John G; Fabini, Douglas H; Perry, Erin E; Lehner, Anna J; Wang, Hengbin; Glaudell, Anne M; Wu, Guang; Evans, Hayden; Buck, David; Cotta, Robert; Echegoyen, Luis; Wudl, Fred; Seshadri, Ram; Chabinyc, Michael L

    2015-09-17

    While recent improvements in the reported peak power conversion efficiency (PCE) of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells have been truly astonishing, there are many fundamental questions about the electronic behavior of these materials. Here we have studied a set of electronic devices employing methylammonium lead iodide ((MA)PbI3) as the active material and conducted a series of temperature-dependent measurements. Field-effect transistor, capacitor, and photovoltaic cell measurements all reveal behavior consistent with substantial and strongly temperature-dependent polarization susceptibility in (MA)PbI3 at temporal and spatial scales that significantly impact functional behavior. The relative PCE of (MA)PbI3 photovoltaic cells is observed to reduce drastically with decreasing temperature, suggesting that such polarization effects could be a prerequisite for high-performance device operation.

  8. Tuning the band gap in hybrid tin iodide perovskite semiconductors using structural templating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Jeremy L; Martin, James D; Mitzi, David B

    2005-06-27

    Structural distortions within the extensive family of organic/inorganic hybrid tin iodide perovskite semiconductors are correlated with their experimental exciton energies and calculated band gaps. The extent of the in- and out-of-plane angular distortion of the SnI4(2-) perovskite sheets is largely determined by the relative charge density and steric requirements of the organic cations. Variation of the in-plane Sn-I-Sn bond angle was demonstrated to have the greatest impact on the tuning of the band gap, and the equatorial Sn-I bond distances have a significant secondary influence. Extended Hückel tight-binding band calculations are employed to decipher the crystal orbital origins of the structural effects that fine-tune the band structure. The calculations suggest that it may be possible to tune the band gap by as much as 1 eV using the templating influence of the organic cation.

  9. High-pressure-induced phase transitions in the ferroelectric bis-thiourea pyridinium iodide inclusion compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilski, P; Bobrowicz-Sarga, L; Czarnecki, P; Maluszynska, H; Wasicki, J [Institute of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Natkaniec, I [Frank Laboratory of Neutrons Physics, JINR, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2008-12-03

    The effect of temperature and pressure on physical properties of the ferroelectric bis-thiourea pyridinium iodide inclusion compound has been studied by dielectric spectroscopy, neutron spectroscopy, neutron powder diffractometry, single crystal x-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). At ambient pressure two structural phase transitions have been revealed: at T{sub 1} = 161 K between phases I and II and at T{sub 2} = 141 K between phases II and III. Phase III with increasing pressure splits into two phases, IIIa and IIIb. The temperatures of the phase transitions T{sub I-II}, T{sub II-IIIa} and T{sub IIIa-IIIb} increase with increasing pressure. The p-T phase diagram constructed for this compound shows two triple points of coordinates 150 K, 100 MPa and 115 K, 100 MPa.

  10. The Inhibition Effect of Potassium Iodide on the Corrosion of Pure Iron in Sulphuric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Attar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of inorganic inhibitors as an alternative to organic compounds is based on the possibility of degradation of organic compounds with time and temperature. The inhibition effect of potassium iodide on the corrosion of pure iron in 0.5 M H2SO4 has been studied by weight loss. It has been observed from the results that the inhibition efficiency (IE% of KI increases from 82.17% to 97.51% with the increase in inhibitor concentration from 1·10−4 to 2·10−3 M. The apparent activation energy (Ea and the equilibrium constant of adsorption (Kads were calculated. The adsorption of the inhibitor on the pure iron surface is in agreement with Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  11. Quasi-gel-state ionic liquid electrolyte with alkyl-pyrazolium iodide for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimaru, Noriyo; Kubo, Wataru; Kitamura, Takayuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yanagida, Shozo [Center for Advanced Science and Innovation, Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tsukahara, Yasunori [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maitani, Masato M. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguroku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Wada, Yuji, E-mail: yuji-w@apc.titech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguroku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > The dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) using quasi-gel-state ionic liquid electrolyte. > We synthesized 1-alkyl-2-methylpyrazolium iodides (PyI) for the electrolytes of DSSC. > The viscosity of PyI were higher than that of the imidazolium iodide electrolytes (ImI). > DSSC using the PyI exhibited the high Jsc and efficiency than that using ImI. > In PyI, the rapid diffusion of charge carriers, Grotthus-like model, was predominant. - Abstract: A series of non-volatile viscous ionic liquid, 1-alkyl-2-methylpyrazolium iodides (RPyI: R = C{sub 3}-C{sub 7}), were synthesized for the electrolyte of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Most of RPyI revealed extremely viscous quasi-gel-state electrolytes potentially preventing leakage and evaporation of electrolytes of the solar cells. A DSSC using the electrolyte composed of 1-hexyl-2-methylpyrazolium iodide (C{sub 6}PyI) with iodine exhibiting higher conversion efficiency of 3.8% (under 1 Sun) for 10% larger short-circuit photocurrent, J{sub SC}, than that with a conventional ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3-methyllimidazolium iodide (C{sub 6}ImI) with iodine, in spite of less favorable viscosity (2013 mPa s (C{sub 6}PyI/I{sub 2}) vs. 1439 mPa s (C{sub 6}ImI/I{sub 2})) for the physical diffusion of charge carriers in the electrolyte. Furthermore, the quasi-gel-state electrolytes composed of a series of RPyI ionic liquids surprisingly exhibiting comparable J{sub SC} to that with much less viscous C{sub 6}ImI/I{sub 2}. We discuss the results of quasi-gel-state RPyI ionic liquid electrolyte for DSSC based on the Grotthus-like electron exchange mechanism of iodide redox species in the highly viscous RPyI ionic liquid evaluated qualitatively by Raman spectroscopic observation of poly-iodide species.

  12. The Role of Connectivity on Electronic Properties of Lead Iodide Perovskite-Derived Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We use a layered solution crystal growth method to synthesize high-quality single crystals of two different benzylammonium lead iodide perovskite-like organic/inorganic hybrids. The well-known (C6H5CH2NH3)2PbI4 phase is obtained in the form of bright orange platelets, with a structure comprised of single ⟨100⟩-terminated sheets of corner-sharing PbI6 octahedra separated by bilayers of the organic cations. The presence of water during synthesis leads to formation of a novel minority phase that crystallizes in the form of nearly transparent, light yellow bar-shaped crystals. This phase adopts the monoclinic space group P21/n and incorporates water molecules, with structural formula (C6H5CH2NH3)4Pb5I14·2H2O. The crystal structure consists of ribbons of edge-sharing PbI6 octahedra separated by the organic cations. Density functional theory calculations including spin–orbit coupling show that these edge-sharing PbI6 octahedra cause the band gap to increase with respect to corner-sharing PbI6 octahedra in (C6H5CH2NH3)2PbI4. To gain systematic insight, we model the effect of the connectivity of PbI6 octahedra on the band gap in idealized lead iodide perovskite-derived compounds. We find that increasing the connectivity from corner-, via edge-, to face-sharing causes a significant increase in the band gap. This provides a new mechanism to tailor the optical properties in organic/inorganic hybrid compounds. PMID:28677956

  13. Imaging and targeted therapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma using the theranostic sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmohl, Kathrin A; Gupta, Aayush; Grünwald, Geoffrey K; Trajkovic-Arsic, Marija; Klutz, Kathrin; Braren, Rickmer; Schwaiger, Markus; Nelson, Peter J; Ogris, Manfred; Wagner, Ernst; Siveke, Jens T; Spitzweg, Christine

    2017-05-16

    The theranostic sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene allows detailed molecular imaging of transgene expression and application of therapeutic radionuclides. As a crucial step towards clinical application, we investigated tumor specificity and transfection efficiency of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted polyplexes as systemic NIS gene delivery vehicles in an advanced genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) that closely reflects human disease. PDAC was induced in mice by pancreas-specific activation of constitutively active KrasG12D and deletion of Trp53. We used tumor-targeted polyplexes (LPEI-PEG-GE11/NIS) based on linear polyethylenimine, shielded by polyethylene glycol and coupled with the EGFR-specific peptide ligand GE11, to target a NIS-expressing plasmid to high EGFR-expressing PDAC. In vitro iodide uptake studies in cell explants from murine EGFR-positive and EGFR-ablated PDAC lesions demonstrated high transfection efficiency and EGFR-specificity of LPEI-PEG-GE11/NIS. In vivo 123I gamma camera imaging and three-dimensional high-resolution 124I PET showed significant tumor-specific accumulation of radioiodide after systemic LPEI-PEG-GE11/NIS injection. Administration of 131I in LPEI-PEG-GE11/NIS-treated mice resulted in significantly reduced tumor growth compared to controls as determined by magnetic resonance imaging, though survival was not significantly prolonged. This study opens the exciting prospect of NIS-mediated radionuclide imaging and therapy of PDAC after systemic non-viral NIS gene delivery.

  14. Delayed cognitive and psychiatric symptoms following methyl iodide and manganese poisoning: Potential for misdiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie Ross, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes two patients who were exposed to toxic substances in the workplace, but for whom diagnosis proved difficult, particularly in case 2. Case 1 was exposed to methyl iodide and case 2 to manganese. Poisoning was characterised by delayed onset of symptoms following exposure and symptom progression after cessation of exposure. The clinical consequences of exposure to these substances include cerebellar and Parkinsonian symptoms followed by the development of cognitive impairment and the late appearance of psychiatric disturbances. Both cases were evaluated by physicians with little training in toxicology. Apart from abnormal liver function in case 1 and decreased power, coordination and proprioception in case 2, results of most routine medical investigations were normal. Both cases were referred for MRI brain scan and neuropsychological assessment. Abnormalities were noted on MRI but reported as being absent initially in case 1and of unknown significance in case 2. There was evidence of cognitive impairment in both and personality change in case 1 of sufficient severity to prevent both cases from returning to work and to impact on family life. There is no antidote to methyl iodide or manganese poisoning. Successful treatment requires early diagnosis and cessation of exposure, but neurotoxic syndromes are difficult to diagnose when a time lag exists between exposure and symptom onset and there is no biomarker of exposure. These syndromes may initially be confused with other neurodegenerative conditions, infectious processes, and psychiatric disorders. Clinician's lack of familiarity with the potential toxicity of environmental and industrial chemicals can lead to misdiagnosis and mismanagement, and this lack of recognition can lead to continued exposure. These cases highlight the importance of taking a detailed occupational history in patients who present with atypical neurological symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diffusional analysis of the adsorption of methyl iodide on silver exchanged mordenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Counce, R.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The removal of organic iodides from off-gas streams is an important step in controlling the release of radioactive iodine to the environment during the treatment of radioactive wastes or the processing of some irradiated materials. Nine-well accepted mass transfer models were evaluated for their ability to adequately explain the observed CH{sub 3}I uptake behavior onto the Ag{degrees}Z. Linear and multidimensional regression techniques were used to estimate the diffusion constants and other model parameters, which then permitted the selection of an appropriate mass transfer model. Although a number of studies have been conducted to evaluate the loading of both elemental and methyl iodide on silver-exchanged mordenite, these studies focused primarily on the macro scale (deep bed) while evaluating the material under a broad range of process conditions and contaminants for total bed loading at the time of breakthrough. A few studies evaluated equilibrium or maximum loading. Thus, to date, only bulk loading data exist for the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z. Hence this is believed to be the first study to quantify the controlling mass transfer mechanisms of this process, It can be concluded from the analysis of the experimental data obtained by the {open_quotes}single-pellet{close_quotes} type experiments and for the process conditions used in this study that the overall mass transfer rate associated with the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z is affected by both micropore and macropore diffusion. The macropore diffusion rate was significantly faster than the micropore diffusion, resulting in a two-step adsorption behavior which was adequately modeled by a bimodal pore distribution model. The micropore diffusivity was determined to be on the order of 2 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s. The system was also shown to be isothermal under all conditions of this study. 21 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Subcellular distribution of the sodium iodide symporter in benign and malignant thyroid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollecker, Inga; von Wasielewski, Reinhard; Langner, Cord; Müller, Jörg Andreas; Spitzweg, Christine; Kreipe, Hans; Brabant, Georg

    2012-05-01

    Membranous expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is a prerequisite for iodide uptake in thyrocytes. Previous studies reported heterogeneous results on the relative frequency of staining in various pathological conditions of the thyroid. The present study aimed at determining membranous staining by using confocal laser microscopy in benign and malignant thyroid diseases, complemented in a subgroup of patients with recurrent or metastatic disease with functional findings of radioiodine uptake (RIU). There were 380 malignant thyroid tumors (145 papillary, 51 follicular, 87 Hurthle cell, and 97 undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas [UTC]), 115 benign adenomas, 62 diffuse goiters, 89 inflammatory conditions (Graves', Hashimoto, Thyroiditis deQuervain, and lymphocytic thyroiditis), and 179 normal tissues (NT, fetal, and adult). These were subjected to NIS (two different antibodies) and thyroglobulin (TG) staining and evaluated by confocal microscopy. In a subgroup of 50 samples from patients with recurrent or metastatic disease, NIS staining was correlated with the RIU. As compared with NT, Graves' patients had significantly higher positive NIS membrane staining (>97% vs. 69%) whereas patients with Hashimoto, lymphocytic thyroiditis but also benign adenomas scored lower than NT (56.7% and 55.8% vs. 69%). Depending on their differentiation NIS staining was significantly lower in thyroid carcinomas in parallel with TG staining with only 1/97 UTCs being positive. RIU was more frequently detectable than NIS staining. Confocal staining strictly evaluating only membranous expression of NIS has not used on a large scale before this study. We confirm the loss of membranous NIS in benign but more prominently in malignant thyroid tumors. NIS staining of diagnostic tissues cannot be used to predict RIU.

  17. Silver nanoplates-based colorimetric iodide recognition and sensing using sodium thiosulfate as a sensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Xinyan; Chen, Shu, E-mail: chenshumail@gmail.com; Tang, Jian; Xiong, Yuan; Long, Yunfei, E-mail: l_yunfei927@163.com

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • A new colorimetric iodide detection strategy based on triangular Ag nanoplate. • Sodium thiosulfate performed as a sensitizer. • Formation of insoluble AgI on the surface of Ag nanoplate. • This method has the advantages of good selectivity and high sensitivity. Abstract: A colorimetric method for the recognition and sensing of iodide ions (I⁻) has been developed by utilizing the reactions between triangular silver nanoplates (TAg-NPs) and I⁻ in the presence of sodium thiosulfate (Na₂S₂O₃). Specifically, I⁻ together with Na₂S₂O₃ can induce protection of TAg-NPs owing to the formation of insoluble AgI, as confirmed by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In the absence of Na₂S₂O₃, the etching reactions on TAg-NPs were observed not only by I⁻ but also other halides ions. The Na₂S₂O₃ plays as a sensitizer in this system, which improved the selectivity and sensitivity. The desired colorimetric detection can be achieved by measuring the change of the absorption peak wavelength corresponding to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) with UV–vis spectrophotometer or recognized by naked eye observation. The results show that the shift of the maximum absorption wavelength (Δλ) of the TAg-NPs/Na₂S₂O₃/I⁻ mixture was proportional to the concentration of I⁻ in the range 1.0 × 10⁻⁹–1.0 × 10⁻⁶ mol L⁻¹. Moreover, no other ions besides I⁻ can induce an eye discernible color change as low as 1.0 × 10⁻⁷ mol L⁻¹. Finally, this method was successfully applied for I⁻ determination in kelp samples.

  18. Distribution and enzymatic activity of heterotrophic bacteria decomposing selected macromolecular compounds in a Baltic Sea sandy beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórska, B.; Mudryk, Z. J.

    2003-03-01

    The potential capability to decompose macromolecular compounds, and the level of extracellular enzyme activities were determined in heterotrophic bacteria isolated from a sandy beach in Sopot on the Southern Baltic Sea coast. Individual isolates were capable of hydrolysing a wide spectrum of organic macromolecular compounds. Lipids, gelatine, and DNA were hydrolyzed most efficiently. Only a very small percentage of strains were able to decompose cellulose, and no pectinolytic bacteria were found. Except for starch-hydrolysis, no significant differences in the intensity of organic compound decomposition were recorded between horizontal and vertical profiles of the studied beach. Of all the studied extracellular enzymes, alkaline phosphatase, esterase lipase, and leucine acrylaminidase were most active; in contrast, the activity α-fucosidase, α-galactosidase and β-glucouronidase was the weakest. The level of extracellular enzyme activity was similar in both sand layers.

  19. Highly concentrated synthesis of copper-zinc-tin-sulfide nanocrystals with easily decomposable capping molecules for printed photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngwoo; Woo, Kyoohee; Kim, Inhyuk; Cho, Yong Soo; Jeong, Sunho; Moon, Jooho

    2013-11-07

    Among various candidate materials, Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a promising earth-abundant semiconductor for low-cost thin film solar cells. We report a facile, less toxic, highly concentrated synthetic method utilizing the heretofore unrecognized, easily decomposable capping ligand of triphenylphosphate, where phase-pure, single-crystalline, and well-dispersed colloidal CZTS nanocrystals were obtained. The favorable influence of the easily decomposable capping ligand on the microstructural evolution of device-quality CZTS absorber layers was clarified based on a comparative study with commonly used oleylamine-capped CZTS nanoparticles. The resulting CZTS nanoparticles enabled us to produce a dense and crack-free absorbing layer through annealing under a N2 + H2S (4%) atmosphere, demonstrating a solar cell with an efficiency of 3.6% under AM 1.5 illumination.

  20. Allylammonium hydrogen oxalate hemihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błażej Dziuk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title hydrated molecular salt, C3H8N+·C2HO4−·0.5H2O, the water O atom lies on a crystallographic twofold axis. The C=C—C—N torsion angle in the cation is 2.8 (3° and the dihedral angle between the CO2 and CO2H planes in the anion is 1.0 (4°. In the crystal, the hydrogen oxalate ions are linked by O—H...O hydrogen bonds, generating [010] chains. The allylammonium cations bond to the chains through N—H...O and N—H...(O,O hydrogen bonds. The water molecule accepts two N—H...O hydrogen bonds and makes two O—H...O hydrogen bonds. Together, the hydrogen bonds generate (100 sheets.

  1. Hydrogen Fuelling Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard

    This thesis concerns hydrogen fuelling stations from an overall system perspective. The study investigates thermodynamics and energy consumption of hydrogen fuelling stations for fuelling vehicles for personal transportation. For the study a library concerning the components in a hydrogen fuelling...... station has been developed in Dymola. The models include the fuelling protocol (J2601) for hydrogen vehicles made by Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the thermodynamic property library CoolProp is used for retrieving state point. The components in the hydrogen fuelling library are building up....... A system consisting of one high pressure storage tank is used to investigate the thermodynamics of fuelling a hydrogen vehicle. The results show that the decisive parameter for how the fuelling proceeds is the pressure loss in the vehicle. The single tank fuelling system is compared to a cascade fuelling...

  2. Spatial distribution of perchlorate, iodide and thiocyanate in the aquatic environment of Tianjin, China: environmental source analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaolei; Zhang, Tao; Gan, Zhiwei; Sun, Hongwen

    2014-09-01

    Although China is the largest producer of fireworks (perchlorate-containing products) in the world, the pathways through which perchlorate enters the environment have not been characterized completely in this country. In this study, perchlorate, iodide and thiocyanate were measured in 101 water samples, including waste water, surface water, sea water and paired samples of rain water and surface runoff collected in Tianjin, China. The concentrations of the target anions were generally on the order of rain>surface water≈waste water treatment plant (WWTP) influent>WWTP effluent. High concentrations of perchlorate, iodide and thiocyanate were detected in rain samples, ranging from 0.35 to 27.3 (median: 4.05), 0.51 to 8.33 (2.92), and 1.31 to 107 (5.62) ngmL(-)(1), respectively. Furthermore, the concentrations of the target anions in rain samples were significantly (r=0.596-0.750, p<0.01) positively correlated with the concentrations obtained in the paired surface runoff samples. The anions tested showed a clear spatial distribution, and higher concentrations were observed in the upper reaches of rivers, sea waters near the coast, and rain-surface runoff pairs sampled in urban areas. Our results revealed that precipitation may act as an important source of perchlorate, iodide and thiocyanate in surface water. Moreover, iodide concentrations in the Haihe River and Dagu Drainage Canal showed a good correlation with an ideal marker (acesulfame) of domestic waste water, indicating that input from domestic waste water was an important source of iodide in the surface waters of Tianjin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dialkylmethyl-2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamidoammonium iodide as a ruthenium selective ligand from nitric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Shikha [Bio-Organic Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ghosh, Sunil K., E-mail: ghsunil@barc.gov.in [Bio-Organic Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sharma, Joti N., E-mail: jnsharma@barc.gov.in [Process Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A new class of quart-ammonium based ligands have been designed and synthesized. • Ligand showed high extractability and selectivity for Ru in nitric acid medium. • Results are better compared to other extractants reported so far. • The iodide ion played key role in extraction process. • The composition of the extracted complex was found to be L[Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}I]. - Abstract: A new class of quaternary ammonium iodide based ligands with 2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamide as an alkyl appendage have been designed, synthesized and tested for their ability to extract ruthenium selectively from nitric acid medium. The 2-(N,N-diisobutyl)acetamido ammonium iodide with two propyl and a methyl substituents showed best results for the recovery of ruthenium. The optimized concentration of the solvent was found to be 0.2 M in 30% isodecyl alcohol/n-dodecane. The stoichiometry of the complex was ascertained by slope analysis method and was found to be 1:1 with respect to ligand L{sup +}I{sup −} and Ru(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Ruthenium formed an adduct of structure LRu(NO)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}I in the extraction medium. Iodide ion played an important role in the formation of the stable and extractable complex of ruthenium. No extraction was observed when iodide was replaced by nitrate anion in the ligand. The ligand also showed good selectivity for ruthenium in the presence of other metal ions commonly found in nitric acid solutions of nuclear waste.

  4. Comparison of expressed human and mouse sodium/iodide sym-porters reveals differences in transport properties and subcellular localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayem, M.; Basquin, C.; Navarro, V.; Carrier, P.; Marsault, R.; Lindenthal, S.; Pourcher, T. [Univ Nice Sophia Antipolis, Sch Med, CEA, DSV, iBEB, SBTN, TIRO, F-06107 Nice (France); Chang, P. [CNRS, UPMC Biol Dev, UMR 7009, F-06230 Villefranche Sur Mer (France); Huc, S.; Darrouzet, E. [CEA Valrho, DSV, iBEB, SBTN, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    The active transport of iodide from the blood stream into thyroid follicular cells is mediated by the Na{sup +}/I{sup -} sym-porter (NIS). We studied mouse NIS (mNIS) and found that it catalyzes iodide transport into transfected cells more efficiently than human NIS (hNIS). To further characterize this difference,we compared {sup 125}I, uptake in the transiently transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. We found that the Vmax for mNIS was four times higher than that for hNIS, and that the iodide transport constant (Km) was 2-5-fold lower for hNIS than mNIS. We also performed immuno-cyto-localization studies and observed that the subcellular distribution of the two ortho-logs differed. While the mouse protein was predominantly found at the plasma membrane, its human ortho-log was intracellular in {approx} 40% of the expressing cells. Using cell surface protein-labeling assays, we found that the plasma membrane localization frequency of the mouse protein was only 2-5-fold higher than that of the human protein, and therefore cannot alone account for,x values. We reasoned that the difference in the obtained Vmax the observed difference could also be caused by a higher turnover number for iodide transport in the mouse protein. We then expressed and analyzed chimeric proteins. The data obtained with these constructs suggest that the iodide recognition site could be located in the region extending from the N-terminus to transmembrane domain 8, and that the region between transmembrane domain 5 and the C-terminus could play a role in the subcellular localization of the protein. (authors)

  5. A quantification method for heat-decomposable methylglyoxal oligomers and its application on 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodigast, Maria; Mutzel, Anke; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2017-03-01

    Methylglyoxal forms oligomeric compounds in the atmospheric aqueous particle phase, which could establish a significant contribution to the formation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). Thus far, no suitable method for the quantification of methylglyoxal oligomers is available despite the great effort spent for structure elucidation. In the present study a simplified method was developed to quantify heat-decomposable methylglyoxal oligomers as a sum parameter. The method is based on the thermal decomposition of oligomers into methylglyoxal monomers. Formed methylglyoxal monomers were detected using PFBHA (o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine hydrochloride) derivatisation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The method development was focused on the heating time (varied between 15 and 48 h), pH during the heating process (pH = 1-7), and heating temperature (50, 100 °C). The optimised values of these method parameters are presented. The developed method was applied to quantify heat-decomposable methylglyoxal oligomers formed during the OH-radical oxidation of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB) in the Leipzig aerosol chamber (LEipziger AerosolKammer, LEAK). Oligomer formation was investigated as a function of seed particle acidity and relative humidity. A fraction of heat-decomposable methylglyoxal oligomers of up to 8 % in the produced organic particle mass was found, highlighting the importance of those oligomers formed solely by methylglyoxal for SOA formation. Overall, the present study provides a new and suitable method for quantification of heat-decomposable methylglyoxal oligomers in the aqueous particle phase.

  6. Modelling the dissipation and leaching of two herbicides in decomposing mulch of crop residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Sohaib; Iqbal, Akhtar; Lafolie, François; Recous, Sylvie; Benoit, Pierre; Garnier, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    greater leaching from mulch than S-metolachlor because of its lower adsorption coefficients to organic mulch. Moreover, simulated results showed a much faster degradation of glyphosate but greater non-extractable residue formation for S-metolachlor. Keywords: Mulch; Pesticides; Transport; Degradation; Modeling; Pastis-mulch References Findeling, A., Garnier, P., Coppens, F., Lafolie, F., Recous, S., 2007. Modelling water, carbon and nitrogen dynamics in soil covered with decomposing mulch. European Journal of Soil Science 58, 196-206. Lashermes, G., Zhang, Y., Houot, S., Barriuso, E., Steyer, J.P., Patureau, D., Garnier, P., 2013. A model coupling organic carbon and organic pollutant dynamics during composting. Journal of Environmental Quality. In Press.

  7. Self-decomposable Fibrous Bridging Additives for Temporary Cementitious Fracture Sealers in EGS Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.; Kisslinger, K.; Iverson, B.; Bour, D.

    2012-11-01

    potential as a self-decomposable bridging additive in the SSASC cement sealer.

  8. Measuring and decomposing inequity in self-reported morbidity and self-assessed health in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorenko Alexandra

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, interest in the study of inequalities in health has not stopped at quantifying their magnitude; explaining the sources of inequalities has also become of great importance. This paper measures socioeconomic inequalities in self-reported morbidity and self-assessed health in Thailand, and the contributions of different population subgroups to those inequalities. Methods The Health and Welfare Survey 2003 conducted by the Thai National Statistical Office with 37,202 adult respondents is used for the analysis. The health outcomes of interest derive from three self-reported morbidity and two self-assessed health questions. Socioeconomic status is measured by adult-equivalent monthly income per household member. The concentration index (CI of ill health is used as a measure of socioeconomic health inequalities, and is subsequently decomposed into contributing factors. Results The CIs reveal inequality gradients disadvantageous to the poor for both self-reported morbidity and self-assessed health in Thailand. The magnitudes of these inequalities were higher for the self-assessed health outcomes than for the self-reported morbidity outcomes. Age and sex played significant roles in accounting for the inequality in reported chronic illness (33.7 percent of the total inequality observed, hospital admission (27.8 percent, and self-assessed deterioration of health compared to a year ago (31.9 percent. The effect of being female and aged 60 years or older was by far the strongest demographic determinant of inequality across all five types of health outcome. Having a low socioeconomic status as measured by income quintile, education and work status were the main contributors disadvantaging the poor in self-rated health compared to a year ago (47.1 percent and self-assessed health compared to peers (47.4 percent. Residence in the rural Northeast and rural North were the main regional contributors to inequality in self

  9. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  10. Pathways to Metallic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Deemyad, Shanti

    2008-01-01

    The traditional pathway that researchers have used in the goal of producing atomic metallic hydrogen is to compress samples with megabar pressures at low temperature. A number of phases have been observed in solid hydrogen and its isotopes, but all are in the insulating phase. The results of experiment and theory for this pathway are reviewed. In recent years a new pathway has become the focus of this challenge of producing metallic hydrogen, namely a path along the melting line. It has bee...

  11. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  12. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen is an especially attractive transportation fuel. It is the least polluting fuel available, and can be produced anywhere there is water and a clean source of electricity. A fuel cycle in which hydrogen is produced by solar-electrolysis of water, or by gasification of renewably grown biomass, and then used in a fuel-cell powered electric-motor vehicle (FCEV), would produce little or no local, regional, or global pollution. Hydrogen FCEVs would combine the best features of bat...

  13. Familiarity breeds dissent: Reliability analyses for British-English idioms on measures of familiarity, meaning, literality, and decomposability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, Emily; Cleland, Alexandra A; Bull, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    To date, there have been several attempts made to build a database of normative data for English idiomatic expressions (e.g., Libben & Titone, 2008; Titone & Connine, 1994), however, there has been some discussion in the literature as to the validity and reliability of the data obtained, particularly for decomposability ratings. Our work aimed to address these issues by looking at ratings from native and non-native speakers and to extend the deeper investigation and analysis of decomposability to other aspects of idiomatic expressions, namely familiarly, meaning and literality. Poor reliability was observed on all types of ratings, suggesting that rather than decomposability being a special case, individual variability plays a large role in how participants rate idiomatic phrases in general. Ratings from native and non-native speakers were positively correlated and an analysis of covariance found that once familiarity with an idiom was accounted for, most of the differences between native and non-native ratings were not significant. Overall, the results suggest that individual experience with idioms plays an important role in how they are perceived and this should be taken into account when selecting stimuli for experimental studies. Furthermore, the results are suggestive of the inability of speakers to inhibit the figurative meanings for idioms that they are highly familiar with. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Classification for dimethylarsenate-decomposing bacteria using a restrict fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Teruya; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Watarai, Hiroshi; Ueda, Kazumasa

    2004-01-01

    A new monitoring system for bacterial communities involving dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA) decomposition was provided by combining the MPN (Most Probable Number) method and RFLP (restriction-fragment-length polymorphism analysis). The abundance of DMAA decomposing bacteria was estimated by the MPN method using a bacterial culture medium, which included DMAA as the sole carbon source, indicating bacterial cell densities of 1700 cells/ml in Lake Kahokugata and 330 cells/ml in Lake Kibagata. After isolating the dominant bacteria using agar plates, the isolates were classified into some genotype groups by RFLP analysis using 16S rDNA sequences. Classification of the RFLP analysis indicated that 14 isolates of Lake Kahokugata were classified into 6 types, which included 2 dominant types related to genus Pseudomonas, while 8 isolates of Lake Kibagata displayed 6 types including one or two isolates. Moreover, the RFLP types were unique for each lake, suggesting that DMAA decomposing bacteria were specific for the aquatic environment related to the arsenic cycle. The activities of DMAA decomposition mostly matched with the RFLP type category of the isolates. Accordingly, combining the MPN method with the RFLP analysis will play an important role in elucidating the distributions and dynamics of the DMAA-decomposing bacterial community.

  15. Quantifying hydrogen peroxide in iron-containing solutions using leuco crystal violet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoonen Martin A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide is present in many natural waters and wastewaters. In the presence of Fe(II, this species decomposes to form hydroxyl radicals, that are extremely reactive. Hence, in the presence of Fe(II, hydrogen peroxide is difficult to detect because of its short lifetime. Here, we show an expanded use of a hydrogen peroxide quantification technique using leuco crystal violet (LCV for solutions of varying pH and iron concentration. In the presence of the biocatalyst peroxidase, LCV is oxidized by hydrogen peroxide, forming a colored crystal violet ion (CV+, which is stable for days. The LCV method uses standard equipment and allows for detection at the low microM concentration level. Results show strong pH dependence with maximum LCV oxidation at pH 4.23. By chelating dissolved Fe(II with EDTA, hydrogen peroxide can be stabilized for analysis. Results are presented for hydrogen peroxide quantification in pyrite–water slurries. Pyrite–water slurries show surface area dependent generation of hydrogen peroxide only in the presence of EDTA, which chelates dissolved Fe(II. Given the stability of CV+, this method is particularly useful for field work that involves the detection of hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  17. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T [Ann Arbor, MI; Li, Yingwel [Ann Arbor, MI; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  18. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

    2013-02-12

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  19. Effect of Magnesium Fluoride on Hydrogenation Properties of Magnesium Hydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya Jain

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A cost effective catalyst is of great importance for consideration of MgH2 as potential hydrogen storage material. In this regard, we investigated the catalytic role of alkaline metal fluoride on the hydrogen storage behavior of MgH2. Samples were synthesized by admixing 5 mol % MgF2 into MgH2 powder using planetary ball mill. Hydrogenation measurements made at 335 °C showed that in comparison to only 70% absorption by pure MgH2, catalyzed material absorbed 92% of theoretical capacity in less than 20 min and desorbed completely in almost the same time. Sorption studies done at lower temperatures revealed that complete absorption at temperature as low as 145 °C is possible. This is due to uniform distribution of MgF2 nano particles within the MgH2 powder. X-ray diffraction patterns also showed the presence of stable MgF2 phase that does not decompose upon hydrogen absorption-desorption. Cyclic measurements done at 310 °C showed negligible loss in the overall storage capacity with cycling. These results reveal that the presence of the chemically inert and stable MgF2 phase is responsible for good reversible characteristic and improved kinetics.

  20. Hydrogen Storage Tank

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This huge stainless steel reservoir,placed near an end of the East Hall, was part of the safety equipment connected to the 2 Metre liquid hydrogen Bubble Chamber. It could store all the hydrogen in case of an emergency. The picture shows the start of its demolition.