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Sample records for hydrogen generation rates

  1. Hydrogen Generation Rate Scoping Study of DOW Corning Antifoam Agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Charles

    2005-09-27

    conservatively bounds hydrogen generation rates (HGRs) from antifoam-containing simulants if the antifoam organic components are treated the same as other native organics. Tests that used the combination of radiolysis and thermolysis conducted on simulants containing antifoam produced measured hydrogen that was bounded by the WTP correlation. These tests used the bounding WTP temperature of 90 C and a dose rate of 1.8 x 10{sup 5} rad/hr. This dose rate is about ten times higher than the dose rate equivalent calculated for a bounding Hanford sludge slurry composition of 10 Ci/L, or 2 x 10{sup 4} rad/hr. Hydrogen was measured using a quadrupole mass spectroscopy instrument. Based on the analyses from the 4wt% and 10wt% antifoam samples, it is expected that the HGR results are directly proportional to the antifoam concentration added. A native organic-containing simulant that did not contain any added antifoam also produced a measurable radiolytic/thermal hydrogen rates that was in bounded by the WTP correlation. A base simulant with no added organic produced a measurable radiolytic/thermal HGR that was {approx}2X higher than the predicted HGR. Analysis of antifoam-containing simulants after prolonged irradiation of 52 Mrad and heating (23 days at 90 C) indicates that essentially all of the PDMS and greater than 60% of the PPG components are degraded, likely to lower molecular weight species. The antifoam components were analyzed by extraction from the salt simulants, followed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) by personnel at Dow Corning. A more detailed study of the antifoam degradation and product formation from radiolysis and thermolysis is currently in progress at SRNL. That study uses a dose rate of about 2 x 10{sup 4} rad/hr and bounding temperatures of 90 C. Results from that study will be reported in a future report.

  2. Empirical rate equation model and rate calculations of hydrogen generation for Hanford tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HU, T.A.

    1999-07-13

    Empirical rate equations are derived to estimate hydrogen generation based on chemical reactions, radiolysis of water and organic compounds, and corrosion processes. A comparison of the generation rates observed in the field with the rates calculated for twenty eight tanks shows agreement with in a factor of two to three.

  3. Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  4. Nitric-glycolic flowsheet testing for maximum hydrogen generation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site is developing for implementation a flowsheet with a new reductant to replace formic acid. Glycolic acid has been tested over the past several years and found to effectively replace the function of formic acid in the DWPF chemical process. The nitric-glycolic flowsheet reduces mercury, significantly lowers the chemical generation of hydrogen and ammonia, allows purge reduction in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), stabilizes the pH and chemistry in the SRAT and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), allows for effective adjustment of the SRAT/SME rheology, and is favorable with respect to melter flammability. The objective of this work was to perform DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) testing at conditions that would bound the catalytic hydrogen production for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet.

  5. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Hydrogen Generation Rate Measurement Apparatus Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-01

    The generation rate of hydrogen gas in the Hanford tank waste will be measured during the qualification of the staged tank waste for processing in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. Based on a review of past practices in measurement of the hydrogen generation, an apparatus to perform this measurement has been designed and tested for use during waste feed qualification. The hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus (HGRMA) described in this document utilized a 100 milliliter sample in a continuously-purged, continuously-stirred vessel, with measurement of hydrogen concentration in the vent gas. The vessel and lid had a combined 220 milliliters of headspace. The vent gas system included a small condenser to prevent excessive evaporative losses from the sample during the test, as well as a demister and filter to prevent particle migration from the sample to the gas chromatography system. The gas chromatograph was an on line automated instrument with a large-volume sample-injection system to allow measurement of very low hydrogen concentrations. This instrument automatically sampled the vent gas from the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus every five minutes and performed data regression in real time. The fabrication of the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus was in accordance with twenty three (23) design requirements documented in the conceptual design package, as well as seven (7) required developmental activities documented in the task plan associated with this work scope. The HGRMA was initially tested for proof of concept with physical simulants, and a remote demonstration of the system was performed in the Savannah River National Laboratory Shielded Cells Mockup Facility. Final verification testing was performed using non-radioactive simulants of the Hanford tank waste. Three different simulants were tested to bound the expected rheological properties expected during waste feed qualification testing. These

  6. Investigation of thermolytic hydrogen generation rate of tank farm simulated and actual waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Howe, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-15

    To support resolution of Potential Inadequacies in the Safety Analysis for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm, Savannah River National Laboratory conducted research to determine the thermolytic hydrogen generation rate (HGR) with simulated and actual waste. Gas chromatography methods were developed and used with air-purged flow systems to quantify hydrogen generation from heated simulated and actual waste at rates applicable to the Tank Farm Documented Safety Analysis (DSA). Initial simulant tests with a simple salt solution plus sodium glycolate demonstrated the behavior of the test apparatus by replicating known HGR kinetics. Additional simulant tests with the simple salt solution excluding organics apart from contaminants provided measurement of the detection and quantification limits for the apparatus with respect to hydrogen generation. Testing included a measurement of HGR on actual SRS tank waste from Tank 38. A final series of measurements examined HGR for a simulant with the most common SRS Tank Farm organics at temperatures up to 140 °C. The following conclusions result from this testing.

  7. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    needed are water and oxygen or air. 2. The product is pure and can therefore be used in disinfection applications directly or after proper dilution with water. 3. Oxygen generated in the anode compartment is used in the electrochemical reduction process; in addition, external oxygen is used to establish a high flow rate in the cathode compartment to remove the desired product efficiently. Exiting oxygen can be recycled after separation of liquid hydrogen peroxide product, if so desired. 4. The process can be designed for peroxide generation under microgravity conditions. 5. High concentrations of the order of 6-7 wt% can be generated by this method. This method at the time of this reporting is superior to what other researchers have reported. 6. The cell design allows for stacking of cells to increase the hydrogen peroxide production. 7. The catalyst mix containing a diquaternary ammonium compound enabled not only higher concentration of hydrogen peroxide but also higher current efficiency, improved energy efficiency, and catalyst stability. 8. The activity of the catalyst is maintained even after repeated periods of system shutdown. 9. The catalyst system can be extended for fuel-cell cathodes with suitable modifications.

  8. Impacts of glycolate and formate radiolysis and thermolysis on hydrogen generation rate calculations for the Savannah River Site tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-14

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) personnel requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluate available data and determine its applicability to defining the impact of planned glycolate anion additions to Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) on Tank Farm flammability (primarily with regard to H2 production). Flammability evaluations of formate anion, which is already present in SRS waste, were also needed. This report describes the impacts of glycolate and formate radiolysis and thermolysis on Hydrogen Generation Rate (HGR) calculations for the SRS Tank Farm.

  9. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  10. Solar hydrogen generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Sabol, A. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus, using solar energy to manufacture hydrogen by dissociating water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen molecules is described. Solar energy is concentrated on a globe containing water thereby heating the water to its dissociation temperature. The globe is pervious to hydrogen molecules permitting them to pass through the globe while being essentially impervious to oxygen molecules. The hydrogen molecules are collected after passing through the globe and the oxygen molecules are removed from the globe.

  11. Onboard hydrogen generation for automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Problems concerning the use of hydrogen as a fuel for motor vehicles are related to the storage of the hydrogen onboard a vehicle. The feasibility is investigated to use an approach based on onboard hydrogen generation as a means to avoid these storage difficulties. Two major chemical processes can be used to produce hydrogen from liquid hydrocarbons and methanol. In steam reforming, the fuel reacts with water on a catalytic surface to produce a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. In partial oxidation, the fuel reacts with air, either on a catalytic surface or in a flame front, to yield a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. There are many trade-offs in onboard hydrogen generation, both in the choice of fuels as well as in the choice of a chemical process. Attention is given to these alternatives, the results of some experimental work in this area, and the combustion of various hydrogen-rich gases in an internal combustion engine.

  12. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  13. Hydrogen generation from renewable resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loges, Bjoern

    2009-09-04

    In this thesis, the hydrogen generation by dehydrogenation of 2-propanol and formic acid as model substances for renewable resources have been studied, which is of importance for hydrogen storage. For the base-assisted dehydrogenation of 2-propanol, a ruthenium diamine catalyst system has been investigated. For the selective decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen and carbon dioxide, a system has been established containing ruthenium catalysts and formic acid amine adducts as substrates. The best catalyst activity and productivity have been achieved with in situ generated ruthenium phosphine catalysts, e.g. [RuCl{sub 2}(benzene)]{sub 2} / dppe (TOF = 900 h{sup -1}, TON = 260,000). The gas evolved has been directly used in fuel cells. Furthermore, the influence of irradiation with visible light has been described for the ruthenium phosphine catalysts. (orig.)

  14. Improved Electrolytic Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Patrick I.

    2005-01-01

    An improved apparatus for the electrolytic generation of hydrogen peroxide dissolved in water has been developed. The apparatus is a prototype of H2O2 generators for the safe and effective sterilization of water, sterilization of equipment in contact with water, and other applications in which there is need for hydrogen peroxide at low concentration as an oxidant. Potential applications for electrolytic H2O2 generators include purification of water for drinking and for use in industrial processes, sanitation for hospitals and biotechnological industries, inhibition and removal of biofouling in heat exchangers, cooling towers, filtration units, and the treatment of wastewater by use of advanced oxidation processes that are promoted by H2O2.

  15. Characteristic features of calculations of hydrogen generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshen'kin, V. B.

    2010-03-01

    Among the methods of hydrogen generation that are economically sound for autonomous customers is the silikol method. The technique of calculation of the cylinder gas generator circuit is given. The restrictions imposed on the flow velocity in a three-phase reacting system are considered. It is established that the reaction rate in the circuit as a dissipative structure is in direct correlation with the change in the Gibbs energy.

  16. Storage, generation, and use of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClaine, Andrew W.; Rolfe, Jonathan L.; Larsen, Christopher A.; Konduri, Ravi K.

    2006-05-30

    A composition comprising a carrier liquid; a dispersant; and a chemical hydride. The composition can be used in a hydrogen generator to generate hydrogen for use, e.g., as a fuel. A regenerator recovers elemental metal from byproducts of the hydrogen generation process.

  17. Development of photovoltaic hydrogen and hypochlorite generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.L.; Beltran, E.D.; Meas, Y.; Ortega, R.; Orozco, G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2010-07-15

    Sodium hypochlorite is among the most efficient methods to disinfect water. Although sodium hypochlorite can be generated from chemical reactions of chlorine gas, the transportation of chlorine is a safety concern. In-situ generation of sodium hypochlorite in an electrolysis cell is therefore desirable. This study examined the feasibility of electrolytically producing both hypochlorite and hydrogen using photovoltaic energy. Since the hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to generate electricity and the hypochlorite can be used to purify drinking water, the integrated process may be operated economically because the products from both the anode and the cathode are valuable. The apparatus used in this study was designed and constructed in such a way that the photovoltaic module was coupled to the hydrogen and hypochlorite generator. The apparatus is suitable for operation in remote areas. The rates of hydrogen and hypochlorite generation were measured and the current/voltage characteristics of both the PV module and the electrolysis cell were analyzed. The electrolytic process yielded a sodium hypochlorite solution that was stable at pH 7. This study showed that environmental conditions such as solar intensity, ambient temperature and surface temperature of the photovoltaic module have a small effect on the rate of hydrogen production. Photovoltaic cells can supply the necessary electric current and voltage to produce 5 litres of 3.5 g/l NaOCl daily when a membrane is incorporated in the cell. The quantity of sodium hypochlorite produced by membraneless electrolysis with 2 photovoltaic modules could purify water for 40 families. It was concluded that long-term testing under real operating conditions is needed in order to estimate the capital cost of the equipment. 15 refs., 8 tabs., 5 figs.

  18. Hydrogen Generation Via Fuel Reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, John F.

    2003-07-01

    Reforming is the conversion of a hydrocarbon based fuel to a gas mixture that contains hydrogen. The H2 that is produced by reforming can then be used to produce electricity via fuel cells. The realization of H2-based power generation, via reforming, is facilitated by the existence of the liquid fuel and natural gas distribution infrastructures. Coupling these same infrastructures with more portable reforming technology facilitates the realization of fuel cell powered vehicles. The reformer is the first component in a fuel processor. Contaminants in the H2-enriched product stream, such as carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), can significantly degrade the performance of current polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC's). Removal of such contaminants requires extensive processing of the H2-rich product stream prior to utilization by the fuel cell to generate electricity. The remaining components of the fuel processor remove the contaminants in the H2 product stream. For transportation applications the entire fuel processing system must be as small and lightweight as possible to achieve desirable performance requirements. Current efforts at Argonne National Laboratory are focused on catalyst development and reactor engineering of the autothermal processing train for transportation applications.

  19. Hydrogen generation in tru waste transportation packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B; Sheaffer, M K; Fischer, L E

    2000-03-27

    This document addresses hydrogen generation in TRU waste transportation packages. The potential sources of hydrogen generation are summarized with a special emphasis on radiolysis. After defining various TRU wastes according to groupings of material types, bounding radiolytic G-values are established for each waste type. Analytical methodologies are developed for prediction of hydrogen gas concentrations for various packaging configurations in which hydrogen generation is due to radiolysis. Representative examples are presented to illustrate how analytical procedures can be used to estimate the hydrogen concentration as a function of time. Methodologies and examples are also provided to show how the time to reach a flammable hydrogen concentration in the innermost confinement layer can be estimated. Finally, general guidelines for limiting the hydrogen generation in the payload and hydrogen accumulation in the innermost confinement layer are described.

  20. Hydrogen generation from magnesium hydride by using organic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yen-Hsi

    In this paper, the hydrolysis of solid magnesium hydride has been studied with the high concentration of catalyst at the varying temperature. An organic acid (acetic acid, CH3COOH) has been chosen as the catalyst. The study has three objectives: first, using three different weights of MgH 2 react with aqueous solution of acid for the hydrogen generation experiments. Secondly, utilizing acetic acid as the catalyst accelerates hydrogen generation. Third, emphasizing the combination of the three operating conditions (the weight of MgH2, the concentration of acetic acid, and the varying temperature) influence the amount of hydrogen generation. The experiments results show acetic acid truly can increase the rate of hydrogen generation and the weight of MgH2 can affect the amount of hydrogen generation more than the varying temperature.

  1. Hydrogen-rich gas generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus are described for producing hydrogen-rich product gases. A spray of liquid hydrocarbon is mixed with a stream of air in a startup procedure and the mixture is ignited for partial oxidation. The stream of air is then heated by the resulting combustion to reach a temperature such that a signal is produced. The signal triggers a two way valve which directs liquid hydrocarbon from a spraying mechanism to a vaporizing mechanism with which a vaporized hydrocarbon is formed. The vaporized hydrocarbon is subsequently mixed with the heated air in the combustion chamber where partial oxidation takes place and hydrogen-rich product gases are produced.

  2. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, J. J.

    1995-02-01

    Clean Air Now (CAN), a non-profit corporation, acting under U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement will build a Solar Hydrogen Generating Facility at the Xerox Corp. Facility in El Segundo, CA. An integral component of this system is an electrolyzer and related equipment for compression and storage of the produced hydrogen gas. CAN has selected The Electrolyser Corporation (T.E.C) to fulfill this requirement.

  3. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs.; Cormos, C. C.; Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO2 emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  4. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs., E-mail: tazsolt@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Cormos, C. C., E-mail: cormos@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Agachi, P. S. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 11 Arany Janos, Postal code: 400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO{sub 2} emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  5. Catalytic partial oxidation of methanol and ethanol for hydrogen generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, Keith L; Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles feature high energy efficiency and minor environmental impact. Liquid fuels are ideal hydrogen carriers, which can catalytically be converted into syngas or hydrogen to power vehicles. Among the potential liquid fuels, alcohols have several advantages. The hydrogen/carbon ratio is higher than that of other liquid hydrocarbons or oxygenates, especially in the case of methanol. In addition, alcohols can be derived from renewable biomass resources. Catalytic partial oxidation of methanol or ethanol offers immense potential for onboard hydrogen generation due to its rapid reaction rate and exothermic nature. These benefits stimulate a burgeoning research community in catalyst design, reaction engineering, and mechanistic investigation. The purpose of this Minireview is to provide insight into syngas and hydrogen production from methanol and ethanol partial oxidation, particularly highlighting catalytic chemistry.

  6. Double heterojunction nanowire photocatalysts for hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongying, P.; Vietmeyer, F.; Aleksiuk, D.; Ferraudi, G. J.; Krylova, G.; Kuno, M.

    2014-03-01

    Charge separation and charge transfer across interfaces are key aspects in the design of efficient photocatalysts for solar energy conversion. In this study, we investigate the hydrogen generating capabilities and underlying photophysics of nanostructured photocatalysts based on CdSe nanowires (NWs). Systems studied include CdSe, CdSe/CdS core/shell nanowires and their Pt nanoparticle-decorated counterparts. Femtosecond transient differential absorption measurements reveal how semiconductor/semiconductor and metal/semiconductor heterojunctions affect the charge separation and hydrogen generation efficiencies of these hybrid photocatalysts. In turn, we unravel the role of surface passivation, charge separation at semiconductor interfaces and charge transfer to metal co-catalysts in determining photocatalytic H2 generation efficiencies. This allows us to rationalize why Pt nanoparticle decorated CdSe/CdS NWs, a double heterojunction system, performs best with H2 generation rates of ~434.29 +/- 27.40 μmol h-1 g-1 under UV/Visible irradiation. In particular, we conclude that the CdS shell of this double heterojunction system serves two purposes. The first is to passivate CdSe NW surface defects, leading to long-lived charges at the CdSe/CdS interface capable of carrying out reduction chemistries. Upon photoexcitation, we also find that CdS selectively injects charges into Pt NPs, enabling simultaneous reduction chemistries at the Pt NP/solvent interface. Pt nanoparticle decorated CdSe/CdS NWs thus enable reduction chemistries at not one, but rather two interfaces, taking advantage of each junction's optimal catalytic activities.Charge separation and charge transfer across interfaces are key aspects in the design of efficient photocatalysts for solar energy conversion. In this study, we investigate the hydrogen generating capabilities and underlying photophysics of nanostructured photocatalysts based on CdSe nanowires (NWs). Systems studied include CdSe, CdSe/CdS core

  7. Hydrogen generation from low-temperature water-rock reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, L. E.; Ellison, E. T.; McCollom, T. M.; Trainor, T. P.; Templeton, A. S.

    2013-06-01

    Hydrogen is commonly produced during the high-temperature hydration of mafic and ultramafic rocks, owing to the oxidation of reduced iron present in the minerals. Hydrothermal hydrogen is known to sustain microbial communities in submarine vent and terrestrial hot-spring systems. However, the rates and mechanisms of hydrogen generation below temperatures of 150°C are poorly constrained. As such, the existence and extent of hydrogen-fuelled ecosystems in subsurface terrestrial and oceanic aquifers has remained uncertain. Here, we report results from laboratory experiments in which we reacted ground ultramafic and mafic rocks and minerals--specifically peridotite, pyroxene, olivine and magnetite--with anoxic fluids at 55 and 100°C, and monitored hydrogen gas production. We used synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy to identify changes in the speciation of iron in the materials. We report a strong correlation between molecular hydrogen generation and the presence of spinel phases--oxide minerals with the general formula [M2+M23+]O4 and a cubic crystal structure--in the reactants. We also identify Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide reaction products localized on the surface of the spinel phases, indicative of iron oxidation. We propose that the transfer of electrons between Fe(II) and water adsorbed to the spinel surfaces promotes molecular hydrogen generation at low temperatures. We suggest that these localized sites of hydrogen generation in ultramafic aquifers in the oceanic and terrestrial crust could support hydrogen-based microbial life.

  8. Electrokinetic Hydrogen Generation from Liquid WaterMicrojets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffin, Andrew M.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2007-05-31

    We describe a method for generating molecular hydrogen directly from the charge separation effected via rapid flow of liquid water through a metal orifice, wherein the input energy is the hydrostatic pressure times the volume flow rate. Both electrokinetic currents and hydrogen production rates are shown to follow simple equations derived from the overlap of the fluid velocity gradient and the anisotropic charge distribution resulting from selective adsorption of hydroxide ions to the nozzle surface. Pressure-driven fluid flow shears away the charge balancing hydronium ions from the diffuse double layer and carries them out of the aperture. Downstream neutralization of the excess protons at a grounded target electrode produces gaseous hydrogen molecules. The hydrogen production efficiency is currently very low (ca. 10-6) for a single cylindrical jet, but can be improved with design changes.

  9. Hydrogen generation via anaerobic fermentation of paper mill wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Vazquez, Idania; Sparling, Richard; Risbey, Derek; Rinderknecht-Seijas, Noemi; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the hydrogen production from paper mill wastes using microbial consortia of solid substrate anaerobic digesters. Inocula from mesophilic, continuous solid substrate anaerobic digestion (SSAD) reactors were transferred to small lab scale, batch reactors. Milled paper (used as a surrogate paper waste) was added as substrate and acetylene or 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) was spiked for methanogenesis inhibition. In the first phase of experiments it was found that acetylene at 1% v/v in the headspace was as effective as BES in inhibiting methanogenic activity. Hydrogen gas accumulated in the headspace of the bottles, reaching a plateau. Similar final hydrogen concentrations were obtained for reactors spiked with acetylene and BES. In the second phase of tests the headspace of the batch reactors was flushed with nitrogen gas after the first plateau of hydrogen was reached, and subsequently incubated, with no further addition of inhibitor nor substrate. It was found that hydrogen production resumed and reached a second plateau, although somewhat lower than the first one. This procedure was repeated a third time and an additional amount of hydrogen was obtained. The plateaux and initial rates of hydrogen accumulation decreased in each subsequent incubation cycle. The total cumulative hydrogen harvested in the three cycles was much higher (approx. double) than in the first cycle alone. We coined this procedure as IV-SSAH (intermittently vented solid substrate anaerobic hydrogen generation). Our results point out to a feasible strategy for obtaining higher hydrogen yields from the fermentation of industrial solid wastes, and a possible combination of waste treatment processes consisting of a first stage IV-SSAH followed by a second SSAD stage. Useful products of this approach would be hydrogen, organic acids or methane, and anaerobic digestates that could be used as soil amenders after post-treatment.

  10. Hydrogen sulfide generation and detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackley, M W

    1983-07-01

    A test system has been devised for generation and measurement of hydrogen sulfide/air mixtures. Such a system has numerous applications, including toxicology studies, detector badge and tube evaluation, sorbent capacity measurements, and respirator cartridge or canister breakthrough testing. The system in this study utilizes an HNU photoionization analyzer for detection of H2S concentrations of 1.0 ppm to 26.0 ppm. Generation techniques for these low concentration levels, and also for much higher H2S concentrations, have been described. Special consideration has been given to H2S permeation of transfer tubing, and to the effects of water vapor interference upon the analyzer.

  11. Energy generation and utilization in hydrogen bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, L

    1970-10-01

    Studies on the relationship between cell synthesis and energy utilization in Hydrogenomonas eutropha have shown that the amount of oxidative energy required for synthetic reactions depends on the conditions of growth. The energy of hydrogen oxidation was most efficiently used when growth conditions were optimal (continuous culture, cells in exponential growth phase) and when the rate of growth was limited by H(2) or O(2) supply. Under these conditions, 2 to 2.5 atoms of oxygen were consumed by the oxyhydrogen reaction for the concomitant conversion of 1 mole of CO(2) to cell matter. This conversion efficiency, expressed as the O/C energyyield value, was observed with continuous cultures. A less efficient conversion was found with batch cultures. With limiting concentrations of CO(2) the rate of hydrogen oxidation was relatively high, and the O/C value was dependent on the growth rate. With nonlimiting concentrations of CO(2), the rate of hydrogen oxidation was strictly proportional to the rate of CO(2) fixation, and the O/C value was independent of growth rate. This proportionality between the rate of H(2) oxidation and the rate of CO(2) fixation suggested that energy supply regulates the (maximum) rate of growth. From the energy-yield measurements, we concluded that the oxidation of 1 mole of H(2) yields the equivalent of 2 moles of adenosine triphosphate for H. eutropha, and that at least 5 moles of this high-energy phosphate is required for the conversion of 1 mole of CO(2) into cellular constituents.

  12. DWPF CATALYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION PROGRAM - REVIEW OF CURRENT STATUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.

    2009-07-10

    Significant progress has been made in the past two years in improving the understanding of acid consumption and catalytic hydrogen generation during the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processing of waste sludges in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). This report reviews issues listed in prior internal reviews, describes progress with respect to the recommendations made by the December 2006 external review panel, and presents a summary of the current understanding of catalytic hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, are historically known catalysts for the conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Rh, Ru, and Pd are present in the DWPF SRAT feed as by-products of thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U in the original waste. Rhodium appears to become most active for hydrogen as the nitrite ion concentration becomes low (within a factor of ten of the Rh concentration). Prior to hydrogen generation, Rh is definitely active for nitrite destruction to N{sub 2}O and potentially active for nitrite to NO formation. These reactions are all consistent with the presence of a nitro-Rh complex catalyst, although definite proof for the existence of this complex during Savannah River Site (SRS) waste processing does not exist. Ruthenium does not appear to become active for hydrogen generation until nitrite destruction is nearly complete (perhaps less nitrite than Ru in the system). Catalytic activity of Ru during nitrite destruction is significantly lower than that of either Rh or Pd. Ru appears to start activating as Rh is deactivating from its maximum catalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The slow activation of the Ru, as inferred from the slow rate of increase in hydrogen generation that occurs after initiation, may imply that some species (perhaps Ru itself) has some bound nitrite on it. Ru, rather than Rh, is primarily responsible for the

  13. Monitoring of hydrogen generated by corrosion reactions of steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbassi, A.; Mihi, A.; Benbouta, R. [Corrosion Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria)

    2008-12-15

    A solid-state sensor has been constructed and used for the detection of hydrogen generated during corrosion of steel in pH2 solutions. In addition to that, weight loss, AC impedance measurements and selected slow strain rate tests were performed under the same conditions as the hydrogen measurements in order to ascertain the degree of embrittlement of steel. The use of such a device in cathodic protection by impressed current in artificial seawater was also investigated. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Generation of the Ultracold Muonic Hydrogen Flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bystritsky, V. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Adamczak, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Beer, G. A. [University of Victoria (Canada); Filipowicz, M. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques (Poland); Fujiwara, M. C. [University of Tokyo (Japan); Huber, T. M. [Gustavus Adolphus College (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Kim, S. K. [Jeonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Knowles, P. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Kunselman, A. R. [University of Wyoming (United States); Maier, M. [University of Victoria (Canada); Markushin, V. E. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Marshall, G. M. [TRIUMF (Canada); Mulhauser, F. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Olin, A. [University of Victoria (Canada); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Porcelli, T. A. [University of Northen British Columbia (Canada); Stolupin, V. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Wozniak, J. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques (Poland)

    2001-12-15

    We present the study of {mu}p atom scattering in solid hydrogen. Anomalously large emission of E{sub p{mu}{<=}1}.9 meV {mu}p's from a solid H{sub 2} layer was observed for the first time. This three times greater {mu}p atom yield is due to non-elastic phonon scattering. As a result, it becomes possible to generate an ultracold flux of {mu}p atoms. The recent calculations of the total and differential cross sections agree with all experimental results of {mu}p atom scattering in solid H{sub 2}.

  15. Oxygen-hydrogen torch is a small-scale steam generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskell, C. E.

    1966-01-01

    Standard oxygen-hydrogen torch generates steam for corrosion-rate analysis of various metals. The steam is generated through local combustion inside a test chamber under constant temperature and pressure control.

  16. Autotrophic denitrification using hydrogen generated from metallic iron corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunger, Neha; Bose, Purnendu

    2009-09-01

    Hydrogenotrophic denitrification was demonstrated using hydrogen generated from anoxic corrosion of metallic iron. For this purpose, a mixture of hydrogenated water and nitrate solution was used as reactor feed. A semi-batch reactor with nitrate loading of 2000 mg m(-3) d(-1) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 50 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of 0.27 mg N L(-1) (99% nitrate removal). A continuous flow reactor with nitrate loading of 28.9 mg m(-3) d(-1) and HRT of 15.6 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of approximately 0.025 mg N L(-1) (95% nitrate removal). In both cases, the concentration of nitrate degradation by-products, viz., ammonia and nitrite, were below detection limits. The rate of denitrification in the reactors was controlled by hydrogen availability, and hence to operate such reactors at higher nitrate loading rates and/or lower HRT than reported in the present study, hydrogen concentration in the hydrogenated water must be significantly increased.

  17. Polysulfide reduction using sulfate-reducing bacteria in a photocatalytic hydrogen generation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yui; Suto, Koichi; Inoue, Chihiro; Chida, Tadashi

    2008-09-01

    A hydrogen generation process using photocatalytic reactions has been proposed. In this process, hydrogen sulfide is a source of hydrogen and is turned into polysulfide. In order to establish the cyclic operation of a photocatalytic hydrogen generation system, it is necessary to convert polysulfide back into hydrogen sulfide with a small energy input. This paper proposes the use of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) for the regeneration of hydrogen sulfide. Batch cultivation of natural source SRB samples were carried out using a culture medium containing polysulfide as the only sulfur compound source. SRB produced hydrogen sulfide from several kinds of polysulfide sources, including a photocatalytic hydrogen generation-produces solution. Production lag phase and production rate of hydrogen sulfide were affected by initial polysulfide concentration. SRB activity was inhibited at high initial polysulfide concentrations. SRB enrichment culture T2, exhibited the highest hydrogen sulfide production rate, and was able to utilize several kinds of organic matter as the electron donor. The results suggest the possibility of using large biomass sources, such as sewage sludge and the raw garbage in a hydrogen generation system. We developed speculative estimates that an SRB based hydrogen generation system is feasible.

  18. Dealloyed Ruthenium Film Catalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Chemical Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramis B. Serin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Thin-film ruthenium (Ru and copper (Cu binary alloys have been prepared on a Teflon™ backing layer by cosputtering of the precious and nonprecious metals, respectively. Alloys were then selectively dealloyed by sulfuric acid as an etchant, and their hydrogen generation catalysts performances were evaluated. Sputtering time and power of Cu atoms have been varied in order to tailor the hydrogen generation performances. Similarly, dealloying time and the sulfuric acid concentration have also been altered to tune the morphologies of the resulted films. A maximum hydrogen generation rate of 35 mL min−1 was achieved when Cu sputtering power and time were 200 W and 60 min and while acid concentration and dealloying time were 18 M and 90 min, respectively. It has also been demonstrated that the Ru content in the alloy after dealloying gradually increased with the increasing the sputtering power of Cu. After 90 min dealloying, the Ru to Cu ratio increased to about 190 times that of bare alloy. This is the key issue for observing higher catalytic activity. Interestingly, we have also presented template-free nanoforest-like structure formation within the context of one-step alloying and dealloying used in this study. Last but not least, the long-time hydrogen generation performances of the catalysts system have also been evaluated along 3600 min. During the first 600 min, the catalytic activity was quite stable, while about 24% of the catalytic activity decayed after 3000 min, which still makes these systems available for the development of robust catalyst systems in the area of hydrogen generation.

  19. An analysis of hydrogen production from ammonia hydride hydrogen generators for use in military fuel cell environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifer, Nicholas; Gardner, Kristopher

    In an effort to simultaneously improve upon existing power storage and generation devices while supplying America's war fighters with state-of-the-art equipment, the US military has focused on fuel cell technology for several military applications. These applications include soldier and sensor power (0-100 W) and auxiliary power units (500-3000 W). Over the past few years, the fuel cell industry has realized remarkable decreases in the size and weight of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. However, a safe and affordable means of storing and generating hydrogen does not yet exist to justify their transition into the field. In order to assess the hydrogen storage capacity and hydrogen generation rates of ammonia (NH 3) based systems, the US Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center (CERDEC), tested several ammonia hydride hydrogen generator systems built by Hydrogen Components Inc. (HCI). Experimental results and analysis illustrate that while there are developments necessary at the sub-system level, the hydrogen generators are ideal energy storage devices for low power (5 W) operations over wide temperature ranges. The results show that the hydrogen generators are capable of operating autonomously for over 50+ h of operation (at a 5 W load) and producing hydrogen delivery system energy densities of 480 Wh/kg.

  20. Lattice discontinuities affecting the generation and annihilation of diffusible hydrogen and vice versa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchheim, Reiner

    2017-06-01

    Lattice discontinuities include lattice defects and surfaces both providing traps for hydrogen atoms. It will be discussed under which conditions discontinuities of a given distribution either release trapped hydrogen to become diffusible or capture diffusible H-atoms to become trapped. It will be shown that for any distribution, the self-diffusion coefficient of hydrogen is determined by the product of the H-diffusion in the perfect lattice times the fraction of hydrogen being diffusible. In this context, the quantities diffusible hydrogen, lattice hydrogen, thermodynamic activity of hydrogen and chemical potential of hydrogen are interchangeable in a general way. New discontinuities are generated during hydrogen embritllement (fracture surfaces, voids, dislocations) and dislocations move by kink pair formation. The production rate of these discontinuities depends on the chemical potential of hydrogen within the defactant concept or the generalized Gibbs adsorption isotherm. Thus, the chemical potential of hydrogen determines both the amount of trapping and the defect generation rate. For a crack propagating by dislocations generation, the chemical potential affects its velocity independent of the accompanying concentration enhancement in front of the crack tip or the related adsorption on the freshly generated crack surface. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  1. Standalone hydrogen generator based on chemical decomposition of water by aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Milinchuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A standalone hydrogen generator (SHG has been developed based on chemical decomposition of water in heterogeneous compositions containing finely dispersed aluminum powder and crystallohydrates of sodium metasilicate. The kinetics of hydrogen generation has been studied depending on constants of the aluminum activation and oxidation rate, and aluminum and oxygen concentrations. In the hydrogen accumulation kinetics, the length of the induction period is determined by the concentration of oxygen. The SHG design, hydrogen selection and capacity are discussed. The availability and low cost of domestically manufactured chemical agents make the SHG a promising choice as the source of hydrogen for various applications, including nuclear power plants (NPP.

  2. Vapor-fed microfluidic hydrogen generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modestino, M A; Dumortier, M; Hosseini Hashemi, S M; Haussener, S; Moser, C; Psaltis, D

    2015-05-21

    Water-splitting devices that operate with humid air feeds are an attractive alternative for hydrogen production as the required water input can be obtained directly from ambient air. This article presents a novel proof-of-concept microfluidic platform that makes use of polymeric ion conductor (Nafion®) thin films to absorb water from air and performs the electrochemical water-splitting process. Modelling and experimental tools are used to demonstrate that these microstructured devices can achieve the delicate balance between water, gas, and ionic transport processes required for vapor-fed devices to operate continuously and at steady state, at current densities above 3 mA cm(-2). The results presented here show that factors such as the thickness of the Nafion films covering the electrodes, convection of air streams, and water content of the ionomer can significantly affect the device performance. The insights presented in this work provide important guidelines for the material requirements and device designs that can be used to create practical electrochemical hydrogen generators that work directly under ambient air.

  3. Utilization of Aluminum Waste with Hydrogen and Heat Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryakovskaya, O. A.; Meshkov, E. A.; Vlaskin, M. S.; Shkolnokov, E. I.; Zhuk, A. Z.

    2017-10-01

    A concept of energy generation via hydrogen and heat production from aluminum containing wastes is proposed. The hydrogen obtained by oxidation reaction between aluminum waste and aqueous solutions can be supplied to fuel cells and/or infrared heaters for electricity or heat generation in the region of waste recycling. The heat released during the reaction also can be effectively used. The proposed method of aluminum waste recycling may represent a promising and cost-effective solution in cases when waste transportation to recycling plants involves significant financial losses (e.g. remote areas). Experiments with mechanically dispersed aluminum cans demonstrated that the reaction rate in alkaline solution is high enough for practical use of the oxidation process. In theexperiments aluminum oxidation proceeds without any additional aluminum activation.

  4. Photocatalysis in Generation of Hydrogen from Water

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-04-18

    Solar energy can be converted by utilizing the thermal or photoelectric effects of photons. Concentrated solar power systems utilize thermal energy from the sun by either making steam and then generating power or shifting the chemical equilibrium of a reaction (e.g., water splitting or CO2 reduction) that occurs at extremely high temperatures. The photocatalytic system contains powder photocatalysts. Each photocatalyst particle should collect sufficient photons from the solar flux to cause the required multielectron reactions to occur. The band gap and band edge positions of semiconductors are the most critical parameters for assessing the suitability of photocatalysts for overall water splitting. The most important requirement when selecting photocatalyst materials is the band positions relative to hydrogen and oxygen evolution potentials. For most photocatalysts, surface modification by cocatalysts was found to be essential to achieve overall water splitting.

  5. Standalone hydrogen generator based on chemical decomposition of water by aluminum

    OpenAIRE

    Milinchuk, V.K.; Klinshpont, E.R.; Belozerov, V.I.

    2015-01-01

    A standalone hydrogen generator (SHG) has been developed based on chemical decomposition of water in heterogeneous compositions containing finely dispersed aluminum powder and crystallohydrates of sodium metasilicate. The kinetics of hydrogen generation has been studied depending on constants of the aluminum activation and oxidation rate, and aluminum and oxygen concentrations. In the hydrogen accumulation kinetics, the length of the induction period is determined by the concentration of oxyg...

  6. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  7. Solar photocatalytic generation of hydrogen under ultraviolet-visible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 33; Issue 1. Solar photocatalytic generation of hydrogen under ultraviolet-visible light irradiation on (CdS/ZnS)/Ag2S + (RuO2/TiO2) photocatalysts. R Priya S Kanmani. Catalysis ... Keywords. Hydrogen; hydrogen sulfide; solar photocatalysis; composite; photocatalysts.

  8. Modeling a PV-FC-Hydrogen Hybrid Power Generation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Javadpoor

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrical grid expansion onto remote areas is often not cost-effective and/or technologically feasible. Thus, isolated electrical systems are preferred in such cases. This paper focuses on a hybrid photovoltaic (PV-hydrogen/fuel cell (FC system which basic components include a PV, a FC, alkaline water electrolysis and a hydrogen gas tank. To increase the response rate, supercapacitors or small batteries are usually employed in such systems. This study focuses on the dynamics of the system. In the suggested structure, the PV is used as the main source of power. The FC is connected to the load in parallel with the PV by a transducer in order to inject the differential power while reducing power generation in relation to power consumption. An electrolyzer is used to convert the surplus power to hydrogen. This study studies a conventional hybrid photovoltaic-hydrogen/fuel cell system to evaluate different loading behaviors. Software modeling is done for the suggested hybrid system using MATLAB/SIMULINK.

  9. Carbon assisted water electrolysis for hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabareeswaran, S.; Balaji, R.; Ramya, K.; Rajalakshmi, N.; Dhathathereyan, K. S.

    2013-06-01

    Carbon Assisted Water Electrolysis (CAWE) is an energy efficient process in that H2 can be produced at lower applied voltage (˜1.0 V) compared to nearly 2.0 V needed for ordinary water electrolysis for the same H2 evolution rate. In this process, carbon is oxidized to oxides of carbon at the anode of an electrochemical cell and hydrogen is produced at the cathode. These gases are produced in relatively pure state and would be collected in a separate chamber. In this paper, we present the results of influence of various operating parameters on efficiency of CAWE process. The results showed that H2 can be produced at applied voltages Eo as low as 1.0V (vs. SHE) and its production rate is strongly dependent on the type of the carbon used and its concentration in the electrolyte. It has also been found that the performance of CAWE process is higher in acidic electrolyte than in alkaline electrolyte.

  10. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of solar hydrogen generation literature from 2001 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghami, Mohammad Reza; Asl, Shahin Navabi; Rezadad, Mohammad Esmaeil; Ale Ebrahim, Nader; Gomes, Chandima

    Solar hydrogen generation is one of the new topics in the field of renewable energy. Recently, the rate of investigation about hydrogen generation is growing dramatically in many countries. Many studies have been done about hydrogen generation from natural resources such as wind, solar, coal etc. In this work we evaluated global scientific production of solar hydrogen generation papers from 2001 to 2014 in any journal of all the subject categories of the Science Citation Index compiled by Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), Philadelphia, USA. Solar hydrogen generation was used as keywords to search the parts of titles, abstracts, or keywords. The published output analysis showed that hydrogen generation from the sun research steadily increased over the past 14 years and the annual paper production in 2013 was about three times 2010-paper production. The number of papers considered in this research is 141 which have been published from 2001 to this date. There are clear distinctions among author keywords used in publications from the five most high-publishing countries such as USA, China, Australia, Germany and India in solar hydrogen studies. In order to evaluate this work quantitative and qualitative analysis methods were used to the development of global scientific production in a specific research field. The analytical results eventually provide several key findings and consider the overview hydrogen production according to the solar hydrogen generation.

  11. Hydrogen generation from aqueous acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jae [Clean Fuels and Catalysis Program, The EMS Energy Institute, and Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Jong; Han, M.K. [Surface technology team, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology (KITECH), Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hansung; Shul, Yong-Gun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyeong Taek [Cheil Industries Co. LTD, 437-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    In this study, the hydrogen feed from both Ru-catalyzed and organic acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} was studied in terms of hydrogen generation rate and integrated PEMFC performance. Hydrogen feed generated from the conventional Ru-catalyzed hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} caused a drastic loss of PEMFC performance. It was found that the presence of sodium ion in hydrogen feed was a main factor that increased the interfacial resistance of fuel cell and, consequently, reduced the performance. Acid-catalyzed hydrolysis with powder form of NaBH{sub 4} was adopted in order to minimize the detrimental effect of sodium ion. The hydrogen feed from acid-catalyzed hydrolysis was quite dry so that even water vapor, the carrier of sodium ion, was not detected after condensation of hydrogen feed. It was confirmed by the several experiments that the hydrogen release rate can be controlled by varying the injection rate and concentration of aqueous acid. Various organic acids were employed in the production of hydrogen and found that acidity, acid type and chemical structure are also important factors on hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4}. The performance from the integrated acid-catalyzed hydrogen generation system with PEMFC was quite stable and no significant loss was observed contrary to that from the integrated Ru-catalyzed hydrogen generation system-PEMFC test. This result also clarified that the detrimental effect of sodium ion could be removed by minimizing the water vapor in this manner. Based on the experiment of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis, a small-scale hydrogen-generating device was designed and fabricated, from which hydrogen release was controlled by the acid concentration and injection rate of aqueous acid solution. (author)

  12. One Step Hydrogen Generation Through Sorption Enhanced Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mays, Jeff [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2017-08-03

    One-step hydrogen generation, using Sorption Enhanced Reforming (SER) technology, is an innovative means of providing critical energy and environmental improvements to US manufacturing processes. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) is developing a Compact Hydrogen Generator (CHG) process, based on SER technology, which successfully integrates previously independent process steps, achieves superior energy efficiency by lowering reaction temperatures, and provides pathways to doubling energy productivity with less environmental pollution. GTI’s prior CHG process development efforts have culminated in an operational pilot plant. During the initial pilot testing, GTI identified two operating risks- 1) catalyst coating with calcium aluminate compounds, 2) limited solids handling of the sorbent. Under this contract GTI evaluated alternative materials (one catalyst and two sorbents) to mitigate both risks. The alternate catalyst met performance targets and did not experience coating with calcium aluminate compounds of any kind. The alternate sorbent materials demonstrated viable operation, with one material enabling a three-fold increase in sorbent flow. The testing also demonstrated operation at 90% of its rated capacity. Lastly, a carbon dioxide co-production study was performed to assess the advantage of the solid phase separation of carbon dioxide- inherent in the CHG process. Approximately 70% lower capital cost is achievable compared to SMR-based hydrogen production with CO2 capture, as well as improved operating costs.

  13. Liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage: catalytic hydrogen generation under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-Long; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Yan, Jun-Min; Zhang, Xin-Bo; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-25

    There is a demand for a sufficient and sustainable energy supply. Hence, the search for applicable hydrogen storage materials is extremely important owing to the diversified merits of hydrogen energy. Lithium and sodium borohydride, ammonia borane, hydrazine, and formic acid have been extensively investigated as promising hydrogen storage materials based on their relatively high hydrogen content. Significant advances, such as hydrogen generation temperatures and reaction kinetics, have been made in the catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous lithium and sodium borohydride and ammonia borane as well as in the catalytic decomposition of hydrous hydrazine and formic acid. In this Minireview we briefly survey the research progresses in catalytic hydrogen generation from these liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  14. Hydrogen Generation Rate Model Calculation Input Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KUFAHL, M.A.

    2000-04-27

    This report documents the procedures and techniques utilized in the collection and analysis of analyte input data values in support of the flammable gas hazard safety analyses. This document represents the analyses of data current at the time of its writing and does not account for data available since then.

  15. Embedded system based on PWM control of hydrogen generator with SEPIC converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Cheikh; Setiawan, Eko; Habibi, Muhammad Afnan; Hodaka, Ichijo

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to design and to produce a micro electrical plant system based on fuel cell for teaching material-embedded systems in technical vocational training center. Based on this, the student can experience generating hydrogen by fuel cells, controlling the rate of hydrogen generation by the duty ration of single-ended primary-inductor converter(SEPIC), drawing the curve rate of hydrogen to duty ratio, generating electrical power by using hydrogen, and calculating the fuel cell efficiency when it is used as electrical energy generator. This project is of great importance insofar as students will need to acquire several skills to be able to realize it such as continuous DC DC conversion and the scientific concept behind the converter, the regulation of systems with integral proportional controllers, the installation of photovoltaic cells, the use of high-tech sensors, microcontroller programming, object-oriented programming, mastery of the fuel cell syste

  16. Thermochemical hydrogen generation of indium oxide thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taekyung Lim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of alternative energy resources is an urgent requirement to alleviate current energy constraints. As such, hydrogen gas is gaining attention as a future alternative energy source to address existing issues related to limited energy resources and air pollution. In this study, hydrogen generation by a thermochemical water-splitting process using two types of In2O3 thin films was investigated. The two In2O3 thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD and sputtering deposition systems contained different numbers of oxygen vacancies, which were directly related to hydrogen generation. The as-grown In2O3 thin film prepared by CVD generated a large amount of hydrogen because of its abundant oxygen vacancies, while that prepared by sputtering had few oxygen vacancies, resulting in low hydrogen generation. Increasing the temperature of the In2O3 thin film in the reaction chamber caused an increase in hydrogen generation. The oxygen-vacancy-rich In2O3 thin film is expected to provide a highly effective production of hydrogen as a sustainable and efficient energy source.

  17. Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Water Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electrochemical cell is proposed for the efficient generation of 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in pure water using only power, oxygen and water. H2O2 is an...

  18. A composite of borohydride and super absorbent polymer for hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z. P.; Liu, B. H.; Liu, F. F.; Xu, D.

    To develop a hydrogen source for underwater applications, a composite of sodium borohydride and super absorbent polymer (SAP) is prepared by ball milling sodium borohydride powder with SAP powder, and by dehydrating an alkaline borohydride gel. When sodium polyacrylate (NaPAA) is used as the SAP, the resulting composite exhibits a high rate of borohydride hydrolysis for hydrogen generation. A mechanism of hydrogen evolution from the NaBH 4-NaPAA composite is suggested based on structure analysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of water and NiCl 2 content in the precursor solution on the hydrogen evolution behavior are investigated and discussed.

  19. Cold weather hydrogen generation system and method of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, Ken Wayne; Kowalski, Michael Thomas; Porter, Stephen Charles; Chow, Oscar Ken; Borland, Nicholas Paul; Goyette, Stephen Arthur

    2010-12-14

    A system for providing hydrogen gas is provided. The system includes a hydrogen generator that produces gas from water. One or more heat generation devices are arranged to provide heating of the enclosure during different modes of operation to prevent freezing of components. A plurality of temperature sensors are arranged and coupled to a controller to selectively activate a heat source if the temperature of the component is less than a predetermined temperature.

  20. Double electrolyte sensor for monitoring hydrogen permeation rate in steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Y.J. [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huaihua College, Huaihua 418008 (China); Yu, G., E-mail: yuganghnu@163.co [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Ou, A.L.; Hu, L.; Xu, W.J. [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} Designed an amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes. {yields} Explained the principle of determining hydrogen permeation rate. {yields} Verified good stability, reproducibility and correctness of the developed sensor. {yields} Field on-line monitoring the susceptivity of hydrogen induced cracks. - Abstract: An amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes composed of a gelatiniform electrolyte and KOH solution has been developed to determine the permeation rate of hydrogen atoms in steel equipment owing to hydrogen corrosion. The gelatiniform electrolyte was made of sodium polyacrylate (PAAS), carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) and 0.2 mol dm{sup -3} KOH solution. The results show that the gelatiniform electrolyte containing 50 wt.% polymers has suitable viscosity and high electrical conductivity. The consistent permeation curves were detected by the sensor of the double electrolyte and single liquid KOH electrolyte, respectively. The developed sensor has good stability and reproducibility at room temperature.

  1. Inelastic collision rates of trapped metastable hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landhuis, D; Matos, L; Moss, SC; Steinberger, JK; Vant, K; Willmann, L; Greytak, TJ; Kleppner, D

    We report the first detailed decay studies of trapped metastable (2S) hydrogen. By two-photon excitation of ultracold H samples, we have produced clouds of at least 5x10(7) magnetically trapped 2S atoms at densities greater than 4x10(10) cm(-3) and temperatures below 100 muK. At these densities and

  2. Nanocatalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Ammonia Borane and Hydrazine Borane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Hui Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia borane (denoted as AB, NH3BH3 and hydrazine borane (denoted as HB, N2H4BH3, having hydrogen content as high as 19.6 wt% and 15.4 wt%, respectively, have been considered as promising hydrogen storage materials. Particularly, the AB and HB hydrolytic dehydrogenation system can ideally release 7.8 wt% and 12.2 wt% hydrogen of the starting materials, respectively, showing their high potential for chemical hydrogen storage. A variety of nanocatalysts have been prepared for catalytic dehydrogenation from aqueous or methanolic solution of AB and HB. In this review, we survey the research progresses in nanocatalysts for hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis or methanolysis of NH3BH3 and N2H4BH3.

  3. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM ELECTROLYSIS - REVISED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IBRAHIM, SAMIR; STICHTER, MICHAEL

    2008-07-31

    DOE GO13028-0001 DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This report is a summary of the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems to understand high pressure electrolysis mechanisms, investigate and address safety concerns related to high pressure electrolysis, develop methods to test components and systems of a high pressure electrolyzer, and produce design specifications for a low cost high pressure electrolysis system using lessons learned throughout the project. Included in this report are data on separator materials, electrode materials, structural cell design, and dissolved gas tests. Also included are the results of trade studies for active area, component design analysis, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen reactions, and control systems design. Several key pieces of a high pressure electrolysis system were investigated in this project and the results will be useful in further attempts at high pressure and/or low cost hydrogen generator projects. An important portion of the testing and research performed in this study are the safety issues that are present in a high pressure electrolyzer system and that they can not easily be simplified to a level where units can be manufactured at the cost goals specified, or operated by other than trained personnel in a well safeguarded environment. The two key objectives of the program were to develop a system to supply hydrogen at a rate of at least 10,000 scf/day at a pressure of 5000psi, and to meet cost goals of $600/ kW in production quantities of 10,000/year. On these two points TESI was not successful. The project was halted due to concerns over safety of high pressure gas electrolysis and the associated costs of a system which reduced the safety concerns.

  4. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, for use in fuel cells, engines, and turbines for transportation or mobile applications. Hydrogen is desirable as an energy carrier, because its oxidation by air releases substantial energy (thermally or electrochemically) and produces only water as a product. In contrast, hydrocarbon energy carriers inevitably produce CO2, contributing to global warming. While CO2 capture may prove feasible in large stationary applications, implementing it in transportation and mobile applications is a daunting challenge. Thus a zero-emission energy carrier like hydrogen is especially needed in these cases. Use of H2 as an energy carrier also brings new challenges such as safe handling of compressed hydrogen and implementation of new transport, storage, and delivery processes and infrastructure. With current storage technologies, hydrogen's energy per volume is very low compared to other automobile fuels. High density storage of compressed hydrogen requires combinations of high pressure and/or low temperature that are not very practical. An alternative for storage is use of solid light weight hydrogenous material systems which have long durability, good adsorption properties and high activity. Substantial research has been conducted on carbon materials like activated carbon, carbon nanofibers, and carbon nanotubes due to their high theoretical hydrogen capacities. However, the theoretical values have not been achieved, and hydrogen uptake capacities in these materials are below 10 wt. %. In this thesis we investigated the use of silicon for hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation via water oxidation of silicon had been ignored due to slow reaction kinetics. We hypothesized that the hydrogen generation rate could be improved by using high surface area silicon nanoparticles. Our laser-pyrolysis-produced nanoparticles showed surprisingly rapid hydrogen generation and high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical maximum of two moles of H2 per

  5. Hydrogen generation at ambient conditions: application in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddien, Albert; Loges, Björn; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The efficient generation of hydrogen from formic acid/amine adducts at ambient temperature is demonstrated. The highest catalytic activity (TOF up to 3630 h(-1) after 20 min) was observed in the presence of in situ generated ruthenium phosphine catalysts. Compared to the previously known methods to generate hydrogen from liquid feedstocks, the systems presented here can be operated at room temperature without the need for any high-temperature reforming processes, and the hydrogen produced can then be directly used in fuel cells. A variety of Ru precursors and phosphine ligands were investigated for the decomposition of formic acid/amine adducts. These catalytic systems are particularly interesting for the generation of H2 for new applications in portable electric devices.

  6. Fuel cell drive system with hydrogen generation in test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonts, B.; Bøgild Hansen, J.; Schmidt, H.; Grube, T.; Höhlein, B.; Peters, R.; Tschauder, A.

    In the future, drive systems for vehicles with polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) may be the environmentally more acceptable alternative to conventional drives with internal combustion engines. The energy carrier may not be gasoline or diesel, as in combustion engines today, but methanol, which is converted on-board into a hydrogen-rich synthesis gas in a reforming reaction with water. After removal of carbon monoxide in a gas-cleaning step, the conditioned synthesis gas is converted into electricity in a fuel cell using air as the oxidant. The electric energy thus generated serves to supply a vehicle's electric drive system. Based on the process design for a test drive system, a test facility was prepared and assembled at Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ). Final function tests with the PEMFC and the integrated compact methanol reformer (CMR) were carried out to determine the performance and the dynamic behaviour. With regard to the 50-kW(H 2)-compact methanol reformer, a special design of catalytic burner was constructed. The burner units, with a total power output of 16 kW, were built and tested under different states of constant and alternating load. If selecting a specific catalyst loading of 40 g Pt/m 2, the burner emissions are below the super ultra low emission vehicle (SULEV) standard. The stationary performance test of the CMR shows a specific hydrogen production of 6.7 m N3/(kg cat h) for a methanol conversion rate of 95% at 280°C. Measurements of the transient behaviour of the CMR clearly show a response time of about 20 s, reaching 99% of the hydrogen flow demand due to the limited performance of the test facility control system. Simulations have been carried out in order to develop a control strategy for hydrogen production by the CMR during the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Based on the NEDC, an optimized energy management for the total drive system was evaluated and the characteristic data for different peak load storage systems are

  7. Molecular cobalt pentapyridine catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Sun, Yujie

    2013-11-05

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition including the moiety of the general formula. [(PY5Me.sub.2)CoL].sup.2+, where L can be H.sub.2O, OH.sup.-, a halide, alcohol, ether, amine, and the like. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water or sea water can be subject to low electric potentials, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen.

  8. GenIce: Hydrogen-Disordered Ice Generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Masakazu; Yagasaki, Takuma; Tanaka, Hideki

    2018-01-05

    GenIce is an efficient and user-friendly tool to generate hydrogen-disordered ice structures. It makes ice and clathrate hydrate structures in various file formats. More than 100 kinds of structures are preset. Users can install their own crystal structures, guest molecules, and file formats as plugins. The algorithm certifies that the generated structures are completely randomized hydrogen-disordered networks obeying the ice rule with zero net polarization. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Design of control algorithm over technical condition of hydrogen generators based on hydro-reactive compositions

    OpenAIRE

    Abramov, Yuriy; Borisenko, Vitaliy; Krivtsova, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    In order to describe the process of hydrogen generation, a system of differential equations is applied, which is matched with a transfer function of the hydrogen generator. A transfer function of the hydrogen generator is used for the transition to the frequency domain of research. We obtained an expression for the asymptotic logarithmic amplitude-frequency characteristic of the hydrogen generator. This characteristic is used to identify a simplified description of the hydrogen generator, whi...

  10. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  11. Study on the Hydrogen Generation Rules of Coal Oxidation at Low Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Shao He; Zhou Fubao; Chen Kaiyan; Cheng Jianwei; Melogh, Palu H.

    2014-01-01

    Based on a hydrogen desorption experiment and a comparative experiment of low-temperature coal oxidation performed prior to and after hydrogen desorption, this paper demonstrates the occurrence of hydrogen adsorption in coal at room temperature and reveals that the hydrogen generated in the process of coal oxidation originates from coal oxidation and desorption. The results show that the hydrogen accumulation generated only by coal oxidation and the hydrogen accumulation generated...

  12. Hydrogen generation by electrolysis of aqueous organic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A device for electrolysis of an aqueous solution of an organic fuel. The electrolyte is a solid-state polymer membrane with anode and cathode catalysts on both surfaces for electro-oxidization and electro-reduction. A low-cost and portable hydrogen generator can be made based on the device with organic fuels such as methanol.

  13. Solid Hydrogen Particles and Flow Rates Analyzed for Atomic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2003-01-01

    The experiments were conducted at Glenn's Small Multipurpose Research Facility (SMIRF, ref. 5). The experimental setup was placed in the facility's vacuum tank to prevent heat leaks and subsequent boiloff of the liquid helium. Supporting systems maintained the temperature and pressure of the liquid helium bath where the solid particles were created. Solid hydrogen particle formation was tested from February 23 to April 2, 2001. Millimeter-sized solid-hydrogen particles were formed in a Dewar of liquid helium as a prelude to creating atomic fuels and propellants for aerospace vehicles. Atomic fuels or propellants are created when atomic boron, carbon, or hydrogen is stored in solid hydrogen particles. The current testing characterized the solid hydrogen particles without the atomic species, as a first step to creating a feed system for the atomic fuels and propellants. This testing did not create atomic species, but only sought to understand the solid hydrogen particle formation and behavior in the liquid helium. In these tests, video images of the solid particle formation were recorded, and the total mass flow rate of the hydrogen was measured. The mass of hydrogen that went into the gaseous phase was also recorded using a commercially available residual gas analyzer. The temperatures, pressures, and flow rates of the liquids and gases in the test apparatus were recorded as well. Testing conducted in 1999 recorded particles as small as 2 to 5 mm in diameter. The current testing extended the testing conditions to a very cold Dewar ullage gas of about 20 to 90 K above the 4 K liquid helium. With the very cold Dewar gas, the hydrogen freezing process took on new dimensions, in some cases creating particles so small that they seemed to be microscopic, appearing as infinitesimally small scintillations on the videotaped images.

  14. Hydrogen Generation in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis Cells Using a Heat-Regenerated Salt Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown that ammonium bicarbonate salts, which can be regenerated using low-temperature waste heat, can also produce sufficient voltage for hydrogen gas generation in an MREC. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 1.6 m3 H2/m3·d, with a hydrogen yield of 3.4 mol H2/mol acetate at a salinity ratio of infinite. Energy recovery was 10% based on total energy applied with an energy efficiency of 22% based on the consumed energy in the reactor. The cathode overpotential was dependent on the catholyte (sodium bicarbonate) concentration, but not the salinity ratio, indicating high catholyte conductivity was essential for maximizing hydrogen production rates. The direction of the HC and LC flows (co- or counter-current) did not affect performance in terms of hydrogen gas volume, production rates, or stack voltages. These results show that the MREC can be successfully operated using ammonium bicarbonate salts that can be regenerated using conventional distillation technologies and waste heat making the MREC a useful method for hydrogen gas production from wastes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Hydrogen generation in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells using a heat-regenerated salt solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Cusick, Roland D; Kim, Younggy; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown that ammonium bicarbonate salts, which can be regenerated using low-temperature waste heat, can also produce sufficient voltage for hydrogen gas generation in an MREC. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 1.6 m(3) H(2)/m(3)·d, with a hydrogen yield of 3.4 mol H(2)/mol acetate at a salinity ratio of infinite. Energy recovery was 10% based on total energy applied with an energy efficiency of 22% based on the consumed energy in the reactor. The cathode overpotential was dependent on the catholyte (sodium bicarbonate) concentration, but not the salinity ratio, indicating high catholyte conductivity was essential for maximizing hydrogen production rates. The direction of the HC and LC flows (co- or counter-current) did not affect performance in terms of hydrogen gas volume, production rates, or stack voltages. These results show that the MREC can be successfully operated using ammonium bicarbonate salts that can be regenerated using conventional distillation technologies and waste heat making the MREC a useful method for hydrogen gas production from wastes. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  16. Measurement of Hydrogen Purge Rates in Parabolic Trough Receiver Tubes: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatzmaier, G. C.

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop methods to remove hydrogen centrally from commercial parabolic trough power plants. A mathematical model was developed that tracks the generation and transport of hydrogen within an operating plant. Modeling results predicted the steady-state partial pressure of hydrogen within the receiver annuli to be ~1 torr. This result agrees with measured values for the hydrogen partial pressure. The model also predicted the rate at which hydrogen must be actively removed from the expansion tank to reduce the partial pressure of hydrogen within the receiver annuli to less than 0.001 torr. Based on these results, mitigation strategies implemented at operating parabolic trough power plants can reduce hydrogen partial pressure to acceptable levels. Transient modeling predicted the time required to reduce the hydrogen partial pressures within receiver annuli to acceptable levels. The times were estimated as a function of bellows temperature, getter quantity, and getter temperature. This work also includes an experimental effort that will determine the time required to purge hydrogen from a receiver annulus with no getter.

  17. Catalytic decomposition of carbon-based liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials for hydrogen generation under mild conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sánchez, Felipe; Motta, Davide; Dimitratos, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    ... investment, and low potential risks. In this review, we survey the progress made in hydrogen generation from carbon-based liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials, focusing mainly on the catalytic decomposition of formic acid...

  18. Hydrogen generation utilizing integrated CO2 removal with steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraiswamy, Kandaswamy; Chellappa, Anand S

    2013-07-23

    A steam reformer may comprise fluid inlet and outlet connections and have a substantially cylindrical geometry divided into reforming segments and reforming compartments extending longitudinally within the reformer, each being in fluid communication. With the fluid inlets and outlets. Further, methods for generating hydrogen may comprise steam reformation and material adsorption in one operation followed by regeneration of adsorbers in another operation. Cathode off-gas from a fuel cell may be used to regenerate and sweep the adsorbers, and the operations may cycle among a plurality of adsorption enhanced reformers to provide a continuous flow of hydrogen.

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator Cycle with a Reciprocating Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C

    2002-06-11

    A four-chamber piston pump is powered by decomposed 85% hydrogen peroxide. The performance envelope of the evolving 400 gram pump has been expanded to 172 cc/s water flow at discharge pressures near 5 MPa. A gas generator cycle system using the pump has been tested under similar conditions of pressure and flow. The powerhead gas is derived from a small fraction of the pumped hydrogen peroxide, and the system starts from tank pressures as low as 0.2 MPa. The effects of steam condensation on performance have been evaluated.

  20. Off-Gas Generation Rate during Chemical Cleaning Operations at the Savannah River Site - 12499

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, Bruce J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Subramanian, Karthik H.; Ketusky, Edward T. [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The enhanced chemical cleaning process (ECC) is being developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to remove the residual radioactive sludge heel that remains in a liquid waste storage tank. Oxalic acid is the chemical agent utilized for this purpose. However, the acid also corrodes the carbon steel tank wall and cooling coils. If the oxalic acid has little interaction with the sludge, hydrogen gas could conceivably evolve at cathodic areas due to the corrosion of the carbon steel. Scenarios where hydrogen evolution could occur during ECC include the initial filling of the tank prior to agitation and near the end of the process when there is little or no sludge present. The purpose of this activity was to provide a bounding estimate for the hydrogen generation rate during the ECC process. Sealed vessel coupon tests were performed to estimate the hydrogen generation rate due to corrosion of carbon steel by oxalic acid. These tests determined the maximum instantaneous hydrogen generation rate, the rate at which the generation rate decays, and the total hydrogen generated. The tests were performed with polished ASTM A285 Grade C carbon steel coupons. This steel is representative of the Type I and II waste tanks at SRS. Bounding conditions were determined for the solution environment. The oxalic acid concentration was 2.5 wt.% and the test temperature was 75 deg. C. The test solution was agitated and contained no sludge simulant. Duplicate tests were performed and showed excellent reproducibility for the hydrogen generation rate and total hydrogen generated. The results showed that the hydrogen generation rate was initially high, but decayed rapidly within a couple of days. A statistical model was developed to predict the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate as a function of exposure time by combining both sets of data. An upper bound on the maximum hydrogen generation rate was determined from the upper 95% confidence limit. The upper bound limit on the maximum

  1. Hydrogen Generation During the Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WIERSMA, BRUCEJ.

    2004-08-01

    A literature review of the corrosion mechanism for carbon steel in oxalic acid was performed to determine the ratio of moles of iron corroded to moles of hydrogen evolved during the corrosion of iron in oxalic acid. The theory of corrosion of carbon steel in oxalic acid and experimental work were reviewed. It was concluded that the maximum ratio of moles of hydrogen evolved to moles of iron corroded is 1:1. This ratio would be observed in a de-aerated environment. If oxygen or other oxidizing species are present, the ratio could be much less than 1:1. Testing would be necessary to determine how much less than 1:1 the ratio might be. Although the ratio of hydrogen evolution to iron corroded will not exceed 1:1, the total amount of hydrogen evolved can be influenced by such things as a decrease in the exposed surface area, suppression of hydrogen generation by gamma radiation, the presence of corrosion products on steel surface, etc. These and other variables present during chemical cleaning operations of the waste tank have not been examined by the tests reported in the literature i.e., the tests have focused on clean corrosion coupons in oxalic acid solutions. It is expected that most of these variables would reduce the total amount of hydrogen evolved. Further testing would need to be performed to quantify the reduction in hydrogen generation rate associated with these variables.

  2. Electroless Nickel-Based Catalyst for Diffusion Limited Hydrogen Generation through Hydrolysis of Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon P. Anderson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Catalysts based on electroless nickel and bi-metallic nickel-molybdenum nanoparticles were synthesized for the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen generation. The catalysts were synthesized by polymer-stabilized Pd nanoparticle-catalyzation and activation of Al2O3 substrate and electroless Ni or Ni-Mo plating of the substrate for selected time lengths. Catalytic activity of the synthesized catalysts was tested for the hydrolyzation of alkaline-stabilized NaBH4 solution for hydrogen generation. The effects of electroless plating time lengths, temperature and NaBH4 concentration on hydrogen generation rates were analyzed and discussed. Compositional analysis and surface morphology were carried out for nano-metallized Al2O3 using Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis (EDAX. The as-plated polymer-stabilized electroless nickel catalyst plated for 10 min and unstirred in the hydrolysis reaction exhibited appreciable catalytic activity for hydrolysis of NaBH4. For a zero-order reaction assumption, activation energy of hydrogen generation using the catalyst was estimated at 104.6 kJ/mol. Suggestions are provided for further work needed prior to using the catalyst for portable hydrogen generation from aqueous alkaline-stabilized NaBH4 solution for fuel cells.

  3. CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

    2008-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830°C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to

  4. Metal-Nanoparticle-Catalyzed Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhangpeng; Xu, Qiang

    2017-06-20

    To meet the ever-increasing energy demand, the development of effective, renewable, and environmentally friendly sources of alternative energy is imperative. Hydrogen (H2) is a renewable, clean energy carrier, which exhibits a threefold energy density compared to gasoline; H2 is considered one of the most promising alternative energy carriers for enabling a secure, clean energy future. However, the realization of a hydrogen economy is restricted by several unresolved issues. Particularly, one of the most difficult challenges is the development of a safe, efficient hydrogen storage and delivery system. To this end, hydrogen storage techniques based on liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials have become an attractive choice. Formic acid (FA) with a high volumetric capacity of 53 g H2/L demonstrates promise as a safe, convenient liquid hydrogen carrier. However, generating H2 from FA in a controlled manner at ambient temperature is still challenging, which primarily depends on the catalyst used. Hence, for practical purposes, it is imperative to develop high-performance heterogeneous catalysts for the dehydrogenation of FA. Ultrasmall metal NPs with a high surface-to-volume ratio and "clean" surface, and hence a high density of active sites exposed to reactants, are of significance for heterogeneous catalysis. However, the size of these "clean" ultrasmall metal NPs inevitably increase, and these particles undergo aggregation during synthesis and catalysis because of their high surface energy. The immobilization of metal NPs into appropriate support materials affords considerable advantages for catalytic applications, which not only offers spatial confinement to control the nucleation and growth of particles, but also prevents them from aggregation; hence, catalytic performance is significantly enhanced. In addition, the functionalization of the support with electron-rich groups is beneficial to the formation of intermediates for FA dehydrogenation, which in

  5. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

  6. Generation of hydrogen from photocatalytic cleavage of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallinson, R.G.; Resasco, D.E.; Lobban, L.L.; Nicholas, K.M. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This paper describes the objectives, methods and early results on the US Department of Energy sponsored project to generate hydrogen from splitting of water using photocatalysts. The approach uses organometallic photosensitizers adsorbed onto platinated titania. Platinized titania is a photocatalyst for water splitting, but does not absorb sunlight in the visible range, where most of the sun`s energy is contained. Organometallic photosensitizers are synthesized, attached to platinized titania and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, action spectra and hydrogen generation ability. Thus far, Copper, Iron and Ruthenium catalyst systems have been produced and characterized in this manner. Suitable sensitized systems that have the desirable properties have not yet been found.

  7. High rates of catalytic hydrogen combustion with air over coated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BHASKAR DEVU MUKRI

    2017-08-02

    Aug 2, 2017 ... High rates of catalytic hydrogen combustion with air over. Ti0.97Pd0.03O2−δ coated cordierite monolith. BHASKAR DEVU MUKRI. ∗ and M S HEGDE. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. E-mail: bhaskardm@gmail.com. MS received 9 May 2017; ...

  8. Pengaruh Jumlah Sel Pada Hydrogen Generator Terhadap Penghematan Bahan Bakar

    OpenAIRE

    Risano, Yudi Eka

    2013-01-01

    Semakin banyaknya kendaraan bermotor menyebabkan semakin sedikitnya cadangan minyakbumi dan pencemaran udara. Salah satu solusi dari permasalahan di atas, dengan cara pemakaianhydrogen generator yang merupakan alat untuk menghemat bahan bakar yang bekerja dengan caramemisahkan senyawa kimia antara gas hidrogen (2 ) dan oksigen (2 ) dari molekul air ( 2 )dengan menggunakan arus listrik (elektrolisis).Proses pembentukan gas hydrogen dan oksigen terjadi dengan cara menggunakan 2 elektrodaata...

  9. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  10. Room temperature hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of ammonia-borane over an efficient NiAgPd/C catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lei

    2014-12-01

    NiAgPd nanoparticles are successfully synthesized by in-situ reduction of Ni, Ag and Pd salts on the surface of carbon. Their catalytic activity was examined in ammonia borane (NH3BH3) hydrolysis to generate hydrogen gas. This nanomaterial exhibits a higher catalytic activity than those of monometallic and bimetallic counterparts and a stoichiometric amount of hydrogen was produced at a high generation rate. Hydrogen production rates were investigated in different concentrations of NH3BH3 solutions, including in the borates saturated solution, showing little influence of the concentrations on the reaction rates. The hydrogen production rate can reach 3.6-3.8 mol H2 molcat -1 min-1 at room temperature (21 °C). The activation energy and TOF value are 38.36 kJ/mol and 93.8 mol H2 molcat -1 min-1, respectively, comparable to those of Pt based catalysts. This nanomaterial catalyst also exhibits excellent chemical stability, and no significant morphology change was observed from TEM after the reaction. Using this catalyst for continuously hydrogen generation, the hydrogen production rate can be kept after generating 6.2 L hydrogen with over 10,000 turnovers and a TOF value of 90.3 mol H2 molcat -1 min-1.

  11. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from

  12. Method of generating hydrogen by catalytic decomposition of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Dorris, Stephen E.; Bose, Arun C.; Stiegel, Gary J.; Lee, Tae-Hyun

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing hydrogen includes providing a feed stream comprising water; contacting at least one proton conducting membrane adapted to interact with the feed stream; splitting the water into hydrogen and oxygen at a predetermined temperature; and separating the hydrogen from the oxygen. Preferably the proton conducting membrane comprises a proton conductor and a second phase material. Preferable proton conductors suitable for use in a proton conducting membrane include a lanthanide element, a Group VIA element and a Group IA or Group IIA element such as barium, strontium, or combinations of these elements. More preferred proton conductors include yttrium. Preferable second phase materials include platinum, palladium, nickel, cobalt, chromium, manganese, vanadium, silver, gold, copper, rhodium, ruthenium, niobium, zirconium, tantalum, and combinations of these. More preferably second phase materials suitable for use in a proton conducting membrane include nickel, palladium, and combinations of these. The method for generating hydrogen is preferably preformed in the range between about 600.degree. C. and 1,700.degree. C.

  13. Generation of oxy-hydrogen gas and its effect on performance of spark ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, N. N.; Chavan, C. B.; More, A. S.; Baskar, P.

    2017-11-01

    Considering the current scenario of petroleum fuels, it has been observed that, they will last for few years from now. On the other hand, the ever increasing cost of a gasoline fuels and their related adverse effects on environment caught the attention of researchers to find a supplementary source. For commercial fuels, supplementary source is not about replacing the entire fuel, instead enhancing efficiency by simply making use of it in lesser amount. From the recent research that has been carried out, focus on the use of Hydrogen rich gas as a supplementary source of fuel has increased. But the problem related to the storage of hydrogen gas confines the application of pure hydrogen in petrol engine. Using oxy-hydrogen gas (HHO) generator the difficulties of storing the hydrogen have overcome up to a certain limit. The present study highlights on performance evaluation of conventional petrol engine by using HHO gas as a supplementary fuel. HHO gas was generated from the electrolysis of water. KOH solution of 3 Molar concentration was used which act as a catalyst and accelerates the rate of generation of HHO gas. Quantity of gas to be supplied to the engine was controlled by varying amount of current. It was observed that, engine performance was improved on the introduction of HHO gas.

  14. Molecular metal-Oxo catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2015-02-24

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition having the general formula [(PY5W.sub.2)MO].sup.2+, wherein PY5W.sub.2 is (NC.sub.5XYZ)(NC.sub.5H.sub.4).sub.4C.sub.2W.sub.2, M is a transition metal, and W, X, Y, and Z can be H, R, a halide, CF.sub.3, or SiR.sub.3, where R can be an alkyl or aryl group. The two accompanying counter anions, in one embodiment, can be selected from the following Cl.sup.-, I.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, and CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water containing electrolyte or straight sea water can be subject to an electric potential of between 1.0 V and 1.4 V relative to the standard hydrogen electrode, which at pH 7 corresponds to an overpotential of 0.6 to 1.0 V, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen with an optimal turnover frequency of ca. 1.5 million mol H.sub.2/mol catalyst per h.

  15. Sum Frequency Generation Studies of Hydrogenation Reactions on Platinum Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krier, James M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is used to characterize intermediate species of hydrogenation reactions on the surface of platinum nanoparticle catalysts. In contrast to other spectroscopy techniques which operate in ultra-high vacuum or probe surface species after reaction, SFG collects information under normal conditions as the reaction is taking place. Several systems have been studied previously using SFG on single crystals, notably alkene hydrogenation on Pt(111). In this thesis, many aspects of SFG experiments on colloidal nanoparticles are explored for the first time. To address spectral interference by the capping agent (PVP), three procedures are proposed: UV cleaning, H2 induced disordering and calcination (core-shell nanoparticles). UV cleaning and calcination physically destroy organic capping while disordering reduces SFG signal through a reversible structural change by PVP.

  16. Measurement of the Formation Rate of Muonic Hydrogen Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V A; Carey, R M; Case, T A; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K R; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rate \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ characterizes the formation of pp\\mu\\ molecules in collisions of muonic p\\mu\\ atoms with hydrogen. In measurements of the basic weak muon capture reaction on the proton to determine the pseudoscalar coupling g_P, capture occurs from both atomic and molecular states. Thus knowledge of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ is required for a correct interpretation of these experiments. Purpose: Recently the MuCap experiment has measured the capture rate \\Lambda_S from the singlet p\\mu\\ atom, employing a low density active target to suppress pp\\mu\\ formation (PRL 110, 12504 (2013)). Nevertheless, given the unprecedented precision of this experiment, the existing experimental knowledge in \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ had to be improved. Method: The MuCap experiment derived the weak capture rate from the muon disappearance rate in ultra-pure hydrogen. By doping the hydrogen with 20 ppm of argon, a competing process to pp\\mu\\ formation was introduced, which allowed the extraction of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ from the observed t...

  17. Photoresist removal process by hydrogen radicals generated by W catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-8531 (Japan)], E-mail: takata@nano.ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ogushi, K.; Yuba, Y.; Akasaka, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-8531 (Japan); Tomioka, K.; Soda, E.; Kobayashi, N. [Semiconductor Leading Edge Technologies Inc., 16-1 Onogawa Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8569 (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    Hydrogen radical process for photoresist removal by use of hot W catalyst has been investigated for a possible application to advanced Cu/low-k dielectric interconnects in LSI. It is found that etching rates of resists depend critically on sample temperature (T{sub s}) and are higher than 1 {mu}m/min at the optimized condition. H radical irradiation effects on porous methylsilsesquioxane (p-MSQ) have been studied from measurements of k value and capacitance of the advanced interconnect test sample. No radical process is observed to induce the increase in k value of p-MSQ films. These results suggest that the hydrogen radical process for resist removal with W catalyst is promising for production of advanced interconnects.

  18. A Renewably Powered Hydrogen Generation and Fueling Station Community Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Sekura, Linda S.; Prokopius, Paul; Theirl, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The proposed project goal is to encourage the use of renewable energy and clean fuel technologies for transportation and other applications while generating economic development. This can be done by creating an incubator for collaborators, and creating a manufacturing hub for the energy economy of the future by training both white- and blue-collar workers for the new energy economy. Hydrogen electrolyzer fueling stations could be mass-produced, shipped and installed in collaboration with renewable energy power stations, or installed connected to the grid with renewable power added later.

  19. Photoassisted electrolysis of water for hydrogen generation with TiO{sub 2} aggregate film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Guanying [Research Institute of Photonics, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian, 116034 (China); Zhang Qifeng; Liu Dawei; Xi Junting; Cao Guozhong, E-mail: gzcao@uw.edu, E-mail: gycao@dlpu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the nanocrystallite aggregates of TiO{sub 2} were synthesized and characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The aggregates are of submicron size, formed by nano-sized crystallites and able to offer both a large specific surface area and desirable size comparable to the wavelength of visible light. Therefore, the TiO{sub 2} aggregates were also studied as photoelectrode in photoelectrochemical cell for hydrogen generation. The results show that the hydrogen generation rates are 0.47 ml/h*cm{sup 2} and 0.27 ml/h*cm{sup 2} during the first test with and without illumination, respectively. The current density also presented continually increasing during the light-on period. This was attributed to the photogenerated current, which benefited from the TiO{sub 2} aggregates and may significantly enhance the electrolysis rate of water.

  20. Alkali free hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen generation under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, M.J.F.; Pinto, A.M.F.R. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Gales, L. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto and Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas Abel Salazar, Largo Prof. Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Fernandes, V.R.; Rangel, C.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Energia e Geologia - LNEG, Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Unit Estrada do Paco do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-15

    The present study is related with the production of hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}), at elevated pressures and with high gravimetric storage density, to supply a PEM fuel cell on-demand. To achieve this goal, solid sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) was mixed with a proper amount of a powder reused nickel-ruthenium based catalyst (Ni-Ru based/NaBH{sub 4}: 0.2 and 0.4 g/g; {approx}150 times reused) inside the bottom of a batch reactor. Then, a stoichiometric amount of pure liquid water (H{sub 2}O/NaBH{sub 4}: 2-8 mol/mol) was added and the catalyzed NaBH{sub 4} hydrolysis evolved, in the absence of an alkali inhibitor. In this way, this research work is designated alkali free hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} for H{sub 2} generation. This type of hydrolysis is excellent from an environmental point of view because it does not involve strongly caustic solutions. Experiments were performed in three batch reactors with internal volumes 646, 369 and 229 cm{sup 3}, and having different bottom geometries (flat and conical shapes). The H{sub 2} generated was a function of the added water and completion was achieved with H{sub 2}O/NaBH{sub 4} = 8 mol/mol. The results show that hydrogen yields and rates increase remarkably increasing both system temperature and pressure. Reactor bottom shape influences deeply H{sub 2} generation: the conical bottom shape greatly enhances the rate and practically eliminates the reaction induction time. Our system of compressed hydrogen generation up to 1.26 MPa shows 6.3 wt% and 70 kg m{sup -3}, respectively, for gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities (materials-only basis) and therefore is a viable hydrogen storage candidate for portable applications. (author)

  1. Spectroscopic determination of hydrogenation rates and intermediates during carbonyl hydrogenation catalyzed by Shvo's hydroxycyclopentadienyl diruthenium hydride agrees with kinetic modeling based on independently measured rates of elementary reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P; Beetner, Sharon E; Johnson, Jeffrey B

    2008-02-20

    The catalytic hydrogenation of benzaldehyde and acetophenone with the Shvo hydrogenation catalysts were monitored by in situ IR spectroscopy in both toluene and THF. The disappearance of organic carbonyl compound and the concentrations of the ruthenium species present throughout the hydrogenation reaction were observed. The dependence of the hydrogenation rate on substrate, H2 pressure, total ruthenium concentration, and solvent were measured. In toluene, bridging diruthenium hydride 1 was the only observable ruthenium species until nearly all of the substrate was consumed. In THF, both 1 and some monoruthenium hydride 2 were observed during the course of the hydrogenation. A full kinetic model of the hydrogenation based on rate constants for individual steps in the catalysis was developed. This kinetic model simulates the rate of carbonyl compound hydrogenation and of the amounts of ruthenium species 1 and 2 present during hydrogenations.

  2. The rate-limiting process of hydrogen transport in Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkoshi, Keishiro; Chikazawa, Yoshitaka; Bandourko, V.; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen isotope transport characteristics of Mo, whose refractory properties are considered to be suitable as plasma facing material, was investigated by applying 3 keV D{sub 2}{sup +} beam to the membrane specimen. The Arrhenius plot of deuterium permeation probability showed linear increase against the reciprocal temperature and its apparent activation energy was determined as 41.5 kJ/mol. The simultaneous irradiation of 3 keV Ar{sup +} onto backside surface of specimen had little effect on the deuterium permeation rate. According to these results, the rate-limiting process of deuterium transport in Mo was determined. (author)

  3. Simultaneous Hydrogen Generation and Waste Acid Neutralization in a Reverse Electrodialysis System

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-09-02

    Waste acid streams produced at industrial sites are often co-located with large sources of waste heat (e.g., industrial exhaust gases, cooling water, and heated equipment). Reverse electrodialysis (RED) systems can be used to generate electrical power and hydrogen gas using waste heat-derived solutions, but high electrode overpotentials limit system performance. We show here that an ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) RED system can achieve simultaneous waste acid neutralization and in situ hydrogen production, while capturing energy from excess waste heat. The rate of acid neutralization was dependent on stack flow rate and increased 50× (from 0.06 ± 0.04 to 3.0 ± 0.32 pH units min -1 m-2 membrane), as the flow rate increased 6× (from 100 to 600 mL min-1). Acid neutralization primarily took place due to ammonium electromigration (37 ± 4%) and proton diffusion (60 ± 5%). The use of a synthetic waste acid stream as a catholyte (pH ≈ 2) also increased hydrogen production rates by 65% (from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 8.7 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3 catholyte day -1) compared to an AmB electrolyte (pH ≈ 8.5). These findings highlight the potential use of dissimilar electrolytes (e.g., basic anolyte and acidic catholyte) for enhanced power and hydrogen production in RED stacks. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2007-12-11

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  5. Sum frequency generation spectroscopy study of hydrogenated stepped Si(111) surfaces made by molecular hydrogen exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hien, K. T. T.; Sattar, M. A.; Miyauchi, Y.; Mizutani, G.; Rutt, H. N.

    2017-09-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on stepped Si(111) surfaces 9.5° miscut in the [ 1 ̅ 1 ̅ 2 ] direction has been investigated in situ in a UHV chamber with a base pressure of 10-8 Pa. The H-Si(111)1×1 surface was prepared by exposing the wafer to ultra-pure hydrogen gas at a pressure of 470 Pa. Termination of hydrogen on terraces and steps was observed by sum frequency generation (SFG) with several polarization combinations such as ppp, ssp, pps, spp, psp, sps, pss and sss. Here the 1st, 2nd and 3rd symbols indicate SFG, visible and IR polarizations, respectively. ppp and ssp-SFG clearly showed only two modes: the Si-H stretching vibration terrace mode at 2082 cm-1 (A) and the vertical step dihydride vibration mode at 2094 cm-1 (C1). Interesting points are the appearance of the C1 mode in contrast to the previous SFG spectrum of the H-Si(111)1×1 surface with the same miscut surface angle prepared by wet chemical etching. We suggest that the formation of step dihydride and its orientation on the Si(111) stepped surfaces depend strongly on the preparation method.

  6. Conversion rate of para-hydrogen to ortho-hydrogen by oxygen: implications for PHIP gas storage and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Shawn

    2014-06-01

    To determine the storability of para-hydrogen before reestablishment of the room temperature thermal equilibrium mixture. Para-hydrogen was produced at near 100% purity and mixed with different oxygen quantities to determine the rate of conversion to the thermal equilibrium mixture of 75: 25% (ortho: para) by detecting the ortho-hydrogen (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance using a 9.4 T imager. The para-hydrogen to ortho-hydrogen velocity constant, k, near room temperature (292 K) was determined to be 8.27 ± 1.30 L/mol · min(-1). This value was calculated utilizing four different oxygen fractions. Para-hydrogen conversion to ortho-hydrogen by oxygen can be minimized for long term storage with judicious removal of oxygen contamination. Prior calculated velocity rates were confirmed demonstrating a dependence on only the oxygen concentration.

  7. Corrosion rate estimations of microscale zerovalent iron particles via direct hydrogen production measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velimirovic, Milica; Carniato, Luca; Simons, Queenie; Schoups, Gerrit; Seuntjens, Piet; Bastiaens, Leen

    2014-04-15

    In this study, the aging behavior of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles was investigated by quantifying the hydrogen gas generated by anaerobic mZVI corrosion in batch degradation experiments. Granular iron and nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles were included in this study as controls. Firstly, experiments in liquid medium (without aquifer material) were performed and revealed that mZVI particles have approximately a 10-30 times lower corrosion rate than nZVI particles. A good correlation was found between surface area normalized corrosion rate (RSA) and reaction rate constants (kSA) of PCE, TCE, cDCE and 1,1,1-TCA. Generally, particles with higher degradation rates also have faster corrosion rates, but exceptions do exists. In a second phase, the hydrogen evolution was also monitored during batch tests in the presence of aquifer material and real groundwater. A 4-9 times higher corrosion rate of mZVI particles was observed under the natural environment in comparison with the aquifer free artificial condition, which can be attributed to the low pH of the aquifer and its buffer capacity. A corrosion model was calibrated on the batch experiments to take into account the inhibitory effects of the corrosion products (dissolved iron, hydrogen and OH(-)) on the iron corrosion rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hydrogen generation during melter feed preparation of Tank 42 sludge and salt washed loaded CST in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W.E.

    1999-12-08

    The main objective of these scoping tests was to measure the rate of hydrogen generation in a series of experiments designed to duplicate the expected SRAT and SME processing conditions in laboratory scale vessels. This document details the testing performed to determine the maximum hydrogen generation expected with a coupled flowsheet of sludge, loaded CST [crystalline silicotitanate], and frit.

  9. In situ generation of hydrogen from water by aluminum corrosion in solutions of sodium aluminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Lluis; Candela, Angelica Maria; Munoz, Maria; Casado, Juan [Centre Grup de Tecniques de Separacio en Quimica (GTS), Unitat de Quimica Analitica, Departament de Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Campus UAB s/n, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Macanas, Jorge [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, UMR 5503 CNRS-INPT-UPS, Universite de Toulouse, Toulouse (France)

    2009-07-01

    A new process to obtain hydrogen from water using aluminum in sodium aluminate solutions is described and compared with results obtained in aqueous sodium hydroxide. This process consumes only water and aluminum, which are raw materials much cheaper than other compounds used for in situ hydrogen generation, such as hydrocarbons and chemical hydrides, respectively. As a consequence, our process could be an economically feasible alternative for hydrogen to supply fuel cells. Results showed an improvement of the maximum rates and yields of hydrogen production when NaAlO{sub 2} was used instead of NaOH in aqueous solutions. Yields of 100% have been reached using NaAlO{sub 2} concentrations higher than 0.65 M and first order kinetics at concentrations below 0.75 M has been confirmed. Two different heterogeneous kinetic models are verified for NaAlO{sub 2} aqueous solutions. The activation energy (E{sub a}) of the process with NaAlO{sub 2} is 71 kJ mol{sup -1}, confirming a control by a chemical step. A mechanism unifying the behavior of Al corrosion in NaOH and NaAlO{sub 2} solutions is presented. The application of this process could reduce costs in power sources based on fuel cells that nowadays use hydrides as raw material for hydrogen production. (author)

  10. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in Pearlitic Steel Rods: The Role of Residual Stresses Generated by Fatigue Precracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Toribio

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC of metals is an issue of major concern in engineering since this phenomenon causes many catastrophic failures of structural components in aggressive environments. SCC is even more harmful under cathodic conditions promoting the phenomenon known as hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC, hydrogen assisted fracture (HAF or hydrogen embrittlement (HE. A common way to assess the susceptibility of a given material to HAC, HAF or HE is to subject a cracked rod to a constant extension rate tension (CERT test until it fractures in this harsh environment. This paper analyzes the influence of a residual stress field generated by fatigue precracking on the sample’s posterior susceptibility to HAC. To achieve this goal, numerical simulations were carried out of hydrogen diffusion assisted by the stress field. Firstly, a mechanical simulation of the fatigue precracking was developed for revealing the residual stress field after diverse cyclic loading scenarios and posterior stress field evolution during CERT loading. Afterwards, a simulation of hydrogen diffusion assisted by stress was carried out considering the residual stresses after fatigue and the superposed rising stresses caused by CERT loading. Results reveal the key role of the residual stress field after fatigue precracking in the HAC phenomena in cracked steel rods as well as the beneficial effect of compressive residual stress.

  11. Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in Pearlitic Steel Rods: The Role of Residual Stresses Generated by Fatigue Precracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toribio, Jesús; Aguado, Leticia; Lorenzo, Miguel; Kharin, Viktor

    2017-05-02

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of metals is an issue of major concern in engineering since this phenomenon causes many catastrophic failures of structural components in aggressive environments. SCC is even more harmful under cathodic conditions promoting the phenomenon known as hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC), hydrogen assisted fracture (HAF) or hydrogen embrittlement (HE). A common way to assess the susceptibility of a given material to HAC, HAF or HE is to subject a cracked rod to a constant extension rate tension (CERT) test until it fractures in this harsh environment. This paper analyzes the influence of a residual stress field generated by fatigue precracking on the sample's posterior susceptibility to HAC. To achieve this goal, numerical simulations were carried out of hydrogen diffusion assisted by the stress field. Firstly, a mechanical simulation of the fatigue precracking was developed for revealing the residual stress field after diverse cyclic loading scenarios and posterior stress field evolution during CERT loading. Afterwards, a simulation of hydrogen diffusion assisted by stress was carried out considering the residual stresses after fatigue and the superposed rising stresses caused by CERT loading. Results reveal the key role of the residual stress field after fatigue precracking in the HAC phenomena in cracked steel rods as well as the beneficial effect of compressive residual stress.

  12. Hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride solution using a ruthenium supported on graphite catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yan; Dai, Hong-Bin; Ma, Lai-Peng; Wang, Ping; Cheng, Hui-Ming [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2010-04-15

    The catalyst with high activity and durability plays a crucial role in the hydrogen generation systems for the portable fuel cell generators. In the present study, a ruthenium supported on graphite catalyst (Ru/G) for hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) solution is prepared by a modified impregnation method. This is done by surface pretreatment with NH{sub 2} functionalization via silanization, followed by adsorption of Ru (III) ion onto the surface, and then reduced by a reducing agent. The obtained catalyst is characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Very uniform Ru nanoparticles with sizes of about 10 nm are chemically bonded on the graphite surface. The hydrolysis kinetics measurements show that the concentrations of NaBH{sub 4} and NaOH all exert considerable influence on the catalytic activity of Ru/G catalyst towards the hydrolysis reaction of NaBH{sub 4}. A hydrogen generation rate of 32.3 L min{sup -1} g{sup -1} (Ru) in a 10 wt.% NaBH{sub 4} + 5 wt.% NaOH solution has been achieved, which is comparable to other noble catalysts that have been reported. (author)

  13. Broad Spectrum Photoelectrochemical Diodes for Solar Hydrogen Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Craig A.

    2014-11-26

    Under program auspices we have investigated material chemistries suitable for the solar generation of hydrogen by water photoelectrolysis. We have built upon, and extended, our knowledge base on the synthesis and application of TiO2 nanotube arrays, a material architecture that appears ideal for water photoelectrolysis. To date we have optimized, refined, and greatly extended synthesis techniques suitable for achieving highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays of given length, wall thickness, pore diameter, and tube-to-tube spacing for use in water photoelectrolysis. We have built upon this knowledge based to achieve visible light responsive, photocorrosion stable n-type and p-type ternary oxide nanotube arrays for use in photoelectrochemical diodes.

  14. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  16. Mixed Ionic and Electonic Conductors for Hydrogen Generation and Separation: A New Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srikanth Gopalan

    2006-12-31

    Composite mixed conductors comprising one electronic conducting phase, and one ionic conducting phase (MIECs) have been developed in this work. Such MIECs have applications in generating and separating hydrogen from hydrocarbon fuels at high process rates and high purities. The ionic conducting phase comprises of rare-earth doped ceria and the electronic conducting phase of rare-earth doped strontium titanate. These compositions are ideally suited for the hydrogen separation application. In the process studied in this project, steam at high temperatures is fed to one side of the MIEC membrane and hydrocarbon fuel or reformed hydrocarbon fuel to the other side of the membrane. Oxygen is transported from the steam side to the fuel side down the electrochemical potential gradient thereby enriching the steam side flow in hydrogen. The remnant water vapor can then be condensed to obtain high purity hydrogen. In this work we have shown that two-phase MIECs comprising rare-earth ceria as the ionic conductor and doped-strontium titanate as the electronic conductor are stable in the operating environment of the MIEC. Further, no adverse reaction products are formed when these phases are in contact at elevated temperatures. The composite MIECs have been characterized using a transient electrical conductivity relaxation technique to measure the oxygen chemical diffusivity and the surface exchange coefficient. Oxygen permeation and hydrogen generation rates have been measured under a range of process conditions and the results have been fit to a model which incorporates the oxygen chemical diffusivity and the surface exchange coefficient from the transient measurements.

  17. Spark Discharge Generated Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vons, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the largest obstacles to the large scale application of hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicles is the absence of hydrogen storage methods suitable for application on-board of these vehicles. Metal hydrides are materials in which hydrogen is reversibly absorbed by one or more metals or

  18. Interfacial electrochemistry of colloidal ruthenium dioxide and catalysis of the photochemical generation of hydrogen from water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The formation of hydrogen from water using solar energy is a very attractive research topic, because of the potential use of hydrogen as an alternative, clean fuel. It has been shown by many workers in the field that photochemical hydrogen generation can be achieved in an aqueous system,

  19. Controllable pneumatic generator based on the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Rok; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a novel compact and controllable pneumatic generator that uses hydrogen peroxide decomposition. A fuel micro-injector using a piston-pump mechanism is devised and tested to control the chemical decomposition rate. By controlling the injection rate, the feedback controller maintains the pressure of the gas reservoir at a desired pressure level. Thermodynamic analysis and experiments are performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed pneumatic generator. Using a prototype of the pneumatic generator, it takes 6 s to reach 3.5 bars with a reservoir volume of 200 ml at the room temperature, which is sufficiently rapid and effective to maintain the repetitive lifting of a 1 kg mass.

  20. Computational design of materials for solar hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Naoto

    Photocatalysis has a great potential for the production of hydrogen from aquerous solution under solar light. In this talk, two different approaches toward the computational materials desing for solar hydrogen generation will be presented. Tin (Sn), which has two major oxidation states, Sn2+ and Sn4+, is abundant on the earth's crust. Recently, visible-light responsive photocatalytc H2 evolution reaction was identified over a mixed valence tin oxide Sn3O4. We have carried out crystal structure prediction for mixed valence tin oxides in different atomic compositions under ambient pressure condition using advanced computational methods based on the evolutionary crystal-structure search and density-functional theory. The predicted novel crystal structures realize the desirable band gaps and band edge positions for H2 evolution under visible light irradiation. It is concluded that multivalent tin oxides have a great potential as an abundant, cheap and environmentally-benign solar-energy conversion photofunctional materials. Transition metal doping is effective for sensitizing SrTiO3 under visible light. We have theoretically investigated the roles of the doped Cr in STO based on hybrid density-functional calculations. Cr atoms are preferably substituting for Ti under any equilibrium growth conditions. The lower oxidation state Cr3+, which is stabilized under an n-type condition of STO, is found to be advantageous for the photocatalytic performance. It is firther predicted that lanthanum is the best codopant for stabilizing the favorable oxidation state, Cr3+. The prediction was validated by our experiments that La and Cr co-doped STO shows the best performance among examined samples. This work was supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO) and International Research Fellow program of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through project P14207.

  1. Hydrogen Generation from Al-NiCl2/NaBH4 Mixture Affected by Lanthanum Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang Sun, Wen; Fan, Mei-Qiang; Fei, Yong; Pan, Hua; Wang, Liang Liang; Yao, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The effect of La on Al/NaBH4 hydrolysis was elaborated in the present paper. Hydrogen generation amount increases but hydrogen generation rate decreases with La content increasing. There is an optimized composition that Al-15 wt% La-5 wt% NiCl2/NaBH4 mixture (Al-15 wt% La-5 wt% NiCl2/NaBH4 weight ratio, 1 : 3) has 126 mL g−1 min−1 maximum hydrogen generation rate and 1764 mL g−1 hydrogen generation amount within 60 min. The efficiency is 88%. Combined with NiCl2, La has great effect on NaBH4 hydrolysis but has little effect on Al hydrolysis. Increasing La content is helpful to decrease the particle size of Al-La-NiCl2 in the milling process, which induces that the hydrolysis byproduct Ni2B is highly distributed into Al(OH)3 and the catalytic reactivity of Ni2B/Al(OH)3 is increased therefore. But hydrolysis byproduct La(OH)3 deposits on Al surface and leads to some side effect. The Al-La-NiCl2/NaBH4 mixture has good stability in low temperature and its hydrolytic performance can be improved with increasing global temperature. Therefore, the mixture has good safety and can be applied as on board hydrogen generation material. PMID:22619596

  2. Hydriding and dehydriding rates and hydrogen-storage capacity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    means of nuclear, wind, solar, tidal or geothermal energy. When hydrogen is converted into energy, water is the only exhaust product. It is thus extremely environmental friendly as an energy carrier. Although hydrogen has obvious benefits, an immediate incorporation of hydrogen into the world economy has a number of ...

  3. Fuel from water: the photochemical generation of hydrogen from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiji; Eisenberg, Richard

    2014-08-19

    Hydrogen has been labeled the fuel of the future since it contains no carbon, has the highest specific enthalpy of combustion of any chemical fuel, yields only water upon complete oxidation, and is not limited by Carnot considerations in the amount of work obtained when used in a fuel cell. To be used on the scale needed for sustainable growth on a global scale, hydrogen must be produced by the light-driven splitting of water into its elements, as opposed to reforming of methane, as is currently done. The photochemical generation of H2, which is the reductive side of the water splitting reaction, is the focus of this Account, particularly with regard to work done in the senior author's laboratory over the last 5 years. Despite seminal work done more than 30 years ago and the extensive research conducted since then on all aspects of the process, no viable system has been developed for the efficient and robust photogeneration of H2 from water using only earth abundant elements. For the photogeneration of H2 from water, a system must contain a light absorber, a catalyst, and a source of electrons. In this Account, the discovery and study of new Co and Ni catalysts are described that suggest H2 forms via a heterocoupling mechanism from a metal-hydride and a ligand-bound proton. Several complexes with redox active dithiolene ligands are newly recognized to be effective in promoting the reaction. A major new development in the work described is the use of water-soluble CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as light absorbers for H2 generation in water. Both activity and robustness of the most successful systems are impressive with turnover numbers (TONs) approaching 10(6), activity maintained over 15 days, and a quantum yield for H2 of 36% with 520 nm light. The water solubilizing capping agent for the first system examined was dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) anion, and the catalyst was determined to be a DHLA complex of Ni(II) formed in situ. Dissociation of DHLA from the QD surface proved

  4. Depletion Rate of Hydrogen Peroxide from Sodium Perborate Bleaching Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Liliann; Orth, Rebecca; Parashos, Peter; Tao, Ying; Tee, Calvin W J; Thomas, Vineet Thenalil; Towers, Georgina; Truong, Diem Thuy; Vinen, Cynthia; Reynolds, Eric C

    2017-03-01

    Internal bleaching of discolored teeth uses sodium perborate reacting with water to form the active agent, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Sodium perborate is replaced at varying time intervals depending on clinician preference and until esthetically acceptable results are achieved, but this is done without scientific basis. This study measured the depletion rate of hydrogen peroxide from sodium perborate as a bleaching agent. Two sodium perborate bleaching products (Odontobleach [Australian Dental Manufacturing, Kenmore Hills, Queensland, Australia] and Endosure Perborate Micro [Dentalife, Ringwood, Victoria, Australia]) and distilled deionized water mixtures at ratios of 25 μg/mL, 50 μg/mL, and 100 μg/mL were placed into sealed microtubes and incubated at 37°C. H2O2 concentrations were measured at 23 time points over 4 weeks. Quantification of H2O2 concentrations was obtained using a ferrothiocyanate oxidation reduction reaction followed by spectrophotometry readings. The H2O2 concentration rapidly peaked within 27 hours and reached a plateau by about 3 days (75 hours). Low levels of H2O2 were evident beyond 3 days and for at least 28 days. No significant differences were found between the 2 sodium perborate products. There was also no significant difference in the depletion rate between the different ratios. Based on the chemistry of H2O2 depletion, the minimum replacement interval for the bleaching agent is 3 days. Frequent replacements of the perborate clinically may be unnecessary because of the continued presence of low H2O2 levels for at least 28 days. Although these data cannot be extrapolated to the clinical situation, they set a baseline for further studies to address the many clinical variables influencing internal bleaching. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Combining photocatalytic hydrogen generation and capsule storage in graphene based sandwich structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Li, Xiyu; Zhang, Guozhen; Cui, Peng; Wang, Xijun; Jiang, Xiang; Zhao, Jin; Luo, Yi; Jiang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    The challenge of safe hydrogen storage has limited the practical application of solar-driven photocatalytic water splitting. It is hard to isolate hydrogen from oxygen products during water splitting to avoid unwanted reverse reaction or explosion. Here we propose a multi-layer structure where a carbon nitride is sandwiched between two graphene sheets modified by different functional groups. First-principles simulations demonstrate that such a system can harvest light and deliver photo-generated holes to the outer graphene-based sheets for water splitting and proton generation. Driven by electrostatic attraction, protons penetrate through graphene to react with electrons on the inner carbon nitride to generate hydrogen molecule. The produced hydrogen is completely isolated and stored with a high-density level within the sandwich, as no molecules could migrate through graphene. The ability of integrating photocatalytic hydrogen generation and safe capsule storage has made the sandwich system an exciting candidate for realistic solar and hydrogen energy utilization.

  6. Combining photocatalytic hydrogen generation and capsule storage in graphene based sandwich structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Li, Xiyu; Zhang, Guozhen; Cui, Peng; Wang, Xijun; Jiang, Xiang; Zhao, Jin; Luo, Yi; Jiang, Jun

    2017-07-06

    The challenge of safe hydrogen storage has limited the practical application of solar-driven photocatalytic water splitting. It is hard to isolate hydrogen from oxygen products during water splitting to avoid unwanted reverse reaction or explosion. Here we propose a multi-layer structure where a carbon nitride is sandwiched between two graphene sheets modified by different functional groups. First-principles simulations demonstrate that such a system can harvest light and deliver photo-generated holes to the outer graphene-based sheets for water splitting and proton generation. Driven by electrostatic attraction, protons penetrate through graphene to react with electrons on the inner carbon nitride to generate hydrogen molecule. The produced hydrogen is completely isolated and stored with a high-density level within the sandwich, as no molecules could migrate through graphene. The ability of integrating photocatalytic hydrogen generation and safe capsule storage has made the sandwich system an exciting candidate for realistic solar and hydrogen energy utilization.

  7. Molecular molybdenum persulfide and related catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R.; Chang, Christopher J.; Karunadasa, Hemamala I.; Majda, Marcin

    2016-11-22

    New metal persulfido compositions of matter are described. In one embodiment the metal is molybdenum and the metal persulfido complex mimics the structure and function of the triangular active edge site fragments of MoS.sub.2, a material that is the current industry standard for petroleum hydro desulfurization, as well as a promising low-cost alternative to platinum for electrocatalytic hydrogen production. This molecular [(PY5W.sub.2)MoS.sub.2].sup.x+ containing catalyst is capable of generating hydrogen from acidic-buffered water or even seawater at very low overpotentials at a turnover frequency rate in excess of 500 moles H.sub.2 per mole catalyst per second, with a turnover number (over a 20 hour period) of at least 19,000,000 moles H.sub.2 per mole of catalyst.

  8. Molecular molybdenum persulfide and related catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R.; Chang, Christopher J.; Karunadasa, Hemamala I.; Majda, Marcin

    2016-04-19

    New metal persulfido compositions of matter are described. In one embodiment the metal is molybdenum and the metal persulfido complex mimics the structure and function of the triangular active edge site fragments of MoS.sub.2, a material that is the current industry standard for petroleum hydro desulfurization, as well as a promising low-cost alternative to platinum for electrocatalytic hydrogen production. This molecular [(PY5W.sub.2)MoS.sub.2].sup.x+ containing catalyst is capable of generating hydrogen from acidic-buffered water or even seawater at very low overpotentials at a turnover frequency rate in excess of 500 moles H.sub.2 per mole catalyst per second, with a turnover number (over a 20 hour period) of at least 19,000,000 moles H.sub.2 per mole of catalyst.

  9. In Situ Measurement of Local Hydrogen Production Rate by Bubble-Evolved Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen visibly bubbles during photocatalytic water splitting under illumination with above-bandgap radiation, which provides a direct measurement of local gas-evolving reaction rate. In this paper, optical microscopy of superfield depth was used for recording the hydrogen bubble growth on Cd0.5Zn0.5S photocatalyst in reaction liquid and illuminated with purple light. By analyzing change of hydrogen bubble size as a function of time, we understood that hydrogen bubble growth experienced two periods, which were inertia effect dominated period and diffusion effect dominated period, respectively. The tendency of hydrogen bubble growth was similar to that of the gas bubble in boiling, while the difference in bubble diameter and growth time magnitude was great. Meanwhile, we obtained the local hydrogen production rate on photocatalyst active site by measuring hydrogen bubble growth variation characteristics. This method makes it possible to confirm local actual hydrogen evolution rate quantitatively during photocatalytic water splitting.

  10. Durable pd-based alloy and hydrogen generation membrane thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Raymond C.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Vanderspurt, Thomas Henry

    2010-02-02

    A durable Pd-based alloy is used for a H.sub.2-selective membrane in a hydrogen generator, as in the fuel processor of a fuel cell plant. The Pd-based alloy includes Cu as a binary element, and further includes "X", where "X" comprises at least one metal from group "M" that is BCC and acts to stabilize the .beta. BCC phase for stability during operating temperatures. The metal from group "M" is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Cr, Nb, Ta, V, Mo, and W, with Nb and Ta being most preferred. "X" may further comprise at least one metal from a group "N" that is non-BCC, preferably FCC, that enhances other properties of the membrane, such as ductility. The metal from group "N" is selected from the group consisting of Ag, Au, Re, Ru, Rh, Y, Ce, Ni, Ir, Pt, Co, La and In. The at. % of Pd in the binary Pd--Cu alloy ranges from about 35 at. % to about 55 at. %, and the at. % of "X" in the higher order alloy, based on said binary alloy, is in the range of about 1 at. % to about 15 at. %. The metals are selected according to a novel process.

  11. Integrated photoelectrochemical energy storage: solar hydrogen generation and supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinhui; Luo, Jingshan; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Guan, Cao; Zhang, Yongqi; Tu, Jiangping; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Current solar energy harvest and storage are so far realized by independent technologies (such as solar cell and batteries), by which only a fraction of solar energy is utilized. It is highly desirable to improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy. Here, we construct an integrated photoelectrochemical device with simultaneous supercapacitor and hydrogen evolution functions based on TiO(2)/transition metal hydroxides/oxides core/shell nanorod arrays. The feasibility of solar-driven pseudocapacitance is clearly demonstrated, and the charge/discharge is indicated by reversible color changes (photochromism). In such an integrated device, the photogenerated electrons are utilized for H(2) generation and holes for pseudocapacitive charging, so that both the reductive and oxidative energies are captured and converted. Specific capacitances of 482 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) and 287 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) are obtained with TiO(2)/Ni(OH)(2) nanorod arrays. This study provides a new research strategy for integrated pseudocapacitor and solar energy application.

  12. Integrated photoelectrochemical energy storage: solar hydrogen generation and supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinhui; Luo, Jingshan; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Guan, Cao; Zhang, Yongqi; Tu, Jiangping; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Current solar energy harvest and storage are so far realized by independent technologies (such as solar cell and batteries), by which only a fraction of solar energy is utilized. It is highly desirable to improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy. Here, we construct an integrated photoelectrochemical device with simultaneous supercapacitor and hydrogen evolution functions based on TiO2/transition metal hydroxides/oxides core/shell nanorod arrays. The feasibility of solar-driven pseudocapacitance is clearly demonstrated, and the charge/discharge is indicated by reversible color changes (photochromism). In such an integrated device, the photogenerated electrons are utilized for H2 generation and holes for pseudocapacitive charging, so that both the reductive and oxidative energies are captured and converted. Specific capacitances of 482 F g−1 at 0.5 A g−1 and 287 F g−1 at 1 A g−1 are obtained with TiO2/Ni(OH)2 nanorod arrays. This study provides a new research strategy for integrated pseudocapacitor and solar energy application. PMID:23248745

  13. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  14. Hydrogen generation and foaming during tests in the GFPS simulating DWPF operations with Tank 42 sludge and CST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.C.

    1999-12-08

    This report summarizes the pilot-scale research requested by the salt disposition team to examine the effect of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) resin with adsorbed noble metals on the maximum hydrogen generation rate produced during the DWPF melter feed preparation processes.

  15. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, R. K., E-mail: r.joshi@unsw.edu.au, E-mail: alwarappan@cecri.res.in; Sahajwalla, V. [Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Shukla, S.; Saxena, S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Lee, G.-H. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Alwarappan, S., E-mail: r.joshi@unsw.edu.au, E-mail: alwarappan@cecri.res.in [CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-01-15

    Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D) MoS{sub 2}, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS{sub 2} film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS{sub 2} is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS{sub 2} shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS{sub 2} is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.

  16. High hydrogen production rate of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with reduced electrode spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-02-01

    Practical applications of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) require high hydrogen production rates and a compact reactor. These goals can be achieved by reducing electrode spacing but high surface area anodes are needed. The brush anode MEC with electrode spacing of 2 cm had a higher hydrogen production rate and energy efficiency than an MEC with a flat cathode and a 1-cm electrode spacing. The maximum hydrogen production rate with a 2 cm electrode spacing was 17.8 m(3)/m(3)d at an applied voltage of E(ap)=1 V. Reducing electrode spacing increased hydrogen production rates at the lower applied voltages, but not at the higher (>0.6 V) applied voltages. These results demonstrate that reducing electrode spacing can increase hydrogen production rate, but that the closest electrode spacing do not necessarily produce the highest possible hydrogen production rates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-07-14

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  18. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2017-06-06

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  19. Hydrogen generation having CO2 removal with steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Duraiswamy; Chellappa, Anand S.; Knobbe, Mack

    2015-07-28

    A method for producing hydrogen using fuel cell off gases, the method feeding hydrocarbon fuel to a sulfur adsorbent to produce a desulfurized fuel and a spent sulfur adsorbent; feeding said desulfurized fuel and water to an adsorption enhanced reformer that comprises of a plurality of reforming chambers or compartments; reforming said desulfurized fuel in the presence of a one or more of a reforming catalyst and one or more of a CO2 adsorbent to produce hydrogen and a spent CO2 adsorbent; feeding said hydrogen to the anode side of the fuel cell; regenerating said spent CO2 adsorbents using the fuel cell cathode off-gases, producing a flow of hydrogen by cycling between said plurality of reforming chambers or compartments in a predetermined timing sequence; and, replacing the spent sulfur adsorbent with a fresh sulfur adsorbent at a predetermined time.

  20. Hydrogen Generator by Methane Pyrolysis with Carbon Capture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop, fabricate, and test a system to provide 99.999% hydrogen by efficiently performing methane pyrolysis. The system has three unique...

  1. Hydrogen generation from formic acid catalyzed by a metal complex under amine-free and aqueous conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2018-01-04

    The present invention provides a class of catalyst compounds that can safely and effectively release hydrogen gas from a chemical substrate without producing either noxious byproducts or byproducts that will deactivate the catalyst. The present invention provides catalysts used to produce hydrogen that has a satisfactory and sufficient lifespan (measured by turnover number (TON)), that has stability in the presence of moisture, air, acid, or impurities, promote a rapid reaction rate, and remain stable under the reaction conditions required for an effective hydrogen production system. Described herein are compounds for use as catalysts, as well as methods for producing hydrogen from formic acid and/or a formate using the disclosed catalysts. The methods include contacting formic acid and/or a formate with a catalyst as described herein, as well as methods of producing formic acid and/or a formate using the disclosed catalyst and methods for generating electricity using the catalysts described herein.

  2. Homogeneous reaction rate model for hydrogen production from ion-irradiated polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Lee, E.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Mansur, L.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Coghlan, W.A. (Grand Canyon Univ., Phoenix, AZ (United States))

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical model has been constructed to calculate the time or fluence dependence of G-values for H[sub 2] production, G(H[sub 2]), from the ion irradiation of the polymers polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), and Kapton. Measurements of the G(H[sub 2]) for 1 Mev Ar[sup +] over a fluence range from about 1 x 10[sup 11] to about 5 x 10[sup 13] /mm[sup 2] have been made in order to determine the parameters of the model. The model is based upon rate equations describing the electronic-generation of and the interaction of a uniform distribution of free radicals. Satisfactory fits to the data could be made by adjusting two key parameters - the effective C-H bond energy and the hydrogen-carbon recombination rate constant relative to the hydrogen-hydrogen recombination rate constant. It was found that the effective C-H bond energy varied from the lowest value of [approx]8 eV for PE to the highest value of [approx]100 eV for Kapton. From the effective bond energy, an average value for hydrogen radical production, G(H[sup .]), was deduced. The effects of the parameters on the G-value versus time/fluence curves are shown and the significance of the parameters are discussed. The data was also compared to percolation model predictions, but the deviations between data and this model were seen to be large at high fluence. (orig.)

  3. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Nørskov, Jens K

    2015-01-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet, over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. Present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH$^*$ can be used as a descriptor to screen for selectivity trends between the 2e$^-$ water oxidation to H$_2$O$_2$ and the 4e$^-$ oxidation to O$_2$. We show that materials that bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO$_2$, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rati...

  4. Enhanced Solar-to-Hydrogen Generation with Broadband Epsilon-Near-Zero Nanostructured Photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Yi

    2017-05-08

    The direct conversion of solar energy into fuels or feedstock is an attractive approach to address increasing demand of renewable energy sources. Photocatalytic systems relying on the direct photoexcitation of metals have been explored to this end, a strategy that exploits the decay of plasmonic resonances into hot carriers. An efficient hot carrier generation and collection requires, ideally, their generation to be enclosed within few tens of nanometers at the metal interface, but it is challenging to achieve this across the broadband solar spectrum. Here the authors demonstrate a new photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution based on metal epsilon-near-zero metamaterials. The authors have designed these to achieve broadband strong light confinement at the metal interface across the entire solar spectrum. Using electron energy loss spectroscopy, the authors prove that hot carriers are generated in a broadband fashion within 10 nm in this system. The resulting photocatalyst achieves a hydrogen production rate of 9.5 µmol h-1  cm-2 that exceeds, by a factor of 3.2, that of the best previously reported plasmonic-based photocatalysts for the dissociation of H2 with 50 h stable operation.

  5. Enhanced hydrogen generation by hydrolysis of Mg doped with flower-like MoS2 for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minghong; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Liu, Jiangwen; Wang, Hui; Shao, Huaiyu; Zhu, Min

    2017-10-01

    In this work, flower-like MoS2 spheres are synthesized via a hydrothermal method and the catalytic activity of the as-prepared and bulk MoS2 on hydrolysis of Mg is systematically investigated for the first time. The Mg-MoS2 composites are prepared by ball milling and the hydrogen generation performances of the composites are investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution. The experimental results suggest that the as-prepared MoS2 exhibits better catalytic effect on hydrolysis of Mg compared to bulk MoS2. In particular, Mg-10 wt% MoS2 (as-prepared) composite milled for 1 h shows the best hydrogen generation properties and releases 90.4% of theoretical hydrogen generation capacity within 1 min at room temperature. The excellent catalytic effect of as-prepared MoS2 may be attributed to the following aspects: three-dimensional flower-like MoS2 architectures improve its dispersibility on Mg particles; make the composite more reactive; hamper the generated Mg(OH)2 from adhering to the surface of Mg; and increase the galvanic corrosion of Mg. In addition, a hydrogen generator based on the hydrolysis reaction of Mg-0.2 wt% MoS2 composite is manufactured and it can supply a maximum hydrogen flow rate of 2.5 L/min. The findings here demonstrate the as-prepared flower-like MoS2 can be a promising catalyst for hydrogen generation from Mg.

  6. Laboratory Studies of Hydrogen Gas Generation Using the Cobalt Chloride Catalyzed Sodium Borohydride-Water Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    reaction to generate hydrogen gas to inflate lighter-than-air vehicles . RESULTS When using CoCl2 as a catalyst, we discovered that distilled or...driving prices up. Consequently, the use of hydrogen gas to inflate LTA vehicles is gaining greater acceptance; many countries (military and commercial...due to leakage, safety, and size concerns. Hydrogen is less flammable than gasoline. In summary, the demand to use LTA vehicles for military and

  7. PANI/NaTaO3 composite photocatalyst for enhanced hydrogen generation under UV light irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zielińska Beata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A PANI/NaTaO3 composite was successfully synthesized by an oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer in hydrochloric acid solution containing sodium tantalate. NaTaO3 at a monoclinic structure was produced via hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic activities of the unmodified NaTaO3 and PANI/NaTaO3 were evaluated for hydrogen generation from an aqueous HCOOH solution and under UV light irradiation. The results showed that the evolution rate of H2 increased significantly when NaTaO3 was modified with PANI. The enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of PANI/NaTaO3 composite was ascribed to the effective charge transfer and separation between NaTaO3 and PANI, which reduced their recombination. This indicates that PANI modification of tantalate photocatalysts may open up a new way to prepare highly efficient catalytic materials for H2 generation.

  8. An effective low Pd-loading catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Xu, Junlei; Ma, Xin

    2017-01-01

    As an interesting hydrogen carrier, formic acid is bio-renewable, non-toxic and available in the liquid state at room temperature. The development of active and low-cost catalyst is of significance for hydrogen generation from formic acid. In this study, both a relatively cheap metal (Ag...

  9. Investment in hydrogen tri-generation for wastewater treatment plants under uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharieh, Kaveh; Jafari, Mohsen A.; Guo, Qizhong

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we present a compound real option model for investment in hydrogen tri-generation and onsite hydrogen dispensing systems for a wastewater treatment plant under price and market uncertainties. The ultimate objective is to determine optimal timing and investment thresholds to exercise initial and subsequent options such that the total savings are maximized. Initial option includes investment in a 1.4 (MW) Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) fed by mixture of waste biogas from anaerobic digestion and natural gas, along with auxiliary equipment. Produced hydrogen in MCFC via internal reforming, is recovered from the exhaust gas stream using Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) purification technology. Therefore the expansion option includes investment in hydrogen compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) systems which creates additional revenue by selling hydrogen onsite in retail price. This work extends current state of investment modeling within the context of hydrogen tri-generation by considering: (i) Modular investment plan for hydrogen tri-generation and dispensing systems, (ii) Multiple sources of uncertainties along with more realistic probability distributions, (iii) Optimal operation of hydrogen tri-generation is considered, which results in realistic saving estimation.

  10. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...

  11. Solar-hydrogen generation and solar concentration (Conference Presentation)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulima, Oleg V.; Chinello, Enrico; Conibeer, Gavin; Modestino, Miquel A.; Schüttauf, Jan-Willem; Lambelet, David; Delfino, Antonio; Domine, Didier; Faes, Antonin; Despeisse, Matthieu; Bailat, Julien; Psaltis, Demetri; Fernandez Rivas, David; Ballif, Christophe; Moser, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We successfully demonstrated and reported the highest solar-to-hydrogen efficiency with crystalline silicon cells and Earth-abundant electrocatalysts under unconcentrated solar radiation. The combination of hetero-junction silicon cells and a 3D printed Platinum/Iridium-Oxide electrolyzer has been

  12. Autothermal hydrogen generation from methanol in a ceramic microchannel network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Angela M.; Wilhite, Benjamin A.

    In this paper, the authors present the first demonstration of a new class of integrated ceramic microchannel reactors for all-in-one reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. The reactor concept employs precision-machined metal distributors capable of realizing complex flow distribution patterns with extruded ceramic microchannel networks for cost-effective thermal integration of multiple chemical processes. The presently reported reactor is comprised of five methanol steam reforming channels packed with CuO/γ-Al 2O 3, interspersed with four methanol combustion channels washcoated with Pt/γ-Al 2O 3, for autothermal hydrogen production (i.e., without external heating). Results demonstrate the capability of this new device for integrating combustion and steam reforming of methanol for autothermal production of hydrogen, owing to the axially self-insulating nature of distributor-packaged ceramic microchannels. In the absence of any external insulation, stable reforming of methanol to hydrogen at conversions >90% and hydrogen yields >70% was achieved at a maximum reactor temperature of 400 °C, while simultaneously maintaining a packaging temperature <50 °C.

  13. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the generation and stabilization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Induction and stabilization of liquid crystallinity through hydrogen bonding (HB) are now well-established. Interesting observations made on the influence of HB on LC behaviour of amido diol-based poly(esteramide)s, poly(esteramide)s containing nitro groups and azobenzene mesogen-based polyacrylates will be ...

  14. Utilization of hydrogen gas production for electricity generation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterobacter aerogenes ADH-43 is a hydrogen gas (H2) producing mutant bacterium and a facultative anaerobic microbe. This double mutant was obtained by classical mutagenetically treated in order to enhance H2 production. In addition, this mutant has ability to degrade molasses from sugar factory as well as other ...

  15. Combustion of hydrogen-oxygen mixture in electrochemically generated nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svetovoy, Vitaly; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2011-01-01

    Ignition of exothermic chemical reactions in small volumes is considered as difficult or impossible due to the large surface-to-volume ratio. Here observation of the spontaneous reaction is reported between hydrogen and oxygen in bubbles whose diameter is smaller than a threshold value around 150

  16. Utilization of hydrogen gas production for electricity generation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lecturer

    2012-05-03

    May 3, 2012 ... Enterobacter aerogenes ADH-43 is a hydrogen gas (H2) producing mutant bacterium and a facultative anaerobic microbe. This double mutant was obtained by classical mutagenetically treated in order to enhance H2 production. In addition, this mutant has ability to degrade molasses from sugar factory as.

  17. Catalytic decomposition of methanol for onboard hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabbs, T.

    1978-01-01

    The steam reformation of an equimolar mixture of methanol and water on a copper chromite catalyst was studied at three furnace temperatures and at feed space velocities from 800 to 2600 per hour. The hydrogen space velocity could be related to the reactor temperature by the equation Sv = A exp (-omega T), where A and omega are constants determined for each value of alpha and T is temperature. At a methanol conversion of 0.87 and a reactor temperature of 589 K, the extrapolated value of the hydrogen space velocity was 9400 per hour. This velocity was used to estimate the size of an onboard hydrogen reactor for automotive applications. Such a reactor would need only about 0.8 liter of catalyst to produce 7630 STP liters (1.5 lb) of hydrogen per hour. This quantity of catalyst would fit into nine tubes 17.8 centimeters along and 2.54 centimeters in inside diameter, which is smaller than most mufflers. The reactor products would contain 12 to 13 percent more chemical energy than the incoming methanol and water.

  18. HOGEN{trademark} proton exchange membrane hydrogen generators: Commercialization of PEM electrolyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.F.; Molter, T.M. [Proton Energy Systems, Inc., Rocky Hill, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    PROTON Energy Systems` new HOGEN series hydrogen generators are Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) based water electrolyzers designed to generate 300 to 1000 Standard Cubic Feet Per Hour (SCFH) of high purity hydrogen at pressures up to 400 psi without the use of mechanical compressors. This paper will describe technology evolution leading to the HOGEN, identify system design performance parameters and describe the physical packaging and interfaces of HOGEN systems. PEM electrolyzers have served US and UK Navy and NASA needs for many years in a variety of diverse programs including oxygen generators for life support applications. In the late 1970`s these systems were advocated for bulk hydrogen generation through a series of DOE sponsored program activities. During the military buildup of the 1980`s commercial deployment of PEM hydrogen generators was de-emphasized as priority was given to new Navy and NASA PEM electrolysis systems. PROTON Energy Systems was founded in 1996 with the primary corporate mission of commercializing PEM hydrogen generators. These systems are specifically designed and priced to meet the needs of commercial markets and produced through manufacturing processes tailored to these applications. The HOGEN series generators are the first step along the path to full commercial deployment of PEM electrolyzer products for both industrial and consumer uses. The 300/1000 series are sized to meet the needs of the industrial gases market today and provide a design base that can transition to serve the needs of a decentralized hydrogen infrastructure tomorrow.

  19. Workshop on Hydrogen Storage and Generation for Medium-Power and -Energy Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthews, Michael

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Hydrogen Storage and Generation Technologies for Medium-Power and -Energy Applications which was held on April 8-10, 1997 at the Radisson Hotel Orlando Airport in Orlando, Florida...

  20. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Retail Stations, Data through Quarter 2 of 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Samuel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Christopher D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-05

    This publication includes 92 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through the second quarter of 2017. These CDPs include data from retail stations only.

  1. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Retail Stations, Data through Quarter 4 of 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-05-31

    This publication includes 86 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through the fourth quarter of 2016. These CDPs include data from retail stations only.

  2. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Retail Stations, Data Through Quarter 3 of 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-07

    This publication includes 80 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Spring 2016 for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through the third quarter of 2016. These CDPs include data from retail stations only.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BIOQUELL, INC. CLARIS C HYDROGEN PEROXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Clarus C Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator, a biological decontamination device manufactured by BIOQUELL, Inc. The unit was tested by evaluating its ability to decontaminate seven types...

  4. Hydrogen Generation from Al-NiCl2/NaBH4 Mixture Affected by Lanthanum Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Qiang Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of La on Al/NaBH4 hydrolysis was elaborated in the present paper. Hydrogen generation amount increases but hydrogen generation rate decreases with La content increasing. There is an optimized composition that Al-15 wt% La-5 wt% NiCl2/NaBH4 mixture (Al-15 wt% La-5 wt% NiCl2/NaBH4 weight ratio, 1 : 3 has 126 mL g−1 min−1 maximum hydrogen generation rate and 1764 mL g−1 hydrogen generation amount within 60 min. The efficiency is 88%. Combined with NiCl2, La has great effect on NaBH4 hydrolysis but has little effect on Al hydrolysis. Increasing La content is helpful to decrease the particle size of Al-La-NiCl2 in the milling process, which induces that the hydrolysis byproduct Ni2B is highly distributed into Al(OH3 and the catalytic reactivity of Ni2B/Al(OH3 is increased therefore. But hydrolysis byproduct La(OH3 deposits on Al surface and leads to some side effect. The Al-La-NiCl2/NaBH4 mixture has good stability in low temperature and its hydrolytic performance can be improved with increasing global temperature. Therefore, the mixture has good safety and can be applied as on board hydrogen generation material.

  5. Continuous/Batch Mg/MgH2/H2O-Based Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew; Huang, Yuhong

    2010-01-01

    A proposed apparatus for generating hydrogen by means of chemical reactions of magnesium and magnesium hydride with steam would exploit the same basic principles as those discussed in the immediately preceding article, but would be designed to implement a hybrid continuous/batch mode of operation. The design concept would simplify the problem of optimizing thermal management and would help to minimize the size and weight necessary for generating a given amount of hydrogen.

  6. Low-Cost High-Pressure Hydrogen Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cropley, Cecelia C.; Norman, Timothy J.

    2008-04-02

    Electrolysis of water, particularly in conjunction with renewable energy sources, is potentially a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method of producing hydrogen at dispersed forecourt sites, such as automotive fueling stations. The primary feedstock for an electrolyzer is electricity, which could be produced by renewable sources such as wind or solar that do not produce carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gas emissions. However, state-of-the-art electrolyzer systems are not economically competitive for forecourt hydrogen production due to their high capital and operating costs, particularly the cost of the electricity used by the electrolyzer stack. In this project, Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC (GES) developed a low cost, high efficiency proton-exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis system for hydrogen production at moderate pressure (300 to 400 psig). The electrolyzer stack operates at differential pressure, with hydrogen produced at moderate pressure while oxygen is evolved at near-atmospheric pressure, reducing the cost of the water feed and oxygen handling subsystems. The project included basic research on catalysts and membranes to improve the efficiency of the electrolysis reaction as well as development of advanced materials and component fabrication methods to reduce the capital cost of the electrolyzer stack and system. The project culminated in delivery of a prototype electrolyzer module to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for testing at the National Wind Technology Center. Electrolysis cell efficiency of 72% (based on the lower heating value of hydrogen) was demonstrated using an advanced high-strength membrane developed in this project. This membrane would enable the electrolyzer system to exceed the DOE 2012 efficiency target of 69%. GES significantly reduced the capital cost of a PEM electrolyzer stack through development of low cost components and fabrication methods, including a 60% reduction in stack parts count. Economic

  7. In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

    2002-09-20

    The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

  8. Water electrolysis with a conducting carbon cloth: subthreshold hydrogen generation and superthreshold carbon quantum dot formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Mandakini; Deshpande, Aparna; Kelkar, Sarika; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2014-03-01

    A conducting carbon cloth, which has an interesting turbostratic microstructure and functional groups that are distinctly different from other ordered forms of carbon, such as graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes, was synthesized by a simple one-step pyrolysis of cellulose fabric. This turbostratic disorder and surface chemical functionalities had interesting consequences for water splitting and hydrogen generation when such a cloth was used as an electrode in the alkaline electrolysis process. Importantly, this work also gives a new twist to carbon-assisted electrolysis. During electrolysis, the active sites in the carbon cloth allow slow oxidation of its surface to transform the surface groups from COH to COOH and so forth at a voltage as low as 0.2 V in a two-electrode system, along with platinum as the cathode, instead of 1.23 V (plus overpotential), which is required for platinum, steel, or even graphite anodes. The quantity of subthreshold hydrogen evolved was 24 mL cm(-2)  h(-1) at 1 V. Interestingly, at a superthreshold potential (>1.23 V+overpotential), another remarkable phenomenon was found. At such voltages, along with the high rate and quantity of hydrogen evolution, rapid exfoliation of the tiny nanoscale (5-7 nm) units of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are found in copious amounts due to an enhanced oxidation rate. These CQDs show bright-blue fluorescence under UV light. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Hydriding and dehydriding rates and hydrogen-storage capacity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Division of Advanced Materials Engineering, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Research Center, Engineering Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, 664-14 Deokjin-Dong 1Ga Deokjin-Gu Jeonju Jeonbuk, 561-756, South Korea; Department of Materials Engineering, Graduate School, Chonbuk National University, 664-14 ...

  10. Hydrogen generation systems and methods utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2017-12-19

    Systems, devices, and methods combine thermally stable reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen and a non-toxic liquid by-product. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Springs and other pressurization mechanisms pressurize and deliver an aqueous solution to the reaction. A check valve and other pressure regulation mechanisms regulate the pressure of the aqueous solution delivered to the reactant fuel material in the reactor based upon characteristics of the pressurization mechanisms and can regulate the pressure of the delivered aqueous solution as a steady decay associated with the pressurization force. The pressure regulation mechanism can also prevent hydrogen gas from deflecting the pressure regulation mechanism.

  11. Hydrogen generation systems and methods utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-08-11

    Systems, devices, and methods combine thermally stable reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen and a non-toxic liquid by-product. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Springs and other pressurization mechanisms pressurize and deliver an aqueous solution to the reaction. A check valve and other pressure regulation mechanisms regulate the pressure of the aqueous solution delivered to the reactant fuel material in the reactor based upon characteristics of the pressurization mechanisms and can regulate the pressure of the delivered aqueous solution as a steady decay associated with the pressurization force. The pressure regulation mechanism can also prevent hydrogen gas from deflecting the pressure regulation mechanism.

  12. International Conference on Solar Concentrators for the Generation of Electricity or Hydrogen: Book of Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, R.; Symko-Davies, M.; Hayden, H.

    2005-05-01

    The International Conference on Solar Concentrators for the Generation of Electricity or Hydrogen provides an opportunity to learn about current significant research on solar concentrators for generating electricity or hydrogen. The conference will emphasize in-depth technical discussions of recent achievements in technologies that convert concentrated solar radiation to electricity or hydrogen, with primary emphasis on photovoltaic (PV) technologies. Very high-efficiency solar cells--above 37%--were recently developed, and are now widely used for powering satellites. This development demands that we take a fresh look at the potential of solar concentrators for generating low-cost electricity or hydrogen. Solar electric concentrators could dramatically overtake other PV technologies in the electric utility marketplace because of the low capital cost of concentrator manufacturing facilities and the larger module size of concentrators. Concentrating solar energy also has advantages for th e solar generation of hydrogen. Around the world, researchers and engineers are developing solar concentrator technologies for entry into the electricity generation market and several have explored the use of concentrators for hydrogen production. The last conference on the subject of solar electric concentrators was held in November of 2003 and proved to be an important opportunity for researchers and developers to share new and crucial information that is helping to stimulate projects in their countries.

  13. Enzymatic generation of hydrogen peroxide shows promising antifouling effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, J.B.; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Laursen, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    The antifouling (AF) potential of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced enzymatically in a coating containing starch, glucoamylase, and hexose oxidase was evaluated in a series of laboratory tests and in-sea field trials. Dissolved H2O2 inhibited bacterial biofilm formation by eight of nine marine...... Proteobacteria, tested in microtiter plates. However, enzymatically produced H2O2 released from a coating did not impede biofilm formation by bacteria in natural seawater tested in a biofilm reactor. A field trial revealed a noticeable effect of the enzyme system: after immersion in the North Sea for 97 days...

  14. High rates of catalytic hydrogen combustion with air over Ti ₀. ₉₇Pd ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High rates of catalytic hydrogen combustion with air over Ti ₀. ... For 50 mL of H ₂, it showed rates of the reaction around 36.45 μmol/g/s at room temperature and 230 μmol/g/s at 60◦C. It was found that the rate of reaction due ... Finally, we propose a mechanism of hydrogen and oxygen recombination reaction over Ti ₀.

  15. Control of microbially generated hydrogen sulfide in produced waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, E.D.; Vance, I.; Gammack, G.F.; Duncan, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    Production of hydrogen sulfide in produced waters due to the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a potentially serious problem. The hydrogen sulfide is not only a safety and environmental concern, it also contributes to corrosion, solids formation, a reduction in produced oil and gas values, and limitations on water discharge. Waters produced from seawater-flooded reservoirs typically contain all of the nutrients required to support SRB metabolism. Surface processing facilities provide a favorable environment in which SRB flourish, converting water-borne nutrients into biomass and H{sub 2}S. This paper will present results from a field trial in which a new technology for the biochemical control of SRB metabolism was successfully applied. A slip stream of water downstream of separators on a produced water handling facility was routed through a bioreactor in a side-steam device where microbial growth was allowed to develop fully. This slip stream was then treated with slug doses of two forms of a proprietary, nonbiocidal metabolic modifier. Results indicated that H{sub 2}S production was halted almost immediately and that the residual effect of the treatment lasted for well over one week.

  16. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R- AND P-REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2009-12-29

    at a temperature of 80 C, the risk will again be very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, grout temperatures less than 100 C should provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. For R-reactor, grout temperatures less than 70 C or 80 C will provide an adequate safety margin for the Portland cement. The other grout formulations are also viable options for R-reactor. (2) Minimize the grout fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min for the ceramicrete and the silica fume grouts will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen accumulation. For R-reactor, fill rates less than 1 inch/min will again minimize the risk of hydrogen accumulation. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates in the P-reactor vessel, however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, (i.e., less than 0.32 ft{sup 3}/min). If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

  17. Trehalose enhancing microbial electrolysis cell for hydrogen generation in low temperature (0 °C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linji; Liu, Wenzong; Wu, Yining; Lee, Poheng; Wang, Aijie; Li, Shuai

    2014-08-01

    This work explored the feasibility of a method combining physical (sonication and base) and biological (partial fermentation) processes for sludge treatment and the effects of trehalose on the hydrogen generation of microbial electrolysis cell at 0 °C. The results demonstrated that the above pretreatment method was favorable, which promoted organics decomposing into lower molecular weight matter. The promotion of trehalose for MEC efficiency was obvious and the optimal concentration of trehalose was 50 mmol/L. With this concentration, the highest hydrogen recovery rate was 0.25 m(3)-H₂/-m(3)-reactor per day. Coulomb efficiency and energy recovery efficiency were 46.4% and 203%, respectively. Further, the consumption order of mixed substances was VFAs>proteins>carbohydrates. For microorganism community, SEM photographs illustrated that the selectivity of environmental temperature for the species of anode bacteria was strong and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis indicated that Microbacterium and Proteobacteria were the two main species and Proteobacteria may be one of the species that produced electrons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Performance of a Small Gas Generator Using Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Loren W.; Fenn, David B.; Dietrich, Marshall W.

    1961-01-01

    The performance and operating problems of a small hot-gas generator burning liquid hydrogen with liquid oxygen are presented. Two methods of ignition are discussed. Injector and combustion chamber design details based on rocket design criteria are also given. A carefully fabricated showerhead injector of simple design provided a gas generator that yielded combustion efficiencies of 93 and 96 percent.

  19. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

    2010-04-30

    This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

  20. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  1. Direct steam reforming of diesel and diesel–biodiesel blends for distributed hydrogen generation

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Stefan; Kraaij, Gerard; Ascher, Torsten; Baltzopoulou, Penelope; Karagiannakis, George; Wails, David; Wörner, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Distributed hydrogen generation from liquid fuels has attracted increasing attention in the past years. Petroleum-derived fuels with already existing infrastructure benefit from high volumetric and gravimetric energy densities, making them an interesting option for cost competitive decentralized hydrogen production. In the present study, direct steam reforming of diesel and diesel blends (7 vol.% biodiesel) is investigated at various operating conditions using a proprietary precious metal ...

  2. High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayers, Katherine [Proton OnSite; Dalton, Luke [Proton OnSite; Roemer, Andy [Proton OnSite; Carter, Blake [Proton OnSite; Niedzwiecki, Mike [Proton OnSite; Manco, Judith [Proton OnSite; Anderson, Everett [Proton OnSite; Capuano, Chris [Proton OnSite; Wang, Chao-Yang [Penn State University; Zhao, Wei [Penn State University

    2014-02-05

    Renewable hydrogen from proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is gaining strong interest in Europe, especially in Germany where wind penetration is already at critical levels for grid stability. For this application as well as biogas conversion and vehicle fueling, megawatt (MW) scale electrolysis is required. Proton has established a technology roadmap to achieve the necessary cost reductions and manufacturing scale up to maintain U.S. competitiveness in these markets. This project represents a highly successful example of the potential for cost reduction in PEM electrolysis, and provides the initial stack design and manufacturing development for Proton’s MW scale product launch. The majority of the program focused on the bipolar assembly, from electrochemical modeling to subscale stack development through prototyping and manufacturing qualification for a large active area cell platform. Feasibility for an advanced membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with 50% reduction in catalyst loading was also demonstrated. Based on the progress in this program and other parallel efforts, H2A analysis shows the status of PEM electrolysis technology dropping below $3.50/kg production costs, exceeding the 2015 target.

  3. Dye-Sensitized Photocatalytic Water Splitting and Sacrificial Hydrogen Generation: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Chowdhury

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Today, global warming and green energy are important topics of discussion for every intellectual gathering all over the world. The only sustainable solution to these problems is the use of solar energy and storing it as hydrogen fuel. Photocatalytic and photo-electrochemical water splitting and sacrificial hydrogen generation show a promise for future energy generation from renewable water and sunlight. This article mainly reviews the current research progress on photocatalytic and photo-electrochemical systems focusing on dye-sensitized overall water splitting and sacrificial hydrogen generation. An overview of significant parameters including dyes, sacrificial agents, modified photocatalysts and co-catalysts are provided. Also, the significance of statistical analysis as an effective tool for a systematic investigation of the effects of different factors and their interactions are explained. Finally, different photocatalytic reactor configurations that are currently in use for water splitting application in laboratory and large scale are discussed.

  4. Hydrogen-oxygen steam generator applications for increasing the efficiency, maneuverability and reliability of power production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schastlivtsev, A. I.; Borzenko, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    The comparative feasibility study of the energy storage technologies showed good applicability of hydrogen-oxygen steam generators (HOSG) based energy storage systems with large-scale hydrogen production. The developed scheme solutions for the use of HOSGs for thermal power (TPP) and nuclear power plants (NPP), and the feasibility analysis that have been carried out have shown that their use makes it possible to increase the maneuverability of steam turbines and provide backup power supply in the event of failure of the main steam generating equipment. The main design solutions for the integration of hydrogen-oxygen steam generators into the main power equipment of TPPs and NPPs, as well as their optimal operation modes, are considered.

  5. Analysis of the measured medical waste generation rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Due to differences in generation rates, the data was normalized in order to compare statistical parameters used to assess medical waste generation rates. The statistical parameters used include: range, skewness, kurtosis, probability density functions and histograms. The study revealed that management of medical waste ...

  6. Hydrogen embrittlement of duplex steel tested using slow strain rate test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vaňova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dealing with hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic-ferritic 2205 duplex steel using the slow strain rate test (SSRT. The original material was subjected to heat treatment under 700 °C during 5 hours and following aircooling with the aim of provoking sigma phase precipitation and embrittlement of the material. The samples of both states were electrolytic saturation with hydrogen in 0,1N solution of sulfuric acid (H2SO4 with addition KSCN during 24 hours. The hydrogen embrittlement appeared on fracture surfaces of tested tensile bars as a quasi-cleavage damage on their perimeter. From the established depth of hydrogen charging the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in duplex steel with ferritic-austenitic structure and with the structure containing the sigma phase as well were estimated.

  7. Predicting efficiency of solar powered hydrogen generation using photovoltaic-electrolysis devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Thomas L.; Kelly, Nelson A. [General Motors Research and Development Center, Chemical Science and Material Systems Laboratory, Mail Code 480-106-269, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090-9055 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Hydrogen fuel for fuel cell vehicles can be produced by using solar electric energy from photovoltaic (PV) modules for the electrolysis of water without emitting carbon dioxide or requiring fossil fuels. In the past, this renewable means of hydrogen production has suffered from low efficiency (2-6%), which increased the area of the PV array required and therefore, the cost of generating hydrogen. A comprehensive mathematical model was developed that can predict the efficiency of a PV-electrolyzer combination based on operating parameters including voltage, current, temperature, and gas output pressure. This model has been used to design optimized PV-electrolyzer systems with maximum solar energy to hydrogen efficiency. In this research, the electrical efficiency of the PV-electrolysis system was increased by matching the maximum power output and voltage of the photovoltaics to the operating voltage of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer, and optimizing the effects of electrolyzer operating current, and temperature. The operating temperature of the PV modules was also an important factor studied in this research to increase efficiency. The optimized PV-electrolysis system increased the hydrogen generation efficiency to 12.4% for a solar powered PV-PEM electrolyzer that could supply enough hydrogen to operate a fuel cell vehicle. (author)

  8. Optimization and field demonstration of hybrid hydrogen generator/high efficiency furnace system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entchev, E.; Coyle, I.; Szadkowski, F. [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A-1M1 (Canada); Manning, M.; Swinton, M. [National Research Council Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Graydon, J.; Kirk, D. [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogen is seen as an energy carrier of the future and significant research on hydrogen generation, storage and utilization is accomplished around the world. However, an appropriate intermediate step before wide hydrogen introduction will be blending conventional fuels such as natural gas, oil or diesel with hydrogen and follow up combustion through conventional means. Due to changes in the combustion and flame characteristics of the system additional research is needed to access the limits and the impact of the fuel mix on the combustion systems performance. The hybrid system consists of a 5 kW{sub el} electrolyzer and a residential 15 kW{sub th} high efficiency gas fired furnace. The electrolyzer was integrated with the furnace gas supply and setup to replace 5-25% of the furnace natural gas flow with hydrogen. A mean for proper mixing of hydrogen with natural gas was provided and a control system for safe system operation was developed. Prior to the start of the field trial the hybrid system was investigated in laboratory environment. It was subjected to a variety of steady state and cycling conditions and a detailed performance and optimization analysis was performed with a range of hydrogen/natural gas mixtures. The optimized system was then installed at the Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies (CCHT) Experimental research house. The energy performance of the hybrid system was compared to the energy performance of an identical high efficiency furnace in the Control research house next door. (author)

  9. Coupling a PEM fuel cell and the hydrogen generation from aluminum waste cans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Susana Silva; Albanil Sanchez, Loyda; Alvarez Gallegos, Alberto A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Mor. CP 62210 (Mexico); Sebastian, P.J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia-UNAM, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Cuerpo Academico de Energia y Sustentabilidad, UPCH, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico)

    2007-10-15

    High purity hydrogen was generated from the chemical reaction of aluminum and sodium hydroxide. The aluminum used in this study was obtained from empty soft drink cans and treated with concentrated sulfuric acid to remove the paint and plastic film. One gram of aluminum was reacted with a solution of 2moldm{sup -3} of sodium hydroxide to produce hydrogen. The hydrogen produced from aluminum cans and oxygen obtained from a proton exchange membrane electrolyzer or air, was fed to a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell to produce electricity. Yields of 44 mmol of hydrogen contained in a volume of 1.760dm{sup 3} were produced from one gram of aluminum in a time period of 20 min. (author)

  10. Understanding oscillatory phenomena in molecular hydrogen generation via sodium borohydride hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budroni, M A; Biosa, E; Garroni, S; Mulas, G R C; Marchettini, N; Culeddu, N; Rustici, M

    2013-11-14

    The hydrolysis of borohydride salts represents one of the most promising processes for the generation of high purity molecular hydrogen under mild conditions. In this work we show that the sodium borohydride hydrolysis exhibits a fingerprinting periodic oscillatory transient in the hydrogen flow over a wide range of experimental conditions. We disproved the possibility that flow oscillations are driven by supersaturation phenomena of gaseous bubbles in the reactive mixture or by a nonlinear thermal feedback according to a thermokinetic model. Our experimental results indicate that the NaBH4 hydrolysis is a spontaneous inorganic oscillator, in which the hydrogen flow oscillations are coupled to an "oscillophor" in the reactive solution. The discovery of this original oscillator paves the way for a new class of chemical oscillators, with fundamental implications not only for testing the general theory on oscillations, but also with a view to chemical control of borohydride systems used as a source of hydrogen based green fuel.

  11. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Pyridine Hydrogenation on Platinum Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-02-22

    Pyridine hydrogenation in the presence of a surface monolayer consisting of cubic Pt nanoparticles stabilized by tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) was investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy using total internal reflection (TIR) geometry. TIR-SFG spectra analysis revealed that a pyridinium cation (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}) forms during pyridine hydrogenation on the Pt nanoparticle surface, and the NH group in the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +} cation becomes more hydrogen bound with the increase of the temperature. In addition, the surface coverage of the cation decreases with the increase of the temperature. An important contribution of this study is the in situ identification of reaction intermediates adsorbed on the Pt nanoparticle monolayer during pyridine hydrogenation.

  12. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2009-10-29

    The R- and P-reactor buildings were retired from service and are now being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated components and structures in a grout-like formulation. Aluminum corrodes very rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout materials and as a result produces hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, the Materials Science and Technology Directorate (MS&T) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been requested to review and evaluate existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints on the chemistry of the fill material and the fill operation are necessary. Various options exist for the type of grout material that may be used for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options include ceramicrete (pH 6-8), low pH portland cement + silica fume grout (pH 10.4), or portland cement grout (pH 12.5). The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Conservative calculations estimate that either ceramicrete or the silica fume grout may be used to safely grout the R- and P- reactor vessels. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. Grout temperatures less than 100 C should however, still provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. (2) Minimize the fill rate as much as

  13. Rate constant for reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the interest in the chemistry of germane in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and because previously reported kinetic reaction rate studies at 298 K gave results differing by a factor of 200, laboratory measurements were performed to determine the reaction rate constant for H + GeH4. Results of the study at 298 K, obtained via the direct technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence, yield the reaction rate constant, k = (4.08 + or - 0.22) x 10(exp -12) cu cm/s.

  14. Hydrogenation of O and OH on Pt(111): a comparison between the reaction rates of the first and the second hydrogen addition steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Näslund, L-Å

    2014-03-14

    The formation of water through hydrogenation of oxygen on platinum occurs at a surprisingly low reaction rate. The reaction rate limited process for this catalytic reaction is, however, yet to be settled. In the present work, the reaction rates of the first and the second hydrogen addition steps are compared when hydrogen is obtained through intense synchrotron radiation that induces proton production in a water overlayer on top of the adsorbed oxygen species. A substantial amount of the produced hydrogen diffuses to the platinum surface and promotes water formation at the two starting conditions O/Pt(111) and (H2O+OH)/Pt(111). The comparison shows no significant difference in the reaction rate between the first and the second hydrogen addition steps, which indicates that the rate determining process of the water formation from oxygen on Pt(111) is neither the first nor the second H addition step or, alternatively, that both H addition steps exert rate control.

  15. A third-generation dispersion and third-generation hydrogen bonding corrected PM6 method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Jimmy Charnley; Christensen, Anders Steen; Svendsen, Casper Steinmann

    2014-01-01

    We present new dispersion and hydrogen bond corrections to the PM6 method, PM6-D3H+, and its implementation in the GAMESS program. The method combines the DFT-D3 dispersion correction by Grimme et al. with a modified version of the H+ hydrogen bond correction by Korth. Overall, the interaction en...... vibrational free energies. While the GAMESS implementation is up to 10 times slower for geometry optimizations of proteins in bulk solvent, compared to MOPAC, it is sufficiently fast to make geometry optimizations of small proteins practically feasible....

  16. Chemiluminescence assay for catechin based on generation of hydrogen peroxide in basic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Kanemitsu, Mahina; Tajima, Noriko; Maeda, Masako

    2002-11-20

    We have determined that the catechin group in basic solution efficiently produces hydrogen peroxide; moreover, a highly sensitive analysis methodology was developed to measure catechin employing a peroxalate chemiluminescence detection system. Identification of hydrogen peroxide generated by catechin was determined by ESR as well as peroxalate chemiluminescence using catalase and SOD. As a result, catechin-generated superoxide by electron reduction to dissolved oxygen in basic solution, followed by production of hydrogen peroxide through dismutation reaction. This method could measure several tea catechins, (+)-catechin (CC), (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) and gallic acid, with measurement range from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -3} mol/l and sensitivity of 10{sup -8} mol/l. This method was also applied to the determination of total catechin levels in green tea, black tea and roasted green tea.

  17. Generation of hydrogen rich gas through fluidized bed gasification of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, M K; Datta, A B

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the process of generating hydrogen rich syngas through thermo chemical fluidized bed gasification of biomass. The experiments were performed in a laboratory scale externally heated biomass gasifier. Rice husk had been taken as a representative biomass and, steam had been used as the fluidizing and gasifying media. A thermodynamic equilibrium model was used to predict the gasification process. The work included the parametric study of process parameters such as reactor temperature and steam biomass ratio which generally influence the percentage of hydrogen content in the product gas. Steam had been used here to generate nitrogen free product gas and also to increase the hydrogen concentration in syngas with a medium range heating value of around 12 MJ/Nm3. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Start up system for hydrogen generator used with an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, J.; Cerini, D. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A hydrogen generator provides hydrogen rich product gases which are mixed with the fuel being supplied to an internal combustion engine for the purpose of enabling a very lean mixture of that fuel to be used, whereby nitrous oxides emitted by the engine are minimized. The hydrogen generator contains a catalyst which must be heated to a pre-determined temperature before it can react properly. To simplify the process of heating up the catalyst at start-up time, either some of the energy produced by the engine such as engine exhaust gas, or electrical energy produced by the engine, or the engine exhaust gas may be used to heat up air which is then used to heat the catalyst.

  19. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.C.

    2002-11-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best

  20. Root cause study on hydrogen generation and explosion through radiation-induced electrolysis in the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Genn, E-mail: sajig@bd5.so-net.ne.jp

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Reviewed how LWRs have coped with “water radiolysis”, during normal operation to severe accidents. • Concluded “water radiolysis” is not likely a route course of the hydrogen explosions at Fukushima. • Performed modeling studies based on “radiation-induced electrolysis” on Unit 1–Unit 4. • Generation of several tens of thousands cubic meters hydrogen gas is predicted before the hydrogen explosions. • Upon SBO, early safe disposal of hydrogen from RPVs is indispensable in BWRs. - Abstract: Since the scientific cause for a series of hydrogen explosions during the Fukushima accident has not been established, the author investigated his basic theory named “radiation-induced electrolysis (RIE)” by applying the estimation of the amounts of H{sub 2} generation during the active phase of the Fukushima accident. The author's theory was originally developed by including Faraday's law of electrolysis into the basic time-dependent material balance equation of radiation-chemical species for his study on accelerated corrosion phenomena which is widely observed in aged plants. As such this theory applies to the early phase of the accident before the loss of water levels in the reactor cores, although the simulations were performed from the time of seismic reactor trip to the hydrogen explosions in this paper. Through this mechanism as much as 29,400 m{sup 3}-STP of hydrogen gas is estimated to be accumulated inside the PCV just prior to the hydrogen explosion which occurred one day after the reactor trip in 1F1. With this large volume of hydrogen gas the explosion was a viable possibility upon the “venting” operation. In view of this observation, hydrogen generation from the spent fuel pools was also investigated. For the investigation of the 1F4 SFP, the pool water temperature and flow velocity due to natural circulation were changed widely to identify conditions of large hydrogen generation. During the trial calculations

  1. Microbial Photoelectrosynthesis for Self-Sustaining Hydrogen Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lu [Department; Williams, Nicholas B. [Department; Turner, John A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Maness, Pin-Ching [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Biosciences Center, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Gu, Jing [Department; Ren, Zhiyong Jason [Department

    2017-11-07

    Current artificial photosynthesis (APS) systems are promising for the storage of solar energy via transportable and storable fuels, but the anodic half-reaction of water oxidation is an energy intensive process which in many cases poorly couples with the cathodic half-reaction. Here we demonstrate a self-sustaining microbial photoelectrosynthesis (MPES) system that pairs microbial electrochemical oxidation with photoelectrochemical water reduction for energy efficient H2 generation. MPES reduces the overall energy requirements thereby greatly expanding the range of semiconductors that can be utilized in APS. Due to the recovery of chemical energy from waste organics by the mild microbial process and utilization of cost-effective and stable catalyst/electrode materials, our MPES system produced a stable current of 0.4 mA/cm2 for 24 h without any external bias and ~10 mA/cm2 with a modest bias under one sun illumination. This system also showed other merits, such as creating benefits of wastewater treatment and facile preparation and scalability.

  2. Fuel processor and method for generating hydrogen for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir [Naperville, IL; Lee, Sheldon H. D. [Willowbrook, IL; Carter, John David [Bolingbrook, IL; Krumpelt, Michael [Naperville, IL; Myers, Deborah J [Lisle, IL

    2009-07-21

    A method of producing a H.sub.2 rich gas stream includes supplying an O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel to an inner reforming zone of a fuel processor that includes a partial oxidation catalyst and a steam reforming catalyst or a combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst. The method also includes contacting the O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel with the partial oxidation catalyst and the steam reforming catalyst or the combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst in the inner reforming zone to generate a hot reformate stream. The method still further includes cooling the hot reformate stream in a cooling zone to produce a cooled reformate stream. Additionally, the method includes removing sulfur-containing compounds from the cooled reformate stream by contacting the cooled reformate stream with a sulfur removal agent. The method still further includes contacting the cooled reformate stream with a catalyst that converts water and carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and H.sub.2 in a water-gas-shift zone to produce a final reformate stream in the fuel processor.

  3. Microbial Photoelectrosynthesis for Self-Sustaining Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Williams, Nicholas B; Turner, John A; Maness, Pin-Ching; Gu, Jing; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2017-11-21

    Current artificial photosynthesis (APS) systems are promising for the storage of solar energy via transportable and storable fuels, but the anodic half-reaction of water oxidation is an energy intensive process which in many cases poorly couples with the cathodic half-reaction. Here we demonstrate a self-sustaining microbial photoelectrosynthesis (MPES) system that pairs microbial electrochemical oxidation with photoelectrochemical water reduction for energy efficient H2 generation. MPES reduces the overall energy requirements thereby greatly expanding the range of semiconductors that can be utilized in APS. Due to the recovery of chemical energy from waste organics by the mild microbial process and utilization of cost-effective and stable catalyst/electrode materials, our MPES system produced a stable current of 0.4 mA/cm2 for 24 h without any external bias and ∼10 mA/cm2 with a modest bias under one sun illumination. This system also showed other merits, such as creating benefits of wastewater treatment and facile preparation and scalability.

  4. Heat and mass transfer rates during flow of dissociated hydrogen gas over graphite surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, V. K.; Sharma, O. P.

    1986-01-01

    To improve upon the performance of chemical rockets, the nuclear reactor has been applied to a rocket propulsion system using hydrogen gas as working fluid and a graphite-composite forming a part of the structure. Under the boundary layer approximation, theoretical predictions of skin friction coefficient, surface heat transfer rate and surface regression rate have been made for laminar/turbulent dissociated hydrogen gas flowing over a flat graphite surface. The external stream is assumed to be frozen. The analysis is restricted to Mach numbers low enough to deal with the situation of only surface-reaction between hydrogen and graphite. Empirical correlations of displacement thickness, local skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local non-dimensional heat transfer rate have been obtained. The magnitude of the surface regression rate is found low enough to ensure the use of graphite as a linear or a component of the system over an extended period without loss of performance.

  5. Low-level hydrogen peroxide generation by unbleached cotton nonwovens: implications for wound healing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation during cotton fiber development. The compon...

  6. Removing CO and acetaldehyde from hydrogen streams generated by ethanol reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Cassia Colman, Rita; Torres, Luciana A.; de Lima, Adriana F.F.; Appel, Lucia G. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Divisao de Catalise e Processos Quimicos Av. Venezuela 82, CEP 20081 312, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-15

    It is well known that CO depletion from the hydrogen is compulsory in order to avoid the poisoning of the anode electrocatalyst of the PEM fuel cell. Hydrogen generated by ethanol reforming contains CO and acetaldehyde. The latter can be decomposed on the electrocatalyst generating more CO. The decarbonylation and methanation reactions are proposed by this work in order to eliminate acetaldehyde and CO from the hydrogen stream. Our results show that Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is more active than Ni/SiO{sub 2} for the methanation reaction. These catalysts also promote the decarbonylation of acetaldehyde generating methane and CO, with Ni/SiO{sub 2} being much more active than the Ru catalyst. The performance of a double-bed reactor in the purification of hydrogen generated by ethanol reforming is described in this contribution. The first layer composed of Ni/SiO{sub 2} decomposes acetaldehyde producing methane and CO, which is then eliminated by the methanation reaction employing Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the second layer. (author)

  7. High performance photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation and solar cells with a double type II heterojunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Lai-Hung; Gomulya, Widianta; Protesescu, Loredana; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Loi, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of CdSe quantum dot (QD) sensitized electrodes by direct adsorption of colloidal QDs on mesoporous TiO2 followed by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) ligand exchange. High efficiency photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation is demonstrated by means of these electrodes. The

  8. Biomass & Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Fuel For Gas Turbine (Power Generation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant progress has been made by major power generation equipment manufacturers in the development of market applications for hydrogen fuel use in gas turbines in recent years. Development of a new application using gas turbines for significant reduction of power plant CO2 e...

  9. Porous layered double hydroxides synthesized using oxygen generated by decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Rodriguez, P.; de Ruiter, M.P.; Wijnands, Tom; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2017-01-01

    Porous magnesium-aluminium layered double hydroxides (LDH) were prepared through intercalation and decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This process generates oxygen gas nano-bubbles that pierce holes in the layered structure of the material by local pressure build-up. The decomposition of the

  10. Photocatalytic generation of hydrogen under visible light on La2CuO4

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bull. Mater. Sci., Vol. 38, No. 4, August 2015, pp. 1043–1048. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Photocatalytic generation of hydrogen under visible light on La2CuO4. H LAHMAR and M TRARI. ∗. Laboratory of Storage and Valorization of Renewable Energies, Faculty of Chemistry (USTHB),. B.P. 32, 16111 Algiers, Algeria.

  11. Workshop on Hydrogen Storage and Generation for Medium-Power and -Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    l-H 135 Figure 2 Hydrogen Gas-Generating System (Royal Systems Design) bug mm mm ^ On/Off 00 Valve Holding Tank Striker Reaction Chamber...919) Darlene Slattery Florida Solar Energy Center 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa , FL 32922-5703 Fax: (407) 638-1010 43| Ed Starkovich CECOM RD

  12. Early-time photodynamics of ruthenium-based photocatalysts for light-induced hydrogen generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to provide a fundamental understanding of the early-time photodynamics of a series of Ru/M (M = Pd or Pt) bimetallic photocatalysts for light-induced hydrogen generation. This class of complexes adopts a general structure involving a Ru(II) center coordinated to two peripheral

  13. Rate equation analysis of hydrogen uptake on Si (100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanaga, S.; Rahman, F.; Khanom, F.; Namiki, A.

    2005-09-01

    We have studied the uptake process of H on Si (100) surfaces by means of rate equation analysis. Flowers' quasiequilibrium model for adsorption and desorption of H [M. C. Flowers, N. B. H. Jonathan, A. Morris, and S. Wright, Surf. Sci. 396, 227 (1998)] is extended so that in addition to the H abstraction (ABS) and β2-channel thermal desorption (TD) the proposed rate equation further includes the adsorption-induced desorption (AID) and β1-TD. The validity of the model is tested by the experiments of ABS and AID rates in the reaction system H+D/Si (100). Consequently, we find it can well reproduce the experimental results, validating the proposed model. We find the AID rate curve as a function of surface temperature Ts exhibits a clear anti-correlation with the bulk dangling bond density versus Ts curve reported in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for amorphous Si films. The significance of the H chemistry in plasma-enhanced CVD is discussed.

  14. Rate coefficients for hydrogen abstraction reaction of pinonaldehyde ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The H abstraction reaction from the –CHO group was found to be the most dominant reaction channelamong all the possible reaction pathways and its corresponding rate coefficient at 300 K is kEckart's unsymmetrical= 3.86 ×10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Whereas the channel with immediate lower activation energy is the ...

  15. Are dialysis adequacy indices independent of solute generation rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniewski, Jacek; Debowska, Malgorzata; Lindholm, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    KT/V is by definition independent of solute generation rate. Alternative dialysis adequacy indices (DAIs) such as equivalent renal clearance (EKR), standard KT/V (stdKT/V), and solute removal index (SRI) are estimated as the ratio of solute mass removed to an average solute mass in the body or solute concentration in blood; both nominator and denominator in these formulas depend on the solute generation rate. Our objective was to investigate whether and under which conditions the alternative DAIs are independent of solute generation rate. By using general compartment modeling, we show that for the metabolically stable patient (in whom the solute generated during the dialysis cycle, typically, 1 week, is equal to the solute removed from the body), DAIs estimated for the dialysis cycle are in general independent of the average solute generation rate (although they may depend on the pattern of oscillations in the generation rate). However, the alternative adequacy parameters (such as EKR, stdKT/V, and SRI) may depend on solute generation rate for metabolically unstable patients.

  16. Shell and explosive hydrogen burning. Nuclear reaction rates for hydrogen burning in RGB, AGB and Novae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeltzig, A. [Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Bruno, C.G.; Davinson, T. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cavanna, F.; Ferraro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova (Italy); INFN, Genova (Italy); Cristallo, S. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, INAF, Teramo (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Depalo, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN, Padova (Italy); DeBoer, R.J.; Wiescher, M. [University of Notre Dame, Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Notre Dame, Indiana (United States); Di Leva, A.; Imbriani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Marigo, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); Terrasi, F. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Seconda Universita di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    The nucleosynthesis of light elements, from helium up to silicon, mainly occurs in Red Giant and Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and Novae. The relative abundances of the synthesized nuclides critically depend on the rates of the nuclear processes involved, often through non-trivial reaction chains, combined with complex mixing mechanisms. In this paper, we summarize the contributions made by LUNA experiments in furthering our understanding of nuclear reaction rates necessary for modeling nucleosynthesis in AGB stars and Novae explosions. (orig.)

  17. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. The low temperature, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has recently been identified as an attractive option for stationary power generation, based on the relatively simple and benign materials employed, the zero-emission character of the device, and the expected high power density, high reliability and low cost. However, a PEMFC stack fueled by hydrogen with the combined properties of low cost, high performance and high reliability has not yet been demonstrated. Demonstration of such a stack will remove a significant barrier to implementation of this advanced technology for electric power generation from hydrogen. Work done in the past at LANL on the development of components and materials, particularly on advanced membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs), has contributed significantly to the capability to demonstrate in the foreseeable future a PEMFC stack with the combined characteristics described above. A joint effort between LANL and an industrial stack manufacturer will result in the demonstration of such a fuel cell stack for stationary power generation. The stack could operate on hydrogen fuel derived from either natural gas or from renewable sources. The technical plan includes collaboration with a stack manufacturer (CRADA). It stresses the special requirements from a PEMFC in stationary power generation, particularly maximization of the energy conversion efficiency, extension of useful life to the 10 hours time scale and tolerance to impurities from the reforming of natural gas.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF REACTOR VESSELS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.; Serrato, M.; Langton, C.

    2010-11-10

    The R- and P-reactor vessels at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D). D&D activities will consist primarily of physically isolating and stabilizing the reactor vessel by filling it with a grout material. The reactor vessels contain aluminum alloy materials, which pose a concern in that aluminum corrodes rapidly when it comes in contact with the alkaline grout. A product of the corrosion reaction is hydrogen gas and therefore potential flammability issues were assessed. A model was developed to calculate the hydrogen generation rate as the reactor is being filled with the grout material. Three options existed for the type of grout material for D&D of the reactor vessels. The grout formulation options included ceramicrete (pH 6-8), a calcium aluminate sulfate (CAS) based cement (pH 10), or Portland cement grout (pH 12.4). Corrosion data for aluminum in concrete were utilized as input for the model. The calculations considered such factors as the surface area of the aluminum components, the open cross-sectional area of the reactor vessel, the rate at which the grout is added to the reactor vessel, and temperature. Given the hydrogen generation rate, the hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of the reactor vessel above the grout was calculated. This concentration was compared to the lower flammability limit for hydrogen. The assessment concluded that either ceramicrete or the CAS grout may be used to safely grout the P-reactor vessel. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen between the grout-air interface and the top of the reactor is very low. Portland cement grout, on the other hand, for the same range of process parameters did not provide a margin of safety against the accumulation of flammable gas in the reactor vessel during grouting operations in the P-reactor vessel. Therefore, it was recommended that this grout not be utilized for this task. On the other hand, the R-reactor vessel

  19. Generation rate and physical composition of solid waste in Wolaita ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ever increasing amount of solid waste generated which is exacerbated by lack of proper waste management system is of growing environmental and public health concern worldwide and in major towns and cities of Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to assess the current solid waste generation rate and compositions in ...

  20. A novel tubular microbial electrolysis cell for high rate hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Prévoteau, Antonin; Rabaey, Korneel

    2017-07-01

    Practical application of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) for hydrogen production requires scalable reactors with low internal resistance, high current density, and high hydrogen recovery. This work reports a liter scale tubular MEC approaching these requirements. The tubular cell components (a platinum-coated titanium mesh cathode, an anion exchange membrane, and a pleated stainless steel felt anode) were arranged in a concentric configuration. The reactor had a low internal resistance (0.325 Ω, 19.5 mΩ m2) due to the high conductivity of the electrodes, a compact reactor configuration, and proper mixing. With acetate as electron donor, the MEC achieved a volumetric current density of 654 ± 22 mA L-1 (projected current density, 1.09 ± 0.04 mA cm-2) and a volumetric hydrogen production rate of 7.10 ± 0.01 L L-1 d-1 at an applied voltage of 1 V. The reactor also showed high hydrogen recovery (∼100%), high hydrogen purity (>98%), and excellent operational stability during the 3 weeks of operation. These results demonstrated that high hydrogen production rate could be achieved on larger scale MEC and this tubular MEC holds great potential for scaling up.

  1. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heske, Clemens; Moujaes, Samir; Weimer, Alan; Wong, Bunsen; Siegal, Nathan; McFarland, Eric; Miller, Eric; Lewis, Michele; Bingham, Carl; Roth, Kurth; Sabacky, Bruce; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2011-09-29

    The objective of this work is to identify economically feasible concepts for the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. The ultimate project objective was to select one or more competitive concepts for pilot-scale demonstration using concentrated solar energy. Results of pilot scale plant performance would be used as foundation for seeking public and private resources for full-scale plant development and testing. Economical success in this venture would afford the public with a renewable and limitless source of energy carrier for use in electric power load-leveling and as a carbon-free transportation fuel. The Solar Hydrogen Generation Research (SHGR) project embraces technologies relevant to hydrogen research under the Office of Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology (HFCIT) as well as concentrated solar power under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Although the photoelectrochemical work is aligned with HFCIT, some of the technologies in this effort are also consistent with the skills and technologies found in concentrated solar power and photovoltaic technology under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water-splitting is a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or a combination of heat and electrolysis instead of pure electrolysis and meets the goals for hydrogen production using only water and renewable solar energy as feed-stocks. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production also meets these goals by implementing photo-electrolysis at the surface of a semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte with bias provided by a photovoltaic source. Here, water splitting is a photo-electrolytic process in which hydrogen is produced using only solar photons and water as feed-stocks. The thermochemical hydrogen task engendered formal collaborations among two universities, three national laboratories and two private sector

  2. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  3. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Tanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  4. Refinements in an Mg/MgH2/H2O-Based Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew; Huang, Yuhong

    2010-01-01

    Some refinements have been conceived for a proposed apparatus that would generate hydrogen (for use in a fuel cell) by means of chemical reactions among magnesium, magnesium hydride, and steam. The refinements lie in tailoring spatial and temporal distributions of steam and liquid water so as to obtain greater overall energy-storage or energy-generation efficiency than would otherwise be possible. A description of the prior art is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the present refinements. The hydrogen-generating apparatus in question is one of two versions of what was called the "advanced hydrogen generator" in "Fuel-Cell Power Systems Incorporating Mg-Based H2 Generators" (NPO-43554), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 1 (January 2009), page 52. To recapitulate: The apparatus would include a reactor vessel that would be initially charged with magnesium hydride. The apparatus would exploit two reactions: The endothermic decomposition reaction MgH2-->Mg + H2, which occurs at a temperature greater than or equal to 300 C, and The exothermic oxidation reaction MgH2 + H2O MgO + 2H2, which occurs at a temperature greater than or equal to 330 C.

  5. A small portable proton exchange membrane fuel cell and hydrogen generator for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlhart, O J; Rohonyi, P; Modroukas, D; Driller, J

    1997-01-01

    Small, lightweight power sources for total artificial hearts (TAH), left ventricular assist devices (LVAD), and other medical products are under development. The new power source will provide 2 to 3 times the capacity of conventional batteries. The implications of this new power source are profound. For example, for the Heartmate LVAD, 5 to 8 hours of operation are obtained with 3 lb of lead acid batteries (Personal Communication Mr. Craig Sherman, Thermo Cardiosystems, Inc TCI 11/29/96). With the same weight, as much as 14 hours of operation appear achievable with the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power source. Energy densities near 135 watt-hour/L are achievable. These values significantly exceed those of most conventional and advanced primary and secondary batteries. The improvement is mission dependent and even applies for the short deployment cited above. The comparison to batteries becomes even more favorable if the mission length is increased. The higher capacity requires only replacement of lightweight hydride cartridges and logistically available water. Therefore, when one spare 50 L hydride cartridge weighing 115 g is added to the reactant supply the energy density of the total system increases to 230 watt-hour/kg. This new power source is comprised of a hydrogen fueled, air-breathing PEM fuel cell and a miniature hydrogen generator (US Patent No 5,514,353). The fuel cell is of novel construction and differs from conventional bipolar PEM fuel cells by the arrangement of cells on a single sheet of ion-exchange membrane. The construction avoids the weight and volume penalty of conventional bipolar stacks. The hydrogen consumed by the fuel cell is generated load-responsively in the miniature hydrogen generator, by reacting calcium hydride with water, forming in the process hydrogen and lime. The generator is cartridge rechargeable and available in capacities providing up to several hundred watt-hours of electric power.

  6. Generating interest-rate scenarios for fixed-income portfolio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The model includes four latent factors and three observable macroeconomic variables (capacity utilisation, inflation and the repo rate). The goal is to capture the dynamic interactions between the macroeconomy and the yield curve in such a way that the resulting model can be used to generate interest-rate scenario trees ...

  7. High performance photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation and solar cells with a double type II heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lai-Hung; Gomulya, Widianta; Protesescu, Loredana; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Loi, Maria A

    2014-04-28

    We report on the fabrication of CdSe quantum dot (QD) sensitized electrodes by direct adsorption of colloidal QDs on mesoporous TiO2 followed by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) ligand exchange. High efficiency photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation is demonstrated by means of these electrodes. The deposition of ZnS on TiO2/CdSe further improves the external quantum efficiency from 63% to 85% at 440 nm under -0.5 V vs. SCE. Using the same photoelectrodes, solar cells with the internal quantum efficiency approaching 100% are fabricated. The ZnS deposition increases the photocurrent and chemical stability of the electrodes. Investigation of the carrier dynamics of the solar cells shows that ZnS enhances the exciton separation rate in CdSe nanocrystals, which we ascribe to the formation of a type II heterojunction between ZnS and CdSe QDs. This finding is confirmed by the dynamics of the CdSe photoluminescence, which in the presence of ZnS becomes noticeably faster.

  8. Superefficient thin film multilayer catalyst for generating hydrogen from sodium borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lunghao; Ceccato, R.; Raj, R.

    A multilayer catalyst consisting of a electrophoretically deposited thin film of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a substrate of carbon fibers, followed by a coating of polymer-derived silicon carbonitride (SiCN), which is then decorated with a monolayer of transition metals is shown to perform at the upperbound of the phenomemological prediction from an earlier work [1]. A figure-of-merit for first order kinetics is equal to 4600 L min -1 [NaBH 4] -1 g met -1, which is nearly 30 times the value reported in literature, is achieved. This high FOM is attributed to the CNT-thin film, as opposed to the thick CNT-paper used in previous work, thus needing merely 0.15 wt% quantities of precious metals for effective catalysis. This new architecture corroborates the concepts that: (i) the catalytic activity derives mainly from the surface of the CNT substrate, and (ii) the silicon carbonitride interlayer is instrumental in dispersing the transition metals into a monolayer. The hydrogen generation rate (HGR) for zero order kinetics, which is obtained when [NaBH 4] > 0.03 M, is measured to be 75 L min -1 g met -1, which is among the higher values reported in the literature. The present multilayer catalysts are able to perform without fading for many cycles, presumably because the bondings in the substrate are predominantly covalent. This feature adds further uniqueness to this multilayer catalyst.

  9. Minimum Entropy Generation Theorem Investigation and Optimization of Metal Hydride Alloy Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to carry out numerical simulation of the hydrogen storage on exothermic reaction of metal hydride LaNi5 alloy container. In addition to accelerating the reaction speed of the internal metal hydride by internal control tube water-cooled mode, analyze via the application of second law of thermodynamics the principle of entropy generation. Use COMSOL Mutilphysics 4.3 a to engage in finite element method value simulation on two-dimensional axisymmetric model. Also on the premise that the internal control tube parameters the radius ri, the flow rate U meet the metal hydride saturation time, observe the reaction process of two parameters on the tank, entropy distribution and the results of the accumulated entropy. And try to find the internal tube parameter values of the minimum entropy, whose purpose is to be able to identify the reaction process and the reaction results of internal tank’s optimum energy conservation.

  10. SLUDGE BATCH 4 FOLLOW-UP QUALIFICATION STUDIES TO EVALUATE HYDROGEN GENERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareizs, J; David Koopman, D; Dan Lambert, D; Cj Bannochie, C

    2007-08-23

    Follow-up testing was conducted to better understand the excessive hydrogen generation seen in the initial Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) qualification Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator (SRAT/SME) simulation in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. This effort included both radioactive and simulant work. The initial SB4 qualification test produced 0.59 lbs/hr hydrogen in the SRAT, which was just below the DWPF SRAT limit of 0.65 lbs/hr, and the test produced over 0.5 lbs/hr hydrogen in the SME cycle on two separate occasions, which were over the DWPF SME limit of 0.223 lbs/hr.

  11. Simulation for estimation of hydrogen sulfide scavenger injection dose rate for treatment of crude oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Elshiekh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of hydrogen sulfide in the hydrocarbon fluids is a well known problem in many oil and gas fields. Hydrogen sulfide is an undesirable contaminant which presents many environmental and safety hazards. It is corrosive, malodorous, and toxic. Accordingly, a need has been long left in the industry to develop a process which can successfully remove hydrogen sulfide from the hydrocarbons or at least reduce its level during the production, storage or processing to a level that satisfies safety and product specification requirements. The common method used to remove or reduce the concentration of hydrogen sulfide in the hydrocarbon production fluids is to inject the hydrogen sulfide scavenger into the hydrocarbon stream. One of the chemicals produced by the Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute (EPRI is EPRI H2S scavenger. It is used in some of the Egyptian petroleum producing companies. The injection dose rate of H2S scavenger is usually determined by experimental lab tests and field trials. In this work, this injection dose rate is mathematically estimated by modeling and simulation of an oil producing field belonging to Petrobel Company in Egypt which uses EPRI H2S scavenger. Comparison between the calculated and practical values of injection dose rate emphasizes the real ability of the proposed equation.

  12. Moment generating function approach to pricing interest rate and foreign exchange rate claims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, T.K.; Yao, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This paper uses moment generating functions to provide a general framework to model international term structures and to price interest rate and foreign exchange rate claims. When moment generating functions of state variables have a closed-form formula, closed-form formulas for bond prices are

  13. Gas-Phase Reaction Pathways and Rate Coefficients for the Dichlorosilane-Hydrogen and Trichlorosilane-Hydrogen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Walch, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    As part of NASA Ames Research Center's Integrated Process Team on Device/Process Modeling and Nanotechnology our goal is to create/contribute to a gas-phase chemical database for use in modeling microelectronics devices. In particular, we use ab initio methods to determine chemical reaction pathways and to evaluate reaction rate coefficients. Our initial studies concern reactions involved in the dichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H2--H2) and trichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H-H2) systems. Reactant, saddle point (transition state), and product geometries and their vibrational harmonic frequencies are determined using the complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure method with the correlation consistent polarized valence double-zeta basis set (cc-pVDZ). Reaction pathways are constructed by following the imaginary frequency mode of the saddle point to both the reactant and product. Accurate energetics are determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations (CCSD(T)) extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Using the data from the electronic structure calculations, reaction rate coefficients are obtained using conventional and variational transition state and RRKM theories.

  14. Hydrogen generation from water using Mg nanopowder produced by arc plasma method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Uda, Hideo Okuyama, Tohru S Suzuki and Yoshio Sakka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report that hydrogen gas can be easily produced from water at room temperature using a Mg nanopowder (30–1000 nm particles, average diameter 265 nm. The Mg nanopowder was produced by dc arc melting of a Mg ingot in a chamber with mixed-gas atmosphere (20% N2–80% Ar at 0.1 MPa using custom-built nanopowder production equipment. The Mg nanopowder was passivated with a gas mixture of 1% O2 in Ar for 12 h in the final step of the synthesis, after which the nanopowder could be safely handled in ambient air. The nanopowder vigorously reacted with water at room temperature, producing 110 ml of hydrogen gas per 1 g of powder in 600 s. This amount corresponds to 11% of the hydrogen that could be generated by the stoichiometric reaction between Mg and water. Mg(OH2 flakes formed on the surface of the Mg particles as a result of this reaction. They easily peeled off, and the generation of hydrogen continued until all the Mg was consumed.

  15. Hydrogen generation from water using Mg nanopowder produced by arc plasma method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, Masahiro; Okuyama, Hideo; Suzuki, Tohru S; Sakka, Yoshio

    2012-04-01

    We report that hydrogen gas can be easily produced from water at room temperature using a Mg nanopowder (30-1000 nm particles, average diameter 265 nm). The Mg nanopowder was produced by dc arc melting of a Mg ingot in a chamber with mixed-gas atmosphere (20% N2-80% Ar) at 0.1 MPa using custom-built nanopowder production equipment. The Mg nanopowder was passivated with a gas mixture of 1% O2 in Ar for 12 h in the final step of the synthesis, after which the nanopowder could be safely handled in ambient air. The nanopowder vigorously reacted with water at room temperature, producing 110 ml of hydrogen gas per 1 g of powder in 600 s. This amount corresponds to 11% of the hydrogen that could be generated by the stoichiometric reaction between Mg and water. Mg(OH)2 flakes formed on the surface of the Mg particles as a result of this reaction. They easily peeled off, and the generation of hydrogen continued until all the Mg was consumed.

  16. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawodzinski, C.; Wilson, M.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. A central objective of a LANL/Industry collaborative effort supported by the Hydrogen Program is to integrate PEM fuel cell and novel stack designs at LANL with stack technology of H-Power Corporation (H-Power) in order to develop a manufacturable, low-cost/high-performance hydrogen/air fuel cell stack for stationary generation of electric power. A LANL/H-Power CRADA includes Tasks ranging from exchange, testing and optimization of membrane-electrode assemblies of large areas, development and demonstration of manufacturable flow field, backing and bipolar plate components, and testing of stacks at the 3-5 cell level and, finally, at the 4-5 kW level. The stack should demonstrate the basic features of manufacturability, overall low cost and high energy conversion efficiency. Plans for future work are to continue the CRADA work along the time line defined in a two-year program, to continue the LANL activities of developing and testing stainless steel hardware for longer term stability including testing in a stack, and to further enhance air cathode performance to achieve higher energy conversion efficiencies as required for stationary power application.

  17. Ethanol steam reforming with Co0 (111 for hydrogen and carbon nanofilament generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The cobalt metal catalysts are highly active at low temperature ESR. In this study, ESR was studied over barren Co metal (Co0 from oxalate precursor without any pre-reduction to find out its role in hydrogen and carbon nano-filament generation. The ethanol conversion was found to be 100% with 96.5% hydrogen selectivity at 723K. The time on stream (TOS study has shown stability up to 19h for Co catalyst. The diameter of Co-carbon nanofilament was calculated and found to be typically in the range of 70–80 nm by the TEM image analysis of spent catalyst. The SEM with EDS analysis revealed that Co0 state was found in between the carbon nanofilament as well as at the tip of carbon nanofilament. The obtained Co-C nanofilament displayed an adsorption capacity of 552 mg/g at optimum parameter of pH = 2, contact time = 60 minute, concentration = 30 ppm, dose = 0.05g for Orange G dye removal without any chemical or physical treatment. This approach has shown significant results in terms of hydrogen generation and method of Co carbon nanofilament for further utilization in different prospects. Keywords: Catalyst deactivation, Characterization, ESR, Hydrogen production

  18. Acetaldehyde behavior over platinum based catalyst in hydrogen stream generated by ethanol reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Lima, Adriana F.F. [Laboratorio de Catalise, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Av. Venezuela 82/507, 20081-310 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica e INOG (Instituto Nacional de Oleo Gas), UERJ-CNPq, FAPERJ, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, 20550-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Colman, Rita C. [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica e de Petroleo, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Passos da Patria, 156/bl E/240, 24210-240 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Zotin, Fatima M.Z. [Instituto de Quimica e INOG (Instituto Nacional de Oleo Gas), UERJ-CNPq, FAPERJ, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, 20550-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); CETEM-MCT, Av. Pedro Calmon, 900, Cidade Universitaria, 21941-908 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Appel, Lucia G. [Laboratorio de Catalise, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Av. Venezuela 82/507, 20081-310 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    Due to the greenhouse effect, hydrogen production from bioethanol reforming is a very important subject in heterogeneous catalysis research. Pt based catalysts are employed in H{sub 2} purification processes and also as electrocatalysts of PEM (''Proton Exchange Membrane'') fuel cells. Hydrogen obtained from ethanol reforming may contain, as contaminants, acetaldehyde and small amounts of CO. This aldehyde can be decarbonylated on Pt based catalysts generating carbon monoxide and methane, rendering the hydrogen purification more challenging. Moreover, acetaldehyde might also change the electrocatalyst behavior. Therefore, this contribution aims at studying the acetaldehyde behavior in the presence of platinum based catalysts in hydrogen atmosphere. The Pt/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/USY catalysts and an electrocatalyst were characterized by n-butylamine, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, ATG/DTG measurements and cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction. It was observed that the acid-basic properties of the supports promote condensation reactions. When in contact with Pt based catalysts, acetaldehyde undergoes C-C and C=O bond scissions. The former occurs at a wide range of temperatures, whereas the latter only at low temperatures (<200 C). The C-C bond scission (decarbonylation) produces methane and CO. The C=O bond scission generates carbon residues on the catalyst as well as oxygen species, which in turn is able to eliminate CO from the catalytic surface. The data also show that decarbonylation is not a structure-sensitive reaction. (author)

  19. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  20. 7-Nitro-4-(phenylthio)benzofurazan is a potent generator of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patridge, Eric V; Eriksson, Emma S E; Penketh, Philip G; Baumann, Raymond P; Zhu, Rui; Shyam, Krishnamurthy; Eriksson, Leif A; Sartorelli, Alan C

    2012-10-01

    Here, we report on 7-nitro-4-(phenylthio)benzofurazan (NBF-SPh), the most potent derivative among a set of patented anticancer 7-nitrobenzofurazans (NBFs), which have been suggested to function by perturbing protein-protein interactions. We demonstrate that NBF-SPh participates in toxic redox-cycling, rapidly generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of molecular oxygen, and this is the first report to detail ROS production for any of the anticancer NBFs. Oxygraph studies showed that NBF-SPh consumes molecular oxygen at a substantial rate, rivaling even plumbagin, menadione, and juglone. Biochemical and enzymatic assays identified superoxide and hydrogen peroxide as products of its redox-cycling activity, and the rapid rate of ROS production appears to be sufficient to account for some of the toxicity of NBF-SPh (LC(50) = 12.1 μM), possibly explaining why tumor cells exhibit a sharp threshold for tolerating the compound. In cell cultures, lipid peroxidation was enhanced after treatment with NBF-SPh, as measured by 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, indicating a significant accumulation of ROS. Thioglycerol rescued cell death and increased survival by 15-fold to 20-fold, but pyruvate and uric acid were ineffective protectants. We also observed that the redox-cycling activity of NBF-SPh became exhausted after an average of approximately 19 cycles per NBF-SPh molecule. Electrochemical and computational analyses suggest that partial reduction of NBF-SPh enhances electrophilicity, which appears to encourage scavenging activity and contribute to electrophilic toxicity.

  1. Safety operation of chromatography column system with discharging hydrogen radiolytically generated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Sou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the extraction chromatography system, accumulation of hydrogen gas in the chromatography column is suspected to lead to fire or explosion. In order to prevent the hazardous accidents, it is necessary to evaluate behaviors of gas radiolytically generated inside the column. In this study, behaviors of gas inside the extraction chromatography column were investigated through experiments and Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulation. N2 gas once accumulated as bubbles in the packed bed was hardly discharged by the flow of mobile phase. However, the CFD simulation and X-ray imaging on γ-ray irradiated column revealed that during operation the hydrogen gas generated in the column was dissolved into the mobile phase without accumulation and discharged.

  2. Continuous biohydrogen production using cheese whey: Improving the hydrogen production rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila-Vazquez, Gustavo; Cota-Navarro, Ciria Berenice; Razo-Flores, Elias [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a seccion, C.P. 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P (Mexico); Rosales-Colunga, Luis Manuel; de Leon-Rodriguez, Antonio [Division de Biologia Molecular, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a seccion, C.P. 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P (Mexico)

    2009-05-15

    Due to the renewed interest in finding sustainable fuels or energy carriers, biohydrogen (Bio-H{sub 2}) from biomass is a promising alternative. Fermentative Bio-H{sub 2} production was studied in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operated during 65.6 d with cheese whey (CW) as substrate. Three hydraulic retention times (HRTs) were tested (10, 6 and 4 h) and the highest volumetric hydrogen production rate (VHPR) was attained with HRT of 6 h. Therefore, four organic loading rates (OLRs) at a fixed HRT of 6 h were tested thereafter, being: 92.4, 115.5, 138.6 and 184.4 g lactose/L/d. The highest VHPR (46.61 mmol H{sub 2}/L/h) and hydrogen molar yield (HMY) of 2.8 mol H{sub 2}/mol lactose were found at an OLR of 138.6 g lactose/L/d; a sharp fall in VHPR occurred at an OLR of 184.4 g lactose/L/d. Butyric, propionic and acetic acids were the main soluble metabolites found, with butyric-to-acetic ratios ranging from 1.0 to 2.4. Bacterial community was identified by partial sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The results showed that at HRT of 10 h and 6 h were dominated by the Clostridium genus. The VHPR attained in this study is the highest reported value for a CSTR system using CW as substrate with anaerobic sludge as inoculum and represents a 33-fold increase compared to a previous study. Thus, it was demonstrated that continuous fermentative Bio-H{sub 2} production from CW can be significantly enhanced by an appropriate selection of parameters such as HRT and OLR. Enhancements in VHPR are significant because it is a critical parameter to determine the full-scale practical application of fermentation technologies that will be used for sustainable and clean energy generation. (author)

  3. Influence of heat transfer rates on pressurization of liquid/slush hydrogen propellant tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmal, G. P.; Hochstein, J. I.; Hardy, T. L.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-dimensional computational model of the pressurization process in liquid/slush hydrogen tank is developed and used to study the influence of heat flux rates at the ullage boundaries on the process. The new model computes these rates and performs an energy balance for the tank wall whereas previous multi-dimensional models required a priori specification of the boundary heat flux rates. Analyses of both liquid hydrogen and slush hydrogen pressurization were performed to expose differences between the two processes. Graphical displays are presented to establish the dependence of pressurization time, pressurant mass required, and other parameters of interest on ullage boundary heat flux rates and pressurant mass flow rate. Detailed velocity fields and temperature distributions are presented for selected cases to further illuminate the details of the pressurization process. It is demonstrated that ullage boundary heat flux rates do significantly effect the pressurization process and that minimizing heat loss from the ullage and maximizing pressurant flow rate minimizes the mass of pressurant gas required to pressurize the tank. It is further demonstrated that proper dimensionless scaling of pressure and time permit all the pressure histories examined during this study to be displayed as a single curve.

  4. Toward enhanced hydrogen generation from water using oxygen permeating LCF membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Xiao-Yu

    2015-01-01

    © the Owner Societies. Hydrogen production from water thermolysis can be enhanced by the use of perovskite-type mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes, through which oxygen permeation is driven by a chemical potential gradient. In this work, water thermolysis experiments were performed using 0.9 mm thick La0.9Ca0.1FeO3-δ (LCF-91) perovskite membranes at 990 °C in a lab-scale button-cell reactor. We examined the effects of the operating conditions such as the gas species concentrations and flow rates on the feed and sweep sides on the water thermolysis rate and oxygen flux. A single step reaction mechanism is proposed for surface reactions, and three-resistance permeation models are derived. Results show that water thermolysis is facilitated by the LCF-91 membrane especially when a fuel is added to the sweep gas. Increasing the gas flow rate and water concentration on the feed side or the hydrogen concentration on the sweep side enhances the hydrogen production rate. In this work, hydrogen is used as the fuel by construction, so that a single-step surface reaction mechanism can be developed and water thermolysis rate parameters can be derived. Both surface reaction rate parameters for oxygen incorporation/dissociation and hydrogen-oxygen reactions are fitted at 990 °C. We compare the oxygen fluxes in water thermolysis and air separation experiments, and identify different limiting steps in the processes involving various oxygen sources and sweep gases for this 0.9 mm thick LCF-91 membrane. In the air feed-inert sweep case, the bulk diffusion and sweep side surface reaction are the two limiting steps. In the water feed-inert sweep case, surface reaction on the feed side dominates the oxygen permeation process. Yet in the water feed-fuel sweep case, surface reactions on both the feed and sweep sides are rate determining when hydrogen concentration in the sweep side is in the range of 1-5 vol%. Furthermore, long term studies show that the surface

  5. Hydrocarbon reforming catalysts and new reactor designs for compact hydrogen generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.; Schwab, E.; Urtel, H. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Farrauto, R. [BASF Catalysts LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2010-12-30

    A hydrogen based future energy scenario will use fuel cells for the conversion of chemically stored energy into electricity. Depending upon the type of fuel cell, different specifications will apply for the feedstock which is converted in the cell, ranging from very clean hydrogen for PEM-FC's to desulfurized methane for SOFC and MCFC technology. For the foreseeable future, hydrogen will be supplied by conventional reforming, however operated in compact and dynamic reformer designs. This requires that known catalyst formulations are offered in specific geometries, giving flexibility for novel reactor design options. These specific geometries can be special tablet shapes as well as monolith structures. Finally, also nonhydrocarbon feedstock might be used in special applications, e.g. bio-based methanol and ethanol. BASF offers catalysts for the full process chain starting from feedstock desulfurization via reforming, high temperature shift, low temperature shift to CO fine polishing either via selective oxidation or selective methanation. Depending upon the customer's design, most stages can be served either with precious metal based monolith solutions or base metal tablet solutions. For the former, we have taken the automobile catalyst monolith support and extended its application to the fuel cell hydrogen generation. Washcoats of precious metal supported catalysts can for example be deposited on ceramic monoliths and/or metal heat exchangers for efficient generation of hydrogen. Major advantages are high through puts due to more efficient heat transfer for catalysts on metal heat exchangers, lower pressure drop with greater catalyst mechanical and thermal stability compared to particulate catalysts. Base metal tablet catalysts on the other hand can have intrinsic cost advantages, larger fractions of the reactor can be filled with active mass, and if produced in unconventional shape, again novel reactor designs are made possible. Finally, if it comes to

  6. Cuboid Ni2P as a Bifunctional Catalyst for Efficient Hydrogen Generation from Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane and Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yeshuang; Liu, Chao; Cheng, Gongzhen; Luo, Wei

    2017-11-16

    The design of high-performance catalysts for hydrogen generation is highly desirable for the upcoming hydrogen economy. Herein, we report the colloidal synthesis of nanocuboid Ni 2 P by the thermal decomposition of nickel chloride hexahydrate (NiCl 2 ⋅6 H 2 O) and trioctylphosphine. The obtained nanocuboid Ni 2 P was characterized by using powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. For the first time, the as-synthesized nanocuboid Ni 2 P is used as a bifunctional catalyst for hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane and electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. Owing to the strong synergistic electronic effect between Ni and P, the as-synthesized Ni 2 P exhibits catalytic performance that is superior to its counterpart without P doping. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Optimum injection dose rate of hydrogen sulfide scavenger for treatment of petroleum crude oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Elshiekh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide H2S scavengers are chemicals that favorably react with hydrogen sulfide gas to eliminate it and produce environmental friendly products. These products depend on the type and composition of the scavenger and the conditions at which the reaction takes place. The scavenger should be widely available and economical for industry acceptance by having a low unit cost. The optimum values of H2S scavenger injection dose rate of scavenging hydrogen sulfide from the multiphase fluid produced at different wells conditions in one of the Petroleum Companies in Egypt were studied. The optimum values of H2S scavenger injection dose rate depend on pipe diameter, pipe length, gas molar mass velocity, inlet H2S concentration and pressure. The optimization results are obtained for different values of these parameters using the software program Lingo. In general, the optimum values of H2S scavenger injection dose rate of the scavenging of hydrogen sulfide are increased by increasing of the pipe diameter and increasing the inlet H2S concentration, and decreased by increasing the pipe length, gas molar mass velocity and pressure.

  8. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  9. Hydrogen Generation from Ammonia Borane and Water Through the Combustion Reactions with Mechanically Alloyed Al/Mg Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-11

    Mostly all hydrogen (around 95%) is produced from natural gas. Steam at high temperatures (700 C to 1000 C) is used to split methane to carbon... catalysts have been studied. Ruthenium catalysts are the most commonly used, which allows 80% conversion of NH3 to hydrogen at 673 K. Ammonia could be...Different catalysts have been added to the reaction such as Pt-LiCoO2 which is the most promising catalyst for this reaction. Hydrogen generation from the

  10. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-08

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal

  11. Multi-Generation Concentrating Solar-Hydrogen Power System for Sustainable Rural Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krothapalli, A.; Greska, B.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes an energy system that is designed to meet the demands of rural populations that currently have no access to grid-connected electricity. Besides electricity, it is well recognized that rural populations need at least a centralized refrigeration system for storage of medicines and other emergency supplies, as well as safe drinking water. Here we propose a district system that will employ a multi-generation concentrated solar power (CSP) system that will generate electricity and supply the heat needed for both absorption refrigeration and membrane distillation (MD) water purification. The electricity will be used to generate hydrogen through highly efficient water electrolysis and individual households can use the hydrogen for generating electricity, via affordable proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, and as a fuel for cooking. The multi-generation system is being developed such that its components will be easy to manufacture and maintain. As a result, these components will be less efficient than their typical counterparts but their low cost-to-efficiency ratio will allow for us to meet our installation cost goal of $1/Watt for the entire system. The objective of this paper is to introduce the system concept and discuss the system components that are currently under development. (auth)

  12. Hydrogen Generation Through Renewable Energy Sources at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony; Prokopius, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    An evaluation of the potential for generating high pressure, high purity hydrogen at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) was performed. This evaluation was based on producing hydrogen utilizing a prototype Hamilton Standard electrolyzer that is capable of producing hydrogen at 3000 psi. The present state of the electrolyzer system was determined to identify the refurbishment requirements. The power for operating the electrolyzer would be produced through renewable power sources. Both wind and solar were considered in the analysis. The solar power production capability was based on the existing solar array field located at NASA GRC. The refurbishment and upgrade potential of the array field was determined and the array output was analyzed with various levels of upgrades throughout the year. The total available monthly and yearly energy from the array was determined. A wind turbine was also sized for operation. This sizing evaluated the wind potential at the site and produced an operational design point for the wind turbine. Commercially available wind turbines were evaluated to determine their applicability to this site. The system installation and power integration were also addressed. This included items such as housing the electrolyzer, power management, water supply, gas storage, cooling and hydrogen dispensing.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN THE R AND P REACTOR VESSELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2010-05-24

    operations in the R-reactor vessel is low for the Portland cement. Alternatively, if the grout fill rate is less than 0.5 inch/min and the grout is maintained at a temperature of 80 C, the risk is again low. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the potential for hydrogen evolution. (1) Minimize the temperature of the grout as much as practical. Lower temperatures will mean lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, grout temperatures less than 100 C should provide an adequate safety margin for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout formulations. For R-reactor, grout temperatures less than 70 C or 80 C will provide an adequate safety margin for the Portland cement. The other grout formulations are also viable options for R-reactor. (2) Minimize the grout fill rate as much as practical. Lowering the fill rate takes advantage of passivation of the aluminum components and hence lower hydrogen generation rates. For P-reactor, fill rates that are less than 2 inches/min for the ceramicrete and the silica fume grouts will reduce the chance of significant hydrogen accumulation. For R-reactor, fill rates less than 1 inch/min will again minimize the risk of hydrogen accumulation. (3) Ventilate the building as much as practical (e.g., leave doors open) to further disperse hydrogen. The volumetric hydrogen generation rates in the P-reactor vessel, however, are low for the pH 8 and pH 10.4 grout, (i.e., less than 0.97 ft{sup 3}/min). If further walk-down inspections of the reactor vessels suggest an increase in the actual areal density of aluminum, the calculations should be re-visited.

  14. Superefficient thin film multilayer catalyst for generating hydrogen from sodium borohydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Lunghao [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0427 (United States); Ceccato, R. [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Raj, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0427 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    A multilayer catalyst consisting of a electrophoretically deposited thin film of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a substrate of carbon fibers, followed by a coating of polymer-derived silicon carbonitride (SiCN), which is then decorated with a monolayer of transition metals is shown to perform at the upperbound of the phenomemological prediction from an earlier work. A figure-of-merit for first order kinetics is equal to 4600 L min{sup -1}[NaBH{sub 4}]{sup -1}g{sub met}{sup -1}, which is nearly 30 times the value reported in literature, is achieved. This high FOM is attributed to the CNT-thin film, as opposed to the thick CNT-paper used in previous work, thus needing merely 0.15 wt% quantities of precious metals for effective catalysis. This new architecture corroborates the concepts that: (i) the catalytic activity derives mainly from the surface of the CNT substrate, and (ii) the silicon carbonitride interlayer is instrumental in dispersing the transition metals into a monolayer. The hydrogen generation rate (HGR) for zero order kinetics, which is obtained when [NaBH{sub 4}]> 0.03 M, is measured to be 75 L min{sup -1}g{sub met}{sup -1}, which is among the higher values reported in the literature. The present multilayer catalysts are able to perform without fading for many cycles, presumably because the bondings in the substrate are predominantly covalent. This feature adds further uniqueness to this multilayer catalyst. (author)

  15. Photoelectrochemical generation of hydrogen and electricity from hydrazine hydrate using BiVO4 electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilli, Satyananda Kishore; Summers, Kodi; Chidambaram, Dev

    2015-06-07

    This study demonstrates solar driven oxidation of hydrazine hydrate and the simultaneous production of hydrogen and electricity in photoelectrochemical cells and photofuel cells, respectively, using a visible light active molybdenum doped BiVO4 photoelectrode. The developed photoelectrodes exhibited tremendous efficiency towards anodic oxidation of hydrous hydrazine with continuous and stable hydrogen evolution at the Pt cathode under benign pH and zero bias conditions. Significantly, the photofuel cell containing hydrazine hydrate fuel has generated electricity with a high open circuit potential of 0.8 V. The presence of bicarbonate ions in the electrolyte has played a significant role in enhancing the kinetics of photoelectrochemical oxidation of hydrazine and improved the hydrogen and electricity generation efficiency thus avoiding the integration of an oxidation electrocatalyst. In addition, molybdenum doped BiVO4 as a possible photoelectrochemical hydrazine sensor has been investigated and the electrode photocurrent was found to be linearly dependent on the concentration of the hydrazine hydrate in the range of 20-90 mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9936.

  16. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride Terrain...

  17. Carbon quantum dots coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Feng; Shen, Mingrong; Fang, Liang, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Thin Films, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-based Functional Materials and Devices, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Wang, Junling [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-04-13

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opal (io-BiVO{sub 4}) structure that shows dramatic improvement of photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation has been fabricated using electrodeposition with a template. The io-BiVO{sub 4} maximizes photon trapping through slow light effect, while maintaining adequate surface area for effective redox reactions. CQDs are then incorporated to the io-BiVO{sub 4} to further improve the photoconversion efficiency. Due to the strong visible light absorption property of CQDs and enhanced separation of the photoexcited electrons, the CQDs coated io-BiVO{sub 4} exhibit a maximum photo-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 0.35%, which is 6 times higher than that of the pure BiVO{sub 4} thin films. This work is a good example of designing composite photoelectrode by combining quantum dots and photonic crystal.

  18. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  19. [Russian oxygen generation system "Elektron-VM": hydrogen content in electrolytically produced oxygen for breathing by International Space Station crews].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshkin, V Yu; Kurmazenko, E A

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the particulars of hydrogen content in electrolysis oxygen produced aboard the ISS Russian segment by oxygen generator "Elektron-VM" (SGK) for crew breathing. Hydrogen content was estimated as in the course of SGK operation in the ISS RS, so during the ground life tests. According to the investigation of hydrogen sources, the primary path of H2 appearance in oxygen is its diffusion through the porous diaphragm separating the electrolytic-cell cathode and anode chambers. Effectiveness of hydrogen oxidation in the SGK reheating unit was evaluated.

  20. Generation rate of carbon monoxide from CO2 arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Jun

    2013-01-01

    CO poisoning has been a serious industrial hazard in Japanese workplaces. Although incomplete combustion is the major cause of CO generation, there is a risk of CO poisoning during some welding operations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the generation rate of CO from CO2 arc welding under controlled laboratory conditions and estimate the ventilation requirements for the prevention of CO poisoning. Bead on plate welding was carried out with an automatic welding robot on a rolled steel base metal under several conditions. The concentration of emitted CO from the welding was measured by a real-time CO monitor in a well-ventilated laboratory that was free from ambient CO contamination. The generation rate of CO was obtained from the three measurements-the flow rate of the welding exhaust gas, CO concentration in the exhaust gas and the arcing time. Then the ventilation requirement to prevent CO poisoning was calculated. The generation rate of CO was found to be 386-883 ml/min with a solid wire and 331-1,293 ml/min with a flux cored wire respectively. It was found that the CO concentration in a room would be maintained theoretically below the OSHA PEL (50 ppm) providing the ventilation rate in the room was 6.6-25.9 m3/min. The actual ventilation requirement was then estimated to be 6.6-259 m3/min considering incomplete mixing. In order to prevent CO poisoning, some countermeasures against gaseous emission as well as welding fumes should be taken eagerly.

  1. Highly Efficient Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Generation Using Zn(x)Bi2S(3+x) Sensitized Platelike WO₃ Photoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Canjun; Yang, Yahui; Li, Wenzhang; Li, Jie; Li, Yaomin; Shi, Qilin; Chen, Qiyuan

    2015-05-27

    Zn(x)Bi2S(3+x) sensitized platelike WO3 photoelectrodes on FTO substrates were for the first time prepared via a sequential ionic layer adsorption reaction (SILAR) process. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet visible spectrometry (UV-vis), and Raman spectra. The results show that the ZnxBi2S3+x quantum dots (QDs) are uniformly coated on the entire surface of WO3 plates, forming a WO3/Zn(x)Bi2S(3+x) core/shell structure. The Zn(x)Bi2S(3+x)/WO3 films show a superior ability to capture visible light. High-efficiency photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen generation is demonstrated using the prepared electrodes as photoanodes in a typical three-electrode electrochemical cell. Compared to the Bi2S3/WO3 photoelectrodes, the Zn(x)Bi2S(3+x)/WO3 photoelectrodes exhibit good photostability and excellent PEC activity, and the photocurrent density is up to 7.0 mA cm(-2) at -0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl under visible light illumination. Investigation of the electron transport properties of the photoelectrodes shows that the introduction of ZnS enhances the photoelectrons' transport rate in the photoelectrode. The high PEC activity demonstrates the potential of the Zn(x)Bi2S(3+x)/WO3 film as an efficient photoelectrode for hydrogen generation.

  2. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  3. Estimates of Optimal Operating Conditions for Hydrogen-Oxygen Cesium-Seeded Magnetohydrodynamic Power Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. M.; Nichols, L. D.

    1977-01-01

    The value of percent seed, oxygen to fuel ratio, combustion pressure, Mach number, and magnetic field strength which maximize either the electrical conductivity or power density at the entrance of an MHD power generator was obtained. The working fluid is the combustion product of H2 and O2 seeded with CsOH. The ideal theoretical segmented Faraday generator along with an empirical form found from correlating the data of many experimenters working with generators of different sizes, electrode configurations, and working fluids, are investigated. The conductivity and power densities optimize at a seed fraction of 3.5 mole percent and an oxygen to hydrogen weight ratio of 7.5. The optimum values of combustion pressure and Mach number depend on the operating magnetic field strength.

  4. Comparison of hydrogen production and electrical power generation for energy capture in closed-loop ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis systems

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is an enormous amount of energy available from salinity gradients, which could be used for clean hydrogen production. Through the use of a favorable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) cathode, the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis (RED) system approached 78 W h m-3. However, if RED is operated with the less favorable (higher overpotential) hydrogen evolution electrode and hydrogen gas is harvested, the energy recovered increases by as much ∼1.5× to 118 W h m-3. Indirect hydrogen production through coupling an RED stack with an external electrolysis system was only projected to achieve 35 W h m-3 or ∼1/3 of that produced through direct hydrogen generation.

  5. Comparison of hydrogen production and electrical power generation for energy capture in closed-loop ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzell, Marta C; Ivanov, Ivan; Cusick, Roland D; Zhu, Xiuping; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-28

    Currently, there is an enormous amount of energy available from salinity gradients, which could be used for clean hydrogen production. Through the use of a favorable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) cathode, the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis (RED) system approached 78 W h m(-3). However, if RED is operated with the less favorable (higher overpotential) hydrogen evolution electrode and hydrogen gas is harvested, the energy recovered increases by as much ~1.5× to 118 W h m(-3). Indirect hydrogen production through coupling an RED stack with an external electrolysis system was only projected to achieve 35 W h m(-3) or ~1/3 of that produced through direct hydrogen generation.

  6. Enhanced hydrogen generation using a saline catholyte in a two chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2011-11-01

    High rates of hydrogen gas production were achieved in a two chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) without a catholyte phosphate buffer by using a saline catholyte solution and a cathode constructed around a stainless steel mesh current collector. Using the non-buffered salt solution (68 mM NaCl) produced the highest current density of 131 ± 12 A/m3, hydrogen yield of 3.2 ± 0.3 mol H2/mol acetate, and gas production rate of 1.6 ± 0.2 m3 H2/m 3·d, compared to MECs with catholytes externally sparged with CO2 or containing a phosphate buffer. The salinity of the catholyte achieved a high solution conductivity, and therefore the electrode spacing did not appreciably affect performance. The coulombic efficiency with the cathode placed near the membrane separating the chambers was 83 ± 4%, similar to that obtained with the cathode placed more distant from the membrane (84 ± 4%). Using a carbon cloth cathode instead of the stainless steel mesh cathode did not significantly affect performance, with all reactor configurations producing similar performance in terms of total gas volume, COD removal, rcat and overall energy recovery. These results show MEC performance can be improved by using a saline catholyte without pH control. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydrogen sulfide generation in simulated construction and demolition debris landfills: impact of waste composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kenton; Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy G; Chadik, Paul; Bitton, Gabriel; Booth, Matthew

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation in construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills has been associated with the biodegradation of gypsum drywall. Laboratory research was conducted to observe H2S generation when drywall was codisposed with different C&D debris constituents. Two experiments were conducted using simulated landfill columns. Experiment 1 consisted of various combinations of drywall, wood, and concrete to determine the impact of different waste constituents and combinations on H2S generation. Experiment 2 was designed to examine the effect of concrete on H2S generation and migration. The results indicate that decaying drywall, even alone, leached enough sulfate ions and organic matter for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to generate large H2S concentrations as high as 63,000 ppmv. The codisposed wastes show some effect on H2S generation. At the end of experiment 1, the wood/drywall and drywall alone columns possessed H2S concentrations > 40,000 ppmv. Conversely, H2S concentrations were < 1 ppmv in those columns containing concrete. Concrete plays a role in decreasing H2S by increasing pH out of the range for SRB growth and by reacting with H2S. This study also showed that wood lowered H2S concentrations initially by decreasing leachate pH values. Based on the results, two possible control mechanisms to mitigate H2S generation in C&D debris landfills are suggested.

  8. Slow Strain Rate Testing for Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of Alloy 718 in Substitute Ocean Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCoursiere, M. P.; Aidun, D. K.; Morrison, D. J.

    2017-05-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of near-peak-aged UNS N07718 (Alloy 718) was evaluated by performing slow strain rate tests at room temperature in air and substitute ocean water. Tests in substitute ocean water were accomplished in an environmental cell that enabled in situ cathodic charging under an applied potential of -1.1 V versus SCE. Some specimens were cathodically precharged for 4 or 16 weeks at the same potential in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl-distilled water solution at 50 °C. Unprecharged specimens tested in substitute ocean water exhibited only moderate embrittlement with plastic strain to failure decreasing by about 20% compared to unprecharged specimens tested in air. However, precharged specimens exhibited significant embrittlement with plastic strain to failure decreasing by about 70%. Test environment (air or substitute ocean water with in situ charging) and precharge time (4 or 16 weeks) had little effect on the results of the precharged specimens. Fracture surfaces of precharged specimens were typical of hydrogen embrittlement and consisted of an outer brittle ring related to the region in which hydrogen infused during precharging, a finely dimpled transition zone probably related to the region where hydrogen was drawn in by dislocation transport, and a central highly dimpled ductile region. Fracture surfaces of unprecharged specimens tested in substitute ocean water consisted of a finely dimpled outer ring and heavily dimpled central region typical of ductile fracture.

  9. Muon molecular formation and transfer rate in solid hydrogen-deuterium mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Mulhauser, F. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility; Fujiwara, M.C. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria); Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Martoff, C.J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Wozniak, J. [Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Technology

    1996-10-01

    In an experiment at TRIUMF to study muon-catalyzed fusion and associated atomic and molecular effects, negative muons were stopped in a solid protium hydrogen layer containing a small amount of deuterium. Most of the resulting {mu}H atoms disappeared by formation of HH{mu} molecules or by muon transfer to a deuteron. The {mu}D can drift almost freely through the hydrogen layer due to the Ramsauer-Townsend effect and may even leave the layer. If a thin neon layer is frozen atop the hydrogen, the exiting muonic atoms will very rapidly release their muon to a neon atom. The analysis of the time structure of the neon X-rays is used to determine the rates of the slower processes involved in the evolution of the {mu}H. This analysis has been performed with the help of Monte Carlo calculations, which simulate the kinetics of both {mu}H and {mu}D atoms in the hydrogen mixtures. (orig.). 23 refs.

  10. Final Technical Report for GO15056 Millennium Cell: Development of an Advanced Chemical Hydrogen Storage and Generation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Oscar [Millennium Cell Inc., Eatontown, NJ (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The objectives of this project are to increase system storage capacity by improving hydrogen generation from concentrated sodium borohydride, with emphasis on reactor and system engineering; to complete a conceptual system design based on sodium borohydride that will include key technology improvements to enable a hydrogen fuel system that will meet the systembased storage capacity of 1.2 kWh/L (36 g H2/L) and 1.5 kWh/kg (45 g H2/kg), by the end of FY 2007; and to utilize engineering expertise to guide Center research in both off-board chemical hydride regeneration and on-board hydrogen generation systems.

  11. Analysis and design of an ultrahigh temperature hydrogen-fueled MHD generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moder, Jeffrey P.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Kaminski, Deborah A.

    1993-01-01

    A coupled gas dynamics/radiative heat transfer analysis of partially ionized hydrogen, in local thermodynamic equilibrium, flowing through an ultrahigh temperature (10,000-20,000 K) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is performed. Gas dynamics are modeled by a set of quasi-one-dimensional, nonlinear differential equations which account for friction, convective and radiative heat transfer, and the interaction between the ionized gas and applied magnetic field. Radiative heat transfer is modeled using nongray, absorbing-emitting 2D and 3D P-1 approximations which permit an arbitrary variation of the spectral absorption coefficient with frequency. Gas dynamics and radiative heat transfer are coupled through the energy equation and through the temperature- and density-dependent absorption coefficient. The resulting nonlinear elliptic problem is solved by iterative methods. Design of such MHD generators as onboard, open-cycle, electric power supplies for a particular advanced airbreathing propulsion concept produced an efficient and compact 128-MWe generator characterized by an extraction ratio of 35.5 percent, a power density of 10,500 MWe/cu m, and a specific (extracted) energy of 324 MJe/kg of hydrogen. The maximum wall heat flux and total wall heat load were 453 MW/sq m and 62 MW, respectively.

  12. Possibly scalable solar hydrogen generation with quasi-artificial leaf approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Kshirodra Kumar; Bhuskute, Bela D; Gopinath, Chinnakonda S

    2017-07-26

    Any solar energy harvesting technology must provide a net positive energy balance, and artificial leaf concept provided a platform for solar water splitting (SWS) towards that. However, device stability, high photocurrent generation, and scalability are the major challenges. A wireless device based on quasi-artificial leaf concept (QuAL), comprising Au on porous TiO2 electrode sensitized by PbS and CdS quantum dots (QD), was demonstrated to show sustainable solar hydrogen (490 ± 25 µmol/h (corresponds to 12 ml H2 h-1) from ~2 mg of photoanode material coated over 1 cm2 area with aqueous hole (S2-/SO32-) scavenger. A linear extrapolation of the above results could lead to hydrogen production of 6 L/h.g over an area of ~23 × 23 cm2. Under one sun conditions, 4.3 mA/cm2 photocurrent generation, 5.6% power conversion efficiency, and spontaneous H2 generation were observed at no applied potential (see S1). A direct coupling of all components within themselves enhances the light absorption in the entire visible and NIR region and charge utilization. Thin film approach, as in DSSC, combined with porous titania enables networking of all the components of the device, and efficiently converts solar to chemical energy in a sustainable manner.

  13. Effective regimes of runaway electron beam generation in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Shut'ko, Yu. V.

    2010-04-01

    Runaway electron beam parameters and current-voltage characteristics of discharge in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at pressures in the range of several Torr to several hundred Torr have been studied. It is found that the maximum amplitudes of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) with a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps are achieved in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at a pressure of ˜60, ˜30, and ˜10 Torr, respectively. It is shown that, as the gas pressure is increased in the indicated range, the breakdown voltage of the gas-filled gap decreases, which leads to a decrease in the SAEB current amplitude. At pressures of helium within 20-60 Torr, hydrogen within 10-30 Torr, and nitrogen within 3-10 Torr, the regime of the runaway electron beam generation changes and, by varying the pressure in the gas-filled diode in the indicated intervals, it is possible to smoothly control the current pulse duration (FWHM) from ˜100 to ˜500 ps, while the beam current amplitude increases by a factor of 1.5-3.

  14. Hydrogen Generation from Biomass-Derived Surgar Alcohols via the Aqueous-Phase Carbohydrate Reforming (ACR) Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randy Cortright

    2006-06-30

    This project involved the investigation and development of catalysts and reactor systems that will be cost-effective to generate hydrogen from potential sorbitol streams. The intention was to identify the required catalysts and reactors systems as well as the design, construction, and operation of a 300 grams per hour hydrogen system. Virent was able to accomplish this objective with a system that generates 2.2 kgs an hour of gas containing both hydrogen and alkanes that relied directly on the work performed under this grant. This system, funded in part by the local Madison utility, Madison, Gas & Electric (MGE), is described further in the report. The design and development of this system should provide the necessary scale-up information for the generation of hydrogen from corn-derived sorbitol.

  15. Locating the rate-limiting step for the interaction of hydrogen with Mg(0001) using density-functional theory calculations and rate theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs

    2004-01-01

    the nudged elastic band method, and rates of the activated processes are calculated within the harmonic approximation to transition state rate theory, using both classical and quantum partition functions based atomic vibrational frequencies calculated by DFT. The dissociation/recombination of H2 is found......The dissociation of molecular hydrogen on a Mgs0001d surface and the subsequent diffusion of atomic hydrogen into the magnesium substrate is investigated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and rate theory. The minimum energy path and corresponding transition states are located using...... to be rate-limiting for the ab- and desorption of hydrogen, respectively. Zero-point energy contributions are found to be substantial for the diffusion of atomic hydrogen, but classical rates are still found to be within an order of magnitude at room temperature....

  16. Hydrogen Recombination Rates of Plate-type Passive Auto-catalytic Recombiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongtae; Hong, Seong-Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gun Hong [Kyungwon E-C Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The hydrogen mitigation system may include igniters, passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR), and venting or dilution system. Recently PAR is commonly used as a main component of HMS in a NPP containment because of its passive nature. PARs are categorized by the shape and material of catalytic surface. Catalytic surface coated by platinum is mostly used for the hydrogen recombiners. The shapes of the catalytic surface can be grouped into plate type, honeycomb type and porous media type. Among them, the plate-type PAR is well tested by many experiments. PAR performance analysis can be approached by a multi-scale method which is composed of micro, meso and macro scales. The criterion of the scaling is the ratio of thickness of boundary layer developed on a catalytic surface to representative length of a computational domain. Mass diffusion in the boundary layer must be resolved in the micro scale analysis. In a lumped parameter (LP) analysis using a system code such as MAAP or MELCOR, the chamber of the PAR is much smaller than a computational node. The hydrogen depletion by a PAR is modeled as a source of mass and energy conservation equations. Te catalytic surface reaction of hydrogen must be modeled by a volume-averaged correlation. In this study, a micro scale analysis method is developed using libraries in OpenFOAM to evaluate a hydrogen depletion rate depending on parameters such as size and number of plates and plate arrangement. The analysis code is validated by simulating REKO-3 experiment. And hydrogen depletion analysis is conducted by changing the plate arrangement as a trial of the performance enhancement of a PAR. In this study, a numerical code for an analysis of a PAR performance in a micro scale has been developed by using OpenFOAM libraries. The physical and numerical models were validated by simulating the REKO-3 experiment. As a try to enhance the performance of the plate-type PAR, it was proposed to apply a staggered two-layer arrangement of the

  17. Hydrogen generation due to water splitting on Si - terminated 4H-Sic(0001) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingfang; Li, Qiqi; Yang, Cuihong; Rao, Weifeng

    2018-02-01

    The chemical reactions of hydrogen gas generation via water splitting on Si-terminated 4H-SiC surfaces with or without C/Si vacancies were studied by using first-principles. We studied the reaction mechanisms of hydrogen generation on the 4H-SiC(0001) surface. Our calculations demonstrate that there are major rearrangements in surface when H2O approaches the SiC(0001) surface. The first H splitting from water can occur with ground-state electronic structures. The second H splitting involves an energy barrier of 0.65 eV. However, the energy barrier for two H atoms desorbing from the Si-face and forming H2 gas is 3.04 eV. In addition, it is found that C and Si vacancies can form easier in SiC(0001)surfaces than in SiC bulk and nanoribbons. The C/Si vacancies introduced can enhance photocatalytic activities. It is easier to split OH on SiC(0001) surface with vacancies compared to the case of clean SiC surface. H2 can form on the 4H-SiC(0001) surface with C and Si vacancies if the energy barriers of 1.02 and 2.28 eV are surmounted, respectively. Therefore, SiC(0001) surface with C vacancy has potential applications in photocatalytic water-splitting.

  18. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Co-Ru Alloy Particle Catalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Sodium Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kurtinaitienė

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of μm and sub-μm-sized Co, Ru, and Co-Ru alloy species by hydrothermal approach in the aqueous alkaline solutions (pH ≥ 13 containing CoCl2 and/or RuCl3, sodium citrate, and hydrazine hydrate and a study of their catalytic properties for hydrogen generation by hydrolysis of sodium borohydride solution. This way provides a simple platform for fabrication of the ball-shaped Co-Ru alloy catalysts containing up to 12 wt% Ru. Note that bimetallic Co-Ru alloy bowls containing even 7 at.% Ru have demonstrated catalytic properties that are comparable with the ones of pure Ru particles fabricated by the same method. This result is of great importance in view of the preparation of cost-efficient catalysts for hydrogen generation from borohydrides. The morphology and composition of fabricated catalyst particles have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of K-Ta Mixed Oxides for Hydrogen Generation in Photocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Zielińska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available K-Ta mixed oxides photocatalysts have been prepared by impregnation followed by calcination. The influence of the reaction temperature (450°C–900°C on the phase formation, crystal morphology, and photocatalytic activity in hydrogen generation of the produced materials was investigated. The detailed analysis has revealed that all products exhibit high crystallinity and irregular structure. Moreover, two different crystal structures of potassium tantalates such as KTaO3 and K2Ta4O11 were obtained. It was also found that the sample composed of KTaO3 and traces of unreacted Ta2O5 (annealed at 600°C exhibits the highest activity in the reaction of photocatalytic hydrogen generation. The crystallographic phases, optical and vibronic properties were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD and diffuse reflectance (DR UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic methods, respectively. Morphology and chemical composition of the produced samples were studied using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX as its mode.

  20. Neutron Scattering in Hydrogenous Moderators, Studied by Time Dependent Reaction Rate Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, L.G.; Moeller, E.; Purohit, S.N.

    1966-03-15

    The moderation and absorption of a neutron burst in water, poisoned with the non-1/v absorbers cadmium and gadolinium, has been followed on the time scale by multigroup calculations, using scattering kernels for the proton gas and the Nelkin model. The time dependent reaction rate curves for each absorber display clear differences for the two models, and the separation between the curves does not depend much on the absorber concentration. An experimental method for the measurement of infinite medium reaction rate curves in a limited geometry has been investigated. This method makes the measurement of the time dependent reaction rate generally useful for thermalization studies in a small geometry of a liquid hydrogenous moderator, provided that the experiment is coupled to programs for the calculation of scattering kernels and time dependent neutron spectra. Good agreement has been found between the reaction rate curve, measured with cadmium in water, and a calculated curve, where the Haywood kernel has been used.

  1. Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.C.; Funk, J.F.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-12-15

    OAK B188 Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process, nor is such a process available for commercialization. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Fossil fuels are polluting and carbon dioxide emissions from their combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. Almost 800 literature references were located which pertain to thermochemical production of hydrogen from water and over 100 thermochemical watersplitting cycles were examined. Using defined criteria and quantifiable metrics, 25 cycles have been selected for more detailed study.

  2. Rate Structures for Customers With Onsite Generation: Practice and Innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, L.; Takahashi, K.; Weston, F.; Murray, C.

    2005-12-01

    Recognizing that innovation and good public policy do not always proclaim themselves, Synapse Energy Economics and the Regulatory Assistance Project, under a contract with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), undertook a survey of state policies on rates for partial-requirements customers with onsite distributed generation. The survey investigated a dozen or so states. These varied in geography and the structures of their electric industries. By reviewing regulatory proceedings, tariffs, publications, and interviews, the researchers identified a number of approaches to standby and associated rates--many promising but some that are perhaps not--that deserve policymakers' attention if they are to promote the deployment of cost-effective DG in their states.

  3. The use of renewable energy in the form of methane via electrolytic hydrogen generation using carbon dioxide as the feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kumagai, Naokazu; Izumiya, Koichi; Takano, Hiroyuki; Shinomiya, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Yusuke; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Kato, Zenta

    2016-12-01

    The history reveals the continuous increase in world energy consumption and carbon emissions. For prevention of intolerable global warming and complete exhaustion of fossil fuels we need complete conversion from fossil fuel consumption to renewable energy. We have been performing the research and development of global carbon dioxide recycling for more than 25 years to supply renewable energy to the world in the form of methane produced by the reaction of carbon dioxide captured from chimney with hydrogen generated electrolytically using electricity generated by renewable energy. We created the cathode and anode for electrolytic hydrogen generation and the catalyst for carbon dioxide methanation by the reaction with hydrogen. The methane formation from renewable energy will be the most convenient and efficient key technology for the use of renewable energy by storage of intermittent and fluctuating electricity generated from renewable energy and by regeneration of stable electricity. Domestic and international cooperation of companies for industrialization is in progress.

  4. Air-stable hydrogen generation materials and enhanced hydrolysis performance of MgH2-LiNH2 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Miaolian; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Liu, Jiangwen; Wang, Hui; Shao, Huaiyu; Zhu, Min

    2017-08-01

    Hydrolysis of materials in water can be a promising solution of onsite hydrogen generation for realization of hydrogen economy. In this work, it was the first time that the MgH2-LiNH2 composites were explored as air-stable hydrolysis system for hydrogen generation. The MgH2-LiNH2 composites with different composition ratios were synthesized by ball milling with various durations and the hydrogen generation performances of the composite samples were investigated and compared. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques were adopted to elucidate the performance improvement mechanisms. The hydrolysis properties of MgH2 were found to be significantly enhanced by the introduction of LiNH2. The 4MgH2-LiNH2 composite ball milled for 5 h can generate 887.2 mL g-1 hydrogen in 1 min and 1016 mL g-1 in 50 min, one of the best results so far for Mg based hydrolysis materials. The LiOH·H2O and NH4OH phases of hydrolysis products from LiNH2 may prevent formation of Mg(OH)2 passivation layer on the surface and supply enough channels for hydrolysis of MgH2. The MgH2-LiNH2 composites appeared to be very stable in air and no obvious negative effect on kinetics and hydrogen generation yield was observed. These good performances demonstrate that the studied MgH2-LiNH2 composites can be a promising and practicable hydrogen generation system.

  5. Optimization of an electrode made from CdS-ZnO nanorods for hydrogen generation from photoelectrochemical splitting of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieu Hoang, Nhat; Nghia Nguyen, Van; Thuy Doan, Minh

    2017-06-01

    Array structures of CdS-sensitized ZnO nanorods (NRs) were fabricated on conducting substrates of indium tin oxide (ITO) that serve as working electrodes in photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells for the generation of hydrogen by splitting of water. The ZnO NRs were synthesized by the hydrothermal method at low temperature with different growth times; structures of CdS-sensitized ZnO NRs were created by the dipping method with various dipping times to optimize the efficiency of splitting water. It was found that maximum photoconversion efficiency of an electrode made from CdS-sensitized ZnO NRs with a growth time of 3 h and a dipping time of 30 min under simulated solar irradiation of 100 mW cm-2 was about 2.7%. The rate of evolution of H2 gas generated from the water-splitting process was also measured. A maximum rate of 22 ml cm-2 was achieved after 1 h exposure, which is higher than with CdS-ZnO NR electrodes in previous studies.

  6. Modeling the Effect of Finite-Rate Hydrogen Diffusion on Porosity Formation in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kent D.; Lin, Zhiping; Beckermann, Christoph

    2007-08-01

    A volume-averaged model for finite-rate diffusion of hydrogen in the melt is developed to predict pore formation during the solidification of aluminum alloys. The calculation of the micro-/macro-scale gas species transport in the melt is coupled with a model for the feeding flow and pressure field. The rate of pore growth is shown to be proportional to the local level of gas supersaturation in the melt, as well as various microstructural parameters. Parametric studies of one-dimensional solidification under an imposed temperature gradient and cooling rate illustrate that the model captures important phenomena observed in porosity formation in aluminum alloys. The transition from gas to shrinkage dominated porosity and the effects of different solubilities of hydrogen in the eutectic solid, capillary pressures at pore nucleation, and pore number densities are investigated in detail. Comparisons between predicted porosity percentages and previous experimental measurements show good correspondence, although some uncertainties remain regarding the extent of impingement of solid on the pores.

  7. Radiolytic and thermolytic bubble gas hydrogen composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodham, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-12-11

    This report describes the development of a mathematical model for the estimation of the hydrogen composition of gas bubbles trapped in radioactive waste. The model described herein uses a material balance approach to accurately incorporate the rates of hydrogen generation by a number of physical phenomena and scale the aforementioned rates in a manner that allows calculation of the final hydrogen composition.

  8. Generating Fast and Accurate Compliance Reports for Various Data Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penugonda, Srinath

    As the demands on the industry data rates have increased there is a need for interoperable interfaces to function flawlessly. Added to this complexity, the number of I/O data lines are also increasing making it more time consuming to design and test. This in general leads to creating of compliance standards to which interfaces must adhere. The goal of this theses is to aid the Signal Integrity Engineers with a better and fast way of rendering a full picture of the interface compliance parameters. Three different interfaces at various data rates were chosen. They are: 25Gbps Very Short Reach (VSR) based on Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF), Mobile Industry Processer Interface (MIPI) particularly for camera based on MIPI Alliance organization upto 1.5Gbps and for a passive Universal Serial Bus (USB) Type-C cable based on USB organization particularly for generation-I with data rate of 10Gbps. After a full understanding of each of the interfaces, a complete end-to-end reports for each of the interfaces were developed with an easy to use user interface. A standard one-to-one comparison is done with commercially available software tools for the above mentioned interfaces. The tools were developed in MATLAB and Python. Data was usually obtained by probing at interconnect, from either an oscilloscope or vector network analyzer.

  9. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, W. A.; Hysell, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  10. Hydrogen generation from decomposition of hydrous hydrazine over Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Dai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of highly active and selective catalysts is the central issue in the development of hydrous hydrazine (N2H4·H2O as a viable hydrogen carrier. Herein, we report the synthesis of bimetallic Ni-Ir nanocatalyts supported on CeO2 using a one-pot coprecipitation method. A combination of XRD, HRTEM and XPS analyses indicate that the Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst is composed of tiny Ni-Ir alloy nanoparticles with an average size of around 4 nm and crystalline CeO2 matrix. The Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst exhibits high catalytic activity and excellent selectivity towards hydrogen generation from N2H4·H2O at mild temperatures. Furthermore, in contrast to previously reported Ni-Pt catalysts, the Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst shows an alleviated requirement on alkali promoter to achieve its optimal catalytic performance.

  11. Efficiency Evaluation of a Photovoltaic System Simultaneously Generating Solar Electricity and Hydrogen for Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abermann S.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The direct combination of a photovoltaic system with an energy storage component appears desirable since it produces and stores electrical energy simultaneously, enabling it to compensate power generation fluctuations and supply sufficient energy during low- or non-irradiation periods. A novel concept based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H triple-junction solar cells, as for example a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H, and a solar water splitting system integrating a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM electrolyser is presented. The thin film layer-by-layer concept allows large-area module fabrication applicable to buildings, and exhibits strong cost-reduction potential as compared to similar concepts. The evaluation shows that it is possible to achieve a sufficient voltage of greater than 1.5 V for effective water splitting with the a-Si based solar cell. Nevertheless, in the case of grid-connection, the actual energy production cost for hydrogen storage by the proposed system is currently too high.

  12. Efficiency Evaluation of a Photovoltaic System Simultaneously Generating Solar Electricity and Hydrogen for Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abermann, S.

    2012-10-01

    The direct combination of a photovoltaic system with an energy storage component appears desirable since it produces and stores electrical energy simultaneously, enabling it to compensate power generation fluctuations and supply sufficient energy during low- or non-irradiation periods. A novel concept based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) triple-junction solar cells, as for example a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H, and a solar water splitting system integrating a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) electrolyser is presented. The thin film layer-by-layer concept allows large-area module fabrication applicable to buildings, and exhibits strong cost-reduction potential as compared to similar concepts. The evaluation shows that it is possible to achieve a sufficient voltage of greater than 1.5 V for effective water splitting with the a-Si based solar cell. Nevertheless, in the case of grid-connection, the actual energy production cost for hydrogen storage by the proposed system is currently too high.

  13. Laccase-13 Regulates Seed Setting Rate by Affecting Hydrogen Peroxide Dynamics and Mitochondrial Integrity in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Seed setting rate is one of the most important components of rice grain yield. To date, only several genes regulating setting rate have been identified in plant. In this study, we showed that laccase-13 (OsLAC13, a member of laccase family genes which are known for their roles in modulating phenylpropanoid pathway and secondary lignification in cell wall, exerts a regulatory function in rice seed setting rate. OsLAC13 expressed in anthers and promotes hydrogen peroxide production both in vitro and in the filaments and anther connectives. Knock-out of OsLAC13 showed significantly increased seed setting rate, while overexpression of this gene exhibited induced mitochondrial damage and suppressed sugar transportation in anthers, which in turn affected seed setting rate. OsLAC13 also induced H2O2 production and mitochondrial damage in the root tip cells which caused the lethal phenotype. We also showed that high abundant of OsmiR397, the suppressor of OsLAC13 mRNA, increased the seed setting rate of rice plants, and restrains H2O2 accumulation in roots during oxidative stress. Our results suggested a novel regulatory role of OsLAC13 gene in regulating seed setting rate by affecting H2O2 dynamics and mitochondrial integrity in rice.

  14. Hydrogen production by reforming of liquid hydrocarbons in a membrane reactor for portable power generation-Model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Ashok S.

    One of the most promising technologies for lightweight, compact, portable power generation is proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells, however, require a source of pure hydrogen. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in an integrated membrane reactor has potential to provide pure hydrogen in a compact system. In a membrane reactor process, the thermal energy needed for the endothermic hydrocarbon reforming may be provided by combustion of the membrane reject gas. The energy efficiency of the overall hydrogen generation is maximized by controlling the hydrogen product yield such that the heat value of the membrane reject gas is sufficient to provide all of the heat necessary for the integrated process. Optimization of the system temperature, pressure and operating parameters such as net hydrogen recovery is necessary to realize an efficient integrated membrane reformer suitable for compact portable hydrogen generation. This paper presents results of theoretical model simulations of the integrated membrane reformer concept elucidating the effect of operating parameters on the extent of fuel conversion to hydrogen and hydrogen product yield. Model simulations indicate that the net possible hydrogen product yield is strongly influenced by the efficiency of heat recovery from the combustion of membrane reject gas and from the hot exhaust gases. When butane is used as a fuel, a net hydrogen recovery of 68% of that stoichiometrically possible may be achieved with membrane reformer operation at 600 °C (873 K) temperature and 100 psig (0.791 MPa) pressure provided 90% of available combustion and exhaust gas heat is recovered. Operation at a greater pressure or temperature provides a marginal improvement in the performance whereas operation at a significantly lower temperature or pressure will not be able to achieve the optimal hydrogen yield. Slightly higher, up to 76%, net hydrogen recovery is possible when methanol is used as a fuel due to the lower heat

  15. Acoustically induced optical second harmonic generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    CERN Document Server

    Ebothe, J; Cabarrocas, P R I; Godet, C; Equer, B

    2003-01-01

    Acoustically induced second harmonic generation (AISHG) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si : H) films of different morphology has been observed. We have found that with increasing acoustical power, the optical SHG of Gd : YAB laser light (lambda = 2.03 mu m) increases and reaches its maximum value at an acoustical power density of about 2.10 W cm sup - sup 2. With decreasing temperature, the AISHG signal strongly increases below 48 K and correlates well with the temperature behaviour of differential scanning calorimetry indicating near-surface temperature phase transition. The AISHG maxima were observed at acoustical frequencies of 10-11, 14-16, 20-22 and 23-26 kHz. The independently performed measurements of the acoustically induced IR spectra have shown that the origin of the observed phenomenon is the acoustically induced electron-phonon anharmonicity in samples of different morphology.

  16. Vibrational excitation of hydrogen molecules by two-photon absorption and third-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Hara, Hideaki; Hiraki, Takahiro; Masuda, Takahiko; Sasao, Noboru; Uetake, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2018-01-01

    We report the coherent excitation of the vibrational state of hydrogen molecules by two-photon absorption and the resultant third-harmonic generation (THG). Parahydrogen molecules cooled by liquid nitrogen are irradiated by mid-infrared nanosecond pulses at 4.8 μm with a nearly Fourier-transform-limited linewidth. The first excited vibrational state of parahydrogen is populated by two-photon absorption of the mid-infrared photons. Because of the narrow linewidth of the mid-infrared pulses, coherence between the ground and excited states is sufficient to induce higher-order processes. Near-infrared photons from the THG are observed at 1.6 μm. The dependence of the intensity of the near-infrared radiation on mid-infrared pulse energy, target pressure, and cell length is determined. We used a simple formula for THG with consideration of realistic experimental conditions to explain the observed results.

  17. Silymarin inhibits cisplatin-mediated apoptosis via inhibition of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angkana Tantituvanont

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin mediated nephrotoxicity has been continuously reported and recognized as a major obstacle for cisplatinbased chemotherapy. The present study aimed to demonstrate the potential use of silymarin, an extract from the seed of Silybum marianum L., as a combination therapy with cisplatin. Previous studies indicated that cisplatin-mediated toxicity was primarily caused by cellular oxidative stress. This study found that pretreatment with silymarin significantly attenuated oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in human renal epithelial cells (HK2-cells and protected against cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, the present study demonstrated that silymarin could attenuate hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical generated by cisplatin while having minimal effect on superoxide anion level. In summary, these observation showed significant impact of silymarin in the inhibition of cisplatin-mediated renal cell death in vitro and could be beneficial for the development of this compound as a combination therapy in patients before receiving cisplatin.

  18. Wind Turbine Contingency Control Through Generator De-Rating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan; Goebel, Kai; Balas, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. In that context, systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage to the turbine. Advanced contingency control is one way to enable autonomous decision-making by providing the mechanism to enable safe and efficient turbine operation. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbines with contingency control to balance the trade-offs between maintaining system health and energy capture. The contingency control involves de-rating the generator operating point to achieve reduced loads on the wind turbine. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  19. Generation of hydrogen peroxide from San Joaquin Valley particles in a cell-free solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown a correlation between exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM and adverse health effects. One proposed mechanism of PM-mediated health effects is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS – e.g., superoxide (O2, hydrogen peroxide (HOOH, and hydroxyl radical (OH – followed by oxidative stress. There are very few quantitative, specific measures of individual ROS generated from PM, but this information would help to more quantitatively address the link between ROS and the health effects of PM. To address this gap, we quantified the generation of HOOH by PM collected at an urban (Fresno and rural (Westside site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV of California during summer and winter from 2006 to 2009. HOOH was quantified by HPLC after extracting the PM in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS solution with or without 50 μM ascorbate (Asc. Our results show that the urban PM generally generates much more HOOH than the rural PM but that there is no apparent seasonal difference in HOOH generation. In nearly all of the samples the addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Asc greatly enhances HOOH formation, but a few of the coarse PM samples were able to generate a considerable amount of HOOH in the absence of added Asc, indicating the presence of unknown reductants. Normalized by air volume, the fine PM (PM2.5 generally makes more HOOH than the corresponding coarse PM (PMcf, i.e., 2.5 to 10 μm, primarily because the mass concentration of PM2.5 is much higher than that of PMcf. However, normalized by PM mass, the coarse PM typically generates more HOOH than the fine PM. The amount of HOOH produced by SJV PM is reduced on average by (78 ± 15% when the transition metal chelator desferoxamine (DSF is added to the extraction solution, indicating that transition metals play a dominant role in HOOH

  20. Enhanced Hydrogen Generation Properties of MgH2-Based Hydrides by Breaking the Magnesium Hydroxide Passivation Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuzhang Ouyang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to its relatively low cost, high hydrogen yield, and environmentally friendly hydrolysis byproducts, magnesium hydride (MgH2 appears to be an attractive candidate for hydrogen generation. However, the hydrolysis reaction of MgH2 is rapidly inhibited by the formation of a magnesium hydroxide passivation layer. To improve the hydrolysis properties of MgH2-based hydrides we investigated three different approaches: ball milling, synthesis of MgH2-based composites, and tuning of the solution composition. We demonstrate that the formation of a composite system, such as the MgH2/LaH3 composite, through ball milling and in situ synthesis, can improve the hydrolysis properties of MgH2 in pure water. Furthermore, the addition of Ni to the MgH2/LaH3 composite resulted in the synthesis of LaH3/MgH2/Ni composites. The LaH3/MgH2/Ni composites exhibited a higher hydrolysis rate—120 mL/(g·min of H2 in the first 5 min—than the MgH2/LaH3 composite— 95 mL/(g·min—without the formation of the magnesium hydroxide passivation layer. Moreover, the yield rate was controlled by manipulation of the particle size via ball milling. The hydrolysis of MgH2 was also improved by optimizing the solution. The MgH2 produced 1711.2 mL/g of H2 in 10 min at 298 K in the 27.1% ammonium chloride solution, and the hydrolytic conversion rate reached the value of 99.5%.

  1. Impact of fermentation rate changes on potential hydrogen sulfide concentrations in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzke, Christian E; Park, Seung Kook

    2011-05-01

    The correlation between alcoholic fermentation rate, measured as carbon dioxide (CO2) evolution, and the rate of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) formation during wine production was investigated. Both rates and the resulting concentration peaks in fermentor headspace H2S were directly impacted by yeast assimilable nitrogenous compounds in the grape juice. A series of model fermentations was conducted in temperature-controlled and stirred fermentors using a complex model juice with defined concentrations of ammonium ions and/or amino acids. The fermentation rate was measured indirectly by noting the weight loss of the fermentor; H2S was quantitatively trapped in realtime using a pre-calibrated H2S detection tube which was inserted into a fermentor gas relief port. Evolution rates for CO2 and H2S as well as the relative ratios between them were calculated. These fermentations confirmed that total sulfide formation was strongly yeast strain-dependent, and high concentrations of yeast assimilable nitrogen did not necessarily protect against elevated H2S formation. High initial concentrations of ammonium ions via addition of diammonium phosphate (DAP) caused a higher evolution of H2S when compared with a non-supplemented but nondeficient juice. It was observed that the excess availability of a certain yeast assimilable amino acid, arginine, could result in a more sustained CO2 production rate throughout the wine fermentation. The contribution of yeast assimilable amino acids from conventional commercial yeast foods to lowering of the H2S formation was marginal.

  2. Hydrogen isotope composition of leaf wax n-alkanes in Arabidopsis lines with different transpiration rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedentchouk, N.; Lawson, T.; Eley, Y.; McAusland, L.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen are used widely to investigate modern and ancient water cycles. The D/H composition of organic compounds derived from terrestrial plants has recently attracted significant attention as a proxy for palaeohydrology. However, the role of various plant physiological and biochemical factors in controlling the D/H signature of leaf wax lipids in extant plants remains unclear. The focus of this study is to investigate the effect of plant transpiration on the D/H composition of n-alkanes in terrestrial plants. This experiment includes 4 varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana that differ with respect to stomatal density and stomatal geometry. All 4 varieties were grown indoors under identical temperature, relative humidity, light and watering regimes and then sampled for leaf wax and leaf water stable isotopic measurements. During growth, stomatal conductance to carbon dioxide and water vapour were also determined. We found that the plants varied significantly in terms of their transpiration rates. Transpiration rates were significantly higher in Arabidopsis ost1 and ost1-1 varieties (2.4 and 3.2 mmol m-2 s-1, respectively) than in Arabidopsis RbohD and Col-0 (1.5 and 1.4). However, hydrogen isotope measurements of n-alkanes extracted from leaf waxes revealed a very different pattern. Varieties ost1, ost1-1, and RbohD have very similar deltaD values of n-C29 alkane (-125, -128, and -127 per mil), whereas the deltaD value of Col-0 is more negative (-137 per mil). The initial results of this work suggest that plant transpiration is decoupled from the D/H composition of n-alkanes. In other words, physical processes that affect water vapour movement between the plant and its environment apparently cannot account for the stable hydrogen isotope composition of organic compounds that comprise leaf waxes. Additional, perhaps biochemical, processes that affect hydrogen isotope fractionation during photosynthesis might need to be invoked

  3. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ming; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng

    FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL) specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10-7-5.748 × 10-7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa √{ m } . The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface.

  4. Modulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide Generated through Heme in L. amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Rocco-Machado

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in many areas of Brazil and causes skin lesions. Using this parasite, our group showed the activation of Na+/K+ ATPase through a signaling cascade that involves the presence of heme and protein kinase C (PKC activity. Heme is an important biomolecule that has pro-oxidant activity and signaling capacity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS can act as second messengers, which are required in various signaling cascades. Our goal in this work is to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generated in the presence of heme in the Na+/K+ ATPase activity of L. amazonensis. Our results show that increasing concentrations of heme stimulates the production of H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 2.5 μM heme. To confirm that the effect of heme on the Na+/K+ ATPase is through the generation of H2O2, we measured enzyme activity using increasing concentrations of H2O2 and, as expected, the activity increased in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 0.1 μM H2O2. To investigate the role of PKC in this signaling pathway, we observed the production of H2O2 in the presence of its activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and its inhibitor calphostin C. Both showed no effect on the generation of H2O2. Furthermore, we found that PKC activity is increased in the presence of H2O2, and that in the presence of calphostin C, H2O2 is unable to activate the Na+/K+ ATPase. 100 μM of Mito-TEMPO was capable of abolishing the stimulatory effect of heme on Na+/K+ ATPase activity, indicating that mitochondria might be the source of the hydrogen peroxide production induced by heme. The modulation of L. amazonensis Na+/K+ ATPase by H2O2 opens new possibilities for understanding the signaling pathways of this parasite.

  5. Hydrogen production by reforming of liquid hydrocarbons in a membrane reactor for portable power generation-Experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Ashok S.

    One of the most promising technologies for lightweight, compact, portable power generation is proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells, however, require a source of pure hydrogen. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in an integrated membrane reactor has potential to provide pure hydrogen in a compact system. Continuous separation of product hydrogen from the reforming gas mixture is expected to increase the yield of hydrogen significantly as predicted by model simulations. In the laboratory-scale experimental studies reported here steam reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, butane, methanol and Clearlite ® was conducted to produce pure hydrogen in a single step membrane reformer using commercially available Pd-Ag foil membranes and reforming/WGS catalysts. All of the experimental results demonstrated increase in hydrocarbon conversion due to hydrogen separation when compared with the hydrocarbon conversion without any hydrogen separation. Increase in hydrogen recovery was also shown to result in corresponding increase in hydrocarbon conversion in these studies demonstrating the basic concept. The experiments also provided insight into the effect of individual variables such as pressure, temperature, gas space velocity, and steam to carbon ratio. Steam reforming of butane was found to be limited by reaction kinetics for the experimental conditions used: catalysts used, average gas space velocity, and the reactor characteristics of surface area to volume ratio. Steam reforming of methanol in the presence of only WGS catalyst on the other hand indicated that the membrane reactor performance was limited by membrane permeation, especially at lower temperatures and lower feed pressures due to slower reconstitution of CO and H 2 into methane thus maintaining high hydrogen partial pressures in the reacting gas mixture. The limited amount of data collected with steam reforming of Clearlite ® indicated very good match between theoretical predictions and

  6. Generation of Hydrogen, Lignin and Sodium Hydroxide from Pulping Black Liquor by Electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzai Nong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Black liquor is generated in Kraft pulping of wood or non-wood raw material in pulp mills, and regarded as a renewable resource. The objective of this paper was to develop an effective means to remove the water pollutants by recovery of both lignin and sodium hydroxide from black liquor, based on electrolysis. The treatment of a 1000 mL of black liquor (122 g/L solid contents consumed 345.6 kJ of electric energy, and led to the generation of 30.7 g of sodium hydroxide, 0.82 g of hydrogen gas and 52.1 g of biomass solids. Therefore, the recovery ratios of elemental sodium and biomass solids are 80.4% and 76%, respectively. Treating black liquor by electrolysis is an environmentally friendly technology that can, in particular, be an alternative process in addressing the environmental issues of pulping waste liquor to the small-scale mills without black liquor recovery.

  7. Temperature dependence of the rate constant of hydrogen isotope interactions with a lithium capillary-porous system under reactor irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazhibayeva, Irina, E-mail: tazhibayeva@ntsc.kz [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Kulsartov, Timur; Gordienko, Yuri [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Mukanova, Aliya [Al’ Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Ponkratov, Yuri; Barsukov, Nikolay; Tulubaev, Evgeniy [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Platacis, Erik [University of Latvia (IPUL), Riga (Latvia); Kenzhin, Ergazy [Shakarim Semey State University, Semey (Kazakhstan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The experiments with Li CPS sample were carried out at reactor IVG-1.M. • The gas absorption technique was used to study hydrogen isotope interaction with lithium CPS. • The temperature dependence of constants of interaction rate was obtained for various power rates of the reactor. • Determination of the activation energies, and pre-exponents of Arrhenius dependence. • The effect of increase of the rate constant under reaction irradiation. -- Abstract: Experiments with a sample of a lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) were performed at the reactor IVG-1.M of the Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK to study the effects of neutron irradiation on the parameters of hydrogen isotope interactions with a lithium CPS. The absorption technique was used during the experiments, and this technique allowed the temperature dependences of the hydrogen isotope interaction rate constants with the lithium CPS to be obtained under various reactor powers. The obtained dependencies were used to determine the main interaction parameters: the activation energies and the pre-exponents of the Arrhenius dependence of the hydrogen interaction rate constants with lithium and the lithium CPS. An increase of the hydrogen isotope interaction rate with the lithium CPS was observed under reactor irradiation.

  8. Fabrication of efficient TiO2-RGO heterojunction composites for hydrogen generation via water-splitting: Comparison between RGO, Au and Pt reduction sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bery, Haitham M.; Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Abdel-moneim, Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    A facile one-step synthesis approach of M/TiO2/RGO (M = Au or Pt) ternary composite by hydrothermal treatment for hydrogen generation via water-splitting was investigated. Photocurrent response measurements revealed that TiO2 (P25) nanoparticles anchored on the reduced graphene oxide (RGO) surface exhibited a p-n heterojunction interface by changing the photocurrent direction with the applied bias from reverse to forward potential. H2 evolution rate of TiO2/RGO (5 wt.%) composite was substantially enhanced by 12-fold in comparison to bare TiO2 under simulated solar light irradiation. Cyclic volatmmetry measurements manifested, that the optimized 0.3 wt.% of platinum metal loaded on TiO2/RGO composite was the most active catalytic reduction sites for hydrogen generation reaction with an initial hydrogen rate of 670 μmol h-1. This study sheds the light on the tunable semiconductor type of TiO2/RGO composite fabricated by solution mixing pathway and its merits to improve the photocatalytic activity.

  9. Coolant-side heat-transfer rates for a hydrogen-oxygen rocket and a new technique for data correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacht, R. L.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the coolant-side, heat transfer coefficients for a liquid cooled, hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chamber. Heat transfer rates were determined from measurements of local hot gas wall temperature, local coolant temperature, and local coolant pressure. A correlation incorporating an integration technique for the transport properties needed near the pseudocritical temperature of liquid hydrogen gives a satisfactory prediction of hot gas wall temperatures.

  10. Temperature-Dependent Rate Coefficients for the Reaction of CH2OO with Hydrogen Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mica C; Chao, Wen; Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S; Takahashi, Kaito; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2017-02-09

    The reaction of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO with hydrogen sulfide was measured with transient UV absorption spectroscopy in a temperature-controlled flow reactor, and bimolecular rate coefficients were obtained from 278 to 318 K and from 100 to 500 Torr. The average rate coefficient at 298 K and 100 Torr was (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10 -13 cm 3 s -1 . The reaction was found to be independent of pressure and exhibited a weak negative temperature dependence. Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of the temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficient at the QCISD(T)/CBS level are in reasonable agreement with the experiment. The reaction of CH 2 OO with H 2 S is 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than the reaction with H 2 O monomer. Though rates of CH 2 OO scavenging by water vapor under atmospheric conditions are primarily controlled by the reaction with water dimer, the H 2 S loss pathway will be dominated by the reaction with monomer. The agreement between experiment and theory for the CH 2 OO + H 2 S reaction lends credence to theoretical descriptions of other Criegee intermediate reactions that cannot easily be probed experimentally.

  11. Nickel/metal hydride batteries using rate-earth hydrogen storage alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1994-07-01

    Fine particles of a hydrogen storage alloy (LaNi3.8Co0.5Mn0.4Al0.3) were microencapsulated with a thin film of nickel of about 0.6 micron thickness. The microencapsulated alloy powders were used as an anode material in a sealed nickel/metal hydride battery. The battery characteristics were compared with those of a battery with a bare (uncoated) alloy anode. The battery using the bare alloy was less stable compared to the coated alloy due to the role of the coated nickel as an oxygen barrier for protecting the alloy surface from oxidation. In addition, charge- discharge characteristics were improved greatly by the nickel coating, especially at high rates and at low temperatures due to the role of nickel as a microcurrent collector. So the microencapsulation of the alloy powders improves the performances of the alloy electrode.

  12. Solar generation of hydrogen; Wasserstofferzeugung auf solarer Basis. Thermische Dissoziation des Wassers mit dem Licht-Kraft-Werk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemba, G.

    2003-04-01

    Solar generation of hydrogen. The ''Licht-Kraft-Werke'' (LKW) is described. Due to this it will be possible to supply solid-state-lasers directly by sunlight. Supplied by lasers water should be split in a highest-temperature-reactor. An efficiency of more than 21% is supposed to be reached. (orig.)

  13. Kinetic modeling of hydrogen production rate by photoautotrophic cyanobacterium A. variabilis ATCC 29413 as a function of both CO2 concentration and oxygen production rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Siti Fatihah; Kamaruddin, Azlina; Uzir, Mohamad Hekarl; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Shamsuddin, Abdul Halim

    2017-02-07

    Hydrogen production by cyanobacteria could be one of the promising energy resources in the future. However, there is very limited information regarding the kinetic modeling of hydrogen production by cyanobacteria available in the literature. To provide an in-depth understanding of the biological system involved during the process, the Haldane's noncompetitive inhibition equation has been modified to determine the specific hydrogen production rate (HPR) as a function of both dissolved CO2 concentration (CTOT) and oxygen production rate (OPR). The highest HPR of 15 [Formula: see text] was found at xCO2 of 5% vol/vol and the rate consequently decreased when the CTOT and OPR were 0.015 k mol m(-3) and 0.55 mL h(-1), respectively. The model provided a fairly good estimation of the HPR with respect to the experimental data collected.

  14. Concurrent desalination and hydrogen generation using microbial electrolysis and desalination cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haiping; Jenkins, Peter E; Ren, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    The versatility of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) makes them promising for various applications, and good combinations could make the system more applicable and economically effective. An integrated BES called microbial electrolysis and desalination cell (MEDC) was developed to concurrently desalinate salt water, produce hydrogen gas, and potentially treat wastewater. The reactor is divided into three chambers by inserting a pair of ion exchange membranes, with each chamber serving one of the three functions. With an added voltage of 0.8 V, lab scale batch study shows the MEDC achieved the highest H(2) production rate of 1.5 m(3)/m(3) d (1.6 mL/h) from the cathode chamber, while also removing 98.8% of the 10 g/L NaCl from the middle chamber. The anode recirculation alleviated pH and high salinity inhibition on bacterial activity and further increased system current density from 87.2 to 140 A/m(3), leading to an improved desalination rate by 80% and H(2) production by 30%. Compared to slight changes in desalination, H(2) production was more significantly affected by the applied voltage and cathode buffer capacity, suggesting cathode reactions were likely affected by the external power supply in addition to the anode microbial activity.

  15. Glycan OH Exchange Rate Determination in Aqueous Solution: Seeking Evidence for Transient Hydrogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistel, Marcos D; Azurmendi, Hugo F; Freedberg, Darón I

    2017-02-02

    Hydrogen bonds (Hbonds) are important stabilizing forces in biomolecules. However, for glycans in aqueous solution, direct NMR detection of Hbonds is elusive because of their transient nature. Here, we present Isotope-based Natural-abundance TOtal correlation eXchange SpectroscopY (INTOXSY), a new (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear single quantum coherence-total correlation spectroscopy based method, to extract OH groups' exchange rate constants (kex) for molecules in natural (13)C abundance and show that OH Hbonds can be inferred from "slower" H/D kex. We evaluate kex measured with INTOXSY in light of those extracted with line-shape analysis. Subsequently, we use a set of common glycans to establish a kex reference basis set and to infer the existence of transient Hbonds involving OH donor groups. Then, we report kex values for a series of mono- and disaccharides, as well as for oligosaccharides sialyl Lewis X and β-cyclodextrin, and compare the results with those from the reference set to extract Hbond information. Finally, we utilize NMR experimental data in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to establish donor and acceptor Hbond pairs. Our exchange rate measurements indicate that OH/OD exchange rates, kHD, values transient Hbond OH groups and potential acceptor groups can be uncovered through MD simulations.

  16. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  17. Micro-grid for on-site wind-and-hydrogen powered generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suskis, P.; Andreiciks, A.; Steiks, I.; Krievs, O.; Kleperis, J.

    2014-02-01

    The authors propose a micro-grid for autonomous wind-and-hydrogen power generation thus replacing such traditional fossil-fuelled equipment as domestic diesel generators, gas micro-turbines, etc. In the proposed microgrid the excess of electrical energy from a wind turbine is spent on electrolytic production of hydrogen which is then stored under low-pressure in absorbing composite material. The electrolyser has a non-traditional feeding unit and electrode coatings. The proposed DC/DC conversion topologies for different micro-grid nodes are shown to be well-designed. The prototypes elaborated for the converters and hydrogen storage media were tested and have demonstrated a good performance. Rakstā piedāvātā mikrotīkla izpēte ir veikta ar mērķi izstrādāt autonomu, uz vēja un ūdeņraža enerģiju balstītu elektroapgādes sistēmu, kas varētu aizvietot tradicionālās fosilā kurināmā sistēmas, piemēram, mājsaimniecību dīzeļa ģeneratorus, gāzes mikroturbīnas u.c. Mikrotīkla elektroapgādes sistēmā vēja agregāta saražotā elektroenerģija tiek pārveidota atbilstoši standarta maiņsprieguma elektroapgādes parametriem un piegādāta slodzei. Pārpalikusī enerģija tiek pārveidota un uzkrāta ūdeņraža formā, izmantojot elektrolīzes iekārtu un kompozītmateriālu uzkrājēju. Ja pieejamā vēja enerģija nenosedz slodzes enerģijas patēriņu, elektroenerģijas padeves funkciju ar atbilstoša energoelektronikas pārveidotāja palīdzību pārņem ūdeņraža degvielas elements. Ja, savukārt, slodzei nav nepieciešama enerģija, no vēja saražoto enerģiju izmanto elektrolīzes iekārta un tā tiek uzkrāta ūdeņraža formā, atbilstoši uzkrājēja ietilpībai. Piedāvātajā mikrotīklā ir izmantota elektrolīzes iekārta ar netradicionāliem elektrodu pārklājumiem un barošanas bloku, kā arī zemspiediena kompozītmateriālu ūdeņraža uzkrājējs. Galvenie mikrotīkla elektriskās enerģijas pārveidošanas mezgli ir

  18. Theoretical and computational study of the energy dependence of the muon transfer rate from hydrogen to higher-Z gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakalov, Dimitar, E-mail: dbakalov@inrne.bas.bg [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko chaussée 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Adamczak, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Stoilov, Mihail [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko chaussée 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Vacchi, Andrea [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Via A. Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2015-01-23

    The recent PSI Lamb shift experiment and the controversy about proton size revived the interest in measuring the hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen as an alternative possibility for comparing ordinary and muonic hydrogen spectroscopy data on proton electromagnetic structure. This measurement critically depends on the energy dependence of the muon transfer rate to heavier gases in the epithermal range. The available data provide only qualitative information, and the theoretical predictions have not been verified. We propose a new method by measurements of the transfer rate in thermalized target at different temperatures, estimate its accuracy and investigate the optimal experimental conditions. - Highlights: • Method for measuring the energy dependence of muon transfer rate to higher-Z gases. • Thermalization and depolarization of muonic hydrogen studied by Monte Carlo method. • Optimal experimental conditions determined by Monte Carlo simulations. • Mathematical model and for estimating the uncertainty of the experimental results.

  19. High Growth Rate Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films and Devices Using ECR-PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium films (a-SiGe:H) and devices have been extensively studied because of the tunable band gap for matching the solar spectrum and mature the fabrication techniques. a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells have great potential for commercial manufacture because of very low cost and adaptability to large-scale manufacturing. Although it has been demonstrated that a-SiGe:H thin films and devices with good quality can be produced successfully, some issues regarding growth chemistry have remained yet unexplored, such as the hydrogen and inert-gas dilution, bombardment effect, and chemical annealing, to name a few. The alloying of the SiGe introduces above an order-of-magnitude higher defect density, which degrades the performance of the a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells. This degradation becomes worse when high growth-rate deposition is required. Preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon, clustering of Ge and Si, and columnar structure and buried dihydride radicals make the film intolerably bad. The work presented here uses the Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECR-PECVD) technique to fabricate a-SiGe:H films and devices with high growth rates. Helium gas, together with a small amount of H2, was used as the plasma species. Thickness, optical band gap, conductivity, Urbach energy, mobility-lifetime product, I-V curve, and quantum efficiency were characterized during the process of pursuing good materials. The microstructure of the a-(Si,Ge):H material was probed by Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. They found that the advantages of using helium as the main plasma species are: (1) high growth rate--the energetic helium ions break the reactive gas more efficiently than hydrogen ions; (2) homogeneous growth--heavy helium ions impinging on the surface promote the surface mobility of the reactive radicals, so that heteroepitaxy growth as clustering of Ge and Si, columnar structure are

  20. Converting Chemical Energy to Electricity through a Three-Jaw Mini-Generator Driven by the Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Wang, Lei; Ji, Fanqin; Shi, Feng

    2016-05-11

    Energy conversion from a mechanical form to electricity is one of the most important research advancements to come from the horizontal locomotion of small objects. Until now, the Marangoni effect has been the only propulsion method to produce the horizontal locomotion to induce an electromotive force, which is limited to a short duration because of the specific property of surfactants. To solve this issue, in this article we utilized the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide the propulsion for a sustainable energy conversion from a mechanical form to electricity. We fabricated a mini-generator consisting of three parts: a superhydrophobic rotator with three jaws, three motors to produce a jet of oxygen bubbles to propel the rotation of the rotator, and three magnets integrated into the upper surface of the rotator to produce the magnet flux. Once the mini-generator was placed on the solution surface, the motor catalyzed the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. This generated a large amount of oxygen bubbles that caused the generator and integrated magnets to rotate at the air/water interface. Thus, the magnets passed under the coil area and induced a change in the magnet flux, thus generating electromotive forces. We also investigated experimental factors, that is, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the turns of the solenoid coil, and found that the mini-generator gave the highest output in a hydrogen peroxide solution with a concentration of 10 wt % and under a coil with 9000 turns. Through combining the stable superhydrophobicity and catalyst, we realized electricity generation for a long duration, which could last for 26 000 s after adding H2O2 only once. We believe this work provides a simple process for the development of horizontal motion and provides a new path for energy reutilization.

  1. An Integrated Device View on Photo-Electrochemical Solar-Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modestino, Miguel A; Haussener, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Devices that directly capture and store solar energy have the potential to significantly increase the share of energy from intermittent renewable sources. Photo-electrochemical solar-hydrogen generators could become an important contributor, as these devices can convert solar energy into fuels that can be used throughout all sectors of energy. Rather than focusing on scientific achievement on the component level, this article reviews aspects of overall component integration in photo-electrochemical water-splitting devices that ultimately can lead to deployable devices. Throughout the article, three generalized categories of devices are considered with different levels of integration and spanning the range of complete integration by one-material photo-electrochemical approaches to complete decoupling by photovoltaics and electrolyzer devices. By using this generalized framework, we describe the physical aspects, device requirements, and practical implications involved with developing practical photo-electrochemical water-splitting devices. Aspects reviewed include macroscopic coupled multiphysics device models, physical device demonstrations, and economic and life cycle assessments, providing the grounds to draw conclusions on the overall technological outlook.

  2. Reaction rates of Criegee intermediates with water vapor and hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. C.; Boering, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Criegee intermediates are byproducts of the reaction of alkenes with ozone. Bimolecular reactions of Criegee intermediates can lead to the production of low-volatility organic compounds and acids in the atmosphere, which in turn play a role in determining the concentration, size, and optical properties of aerosols. Recently, a novel method for producing measurable quantities of stabilized Criegee intermediates in the laboratory paved the way for the development of new experimental techniques to study their chemical properties and predict their importance in the atmosphere. Our lab uses transient UV absorption spectroscopy to measure the formation and decay of Criegee intermediates in a flow cell, using 8-pass absorption of a bright plasma light source combined with sensitive balanced photodiode detection. Here we measured the transient absorption of CH2OO and obtained rate coefficients for its reaction with water dimer from 283 to 324 K. The fast reaction of CH2OO with water dimer is thought to dominate CH2OO removal in the atmosphere, but reaction rates can vary considerably under different conditions of temperature, humidity, and pressure. The rate of the reaction of CH2OO with water dimer was found to exhibit a strong negative temperature dependence. Due to the strong temperature dependence, and shifting competition between water dimer and water monomer (which has a positive temperature dependence), the effective loss rate of CH2OO by reaction with water vapor is highly sensitive to atmospheric conditions. We also present the first measurements of the reaction rate between CH2OO and hydrogen sulfide, which is analogous to the water molecule and may have significance in areas with volcanic activity.

  3. Bioelectrocatalytic hydrogen production by hydrogenase electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, S.V.; Karyakina, E.E.; Karyakin, A.A. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation). Faculty of Chemistry; Vignais, P.M. [Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France). Departement de Biologie Moleculaire et Structurale, Laboratoire de Biochimie et Biophysique des Systemes Integres; Cournac, L. [Universite Mediterranee, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Departement d' Ecophysiologie Vegetale et de Microbiologie, Laboratoire d' Ecophysiologie de la Photosintese; Zorin, N.A. [Russian Academy of Science, Puschino (Russian Federation). Institute of Basic Biological Problems; Cosnier, S. [Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France). Laboratoire d' Electrochimie Organique et Photochimie Redox

    2002-12-01

    Production of molecular hydrogen by enzyme electrodes based on direct bioelectrocatalysis by [NiFe] hydrogenases from different sources (Thiocapsa roseopersicina and Desulfovibrio fructosovorans) was investigated. Hydrogen evolution was independently controlled by means of mass spectrometry. A strong correlation between the cathodic current generated by the hydrogenase electrodes and the rate of hydrogen evolution was demonstrated. (author)

  4. Polymer membrane based electrolytic cell and process for the direct generation of hydrogen peroxide in liquid streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James H. (Inventor); Schwartz, Michael (Inventor); Sammells, Anthony F. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for generating hydrogen peroxide is provided including a cathode containing a catalyst for the reduction of oxygen, and an anode containing a catalyst for the oxidation of water. A polymer membrane, semipermeable to either protons or hydroxide ions is also included and has a first face interfacing to the cathode and a second face interfacing to the anode so that when a stream of water containing dissolved oxygen or oxygen bubbles is passed over the cathode and a stream of water is passed over the anode, and an electric current is passed between the anode and the cathode, hydrogen peroxide is generated at the cathode and oxygen is generated at the anode.

  5. Volcano Plot for Bimetallic Catalysts in Hydrogen Generation by Hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, Anais; Toshikj, Nikola; Hoett, Sandra; Bernaud, Laurent; Demirci, Umit B.

    2017-01-01

    In the field of "hydrogen energy", sodium borohydride (NaBH[subscript 4]) is a potential hydrogen carrier able to release H[subscript 2] by hydrolysis in the presence of a metal catalyst. Our laboratory experiment focuses on this. It is intended for thirdyear undergraduate students in order to have hands-on laboratory experience through…

  6. Metal alloys for the new generation of compressors at hydrogen stations: Parametric study of corrosion behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arjomand Kermani, Nasrin; Petrushina, Irina; Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich

    2017-01-01

    Compressors are one of the most costly components at hydrogen stations, which leads to the high price of hydrogen production. The substitution of a solid piston with ionic liquid is a promising option that may solve some of the challenges related to conventional reciprocating compressors and, con...

  7. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation with Ag-loaded LiNbO3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. In this contribiution LiNbO3 and Ag-loaded LiNbO3 photocatalysts were tested in the reaction of hydrogen evolution. The silver modified samples contained different loading of co-catalyst in the range of. 0∙5–4 wt%. It was essential to optimize the sample composition to achieve an efficient hydrogen evolution. The.

  8. Hydrogen partitioning in pure cast aluminum as determined by dynamic evolution rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Peterson, D. T.; Schmidt, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen in pure aluminum can be found in two different states. One is related to a presence in gas-filled pores, while the other state involves the formation of a solid solution between hydrogen and aluminum. The considered investigation is concerned with the distribution of the hydrogen between various states. A dynamic technique is employed to measure the evolution of hydrogen from commercially available samples of polycrystalline pure aluminum under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The obtained data are compared with the results of a statistical analysis concerning the porosity in the cast aluminum. It was found that more than 99 pct of the hydrogen in the aluminum is located in large pores. Less than 1 pct of the hydrogen is partitioned between the solid solution and the small pores.

  9. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM SLUDGE SAMPLE BOTTLES CAUSED BY RADIOLYSIS AND CHEMISTRY WITH CONCETNRATION DETERMINATION IN A STANDARD WASTE BOX (SWB) OR DRUM FOR TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RILEY DL; BRIDGES AE; EDWARDS WS

    2010-03-30

    A volume of 600 mL of sludge, in 4.1 L sample bottles (Appendix 7.6), will be placed in either a Super Pig (Ref. 1) or Piglet (Ref. 2, 3) based on shielding requirements (Ref. 4). Two Super Pigs will be placed in a Standard Waste Box (SWB, Ref. 5), as their weight exceeds the capacity of a drum; two Piglets will be placed in a 55-gallon drum (shown in Appendix 7.2). The generation of hydrogen gas through oxidation/corrosion of uranium metal by its reaction with water will be determined and combined with the hydrogen produced by radiolysis. The hydrogen concentration in the 55-gallon drum and SWB will be calculated to show that the lower flammability limit of 5% hydrogen is not reached. The inner layers (i.e., sample bottle, bag and shielded pig) in the SWB and drum will be evaluated to assure no pressurization occurs as the hydrogen vents from the inner containers (e.g., shielded pigs, etc.). The reaction of uranium metal with anoxic liquid water is highly exothermic; the heat of reaction will be combined with the source term decay heat, calculated from Radcalc, to show that the drum and SWB package heat load limits are satisfied. This analysis does five things: (1) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water; (2) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from radiolysis (using Radcalc 4.1); (3) Combines both H{sub 2} generation amounts, from Items 1 and 2, and determines the percent concentration of H{sub 2} in the interior of an SWB with two Super Pigs, and the interior of a 55-gallon drum with two Piglets; (4) From the combined gas generation rate, shows that the pressure at internal layers is minimal; and (5) Calculates the maximum thermal load of the package, both from radioactive decay of the source and daughter products as calculated/reported by Radcalc 4.1, and from the exothermic reaction of uranium metal with water.

  10. The influence of strain rate and hydrogen on the plane-strain ductility of Zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, T.M.; Motta, A.T.; Koss, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The authors studied the ductility of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding under loading conditions prototypical of those found in reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), i.e.: near plane-strain deformation in the hoop direction (transverse to the cladding axis) at room temperature and 300 C and high strain rates. To conduct these studies, they developed a specimen configuration in which near plane-strain deformation is achieved in the gage section, and a testing methodology that allows one to determine both the limit strain at the onset of localized necking and the fracture strain. The experiments indicate that there is little effect of strain rate (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) on the ductility of unhydrided Zircaloy tubing deformed under near plane-strain conditions at either room temperature or 300 C. Preliminary experiments on cladding containing 190 ppm hydrogen show only a small loss of fracture strain but no clear effect on limit strain. The experiments also indicate that there is a significant loss of Zircaloy ductility when surface flaws are present in the form of thickness imperfections.

  11. Methane Formation by Flame-Generated Hydrogen Atoms in the Flame Ionization Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1996-01-01

    The precombustion degradation of organic compounds in the flame ionization detector has been studied (1) by heating the additives in hydrogen in a quartz capillary and analyzing the reaction products by GC and (2) by following the degradation of the additives in a hydrogen flame, by means of a thin......, and conceivably all hydrocarbons are quantitatively converted into methane at temperatures below 600 C, that is, before the proper combustion has started. The splitting of the C-C bonds is preceded by hydrogenation of double and triple bonds and aromatic rings. The reactions, no doubt, are caused by hydrogen...... atoms, which are formed in the burning hydrogen and which diffuse into the inner core of the flame. The quantitative formation of methane appears to explain the "equal per carbon" rule for the detector response of hydrocarbons, since all carbons are "exchanged" for methane molecules....

  12. The response of Leuconostoc mesenteroides to low external oxidoreduction potential generated by hydrogen gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourel, G; Henini, S; Diviès, C; Garmyn, D

    2003-01-01

    The physiological consequences of low external oxidoreduction potential in Leuconostoc mesenteroides were investigated. Leuconostoc mesenteroides was grown under two initial oxidoreduction potential conditions (Eh7: +200 mV and -400 mV) using nitrogen and hydrogen as reducing agents. Growth was affected by Eh7; the lag phase increased from 1 h at an initial Eh7 of +200 mV to 6 h at an initial Eh7 of -400 mV; the maximum specific growth rate at -400 mV was 68% of the one observed at +200 mV. The NADH/NAD+ ratio and (NADH + NAD+) pool were independent of the external Eh7. This study shows that changing the external oxidoreduction potential from +200 to -400 mV has a strong effect on the Leuc. mesenteroides physiology. The constancy of the maximum carbon and energetic fluxes (qglu, qATP) under the two Eh7 conditions accompanied by the decrease of YX/S and YATP suggested the existence of an uncoupling phenomenon, namely that some catabolized glucose and hence ATP was not associated with biomass production. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of taking into account, the effect of the oxidoreduction potential on the growth of Leuc. mesenteroides in the fermentation process.

  13. Kinetic investigation of hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of SnO and Zn solar nanopowders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambon, Marc; Abanades, Stephane; Flamant, Gilles [Processes, Materials and Solar Energy Laboratory (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, 66120 Font-Romeu (France)

    2009-07-15

    The hydrolysis reaction of the two-step ZnO/Zn and SnO{sub 2}/SnO thermochemical cycles was kinetically investigated for solar hydrogen production. Nanoparticles of Zn and SnO were synthesized by solar thermal reduction of the oxides and neutral gas quenching of the vapors. They were then hydrolyzed to quantify and compare the H{sub 2} yields and the kinetic rate laws in fixed-bed. The hydrolysis of Zn nanoparticles reached only up to 55% of H{sub 2} yield, whereas SnO hydrolysis was almost complete. In contrast, Zn hydrolysis was much faster than SnO hydrolysis, but Zn deactivation occurred suddenly. Models of solid-gas reactions were applied to identify the controlling mechanisms and the associated kinetic parameters. The kinetic models were fitted to both isothermal and non-isothermal (temperature ramp) hydrolysis experimental data. Activation energies and reaction orders were found to be 122 {+-} 13 kJ/mol and 2.0 {+-} 0.3 for SnO, and 87 {+-} 7 kJ/mol and 3.5 {+-} 0.5 for Zn, respectively. Finally, a shrinking core approach was applied to the case of SnO to account for the reaction-controlling mechanisms. (author)

  14. Modulation of electrochemical hydrogen evolution rate by araliphatic thiol monolayers on gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglali, Mutlu I.; Erbe, Andreas; Chen, Ying; Barth, Christoph; Koelsch, Patrick; Rohwerder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Electroreductive desorption of a highly ordered self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formed by the araliphatic thiol (4-(4-(4-pyridyl)phenyl)phenyl)methanethiol leads to a concurrent rapid hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The desorption process and resulting interfacial structure were investigated by voltammetric techniques, in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, and in situ vibrational sum–frequency–generation (SFG) spectroscopy. Voltammetric experiments on SAM-modified electrodes exhibit extraordinarily high peak currents, which di er between Au(111) and polycrystalline Au substrates. Association of reductive desorption with HER is shown to be the origin of the observed excess cathodic charges. The studied SAM preserves its two–dimensional order near Au surface throughout a fast voltammetric scan even when the vertex potential is set several hundred millivolt beyond the desorption potential. A model is developed for the explanation of the observed rapid HER involving ordering and pre–orientation of water present in the nanometer–sized reaction volume between desorbed SAM and the Au electrode, by the structurally extremely stable monolayer, leading to the observed catalysis of the HER. PMID:24235778

  15. NMR Analysis of Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates in a Pentapeptide-Repeat Protein from A. thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shenyuan; Ni, Shuisong; Kennedy, Michael A

    2017-05-23

    At2g44920 from Arabidopsis thaliana is a pentapeptide-repeat protein (PRP) composed of 25 repeats capped by N- and C-terminal α-helices. PRP structures are dominated by four-sided right-handed β-helices typically consisting of mixtures of type II and type IV β-turns. PRPs adopt repeated five-residue (Rfr) folds with an Rfr consensus sequence (STAV)(D/N)(L/F)(S/T/R)(X). Unlike other PRPs, At2g44920 consists exclusively of type II β-turns. At2g44920 is predicted to be located in the thylakoid lumen although its biochemical function remains unknown. Given its unusual structure, we investigated the biophysical properties of At2g44920 as a representative of the β-helix family to determine if it had exceptional global stability, backbone dynamics, or amide hydrogen exchange rates. Circular dichroism measurements yielded a melting point of 62.8°C, indicating unexceptional global thermal stability. Nuclear spin relaxation measurements indicated that the Rfr-fold core was rigid with order parameters ranging from 0.7 to 0.9. At2g44920 exhibited a striking range of amide hydrogen exchange rates spanning 10 orders of magnitude, with lifetimes ranging from minutes to several months. A weak correlation was found among hydrogen exchange rates, hydrogen bonding energies, and amino acid solvent-accessible areas. Analysis of contributions from fast (approximately picosecond to nanosecond) backbone dynamics to amide hydrogen exchange rates revealed that the average order parameter of amides undergoing fast exchange was significantly smaller compared to those undergoing slow exchange. Importantly, the activation energies for amide hydrogen exchange were found to be generally higher for the slowest exchanging amides in the central Rfr coil and decreased toward the terminal coils. This could be explained by assuming that the concerted motions of two preceding or following coils required for hydrogen bond disruption and amide hydrogen exchange have a higher activation energy

  16. Photocatalytic generation of hydrogen by core-shell WO3/BiVO4 nanorods with ultimate water splitting efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihosh, Yuriy; Turkevych, Ivan; Mawatari, Kazuma; Uemura, Jin; Kazoe, Yutaka; Kosar, Sonya; Makita, Kikuo; Sugaya, Takeyoshi; Matsui, Takuya; Fujita, Daisuke; Tosa, Masahiro; Kondo, Michio; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Efficient photocatalytic water splitting requires effective generation, separation and transfer of photo-induced charge carriers that can hardly be achieved simultaneously in a single material. Here we show that the effectiveness of each process can be separately maximized in a nanostructured heterojunction with extremely thin absorber layer. We demonstrate this concept on WO3/BiVO4+CoPi core-shell nanostructured photoanode that achieves near theoretical water splitting efficiency. BiVO4 is characterized by a high recombination rate of photogenerated carriers that have much shorter diffusion length than the thickness required for sufficient light absorption. This issue can be resolved by the combination of BiVO4 with more conductive WO3 nanorods in a form of core-shell heterojunction, where the BiVO4 absorber layer is thinner than the carrier diffusion length while it’s optical thickness is reestablished by light trapping in high aspect ratio nanostructures. Our photoanode demonstrates ultimate water splitting photocurrent of 6.72 mA cm−2 under 1 sun illumination at 1.23 VRHE that corresponds to ~90% of the theoretically possible value for BiVO4. We also demonstrate a self-biased operation of the photoanode in tandem with a double-junction GaAs/InGaAsP photovoltaic cell with stable water splitting photocurrent of 6.56 mA cm−2 that corresponds to the solar to hydrogen generation efficiency of 8.1%. PMID:26053164

  17. Hydrogen abstraction mechanisms and reaction rates of toluene+NO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yongmei; Su, Kehe; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yan

    2015-08-01

    The hydrogen abstraction reaction mechanisms of toluene molecule by NO3 radical were investigated theoretically with quantum chemistry and reaction kinetics. All the molecular structures, vibrational properties, and the intrinsic reaction coordinates were determined with B3LYP/6-311G(d,p). The non-dynamic electronic correlations were examined with the CASSCF dominant configurations. The energies and the potential energy profiles were refined with accurate model chemistry G3(MP2). Rate constants were determined using the CVT method over the temperature range 200-2000 K. It was found that in addition to the side chain H-abstraction, the ring H-abstraction reactions are also possible. The side chain H-abstraction rate constant is in very good agreement with the available experiments and has a non-Arrhenius characteristic. Nevertheless, all the ring H-abstractions follow the Arrhenius behavior well. The over-all reaction was found to have a complex reaction mechanism in which the side chain H-abstraction is dominant below 700 K while the ring H-abstractions are competitive above 800 K. The approximate apparent activation energies E app are 15.5 and 66.4 kJ mol(-1) at 300-700 K and 800-2000 K, respectively. Graphical Abstract The calculation of the reaction rate indicates that the over-all reaction has a complex mechanism. The reaction proceeds mainly by the side chain H-abstraction at temperatures lower than 700 K and is nearly irreversible, while the competition of the ring H-abstractions becomes observable at higher temperatures and is reversible.

  18. Maternal Psychopathology Influences Infant Heart Rate Variability: Generation R Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Dierckx (Bram); J.H.M. Tulen (Joke); M.P. Lambregtse-van den Berg (Mijke); A. Tharner (Anne); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); A. Hofman (Albert); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAbstract OBJECTIVE: To assess the determinants of heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in children. The autonomic nervous system as measured by HR and HRV is considered a biological marker of psychopathology in children. METHODS: We examined the relationship of maternal

  19. Biologically Induced Hydrogen Production Drives High Rate/High Efficiency Microbial Electrosynthesis of Acetate from Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jourdin, Ludovic; Lu, Yang; Flexer, Victoria; Keller, Jurg; Freguia, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Electron-transfer pathways occurring in biocathodes are still unknown. We demonstrate here that high rates of acetate production by microbial electrosynthesis are mainly driven by an electron flux from the electrode to carbon dioxide, occurring via biologically induced hydrogen, with (99±1)%

  20. Radiolysis of confined water: hydrogen production at a high dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Caër, Sophie; Rotureau, Patricia; Brunet, Francine; Charpentier, Thibault; Blain, Guillaume; Renault, Jean Philippe; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2005-12-09

    The production of molecular hydrogen in the radiolysis of dried or hydrated nanoporous controlled-pore glasses (CPG) has been carefully studied using 10 MeV electron irradiation at high dose rate. In all cases, the H2 yield increases when the pore size decreases. Moreover, the yields measured in dried materials are two orders of magnitude smaller than those obtained in hydrated glasses. This proves that the part of the H2 coming from the surface of the material is negligible in the hydrated case. Thus, the measured yields correspond to those of nanoconfined water. Moreover, these yields are not modified by the presence of potassium bromide, which is a hydroxyl radical scavenger. This experimental observation shows that the back reaction between H2 and HO* does not take place in such confined environments. These porous materials have been characterized before and after irradiation by means of Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, which helps to understand the elementary processes taking place in this type of environment, especially the protective effect of water on the surface in the case of hydrated glasses.

  1. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol−1 catalyst h−1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells. PMID:22953041

  2. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-08-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol-1 catalyst h-1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells.

  3. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation with Ag-loaded LiNbO3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this contribiution LiNbO3 and Ag-loaded LiNbO3 photocatalysts were tested in the reaction of hydrogen evolution. The silver modified samples contained different loading of co-catalyst in the range of 0.5–4 wt%. It was essential to optimize the sample composition to achieve an efficient hydrogen evolution. The optimal ...

  4. Measurement of muon transfer rate {lambda}{sub pt} and molecular formation rate {lambda}{sub pp{mu}} in solid hydrogen targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulhauser, F.; Beveridge, J.L.; Douglas, J.L.; Maier, M.; Marshall, G.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility; Bailey, J.M. [EA Technology, Capenhurst (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Porcelli, T.A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Markushin, V.E. [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol`zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii; Martoff, C.J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-10-01

    The knowledge of muon transfer from protium to tritium is essentially theoretical and the different theoretical values disagree partially. Using solid hydrogen-tritium targets, with different tritium concentrations, we obtained precise experimental results for the transfer rate to tritium and the HH{mu} molecular formation rate. The time spectra of neutrons and alpha particles produced after DT{mu} fusion are used to determine the transfer rate {lambda}{sub pt} and the molecule formation rate {lambda}{sub pp{mu}}. (orig.). 27 refs.

  5. Incorporation of iron hydrogenase active sites into a highly stable metal-organic framework for photocatalytic hydrogen generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasan, Koroush; Lin, Qipu; Mao, ChengYu; Feng, Pingyun

    2014-09-18

    A new biomimetic heterogeneous photocatalyst ([FeFe]@ZrPF) has been synthesized through the incorporation of homogeneous complex 1 [(í-SCH2)2NC(O)C5H4N]-[Fe2(CO)6] into the highly robust zirconium-porphyrin based metal-organic framework (ZrPF). The immobilized biomimetic [Fe2S2] catalyst inside the MOF shows great improvement in hydrogen generation compared to the reference homogeneous catalyst complex 1.

  6. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest ...

  7. Induction of Low-Level Hydrogen Peroxide Generation by Unbleached Cotton Nonwovens as Potential Wound Dressing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J Vincent; Prevost, Nicolette T; Nam, Sunghyun; Hinchliffe, Doug; Condon, Brian; Yager, Dorne

    2017-03-06

    Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) generation during cotton fiber development. Traditionally, the processing of cotton into gauze involves scouring and bleaching processes that remove the components in the cuticle and primary cell wall. The use of unbleached, greige cotton fibers in dressings, has been relatively unexplored. We have recently determined that greige cotton can generate low levels of H₂O₂ (5-50 micromolar). Because this may provide advantages for the use of greige cotton-based wound dressings, we have begun to examine this in more detail. Both brown and white cotton varieties were examined in this study. Brown cotton was found to have a relatively higher hydrogen peroxide generation and demonstrated different capacities for H₂O₂ generation, varying from 1 to 35 micromolar. The H₂O₂ generation capacities of white and brown nonwoven greige cottons were also examined at different process stages with varying chronology and source parameters, from field to nonwoven fiber. The primary cell wall of nonwoven brown cotton appeared very intact, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, and possessed higher pectin levels. The levels of pectin, SOD, and polyphenolics, correlated with H₂O₂ generation.

  8. Induction of Low-Level Hydrogen Peroxide Generation by Unbleached Cotton Nonwovens as Potential Wound Dressing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vincent Edwards

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generation during cotton fiber development. Traditionally, the processing of cotton into gauze involves scouring and bleaching processes that remove the components in the cuticle and primary cell wall. The use of unbleached, greige cotton fibers in dressings, has been relatively unexplored. We have recently determined that greige cotton can generate low levels of H2O2 (5–50 micromolar. Because this may provide advantages for the use of greige cotton-based wound dressings, we have begun to examine this in more detail. Both brown and white cotton varieties were examined in this study. Brown cotton was found to have a relatively higher hydrogen peroxide generation and demonstrated different capacities for H2O2 generation, varying from 1 to 35 micromolar. The H2O2 generation capacities of white and brown nonwoven greige cottons were also examined at different process stages with varying chronology and source parameters, from field to nonwoven fiber. The primary cell wall of nonwoven brown cotton appeared very intact, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, and possessed higher pectin levels. The levels of pectin, SOD, and polyphenolics, correlated with H2O2 generation.

  9. Induction of Low-Level Hydrogen Peroxide Generation by Unbleached Cotton Nonwovens as Potential Wound Dressing Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J. Vincent; Prevost, Nicolette T.; Nam, Sunghyun; Hinchliffe, Doug; Condon, Brian; Yager, Dorne

    2017-01-01

    Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation during cotton fiber development. Traditionally, the processing of cotton into gauze involves scouring and bleaching processes that remove the components in the cuticle and primary cell wall. The use of unbleached, greige cotton fibers in dressings, has been relatively unexplored. We have recently determined that greige cotton can generate low levels of H2O2 (5–50 micromolar). Because this may provide advantages for the use of greige cotton-based wound dressings, we have begun to examine this in more detail. Both brown and white cotton varieties were examined in this study. Brown cotton was found to have a relatively higher hydrogen peroxide generation and demonstrated different capacities for H2O2 generation, varying from 1 to 35 micromolar. The H2O2 generation capacities of white and brown nonwoven greige cottons were also examined at different process stages with varying chronology and source parameters, from field to nonwoven fiber. The primary cell wall of nonwoven brown cotton appeared very intact, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, and possessed higher pectin levels. The levels of pectin, SOD, and polyphenolics, correlated with H2O2 generation. PMID:28272304

  10. Impact-generated Tsunamis: An Over-rated Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosh, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    A number of authors have suggested that oceanic waves (tsunami) created by the impact of relatively small asteroids into the Earth's oceans might cause widespread devastation to coastal cities. If correct, this suggests that asteroids > 100 m in diameter may pose a serious hazard to humanity and could require a substantial expansion of the current efforts to identify earth-crossing asteroids > 1 km in diameter. The debate on this hazard was recently altered by the release of a document previously inaccessible to the scientific community. In 1968 the US Office of Naval Research commissioned a summary of several decades of research into the hazard proposed by waves generated by nuclear explosions in the ocean. Authored by tsunami expert William Van Dorn, this 173-page report entitled Handbook of Explosion-Generated Water Waves affords new insight into the process of impact wave formation, propagation, and run up onto the shoreline.

  11. Coolant rate distribution in horizontal steam generator under natural circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitrioukhin, A. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    In the presentation the major factors determining the conditions of NCC (Natural Coolant Circulation) in the primary circuit and in particular conditions of coolant rate distribution on the horizontal tubes of PGV-1000 in NPP with VVER-1000 under NCC are considered. 5 refs.

  12. Pyrrole Hydrogenation over Rh(111) and Pt(111) Single-Crystal Surfaces and Hydrogenation Promotion Mediated by 1-Methylpyrrole: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliewer, Christopher J.; Bieri, Marco; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-03-04

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of pyrrole over both Pt(111) and Rh(111) single-crystal surfaces at Torr pressures (3 Torr pyrrole, 30 Torr H{sub 2}) to form pyrrolidine and the minor product butylamine. Over Pt(111) at 298 K it was found that pyrrole adsorbs in an upright geometry cleaving the N-H bond to bind through the nitrogen evidenced by SFG data. Over Rh(111) at 298 K pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry relative to the surface through the p-aromatic system. A pyrroline surface reaction intermediate, which was not detected in the gas phase, was seen by SFG during the hydrogenation over both surfaces. Significant enhancement of the reaction rate was achieved over both metal surfaces by adsorbing 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. SFG vibrational spectroscopic results indicate that reaction promotion is achieved by weakening the bonding between the N-containing products and the metal surface because of lateral interactions on the surface between 1-methylpyrrole and the reaction species, reducing the desorption energy of the products. It was found that the ring-opening product butylamine was a reaction poison over both surfaces, but this effect can be minimized by treating the catalyst surfaces with 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. The reaction rate was not enhanced with elevated temperatures, and SFG suggests desorption of pyrrole at elevated temperatures.

  13. The effect of slightly faster strain rates and internal hydrogen on uranium-0. 8 weight percent titanium alloy mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, E.L.

    1990-10-10

    Mechanical testing of uranium-0.8 wt % titanium (U-0.8 wt % Ti) alloys can affect the outcome of mechanical properties, primarily ductility, by varying the crosshead velocity, which changes the strain rate. However, most specifications that govern mechanical properties of this alloy reference ASTM E-8, which limits the speed to 0.5 in./in. of gage length per minute. Our current procedure for testing U-0.8 Ti is not at the maximum speed permitted in ASTM E-8, so an experiment was designed to evaluate the effect of maximizing the crosshead velocity per ASTM E-8. In order to create a fair assessment, tensile specimens were prepared that were low in internal hydrogen (0.02 ppM) and higher in internal hydrogen (0.36 ppM). External hydrogen effects were minimized by testing in a controlled environment that contained less than 10% relative humidity. Test results showed that for the low hydrogen test group, increasing the crosshead velocity caused a significant increase in reduction in area (RA), but not in elongation. For the higher hydrogen test group, increasing the speed resulted in a significant increase in RA and an increase, though not statistically significant, in elongation. Of equal importance was an observation that strongly suggests a correlation between material defects, like inclusion clusters, and higher hydrogen content, especially at the slower strain rate that would explain the erratic behavior in ductile properties associated with this alloy. As a result of this study, increasing the crosshead velocity to 0.32 in./min is recommended for mechanical testing of U-0.8 Ti alloys. 9 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Nano-design of quantum dot-based photocatalysts for hydrogen generation using advanced surface molecular chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation in a suspension system requires a sophisticated nano-device that combines a photon absorber with effective redox catalysts. This study demonstrates an innovative molecular linking strategy for fabricating photocatalytic materials that allow effective charge separation of excited carriers, followed by efficient hydrogen evolution. The method for the sequential replacement of ligands with appropriate molecules developed in this study tethers both quantum dots (QDs), as photosensitizers, and metal nanoparticles, as hydrogen evolution catalysts, to TiO2 surfaces in a controlled manner at the nano-level. Combining hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions on the surface, CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and an Au-Pt alloy were attached to TiO2 without overlapping during the synthesis. The resultant nano-photocatalysts achieved substantially high-performance visible-light-driven photocatalysis for hydrogen evolution. All syntheses were conducted at room temperature and in ambient air, providing a promising route for fabricating visible-light-responsive photocatalysts.

  15. Copolymerization of Ethylene and Propylene Using 4th Generation Ziegler- Natta Catalyst: Influence of Cocatalyst, External Electron Donor and Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mehtarani

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Copolymerization of ethylene and propylene was investigated using a 4th generation phthalate Ziegler-Natta catalyst in normal hexane in a Buchi reactor. The effects of different mole fractions of [Al]/[Ti], [Si]/[Al] and various amounts of hydrogen on productivity and weight percent of ethylene on the product, were studied. In the copolymerization reactions, tri-isobutyl aluminum (TiBAl was used as cocatalyst instead of triethyl aluminum (TEAl because TiBAl produced a more amorphous copolymer. In molar ratio [TiBAl]/[Ti] = 480 the catalyst activity was at maximum and ethylene content in this ratio was at minimum. Cyclohexyl-methyldimethoxy silane was used as external donor. In molar ratio [Si]/[TiBAl] = 0.05, the copolymer showed more amorphous behavior. In this molar ratio, the external donor decreased the productivity of the catalyst and a further increase of external donor concentration increased the productivity. Hydrogen increased the productivity of the catalyst and decreased the ethylene content of the copolymer in low concentration. In high concentration, however, hydrogen decreased the productivity and increased the ethylene content of the copolymer. Hydrogen as a chain transfer agent decreased the viscosity average molecular weight.

  16. Neural Rating Regression with Abstractive Tips Generation for Recommendation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Piji; Wang, Zihao; Ren, Zhaochun; Bing, Lidong; Lam, Wai

    2017-01-01

    Recently, some E-commerce sites launch a new interaction box called Tips on their mobile apps. Users can express their experience and feelings or provide suggestions using short texts typically several words or one sentence. In essence, writing some tips and giving a numerical rating are two facets of a user's product assessment action, expressing the user experience and feelings. Jointly modeling these two facets is helpful for designing a better recommendation system. While some existing mo...

  17. Measurement of the Rate of Muon Capture in Hydrogen Gas and Determination of the Proton's Pseudoscalar Coupling $g_P$

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V A; Case, T A; Chitwood, D B; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K L; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Özben, C S; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2007-01-01

    The rate of nuclear muon capture by the proton has been measured using a new experimental technique based on a time projection chamber operating in ultra-clean, deuterium-depleted hydrogen gas at 1 MPa pressure. The capture rate was obtained from the difference between the measured $\\mu^-$ disappearance rate in hydrogen and the world average for the $\\mu^+$ decay rate. The target's low gas density of 1% compared to liquid hydrogen is key to avoiding uncertainties that arise from the formation of muonic molecules. The capture rate from the hyperfine singlet ground state of the $\\mu p$ atom is measured to be $\\Lambda_S=725.0 \\pm 17.4 s^{-1}$, from which the induced pseudoscalar coupling of the nucleon, $g_P(q^2=-0.88 m_\\mu^2)=7.3 \\pm 1.1$, is extracted. This result is consistent with theoretical predictions for $g_P$ that are based on the approximate chiral symmetry of QCD.

  18. Efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation using heterostructures of Si and chemically exfoliated metallic MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qi; Meng, Fei; English, Caroline R; Cabán-Acevedo, Miguel; Shearer, Melinda J; Liang, Dong; Daniel, Andrew S; Hamers, Robert J; Jin, Song

    2014-06-18

    We report the preparation and characterization of highly efficient and robust photocathodes based on heterostructures of chemically exfoliated metallic 1T-MoS2 and planar p-type Si for solar-driven hydrogen production. Photocurrents up to 17.6 mA/cm(2) at 0 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode were achieved under simulated 1 sun irradiation, and excellent stability was demonstrated over long-term operation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed low charge-transfer resistances at the semiconductor/catalyst and catalyst/electrolyte interfaces, and surface photoresponse measurements also demonstrated slow carrier recombination dynamics and consequently efficient charge carrier separation, providing further evidence for the superior performance. Our results suggest that chemically exfoliated 1T-MoS2/Si heterostructures are promising earth-abundant alternatives to photocathodes based on noble metal catalysts for solar-driven hydrogen production.

  19. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  20. Measurement of dark, particle-generated superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production and decay in the subtropical and temperate North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Kelly L.; Schneider, Robin J.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include the superoxide radical (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are thought to be generated mostly through photochemical reactions and biological activity in seawater and can influence trace metal speciation in the ocean. This study reports the results of an intercomparison of two methods to measure particle-generated [O2-] in seawater samples, as well as measurements of particle-generated O2- and H2O2 concentrations, decay kinetics, and dark production rates in seawater samples at Station ALOHA and (O2- only) in the southern California Current Ecosystem. O2- was measured using two different methods relying on chemiluminescence detection. The first method measured the difference between steady-state [O2-] in filtered and unfiltered seawater, while the second method (standard method) measured O2- decay to baseline in freshly filtered seawater. Because both methods detected [O2-] relative to the background signal from filtered seawater, both should have measured [O2-] generated by particles (presumably biota). However, the O2- concentrations determined by the first method were always much smaller than those obtained from the second (standard) method. Follow-up laboratory and field experiments showed that the increased signal in the standard method was due to a filtration artifact that could neither be eliminated nor consistently accounted for under the tested conditions. We therefore recommend the first method for measuring particle-generated [O2-]. Measured by this method, Station ALOHA had particle-generated O2- concentrations that ranged from undetectable to 0.02 nM, with production rates less than 0.6 nM hr-1 and decay rate coefficients from 0.003 to 0.014 s-1. The southern California Current Ecosystem had particle-generated O2- concentrations that ranged from undetectable to 0.05 nM, with production rates up to 4.7 nM hr-1 and decay rate coefficients from 0.006 to 0.017 s-1. H2O2 concentrations were measured by

  1. Power generation in fuel cells using liquid methanol and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is directed to an encapsulated fuel cell including a methanol source that feeds liquid methanol (CH.sub.3 OH) to an anode. The anode is electrical communication with a load that provides electrical power. The fuel cell also includes a hydrogen peroxide source that feeds liquid hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2 O.sub.2) to the cathode. The cathode is also in communication with the electrical load. The anode and cathode are in contact with and separated by a proton-conducting polymer electrolyte membrane.

  2. Thermodynamic investigation of waste cooking oil based hydrogen generation system with chemical looping process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahla Faleh

    2016-07-01

    The results show that coke formation can be thermodynamically inhibited by increasing the S/C ratio and/or the NiO/C ratio. The conditions that maximize hydrogen production, minimize methane and carbon monoxide content as well as avoid coke formation at thermoneutral conditions were found to be S/C = 5, T = 600 °C and NiO/C = 0.493. Under these conditions, a hydrogen yield of 144.3 mol/kg of soybean waste cooking oil can be obtained, which appears to be an attractive result for starting experimental research.

  3. Compact, high-repetition-rate source for broadband sum-frequency generation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Zsuzsanna; Petrov, Valentin; Mero, Mark

    2017-06-01

    We present a high-efficiency optical parametric source for broadband vibrational sum-frequency generation (BB-VSFG) for the chemically important mid-infrared spectral range at 2800-3600 cm-1 to study hydrogen bonding interactions affecting the structural organization of biomolecules at water interfaces. The source consists of a supercontinuum-seeded, dual-beam optical parametric amplifier with two broadband infrared output beams and a chirped sum-frequency mixing stage providing narrowband visible pulses with adjustable bandwidth. Utilizing a pulse energy of only 60 μJ from a turn-key, 1.03-μm pump laser operating at a repetition rate of 100 kHz, the source delivers 6-cycle infrared pulses at 1.5 and 3.2 μm with pulse energies of 4.6 and 1.8 μJ, respectively, and narrowband pulses at 0.515 μm with a pulse energy of 5.0 μJ. The 3.2-μm pulses are passively carrier envelope phase stabilized with fluctuations at the 180-mrad level over a 10-s time period. The 1.5-μm beamline can be exploited to deliver pump pulses for time-resolved studies after suitable frequency up-conversion. The high efficiency, stability, and two orders of magnitude higher repetition rate of the source compared to typically employed systems offer great potential for providing a boost in sensitivity in BB-VSFG experiments at a reduced cost.

  4. Degradation of fast electrons energy and atomic hydrogen generation in an emission plume from atomic power stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotkov, G. A.; Penin, S. T.; Chistyakova, L. K.

    2006-02-01

    The problem of remote detecting of a radioactivity in emissions from atomic power stations (APS) is devoted. The basic radionuclides contained in emissions of nuclear energy stations with various types of reactors have been analyzed. The total power spectrum of electrons is determined taking into account their multiplication. Physical and chemical reactions reducing to generation of atomic hydrogen are considered. For definition of the radiating volume in the emission from APS, the spatial distribution of atomic hydrogen concentration has been calculated with the use Pasquill- Gifford model. Power radiating by the emission plume from the APS with the BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) is estimated. It has been shown, that for estimation of radiation effect on the atmosphere, it is necessary to take into account many generations of electrons, because they have average energies exceeding considerably the ionization potentials for atoms and molecules of the atmospheric components. The area of the maximum concentration of atomic hydrogen in an emission plume can be determined by modelling the transport processes of admixture. The power radiated at frequency 1420 MHz by the volume 1 km from the APS emissions can amount to ~10 -13 W that allows one to detect the total level of activity confidently. The possible configuration of an emission plume has been calculated for various atmospheric stratification and underlying surfaces.

  5. Biological hydrogen generation. Research-accompanied technology risk assessment. Results of a literature research on the progress of research and technology in biological hydrogen generation. Short report; Biologische Wasserstoffgewinnung. Forschungsbegleitende Technikfolgenabschaetzung. Ergebnisse einer Literaturrecherche zur Entwicklung von Forschung und Technik bei der biologischen Wasserstoffgewinnung. Kurzbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-02-01

    Concerning the subject complex ``biological hydrogen generation``, an on-line literature research was carried out in order to document the state of the art and research in the fields of biophotolytic hydrogen generation, photoproduction of hydrogen from biomass, and hydrogen generation from biomass by means of fermentation processes. (SR) [Deutsch] Zu dem Themenkomplex Biologische Wasserstoffgewinnung wurde eine online-Literaturrecherche durchgefuehrt um den Stand der Forschung und Technologie auf den Gebieten biophotolytische Wasserstofferzeugung, Photoproduktion von Wasserstoff aus Biomasse und Wasserstofferzeugung aus Biomasse durch Gaerungsprozesse darzustellen. (SR)

  6. Engineering Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Catalysts for Water-Splitting Hydrogen Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Xianyi; Tang, Yingying; Duus, Jens Øllgaard

    2017-01-01

    Development of advanced energy conversion and storage technologies is essential for optimizing the integration of sustainable energy resources into current-running power grid systems. As one of the key energy-storage carriers, hydrogen (H2) possesses ultrahigh gravimetric energy density, eco...

  7. Integration of first and second generation biofuels: Fermentative hydrogen production from wheat grain and straw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panagiotopoulos, I.A.; Bakker, R.R.C.; Vrije, de G.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Koukios, E.G.

    2013-01-01

    Integrating of lignocellulose-based and starch-rich biomass-based hydrogen production was investigated by mixing wheat straw hydrolysate with a wheat grain hydrolysate for improved fermentation. Enzymatic pretreatment and hydrolysis of wheat grains led to a hydrolysate with a sugar concentration of

  8. Environmental meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) disinfection using dry-mist-generated hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, M.D.; Kristoffersen, K.; Slotsbjerg, T.

    2008-01-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major problem in hospitals worldwide. Hand hygiene is recognised as crucial in limiting the spread of MRSA but less is known about the role of MRSA reservoirs in the inanimate hospital environment. We evaluated the effect of hydrogen peroxide...

  9. Design of a Fuel Processor System for Generating Hydrogen for Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolavennu, Panini K.; Telotte, John C.; Palanki, Srinivas

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to design a train of tubular reactors that use a methane feed to produce hydrogen of the desired purity so that it can be utilized by a fuel cell for automotive applications. Reaction engineering principles, which are typically covered at the undergraduate level, are utilized to design this reactor train. It is shown…

  10. Comprehensive rate coefficients for electron-collision-induced transitions in hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrinceanu, D. [Department of Physics, Texas Southern University, Houston, TX 77004 (United States); Onofrio, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia " Galileo Galilei," Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Sadeghpour, H. R., E-mail: daniel.vrinceanu@gmail.com, E-mail: onofrior@gmail.com, E-mail: hrsadeghpour@gmail.com [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Energy-changing electron-hydrogen atom collisions are crucial to regulating the energy balance in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas and are relevant to the formation of stellar atmospheres, recombination in H II clouds, primordial recombination, three-body recombination, and heating in ultracold and fusion plasmas. Computational modeling of electron-hydrogen collision has been attempted through quantum mechanical scattering state-to-state calculations of transitions involving low-lying energy levels in hydrogen (with principal quantum number n < 7) and at large principal quantum numbers using classical trajectory techniques. Analytical expressions are proposed that interpolate the current quantum mechanical and classical trajectory results for electron-hydrogen scattering in the entire range of energy levels for nearly the entire temperature range of interest in astrophysical environments. An asymptotic expression for the Born cross section is interpolated with a modified expression previously derived for electron-hydrogen scattering in the Rydberg regime using classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. The derived formula is compared to existing numerical data for transitions involving low principal quantum numbers, and the dependence of the deviations on temperature is discussed.

  11. Imaging the Extended Hot Hydrogen Exosphere at Mars to Determine the Water Escape Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Dolon

    2017-08-01

    ACS SBC imaging of the extended hydrogen exosphere of Mars is proposed to identify the hot hydrogen population present in the exosphere of Mars. Determining the characteristics of this population and the underlying processes responsible for its production are critical towards constraining the escape flux of H from Mars, which in turn is directly related to the water escape history of Mars. Since the hot atoms appear mainly at high altitudes, these observations will be scheduled when Mars is far from Earth allowing us to image the hot hydrogen atoms at high altitudes where they dominate the population. The altitude coverage by HST will extend beyond 30,000 km or 8.8 Martian radii in this case, which makes it perfect for this study as orbiting spacecraft remain at low altitudes (MAVEN apoapse is 6000 km) and cannot separate hot atoms from the thermal population at those altitudes. The observations will also be carried out when Mars is near aphelion, the atmospheric temperature is low, and the thermal population has a small scale height, allowing the clear characterization of the hot hydrogen layer. Another advantage of conducting this study in this cycle is that the solar activity is near its minimum, allowing us to discriminate between changes in the hot hydrogen population from processes taking place within the atmosphere of Mars and changes due to external drivers like the solar wind, producing this non-thermal population. This proposal is part of the HST UV initiative.

  12. NEW MATERIAL NEEDS FOR HYDROCARBON FUEL PROCESSING: Generating Hydrogen for the PEM Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrauto, R.; Hwang, S.; Shore, L.; Ruettinger, W.; Lampert, J.; Giroux, T.; Liu, Y.; Ilinich, O.

    2003-08-01

    The hydrogen economy is fast approaching as petroleum reserves are rapidly consumed. The fuel cell promises to deliver clean and efficient power by combining hydrogen and oxygen in a simple electrochemical device that directly converts chemical energy to electrical energy. Hydrogen, the most plentiful element available, can be extracted from water by electrolysis. One can imagine capturing energy from the sun and wind and/or from the depths of the earth to provide the necessary power for electrolysis. Alternative energy sources such as these are the promise for the future, but for now they are not feasible for power needs across the globe. A transitional solution is required to convert certain hydrocarbon fuels to hydrogen. These fuels must be available through existing infrastructures such as the natural gas pipeline. The present review discusses the catalyst and adsorbent technologies under development for the extraction of hydrogen from natural gas to meet the requirements for the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The primary market is for residential applications, where pipeline natural gas will be the source of H2 used to power the home. Other applications including the reforming of methanol for portable power applications such as laptop computers, cellular phones, and personnel digital equipment are also discussed. Processing natural gas containing sulfur requires many materials, for example, adsorbents for desulfurization, and heterogeneous catalysts for reforming (either autothermal or steam reforming) water gas shift, preferential oxidation of CO, and anode tail gas combustion. All these technologies are discussed for natural gas and to a limited extent for reforming methanol.

  13. Noble-metal-free NiO@Ni-ZnO/reduced graphene oxide/CdS heterostructure for efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fayun; Zhang, Laijun; Wang, Xuewen; Zhang, Rongbin

    2017-11-01

    Noble-metal-free semiconductor materials are widely used for photocatalytic hydrogen generation because of their low cost. ZnO-based heterostructures with synergistic effects exhibit an effective photocatalytic activity. In this work, NiO@Ni-ZnO/reduced graphene oxide (rGO)/CdS heterostructures are synthesized by a multi-step method. rGO nanosheets and CdS nanoparticles were introduced into the heterostructures via a redox reaction and light-assisted growth, respectively. A novel Ni-induced electrochemical growth method was developed to prepare ZnO rods from Zn powder. NiO@Ni-ZnO/rGO/CdS heterostructures with a wide visible-light absorption range exhibited highly photocatalytic hydrogen generation rates under UV-vis and visible light irradiation. The enhanced photocatalytic activity is attributed to the Ni nanoparticles that act as cocatalysts for capturing photoexcited electrons and the improved synergistic effect between ZnO and CdS due to the rGO nanosheets acting as photoexcited carrier transport channels.

  14. Hydrogen Generation through Solar Photocatalytic Processes: A Review of the Configuration and the Properties of Effective Metal-Based Semiconductor Nanomaterials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laura Clarizia; Danilo Russo; Ilaria Di Somma; Roberto Andreozzi; Raffaele Marotta

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting and organic reforming based on nano-sized composites are gaining increasing interest due to the possibility of generating hydrogen by employing solar energy with low environmental impact...

  15. A new strategy to improve the high-rate performance of hydrogen storage alloys with MoS2 nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L. X.; Zhu, Y. F.; Yang, C. C.; Chen, Z. W.; Zhang, D. M.; Jiang, Q.

    2016-11-01

    The poor high-rate dischargeability of negative electrode materials (hydrogen storage alloys) has hindered applications of nickel metal hydride batteries in high-power fields, new-energy vehicles, power tools, military devices, etc. In this work, a new strategy is developed to improve the high-rate performance of hydrogen storage alloys by coating MoS2 nanosheets on alloy surfaces. The capacity retention rate of the composite electrode reaches 50.5% at a discharge current density of 3000 mA g-1, which is 2.7 times that of bare alloy (18.4%). The density functional theory simulations indicate that such an outstanding performance is derived from adjustments of ion concentrations at the electrode/electrolyte interface by MoS2 nanosheets: (1) the higher OH- concentration facilitates the electrochemical reaction of MHads + OH- - e- → M + H2O; and (2) the lower H+ concentration leads to a large gradient between the electrode/electrolyte interface and interior of alloys, which is beneficial for the diffusion of atomic hydrogen during the discharging process.

  16. Electrodeposited synthesis of self-supported Ni-P cathode for efficient electrocatalytic hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixian Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the key challenges for electrochemical water splitting is the development of low-cost and efficient hydrogen evolution cathode. In this work, a self-supported Ni-P cathode was synthesized by a facile electrodeposition method. The composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The Ni-P cathode performed low onset over-potential, good catalytic activity and long-term stability under neutral and alkaline conditions. The mechanism of Ni-P electrode for hydrogen production was discussed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The excellent performance of Ni-P cathode was mainly attributed to the synergistic effect of phosphate anions and the self-supported feature.

  17. Raising efficiency of hydrogen generation from alkaline water electrolysis - Energy saving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, Vladimir M.; Tasic, Gvozden S.; Maksic, Aleksandar D.; Saponjic, Djordje P.; Marceta Kaninski, Milica P. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Department of Physical Chemistry, 11001 Belgrade, POB 522 (RS); Miulovic, Snezana M. [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physical Chemistry, 11001 Belgrade, POB 276 (RS)

    2010-11-15

    This paper presents an attempt to make the alkaline electrolytic production of hydrogen more efficient by adding in situ activating compounds in ionic and complex form. Cobalt and tungsten based ionic activators (i.a.), added directly into the electrolyte during the electrolytic process, reduce energy requirements per mass unit of hydrogen produced for about 15%, compared to non-activated system, for a number of current densities in a wide temperature range. Energy saving is higher at higher temperatures and on higher current densities. Structural and morphological characteristic of deposit formed on the cathode during the electrolytic process reveal very interesting and unique pattern with highly developed surface area and uniform distribution of the pores. Obtained deposit also exhibit a long term stability. (author)

  18. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.S.; Moeller-Holst, S.; Webb, D.M.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1998-08-01

    The objective is to develop and demonstrate a 4 kW, hydrogen-fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) stack, based on non-machined stainless steel hardware and on membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) of low catalyst loadings. The stack is designed to operate at ambient pressure on the air-side and can accommodate operation at higher fuel pressures, if so required. This is to be accomplished by working jointly with a fuel cell stack manufacturer, based on a CRADA. The performance goals are 57% energy conversion efficiency hydrogen-to-electricity (DC) at a power density of 0.9 kW/liter for a stack operating at ambient inlet pressures. The cost goal is $600/kW, based on present materials costs.

  19. Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooteghem Van, Suellen

    2005-09-13

    A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

  20. Restructuring the crystalline cellulose hydrogen bond network enhances its depolymerization rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishir P.S. Chundawat; Giovanni Bellesia; Nirmal Uppugundla; Leonardo da Costa Sousa; Dahai Gao; Albert M. Cheh; Umesh P. Agarwal; Christopher M. Bianchetti; George N. Phillips; Paul Langan; Venkatesh Balan; S. Gnanakaran; Bruce E. Dale

    2011-01-01

    Conversion of lignocellulose to biofuels is partly inefficient due to the deleterious impact of cellulose crystallinity on enzymatic saccharification. We demonstrate how the synergistic activity of cellulases was enhanced by altering the hydrogen bond network within crystalline cellulose fibrils. We provide a molecular-scale explanation of these phenomena through...

  1. Hard graphitelike hydrogenated amorphous carbon grown at high rates by a remote plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Zaharia, T.; Creatore, M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) deposited from an Ar-C 2H2 expanding thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition (ETP-CVD) is reported. The downstream plasma region of an ETP is characterized by a low electron temperature (∼0.3 eV), which leads to an ion driven chemistry and negligible physical...

  2. Fabrication of A/R-TiO2 composite for enhanced photoelectrochemical performance: Solar hydrogen generation and dye degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadik, Mahadeo A.; An, Gil Woo; David, Selvaraj; Choi, Sun Hee; Cho, Min; Jang, Jum Suk

    2017-12-01

    Anatase/rutile TiO2 nanorods composites were prepared by a facile hydrothermal method followed by dip coating method using titanium isopropoxide in acetic acid and ethanol solvent. The effects of the titanium isopropoxide precursor concentration, on the formation of dip coated anatase/rutile TiO2 nanorods composite were systematically explored. The growth of anatase on rutile TiO2 nanorods can be controlled by varying the titanium isopropoxide concentration. The morphological study reveals that anatase TiO2 nanograins formed on the surface of rutile TiO2 nanorod arrays through dip coating method. Photoelectrochemical analyses showed that the enhancement of the photocatalytic activities of the samples is affected by the anatase nanograins present on the rutile TiO2 nanorods, which can induce the separation of electrons and holes. To interpret the photoelectrochemical behaviors, the prepared photoelectrodes were applied in photoelectrochemical solar hydrogen generation and orange II dye degradation. The optimized photocurrent density of 1.8 mA cm-2 and the 625 μmol hydrogen generation was observed for 10 mM anatase/rutile TiO2 NRs composites. Additionally, 96% removal of the orange II dye was achieved within 5 h during oxidative degradation under solar light irradiation. One of the benefits of high specific surface area and the efficient photogenerated charge transport in the anatase/rutile TiO2 nanorod composite improves the photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation and orange dye degradation compared to the rutile TiO2. Thus, our strategy provides a promising, stable, and low cost alternative to existing photocatalysts and is expected to attract considerable attention for industrial applications.

  3. On-board hydrogen generation for transport applications: the HotSpot™ methanol processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Neil; Ellis, Suzanne R.; Frost, Jonathan C.; Golunski, Stanislaw E.; van Keulen, Arjan N. J.; Lindewald, Nicklas G.; Reinkingh, Jessica G.

    In the absence of a hydrogen infrastructure, development of effective on-board fuel processors is likely to be critical to the commercialisation of fuel-cell cars. The HotSpot™ reactor converts methanol, water and air in a single compact catalyst bed into a reformate containing mainly CO2 and hydrogen (and unreacted nitrogen). The process occurs by a combination of exothermic partial oxidation and endothermic steam reforming of methanol, to produce 750 l of hydrogen per hour from a 245-cm3 reactor. The relative contribution of each reaction can be tuned to match the system requirements at a given time. Scale-up is achieved by the parallel combination of the required number of individual HotSpot reactors, which are fed from a central manifold. Using this modular design, the start-up and transient characteristics of a large fuel-processor are identical to that of a single reactor. When vaporised liquid feed and air are introduced into cold reactors, 100% output is achieved in 50 s; subsequent changes in throughput result in instantaneous changes in output. Surplus energy within the fuel-cell powertrain can be directed to the manifold, where it can be used to vaporise the liquid feeds and so promote steam reforming, resulting in high system efficiency. The small amount of CO that is produced by the HotSpot reactions is attenuated to methanol, but are being applied to other organic fuels.

  4. Sequential generation of hydrogen and methane from glutamic acid through combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ao; Cheng, Jun; Lin, Richen; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-03-01

    Glutamic acid can hardly produce hydrogen via dark- or photo-fermentation without pretreatment. In this study, a novel process of acidogenic pretreatment with bacteria and zeolite treatment for NH4(+) removal was proposed to use glutamic acid as feedstock in photo-fermentation for efficient hydrogen production. Glutamic acid pretreated with acidogenic bacteria produces soluble metabolite products. After zeolite treatment, the acidulated solution, which mainly contains acetate, butyrate, and NH4(+), shows a decrease in NH4(+) concentration from 36.7mM to 3.2mM (NH4(+) removal efficiency of 91.1%). After NH4(+) removal, the treated solution is incubated with photosynthetic bacteria, exhibiting a maximum hydrogen yield of 292.9mL/g(-glutamic acid) during photo-fermentation. The residual solution from photo-fermentation is reused by methanogenic bacteria to produce a maximum methane yield of 102.7mL/g. The heating value conversion efficiency from glutamic acid to gas fuel significantly increases from 18.9% during photo-fermentation to 40.9% in the combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL FOR HYDROGEN GENERATION DURING GROUTING OPERATIONS IN C-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-07-12

    C-reactor disassembly basin is being prepared for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities will consist primarily of immobilizing contaminated scrap components and structures in a grout-like formulation. The disassembly basin will be the first area of the C-reactor building that will be immobilized. The scrap components contain aluminum alloy materials. Any aluminum will corrode very rapidly when it comes in contact with the very alkaline grout (pH > 13), and as a result would produce hydrogen gas. To address this potential deflagration/explosion hazard, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) reviewed and evaluated existing experimental and analytical studies of this issue to determine if any process constraints are necessary. The risk of accumulation of a flammable mixture of hydrogen above the surface of the water during the injection of grout into the C-reactor disassembly area is low if the assessment of the aluminum surface area is reliable. Conservative calculations estimate that there is insufficient aluminum present in the basin areas to result in significant hydrogen accumulation in this local region. The minimum safety margin (or factor) on a 60% LFL criterion for a local region of the basin (i.e., Horizontal Tube Storage) was greater than 3. Calculations also demonstrated that a flammable situation in the vapor space above the basin is unlikely. Although these calculations are conservative, there are some measures that may be taken to further minimize the risk of developing a flammable condition during grouting operations.

  6. Performance of catalysts CuO-ZnO-Al 2O 3, CuO-ZnO-Al 2O 3-Pt-Rh, and Pt-Rh in a small reformer for hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Yung; Sun, Yu-Ming; Chou, Chung-Yang; Su, Chin-Chia

    This study experimentally investigates the performances of catalysts CuO-ZnO-Al 2O 3, CuO-ZnO-Al 2O 3-Pt-Rh, and Pt-Rh in a reformer designed to generate hydrogen from a solution of methanol and water for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The results show that both of the methanol conversion and the hydrogen yield rates increase with temperature. For the three catalysts tested, catalyst CuO-ZnO-Al 2O 3 provides the best performance at temperatures lower than 320 °C. However, at higher temperatures, the performance of this catalyst deteriorates, while that of CuO-ZnO-Al 2O 3-Pt-Rh and Pt-Rh continue to improve. It suggests that the addition of Pt and Rh to the original CuO-ZnO-Al 2O 3 catalyst has a stabilizing effect upon the reforming process under higher temperature conditions. The results also show that a higher methanol feed rate reduces the methanol conversion rate, but increases the hydrogen yield rate. It is found that both of the methanol conversion and the hydrogen yield rates reduce as the steam-to-methanol ratio is increased. Finally, the performance can be significantly improved by introducing a turbulence inducer upstream of the catalyst carrier and by increasing both the length and the cell density of the honeycomb structure.

  7. Photoelectrochemical water splitting and hydrogen generation by a spontaneously formed InGaN nanowall network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvi, N. H., E-mail: nhalvi@isom.upm.es, E-mail: r.noetzel@isom.upm.es; Soto Rodriguez, P. E. D.; Kumar, Praveen; Gómez, V. J.; Aseev, P.; Nötzel, R., E-mail: nhalvi@isom.upm.es, E-mail: r.noetzel@isom.upm.es [ISOM Institute for Systems Based on Optoelectronics and Microtechnology, ETSI Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alvi, A. H. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Alvi, M. A. [Department of Chemistry, Government College University, Faisalabad (Pakistan); Willander, M. [Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Campus Norrköping, Linköping University, 60174 Norrköping (Sweden)

    2014-06-02

    We investigate photoelectrochemical water splitting by a spontaneously formed In-rich InGaN nanowall network, combining the material of choice with the advantages of surface texturing for light harvesting by light scattering. The current density for the InGaN-nanowalls-photoelectrode at zero voltage versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode is 3.4 mA cm{sup −2} with an incident-photon-to-current-conversion efficiency (IPCE) of 16% under 350 nm laser illumination with 0.075 W·cm{sup −2} power density. In comparison, the current density for a planar InGaN-layer-photoelectrode is 2 mA cm{sup −2} with IPCE of 9% at zero voltage versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The H{sub 2} generation rates at zero externally applied voltage versus the Pt counter electrode per illuminated area are 2.8 and 1.61 μmol·h{sup −1}·cm{sup −2} for the InGaN nanowalls and InGaN layer, respectively, revealing ∼57% enhancement for the nanowalls.

  8. Generation of three-octave-spanning transient Raman comb in hydrogen-filled hollow-core PCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, F; Belli, F; Abdolvand, A; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2015-03-15

    A noise-seeded transient comb of Raman sidebands spanning three octaves from 180 to 2400 nm, is generated by pumping a hydrogen-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber with 26-μJ, 300-fs pulses at 800 nm. The pump pulses are spectrally broadened by both Kerr and Raman-related self-phase modulation (SPM), and the broadening is then transferred to the Raman lines. In spite of the high intensity, and in contrast to bulk gas-cell based experiments, neither SPM broadening nor ionization are detrimental to comb formation.

  9. Reforming water to generate hydrogen using mechanical alloy; El reformado del agua para generar hidrogeno mediante aleado mecanico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena F, D. L.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this research was to generate a hydrogen production system by means of mechanical milling, in which 0.1 g of magnesium were weighed using a volume of 300 μL for each water solvent (H{sub 2}O) and methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) in a container to start mechanical milling for 2, 4 and 6 h. Once the mechanical milling was finished, the hydrogen that was produced every two hours was measured to determine the appropriate milling time in the production, also in each period of time samples of the powders produced during the milling of Mg were taken, in this process we used characterization techniques such as: X-ray diffraction at an angle of 2θi 5 and 2θf 90 degrees and scanning electron microscopy, taking micrographs of 100, 500, 1000 and 5000 magnifications. According to the mechanical milling results hydrogen was obtained when using water, as well as with methanol. In the techniques of X-ray diffraction characterization different results were obtained before and after the milling, since by the diffractogram s is possible to observe how the magnesium to be put in the mechanical milling along with the water and methanol was diminishing to be transformed into hydroxide and magnesium oxide, as well as in the micrographs taken with scanning electron microscopy the change in the magnesium morphology to hydroxide and magnesium oxide is observed. (Author)

  10. DESIGN, SYNTHESIS AND STUDY OF MULTI-COMPONENT AND INTEGRATED SYSTEMS FOR LIGHT-DRIVEN HYDROGEN GENERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Richard Eisenberg

    2012-07-18

    The research focussed on fundamental problems in the conversion of light to stored chemical energy. Specifically, work was completed on the design, synthesis and study of multi-component super- and supramolecular systems for photoinduced charge separation, one of the key steps in artificial photosynthesis, and on the use of these and related systems for the photochemical generation of H2 from water. At the center of these systems are chromophores comprised of square planar coordinated Pt(II) ions with arylacetylide and either diimine or terpyridyl ligands. Previous work had shown that the chromophores are photoluminescent in fluid solution with long-lived metal-to-ligand charge transfer (3MLCT) excited states that are necessarily directional. An advance which set the stage for a number of proposed studies was the light-driven production of hydrogen from water using a Pt(terpyridyl)(arylacetylide)+ chromophore and a sacrificial electron donor. The reaction is catalytic and appears to rival previously reported ruthenium bipyridyl systems in terms of H2 production. Variation of system components and mechanistic studies were conducted to understand better the individual steps in the overall process and how to improve its efficiency. Success with light driven H2 generation was employed as a key probe as new systems were constructed consisting of triads for photoinduced charge separation placed in close proximity to the H2 generating catalyst - a Pt colloid - through direct linkage or supramolecular interactions with the polymer used to stabilize the colloid. In order to prepare new donor-chromophore-acceptor (D-C-A) triads and associated D-C and C-A dyads, new ligands were synthesized having functional groups for different coupling reactions such as simple amide formation and Pd-catalyzed coupling. In these systems, the donor was attached to the arylacetylide ligands and the acceptor was linked to the diimine or terpyridyl chelate. Research under the contract proved

  11. Analysis of municipal waste generation rate in Poland compared to selected European countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klojzy-Karczmarczyk, Beata; Makoudi, Said

    2017-10-01

    The generated municipal waste rates provided in the planning documents are a tool for forecasting the mass of waste generated in individual waste management regions. An important issue is the decisive separation of two concepts: waste generated and waste collected. The study includes analysis of the generation rate for Poland with division into urban and rural areas. The estimated and projected rate of municipal waste generation for Poland provided in subsequent editions of National Waste Management Plans (KPGO) changed since 2000 within wide range from about 300 to more than 500 kg per capita in an individual year (kg/pc/year). Currently, the National Waste Management Plan for the years 2017-2022 estimates municipal waste generation rate at approx. 270 kg/per capita/year with a projected increase to 330 kg/per capita/year in 2030. Most European countries adopt higher municipal waste generation rate, often exceeding 600 kg/per capita/year. The objective of the paper is therefore to analyze the causes of this difference in the declared values. The morphological composition of municipal waste stream in Poland and in selected European countries (e.g. France, Belgium, Switzerland) was analyzed. At present it is not possible to balance the value of the generation rate with the rate of waste collection in Poland. The conducted analyzes allow for determining a number of reasons for variation of the rate value in particular countries, mostly morphological composition of municipal waste, inclusion of household-like waste from infrastructure facilities or not and amount of waste collected in rural areas. The differences in the generation rates and provided possible reasons indicate the need to harmonize the methodology for estimating rates of municipal waste generation in various countries, including Poland.

  12. Production of HBR from bromine and steam for off-peak electrolytic hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlief, R.E.; Hanrahan, R.J.; Stoy, M.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Progress is reported on the development of a renewable energy source based solar-electrolytic system for production of hydrogen and oxygen. It employs water, bromine, solar energy and supplemental electrical power. The concept is being developed by Solar Reactor Technologies, Inc., (SRT), with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). An overview of the nature and objectives of this program is provided here, and technical progress made during the first (three-month) performance period of the Phase I work effort is reported. The SRT concept entails (1) absorption of concentrated solar radiation by bromine vapor Br{sub 2(g)} in a high-temperature reactor producing Br{sub (g)} atoms, (2) reaction of Br{sub (g)} with water yielding hydrogen bromide (HBr), and (3) electrolysis of stored hydrogen bromide for production of H{sub 2(g)} and recovery of Br{sub 2(I)}. Incorporation of solar radiation in the primary photochemical step (1) reduces by 50 - 70% the electrical power required to split water. The SRT concept is very attractive from an economic viewpoint as well. The reversible fuel cell, employed in the SRT electrolysis concept is capitalized via its use in load leveling by the utility. A 1 kW solar reactor was designed and constructed during the first three-month performance period by SRT personnel at the University of Florida, Gainesville. It was employed in taking survey data of the reaction between bromine and steam at temperatures between 900 and 1300 K. This reaction was run under purely thermal conditions, i.e. in the absence of solar photons. The experimental data are reported and interpreted employing concomitant thermodynamic calculations. The anticipated improvement is discussed briefly as well as the effect of a photochemical boost to the reaction. The amount of this enhancement will be studied in the next three month performance period.

  13. Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of four material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base and Ti-base (alternative packaging) materials, and Al-base (simulated waste) materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments consisted primarily of anoxic brine with overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Limited tests of low-carbon steel were also performed in simulated-backfill environments and in brine environments with pH values ranging from 3 to 11. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Addition of H{sub 2}S to a CO{sub 2}-passivated system caused reversal of the passivation. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of FeS. Addition of CO{sub 2} to an H{sub 2}S-passivated system did not reverse the passivation. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. The Al-base materials reacted at approximately the same rate as low-carbon steel when immersed in anoxic Brine A; considerably more rapidly in the presence of CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S; and much more rapidly when iron was present in the system as a brine contaminant. High-purity Al was much more susceptible to corrosion than the 6061 alloy. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

  14. Hydrogen generation from decomposition of hydrous hydrazine over Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Hongbin; Zhong, Yujie; Wang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of highly active and selective catalysts is the central issue in the development of hydrous hydrazine (N2H4·H2O) as a viable hydrogen carrier. Herein, we report the synthesis of bimetallic Ni-Ir nanocatalyts supported on CeO2 using a one-pot coprecipitation method. A combination of XRD, HRTEM and XPS analyses indicate that the Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst is composed of tiny Ni-Ir alloy nanoparticles with an average size of around 4 nm and crystalline CeO2 matrix. The Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst...

  15. Light-activated regulation of cofilin dynamics using a photocaged hydrogen peroxide generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Evan W; Taulet, Nicolas; Onak, Carl S; New, Elizabeth J; Lanselle, Julie K; Smelick, Gillian S; Chang, Christopher J

    2010-12-08

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can exert diverse signaling and stress responses within living systems depending on its spatial and temporal dynamics. Here we report a new small-molecule probe for producing H2O2 on demand upon photoactivation and its application for optical regulation of cofilin-actin rod formation in living cells. This chemical method offers many potential opportunities for dissecting biological roles for H2O2 as well as remote control of cell behavior via H2O2-mediated pathways.

  16. Dye-sensitized Pt@TiO2 core–shell nanostructures for the efficient photocatalytic generation of hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Fang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pt@TiO2 core–shell nanostructures were prepared through a hydrothermal method. The dye-sensitization of these Pt@TiO2 core–shell structures allows for a high photocatalytic activity for the generation of hydrogen from proton reduction under visible-light irradiation. When the dyes and TiO2 were co-excited through the combination of two irradiation beams with different wavelengths, a synergic effect was observed, which led to a greatly enhanced H2 generation yield. This is attributed to the rational spatial distribution of the three components (dye, TiO2, Pt, and the vectored transport of photogenerated electrons from the dye to the Pt particles via the TiO2 particle bridge.

  17. Preparation of Rh/Ni Bimetallic Nanoparticles and Their Catalytic Activities for Hydrogen Generation from Hydrolysis of KBH4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiong Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ISOBAM–104 protected Rh/Ni bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs of 3.1 nm in diameter were synthesized by a co–reduction method with a rapid injection of KBH4 solution. The catalytic activities of as–prepared BNPs for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of a basic KBH4 solution were evaluated. Ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry (UV–Vis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and high–resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM were employed to characterize the structure, particle size, and chemical composition of the resultant BNPs. Catalytic activities for hydrolysis of KBH4 and catalytic kinetics of prepared BNPs were also investigated. It was shown that Rh/Ni BNPs displayed much higher catalytic activities than that of Rh or Ni monometallic nanoparticles (MNPs, and the prepared Rh10Ni90 BNPs possessed the highest catalytic activities with a value of 11580 mol–H2·h−1·mol–Rh−1. The high catalytic activities of Rh/Ni BNPs could be attributed to the electron transfer effect between Rh and Ni atoms, which was confirmed by a density functional theory (DFT calculation. The apparent activation energy for hydrogen generation of the prepared Rh10Ni90 BNPs was about 47.2 ± 2.1kJ/mol according to a kinetic study.

  18. Method and apparatus for electrokinetic co-generation of hydrogen and electric power from liquid water microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saykally, Richard J; Duffin, Andrew M; Wilson, Kevin R; Rude, Bruce S

    2013-02-12

    A method and apparatus for producing both a gas and electrical power from a flowing liquid, the method comprising: a) providing a source liquid containing ions that when neutralized form a gas; b) providing a velocity to the source liquid relative to a solid material to form a charged liquid microjet, which subsequently breaks up into a droplet spay, the solid material forming a liquid-solid interface; and c) supplying electrons to the charged liquid by contacting a spray stream of the charged liquid with an electron source. In one embodiment, where the liquid is water, hydrogen gas is formed and a streaming current is generated. The apparatus comprises a source of pressurized liquid, a microjet nozzle, a conduit for delivering said liquid to said microjet nozzle, and a conductive metal target sufficiently spaced from said nozzle such that the jet stream produced by said microjet is discontinuous at said target. In one arrangement, with the metal nozzle and target electrically connected to ground, both hydrogen gas and a streaming current are generated at the target as it is impinged by the streaming, liquid spray microjet.

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide Mediating both Excitatory and Inhibitory Effects in a Rat Model of Meningeal Nociception and Headache Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Teicher

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/purposeHydrogen sulfide (H2S is a neuromodulator acting through nitroxyl (HNO when it reacts with nitric oxide (NO. HNO activates transient receptor potential channels of the ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1 causing release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from primary afferents. Activation of meningeal nociceptors projecting to the human spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN may lead to headaches. In a rat model of meningeal nociception, the activity of spinal trigeminal neurons was used as read-out for the interaction between H2S and NO.MethodsIn anesthetized rats extracellular recordings from single neurons in the STN were made. Sodium sulfide (Na2S producing H2S in the tissue and the NO donor diethylamine-NONOate (DEA-NONOate were infused intravenously. H2S was also locally applied onto the exposed cranial dura mater or the medulla. Endogenous production of H2S was inhibited by oxamic acid, and NO production was inhibited by nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME to manipulate endogenous HNO formation.Key resultsSystemic administration of Na2S was followed either by increased ongoing activity (in 73% or decreased activity (in 27% of units. Topical application of Na2S onto the cranial dura mater caused a short-lasting activation followed by a long-lasting decrease in activity in the majority of units (70%. Systemic administration of DEA-NONOate increased neuronal activity, subsequent infusion of Na2S added to this effect, whereas DEA-NONOate did not augment the activity after Na2S. The stimulating effect of DEA-NONOate was inhibited by oxamic acid in 75% of units, and l-NAME following Na2S administration returned the activity to baseline.ConclusionIndividual spinal trigeminal neurons may be activated or (less frequently inhibited by the TRPA1 agonist HNO, presumably formed by H2S and NO in the STN, whereby endogenous H2S production seems to be rate-limiting. Activation of meningeal afferents by HNO may induce decreased spinal

  20. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected

  1. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation from hydriodic acid using methylammonium lead iodide in dynamic equilibrium with aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunghak; Chang, Woo Je; Lee, Chan Woo; Park, Sangbaek; Ahn, Hyo-Yong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2017-01-01

    The solar-driven splitting of hydrohalic acids (HX) is an important and fast growing research direction for H2 production. In addition to the hydrogen, the resulting chemicals (X2/X3-) can be used to propagate a continuous process in a closed cycle and are themselves useful products. Here we present a strategy for photocatalytic hydrogen iodide (HI) splitting using methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) in an effort to develop a cost-effective and easily scalable process. Considering that MAPbI3 is a water-soluble ionic compound, we exploit the dynamic equilibrium of the dissolution and precipitation of MAPbI3 in saturated aqueous solutions. The I- and H+ concentrations of the aqueous solution are determined to be the critical parameters for the stabilization of the tetragonal MAPbI3 phase. Stable and efficient H2 production under visible light irradiation was demonstrated. The solar HI splitting efficiency of MAPbI3 was 0.81% when using Pt as a cocatalyst.

  2. Nanomaterial characterization and synthesis for solar energy utilization and hydrogen fuel generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Xi, Donjuan; Pei, Qibing; Han, Song; Zhou, Chongwu

    2006-08-01

    Semiconducting metal oxide nanowires represent a class of novel materials that are of superior properties to naoparticles currently used in dye sensitized solar cell and polymer hybrid solar cells. The quasi one-dimensional nanostructure and surface states of nanowires improve carrier mobility and charge transfer through interface interactions of theses nanocomposite materials. Raman spectroscopy, especially resonant Raman spectroscopy, is used to correlate nanomaterial synthesis condition to the structural, optical and electric transport properties that are important to photocatalysis, exciton transport and recombination and hydrogen storage mechanism. For example, highly orientated ZnO nanowires studied with Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrated the high efficiency of the phonon and electron coupling. These results are compared with that of other ZnO forms such as thin film, polycrystalline powder and solid. The Raman bandwidths and shifts of nanowires revealed the phonon confinement in the quasi one-dimensional nanostructures, which is further demonstrated with In IIO 3 nanowires at 5, 10, 20, 30 nm in diameters. Room temperature photoluminescence results also show band gap shifts with nanowire dimensions. Nanowire sizes, defects and strains, controlled by synthesis conditions, have shown to determine band structure and optical phonon properties. We also discuss characterization and synthesis of carbon nanotube based composite materials including polymer electropolymerization and infiltration. Combining significantly enhanced mechanical compressive strength and excellent electric conductivity, these composite materials offer potentials to fuel cell anode materials as multifunctional hydrogen storage media.

  3. A novel mechanism of formaldehyde neurotoxicity: inhibition of hydrogen sulfide generation by promoting overproduction of nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Qing Tang

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde (FA induces neurotoxicity by overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. Increasing studies have shown that hydrogen sulfide (H(2S, an endogenous gastransmitter, protects nerve cells against oxidative stress by its antioxidant effect. It has been shown that overproduction of nitric oxide (NO inhibits the activity of cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS, the predominant H(2S-generating enzyme in the central nervous system.We hypothesize that FA-caused neurotoxicity involves the deficiency of this endogenous protective antioxidant gas, which results from excessive generation of NO. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether FA disturbs H(2S synthesis in PC12 cells, and whether this disturbance is associated with overproduction of NO.We showed that exposure of PC12 cells to FA causes reduction of viability, inhibition of CBS expression, decrease of endogenous H(2S production, and NO production. CBS silencing deteriorates FA-induced decreases in endogenous H(2S generation, neurotoxicity, and intracellular ROS accumulation in PC12 cells; while ADMA, a specific inhibitor of NOS significantly attenuates FA-induced decreases in endogenous H(2S generation, neurotoxicity, and intracellular ROS accumulation in PC12 cells.Our data indicate that FA induces neurotoxicity by inhibiting the generation of H(2S through excess of NO and suggest that strategies to manipulate endogenous H(2S could open a suitable novel therapeutic avenue for FA-induced neurotoxicity.

  4. Developing models for the prediction of hospital healthcare waste generation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfahun, Esubalew; Kumie, Abera; Beyene, Abebe

    2016-01-01

    An increase in the number of health institutions, along with frequent use of disposable medical products, has contributed to the increase of healthcare waste generation rate. For proper handling of healthcare waste, it is crucial to predict the amount of waste generation beforehand. Predictive models can help to optimise healthcare waste management systems, set guidelines and evaluate the prevailing strategies for healthcare waste handling and disposal. However, there is no mathematical model developed for Ethiopian hospitals to predict healthcare waste generation rate. Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop models for the prediction of a healthcare waste generation rate. A longitudinal study design was used to generate long-term data on solid healthcare waste composition, generation rate and develop predictive models. The results revealed that the healthcare waste generation rate has a strong linear correlation with the number of inpatients (R(2) = 0.965), and a weak one with the number of outpatients (R(2) = 0.424). Statistical analysis was carried out to develop models for the prediction of the quantity of waste generated at each hospital (public, teaching and private). In these models, the number of inpatients and outpatients were revealed to be significant factors on the quantity of waste generated. The influence of the number of inpatients and outpatients treated varies at different hospitals. Therefore, different models were developed based on the types of hospitals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Theoretical Prediction of Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction by OH, H, O, CH3, and HO2 Radicals from Toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Hao; Guo, Jun-Jiang; Li, Rui; Wang, Fan; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2016-05-26

    Hydrogen abstraction from toluene by OH, H, O, CH3, and HO2 radicals are important reactions in oxidation process of toluene. Geometries and corresponding harmonic frequencies of the reactants, transition states as well as products involved in these reactions are determined at the B3LYP/6-31G(2df,p) level. To achieve highly accurate thermochemical data for these stationary points on the potential energy surfaces, the Gaussian-4(G4) composite method was employed. Torsional motions are treated either as free rotors or hindered rotors in calculating partion functions to determine thermodynamic properties. The obtained standard enthalpies of formation for reactants and some prodcuts are shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental data with the largest error of 0.5 kcal mol(-1). The conventional transition state theory (TST) with tunneling effects was adopted to determine rate constants of these hydrogen abstraction reactions based on results from quantum chemistry calculations. To faciliate its application in kinetic modeling, the obtained rate constants are given in Arrhenius expression: k(T) = AT(n) exp(-EaR/T). The obtained reaction rate constants also agree reasonably well with available expermiental data and previous theoretical values. Branching ratios of these reactions have been determined. The present reaction rates for these reactions have been used in a toluene combustion mechanism, and their effects on some combustion properties are demonstrated.

  6. Fatal flaws in measuring landfill gas generation rates by empirical well testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Gary R

    2003-04-01

    Well testing procedures, such as the Tier 3 methodology specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Subtitle D, are commonly used for directly estimating landfill gas (LFG) emissions at municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. Similar procedures are also used to estimate LFG generation rates for the design of LFG-to-energy projects. These methodologies assume that the LFG generation rate equals the extraction rate of a test gas well within its radius of influence (ROI). The ROI is defined as the distance from the extraction well at which the induced pressure drop is immeasurable by some standard of precision. Based on fluid dynamic principles, Tier 3 and similar methodologies are demonstrated to be incapable of providing reliable estimates of the LFG generation rate. These tests may either over- or underestimate the LFG generation rate depending on the precision with which the ROI is determined, but they will only coincidentally produce an estimate that accurately represents the actual LFG generation rate. Fluid dynamic principles dictate that the actual LFG generation rate can only be estimated if the pneumatic properties of the refuse and cover materials as well as the excess pressure in the refuse caused by LFG generation are known or can be estimated.

  7. Macroscopic rate equation modeling of trapping/detrapping of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodille, E.A., E-mail: etienne.hodille@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Bonnin, X. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93430 Villetaneuse (France); Bisson, R.; Angot, T. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Becquart, C.S. [Université Lille I, UMET, UMR 8207, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq cédex France (France); Layet, J.M. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Grisolia, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-12-15

    Relevant parameters for trapping of Hydrogen Isotopes (HIs) in polycrystalline tungsten are determined with the MHIMS code (Migration of Hydrogen Isotopes in MaterialS) which is used to reproduce Thermal Desorption Spectrometry experiments. Three types of traps are found: two intrinsic traps (detrapping energy of 0.87 eV and 1.00 eV) and one extrinsic trap created by ion irradiation (detrapping energy of 1.50 eV). Then MHIMS is used to simulate HIs retention at different fluences and different implantation temperatures. Simulation results agree well with experimental data. It is shown that at 300 K the retention is limited by diffusion in the bulk. For implantation temperatures above 500 K, the retention is limited by trap creation processes. Above 600 K, the retention drops by two orders of magnitude as compared to the retention at 300 K. With the determined detrapping energies, HIs outgassing at room temperature is predicted. After ions implantation at 300 K, 45% of the initial retention is lost to vacuum in 300 000 s while during this time the remaining trapped HIs diffuse twice as deep into the bulk. - Highlights: • Code development to solve numerically the model equations of diffusion and trapping of hydrogen in metals. • Parametrization of the model trapping parameters (detrapping energies and density): fitting of experimental TDS spectrum. • Confrontation model/experiment: evolution of retention with fluence and implantation temperature. • Investigation of period of rest between implantation and TDS on retention and depth profile.

  8. Homocysteine in renovascular complications: hydrogen sulfide is a modulator and plausible anaerobic ATP generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Utpal; Pushpakumar, Sathnur B; Amin, Matthew A; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2014-09-15

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a non-protein amino acid derived from dietary methionine. High levels of Hcy, known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is known to cause vascular complications. In the mammalian tissue, Hcy is metabolized by transsulfuration enzymes to produce hydrogen sulfide (H2S). H2S, a pungent smelling gas was previously known for its toxic effects in the central nervous system, recent studies however has revealed protective effects in a variety of diseases including hypertension, diabetes, inflammation, atherosclerosis, and renal disease progression and failure. Interestingly, under stress conditions including hypoxia, H2S can reduce metabolic demand and also act as a substrate for ATP production. This review highlights some of the recent advances in H2S research as a potential therapeutic agent targeting renovascular diseases associated with HHcy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimation of construction and demolition waste using waste generation rates in Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, V G; Kalidindi, Satyanarayana N

    2017-06-01

    A large amount of construction and demolition waste is being generated owing to rapid urbanisation in Indian cities. A reliable estimate of construction and demolition waste generation is essential to create awareness about this stream of solid waste among the government bodies in India. However, the required data to estimate construction and demolition waste generation in India are unavailable or not explicitly documented. This study proposed an approach to estimate construction and demolition waste generation using waste generation rates and demonstrated it by estimating construction and demolition waste generation in Chennai city. The demolition waste generation rates of primary materials were determined through regression analysis using waste generation data from 45 case studies. Materials, such as wood, electrical wires, doors, windows and reinforcement steel, were found to be salvaged and sold on the secondary market. Concrete and masonry debris were dumped in either landfills or unauthorised places. The total quantity of construction and demolition debris generated in Chennai city in 2013 was estimated to be 1.14 million tonnes. The proportion of masonry debris was found to be 76% of the total quantity of demolition debris. Construction and demolition debris forms about 36% of the total solid waste generated in Chennai city. A gross underestimation of construction and demolition waste generation in some earlier studies in India has also been shown. The methodology proposed could be utilised by government bodies, policymakers and researchers to generate reliable estimates of construction and demolition waste in other developing countries facing similar challenges of limited data availability.

  10. Construction and demolition waste generation rates for high-rise buildings in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Chooi Mei; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Ho, Chin Siong

    2016-12-01

    Construction and demolition waste continues to sharply increase in step with the economic growth of less developed countries. Though the construction industry is large, it is composed of small firms with individual waste management practices, often leading to the deleterious environmental outcomes. Quantifying construction and demolition waste generation allows policy makers and stakeholders to understand the true internal and external costs of construction, providing a necessary foundation for waste management planning that may overcome deleterious environmental outcomes and may be both economically and environmentally optimal. This study offers a theoretical method for estimating the construction and demolition project waste generation rate by utilising available data, including waste disposal truck size and number, and waste volume and composition. This method is proposed as a less burdensome and more broadly applicable alternative, in contrast to waste estimation by on-site hand sorting and weighing. The developed method is applied to 11 projects across Malaysia as the case study. This study quantifies waste generation rate and illustrates the construction method in influencing the waste generation rate, estimating that the conventional construction method has a waste generation rate of 9.88 t 100 m -2 , the mixed-construction method has a waste generation rate of 3.29 t 100 m -2 , and demolition projects have a waste generation rate of 104.28 t 100 m -2 . © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Effect of three disinfectants (chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide on the microleakage of 7th generation bonding agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salari Behzad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims : The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorhexidin 2%, sodium hypochlorite 2.5% and hydrogen peroxide 3% as three effective and regular disinfectants on the microleakage of 7th generation bonding agents in vitro.   Materials and Methods: 45 extracted molar teeth without carries were collected and disinfected. On buccal and lingual aspects of these teeth conventional class V cavity preparation were done (90 cavities, then randomly divided to 4 groups, three of them had 10 teeth (20 cavities and one of them had 5 teeth (10 cavities as control group. Cavities in each experimental group prepared with one of the disinfectants and then 7th generation bonding (Optibond all in one, kerr was used as noted by manufacturer, then cavities filled with composite and polished. Bonding agent was used without our previous disinfectants manipulation in control group. Specimens were thermocycled with 1000 thermal cycles between 5 and 55 0 C each for 30 seconds and then immersed in the methylene blue 5%, then sectioned mesiodistally and investigated for microleakage under stereomicroscope (Olympus, Japan. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon mean rank tests.   Results: Despite the lower mean rank values for the untreated group at both occlusal and gingival aspects, the Kruskal-Wallis procedure (α=0.05 showed that the treatment factor did not significantly affect the mean rank values neither in occlusal (P=0.12 nor in gingival (P=0.39 part of cavities.   Conclusion: According to the results of this study, antimicrobial agents such as chlorhexidine 2%, sodium hypochloride 2.5% and hydrogen peroxide 3% can be used perior to 7th generation dentin bonding agent(Optibond all in one, kerr without much concern.

  12. Hydrodynamic analysis of a three-fluidized bed reactor cold flow model for chemical looping hydrogen generation. Pressure characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Zhipeng; Xiang, Wenguo; Chen, Shiyi; Wang, Dong [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment

    2013-07-01

    Chemical looping hydrogen generation (CLHG) can produce pure hydrogen with inherent separation of CO{sub 2} from fossils fuel. The process involves a metal oxide, as an oxygen carrier, such as iron oxide. The CLHG system consists of three reactors: a fuel reactor (FR), a steam reactor (SR) and an air reactor (AR). In the FR, the fuel gases react with iron oxides (hematite Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, magnetite Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, wuestite FeO), generating reduced iron oxides (FeO or even Fe), and with full conversion of gaseous fuels, pure CO{sub 2} can be obtained after cooling the flue gas from the fuel reactor; in the SR, FeO and Fe reacts with steam to generate magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and H{sub 2}, the latter representing the final target product of the process; in the AR, the magnetite is oxidized back to hematite which is used in another cycle. A cold flow model of three-fluidized bed for CLHG corresponding to 50 KW hot units has been built. A major novelty of this facility is the compact fuel reactor, which integrates a bubble and a fast fluidized bed to avoid the incomplete conversion of the fuel gas caused by the thermodynamics equilibrium. In order to study the pressure characteristics and the solids concentration of the system, especially in the fuel reactor, the gas velocity of three reactors, gas flow of L-type value, total solids inventory (TSI) and the secondary air of fuel reactor were varied. Results show that the pressure and the solids concentration are strongly influenced by the fluidizing-gas velocity of three reactors. Moreover, the entrainment of the upper part of fuel reactor increases as the total solids inventory increases, and the operating range of the FR can be changed by introducing secondary air or increasing the total solids inventory.

  13. Generation and Retention of Helium and Hydrogen in Austenitic Steels Irradiated in a Variety of LWR and Test Reactor Spectral Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, Francis A.; Oliver, Brian M.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Edwards, Danny J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Grossbeck, Martin L.

    2002-03-31

    In fission and fusion reactor environments stainless steels generate significant amounts of helium and hydrogen by transmutation. The primary sources of helium are boron and nickel, interacting with both fast and especially thermal neutrons. Hydrogen arises primarily from fast neutron reactions, but is also introduced into steels at often much higher levels by other environmental processes. Although essentially all of the helium is retained in the steel, it is commonly assumed that most of the hydrogen is not retained. It now appears that under some circumstances, significant levels of hydrogen can be retained, especially when helium-nucleated cavities become a significant part of the microstructure. A variety of stainless steel specimens have been examined from various test reactors, PWRs and BWRs. These specimens were exposed to a wide range of neutron spectra with different thermal/fast neutron ratios. Pure nickel and pure iron have also been examined. It is shown that all major features of the retention of helium and hydrogen can be explained in terms of the composition, thermal/fast neutron ratio and the presence or absence of helium-nucleated cavities. In some cases, the hydrogen retention is very large and can exceed that generated by transmutation, with the additional hydrogen arising from either environmental sources and/or previously unidentified radioisotope sources that may come into operation at high neutron exposures.

  14. Formaldehyde impairs learning and memory involving the disturbance of hydrogen sulfide generation in the hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Qing; Zhuang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Ping; Fang, Heng-Rong; Zhou, Cheng-Fang; Gu, Hong-Feng; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Chun-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA), a well-known indoor and outdoor pollutant, has been implicated as the responsible agent in the development of neurocognitive disorders. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), the third gasotransimitter, is an endogenous neuromodulator, which facilitates the induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation, involving the functions of learning and memory. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of FA on the formation of learning and memory and the generation of endogenous H(2)S in the hippocampus of rats. We found that the intracerebroventricular injection of FA in rats impairs the function of learning and memory in the Morris water maze and novel object recognition test and increases the formation of apoptosis and lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. We also showed that FA exposure inhibits the expression of cystathionine β-synthase, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous H(2)S generation in hippocampus and decreases the production of endogenous H(2)S in hippocampus in rats. These results suggested that FA-disturbed generation of endogenous H(2)S in hippocampus leads to the oxidative stress-mediated neuron damage, ultimately impairing the function of learning and memory. Our findings imply that the disturbance of endogenous H(2)S generation in hippocampus is a potential contributing mechanism underling FA-caused learning and memory impairment.

  15. Control in the Rate-Determining Step Provides a Promising Strategy To Develop New Catalysts for CO2 Hydrogenation: A Local Pair Natural Orbital Coupled Cluster Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Bhaskar; Neese, Frank; Ye, Shengfa

    2015-08-03

    The development of efficient catalysts with base metals for CO2 hydrogenation has always been a major thrust of interest. A series of experimental and theoretical work has revealed that the catalytic cycle typically involves two key steps, namely, base-promoted heterolytic H2 splitting and hydride transfer to CO2, either of which can be the rate-determining step (RDS) of the entire reaction. To explore the determining factor for the nature of RDS, we present herein a comparative mechanistic investigation on CO2 hydrogenation mediated by [M(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](n+) (M = Fe(II), Ru(II), and Co(III); PP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)phosphine) type complexes. In order to construct reliable free energy profiles, we used highly correlated wave function based ab initio methods of the coupled cluster type alongside the standard density functional theory. Our calculations demonstrate that the hydricity of the metal-hydride intermediate generated by H2 splitting dictates the nature of the RDS for the Fe(II) and Co(III) systems, while the RDS for the Ru(II) catalyst appears to be ambiguous. CO2 hydrogenation catalyzed by the Fe(II) complex that possesses moderate hydricity traverses an H2-splitting RDS, whereas the RDS for the high-hydricity Co(III) species is found to be the hydride transfer. Thus, our findings suggest that hydricity can be used as a practical guide in future catalyst design. Enhancing the electron-accepting ability of low-hydricity catalysts is likely to improve their catalytic performance, while increasing the electron-donating ability of high-hydricity complexes may speed up CO2 conversion. Moreover, we also established the active roles of base NEt3 in directing the heterolytic H2 splitting and assisting product release through the formation of an acid-base complex.

  16. Hierarchical Ni-Mo-S nanosheets on carbon fiber cloth: A flexible electrode for efficient hydrogen generation in neutral electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jianwei; Xiao, Fang-Xing; Yang, Hong Bin; Khoo, Si Yun; Chen, Jiazang; Fan, Zhanxi; Hsu, Ying-Ya; Chen, Hao Ming; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Bin

    2015-08-01

    A unique functional electrode made of hierarchal Ni-Mo-S nanosheets with abundant exposed edges anchored on conductive and flexible carbon fiber cloth, referred to as Ni-Mo-S/C, has been developed through a facile biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal method. The incorporation of Ni atoms in Mo-S plays a crucial role in tuning its intrinsic catalytic property by creating substantial defect sites as well as modifying the morphology of Ni-Mo-S network at atomic scale, resulting in an impressive enhancement in the catalytic activity. The Ni-Mo-S/C electrode exhibits a large cathodic current and a low onset potential for hydrogen evolution reaction in neutral electrolyte (pH ~7), for example, current density of 10 mA/cm(2) at a very small overpotential of 200 mV. Furthermore, the Ni-Mo-S/C electrode has excellent electrocatalytic stability over an extended period, much better than those of MoS2/C and Pt plate electrodes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to understand the formation process and electrocatalytic properties of Ni-Mo-S/C. The intuitive comparison test was designed to reveal the superior gas-evolving profile of Ni-Mo-S/C over that of MoS2/C, and a laboratory-scale hydrogen generator was further assembled to demonstrate its potential application in practical appliances.

  17. Graphene-based materials: fabrication, characterization and application for the decontamination of wastewater and wastegas and hydrogen storage/generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hou; Yuan, Xingzhong; Wu, Yan; Huang, Huajun; Peng, Xin; Zeng, Guangming; Zhong, Hua; Liang, Jie; Ren, Miaomiao

    2013-07-01

    Graphene, as an ideal two-dimensional material and single-atom layer of graphite, has attracted exploding interests in multidisciplinary research because of its unique structure and exceptional physicochemical properties. Especially, graphene-based materials offer a wide range of potentialities for environmental remediation and energy applications. This review shows an extensive overview of the main principles and the recent synthetic technologies about designing and fabricating various innovative graphene-based materials. Furthermore, an extensive list of graphene-based sorbents and catalysts from vast literature has been compiled. The adsorptive and catalytic properties of graphene-based materials for the removal of various pollutants and hydrogen storage/production as available in the literature are presented. Tremendous adsorption capacity, excellent catalytic performance and abundant availability are the significant factors making these materials suitable alternatives for environmental pollutant control and energy-related system, especially in terms of the removal of pollutants in water, gas cleanup and purification, and hydrogen generation and storage. Meanwhile, a brief discussion is also included on the influence of graphene materials on the environment, and its toxicological effects. Lastly, some unsolved subjects together with major challenges in this germinating area of research are highlighted and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of graphene-based materials in the field of adsorption and catalysis science represents a viable and powerful tool, resulting in the superior improvement of environmental pollution control and energy development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of Effect of Heat Pipe Parameters in Minimising the Entropy Generation Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Rakesh Hari; Chandrasekharan Muraleedharan

    2016-01-01

    Heat transfer and fluid flow in the heat pipe system result in thermodynamic irreversibility generating entropy. The minimum entropy generation principle can be used for optimum design of flat heat pipe. The objective of the present work is to minimise the total entropy generation rate as the objective function with different parameters of the flat heat pipe subjected to some constraints. These constraints constitute the limitations on the heat transport capacity of the heat pipe. This physic...

  19. A generation-time effect on the rate of molecular evolution in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Cory; Wu, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Molecular evolutionary rate varies significantly among species and a strict global molecular clock has been rejected across the tree of life. Generation time is one primary life-history trait that influences the molecular evolutionary rate. Theory predicts that organisms with shorter generation times evolve faster because of the accumulation of more DNA replication errors per unit time. Although the generation-time effect has been demonstrated consistently in plants and animals, the evidence of its existence in bacteria is lacking. The bacterial phylum Firmicutes offers an excellent system for testing generation-time effect because some of its members can enter a dormant, nonreproductive endospore state in response to harsh environmental conditions. It follows that spore-forming bacteria would--with their longer generation times--evolve more slowly than their nonspore-forming relatives. It is therefore surprising that a previous study found no generation-time effect in Firmicutes. Using a phylogenetic comparative approach and leveraging on a large number of Firmicutes genomes, we found sporulation significantly reduces the genome-wide spontaneous DNA mutation rate and protein evolutionary rate. Contrary to the previous study, our results provide strong evidence that the evolutionary rates of bacteria, like those of plants and animals, are influenced by generation time. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. Estimation of shutdown heat generation rates in GHARR-1 due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fission products decay power and residual fission power generated after shutdown of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) by reactivity insertion accident were estimated by solution of the decay and residual heat equations. A Matlab program code was developed to simulate the heat generation rates by fission product ...

  1. Competing quantum effects in the free energy profiles and diffusion rates of hydrogen and deuterium molecules through clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendagorta, Joseph R; Powers, Anna; Hele, Timothy J H; Marsalek, Ondrej; Bačić, Zlatko; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2016-11-30

    Clathrate hydrates hold considerable promise as safe and economical materials for hydrogen storage. Here we present a quantum mechanical study of H2 and D2 diffusion through a hexagonal face shared by two large cages of clathrate hydrates over a wide range of temperatures. Path integral molecular dynamics simulations are used to compute the free-energy profiles for the diffusion of H2 and D2 as a function of temperature. Ring polymer molecular dynamics rate theory, incorporating both exact quantum statistics and approximate quantum dynamical effects, is utilized in the calculations of the H2 and D2 diffusion rates in a broad temperature interval. We find that the shape of the quantum free-energy profiles and their height relative to the classical free energy barriers at a given temperature, as well as the rate of diffusion, are strongly affected by competing quantum effects: above 25 K, zero-point energy (ZPE) perpendicular to the reaction path for diffusion between cavities decreases the quantum rate compared to the classical rate, whereas at lower temperatures tunneling outcompetes the ZPE and as a result the quantum rate is greater than the classical rate.

  2. Influence of loading rate and hydrogen content on fracture toughness of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bind, A.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Singh, R.N., E-mail: rnsingh@barc.gov.in [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Division of Solid Mechanics, Lund University, SE22100 (Sweden); Khandelwal, H.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Sunil, S.; Avinash, G.; Chakravartty, J.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ståhle, P. [Division of Solid Mechanics, Lund University, SE22100 (Sweden)

    2015-10-15

    For the safety assessment of PHWR, it is required to study the flaw tolerance capacity of the pressure tubes as a function of the loading rate. In this work, the effect of loading rate and hydrogen content on the fracture behaviour of a Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube was investigated between 25 and 300 °C. For the as received material, the pulling rate only had an effect on fracture toughness at 25 °C whereas for hydrided material the pulling rate affected fracture toughness in the transition regime. For all pulling rates, hydrided materials showed typical S curve behavior with an increase in lower shelf, upper shelf and transition temperature with pulling rate. The number of axial splits on fracture surfaces increased with an increase in the pulling rate and a decrease in temperature and fracture toughness was found to decrease with an increase in the number of axial splits. The reduction in fracture toughness is attributed to a localised deformation between axial splits.

  3. Dark Photocatalysis: Storage of Solar Energy in Carbon Nitride for Time-Delayed Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Klose, Daniel; Kasap, Hatice; Podjaski, Filip; Pignié, Marie-Claire; Reisner, Erwin; Jeschke, Gunnar; Lotsch, Bettina V

    2017-01-09

    While natural photosynthesis serves as the model system for efficient charge separation and decoupling of redox reactions, bio-inspired artificial systems typically lack applicability owing to synthetic challenges and structural complexity. We present herein a simple and inexpensive system that, under solar irradiation, forms highly reductive radicals in the presence of an electron donor, with lifetimes exceeding the diurnal cycle. This radical species is formed within a cyanamide-functionalized polymeric network of heptazine units and can give off its trapped electrons in the dark to yield H2 , triggered by a co-catalyst, thus enabling the temporal decoupling of the light and dark reactions of photocatalytic hydrogen production through the radical's longevity. The system introduced here thus demonstrates a new approach for storing sunlight as long-lived radicals, and provides the structural basis for designing photocatalysts with long-lived photo-induced states. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  4. CoP nanosheet assembly grown on carbon cloth: A highly efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiulin

    2015-07-01

    There exists a strong demand to replace expensive noble metal catalysts with cheap metal sulfides or phosphides for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Recently metal phosphides such as NixP, FeP and CoP have been considered as promising candidates to replace Pt cathodes. Here we report that the nanocrystalline CoP nanosheet assembly on carbon cloth can be formed by a two-step process: electrochemical deposition of Co species followed by gas phase phosphidation. The CoP catalyst in this report exhibits a Tafel slope of 30.1mV/dec in 0.5M H2SO4 and 42.6mV/dec in 1M KOH. The high HER performance of our CoP catalysts is attributed to the rugae-like morphology which results in a high double-layer capacitance and high density of active sites, estimated as 7.77×1017sites/cm2. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Between photocatalysis and photosynthesis: Synchrotron spectroscopy methods on molecules and materials for solar hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bora, Debajeet K. [Laboratory for High Performance Ceramics, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, CH-4052 Basel (Switzerland); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hu, Yelin [Laboratory for High Performance Ceramics, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Laboratory for Photonics and Interfaces, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1005 Lausanne (Switzerland); Thiess, Sebastian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Erat, Selma [Laboratory for High Performance Ceramics, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Toros University, Faculty of Engineering, Electrical-Electronics Department, TR-33140 Mersin (Turkey); Feng, Xuefei [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Mukherjee, Sumanta [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Fortunato, Giuseppino [Laboratory of Advanced Fibers, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-9014 St. Gallen (Switzerland); Gaillard, Nicolas [Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Toth, Rita [Laboratory for High Performance Ceramics, Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); and others

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We provide a series of soft X-ray and nuclear resonant vibration spectroscopy experiments relevant for solar hydrogen production. ► Metal oxide photoelectrodes and photosynthesis protein motifs are investigated. ► Ex situ and photoelectrochemical in situ studies are presented. ► The relevant role of defect states on surfaces, in sub-surfaces and in the bulk is elucidated. -- Abstract: Energy research is to a large extent materials research, encompassing the physics and chemistry of materials, including their synthesis, processing toward components and design toward architectures, allowing for their functionality as energy devices, extending toward their operation parameters and environment, including also their degradation, limited life, ultimate failure and potential recycling. In all these stages, X-ray and electron spectroscopy are helpful methods for analysis, characterization and diagnostics for the engineer and for the researcher working in basic science. This paper gives a short overview of experiments with X-ray and electron spectroscopy for solar energy and water splitting materials and addresses also the issue of solar fuel, a relatively new topic in energy research. The featured systems are iron oxide and tungsten oxide as photoanodes, and hydrogenases as molecular systems. We present surface and sub-surface studies with ambient pressure XPS and hard X-ray XPS, resonant photoemission, light induced effects in resonant photoemission experiments and a photo-electrochemical in situ/operando NEXAFS experiment in a liquid cell, and nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS)

  6. Understanding and Enhancing the Photostability of Nanoporous Metal Oxide Thin Films for Solar Hydrogen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrada, Kalyan Chakravarthi

    Solar water splitting is an environmentally benign process which has received wide attention in the recent years as an alternate method for a clean and safe production of hydrogen. This process employs a semiconductor based photocatalyst, water, and sunlight to produce hydrogen. Metal-oxide based semiconductors are considered to be ideal photocatalytic materials because of their stability against photo-corrosion combined with relatively narrow energy band-gap, appropriately placed band edge positions with reference to oxygen and hydrogen energy levels, less scattering of charges due to wider valence band, high dielectric constant, natural abundance, and non-toxicity. In this dissertation, two metal oxide based semiconductors viz., iron (III) oxide and bismuth (III) oxide were investigated to understand and enhance their photo activity as photoanodes for solar water splitting application. Iron (III) oxide has a well suited band gap to capture solar spectrum but it suffers from inappropriately positioned band edges, recombination losses due to low electron mobility, and a small minority carrier diffusion length. However, it was hypothesized that the Iron (III) oxide might show interesting photoelectrochemical properties by alloying with 4f elements and shifting the conduction band minimum of the iron oxide favorably to more negative potentials. In the present study, a nanoporous iron oxide layer incorporated with Nd3+ and B3+ was synthesized by electrochemical anodization of a FeNdB alloy. The photoelectrochemical behavior of this oxide was compared with thermally oxidized FeNdB alloy and the iron oxides obtained by anodization and thermal oxidation of pure iron foil. Incorporation of Nd3+ and B3+ in the iron oxide showed a direct bandgap of 2.05 eV, an indirect bandgap of 1.9 eV and shifted the flatband potentials to --0.8 VAg/AgCl in 1 M KOH solution. The FeNdB oxide showed marginally better catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction than pure iron oxide

  7. Quantifying Molecular Hydrogen Emissions and an Industrial Leakage Rate for the South Coast Air Basin of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, M. C.; Schroeder, J.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The poorly understood atmospheric budget and distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2) have invited further research since the discovery that emissions from a hydrogen-based economy could have negative impacts on the global climate system and stratospheric ozone. The burgeoning fuel cell electric vehicle industry in the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB) presents an opportunity to observe and constrain urban anthropogenic H2 emissions. This work presents the first H2 emissions estimate for the SoCAB and calculates an upper limit for the current rate of leakage from production and distribution infrastructure within the region. A top-down method utilized whole air samples collected during the Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) onboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft from 23-25 June 2015 to estimate H2 emissions from combustion and non-combustion sources. H2:carbon monoxide (CO) and H2:carbon dioxide ratios from airborne observations were compared with experimentally established ratios from pure combustion source ratios and scaled with the well-constrained CO emissions inventory to yield H2 emissions of 24.9 ± 3.6 Gg a-1 (1σ) from combustion engines and 8.2 ± 4.7 Gg a-1 from non-combustion sources. Total daily production of H2 in the SoCAB was compared with the top-down results to estimate an upper limit leakage rate (5%) where all emissions not accounted for by incomplete combustion in engines were assumed to be emitted from H2 infrastructure. For bottom-up validation, the NOAA Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory dispersion model was run iteratively with all known stationary sources in attempt to constrain emissions. While this investigation determined that H2 emissions from non-combustion sources in the SoCAB are likely significant, more in-depth analysis is required to better predict the atmospheric implications of a hydrogen economy.

  8. LEAK: A source term generator for evaluating release rates from leaking vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clinton, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    An interactive computer code for estimating the rate of release of any one of several materials from a leaking tank or broken pipe leading from a tank is presented. It is generally assumed that the material in the tank is liquid. Materials included in the data base are acetonitrile, ammonia, carbon tetrachloride, chlorine, chlorine trifluoride, fluorine, hydrogen fluoride, nitric acid, nitrogen tetroxide, sodium hydroxide, sulfur hexafluoride, sulfuric acid, and uranium hexafluoride. Materials that exist only as liquid and/or vapor over expected ranges of temperature and pressure can easily be added to the data base file. The Fortran source code for LEAK and the data file are included with this report.

  9. Electrochemical generation of sulfur vacancies in the basal plane of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Charlie; Li, Hong; Park, Sangwook; Park, Joonsuk; Han, Hyun Soo; Nørskov, Jens K.; Zheng, Xiaolin; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Recently, sulfur (S)-vacancies created on the basal plane of 2H-molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) using argon plasma exposure exhibited higher intrinsic activity for the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction than the edge sites and metallic 1T-phase of MoS2 catalysts. However, a more industrially viable alternative to the argon plasma desulfurization process is needed. In this work, we introduce a scalable route towards generating S-vacancies on the MoS2 basal plane using electrochemical desulfurization. Even though sulfur atoms on the basal plane are known to be stable and inert, we find that they can be electrochemically reduced under accessible applied potentials. This can be done on various 2H-MoS2 nanostructures. By changing the applied desulfurization potential, the extent of desulfurization and the resulting activity can be varied. The resulting active sites are stable under extended desulfurization durations and show consistent HER activity. PMID:28429782

  10. Electrochemical generation of sulfur vacancies in the basal plane of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Charlie; Li, Hong; Park, Sangwook; Park, Joonsuk; Han, Hyun Soo; Nørskov, Jens K.; Zheng, Xiaolin; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Recently, sulfur (S)-vacancies created on the basal plane of 2H-molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) using argon plasma exposure exhibited higher intrinsic activity for the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction than the edge sites and metallic 1T-phase of MoS2 catalysts. However, a more industrially viable alternative to the argon plasma desulfurization process is needed. In this work, we introduce a scalable route towards generating S-vacancies on the MoS2 basal plane using electrochemical desulfurization. Even though sulfur atoms on the basal plane are known to be stable and inert, we find that they can be electrochemically reduced under accessible applied potentials. This can be done on various 2H-MoS2 nanostructures. By changing the applied desulfurization potential, the extent of desulfurization and the resulting activity can be varied. The resulting active sites are stable under extended desulfurization durations and show consistent HER activity.

  11. A Study on the Combustion Characteristics of a Generator Engine Running on a Mixture of Syngas and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Hyun; Park, Cheol Woong [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Youp; Kim, Chang Gi [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    Internal combustion engines running on syngas, which can be obtained from biomass or organic wastes, are expected to be one of the suitable alternatives for power generation, because they are environment-friendly and do not contribute to the depletion of fossil fuels. However, syngas has variable compositions and a lower heating value than pure natural gas, owing to which the combustion conditions need to be adjusted in order to achieve stable combustion. In this study, a gas that has the same characteristics as syngas, such as low heating value (LHV), was produced by mixing N{sub 2} with compressed natural gas (CNG). In addition, this study investigates the combustion characteristics of syngas when it is mixed with hydrogen in a ratio ranging from 10% to 30% with a constant LHV of total gas.

  12. Peripheral ligands as electron storage reservoirs and their role in enhancement of photocatalytic hydrogen generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Qing; Freitag, Leon; Kowacs, Tanja; Falgenhauer, Jane C.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Schlettwein, Derck; Browne, Wesley R.; Pryce, Mary T.; Rau, Sven; Gonzalez, Leticia; Vos, Johannes G.; Huijser, Jannetje Maria

    2016-01-01

    The contrasting early-time photodynamics of two related Ru/Pt photocatalysts with very different photocatalytic H2 generation capabilities are reported. Ultrafast equilibration (535 ± 17 fs) creates an electron reservoir on the peripheral ligands of the ester substituted complex, allowing a dramatic

  13. Theoretical Design of a Thermosyphon for Efficient Process Heat Removal from Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) for Production of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Fred Gunnerson; Akira Tokuhiro; Vivek Utgiker; Kevan Weaver; Steven Sherman

    2007-10-01

    The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase Thermosyphon heat transfer performance with various alkali metals. Thermosyphon is a device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. Heat transport occurs via evaporation and condensation, and the heat transport fluid is re-circulated by gravitational force. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. For process heat, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) are required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant in the most efficient way possible. The production of power at higher efficiency using Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production requires both heat at higher temperatures (up to 1000oC) and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. The purpose for selecting a compact heat exchanger is to maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. The IHX design requirements are governed by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet of the NGNP (900oC, based on the current capabilities of NGNP), and the temperatures in the hydrogen production plant. Spiral Heat Exchangers (SHE’s) have superior heat transfer characteristics, and are less susceptible to fouling. Further, heat losses to surroundings are minimized because of its compact configuration. SHEs have never been examined for phase-change heat transfer applications. The research presented provides useful information for thermosyphon design and Spiral Heat Exchanger.

  14. Nanostructured N-doped orthorhombic Nb2O5 as an efficient stable photocatalyst for hydrogen generation under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Aniruddha K; Praveen, C S; Sethi, Yogesh A; Panmand, Rajendra P; Arbuj, Sudhir S; Naik, Sonali D; Ghule, Anil V; Kale, Bharat B

    2017-11-07

    The synthesis of orthorhombic nitrogen-doped niobium oxide (Nb2O5-xNx) nanostructures was performed and a photocatalytic study carried out in their use in the conversion of toxic H2S and water into hydrogen under UV-Visible light. Nanostructured orthorhombic Nb2O5-xNx was synthesized by a simple solid-state combustion reaction (SSCR). The nanostructural features of Nb2O5-xNx were examined by FESEM and HRTEM, which showed they had a porous chain-like structure, with chains interlocked with each other and with nanoparticles sized less than 10 nm. Diffuse reflectance spectra depicted their extended absorbance in the visible region with a band gap of 2.4 eV. The substitution of nitrogen in place of oxygen atoms as well as Nb-N bond formation were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. A computational study (DFT) of Nb2O5-xNx was also performed for investigation and conformation of the crystal and electronic structure. N-Substitution clearly showed a narrowing of the band gap due to N 2p bands cascading above the O 2p band. Considering the band gap in the visible region, Nb2O5-xNx exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity toward hydrogen evolution (3010 μmol h-1 g-1) for water splitting and (9358 μmol h-1 g-1) for H2S splitting under visible light. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of Nb2O5-xNx was attributed to its extended absorbance in the visible region due to its electronic structure being modified upon doping, which in turn generates more electron-hole pairs, which are responsible for higher H2 generation. More significantly, the mesoporous nanostructure accelerated the supression of electron and hole recombination, which also contributed to the enhancement of its activity.

  15. Effects of starch loading rate on performance of combined fed-batch fermentation of ground wheat for bio-hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozmihci, Serpil; Kargi, Fikret [Department of Environmental Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, 35160 Buca, Izmir (Turkey)

    2010-02-15

    Ground wheat powder solution (10 g L{sup -1}) was subjected to combined dark and light fermentations for bio-hydrogen production by fed-batch operation. A mixture of heat treated anaerobic sludge (AN) and Rhodobacter sphaeroides-NRRL (RS-NRRL) were used as the mixed culture of dark and light fermentation bacteria with an initial dark/light biomass ratio of 1/2. Effects of wheat starch loading rate on the rate and yield of bio-hydrogen formation were investigated. The highest cumulative hydrogen formation (CHF = 3460 ml), hydrogen yield (201 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} starch) and formation rate (18.1 ml h{sup -1}) were obtained with a starch loading rate of 80.4 mg S h{sup -1}. Complete starch hydrolysis and glucose fermentation were achieved within 96 h of fed-batch operation producing volatile fatty acids (VFA) and H{sub 2}. Fermentation of VFAs by photo-fermentation for bio-hydrogen production was most effective at starch loading rate of 80.4 mg S h{sup -1}. Hydrogen formation by combined fermentation took place by a fast dark fermentation followed by a rather slow light fermentation after a lag period. (author)

  16. An Architecturally Constrained Model of Random Number Generation and its Application to Modelling the Effect of Generation Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Sexton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Random number generation (RNG is a complex cognitive task for human subjects, requiring deliberative control to avoid production of habitual, stereotyped sequences. Under various manipulations (e.g., speeded responding, transcranial magnetic stimulation, or neurological damage the performance of human subjects deteriorates, as reflected in a number of qualitatively distinct, dissociable biases. For example, the intrusion of stereotyped behaviour (e.g., counting increases at faster rates of generation. Theoretical accounts of the task postulate that it requires the integrated operation of multiple, computationally heterogeneous cognitive control ('executive' processes. We present a computational model of RNG, within the framework of a novel, neuropsychologically-inspired cognitive architecture, ESPro. Manipulating the rate of sequence generation in the model reproduced a number of key effects observed in empirical studies, including increasing sequence stereotypy at faster rates. Within the model, this was due to time limitations on the interaction of supervisory control processes, namely, task setting, proposal of responses, monitoring, and response inhibition. The model thus supports the fractionation of executive function into multiple, computationally heterogeneous processes.

  17. The Generation Rate of Respirable Dust from Cutting Fiber Cement Siding Using Different Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chaolong; Echt, Alan; Gressel, Michael G

    2017-03-01

    This article describes the evaluation of the generation rate of respirable dust (GAPS, defined as the mass of respirable dust generated per unit linear length cut) from cutting fiber cement siding using different tools in a laboratory testing system. We used an aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer (APS) to continuously monitor the real-time size distributions of the dust throughout cutting tests when using a variety of tools, and calculated the generation rate of respirable dust for each testing condition using the size distribution data. The test result verifies that power shears provided an almost dust-free operation with a GAPS of 0.006 g m-1 at the testing condition. For the same power saws, the cuts using saw blades with more teeth generated more respirable dusts. Using the same blade for all four miter saws tested in this study, a positive linear correlation was found between the saws' blade rotating speed and its dust generation rate. In addition, a circular saw running at the highest blade rotating speed of 9068 rpm generated the greatest amount of dust. All the miter saws generated less dust in the 'chopping mode' than in the 'chopping and sliding' mode. For the tested saws, GAPS consistently decreased with the increases of the saw cutting feed rate and the number of board in the stack. All the test results point out that fewer cutting interactions between the saw blade's teeth and the siding board for a unit linear length of cut tend to result in a lower generation rate of respirable dust. These results may help guide optimal operation in practice and future tool development aimed at minimizing dust generation while producing a satisfactory cut. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The British Occupational Hygiene Society 2017.

  18. Comparison of recombination rate coefficients given by empirical formulas for ions from hydrogen through nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T.; Asano, E. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Recombination rate coefficients based on several empirical formulae are compared for ions of H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, P, Cl, Ar, Ca, Fe and Ni. The total rate coefficients including radiative recombination and dielectronic recombination are shown in graphs. (author)

  19. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  20. Design and assembly of a catalyst bed gas generator for the catalytic decomposition of high concentration hydrogen peroxide propellants and the catalytic combustion of hydrocarbon/air mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method for designing and assembling a high performance catalyst bed gas generator for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in target, space, and on-orbit propulsion systems and low-emission terrestrial power and gas generation. The gas generator utilizes a sectioned catalyst bed system, and incorporates a robust, high temperature mixed metal oxide catalyst. The gas generator requires no special preheat apparatus or special sequencing to meet start-up requirements, enabling a fast overall response time. The high performance catalyst bed gas generator system has consistently demonstrated high decomposition efficiency, extremely low decomposition roughness, and long operating life on multiple test articles.

  1. The role of bridging ligand in hydrogen generation by photocatalytic Ru/Pd assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Bindra, Gurmeet Singh; Schulz, Martin; Paul, Avishek; Groarke, Robert; Soman, Suraj; Inglis, Jane L.; Browne, Wesley R.; Pfeffer, Michael G.; Rau, Sven; MacLean, Brian J.; Pryce, Mary T.; Vos, Johannes G.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of two terpyridine based ruthenium/palladium heteronuclear compounds are presented. The photocatalytic behaviour of the Ru/Pd complex containing the linear 2,2':5',2 ''-terpyridine bridge (1a) and its analogue the non-linear 2,2':6',2 ''-terpyridine bridge (2a) are compared together with the respective mononuclear complexes 1 and 2. Irradiation of 1a with visible light (e.g., 470 nm) results in the photocatalytic generation of dihydrogen gas. Photocatalysis ...

  2. Quantification of Hydrogen Cyanide Generated at Low Temperature O-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile (CS) Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    the higher temperature of CS pyrolysis generated a higher percentage of HCN. From the 1970’s to the early 2000’s, research into HCN as a thermal...1995. Occupational Safety and Health Guideline for o-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile. http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/81-123/ pdfs /0122-rev.pdf 11...Health Guidelines for O-chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile. www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/81-123/ pdf /0122. pdf 27. NIOSH. 1994. NIOSH Manual of Analytical

  3. Analysis of Effect of Heat Pipe Parameters in Minimising the Entropy Generation Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Hari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer and fluid flow in the heat pipe system result in thermodynamic irreversibility generating entropy. The minimum entropy generation principle can be used for optimum design of flat heat pipe. The objective of the present work is to minimise the total entropy generation rate as the objective function with different parameters of the flat heat pipe subjected to some constraints. These constraints constitute the limitations on the heat transport capacity of the heat pipe. This physical nonlinear programming problem with nonlinear constraints is solved using LINGO 15.0 software, which enables finding optimum values for the independent design variables for which entropy generation is minimum. The effect of heat load, length, and sink temperature on design variables and corresponding entropy generation is studied. The second law analysis using minimum entropy generation principle is found to be effective in designing performance enhanced heat pipe.

  4. Flexible-rate optical packet generation/detection and label swapping for optical label switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongying; Li, Juhao; Tian, Yu; Ge, Dawei; Zhu, Paikun; Chen, Yuanxiang; Chen, Zhangyuan; He, Yongqi

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical label switching (OLS) gains lots of attentions due to its intrinsic advantages to implement protocol, bit-rate, granularity and data format transparency packet switching. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to realize flexible-rate optical packet switching for OLS networks. At the transmitter node, flexible-rate packet is generated by parallel modulating different combinations of optical carriers generated from the optical multi-carrier generator (OMCG), among which the low-speed optical label occupies one carrier. At the switching node, label is extracted and re-generated in label processing unit (LPU). The payloads are switched based on routing information and new label is added after switching. At the receiver node, another OMCG serves as local oscillators (LOs) for optical payloads coherent detection. The proposed scheme offers good flexibility for dynamic optical packet switching by adjusting the payload bandwidth and could also effectively reduce the number of lasers, modulators and receivers for packet generation/detection. We present proof-of-concept demonstrations of flexible-rate packet generation/detection and label swapping in 12.5 GHz grid. The influence of crosstalk for cascaded label swapping is also investigated.

  5. Loading Cd0.5Zn0.5S Quantum Dots onto Onion-Like Carbon Nanoparticles to Boost Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Wang, Xina; Feng, Xi; Zhang, Kun; Peng, Xiaoniu; Wang, Hanbin; Liu, Chunlei; Han, Yibo; Wang, Hao; Li, Quan

    2017-07-12

    Carbon dots (C dots, size 5S quantum dots (QDs) loaded onto the onionlike carbon (OLC) matrix for noble metal-free photocatalytic H2 evolution. Cd0.5Zn0.5S QDs (6.9 nm) were uniformly distributed on an OLC (30 nm) matrix with both upconverted and downconverted photoluminescence property. Such an inverse structure allows the full optimization of the QD/OLC interfaces for effective energy transfer and charge separation, both of which contribute to efficient H2 generation. An optimized H2 generation rate of 2018 μmol/h/g (under the irradiation of visible light) and 58.6 μmol/h/g (under the irradiation of 550-900 nm light) was achieved in the Cd0.5Zn0.5S/OLC composite samples. The present work shows that using the OLC matrix in such a reverse construction is a promising strategy for noble metal-free solar hydrogen production.

  6. Generation of µW level plateau harmonics at high repetition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädrich, S; Krebs, M; Rothhardt, J; Carstens, H; Demmler, S; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2011-09-26

    The process of high harmonic generation allows for coherent transfer of infrared laser light to the extreme ultraviolet spectral range opening a variety of applications. The low conversion efficiency of this process calls for optimization or higher repetition rate intense ultrashort pulse lasers. Here we present state-of-the-art fiber laser systems for the generation of high harmonics up to 1 MHz repetition rate. We perform measurements of the average power with a calibrated spectrometer and achieved µW harmonics between 45 nm and 61 nm (H23-H17) at a repetition rate of 50 kHz. Additionally, we show the potential for few-cycle pulses at high average power and repetition rate that may enable water-window harmonics at unprecedented repetition rate. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. The Effect of Herbicides on Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Isolated Vacuoles of Red Beet Root (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Pradedova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of herbicides on the hydrogen peroxide generation in vacuolar extracts of red beet root (Beta vulgaris L. was investigated. Belonging to different chemical classes of herbicide compounds have been used. Herbicides differ from each other in the mechanism of effects on plants. Clopyralid (aromatic acid herbicide, derivative of picolinic acid and 2.4-D (phenoxyacetic herbicide, characterized by hormone-like effects, contributed to the formation of H2O2 in vacuolar extracts. Fluorodifen (nitrophenyl ether herbicide and diuron (urea herbicide also have increased contents H2O2. These compounds inhibit the electron transport, photosynthesis, and photorespiration in sensitive plants. Herbicidal effect of glyphosate (organophosphorus herbicide is due to the inhibition of amino acid synthesis in plant cells. Glyphosate did not affect the content of H2O2 in vacuolar extracts. Herbicide dependent H2O2-generation did not occur with oxidoreductase inhibitors, potassium cyanide and sodium azide. The results suggest that the formation of ROS in the vacuoles due to activity of oxidoreductases, which could interact with herbicides.

  8. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, P H; Trong, V D; Renucci, P; Marie, X

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power.

  9. Storage of liquid hydrogen in natural zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Rybár

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available When producing and utilizing hydrogen, its storage is one of the biggest problems. Hydrogen, as a gas, is extremely fluid with very low specific weight. Moreover, at a certain rate, the hydrogen-oxygen mixture is explosive. Therefore, the storage of hydrogen is relatively dangerous. A storage of liquid hydrogen in the natural zeolite, which is placed in large capacity battery, appears to be a suitable hydrogen storage method. Proposed and constructed pressure tank, large capacity battery, allows long-term and safe storage of liquid hydrogen, with the possibility to change its state from liquid to gaseous or contrarily in real time. Natural zeolite is an inert material with large internal surface area and high thermal capacity. In the future, presented large capacity battery VAZEP can be a part of the system for production and storage of electric energy generated by photovoltaic modules from the sun.

  10. Picosecond-pulse generation over 10 GHz repetition rate based on cascaded semiconductor optical amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Wenlong; Yang, Tianxin; Ge, Chunfeng; Jia, Dongfang

    2017-02-01

    A cavity-free setup to generate short pulses at high repetition rate is introduced, which is based on four-wave mixing (FWM) in cascaded semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). High repetition rate picosecond-pulse is important in optical communication and all-optic information processing systems. Cavity-free setup based on SOA means without ring cavity, which is stable and easy to be large-scale integrated. In this paper, we obtain picosecond-pulse around 10GHz repetition rate and the side-mode suppression ratio is 23 dB. Moreover, the repetition rate and center wavelength of optical pulse is tunable.

  11. Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Jens F; Sunde, Niels A; Bergholt, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation......Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation...

  12. Prognosticating fault development rate in wind turbine generator bearings using local trend models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros; Palou, Jonel; Sweeney, Christian Walsted

    2016-01-01

    Generator bearing defects, e.g. ball, inner and outer race defects, are ranked among the most frequent mechanical failures encountered in wind turbines. Diagnosis and prognosis of bearing faults can be successfully implemented using vibration based condition monitoring systems, where tracking...... of vibration trends from multi-megawatt wind turbine generators are presented, showing the effectiveness of the suggested approach on the calculation of the RUL and fault progression rate....

  13. The synchronous Generators Rated Speed’s Influence on electromagnetic Stresses and on Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeta Spunei; Laurenţiu Pădeanu; Florina Piroi; Ion Piroi; Gheorghe Liuba

    2013-01-01

    During the design of synchronous generators is very important to establish the values of their electromagnetic stresses. The specific literature recommends that these stress values are to be chosen from the curves obtained during experimental design, where the independent values are the polar pitch and the number of pole pairs. The authors of this work propose a method of finding the dependency between the electromagnetic stress and the synchronous generator rated speed t...

  14. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun

    2017-08-03

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  15. Evaluation of Physical Composition and Municipal Solid Waste Generation Rate of Hamadan (June 1999 May 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Samadi

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Although municipal solid waste (MSW is generated every day , but with comparison to other municipal Environmental aspects such as Air pollution and Sewage, is not well considered. MSW management includes refuse production, storage, collection, transportation and disposal. Without adequate and reliable in formation and data about MSW generation rate and it’s physical components, optimun planning and management is not obtainable. In this research the physical composition of Hamadan MSW was studied . Samples were takan by Truck–Load sampling and portional random method from June 1999 untile May 2000 and analyzed for physical components and moisture percent age. The results showed that the average generation rate, density of wastes and its moisture percent were 252.33 Tons and 204.83 kg/m3 and 22.46% respectively. Average percents of physical componets were 77.72% , 5.75% , 5.42% , 3.15%, 2.11% , 1.04% and 4.92% for Biodegriable materials (garbage, papers, plastics, textiles, metals, glass and other materials respectively. Also maximum generation rate was 328 tons in March and minimum generation rate was 196 tons in December. In general, with planning of enforceable reuse and recycling programmes, could be avoid of 183, 14, 13 and 5 tons of biodegriable materials , paper, plastics and metals burial respectively everyday.

  16. The role of bridging ligand in hydrogen generation by photocatalytic Ru/Pd assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindra, Gurmeet Singh; Schulz, Martin; Paul, Avishek; Groarke, Robert; Soman, Suraj; Inglis, Jane L; Browne, Wesley R; Pfeffer, Michael G; Rau, Sven; MacLean, Brian J; Pryce, Mary T; Vos, Johannes G

    2012-11-14

    The synthesis and characterisation of two terpyridine based ruthenium/palladium heteronuclear compounds are presented. The photocatalytic behaviour of the Ru/Pd complex containing the linear 2,2':5',2''-terpyridine bridge (1a) and its analogue the non-linear 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine bridge (2a) are compared together with the respective mononuclear complexes 1 and 2. Irradiation of 1a with visible light (e.g., 470 nm) results in the photocatalytic generation of dihydrogen gas. Photocatalysis was not observed with complex 2a by contrast. A comparison with the photocatalytic behaviour of the precursors 1 and 2 indicates, that while for 1a the photocatalysis is an intramolecular process, for the mononuclear precursors it is intermolecular. The photophysical and electrochemical properties of the mono- and heterobinuclear compounds are compared. Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations indicate that there are substantial differences in the nature of the lowest energy (3)MLCT states of 1a and 2a, from which the contrasting photocatalytic activities of the complexes can be understood.

  17. Unbiased Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation from Pure Water on Stable Ir-treated In 0.33 Ga 0.67 N Nanorods

    KAUST Repository

    Ebaid, Mohamed

    2017-05-11

    InGaN-based nanostructures have recently been recognized as promising materials for efficient solar hydrogen generation. This is due to their chemical stability, adjustable optoelectronic properties, suitable band edge alignment, and large surface-to-volume ratio. The inherent high density of surface trapping states and the lack of compatible conductive substrates, however, hindered their use as stable photo-catalysts. We have designed, synthesized and tested an efficient photocatalytic system using stable In0.33Ga0.67N-based nanorods (NRs) grown on an all-metal stack substrate (Ti-Mo) for a better electron transfer process. In addition, we have applied a bifunctional ultrathin thiol-based organic surface treatment using 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT), in which sulfur atoms protected the surface from oxidation. This treatment has dual functions, it passivates the surface (by the removal of dangling bonds) and creates ligands for linking Ir-metal ions as oxygen evolution centers on top of the semiconductor. This treatment when applied to In0.33Ga0.67N NRs resulted in a photo-catalyst that achieved 3.5% solar-to-hydrogen (STH) efficiency, in pure water (pH~7, buffer solution) under simulated one-sun (AM1.5G) illumination and without electrical bias. Over the tested period, a steady increase of the gas evolution rate was observed from which a turnover frequency of 0.23s-1 was calculated. The novel growth of InGaN-based NRs on a metal as well as the versatile surface functionalization techniques (EDT-Ir) have a high potential for making stable photo-catalysts with adjustable band gaps and band edges to harvest sun light.

  18. The Synchronous Generators Rated Speed’s Influence on Electromagnetic Stresses and on Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeta Spunei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During the design of synchronous generators is very important to establish the values of their electromagnetic stresses. The specific literature recommends that these stress values are to be chosen from the curves obtained during experimental design, where the independent values are the polar pitch and the number of pole pairs. The authors of this work propose a method of finding the dependency between the electromagnetic stress and the synchronous generator rated speed to rapidly estimate the stresses in a given interval of rated speed values.

  19. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: All Stations (Retail and Non-Retail Combined), Data through Quarter 4 of 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-05-31

    This publication includes 90 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations with data through the fourth quarter of 2016. These CDPs include data for all stations in NREL's evaluation (retail and non-retail combined).

  20. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: All Stations (Retail and Non-Retail Combined), Data through Quarter 3 of 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-06

    This publication includes 87 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations with data through the third quarter of 2016. These CDPs include data for all stations in NREL's evaluation (retail and non-retail combined).

  1. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: All Stations (Retail and Non-Retail Combined), Data through Quarter 2 of 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Samuel [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Christopher D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-12-05

    This publication includes 95 composite data products (CDPs) produced for next generation hydrogen stations with data through the second quarter of 2017. These CDPs include data for all stations in NREL's evaluation (retail and non-retail combined).

  2. Antimicrobial activity of hydroxyl radicals generated by hydrogen peroxide photolysis against Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Shirato, Midori; Kanno, Taro; Örtengren, Ulf; Lingström, Peter; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2016-10-01

    Prevention of dental caries with maximum conservation of intact tooth substance remains a challenge in dentistry. The present study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of H2O2 photolysis on Streptococcus mutans biofilm, which may be a novel antimicrobial chemotherapy for treating caries. S. mutans biofilm was grown on disk-shaped hydroxyapatite specimens. After 1-24 h of incubation, growth was assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and viable bacterial counting. Resistance to antibiotics (amoxicillin and erythromycin) was evaluated by comparing bactericidal effects on the biofilm with those on planktonic bacteria. To evaluate the effect of the antimicrobial technique, the biofilm was immersed in 3% H2O2 and was irradiated with an LED at 365 nm for 1 min. Viable bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined by colony counting. The thickness and surface coverage of S. mutans biofilm increased with time, whereas viable bacterial counts plateaued after 6 h. When 12- and 24-h-old biofilms were treated with the minimum concentration of antibiotics that killed viable planktonic bacteria with 3 log reduction, their viable counts were not significantly decreased, suggesting the biofilm acquired antibiotic resistance by increasing its thickness. By contrast, hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of 3% H2O2 effectively killed S. mutans in 24-h-old biofilm, with greater than 5 log reduction. The technique based on H2O2 photolysis is a potentially powerful adjunctive antimicrobial chemotherapy for caries treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Preferential mitochondrial DNA injury caused by glucose oxidase as a steady generator of hydrogen peroxide in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, J J; Van Houten, B

    1997-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is more prone to reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage than nuclear DNA, a continuous flux of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was produced with the glucose/glucose oxidase system. Using a horse radish peroxidase (HRPO)-based colorimetric assay to detect H2O2, glucose oxidase (GO; 12 mU/ml) produced 95 microM of H2O2 in 1 h, whereas only 46 microM of hydrogen peroxide accumulated in the presence of SV40-transformed human fibroblasts ( approximately 1 x 10(6). DNA damage was assessed in the mitochondira and three nuclear regions using a quantitative PCR assay. GO (12 mU/ml) resulted in more damage to the mitochondrial DNA (2.250 +/- 0.045 lesions/10 kb) than in any one of three nuclear targets, which included the non-expressed beta-globin locus (0.436 +/- 0.029 lesions/10 kb); and the active DNA polymerase b gene (0.442 +/- 0.037 lesions/10 kb); and the active hprt gene (0.310 +/- 0.025). Damage to the mtDNA occurred within 15 min of GO treatment, whereas nuclear damage did not appear until after 30 min, and reached a maximum after 60 min. Repair of mitochondrial damage after a 15 min GO (6 mU/ml) treatment was examined. Mitochondria repaired 50% of the damage after 1 h, and by 6 h all the damage was repaired. Higher doses of GO-generated H202, or more extended treatment periods, lead to mitochondrial DNA damage which was not repaired. Mitochondrial function was monitored using the MTT (3,(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. A 15 min treatment with 6 mU/ml of GO decreased mitochondrial activity to 80% of the control; the activity recovered completely within 1 h after damage. These data show that GO-generated H202 causes acute damage to mtDNA and function, and demonstrate that this organelle is an important site for the cellular toxicity of ROS.

  4. Hydrogen generation from bioethanol reforming : bench-scale unit performance with Cu/Nb2O5 catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, N.R.C.F.; Rizzo, R.C.P.; Calsavara, V.; Takahashi, F.; Almeida, A.A.; Melo, F.R. de; Zschornack, M.A.; Bessani, A.N.; Rodrigues, R.M.O. [State University of Maringa, Maringa (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering Lab. of Catalysis; Schmal, M. [Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia, Graduate School and Research in Engineering Alberto Luiz Coimbra Institute; Cantao, M.P. [Institute of Technology for Development, Curitiba (Brazil). Dept. of Materials

    2003-07-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to produce hydrogen from ethanol reforming. This paper presents the bench-scale study unit that uses a 5 per cent copper-niobium2oxygen5 (Cu/Nb2O5) catalyst previously selected in a micro reactor. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the catalyst contained copper oxide in an amorphous form and that the Nb2O5 was highly crystalline. The calcinated catalyst was analysed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and showed that 35 per cent of total copper was on the surface as Cu{sup I} (55 per cent) and Cu{sup II} (45 per cent). The surface area was mainly comprised of meso and macro pores. There was a two-step reduction of Cu{sup II} to Cu at 245 and 306 degrees C, as shown by temperature programmed reduction, as well as a 6 per cent reduction of Nb2O5. An internal reactor with 16 grams (g) of catalyst pellets was contained in the reaction unit. To optimize hydrogen production, reaction temperature and feed rate were varied, and the major by-product was carbon dioxide. Reagents (water and ethanol) were fed into and vaporized in, an electric pre-heater in stoichiometric proportion. Mean conversion increased from 17 per cent to 35 per cent through an increase of reaction temperature from 300 to 400 degrees C. Minor by-products were detected in the form of ethene and ethyl ether. 9 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  5. III-Nitride Membranes for Thermal Bio-Sensing and Solar Hydrogen Generation

    KAUST Repository

    Elafandy, Rami Tarek Mahmoud

    2017-09-01

    III-nitride nanostructures have generated tremendous scientific and technological interests in studying and engineering their low dimensional physics phenomena. Among these, 2D planar, free standing III-nitride nanomembranes are unrivalled in their scalability for high yield manufacture and can be mechanically manipulated. Due to the increase in their surface to volume ratio and the manifestation of quantum phenomena, these nanomembranes acquire unique physical properties. Furthermore, III-nitride membranes are chemically stable and biocompatible. Finally, nanomembranes are highly flexible and can follow curvilinear surfaces present in biological systems. However, being free-standing, requires especially new techniques for handling nanometers or micrometers thick membrane devices. Furthermore, effectively transferring these membrane devices to other substrates is not a direct process which requires the use of photoresists, solvents and/or elastomers. Finally, as the membranes are transferred, they need to be properly attached for subsequent device fabrications, which often includes spin coating and rinsing steps. These engineering complications have impeded the development of novel devices based on III-nitride membranes. In this thesis, we demonstrate the versatility of III-nitride membranes where we develop a thermal bio-sensor nanomembrane and solar energy photo-anode membrane. First, we present a novel preparation technique of nanomembranes with new characteristics; having no threading dislocation cores. We then perform optical characterization to reveal changes in their defect densities compared to the bulk crystal. We also study their mechanical properties where we successfully modulate their bandgap emission by 55 meV through various external compressive and tensile strain fields. Furthermore, we characterize the effect of phonon-boundary scattering on their thermal properties where we report a reduction of thermal conductivity from 130 to 9 W/mK. We employ

  6. Competing quantum effects in the free energy profiles and diffusion rates of hydrogen and deuterium molecules through clathrate hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Cendagorta, Joseph R; Hele, Timothy J H; Marsalek, Ondrej; Bačić, Zlatko; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates hold considerable promise as safe and economical materials for hydrogen storage. Here we present a quantum mechanical study of H$_2$ and D$_2$ diffusion through a hexagonal face shared by two large cages of clathrate hydrates over a wide range of temperatures. Path integral molecular dynamics simulations are used to compute the free-energy profiles for the diffusion of H$_2$ and D$_2$ as a function of temperature. Ring polymer molecular dynamics rate theory, incorporating both exact quantum statistics and approximate quantum dynamical effects, is utilized in the calculations of the H$_2$ and D$_2$ diffusion rates in a broad temperature interval. We find that the shape of the quantum free-energy profiles and their height relative to the classical free energy barriers at a given temperature, as well as the rate of diffusion, are profoundly affected by competing quantum effects: above 25 K, zero-point energy (ZPE) perpendicular to the reaction path for diffusion between cavities decreases the ...

  7. Effects of organic loading rate on hydrogen and volatile fatty acid production and microbial community during acidogenic hydrogenesis in a continuous stirred tank reactor using molasses wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, J; Cho, K-S

    2016-12-01

    Microbial community associated with hydrogen production and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) accumulation was characterized in acidogenic hydrogenesis using molasses wastewater as a feedstock. Hydrogen and VFAs production were measured under an organic loading rate (OLR) from 19 to 35 g-COD l(-1)  day(-1) . The active microbial community was analysed using RNA-based massively parallel sequencing technique, and their correlation patterns were analysed using networking analysis. The continuous stirred tank reactor achieved stable hydrogen production at different OLR conditions, and the maximum hydrogen production rate (HPR) was 1·02 L-H2  l(-1)  day(-1) at 31·0 g-COD l(-1)  day(-1) . Butyrate (50%) and acetate (38%) positively increased with increase in OLR. Total VFA production stayed around 7135 mg l(-1) during the operation period. Although Clostridiales and Lactobacillales were relatively abundant, the HPR was positively associated with Pseudomonadaceae and Micrococcineae. Total VFA and acetate, butyrate and propionate concentrations were positively correlated with lactic acid bacteria (LAB) such as Bacillales, Sporolactobacillus and Lactobacillus. The close relationship between Pseudomonadaceae and Micrococcineae, and LAB play important roles for stable hydrogen and VFA production from molasses wastewater. Microbial information on hydrogen and VFA production can be useful to design and operate for acidogenic hydrogenesis using high strength molasses wastewater. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Isothermal calorimeter for measurements of time-dependent heat generation rate in individual supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteshari, Obaidallah; Lau, Jonathan; Krishnan, Atindra; Dunn, Bruce; Pilon, Laurent

    2018-01-01

    Heat generation in electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) may lead to temperature rise and reduce their lifetime and performance. This study aims to measure the time-dependent heat generation rate in individual carbon electrode of EDLCs under various charging conditions. First, the design, fabrication, and validation of an isothermal calorimeter are presented. The calorimeter consisted of two thermoelectric heat flux sensors connected to a data acquisition system, two identical and cold plates fed with a circulating coolant, and an electrochemical test section connected to a potentiostat/galvanostat system. The EDLC cells consisted of two identical activated carbon electrodes and a separator immersed in an electrolyte. Measurements were performed on three cells with different electrolytes under galvanostatic cycling for different current density and polarity. The measured time-averaged irreversible heat generation rate was in excellent agreement with predictions for Joule heating. The reversible heat generation rate in the positive electrode was exothermic during charging and endothermic during discharging. By contrast, the negative electrode featured both exothermic and endothermic heat generation during both charging and discharging. The results of this study can be used to validate existing thermal models, to develop thermal management strategies, and to gain insight into physicochemical phenomena taking place during operation.

  9. NORCAL_BASELINES - Offshore Baseline for Northern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  10. SOCAL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Southern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  11. CENCAL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Central California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  12. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-12-01

    OAK-B135 Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy [1-1,1-2]. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties [1-3,1-4]. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily

  13. Impact of the High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion on Cold Source Nuclear Heat Generation Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, staff members at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducting studies to determine whether the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. As part of these ongoing studies, an assessment of the impact that the HEU to LEU fuel conversion has on the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source system and its moderator vessel was performed and is documented in this report. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions and few-group neutron fluxes in the cold source moderator were also estimated. Neutronics calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo N-Particle code to determine the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source and its vessel for the HEU core operating at a full reactor power (FP) of 85 MW(t) and the reference LEU core operating at an FP of 100 MW(t). Calculations were performed with beginning-of-cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) conditions to bound typical irradiation conditions. Average specific BOC heat generation rates of 12.76 and 12.92 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the hemispherical region of the cold source liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the HEU and LEU cores, and EOC heat generation rates of 13.25 and 12.86 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the HEU and LEU cores. Thus, the greatest heat generation rates were calculated for the EOC HEU core, and it is concluded that the conversion from HEU to LEU fuel and the resulting increase of FP from 85 MW to 100 MW will not impact the ability of the heat removal equipment to remove the heat deposited in the cold source system. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions are estimated to be about 12.0% greater at BOC and 2.7% greater at EOC for the LEU core in comparison to the HEU core. Silicon is aluminum s major transmutation product and

  14. Note: An avalanche transistor-based nanosecond pulse generator with 25 MHz repetition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beev, Nikolai; Keller, Jonas; Mehlstäubler, Tanja E

    2017-12-01

    We have developed an avalanche transistor-based pulse generator for driving the photocathode of an image intensifier, which comprises a mainly capacitive load on the order of 100 pF. The circuit produces flat-top pulses with a rise time of 2 ns, a FWHM of 10 ns, and an amplitude of tens of V at a high repetition rate in the range of tens of MHz. The generator is built of identical avalanche transistor sections connected in parallel and triggered in a sequence, synchronized to a reference rf signal. The described circuit and mode of operation overcome the power dissipation limit of avalanche transistor generators and enable a significant increase of pulse repetition rates. Our approach is naturally suited for synchronized imaging applications at low light levels.

  15. Note: An avalanche transistor-based nanosecond pulse generator with 25 MHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beev, Nikolai; Keller, Jonas; Mehlstäubler, Tanja E.

    2017-12-01

    We have developed an avalanche transistor-based pulse generator for driving the photocathode of an image intensifier, which comprises a mainly capacitive load on the order of 100 pF. The circuit produces flat-top pulses with a rise time of 2 ns, a FWHM of 10 ns, and an amplitude of tens of V at a high repetition rate in the range of tens of MHz. The generator is built of identical avalanche transistor sections connected in parallel and triggered in a sequence, synchronized to a reference rf signal. The described circuit and mode of operation overcome the power dissipation limit of avalanche transistor generators and enable a significant increase of pulse repetition rates. Our approach is naturally suited for synchronized imaging applications at low light levels.

  16. Silver nanoparticles sensitized C60(Ag@C60) as efficient electrocatalysts for hydrazine oxidation: Implication for hydrogen generation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwade, Shankar S.; Mulik, Balaji B.; Mali, Shivsharan M.; Sathe, Bhaskar R.

    2017-02-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs; 10 ± 0.5 nm) sensitized Fullerene (C60; 15 ±2 nm) nanocatalysts (Ag@C60) for the first time showing efficient electroatalytic activity for the oxidation of hydrazine demonstrating activity comparable to that of Pt in acidic, neutral and basic media. The performance is comparable with the best available electrocatalytic system and plays a vital role in the overall hydrogen generation reactions from hydrazine as a one of the fuel cell reaction. The materials are synthesized by a simple and scalable synthetic route involving acid functionalization of C60 followed by chemical reduction of Ag+ ions in ethylene glycol at high temperature. The distributation of Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) (morphological information) on C60, bonding, its crystal structure, along with activity towards hydrazine oxidation (electrocatalytic) is studied using TEM, XRD, UV-vis, XPS, FTIR and electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry) studies, respectively. The observed efficient electrocatalytic activity of the as-synthesized electrode is attributed to the co-operative response and associated structural defects due to their oxidative functionalization along with thier cooperative functioning at nanodimensions.

  17. Solar hydrogen generation with wide-band-gap semiconductors: GaP(100) photoelectrodes and surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Bernhard; Fertig, Dominic; Ziegler, Jürgen; Klett, Joachim; Hoch, Sascha; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2012-08-27

    GaP, with its large band gap of 2.26 eV (indirect) and 2.78 eV (direct), is a very promising candidate for direct photoelectrochemical water splitting. Herein, p-GaP(100) is investigated as a photocathode for hydrogen generation. The samples are characterized after each preparation step regarding how their photoelectrochemical behavior is influenced by surface composition and structure using a combination of electrochemical and surface-science preparation and characterization techniques. The formation of an Ohmic back contact employing an annealed gold layer and the removal of the native oxides using various etchants are studied. It turns out that the latter has a pronounced effect on the surface composition and structure and therefore also on the electronic properties of the interface. The formation of a thin Ga(2)O(3) buffer layer on the p-GaP(100) surface does not lead to a clear improvement in the photoelectrochemical efficiency, neither do Pt nanocatalyst particles deposited on top of the buffer layer. This behavior can be understood by the electronic structure of these layers, which is not well suited for an efficient charge transfer from the absorber to the electrolyte. First experiments show that the efficiency can be considerably improved by employing a thin GaN layer as a buffer layer on top of the p-GaP(100) surface. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Preparation of Rh/Ag bimetallic nanoparticles as effective catalyst for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of KBH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liang; Jiao, Chengpeng; Wang, Liqiong; Huang, Zili; Liang, Feng; Liu, Simin; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Shaowei

    2018-01-01

    ISOBAM-104 protected Rh/Ag bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) with average diameter less than 3.0 nm were synthesized by a co-reduction method. Ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to characterize the structure, particle size, and electronic structure of the prepared bimetallic NPs. The catalytic activities of prepared bimetallic NPs for hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of a basic KBH4 solution were evaluated in detail. The results indicated that as-prepared Rh/Ag bimetallic NPs showed a higher catalytic activity than corresponding monometallic NPs. Among all the monometallic NPs and bimetallic NPs, Rh80Ag20 bimetallic NPs exhibited the highest catalytic activity with a value of 6010 mol-H2·h‑1·mol-catalyst‑1 at pH = 12 and 303 K. The high catalytic activities of Rh/Ag bimetallic NPs could be attributed to presence of negatively charged Rh atoms and positively charged Ag atoms, which is supported by the results of XPS and density functional theory calculation. Based on the kinetic study, the apparent activation energy for the hydrolysis reaction of the basic KBH4 solution catalyzed by Rh80Ag20 bimetallic NPs was about 47.0 ± 3.9 kJ mol‑1.

  19. Ambient-temperature synthesis of nanocrystalline ZnO and its application in the generation of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perales-Perez, O.J.; Singh, S.P. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, PR 00681 (United States); Tomar, M.S.; Watanabe, A.; Arai, T.; Kasuya, A.; Tohji, K. [Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2004-03-01

    The conditions leading to the direct formation of nanocrystalline ZnO particles from aqueous solutions at 25 C are presented. The synthesis of ZnO was made possible by the suitable selection of the solution chemistry and the control of the alkaline conditions established during the formation and conversion of the precursor solid. XRD and FT-IR analyses revealed that the progressive removal of molecular and coordinated water from the precursor basic zinc sulphate and the diminution of sulphate contents took place at a temperature as low as 25 C, making unnecessary any further thermal treatment of the as-synthesized powders. SEM observations evidenced the formation of sub-micron aggregates of ZnO (sizes below 100 nm). Depending on synthesis and precipitation conditions, it was possible to decrease the crystallite size from 25 down to 11 nm. The ambient-temperature ZnO nanocrystals were used in the photo-catalytic generation of hydrogen from alkaline Na{sub 2}S aqueous solutions. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. High-precision QED calculations of the hyperfine structure in hydrogen and transition rates in multicharged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volotka, A.V.

    2006-07-01

    Studies of the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen are strongly motivated by the level of accuracy achieved in recent atomic physics experiments, which yield finally model-independent informations about nuclear structure parameters with utmost precision. Considering the current status of the determination of corrections to the hyperfine splitting of the ground state in hydrogen, this thesis provides further improved calculations by taking into account the most recent value for the proton charge radius. Comparing theoretical and experimental data of the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen the proton-size contribution is extracted and a relativistic formula for this contribution is derived in terms of moments of the nuclear charge and magnetization distributions. An iterative scheme for the determination of the Zemach and magnetic radii of the proton is proposed. As a result, the Zemach and magnetic radii are determined and the values are compared with the corresponding ones deduced from data obtained in electron-proton scattering experiments. The extraction of the Zemach radius from a rescaled difference between the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen and in muonium is considered as well. Investigations of forbidden radiative transitions in few-electron ions within ab initio QED provide a most sensitive tool for probing the influence of relativistic electron-correlation and QED corrections to the transition rates. Accordingly, a major part of this thesis is devoted to detailed studies of radiative and interelectronic-interaction effects to the transition probabilities. The renormalized expressions for the corresponding corrections in one- and twoelectron ions as well as for ions with one electron over closed shells are derived employing the two-time Green's function method. Numerical results for the correlation corrections to magnetic transition rates in He-like ions are presented. For the first time also the frequency-dependent contribution is calculated, which has to be

  1. Using cheese whey for hydrogen and methane generation in a two-stage continuous process with alternative pH controlling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venetsaneas, Nikolaos; Antonopoulou, Georgia; Stamatelatou, Katerina; Kornaros, Michael; Lyberatos, Gerasimos

    2009-08-01

    This study focuses on the exploitation of cheese whey as a source for hydrogen and methane, in a two-stage continuous process. Mesophilic fermentative hydrogen production from undiluted cheese whey was investigated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 h. Alkalinity addition (NaHCO(3)) or an automatic pH controller were used, to maintain the pH culture at a constant value of 5.2. The hydrogen production rate was 2.9+/-0.2 L/Lreactor/d, while the yield of hydrogen produced was approximately 0.78+/-0.05 mol H(2)/mol glucose consumed, with alkalinity addition, while the respective values when using pH control were 1.9+/-0.1 L/Lreactor/d and 0.61+/-0.04 mol H(2)/mol glucose consumed. The corresponding yields of hydrogen produced were 2.9 L of H(2)/L cheese whey and 1.9 L of H(2)/L cheese whey, respectively. The effluent from the hydrogenogenic reactor was further digested to biogas in a continuous mesophilic anaerobic bioreactor. The anaerobic digester was operated at an HRT of 20 d and produced approximately 1L CH(4)/d, corresponding to a yield of 6.7 L CH(4)/L of influent. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) elimination reached 95.3% demonstrating that cheese whey could be efficiently used for hydrogen and methane production, in a two-stage process.

  2. The absorption effect of the Lα-line Supplement to the paper 'On the Correlation Between the Hα-line emission rate and the ablation rate of a hydrogen pellet in tokamak discharges' – Nuclear Fusion 24 (1984) 697

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, C. T.; Thomsen, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    Several assumptions made in a previous study of the correlation between the Hα-line emission rate and the ablation rate of a hydrogen pellet injected into a tokamak discharge showed that the emission layer of the ablatant as optically thin with respect to all levels of the principal quantum numbe...

  3. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  4. Electricity Cogenerator from Hydrogen and Biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinate, W.; Chinnasa, P.; Dangphonthong, D.

    2017-09-01

    This research studied about electricity cogenerator from Hydrogen and Biogas and the factors that cause that effecting Hydrogen from Aluminium which was a cylindrical feature. By using a catalyst was NaOH and CaO, it was reacted in distilled water with percentage of Aluminium: the catalyst (NaOH and CaO) and brought to mix with Biogas afterwards, that have been led to electricity from generator 1 kilowatt. The research outcomes were concentration of solutions that caused amount and percent of maximum Hydrogen was to at 10 % wt and 64.73 % which rate of flowing of constant gas 0.56 litter/minute as temperature 97 degree Celsius. After that led Hydrogen was mixed by Biogas next, conducted to electricity from generator and levelled the voltage of generator at 220 Volt. There after the measure of electricity current and found electricity charge would be constant at 3.1 Ampere. And rate of Biogas flowing and Hydrogen, the result was the generator used Biogas rate of flowing was highest 9 litter/minute and the lowest 7.5 litter/minute, which had rate of flowing around 8.2 litter/minute. Total Biogas was used around 493.2 litter or about 0.493 m3 and Hydrogen had rate of flowing was highest 2.5 litter/minute.

  5. A new approach for bio-jet fuel generation from palm oil and limonene in the absence of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Zhao, Chen

    2015-12-18

    The traditional methodology includes a carbon-chain shortening strategy to produce bio-jet fuel from lipids via a two-stage process with hydrogen. Here, we propose a new solution using a carbon-chain filling strategy to convert C10 terpene and lipids to jet fuel ranged hydrocarbons with aromatic hydrocarbon ingredients in the absence of hydrogen.

  6. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from

  7. A third-generation hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) enzyme immobilized in a Nafion-Sonogel-Carbon composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElKaoutit, Mohammed; Naranjo-Rodriguez, Ignacio [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apdo. 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Dominguez, Manuel [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz (Spain); Hernandez-Artiga, Maria P.; Bellido-Milla, Dolores [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apdo. 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Hidalgo-Hidalgo de Cisneros, Jose Luis [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Apdo. 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)], E-mail: jluis.hidalgo@uca.es

    2008-10-15

    A third-generation biosensor based on HRP and a Sonogel-Carbon electrode has been fabricated with the aim of monitoring hydrogen peroxide in aqueous media via a direct electron transfer process. The redox activity of native HRP, typical of thin-layer electrochemistry, was observed. The charge coefficient transfer, {alpha}, and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k{sub s}, were calculated to be 0.51 {+-} 0.04 and 1.29 {+-} 0.04 s{sup -1}, respectively. Topographic study by atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that the enzyme may have been introduced inside the ionic cluster of the Nafion. The immobilized HRP exhibited excellent electrocatalytical response to the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and preserved its native state after the immobilization stage. Several important experimental variables were optimized. The resulting biosensor showed a linear response to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} over a concentration range from 4 to 100 {mu}M, with a sensitivity of 12.8 nA/{mu}M cm{sup -2} and a detection limit of 1.6 {mu}M, calculated as (3 S.D./sensitivity). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant K{sub m}{sup app} was calculated to be 0.295 {+-} 0.020 mM. The biosensor showed high sensitivity as well as good stability and reproducibility. The performance of the biosensor was evaluated with respect to four possible interferences.

  8. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Kinetic Study of 2-Methylfuran and 2,5-Dimethylfuran Hydrogenation over 7 nm Platinum Cubic Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Aliaga, Cesar

    2011-04-28

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements obtained from gas chromatography were used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) over cubic Pt nanoparticles of 7 nm average size, synthesized by colloidal methods and cleaned by ultraviolet light and ozone treatment. Reactions carried out at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range of 20-120 °C produced dihydro and tetrahydro species, as well as ring-opening products (alcohols) and ring-cracking products, showing high selectivity toward ring opening throughout the entire temperature range. The aromatic rings (MF and DMF) adsorbed parallel to the nanoparticle surface. Results yield insight into various surface reaction intermediates and the reason for the significantly lower selectivity for ring cracking in DMF hydrogenation compared to MF hydrogenation. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  9. Quantitative study of the production rate of droplets in a T-junction microdroplet generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hai; Zeng, Wen; Li, Songjing

    2017-12-01

    In a T-junction microdroplet generator, a mathematical model which can quantify the production rate of droplets is demonstrated. The experiments of droplet formation are performed for different geometries of the T-junction microchannels, and good agreements are shown between the predicted and the measured values of the droplet production rates. From both theoretical and experimental study, the production rate of droplets varies nonlinearly with the flow-rate ratio of the two phases during droplet formation, and by fixing the flow-rate ratio, the production rate of droplets is approximately a linear function of the flow rate of the fluids. In particular, the coefficients of the linear relation are only determined by the geometrical parameters of the T-junction microchannel. As a result, our model can be validated experimentally, and especially for a specific geometry of the T-junction, the production rate of droplets can be precisely predicted and controlled based on the flow rate of the fluids.

  10. The Norwegian hydrogen guide 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen technologies are maturing at rapid speed, something we experience in Norway and around the globe every day as demonstration projects for vehicles and infrastructure expand at a rate unthinkable of only a few years ago. An example of this evolution happened in Norway in 2009 when two hydrogen filling stations were opened on May the 11th, making it possible to arrange the highly successful Viking Rally from Oslo to Stavanger with more than 40 competing teams. The Viking Rally demonstrated for the public that battery and hydrogen-electric vehicles are technologies that exist today and provide a real alternative for zero emission mobility in the future. The driving range of the generation of vehicles put into demonstration today is more than 450 km on a full hydrogen tank, comparable to conventional vehicles. As the car industry develops the next generation of vehicles for serial production within the next 4-5 years, we will see vehicles that are more robust, more reliable and cost effective. Also on the hydrogen production and distribution side progress is being made, and since renewable hydrogen from biomass and electrolysis is capable of making mobility basically emission free, hydrogen can be a key component in combating climate change and reducing local emissions. The research Council of Norway has for many years supported the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, and The Research Council firmly believes that hydrogen and fuel cell technologies play a crucial role in the energy system of the future. Hydrogen is a flexible transportation fuel, and offers possibilities for storing and balancing intermittent electricity in the energy system. Norwegian companies, research organisations and universities have during the last decade developed strong capabilities in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, capabilities it is important to further develop so that Norwegian actors can supply high class hydrogen and fuel cell technologies to global markets

  11. Removal of hydrogen sulfide generated during anaerobic treatment of sulfate-laden wastewater using biochar: Evaluation of efficiency and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjanarong, Jarupat; Giri, Balendu S; Jaisi, Deb P; Oliveira, Fernanda R; Boonsawang, Piyarat; Chaiprapat, Sumate; Singh, R S; Balakrishna, Avula; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from biogas was investigated in a biochar column integrated with a bench-scale continuous-stirred tank reactor (CSTR) treating sulfate-laden wastewater. Synthetic wastewater containing sulfate concentrations of 200-2000mg SO4(2-)/L was used as substrate, and the CSTR was operated at an organic loading rate of 1.5g chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L·day and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20days. The biochar was able to remove about 98.0 (±1.2)% of H2S for the ranges of concentrations from 105-1020ppmv, especially at high moisture content (80-85%). Very high H2S adsorption capacity (up to 273.2±1.9mg H2S/g) of biochar is expected to enhance the H2S oxidation into S(0) and sulfate. These findings bring a potentially novel application of sulfur-rich biochar as a source of sulfur, an essential but often deficient micro-nutrient in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gold supported on zirconia polymorphs for hydrogen generation from formic acid in base-free aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Qing-Yuan; Lin, Jian-Dong; Liu, Yong-Mei; He, He-Yong; Huang, Fu-Qiang; Cao, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Formic acid (FA) has attracted considerable attention as a safe and convenient hydrogen storage material for renewable energy transformation. However, development of an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for selective FA decomposition for ultraclean H2 gas in the absence of any alkalis or additives under mild conditions remains a major challenge. Based on our previous work on Au/ZrO2 as a robust and efficient catalyst for FA dehydrogenation in amine system, we report here ZrO2 with different nanocrystal polymorphs supported Au nanoparticles can achieve near completion of FA dehydrogenation in base-free aqueous medium. Of significant importance is that an excellent rate of up to 81.8 L H2 gAu-1 h-1 in open system and highly pressurized gas of 5.9 MPa in closed one can be readily attained at 80 °C for Au/m-ZrO2. In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) and CO2-temperature programmed desorption (TPD) techniques revealed that Au/m-ZrO2 exhibits a higher density of surface basic sites than Au/t-ZrO2 and Au/a-ZrO2. Basic sites in surface can substantially facilitate crucial FA deprotonation process which appears to be a key factor for achieving high dehydrogenation activity. The H/D exchange between solvent of H2O and substrate of FA was observed by the kinetic isotope effect experiments.

  13. A Measurement of the Rate of Muon Capture in Hydrogen Gas andDetermination of the Proton's Induced Pseudoscalar Coupling gP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, Thomas Ira [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the rate ofnuclear muon capture by the proton, performed by the MuCap Collaborationusing a new technique based on a time projection chamber operating inultraclean, deuterium-depleted hydrogen gas at room temperature and 1 MPapressure. The hydrogen target's low gas density of 1 percent compared toliquid hydrogen is key to avoiding uncertainties that arise from theformation of muonic molecules. The capture rate was obtained from thedifference between the μ- disappearance rate in hydrogen--as determinedfrom data collected in the experiment's first physics run in fall2004--and the world averagefor the μ+ decay rate. After combining theresults of my analysis with the results from another independent analysisof the 2004 data, the muon capture rate from the hyperfine singlet groundstate of the mu-p atom is found to be ΛS = 725.0 ± 17.4 1/s, fromwhich the induced pseudoscalar coupling of the nucleon, gP(q2 = -0.88m$2\\atop{μ}$)= 7.3 ± 1.1, is extracted. This result for gP is consistent withtheoretical predictions that are based on the approximate chiral symmetryof QCD.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate: a shock tube study using tunable laser absorption of H(2)O near 2.5 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zekai; Farooq, Aamir; Barbour, Ethan A; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2009-11-19

    The thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was measured behind reflected shock waves in hydrogen peroxide/inert gas mixtures using a sensitive laser diagnostic for water vapor. In these mixtures, the formation rate of water is predominantly controlled by the decomposition rate of hydrogen peroxide. Rate determinations were made over a temperature range of 1000-1200 K and a pressure range of 0.9-3.2 atm for both argon and nitrogen carrier gases. Good detection sensitivity for water was achieved using tunable diode laser absorption of water at 2550.96 nm within its v(3) fundamental band. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition rates were found to be independent of pressure at 0.9 and 1.7 atm and showed only slight influence of pressure at 3.2 atm. The best fit of the current data to the low-pressure-limit rate for H(2)O(2) dissociation in argon bath gas is k(1,0) = 10(15.97+/-0.10) exp(-21 220 +/- 250 K/T) [cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)] (1000-1200 K). Experiments conducted in a nitrogen bath gas show a relative collision efficiency of argon to nitrogen of 0.67.

  15. Rapid generation of hydrogen peroxide contributes to the complex cell death induction by the angucycline antibiotic landomycin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchuk, Rostyslav R; Lehka, Lilya V; Terenzi, Alessio; Matselyukh, Bohdan P; Rohr, Jürgen; Jha, Amit K; Downey, Theresa; Kril, Iryna J; Herbacek, Irene; van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Heffeter, Petra; Stoika, Rostyslav S; Berger, Walter

    2017-05-01

    Landomycin E (LE) is an angucycline antibiotic produced by Streptomyces globisporus. Previously, we have shown a broad anticancer activity of LE which is, in contrast to the structurally related and clinically used anthracycline doxorubicin (Dx), only mildly affected by multidrug resistance-mediated drug efflux. In the present study, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer activity of landomycin E towards Jurkat T-cell leukemia cells were dissected focusing on the involvement of radical oxygen species (ROS). LE-induced apoptosis distinctly differed in several aspects from the one induced by Dx. Rapid generation of both extracellular and cell-derived hydrogen peroxide already at one hour drug exposure was observed in case of LE but not found before 24h for Dx. In contrast, Dx but not LE induced production of superoxide radicals. Mitochondrial damage, as revealed by JC-1 staining, was weakly enhanced already at 3h LE treatment and increased significantly with time. Accordingly, activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway initiator caspase-9 was not detectable before 12h exposure. In contrast, cleavage of the down-stream caspase substrate PARP-1 was clearly induced already at the three hour time point. Out of all caspases tested, only activation of effector caspase-7 was induced at this early time points paralleling the LE-induced oxidative burst. Accordingly, this massive cleavage of caspase-7 at early time points was inhibitable by the radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Additionally, only simultaneous inhibition of multiple caspases reduced LE-induced apoptosis. Specific scavengers of both H2O2 and OH(•) effectively decreased LE-induced ROS production, but only partially inhibited LE-induced apoptosis. In contrast, NAC efficiently blocked both parameters. Summarizing, rapid H2O2 generation and a complex caspase activation pattern contribute to the antileukemic effects of LE. As superoxide generation is considered as the main

  16. Peer group reflection on student ratings stimulates clinical teachers to generate plans to improve their teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lierop, Marion; de Jonge, Laury; Metsemakers, Job; Dolmans, Diana

    2017-11-28

    Previous studies have demonstrated that student ratings of a teachers' performance do not incentivize clinical teachers to reflect critically and generate plans to improve their teaching. Peer group reflection might offer a solution in mediating this change. To investigate: (a) to which extent clinical teachers perceive self-evaluation, student ratings and peer group reflection effective; and (b) whether additional peer group reflection fosters critical reflection and the translation of feedback into concrete plans of action. We conducted a quasi-experiment, inviting two groups of 10 clinical teachers each (1) to complete a self-evaluation and (2) subsequently examine their student ratings. One group participated in (3) an additional peer group reflection meeting. All participants were finally requested to define plans for improvement and evaluate each activity's effectiveness. Participants perceived all three activities to be effective. Levels of reflection did not differ across the two groups. However, participation in peer group reflection did result in generating more concrete plans to change clinical teaching. Peer group reflection on student ratings shows promise as tool to assist clinical teachers in generating plans for improvement. Future research should focus on whether teaching indeed improves with the introduction of peer group reflection.

  17. Operation of metal hydride hydrogen storage systems for hydrogen compression using solar thermal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruki Endo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using a newly constructed bench-scale hydrogen energy system with renewable energy, ‘Pure Hydrogen Energy System’, the present study demonstrates the operations of a metal hydride (MH tank for hydrogen compression as implemented through the use solar thermal energy. Solar thermal energy is used to generate hot water as a heat source of the MH tank. Thus, 70 kg of LaNi5, one of the most typical alloys used for hydrogen storage, was placed in the MH tank. We present low and high hydrogen flow rate operations. Then, the operations under winter conditions are discussed along with numerical simulations conducted from the thermal point of view. Results show that a large amount of heat (>100 MJ is generated and the MH hydrogen compression is available.

  18. Determination of Equine Cytochrome c Backbone Amide Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Rates by Mass Spectrometry Using a Wider Time Window and Isotope Envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-03-01

    A new strategy to analyze amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) data is proposed, utilizing a wider time window and isotope envelope analysis of each peptide. While most current scientific reports present HDX-MS data as a set of time-dependent deuteration levels of peptides, the ideal HDX-MS data presentation is a complete set of backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The ideal data set can provide single amide resolution, coverage of all exchange events, and the open/close ratio of each amide hydrogen in EX2 mechanism. Toward this goal, a typical HDX-MS protocol was modified in two aspects: measurement of a wider time window in HDX-MS experiments and deconvolution of isotope envelope of each peptide. Measurement of a wider time window enabled the observation of deuterium incorporation of most backbone amide hydrogens. Analysis of the isotope envelope instead of centroid value provides the deuterium distribution instead of the sum of deuteration levels in each peptide. A one-step, global-fitting algorithm optimized exchange rate and deuterium retention during the analysis of each amide hydrogen by fitting the deuterated isotope envelopes at all time points of all peptides in a region. Application of this strategy to cytochrome c yielded 97 out of 100 amide hydrogen exchange rates. A set of exchange rates determined by this approach is more appropriate for a patent or regulatory filing of a biopharmaceutical than a set of peptide deuteration levels obtained by a typical protocol. A wider time window of this method also eliminates false negatives in protein-ligand binding site identification.

  19. Development of a Novel Efficient Solid-Oxide Hybrid for Co-generation of Hydrogen and Electricity Using Nearby Resources for Local Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Greg, G.; Virkar, Anil, V.; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Thangamani, Nithyanantham; Anderson, Harlan, U.; Brow, Richard, K.

    2009-06-30

    Developing safe, reliable, cost-effective, and efficient hydrogen-electricity co-generation systems is an important step in the quest for national energy security and minimized reliance on foreign oil. This project aimed to, through materials research, develop a cost-effective advanced technology cogenerating hydrogen and electricity directly from distributed natural gas and/or coal-derived fuels. This advanced technology was built upon a novel hybrid module composed of solid-oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs) and solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), both of which were in planar, anode-supported designs. A SOFEC is an electrochemical device, in which an oxidizable fuel and steam are fed to the anode and cathode, respectively. Steam on the cathode is split into oxygen ions that are transported through an oxygen ion-conducting electrolyte (i.e. YSZ) to oxidize the anode fuel. The dissociated hydrogen and residual steam are exhausted from the SOFEC cathode and then separated by condensation of the steam to produce pure hydrogen. The rationale was that in such an approach fuel provides a chemical potential replacing the external power conventionally used to drive electrolysis cells (i.e. solid oxide electrolysis cells). A SOFC is similar to the SOFEC by replacing cathode steam with air for power generation. To fulfill the cogeneration objective, a hybrid module comprising reversible SOFEC stacks and SOFC stacks was designed that planar SOFECs and SOFCs were manifolded in such a way that the anodes of both the SOFCs and the SOFECs were fed the same fuel, (i.e. natural gas or coal-derived fuel). Hydrogen was produced by SOFECs and electricity was generated by SOFCs within the same hybrid system. A stand-alone 5 kW system comprising three SOFEC-SOFC hybrid modules and three dedicated SOFC stacks, balance-of-plant components (including a tailgas-fired steam generator and tailgas-fired process heaters), and electronic controls was designed, though an overall

  20. Next generation leadership: a profile of self-rated competencies among administrative resident and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, Brad; Cherlin, Emily; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2005-01-01

    Healthcare executives and program faculty have voiced concerns that early careerists lack needed competencies for future leadership in the increasingly complex healthcare industry. However, empirical studies of early careerists' competency levels are limited. We sought to describe administrative fellows' and residents' (n = 78, response rate 73.6%) self-rated competency in several key areas and assess how these ratings differed by individuals' gender, age, prior work experience, year of graduate training, and type of degree program. Respondents rated their competence particularly high (41.7% of respondents rated themselves "A") in the domain of interpersonal and emotional intelligence, which included being an effective team leader and member, coaching and developing others, self-awareness, and self-regulation. Lower ratings were in the domains of facilities management and in development and fundraising. Compared to males, females rated their competency in the financial skills domain lower (P-value = 0.04). Age, prior work experience, year of graduate training, and type of degree program were not significantly associated with self-rated competency in any area. These results provide early evidence that may help program faculty and preceptors consider pedagogical approaches that reflect students' vocalized needs and may help to design strategies that effectively cultivate next generation leadership.