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Sample records for hydrogen fluoride supply

  1. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned in...

  2. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed chemical processing systems at Building 9212, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is located within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The proposed replacement system would be based upon modern design criteria and safety analyses. The replacement AHF supply and distribution system equipment would be located on the existing Dock 8/8A at Building 9212. Utilities would be extended to the dock to service the process equipment. The following process equipment modules would be prefabricated for installation at the modified dock: an AHF cylinder enclosure, an AHF supply manifold and vaporizer module, an AHF sump tank and transfer skid, and an AHF supply off-gas scrubber assembly module. The fluidized-bed reactor system would be constructed in an area adjacent to the existing system in Building 9212. The replacement equipment would consist of a new reduction fluidized-bed reactor, a hydrofluorination fluidized-bed reactor, and associated air emission control equipment. The no-action alternative, which is the continued operation of the existing AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems, was also evaluated.

  3. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed reactor system at Building 9212. Draft environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is Iocated within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The current AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems were designed and constructed more than 40 years ago. Because of their deteriorating condition, the corrosive nature of the materials processed, and the antiquated design philosophy upon which they are based, their long-term reliability cannot be assured. The current AHF supply system cannot mitigate an accidental release of AHF and vents fugitive AHF directly to the atmosphere during operations. the proposed action would reduce the risk of exposing the Y-12 Plant work force, the public, and the environment to an accidental release of AHF and would ensure the continuing ability of the Y-12 Plant to manufacture highly enriched uranium metal and process uranium from retired weapons for storage.

  4. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  5. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Just, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF/sub 6/ and UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF/sub 6/, UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/, and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Dugheri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen fluoride (HF is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC/mass spectrometry (MS. After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90. In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n=10, 4.3%, sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter, and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913 were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation.

  7. Innovative Monitoring of Atmospheric Gaseous Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonari, Alessandro; Pompilio, Ilenia; Monti, Alessandro; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a basic raw material for a wide variety of industrial products, with a worldwide production capacity of more than three million metric tonnes. A novel method for determining particulate fluoride and gaseous hydrogen fluoride in air is presented herewith. Air was sampled using miniaturised 13 mm Swinnex two-stage filter holders in a medium-flow pumping system and through the absorption of particulate fluoride and HF vapours on cellulose ester filters uncoated or impregnated with sodium carbonate. Furthermore, filter desorption from the holders and the extraction of the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivative based on solid-phase microextraction were performed using an innovative robotic system installed on an xyz autosampler on-line with gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS). After generating atmospheres of a known concentration of gaseous HF, we evaluated the agreement between the results of our sampling method and those of the conventional preassembled 37 mm cassette (±8.10%; correlation coefficient: 0.90). In addition, precision (relative standard deviation for n = 10, 4.3%), sensitivity (0.2 μg/filter), and linearity (2.0–4000 μg/filter; correlation coefficient: 0.9913) were also evaluated. This procedure combines the efficiency of GC/MS systems with the high throughput (96 samples/day) and the quantitative accuracy of pentafluorobenzyl bromide on-sample derivatisation. PMID:27829835

  8. Hydrogen fluoride overtone technology: Status review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, William A.; Patterson, Stanley P.; Graves, Bruce R.; Holloman, Miles E.; Sollee, Jeffrey L.

    The hydrogen fluoride (HF) overtone chemical laser concept is being developed as a shorter wavelength alternative to the well known HF fundamental chemical laser to achieve higher brightness space-based laser platforms. This paper provides a brief review of the overtone experimental data base and then concentrates on the design of versatile gain generator hardware for optimizing the Hypersonic Low-Temperature (HYLTE) nozzle concept for HF overtone laser performance. The paper also describes a recent high power demonstration of overtone lasing on a scalable gain generator device that is directly traceable to a space-based laser weapon, utilizing uncooled resonator optics.

  9. Chemical Emergency Preparedness and Prevention Advisory: Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    This advisory recommends ways Local Emergency Planning Committees (LEPCs) and chemical facilities can reduce risks posed by the presence of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a strong inorganic acid used to manufacture CFCs, in their communities.

  10. Effects of long term exposure to hydrogen fluoride on grapevines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, F.

    1984-01-01

    Grapevines Vitis vinifera L. Shiraz were exposed to hydrogen fluoride in open-top chambers for 189 days at mean atmospheric fluoride concentrations of 0.27, 0.17 or 0.07 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/. Grapevines growing under ambient conditions outside the chambers were exposed to a mean atmospheric fluoride concentration of 0.08 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/. The maximum leaf fluoride concentrations associated with these treatments were 62, 27, 9 and 15 ..mu..g Fg/sup -1/, respectively. Foliar necrosis was first observed on grapevines exposed to 0.27 and 0.17 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/ after 83 and 99 days, respectively. Exposure to fluoride increased the fluoride content of berries and peduncles, and reduced leaf chlorophyll a and total chlorophyll concentration at both mid-season and harvest. Exposure to 0.17 ..mu..g HF m/sup -3/ was associated with higher total acid content of grapes than other treatments. Fluoride had no significant effect on bunch weight, number of bunches, grape yield, grape water or potential alcohol content, leaf chlorophyll b or leaf protein concentration. The high accumulation of fluoride in peduncles, but low fluoride accumulation in berries, suggests that the peduncle acts to block the translocation of fluoride from sites of uptake to the fruit. 42 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  11. Hydrogen Fluoride in High-mass Star-forming Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emprechtinger, M.; Monje, R. R.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Lis, D. C.; Neufeld, D.; Phillips, T. G.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J = 1-0 toward two high-mass

  12. Reactivity of aminodeoxyalditols and derivatives in hydrogen fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Jens Chr.

    Reactions of a series of aminodeoxy-pentitols and -hexitols in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride with formic acid as catalyst gave the corresponding 2,5 and 3,6-anhydro-aminodeoxyhexitols respectively in yields of more than 95%. In the analogous reaction of 3-amino-3-deoxy-D-altritol a dianhydride......-closure was obstructed, were treated with hydrogen fluoride in the presence of a carboxylic acid catalyst. The products from these reactions, including 2,6-anhydrides, were assigned. In case of 1-amino-1,6-dideoxy- or 1-benzylamino-1,3,6-trideoxy-hexitols very efficient and regioselective conversions...... and treated with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. Very stereo- and regioselective reactions to the C-2 inverted 2,5-anhydrides were observed in yields of more than 80%. The reactions proceed via 1,2-fused 2-trifluoromethyl-oxazolinium ions which react by an intramolecular attack by HO-5 at C-2 forming a five...

  13. Effect of hydrogen fluoride on two pigments in coleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamprecht, W.O. Jr.; Powell, R.D.

    Coleus blumei Benth. Cv. 12th Man was fumigated with hydrogen fluoride gas. The treatment caused the development of lesions which originally involved the mesophyll but spread to and eventually included the epidermis. An anthocyanin, cyanidin-3,5-diglucoside acylated with p-coumaric acid, was destroyed and it was postulated that the flavanonol, dihydrokaempferol, was converted to the flavone, apigenin. The anthocyanin destruction and pigment conversion occurred following membrane injury and mixing of the cellular constituents. 17 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  14. Advanced nozzle characterization for hydrogen fluoride overtone chemical lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, William A.; Patterson, Stanley P.; Graves, Bruce R.; Sollee, Jeffrey L.; Yonehara, Gordon N.; Dering, John P.

    1992-07-01

    The parametric characterization and optimization of the hypersonic, low-temperature (HYLTE) nozzle concept for the hydrogen fluoride (HF) overtone and HF fundamental performance are reviewed. The HF fundamental space-based laser for weapons systems is considered to be more mature, nearer term potential application than the overtone. Emphasis is placed on the Task 3 advanced gain generator technology configurations (AGGTC) aimed at a thorough characterization in the fundamental regime. The experiments were based on advanced multilayer dielectric coatings on uncooled silicon substrates. It is concluded that the Task 3 AGGTC hardware functioned quite well in optimizing the performance of the HYLTE nozzle concept.

  15. FLUORIDE CONCENTRATION IN WATER AT THE AREA SUPPLIED BY THE WATER TREATMENT STATION OF BAURU, SP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, Carolina Simonetti; Ramires, Irene; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Bastos, José Roberto de Magalhães

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the fluoride concentration in the public water supply at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station of Bauru and classify the samples as acceptable or unacceptable according to the fluoride concentration. Material and methods: samples were collected from 30 areas at two periods, October 2002 and March 2003. The fluoride concentration in the samples was determined in duplicate, using an ion sensitive electrode (Orion 9609) connected to a potentiometer (Procyon, model 720). Samples with fluoride concentration ranging from 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L were considered acceptable, and those whose concentration was outside this range as unacceptable. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results: the fluoride concentration of the water samples varied between 0.31 and 2.01 mg F/L. Nearly 56% of the samples were classified as acceptable. Conclusion: the variations in fluoride concentration at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station reinforce the need of constant monitoring for maintenance of adequate fluoride levels in the public water supply. PMID:19089059

  16. Glycine hydrogen fluoride: Remarkable hydrogen bonding in the dimeric glycine glycinium cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, M.; Ghazaryan, V. V.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Crystals of glycine hydrogen fluoride (Gly·HF) were prepared from an aqueous solution containing stoichiometric quantities of the components. The crystal structure of Gly·HF was determined, IR and Raman spectra were registered and are discussed. Gly·HF crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with Z = 32. The most remarkable feature of the structure is the existence of symmetric dimeric glycine-glycinium cations with short hydrogen bonds (O⋯O distance of 2.446 Å), charge-counterbalanced by hydrogen bifluoride (F sbnd H⋯F) - anions - in addition to the expected glycinium cations and fluoride anions. These results were compared with previously published data on crystals grown in the system glycine-HF-H 2O.

  17. Effect of Magnesium Fluoride on Hydrogenation Properties of Magnesium Hydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya Jain

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A cost effective catalyst is of great importance for consideration of MgH2 as potential hydrogen storage material. In this regard, we investigated the catalytic role of alkaline metal fluoride on the hydrogen storage behavior of MgH2. Samples were synthesized by admixing 5 mol % MgF2 into MgH2 powder using planetary ball mill. Hydrogenation measurements made at 335 °C showed that in comparison to only 70% absorption by pure MgH2, catalyzed material absorbed 92% of theoretical capacity in less than 20 min and desorbed completely in almost the same time. Sorption studies done at lower temperatures revealed that complete absorption at temperature as low as 145 °C is possible. This is due to uniform distribution of MgF2 nano particles within the MgH2 powder. X-ray diffraction patterns also showed the presence of stable MgF2 phase that does not decompose upon hydrogen absorption-desorption. Cyclic measurements done at 310 °C showed negligible loss in the overall storage capacity with cycling. These results reveal that the presence of the chemically inert and stable MgF2 phase is responsible for good reversible characteristic and improved kinetics.

  18. Hydrogen fluoride damage to vegetation from peri-urban brick kilns in Asia: a growing but unrecognised problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Nauman; van den Berg, Leon J L; Shah, Hamid Ullah; Masood, Tariq; Büker, Patrick; Emberson, Lisa; Ashmore, Mike

    2012-03-01

    The rapid urbanisation of many cities in south and south-east Asia has increased the demand for bricks, which are typically supplied from brick kilns in peri-urban areas. We report visible foliar damage to mango, apricot and plum trees in the vicinity of traditional Bull's Trench brick kilns in Peshawar, Pakistan. Visible injury symptoms, hydrogen fluoride concentrations in air, and foliar fluoride concentrations were all greater in the vicinity of brick kilns than at more distant sites, indicating that fluoride emissions from brick kilns were the main cause of damage. Interviews with local farmers established the significant impact of this damage on their livelihoods. Since poorly regulated brick kilns are often found close to important peri-urban agricultural areas, we suggest that this may be a growing but unrecognised environmental problem in regions of Asia where emission control in brick kilns has not been improved.

  19. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  20. HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emprechtinger, M.; Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Van der Tak, F. F. S.; Van der Wiel, M. H. D. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, NL-9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Neufeld, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ceccarelli, C., E-mail: emprecht@caltech.edu [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2012-09-10

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J = 1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC 6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC 6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H{sub 2} of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC 6334 I we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freezeout of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant (3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of interstellar fluorine is controlled by freezeout onto gas grains.

  1. Hydrogen Fluoride in High-Mass Star-forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Emprechtinger, Martin; van der Tak, Floris F S; van der Wiel, Matthijs H D; Lis, Dariusz C; Neufeld, David; Phillips, Thomas G; Ceccarelli, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J=1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H2 of 1.5e-8 in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC6334 I, we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5e-10. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freeze out of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant 3.6e-8) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of...

  2. Mathematical Modelling of the Process of Tungsten Fluorides Reduction by Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Brendakov Roman; Shvab Alexander; Brendakov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The process of tungsten fluorides reduction by hydrogen is a component part of Fluoride technology of tungsten conversion. Nowadays the researchers are definitely interested in studying this process. It is connected with common use of metal tungsten products in different sectors of the economy, which is the result of unique qualities of this metal. With the help of physical and mathematical modelling of the process of tungsten hexafluoride reduction by hydrogen, it becomes possible to create ...

  3. METHOD OF HYDROGEN FEEDING FOR AUTOMOTIVE ENGINE SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Abramchuk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On basis of analysis of various methods of hydrogen feeding for automotive engine supply methods of multipoint hydrogen distribution with microprocessor-based control are proposed.

  4. Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen ... and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose ...

  5. Inequalities in public water supply fluoridation in Brazil: An ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moysés Simone T

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature is scarce on the social and geographic inequalities in the access to and implementation of the fluoridation of public water supplies. This study adds knowledge to the Brazilian experience of the chronic privation of water and wastewater policies, access to potable water and fluoridation in the country. Thus, the aim of this study was to verify possible inequalities in the population's access to fluoridated drinking water in 246 Brazilian municipalities. Methods The information on the process of water fluoridation in the municipalities and in the macro region in which each municipality is located was obtained from the national epidemiological survey which was concluded in 2003. The data relating to the human development index at municipal level (HDI-M and access to mains water came from the Brazilian Human Development Atlas, whilst the size of the population was obtained from a governmental source. The Fisher exact test (P Results The results clearly showed that there is a relationship between municipalities with larger populations, located in more socio-economically advantaged regions and with better HDI-M, and where fluoridation is both present and has been implemented for a longer period of time (started before 1990. Conclusion The findings suggest that the aim of treating water with fluoride may not be being adequately achieved, requiring more effective strategies so that access to this measure can be expanded equitably.

  6. Enhanced half-metallicity in the zigzag graphene nanoribbons by adsorption of the zigzag hydrogen fluoride molecular chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive theoretical study of the half-metallicity in the zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs by adsorption of the zigzag hydrogen fluoride chains was presented. The ZGNR by adsorption of the hydrogen fluoride chains could be half-metallic when a critical length of the hydrogen fluoride chain is achieved on the ZGNR at low temperature. It was found that the strong dipole moments of the hydrogen fluoride chains act as the constant electric field. Our results suggest a huge possibility in spintronics device applications for achieving half-metallicity in the ZGNRs without the excessively high external electric fields.

  7. Effects of hydrogen fluoride on plant-pathogen interactions. [Lycopersicon esculentum; Phaseolus vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, D.C.; Weinstein, L.H.; Mancini, J.F.; van Lueken, P.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments in fumigation chambers with tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants were performed to assess the effects of hydrogen fluoride on plant-pathogen (fungal and bacterial) interactions. Hydrogen fluoride was found to alter the plant-pathogen interaction, although the kind and consistency of effect caused by HF depended upon the host, pathogen, and several other factors. A reduction in powdery mildew probably indicates that HF was affecting the infectivity of the pathogen itself because reduction in disease was proportional to the length of the exposure period, infection was continuous during the exposure period, and the pathogen itself was epiphytic. The effect of fluoride on bean rust may have been due to accumulated fluoride in the leaf having a direct or indirect effect on the pathogen because both pre- and post-inoculation exposures to HF were effective and additive. Other evidence for an indirect effect of fluoride was found in halo-blight where stem collapse was affected but foliar symptoms were not, and the site affected was spatially removed from the site of fluoride accumulation. Effects on early blight of tomato also indicated an effect of fluoride in the leaf.

  8. Inequalities in public water supply fluoridation in Brazil: An ecological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardo, Marilisa CL; da Silva, Wander J; Olandoski, Marcia; Moysés, Simone T; Moysés, Samuel J

    2008-01-01

    Background The literature is scarce on the social and geographic inequalities in the access to and implementation of the fluoridation of public water supplies. This study adds knowledge to the Brazilian experience of the chronic privation of water and wastewater policies, access to potable water and fluoridation in the country. Thus, the aim of this study was to verify possible inequalities in the population's access to fluoridated drinking water in 246 Brazilian municipalities. Methods The information on the process of water fluoridation in the municipalities and in the macro region in which each municipality is located was obtained from the national epidemiological survey which was concluded in 2003. The data relating to the human development index at municipal level (HDI-M) and access to mains water came from the Brazilian Human Development Atlas, whilst the size of the population was obtained from a governmental source. The Fisher exact test (P water fluoridation process in the municipalities as well as the length of time during which this measure has been implemented. Linear regression was used to observe the associations between the relevant variables in a multivariate environment. Results The results clearly showed that there is a relationship between municipalities with larger populations, located in more socio-economically advantaged regions and with better HDI-M, and where fluoridation is both present and has been implemented for a longer period of time (started before 1990). Conclusion The findings suggest that the aim of treating water with fluoride may not be being adequately achieved, requiring more effective strategies so that access to this measure can be expanded equitably. PMID:18402688

  9. Fluoride content in drinking water supply in São Miguel volcanic island (Azores, Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, S; Coutinho, R; Cruz, J V

    2012-08-15

    High fluoride contents in the water supply of the city of Ponta Delgada, located in the volcanic island of São Miguel (Azores, Portugal) have been reported. Dental fluorosis in São Miguel has been identified and described in several medical surveys. The water supply in Ponta Delgada consists entirely of groundwater. A study was carried out in order to characterize the natural F-pollution of a group of springs (30) and wells (3), that are associated to active central volcanoes of a trachytic nature. Two springs known for their high content in fluoride were sampled, both located in the central volcano of Furnas. The sampled waters are cold, ranging from slightly acidic to slightly alkaline (pH range 6.53-7.60), exhibiting a low electrical conductivity (springs range 87-502 μS/cm; wells range 237-1761 μS/cm), and are mainly from the Na-HCO(3), Na-HCO(3)-Cl and Na-Cl-HCO(3) water types. Results suggest two main trends of geochemical evolution: silicate weathering, enhanced by CO(2) dilution, and seawater spraying. Fluoride contents range between 0.17 mg/L and 2 mg/L, and no seasonal variations were detected. Results in the sources of the water supply system are lower than those of the Furnas volcano, which reach 5.09 mgF/L, demonstrating the effect of F-rich gaseous emanations in this area. Instead, the higher fluoride contents in the water supply are mainly due to silicate weathering in aquifers made of more evolved volcanic rocks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A test chamber for experimental hydrogen fluoride exposure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søstrand, P; Kongerud, J; Eduard, W; Nilsen, T; Skogland, M; Boe, J

    1997-07-01

    An inhalation chamber was built to perform experimental studies with hydrogen fluoride (HF), other gases, and particulate matter. The present study sought to describe a new gas delivery system and the distribution and concentration of HF gas in the chamber. The aluminum chamber has a volume of 19.2 m3 and a variable ventilation rate of about 1 to 10 air changes per hour. The negative pressure difference between the chamber and outside air can be regulated from 0 to 300 Pa. HF was fed at concentrations of up to 4000 mg/m3 directly into the ventilation duct feeding the chamber through openings with diameters as small as 50 microns, oriented opposite to the airflow. Gas flow was varied from about 0.1 dm3/min at a pressure of 4 atm. The dilution factor of HF concentration from cylinder to chamber was on the order of 10(3) to 10(4). The standard deviation (SD) of the HF concentrations at a fixed measurement point during a 1-hour test was typically 0.05 mg/m3 at a time-weighted average (TWA) concentration of 2.66 mg/m3. The SD of the TWA HF concentrations at six locations in the chamber was typically 0.05 mg/m3 and 0.29 mg/m3 at 0.61 and 3.46 mg/m3, respectively. Human exposure could be predicted from calculations based on ventilation data, gas flow, and observed ratio between calculated and measured concentrations. When the target exposure concentration was 1.5 mg/m3, the measured mean exposure concentration was typically 1.54 mg/m3 (range: 1.4-1.7 mg/m3, SD 0.09 mg/m3, n = 8). The chamber is well-suited for inhalation studies in humans. Chamber atmosphere was controlled and has proved to be stable and homogeneous, even in tests with HF, a highly reactive gas in the class of superacids.

  11. Evaluation of hydrogenation properties on MgHx-transition metal fluoride composites by planetary ball milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Min-Hyuk; Park, So-Hyun; Kim, Whan-Gi; Hong, Tae-Whan

    2015-11-01

    To improve the disadvantages of Mg hydrides, a few studies were conducted for MgHx intermixed with transition metal fluorides. MgF2 formed from the MgHx-transition metal fluoride system can be replaces the initial surface oxide layer and provides a reactive and protective fluorinated surface for for hydrogen uptake. Thus, the absorption/desorption kinetics will be enhanced. In this research, MgHx-transition metal fluoride composites mixture has been prepared by hydrogen induced planetary ball milling. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy and simultaneous thermogravimetric, differential scanning calorimetric analysis. The hydrogenation behaviors were evaluated by using a sievert's type automatic pressure-composition-temperature apparatus without any activation treatment. From the characteristics of the absorption kinetics and curves observed, the role of transition metal fluoride was catalyst in hydrogen absorption. The results of Pressure-Composition Isotherm curve, available hydrogen storage amount for MgHx-5 vol% CoF2 composites were 4.85 wt%, for MgHx-5 vol%TiF3 composites were 4.88 wt%. at 623K in the 5th cycle.

  12. Histological responses of some plant leaves to hydrogen fluoride and sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, D.F.; Solberg, R.A.

    1956-12-01

    Dicotyledonous plants were fumigated with hydrogen fluoride and/or sulfur dioxide. Samples were taken of injured and control leaves, processed microtechnically, and examined microscopically. Histological responses to hydrogen fluoride and sulfur dioxide were indistinguishable. The spongy mesophyll and lower epidermis first collapsed, followed by distortion and chloroplast disruption in the palisade cells. The upper epidermis finally distorted and collapsed. Microscopically injured leaf tissues were selectively stained with safranin. Various postulates are discussed concerning the means and pathways by which a phytotoxic air pollutant may enter the leaf and produce injury therein. The evidence indicates that should fluoride enter a leaf in sub-phytotoxic concentrations, it is transported acropetally. Should phytotoxic levels be reached, visible marginal injury results.

  13. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of hydrogen fluoride at several thermodynamic states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreitmeir, M.; Bertagnolli, H.; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen;

    2003-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen fluoride is a simple but interesting system for studies of the influence of hydrogen bonds on physical properties. We have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of HF at several thermodynamic states, where we examine the microscopic structure of the liquid as well...... as its static and dynamic properties. The results obtained show good agreement with well established data, and, moreover, we were able to show significant changes within the structure depending on the system's temperature and density....

  14. Effects of gaseous hydrogen fluoride on oxidative enzymes of Pelargonium zonale leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poovaiah, B.W.; Wiebe, H.H.

    1971-10-01

    Changes in peroxidase and cytochrome oxidase enzymes were established histochemically in hydrogen fluoride fumigated leaves of Pelargonium zonale. Highest peroxidase and cytochrome oxidase activities were localized near the injured areas of fumigated leaves, and the greatest increase was observed in the phloem region.

  15. HIFI detection of hydrogen fluoride in the carbon star envelope IRC +10216

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Decin, L.; Encrenaz, P.; Neufeld, D.; Teyssier, D.; Daniel, F.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of emission in the J = 1−0 rotational transition of hydrogen fluoride (HF), together with observations of the J = 1−0 to J = 3−2 rotational lines of H35Cl and H37Cl, towards the envelope of the carbon star IRC +10216. High-sensitivity, high-spectral resolution observations ha

  16. Geographical distribution of fluoride in the public water supply in the province of Tucumán, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Alberto Durán

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the geographical distribution of fluoride content in the public water supply in the province of Tucumán, Argentina. A total of 1,210 samples were collected in 190 localities of the 17 departments of the province during the 2008-2012 period. The analytical determination was performed using the SPADNS method and QGis 2.16 was used for processing the information. The fluoride content requirements in the studied localities were determined according to the Argentine Food Code. The results showed that 94% of population studied consumed water with fluoride concentrations below the recommended limits, 5% were exposed to fluoride concentrations above the required maximum limit and 1% consumed water at optimal fluoride concentrations. The maps showed a heterogeneous geographical distribution of fluorides, in which areas with deficit, excess and recommended values of fluorides can be differentiated; in some departments an inverse relationship between the density of the hydrological network and fluoride concentration can be observed. In the capital of the province, the average value found was 0.32 mg/l, presenting a homogeneous geographical distribution. The information obtained is indispensable for the proper management of fluoride, so as to improve public health through policy.

  17. Change of urinary fluoride and bone metabolism indicators in the endemic fluorosis areas of southern china after supplying low fluoride public water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated health impacts, especially biomarker changes, following implementation of a new environmental policy. This study examined changes in water fluoride, urinary fluoride (UF), and bone metabolism indicators in children after supplying low fluoride public water in endemic fluorosis areas of Southern China. We also assessed the relationship between UF and serum osteocalcin (BGP), calcitonin (CT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and bone mineral density to identify the most sensitive bone metabolism indicators related to fluoride exposure. Methods Four fluorosis-endemic villages (intervention villages) in Guangdong, China were randomly selected to receive low-fluoride water. One non-endemic fluorosis village with similar socio-economic status, living conditions, and health care access, was selected as the control group. 120 children aged 6-12 years old were randomly chosen from local schools in each village for the study. Water and urinary fluoride content as well as serum BGP, CT, ALP and bone mineral density were measured by the standard methods and compared between the children residing in the intervention villages and the control village. Benchmark dose (BMD) and benchmark dose lower limit (BMDL) were calculated for each bone damage indicator. Results Our study found that after water source change, fluoride concentrations in drinking water in all intervention villages (A-D) were significantly reduced to 0.11 mg/l, similar to that in the control village (E). Except for Village A where water change has only been taken place for 6 years, urinary fluoride concentrations in children of the intervention villages were lower or comparable to those in the control village after 10 years of supplying new public water. The values of almost all bone indicators in children living in Villages B-D and ALP in Village A were either lower or similar to those in the control village after the intervention. CT and BGP are sensitive bone metabolism

  18. Health impact of supplying safe drinking water containing fluoride below permissible level on flourosis patients in a fluoride-endemic rural area of West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Kunal Kanti

    2011-01-01

    The problem of high fluoride concentration in groundwater resources has become one of the most important toxicological and geo-environmental issues in India. Excessive fluoride in drinking water causes dental and skeletal fluorosis, which is encountered in endemic proportions in several parts of the world. World Health Organization (WHO) guideline value and the permissible limit of fluoride as per Bureau of Indian Standard (BIS) is 1.5 mg/L. About 20 states of India, including 43 blocks of seven districts of West Bengal, were identified as endemic for fluorosis and about 66 million people in these regions are at risk of fluoride contamination. Studies showed that withdrawal of sources identified for fluoride often leads reduction of fluoride in the body fluids (re-testing urine and serum after a week or 10 days) and results in the disappearance of non-skeletal fluorosis within a short duration of 10-15 days. To determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of suspected dental, skeletal, and non-skeletal fluorosis, along with food habits, addictions, and use of fluoride containing toothpaste among participants taking water with fluoride concentration above the permissible limit, and to assess the changes in clinical manifestations of the above participants after they started consuming safe drinking water. A longitudinal intervention study was conducted in three villages in Rampurhat Block I of Birbhum district of West Bengal to assess the occurrence of various dental, skeletal, and non-skeletal manifestations of fluorosis, along with food habits, addictions, and use of fluoride containing toothpaste among the study population and the impact of taking safe water from the supplied domestic and community filters on these clinical manifestations. The impact was studied by follow-up examination of the participants for 5 months to determine the changes in clinical manifestations of the above participants after they started consuming safe drinking water from supplied

  19. Health impact of supplying safe drinking water containing fluoride below permissible level on flourosis patients in a fluoride-endemic rural area of West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Kanti Majumdar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The problem of high fluoride concentration in groundwater resources has become one of the most important toxicological and geo-environmental issues in India. Excessive fluoride in drinking water causes dental and skeletal fluorosis, which is encountered in endemic proportions in several parts of the world. World Health Organization (WHO guideline value and the permissible limit of fluoride as per Bureau of Indian Standard (BIS is 1.5 mg/L. About 20 states of India, including 43 blocks of seven districts of West Bengal, were identified as endemic for fluorosis and about 66 million people in these regions are at risk of fluoride contamination. Studies showed that withdrawal of sources identified for fluoride often leads reduction of fluoride in the body fluids (re-testing urine and serum after a week or 10 days and results in the disappearance of non-skeletal fluorosis within a short duration of 10-15 days. Objective: To determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of suspected dental, skeletal, and non-skeletal fluorosis, along with food habits, addictions, and use of fluoride containing toothpaste among participants taking water with fluoride concentration above the permissible limit, and to assess the changes in clinical manifestations of the above participants after they started consuming safe drinking water. Materials and Methods: A longitudinal intervention study was conducted in three villages in Rampurhat Block I of Birbhum district of West Bengal to assess the occurrence of various dental, skeletal, and non-skeletal manifestations of fluorosis, along with food habits, addictions, and use of fluoride containing toothpaste among the study population and the impact of taking safe water from the supplied domestic and community filters on these clinical manifestations. The impact was studied by follow-up examination of the participants for 5 months to determine the changes in clinical manifestations of the above participants

  20. Mathematical Modelling of the Process of Tungsten Fluorides Reduction by Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendakov Roman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of tungsten fluorides reduction by hydrogen is a component part of Fluoride technology of tungsten conversion. Nowadays the researchers are definitely interested in studying this process. It is connected with common use of metal tungsten products in different sectors of the economy, which is the result of unique qualities of this metal. With the help of physical and mathematical modelling of the process of tungsten hexafluoride reduction by hydrogen, it becomes possible to create an import substitution technology of metal tungsten conversion. Fluoride technology of tungsten conversion allows putting different coverings and make tungsten products of different shapes, which is impossible to get traditionally. The process of tungsten fluorides reduction by hydrogen can be referred to CVD processes (Chemical Vapor Deposition. Common use of CVD technologies for getting metal products and coverings is limited by definite problems, connected with access difficulties to initial components of research and the lack of information about their basic thermal characteristics. Therefore, mathematical description of the initial components mass-moving process, which provides with optimal value of their concentration in gas flow and in precipitation zone, is a question of current importance.

  1. Demand and supply of hydrogen as chemical feedstock in USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C. J.; Tang, K.; Kelley, J. H.; Berger, B. J.

    1979-01-01

    Projections are made for the demand and supply of hydrogen as chemical feedstock in USA. Industrial sectors considered are petroleum refining, ammonia synthesis, methanol production, isocyanate manufacture, edible oil processing, coal liquefaction, fuel cell electricity generation, and direct iron reduction. Presently, almost all the hydrogen required is produced by reforming of natural gas or petroleum fractions. Specific needs and emphases are recommended for future research and development to produce hydrogen from other sources to meet the requirements of these industrial sectors. The data and the recommendations summarized in this paper are based on the Workshop 'Supply and Demand of Hydrogen as Chemical Feedstock' held at the University of Houston on December 12-14, 1977.

  2. Structural and dynamical properties of hydrogen fluoride in aqueous solution: an ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritayakornupong, Chinapong; Vchirawongkwin, Viwat; Hofer, Thomas S; Rode, Bernd M

    2008-09-25

    The novel ab initio quantum mechanical charge field (QMCF) molecular dynamics simulation at the Hartree-Fock level has been employed to investigate hydration structure and dynamics of hydrogen fluoride in aqueous solution. The average H-F bond length of 0.93 A obtained from the QMCF MD simulation is in good agreement with the experimental data. The HHF...Ow distance of 1.62 A was evaluated for the first hydration shell, and 2.00 A was observed for the FHF...Hw distance. The stability of hydrogen bonding is more pronounced in the hydrogen site of hydrogen fluoride, with a single water molecule in this part of the first hydration shell. A wide range of coordination numbers between 3 and 9 with an average value of 5.6 was obtained for the fluorine site. The force constants of 819.1 and 5.9 N/m were obtained for the HHF-FHF and HHF...Ow interactions, respectively, proving the stability of the nondissociated form of hydrogen fluoride in aqueous solution. The mean residence times of 2.1 and 2.5 ps were determined for ligand exchange processes in the neighborhood of fluorine and hydrogen atoms of hydrogen fluoride, respectively, indicating a weak structure-making effect of hydrogen fluoride in water. The corresponding H-bond lifetimes attribute this effect to the H atom site of HF.

  3. A study of industrial hydrogen and syngas supply systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, W. J.; Solomon, J.; Eliezer, K. F.

    1979-01-01

    The potential and incentives required for supplying hydrogen and syngas feedstocks to the U.S. chemical industry from coal gasification systems were evaluated. Future hydrogen and syngas demand for chemical manufacture was estimated by geographic area and projected economics for hydrogen and syngas manufacture was estimated with geographic area of manufacture and plant size as parameters. Natural gas, oil and coal feedstocks were considered. Problem areas presently affecting the commercial feasibility of coal gasification discussed include the impact of potential process improvements, factors involved in financing coal gasification plants, regulatory barriers affecting coal gasification, coal mining/transportation, air quality regulations, and competitive feedstock pricing barriers. The potential for making coal gasification the least costly H2 and syngas supply option. Options to stimulate coal gasification system development are discussed.

  4. Catalase and sodium fluoride mediated rehabilitation of enamel bleached with 37% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching agents bring about a range of unwanted changes in the physical structure of enamel which needs to be restored qualitatively and timely. Catalase being an antioxidant ensures the effective removal of free radicals and improvement in fluoride mediated remineralization from the enamel microstructure which if retained may harm the integrity and affect the hardness of enamel. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted incisors were sectioned to 6 slabs which were divided into 5 groups: Group A, control; Group B, treatment with 37% hydrogen peroxide (HP; Group C, treatment with 37% HP and catalase, Group D, treatment with 37% HP and 5% sodium fluoride application, Group E, treatment with 37% HP followed by catalase and 5% sodium fluoride. Scanning electron microscope and microhardness analysis were done for all slabs. One-way ANOVA test was applied among different groups. Results: Vicker′s microhardness number (VHN of Group B and C was significantly lower. No significant difference between VHN of Group B and C. VHN of Group D was significantly higher than Group A, B, and C; but significantly lower than Group E. VHN of Group E was significantly higher than any other experimental group. One-way ANOVA revealed a highly significant P value (P = 0.0001 and so Tukey′s post-hoc Test for the group comparisons was employed. Conclusion: Subsequent treatment of bleached enamel with catalase and fluoride varnish separately results in repairing and significantly increasing the microhardness.

  5. Development and demonstration of a personal monitoring system for exposure to hydrogen fluoride. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, M.S.; Monat, J.P.

    1993-09-01

    A good, functional Hydrogen Fluoride Gasbadge dosimeter has been developed for sampling of airborne HF vapor. The device is small (7.7 cm {times} 5.4 cm {times} 1.9 cm) and can easily and conveniently be worn on one`s lapel. It consists of polyethylene and polypropylene parts and a triethanolamine-impregnated polyproylene collection element. It is completely self contained, requiring no pumps, impingers, or sampling tubes. Subsequent to sampling, the collection element is analyzed quickly and easily with a fluoride selective-ion electrode. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine precision, linearity, interference effects, influences of temperature and humidity, and collection element stability over time. Results of the tests indicate that the Abcor Gasbadge HF dosimeter is an excellent passive HF monitor for work spaces, and that results obtained with it are accurate within {plus_minus}25%. These results have been corroborated in a field study.

  6. Survey on fluoride, bromide and chloride contents in public drinking water supplies in Sicily (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco; Brusca, Lorenzo; Longo, Manfredi

    2008-10-01

    Six hundred and sixty-seven water samples were collected from public drinking water supplies in Sicily and analysed for electric conductivity and for their Cl(-), Br(-) and F(-) contents. The samples were, as far as possible, collected evenly over the entire territory with an average sampling density of about one sample for every 7,600 inhabitants. The contents of Cl(-) and Br(-), ranging between 5.53 and 1,302 mg/l and between <0.025 and 4.76 mg/l respectively, correlated well with the electric conductivity, a parameter used as a proxy for water salinity. The highest values were found both along the NW and SE coasts, which we attributed to seawater contamination, and in the central part of Sicily, which we attributed to evaporitic rock dissolution. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.023 to 3.28 mg/l, while the highest values (only three exceeding the maximum admissible concentration of 1.5 mg/l) generally correlated either with the presence in the area of crystalline (volcanic or metamorphic) or evaporitic rocks or with contamination from hydrothermal activity. Apart from these limited cases of exceeding F(-) levels, the waters of public drinking water supplies in Sicily can be considered safe for human consumption for the analysed parameters. Some limited concern could arise from the intake of bromide-rich waters (about 3% exceeding 1 mg/l) because of the potential formation of dangerous disinfection by-products.

  7. Basis set effects on the energy and hardness profiles of the hydrogen fluoride dimer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Miquel Torrent-Sucarrat; Miquel Duran; Josep M Luis; Miquel Solà

    2005-09-01

    In earlier work, the present authors have shown that hardness profiles are less dependent on the level of calculation than energy profiles for potential energy surfaces (PESs) having pathological behaviors. At variance with energy profiles, hardness profiles always show the correct number of stationary points. This characteristic has been used to indicate the existence of spurious stationary points on the PESs. In the present work, we apply this methodology to the hydrogen fluoride dimer, a classical difficult case for the density functional theory methods.

  8. External control of fluoridation of public water supplies of the city of Jaguaribara, Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fernandes Peixoto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To monitor the levels of fluoride (F in public water supplies in the city of Jaguaribara, Ceará, Brazil. Methods: Water samples were collected from the urban area, at three different points. Samples were collected twice a month, from August 2010 to July 2011. The samples were analyzed in triplicate, using the combined electrode connected to a meter, previously calibrated with standards containing 0.2 to 6.4 ppm F, with Tisab II. Data was analyzed by three criteria: I (Brazil, 1975, II (Ramires et al., 2006 and III (Technical Consensus, 2011. results: Among a total of 72 water samples, we observed an average of 0.55 (± 0.19 ppm F, median of 0.61. According to Criterion I, acceptable levels of fluoride were found in 47.2% of samples, while 44,4% were underfluoridated ( 0.84 ppm F. Based on criterion III, 25% of samples showed negligible risk and benefits concerning dental fluorosis and prevention of dental caries, while 11.1% of the samples presented low risk and benefit and 63.9% pointed to low risk and maximum benefit. Conclusions: Altered levels of fluoride were observed in public water supplies in the studied period. It is suggested the need to improve operational control and also the external control of water fluoridation in Jaguaribara, Ceará, Brazil.

  9. Sustainability of Hydrogen Supply Chain. Part II: Prioritizing and Classifying the Sustainability of Hydrogen Supply Chains based on the Combination of Extension Theory and AHP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Manzardo, Alessandro; Toniolo, Sara;

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a method for prioritizing and classifying the sustainability of hydrogen supply chains and assist decision-making for the stakeholders/decision-makers. Multiple criteria for sustainability assessment of hydrogen supply chains are considered and multiple...... decision-makers are allowed to participate in the decision-making using linguistic terms. In this study, extension theory and analytic hierarchy process are combined to rate the sustainability of hydrogen supply chains. The sustainability of hydrogen supply chains could be identified according...... to the synthesis correlation degrees to each classical domain. Finally, an illustrative case is studied by the proposed method, and the results show that the proposed method is feasible for prioritizing and classifying the sustainability of hydrogen supply chains....

  10. Enhanced hydrogen desorption property of MgH{sub 2} with the addition of cerium fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Huai-Jun, E-mail: huaijun.lin.489@s.kyushu-u.ac.jp [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Matsuda, Junko [International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Li, Hai-Wen [International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Research Center for Hydrogen Energy, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Zhu, Min [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); China–Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Akiba, Etsuo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Research Center for Hydrogen Energy, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Activation energy of MgH{sub 2} desorption is remarkably reduced with the dopant of CeF{sub 4}. • The improvement might be attributed to new Ce–F–Mg species at the CeF{sub 4}/MgH{sub 2} interface. • Easy electron transfer induced from the high valence Ce-cation benefits MgH{sub 2} desorption. - Abstract: Hydrogen desorption property of MgH{sub 2} doped with cerium fluorides with different valences prepared using ball milling has been studied. CeF{sub 4} is catalytically active for hydrogen desorption of MgH{sub 2}. Hydrogen desorption temperature and apparent activation energy of MgH{sub 2} are significantly reduced with dopant of 2 mol% of CeF{sub 4}, which might be attributed to the formation of a new Ce–F–Mg specie at the CeF{sub 4}/MgH{sub 2} interface and the easy electron transfer induced from the high valence Ce-cation. The apparent activation energy of hydrogen desorption of MgH{sub 2} is reduced from ∼160 kJ/mol to ∼110 kJ/mol with the dopant of CeF{sub 4}.

  11. Hydrogen fluoride effects on local mung bean and maize cereal crops from peri-urban brick kilns in south asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, M.N.; Ahmad, S.S.; Zia, A.; Iqbal, M.S.; Shah, H.; Mian, A.A.; Shah, R.U.

    2014-01-01

    Increased urbanisation throughout South Asia has increased the number and output of the brick kilns that typically surround major cities, but the environmental and health impacts of their atmospheric emissions are poorly understood in Pakistan. We report the negative effects of hydrogen fluoride (HF

  12. [Epidemiological surveillance of dental fluorosis in a city with a tropical climate with a fluoridated public drinking water supply].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Marcoeli Silva; Barbosa, Pablo Renan Ribeiro; Nunes-Dos-Santos, Danila Lorena; Dantas-Neta, Neusa Barros; Moura, Lúcia de Fátima Almeida de Deus; de Lima, Marina de Deus Moura

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis among 11 to 14-year-old schoolchildren in Teresina, Piauí, Brazil, which is a tropical city with a fluoridated public drinking water supply. It involved a cross-sectional observational study on a sample of 571 students in public and private schools. Informed Consent forms were approved for the data collection and the exams were conducted at the schools. Data were recorded on a questionnaire answered by the parents, regarding the socioeconomic and demographic characteristics and oral hygiene habits of the sample. The dental exam was performed qualified dental sugeons. The Thylstrup-Fejerskov (TF) index was used. The prevalence of fluorosis was 77.9%, and only 12.5% of the affected children had TF ≥ grade 3 (with aesthetic damage). The premolars were the teeth most affected by fluorosis. Among the students with the highest severity of fluorosis, 98.6% belonged to the lowest social bracket (> B2), 91.5% were born and had always lived in Teresina, 94.4% consumed water from the fluoridated public supply, 76% used toothpaste for children and 64% of mothers reported that they swallowed toothpaste. The prevalence of fluorosis was high, though the severity was low in individuals exposed to fluoridation since birth.

  13. Response of anaerobes to methyl fluoride, 2-bromoethanesulfonate and hydrogen during acetate degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Hao; Fan Lü; Lei Li; Liming Shao; Pinjing He

    2013-01-01

    To use the selective inhibition method for quantitative analysis of acetate metabolism in methanogenic systems,the responses of microbial communities and metabolic activities,which were involved in anaerobic degradation of acetate,to the addition of methyl fluoride (CH3F),2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) and hydrogen were investigated in a thermophilic batch experiment.Both the methanogenic inhibitors,i.e.,CH3F and BES,showed their effectiveness on inhibiting CH4 production,whereas acetate metabolism other than acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated by BES,as reflected by the fluctuated acetate concentration.Syntrophic acetate oxidation was thermodynamically blocked by hydrogen (H2),while H2-utilizing reactions as hydrogenotrophic methanogencsis and homoacetogenesis were correspondingly promoted.Results of PCR-DGGE fingerprinting showed that,CH3F did not influence the microbial populations significantly.However,the BES and hydrogen notably altered the bacterial community structures and increased the diversity.BES gradually changed the methanogenic community structure by affecting the existence of different populations to different levels,whilst H2 greatly changed the abundance of different methanogenic populations,and induced growth of new species.

  14. Response of anaerobes to methyl fluoride, 2-bromoethanesulfonate and hydrogen during acetate degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liping; Lü, Fan; Li, Lei; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2013-05-01

    To use the selective inhibition method for quantitative analysis of acetate metabolism in methanogenic systems, the responses of microbial communities and metabolic activities, which were involved in anaerobic degradation of acetate, to the addition of methyl fluoride (CH3F), 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) and hydrogen were investigated in a thermophilic batch experiment. Both the methanogenic inhibitors, i.e., CH3F and BES, showed their effectiveness on inhibiting CH4 production, whereas acetate metabolism other than acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated by BES, as reflected by the fluctuated acetate concentration. Syntrophic acetate oxidation was thermodynamically blocked by hydrogen (H2), while H2-utilizing reactions as hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and homoacetogenesis were correspondingly promoted. Results of PCR-DGGE fingerprinting showed that, CH3F did not influence the microbial populations significantly. However, the BES and hydrogen notably altered the bacterial community structures and increased the diversity. BES gradually changed the methanogenic community structure by affecting the existence of different populations to different levels, whilst H2 greatly changed the abundance of different methanogenic populations, and induced growth of new species.

  15. Absorption, distribution and excretion of inhaled hydrogen fluoride in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    Rats were subjected to whole body HF exposure for 6 hrs or to nose-only HF exposure for 1 hr. Total and/or ionic fluoride concentrations in selected tissues were determined at various times following exposure. In rats sacrificed 6 hrs after whole body exposure, dose-dependent increases in lung, plasma, and kidney total and ionic fluoride concentration occurred. Rats excreted more fluoride in the urine after whole body exposure than could be explained by the amount of HF inhaled. Considerable evidence suggests that airborne HF deposits on fur and is then ingested due to preening activity. Urinary fluoride excretion was increased by nose-only exposure. The urinary fluoride excretion accounted for approximately twice the fluoride estimated to be inhaled during exposure. Tissue fluoride concentrations were elevated immediately after nose-only exposure. Fluoride concentrations in lung and kidney returned to control levels within 12 hrs. Plasma fluoride concentration was slightly elevated 24 hrs after the start of the 1 hr exposure but was at control levels at 96 hrs. Immediately following nose-only exposure, lung ionic fluoride concentrations were less than plasma ionic fluoride concentrations suggesting that the fluoride in the lung had reached that site via plasma transport rather than by inhalation. A dose-dependent increase in plasma ionic fluoride concentration occurred after upper respiratory tract HF exposure providing strong evidence that fluoride is absorbed systemically from that site. The plasma ionic fluoride concentration after upper respiratory tract exposure was of sufficient magnitude to account for the plasma fluoride concentrations observed in intact nose-only exposed rats. (ERB)

  16. Discovery of Hydrogen Fluoride in the Cloverleaf Quasar at z = 2.56

    CERN Document Server

    Monje, R R; Peng, R; Lis, D C; Neufeld, D A; Emprechtinger, M; 10.1088/2041-8205/742/2/L21

    2012-01-01

    We report the first detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) toward a high redshift quasar. Using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) we detect the HF J = 1 - 0 transition in absorption toward the Cloverleaf, a broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar object (QSO) at z=2.56. The detection is statistically significant at the ~ 6 sigma level. We estimate a lower limit of 4 \\times 1014 cm-2 for the HF column density and using a previous estimate of the hydrogen column density, we obtain a lower limit of 1.7 \\times 10-9 for the HF abundance. This value suggests that, assuming a Galactic N(HF)/NH ratio, HF accounts for at least ~10% of the fluorine in the gas phase along the line of sight to the Cloverleaf quasar. This observation corroborates the prediction that HF should be a good probe of the molecular gas at high redshift. Measurements of the HF abundance as a function of redshift are urgently needed to better constrain the fluorine nucleosynthesis mechanism(s).

  17. DISCOVERY OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN THE CLOVERLEAF QUASAR AT z = 2.56

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monje, R. R.; Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C.; Emprechtinger, M. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125-4700 (United States); Peng, R. [Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, 111 Nowelo Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Neufeld, D. A., E-mail: raquel@caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We report the first detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) toward a high-redshift quasar. Using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, we detect the HF J = 1-0 transition in absorption toward the Cloverleaf, a broad absorption line quasi-stellar object at z = 2.56. The detection is statistically significant at the {approx}6{sigma} level. We estimate a lower limit of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} for the HF column density and using a previous estimate of the hydrogen column density, we obtain a lower limit of 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} for the HF abundance. This value suggests that, assuming a Galactic N(HF)/N{sub H} ratio, HF accounts for at least {approx}10% of the fluorine in the gas phase along the line of sight to the Cloverleaf quasar. This observation corroborates the prediction that HF should be a good probe of the molecular gas at high redshift. Measurements of the HF abundance as a function of redshift are urgently needed to better constrain the fluorine nucleosynthesis mechanism(s).

  18. A DU bed system for storing and supplying hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongchul; Ahn, Do-Hee; Chung, Hongsuk [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sei-Hun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been extensively proposed for the storage, supply, and recovery of hydrogen isotopes. SDS is used for storing hydrogen isotopes as a metal hydride form. To control the SDS, it is necessary to monitor the tritium amount in a bed. In this study, a full-sized DU bed was designed and fabricated including cylindrical-type copper foam of nine layers to study the characteristics of hydriding/dehydriding and simulate the tritium amount in a bed. The integrity and leak inspection on the welding of a primary vessel was performed using a penetration test, helium leak test, and pressure test. Auto tuning on the cable heaters of two pairs in the DU bed was also be performed. In our next study, the hydriding/dehydriding on a DU bed will be performed. A simulation on the depleted uranium hydriding will be carried out. A DU bed was designed and fabricated including cylindrical-type copper foam of nine layers to study the characteristics of hydriding/dehydriding and simulate the tritium amount in a bed. Through a penetration test, it was confirmed that the welding of the primary vessel has a good integrity. It was confirmed that the two helium tubes is sound by inspecting a helium leak test on the welding of the primary vessel. It was also confirmed that the primary vessel has a good integrity by inspecting a helium leak and conducting a pressure test on it. Vacuuming of the DU bed system was carried out. Vacuuming of the in-bed calorimetric equipment was also carried out.

  19. A national cross-sectional study on effects of fluoride-safe water supply on the prevalence of fluorosis in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Gao, Yanhui; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Lijun; Zhang, Wei; Han, Hepeng; Shi, Yuxia; Yu, Guangqian; Sun, Dianjun

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of provided fluoride-safe drinking-water for the prevention and control of endemic fluorosis in China. Design A national cross-sectional study in China. Setting In 1985, randomly selected villages in 27 provinces (or cities and municipalities) in 5 geographic areas all over China. Participants Involved 81 786 children aged from 8 to 12 and 594 698 adults aged over 16. Main outcome measure The prevalence of dental fluorosis and clinical skeletal fluorosis, the fluoride concentrations in the drinking-water in study villages and in the urine of subjects. Results The study showed that in the villages where the drinking-water fluoride concentrations were higher than the government standard of 1.2 mg/l, but no fluoride-safe drinking-water supply scheme was provided (FNB areas), the prevalence rate and index of dental fluorosis in children, and prevalence rate of clinical skeletal fluorosis in adults were all significantly higher than those in the historical endemic fluorosis villages after the fluoride-safe drinking-water were provided (FSB areas). Additionally, the prevalence rate of dental fluorosis as well as clinical skeletal fluorosis, and the concentration of fluoride in urine were found increased with the increase of fluoride concentration in drinking-water, with significant positive correlations in the FNB areas. While, the prevalence rate of dental fluorosis and clinical skeletal fluorosis in different age groups and their degrees of prevalence were significantly lower in the FSB areas than those in the FNB areas. Conclusions The provision of fluoride-safe drinking-water supply schemes had significant effects on the prevention and control of dental fluorosis and skeletal fluorosis. The study also indicated that the dental and skeletal fluorosis is still prevailing in the high-fluoride drinking-water areas in China. PMID:23015601

  20. Hydrogen fluoride toward luminous nearby galaxies: NGC 253 and NGC 4945

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125-4700 (United States); Lord, S. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Falgarone, E. [LERMA/LRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure and Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France); Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Güsten, R., E-mail: raquel@caltech.edu [Max-Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-04-10

    We present the detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in two luminous nearby galaxies, NGC 253 and NGC 4945 using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The HF line toward NGC 253 has a P-Cygni profile, while an asymmetric absorption profile is seen toward NGC 4945. The P-Cygni profile in NGC 253 suggests an outflow of molecular gas with a mass of M(H{sub 2}){sub out} ∼ 1 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} and an outflow rate as large as M-dot ∼6.4 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In the case of NGC 4945, the axisymmetric velocity components in the HF line profile are compatible with the interpretation of a fast-rotating nuclear ring surrounding the nucleus and the presence of inflowing gas. The gas falls into the nucleus with an inflow rate of ≤1.2 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, inside an inner radius of ≤200 pc. The gas accretion rate to the central active galactic nucleus is much smaller, suggesting that the inflow may be triggering a nuclear starburst. From these results, the HF J = 1-0 line is seen to provide an important probe of the kinematics of absorbing material along the sight-line to nearby galaxies with bright dust continuum and a promising new tracer of molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies.

  1. Herschel/HIFI Observations of Hydrogen Fluoride Toward Sagittarius B2(M)

    CERN Document Server

    Monje, R R; Phillips, T G; Lis, D C; Goldsmith, P F; Bergin, E A; Bell, T A; Neufeld, D A; Sonnentrucker, P; 10.1088/2041-8205/734/1/L23

    2011-01-01

    Herschel/HIFI observations have revealed the presence of widespread absorption by hydrogen fluoride (HF) J = 1-0 rotational transition, toward a number of Galactic sources. We present observations of HF J = 1-0 toward the high-mass star-forming region Sagittarius B2(M). The spectrum obtained shows a complex pattern of absorption, with numerous features covering a wide range of local standard of rest velocities (-130 to 100 km -1). An analysis of this absorption yields HF abundances relative to H2 of ~1.3 {\\times}10-8, in most velocity intervals. This result is in good agreement with estimates from chemical models, which predict that HF should be the main reservoir of gas-phase fluorine under a wide variety of interstellar conditions. Interestingly, we also find velocity intervals in which the HF spectrum shows strong absorption features that are not present, or are very weak, in spectra of other molecules, such as 13CO (1-0) and CS (2-1). HF absorption reveals components of diffuse clouds with small extinctio...

  2. Hydrogen Fluoride toward Luminous Nearby Galaxies: NGC 253 and NGC 4945

    CERN Document Server

    Monje, R R; Falgarone, E; Lis, D C; Neufeld, D A; Phillips, T G; Güsten, R

    2014-01-01

    We present the detection of hydrogen fluoride, HF, in two luminous nearby galaxies NGC 253 and NGC 4945 using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The HF line toward NGC 253 has a P-Cygni profile, while an asymmetric absorption profile is seen toward NGC 4945. The P-Cygni profile in NGC 253 suggests an outflow of molecular gas with a mass of M(H$_2$)$_{out}$ $\\sim$ 1 $\\times$ 10$^7$ M$_\\odot$ and an outflow rate as large as \\.{M} $\\sim$ 6.4 M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. In the case of NGC 4945, the axisymmetric velocity components in the HF line profile is compatible with the interpretation of a fast-rotating nuclear ring surrounding the nucleus and the presence of inflowing gas. The gas falls into the nucleus with an inflow rate of $\\le$ 1.2 M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$, inside a inner radius of $\\le$ 200 pc. The gas accretion rate to the central AGN is much smaller, suggesting that the inflow can be triggering a nuclear starburst. From these results, the HF $J = 1-0$ ...

  3. Quantum mechanical force field for hydrogen fluoride with explicit electronic polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazack, Michael J. M., E-mail: mazack@mazack.org [Department of Chemistry and Supercomputing Institute, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street, SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States); Gao, Jiali, E-mail: gao@jialigao.org [Department of Chemistry and Supercomputing Institute, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street, SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0431 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin Province 130028 (China)

    2014-05-28

    The explicit polarization (X-Pol) theory is a fragment-based quantum chemical method that explicitly models the internal electronic polarization and intermolecular interactions of a chemical system. X-Pol theory provides a framework to construct a quantum mechanical force field, which we have extended to liquid hydrogen fluoride (HF) in this work. The parameterization, called XPHF, is built upon the same formalism introduced for the XP3P model of liquid water, which is based on the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) semiempirical quantum chemistry method and the dipole-preserving polarization consistent point charge model. We introduce a fluorine parameter set for PMO, and find good agreement for various gas-phase results of small HF clusters compared to experiments and ab initio calculations at the M06-2X/MG3S level of theory. In addition, the XPHF model shows reasonable agreement with experiments for a variety of structural and thermodynamic properties in the liquid state, including radial distribution functions, interaction energies, diffusion coefficients, and densities at various state points.

  4. Gain generator optimization for hydrogen fluoride overtone and fundamental chemical lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, William A.; Patterson, Stanley P.; Graves, Bruce R.; Sollee, Jeffrey L.; Yonehara, Gordon N.; Dering, John P.

    1993-06-01

    The hydrogen fluoride (HF) chemical laser is the baseline concept for SDIO space based laser (SBL) weapons systems. Ground based tests at power levels appropriate for this application have been demonstrated. Because the brightness of a laser beam projected to the far field is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength, shorter wavelengths are desirable to enhance brightness on target. Development of the HF overtone chemical laser ((lambda) equals 1.3 - 1.4 micrometers ) as a growth technology for SBL applications has proceeded rapidly during the past several years. This paper reviews the parametric characterization and optimization of the Hypersonic, Low-Temperature (HYLTE) nozzle concept for HF overtone and HF fundamental performance. The experiments utilize advanced multilayer dielectric coatings on uncooled silicon substrates. The experimental results reported include laser power, small signal gain, mode footprint, and spectral content. The design of a multiple nozzle HYLTE module as a building block to an advanced high power HF chemical laser device is presented. Design philosophy emphasizes traceability from an intermediate size linear module to a full scale cylindrical gain generator for SBL applications. The key issues addressed are power scalability, fabricability, regenerative cooling capability, and thermal/structural performance.

  5. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  6. New insights about the hydrogen bonds formed between acetylene and hydrogen fluoride: π ⋯ H, C ⋯ H and F ⋯ H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Denize S.; Oliveira, Boaz G.

    2017-02-01

    A theoretical study of hydrogen bond strength and bond properties in the C2H2 ⋯(HF)-T, C2H2 ⋯ 2(HF)-T, C2H2 ⋯ 2(HF), C2H2 ⋯ 3(HF) and C2H2 ⋯ 4(HF) complexes was carried out at the B3LYP/6-311 ++G(d,p) theory level. In these systems, a strength competition between the π ⋯ H and C ⋯ H interactions was examined. Specifically the F ⋯ H hydrogen bond, its properties were studied through a comparison between the hydrogen fluoride and the higher-order complexes (trimer, tetramer and pentamer). Regarding the electronic properties, the hydrogen bond strength could not be determined by the supermolecule approach. Thus, the hydrogen bond energies were computed via NBO calculations. Additionally to NBO, the ChelpG charge calculations were used to interpret the intermolecular charge transfer. The QTAIM integrations were useful to predict the covalent character of the π ⋯ H, C ⋯ H and F ⋯ H hydrogen bonds. Moreover, values of hybrid orbitals (s and p) and atomic radii were also determined in order to justify the red shifts in the stretch frequencies of the Hsbnd F bonds.

  7. Possibility of hydrogen supply by shared residential fuel cell systems for fuel cell vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ono Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Residential polymer electrolyte fuel cells cogeneration systems (residential PEFC systems produce hydrogen from city gas by internal gas-reformer, and generate electricity, the hot water at the same time. From the viewpoint of the operation, it is known that residential PEFC systems do not continuously work but stop for long time, because the systems generate enough hot water for short operation time. In other words, currently residential PEFC systems are dominated by the amount of hot water demand. This study focuses on the idle time of residential PEFC systems. Since their gas-reformers are free, the systems have potential to produce hydrogen during the partial load operations. The authors expect that residential PEFC systems can take a role to supply hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles (FCVs before hydrogen fueling stations are distributed enough. From this perspective, the objective of this study is to evaluate the hydrogen production potential of residential PEFC systems. A residential PEFC system was modeled by the mixed integer linear programming to optimize the operation including hydrogen supply for FCV. The objective function represents annual system cost to be minimized with the constraints of energy balance. It should be noted that the partial load characteristics of the gas-reformer and the fuel cell stack are taken into account to derive the optimal operation. The model was employed to estimate the possible amount of hydrogen supply by a residential PEFC system. The results indicated that the system could satisfy at least hydrogen demand for transportation of 8000 km which is as far as the average annual mileage of a passenger car in Japan. Furthermore, hydrogen production by sharing a residential PEFC system with two households is more effective to reduce primary energy consumption with hydrogen supply for FCV than the case of introducing PEFC in each household.

  8. Rugged, Portable, Real-Time Optical Gaseous Analyzer for Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey; Gonzales, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen fluoride (HF) is a primary evolved combustion product of fluorinated and perfluorinated hydrocarbons. HF is produced during combustion by the presence of impurities and hydrogen- containing polymers including polyimides. This effect is especially dangerous in closed occupied volumes like spacecraft and submarines. In these systems, combinations of perfluorinated hydrocarbons and polyimides are used for insulating wiring. HF is both highly toxic and short-lived in closed environments due to its reactivity. The high reactivity also makes HF sampling problematic. An infrared optical sensor can detect promptly evolving HF with minimal sampling requirements, while providing both high sensitivity and high specificity. A rugged optical path length enhancement architecture enables both high HF sensitivity and rapid environmental sampling with minimal gaseous contact with the low-reactivity sensor surfaces. The inert optical sample cell, combined with infrared semiconductor lasers, is joined with an analog and digital electronic control architecture that allows for ruggedness and compactness. The combination provides both portability and battery operation on a simple camcorder battery for up to eight hours. Optical detection of gaseous HF is confounded by the need for rapid sampling with minimal contact between the sensor and the environmental sample. A sensor is required that must simultaneously provide the required sub-parts-permillion detection limits, but with the high specificity and selectivity expected of optical absorption techniques. It should also be rugged and compact for compatibility with operation onboard spacecraft and submarines. A new optical cell has been developed for which environmental sampling is accomplished by simply traversing the few mm-thick cell walls into an open volume where the measurement is made. A small, low-power fan or vacuum pump may be used to push or pull the gaseous sample into the sample volume for a response time of a few

  9. Theoretical study on hydrogenation catalysts containing a metal hydride as additional hydrogen supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, E.D.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1992-01-01

    A hypothetical hydrogenation catalyst consisting of porous, catalytically active particles embedded with metal hydride powder was evaluated. The metal hydride provides temporarily additional hydrogen if the mass transfer rate of the hydrogen to the internal of the particle is not sufficient. A numer

  10. Study of Hydrogen Supply System with Ammonia Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saika, Takashi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nohara, Tetsuo; Ishimatsu, Shinji

    Carbon-free fuel is effective in preventing global warming. Hydrogen has no carbon and can be made also from nuclear energy or reproducible energies other than fossil fuels. However, hydrogen lacks portability because of its difficulty in liquefying, but ammonia can easily be liquefied at a room temperature and dissociated into high-content hydrogen and nitrogen using a suitable catalyst. An ammonia dissociation system for fuel cells is proposed in this paper. The residual ammonia by 13ppm or more in the dissociated gas (H2+ N2) causes a decrease in the output of fuel cells. To separate residual ammonia, it should be sent to an ammonia separator and then to an ammonia distiller. In the experiment, the authors examine the concentrations of ammonia after dissociation at various temperatures, pressures and space velocities. The ammonia separator uses the fact that ammonia dissolves well in water. Then the ammonia water is distilled in the distiller. Thereby, the authors have proposed an ammonia circulation system that is a clean energy system.

  11. Application of an industrial gas supply system to a hydrogen water chemistry installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, D.; Kuberka, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    Equipment for a hydrogen gas supply and an oxygen gas supply was adapted to meet operating safety criteria for a hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) application at a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. The oxygen and hydrogen gases are supplied by vaporizing cryogenic liquid drawn from storage tanks. Cryogenic storage tanks consist of an inner vessel supported within an outer vessel, with insulation in the space between vessels. The supports and product lines on the inner container are small and flexible for heat transfer and thermal flexibility considerations. Cryogenic storage tank systems inherently have low natural frequencies and must be analyzed for dynamic response to site seismic criteria. Equipment modifications to meet application criteria were made without compromising performance. The guidelines for HWC installations were supplemented by a comprehensive design safety review to assess the equipment safeguards required to control potential product releases.

  12. Fluoride, nitrate and water hardness in groundwater supplied to the rural communities of Ensenada County, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daesslé, L. W.; Ruiz-Montoya, L.; Tobschall, H. J.; Chandrajith, R.; Camacho-Ibar, V. F.; Mendoza-Espinosa, L. G.; Quintanilla-Montoya, A. L.; Lugo-Ibarra, K. C.

    2009-07-01

    The hydrogeochemistry of 26 wells belonging to ten different aquifers in the county of Ensenada, Baja California, is studied. These wells are all used to supply the rural communities in the region, which comprise ~37,000 inhabitants, excluding the city of Ensenada. High total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations (maximum 7.35 g l-1) indicate that salt is a ubiquitous contaminant in the aquifers due to seawater intrusion. The aquifers that support extensive agriculture activities (Maneadero, San Quintín, San Simón and El Rosario) are characterized by higher N-NO3 concentrations (maximum 20 mg l-1) derived from fertilizers. Fluoride concentrations exceed the 1.5 mg l-1 Mexican official limit in only four wells. The enrichments of F- in the southern aquifers are thought to be associated to water-rock interactions controlled mainly by Na-Ca equilibrium reactions with fluorite, as suggested from high dissolved Na concentrations in these waters. In the northern aquifer of Maneadero, no enrichment of Na is found and a geothermal source for F- is likely. Water is hard to moderately hard, with Ca/Mg ratios >1. Although drinking water directly from the tap is not a common practice in these localities, most sources have concentrations of major ions and TDS that exceed the Mexican official limits.

  13. Role of membranes and membrane reactors in the hydrogen supply of fuel cells for transports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julbe, A.; Guizard, Ch. [Institut Europeen des Membranes, UMII, Lab. des Materiaux et des Procedes Membranaires, CNRS UMR 5635, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2000-07-01

    Production, storage and supply of high-purity hydrogen as a clean and efficient fuel is central to fuel cells technology, in particular in vehicle traction. Actually, technologies for handling liquefied or gaseous hydrogen in transports are not available so that a number of alternative fuels are considered with the aim of in-situ generation of hydrogen through catalytic processes. The integrated concept of membrane reactors (MRs) can greatly benefit to these technologies. Particular emphasis is put on inorganic membranes and their role in MRs performance for H{sub 2} production.

  14. Continuous measurement of peak hydrogen fluoride exposures in aluminum smelter potrooms: instrument development and in-plant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Neal; Xu, Weizong; Peace, Jon Nathaniel

    2008-02-01

    The aluminum smelting process continuously evolves both sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) gases. The vast majority of these evolved gases are captured by local exhaust ventilation systems and transported to fume treatment centers. Any gas escaping the ventilation systems could create the potential for workplace exposures. Currently, there are no commercially available sensors that are capable of selectively measuring peak concentrations (< 10 sec) of HF in the presence of SO2. This measurement capability is critical for facilitating a better understanding of the etiology of respiratory health effects. This article presents the development and in-plant testing of a portable, tunable diode-based HF sensor that shows equivalent or improved performance relative to NIOSH Method 7902 and is capable of measuring short-term personal peak HF exposure potentials in operating aluminum smelters.

  15. Detection of hydrogen fluoride absorption in diffuse molecular clouds with Herschel/HIFI: a ubiquitous tracer of molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnentrucker, P; Phillips, T G; Gerin, M; Lis, D C; De Luca, M; Goicoechea, J R; Black, J H; Bell, T A; Boulanger, F; Cernicharo, J; Coutens, A; Dartois, E; Kazmierczak, M; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Geballe, T R; Giesen, T; Godard, B; Goldsmith, P F; Gry, C; Gupta, H; Hennebelle, P; Herbst, E; Hily-Blant, P; Joblin, C; Kolos, R; Krelowski, J; Mart\\in-Pintado, J; Menten, K M; Monje, R; Mookerjea, B; Pearson, J; Perault, M; Persson, C M; Plume, R; Salez, M; Schlemmer, S; Schmidt, M; Stutzki, J; Teyssier, D; Vastel, C; Yu, S; Caux, E; Gusten, R; Hatch, W A; Klein, T; Mehdi, I; Morris, P; Ward, J S

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the detection of absorption by interstellar hydrogen fluoride (HF) along the sight line to the submillimeter continuum sources W49N and W51. We have used Herschel's HIFI instrument in dual beam switch mode to observe the 1232.4762 GHz J = 1 - 0 HF transition in the upper sideband of the band 5a receiver. We detected foreground absorption by HF toward both sources over a wide range of velocities. Optically thin absorption components were detected on both sight lines, allowing us to measure - as opposed to obtain a lower limit on - the column density of HF for the first time. As in previous observations of HF toward the source G10.6-0.4, the derived HF column density is typically comparable to that of water vapor, even though the elemental abundance of oxygen is greater than that of fluorine by four orders of magnitude. We used the rather uncertain N(CH)-N(H2) relationship derived previously toward diffuse molecular clouds to infer the molecular hydrogen column density in the clouds exhibiting HF abs...

  16. Herschel observations of extra-ordinary sources: Detection of Hydrogen Fluoride in absorption towards Orion~KL

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, T G; Lis, D C; Neufeld, D A; Bell, T A; Wang, S; Crockett, N R; Emprechtinger, M; Blake, G A; Caux, E; Ceccarelli, C; Cernicharo, J; Comito, C; Daniel, F; Dubernet, M -L; Encrenaz, P; Gerin, M; Giesen, T F; Goicoechea, J R; Goldsmith, P F; Herbst, E; Joblin, C; Johnstone, D; Langer, W D; Latter, W D; Lord, S D; Maret, S; Martin, P G; Melnick, G J; Menten, K M; Morris, P; Muller, H S P; Murphy, J A; Ossenkopf, V; Pearson, J C; Perault, M; Plume, R; Qin, S -L; Schilke, P; Schlemmer, S; Stutzki, J; Trappe, N; van der Tak, F F S; Vastel, C; Yorke, H W; Yu, S; Zmuidzinas, J; Boogert, A; Gusten, R; Hartogh, P; Honingh, N; Karpov, A; Kooi, J; Krieg, J -M; Schieder, R

    2010-01-01

    We report a detection of the fundamental rotational transition of hydrogen fluoride in absorption towards Orion KL using Herschel/HIFI. After the removal of contaminating features associated with common molecules ("weeds"), the HF spectrum shows a P-Cygni profile, with weak redshifted emission and strong blue-shifted absorption, associated with the low-velocity molecular outflow. We derive an estimate of 2.9 x 10^13 cm^-2 for the HF column density responsible for the broad absorption component. Using our best estimate of the H2 column density within the low-velocity molecular outflow, we obtain a lower limit of ~1.6 x 10^-10 for the HF abundance relative to hydrogen nuclei, corresponding to 0.6% of the solar abundance of fluorine. This value is close to that inferred from previous ISO observations of HF J=2--1 absorption towards Sgr B2, but is in sharp contrast to the lower limit of 6 x 10^-9 derived by Neufeld et al. (2010) for cold, foreground clouds on the line of sight towards G10.6-0.4.

  17. Strong absorption by interstellar hydrogen fluoride: Herschel/HIFI observations of the sight-line to G10.6-0.4 (W31C)

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, D A; Phillips, T G; Lis, D C; De Luca, M; Goicoechea, J R; Black, J H; Gerin, M; Bell, T; Boulanger, F; Cernicharo, J; Coutens, A; Dartois, E; Kazmierczak, M; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Geballe, T R; Giesen, T; Godard, B; Goldsmith, P F; Gry, C; Gupta, H; Hennebelle, P; Herbst, E; Hily-Blant, P; Joblin, C; Kolos, R; Krelowski, J; Martin-Pintado, J; Menten, K M; Monje, R; Mookerjea, B; Pearson, J; Perault, M; Persson, C; Plume, R; Salez, M; Schlemmer, S; Schmidt, M; Stutzki, J; Teyssier, D; Vastel, C; Yu, S; Cais, P; Caux, E; Liseau, R; Morris, P; Planesas, P

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of strong absorption by interstellar hydrogen fluoride along the sight-line to the submillimeter continuum source G10.6-0.4 (W31C). We have used Herschel's HIFI instrument, in dual beam switch mode, to observe the 1232.4763 GHz J=1-0 HF transition in the upper sideband of the Band 5a receiver. The resultant spectrum shows weak HF emission from G10.6-0.4 at LSR velocities in the range -10 to -3 km/s, accompanied by strong absorption by foreground material at LSR velocities in the range 15 to 50 km/s. The spectrum is similar to that of the 1113.3430 GHz 1(11)-0(00) transition of para-water, although at some frequencies the HF (hydrogen fluoride) optical depth clearly exceeds that of para-H2O. The optically-thick HF absorption that we have observed places a conservative lower limit of 1.6E+14 cm-2 on the HF column density along the sight-line to G10.6-0.4. Our lower limit on the HF abundance, 6E-6 relative to hydrogen nuclei, implies that hydrogen fluoride accounts for between ~ 30 and 10...

  18. A noie on the loss of hydrogen and the supply of hydrogen to the Earth as a direct or indirect effect of the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. BARRICELLI

    1969-06-01

    Full Text Available The rate at which hydrogen is supplied to the Earth
    by the solar wind, and the rate at which hydrogen escapes from the Earth
    by diffusion into space are compared 011 the basis of recent estimates. It
    is found that the hydrogen supplied by the solar wind is roughly comparable
    to or may even be larger than present hydrogen losses. The Earth
    may have lost most of its hydrogen at an early stage when, according to
    Urey and Miller (1959, Pox (1960 and others, the Earth had a reducing,
    instead of an oxidizing atmosphere. However, no sufficient evidence is
    yet available to determine whether the Earth is still losing more hydrogen
    than it receives. The common notion that the Earth is still in the process
    of losing its hydrogen is therefore in question.

  19. MIGREYD Modular IGCC concepts for in-Refinery Energy and Hydrogen supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romey, I.; Obladen, M.; Schulz, A. [Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Inst. Technology of Energy Supply and Energery Conversion Systems (TEE), Essen (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    There is an increasing tendency for refineries to produce a greater proportion of light, high-hydrogen-content chemicals, which also results in greater quantities of heavy residues which require disposal. Gasification of these residues offers a number of options for utilisation of the resulting products. Importantly, gasification offers the opportunity for cost-effective production of hydrogen, which may not only be used in the refinery processes, but also in future fuel cell applications, either for stationary or transport options. The MIGREYD project opens an important bridge for the transition from the use of conventional fossil fuels to a future hydrogen based energy system. Through this project, an advanced, highly efficient in-refinery energy and hydrogen supply system will be developed that is flexible in terms of fuels (biomass, oil refinery residues, low-grade fossil fuels) and products (hydrogen, cogeneration of power and process heat, and other chemicals). The improved efficiency of the process stages and the synergistic benefits of poly-generation will realise savings of primary fossil energy resources, sustainable pollution control and a significant decrease of the total plant's CO{sub 2} emissions. (orig.)

  20. Effect of hydrogen fluoride on pollen germination and pollen tube growth in Prunus avium L. cv. Royal Ann

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facteau, T.J.; Wang, S.Y.; Rowe, K.E.

    1973-05-01

    Increased fluoride (F) fumigation levels resulted in decrease in percent Royal Ann pollen germination and pollen tube growth. As dose (hour x concentration in ..mu.. gF/m/sup 3/) increased, Van pollen tube growth in vivo decreased. A linear relationship between increased dose and fluoride residue in the flowers was shown. 14 references, 5 figures.

  1. Physiological effects of the air pollutant hydrogen fluoride on phloem transport in soybean plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madkour, S.A.A.S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of continuous exposure to HF at ca. 0, 1, and 5 ugF m/sup -3/ for 8-10 days on the transport and relative distribution of /sup 14/C-labelled photosynthetic assimilates in Hodgson soybean plants at three stages of development (vegetative, flowering and early fruit set, and pod filling) were investigated. Fumigated and non-fumigated plants were supplied with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ by enclosing the second fully-expanded trifoliolate leaf in a cuvette designed for the purpose. Results from these experiments indicate that transport from the source leaves of /sup 14/C-labelled assimilates to sink tissues was partially inhibited by exposure to both concentrations of HF and at each stage of development. However, the greatest degree of inhibition in the transport occurred in plants that were exposed during the flowering stage. Results indicated that there was a greater retention of sugars and a greater incorporation of the /sup 14/C into non-transport compounds in the source leaves accompanied by a reduced transport to sink tissue as the HF concentration increases. This suggested that F-induced inhibition of phloem loading of sugars. The effect of HF fumigation on phloem loading was investigated by monitoring the uptake of /sup 14/C-sucrose supplied to source leaf discs, collected from fumigated and non-fumigated plants. HF was shown to inhibit the loading of /sup 14/C-sucrose. The effect of F on the activity of plasma membrane ATPase was investigated both in vivo, by isolating plasma membranes from fumigated and non-fumigated plants, and in vitro by exposure of plasma membranes to NaF. F was shown to inhibit ATPase activity both in vivo and in vitro. It is concluded that plasma membrane ATPases is the target site for F inhibition of phloem transport, and that the inhibition occurs through the formation of Mg/sup +2/-fluorophosphate complexes.

  2. Sustainability of hydrogen supply chain. Part I: Identification of critical criteria and cause–effect analysis for enhancing the sustainability using DEMATEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Manzardo, Alessandro; Toniolo, Sara;

    2013-01-01

    The enhancement of sustainability of hydrogen supply chain is of vital importance for the stakeholders/decision-makers to design a sustainable hydrogen supply chain. The objective of this paper is to develop a method for prioritizing the influential factors, identifying the key driving factors...... that influence the sustainability of hydrogen supply chain and mapping the cause–effect relationships to improve the sustainability of hydrogen supply chain. In this paper, thirty seven criteria in four aspects including economic, technological, environmental and societal aspects are considered for enhancing...... the sustainability of hydrogen supply chain, and decision making trial and evaluation laboratory has been used to analyze the relationships among these criteria. The status of hydrogen supply chain in China has been studied by the proposed method, and the results are consistent with the actual conditions. It could...

  3. Increasing Hydrogen Ion Activity of Water in Two Reservoirs Supplying the San Francisco Bay Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, J. G.

    1981-10-01

    The hydrogen ion activity (H+) of water in two Sierra Nevada reservoirs (Pardee and Hetch Hetchy) that supply the San Francisco Bay area has been increasing with time over the period 1954-1979. This conclusion is based on weekly measurements ofpH at the two reservoirs and is supported by measurements of alkalinity which decreased at Pardee over the period 1944-1979. Based on linear models, the rate of the increasing (H+) was the same at both reservoirs, and (H+) varied concomitantly from year to year, suggesting a common, general cause. Mean monthly variation in (H+) corresponded to mean monthly variation in atmospheric pollution from a nine-county area around San Francisco Bay. The most likely cause of the increasing (H+) of reservoir waters is NOx from automobile exhausts primarily from the San Francisco Bay area.

  4. The differences of tooth density changes in the applications of 45% carbamide peroxide PF and 38% hydrogen peroxide PF as dental bleaching agents and after the application of 1.2% acidulated phosphoric fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devriza Jurnalis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The changes of tooth density is caused by the dissolutions of mineral enamel (demineralization by bleaching agent. The purpose of this research was intended to know tooth density changes after the application of bleaching agent using 45% carbamide peroxide potassium fluoride (PF and 38% hydrogen peroxide potassium fluoride (PF and after the application of 1.2% acidulated phosphoric fluoride (APF.This research was true experimental in-vitro. Sample taking was by random sampling. The sample consisted of 32 maxillary central incisive permanent teeth. The tooth density was measured using RVG (Radiovisiography. The research results were analyzed and tested in a pair and in a pair of two sample for means using t student method. The conclusion of the research was a decrease of tooth density after the application of bleaching agent with 45% carbamide peroxide PF and 38% hydrogen peroxide PF with statistically significant. After the application of 1.2% APF the density increased significantly but the density was lower than original density. There was no significant difference between bleached with 45% carbamide peroxide potassium fluoride and 38% hydrogen peroxide potassium fluoride.

  5. Crystal structure of μ-fluorido-bis{(η4-cyclooctadiene[hexafluoridoantimonato(V]platinum(II} hexafluoridoantimonate(V hydrogen fluoride 0.75-solvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Seppelt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the complex cation of the binuclear solvated title salt, [Pt2F(SbF62(C8H122]SbF6·0.75HF, an F atom bridges the two platinum(II atoms with a bond angle of 123.3 (2°. The corresponding Pt—F bond lengths are in the range of other fluorine-bridged binuclear platinum(II complexes. Two of the three SbF6− anions each coordinate with one F atom to one platinum(II atom. Including the η4-bound cyclooctadiene (COD ligands, the overall coordination sphere of each platinum(II atom is square-planar. The third SbF6− anion is not bound to the complex. Hydrogen fluoride is present in the crystal structure as a solvent disordered over three positions, each with an occupancy of 0.25. F...F distances of 2.5512 (7, 2.6076 (8 and 3.2215 (10 Å to surrounding SbF6− anions are indicative of F—H...F hydrogen-bonding interactions although no H atoms could be localized for the disordered solvent molecules. The resulting hydrogen-bonded network is three-dimensional.

  6. Fluoride Programs in the School Setting: Preventive Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebich, Theodore, Jr.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Two types of school-based programs that increase students' use of fluoride for preventive dental health are described. In fluoride mouthrinse programs, teachers give their students a fluoride solution once a week in a paper cup. In areas where the level of fluoride in the water supply is insufficient, the flouride tablet program is used. (JN)

  7. “Distributed hybrid” MH–CGH2 system for hydrogen storage and its supply to LT PEMFC power modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lototskyy, M., E-mail: mlototskyy@uwc.ac.za [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Tolj, I.; Davids, M.W.; Bujlo, P. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Smith, F. [Impala Platinum Ltd, Springs (South Africa); Pollet, B.G. [HySA Systems Competence Centre, South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Prototype hydrogen storage and supply system for LTPEMFC applications was developed. • Combination of MH and CGH2 tanks with common gas manifold was used. • Thermal coupling of fuel cell stack and MH tank was applied. • The system uses AB2-type MH; H2 equilibrium pressure ∼10 bar at room temperature. • Shorter H2 charge time and stable H2 supply at a fluctuating load were observed. - Abstract: This paper describes the layout and presents the results of the testing of a novel prototype “distributed hybrid” hydrogen storage and supply system that has the potential to be used for Low Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (LT-PEMFC) applications. The system consists of individual Metal Hydride (MH) and Compressed Gas (CGH2) tanks with common gas manifold, and a thermal management system where heat exchanger of the liquid heated-cooled MH tank is integrated with the cooling system of the LT-PEMFC BoP. The MH tank is filled with a medium-stability AB{sub 2}-type MH material (H{sub 2} equilibrium pressure of about 10 bar at room temperature). This innovative solution allows for (i) an increase in hydrogen storage capacity of the whole gas storage system and the reduction of H{sub 2} charge pressure; (ii) shorter charging times in the refuelling mode and smoother peaks of H{sub 2} consumption during its supply to the fuel cell stack; (iii) the use of standard parts with simple layout and lower costs; and (iv) adding flexibility in the layout and placement of the components of the hydrogen storage and supply system.

  8. Relação entre níveis de fluoreto na água de abastecimento público e fluorose dental Relationship between fluoride levels in the public water supply and dental fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Bonadia Catani

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência da fluorose dentária em escolares sujeitos a diferentes concentrações de fluoreto na água de abastecimento público das suas cidades. MÉTODOS: A amostra foi composta de 386 escolares de sete anos de idade, moradores de dois municípios do estado de São Paulo que realizaram heterocontrole da fluoretação da água de 1998 a 2002, um deles apresentando concentração homogênea de fluoreto e o outro oscilante. Fluorose dental foi determinada examinando os incisivos superiores permanentes (secos pelo índice de Dean, o grau de fluorose classificado como questionável foi considerado como fluorose. Variáveis sociodemográficas e questões sobre saúde bucal foram avaliadas com questionário estruturado enviado aos pais/responsáveis. Associações foram verificadas por meio de regressão logística múltipla (pOBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of dental fluorosis among schoolchildren subjected to different fluoride concentrations in the public water supply of their cities. METHODS: The sample comprised 386 seven-year-old schoolchildren living in two municipalities in the State of São Paulo that practiced external control over the fluoridation of the water from 1998 to 2002: one with homogenous fluoride concentration and the other with oscillating concentration. Dental fluorosis was determined by dry examination of the upper permanent incisors using Dean's index. Scores classified as questionable were considered to represent fluorosis. Sociodemographic variables and questions regarding oral health were assessed using a structured questionnaire sent to the children's parents or the adults responsible for these children. Correlates of fluorosis were assessed using multivariate logistic regression (p<0.05. RESULTS: Both municipalities presented a mild degree of fluorosis. The prevalence of fluorosis in the municipality with oscillating fluoride content in the water was 31.4%, and it was 79.9% in the

  9. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  10. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Organic Compounds without H2 Supply: An Electrochemical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Navarro, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    An experiment developed for an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course that can be used to introduce the catalytic hydrogenation reaction, catalysis electrochemical principles and gas chromatography is presented. The organic compounds hydrogenated by the electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) process were styrene, benzaldehyde and…

  11. Studies on a New Material for Hydrogen Storage and Supply by Modified Fe and Fe2O3 Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG, Hui; WANG, Xian-Sheng; WANG, Xin-Zhi; WANG, Xiao-Fang; DONG, Fa-Xin; SHI, Qi-Zhen

    2007-01-01

    Modified iron oxide, a new material for hydrogen storage and supply to polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC),was prepared by impregnating Fe or Fe2O3 powder with an aqueous solution containing metal cation additives (Al,Cr, Ni, Co, Zr and Mo). Hydrogen storage properties of the samples were investigated. The results show that both Fe and Fe2O3 powder with additive Mo presented excellent catalytic activity and cyclic stability, and their hydrogen producing temperature could be surprisingly decreased. The temperature of forming hydrogen for the Fe2O3-Mo at after addition of Mo in the fourth cycle. The cause for it was probably related to preventing the sinter of the sample particles. In addition, hydrogen storage capacity of the Fe2O3-Mo can reach w=4.5% (72 kg H2/m3), close to International Energy Agency (IEA) criterion. These show the value of practical application of the Fe2O3-Mo as the promising hydrogen storage material.

  12. Hydrogen amid the change of the energy supply system; Wasserstoff im Wandel der Energieversorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehlein, Bernd; Kattenstein, Thomas [EnergieAgentur.NRW, Duesseldorf (Germany). Netzwerk Brennstoffzelle und Wasserstoff NRW; Toepler, Johannes [Deutscher Wasserstoff und Brennstoffzellenverband e.V., Berlin (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Germany has set itself ambitious goals for the energy turnaround. Being a complementary energy carrier hydrogen could play an important role in their achievement. One of the great advantages of hydrogen is its excellent storability. Due to the fact that energy can be converted back and forth between hydrogen and electricity, making use of hydrogen alongside the heavily fluctuating feed-in of renewable energy could prove a wise decision. The present article analyses what opportunities are associated with the integration of hydrogen but also what challenges must be taken into consideration and ultimately mastered.

  13. Study on improving efficiency in hydrogen utilizing regional heat supply system; Suiso riyo chinetsu kyokyu system no koritsu kaizen ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sueyoshi, S.; Ishitani, H.; Matsuhashi, T. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-01-30

    With an objective to improve efficiency in a hydrogen energy distribution system, discussions were given on combining heat energy supply from hydrogen with factory waste heat recovery by using hydrogen absorbing alloys. This system carries out simultaneously heat supply as a result of burning hydrogen directly and heat supply obtained by converting hydrogen pressure by using hydrogen absorbing alloys. This system could allow existing gas piping facilities to be utilized. However, since quantity of hydrogen that can be transported as pressure is smaller than quantity of heat of hydrogen itself, absorption and emission are repeated a number of times in order to utilize the heat source to a possible maximum extent. Thus, a large quantity of waste heat can be utilized when this method is used. A hydrogen manufacturing system by means of LNG reformation may be combined with this heat transportation system. When waste heat that is received is handled as having zero input in the same sense as natural energy, and heat supply from a hydrogen absorbing alloy is repeated for 50 times, the overall energy balance has resulted in a considerably good value at 0.95. 5 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Heterocontrole da fluoretação da água de abastecimento público de Lages, Santa Catarina, Brasil External control of fluoride levels in the public water supply in Lages, Santa Catarina State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Fernanda Ceriotti Toassi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi monitorar mensalmente e oficializar um programa de heterocontrole dos níveis de flúor na água de abastecimento público de Lages, Santa Catarina, Brasil. O município foi dividido geograficamente em dez pontos e a coleta realizada de outubro de 2004 a setembro de 2005, em duplicata. Após a coleta, as amostras eram enviadas para o Laboratório de Vigilância Sanitária de Flúor da Universidade do Vale do Itajaí (Santa Catarina, que realizou as análises utilizando o método eletrométrico (Orion 920A/Eletrodo Orion 9609. Após doze meses, 45,8% das amostras de água coletadas apresentaram teores inadequados de flúor. Verificou-se uma elevada e contínua variabilidade nos resultados. Entre os pontos que apresentaram teores inadequados de flúor, houve predomínio daqueles com excesso de fluoretos (35,8%. Também houve um significativo número de unidades amostrais com uma concentração adequada de flúor (54,2%. Os resultados permitiram concluir que o heterocontrole em Lages é fundamental para a manutenção de um correto programa de fluoretação das águas de abastecimento público.The purpose of this study is a monthly assessment of fluoride levels in the public water supply in Lages, Santa Catarina State, Brazil. This town was divided into ten regions, where water samples were collected from October 2004 to September 2005. Two samples were drawn from each region and sent to the Fluoride Health Surveillance Laboratory at Vale do Itajaí University for analysis through an electrometric method (Orion 920A/Orion Electrode 9609. After twelve months, 120 samples had been collected, demonstrating gaps in the fluoride levels and some points with excessive fluoride levels (35,8%. Several points with ideal fluoride concentrations (54.2% also appeared. These findings lead to the conclusion that external controls are required for monitoring fluoride levels in the public water supply in Lages.

  15. Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, Neil (Orinda, CA); Whalen, J. Marc (Corning, NY); Chacon, Lisa (Corning, NY)

    2000-12-12

    A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

  16. Dentifrice Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakita, Philip E.

    2004-05-01

    The effectiveness of the fluoride ion in lowering the incidence of dental caries is a major factor in the field of dental health. Observations and research studies in the first half of the 20th century have lead to the widespread adoption of fluoridated water and the use of inorganic fluoride compounds in oral care products, such as toothpaste and dental rinses. This article provides a brief review of the types of compounds used and the chemistry involved.

  17. Safety assessment of envisaged systems for automotive hydrogen supply and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landucci, Gabriele [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Chimica Industriale e Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Pisa, via Diotisalvi n.2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Tugnoli, Alessandro; Cozzani, Valerio [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Mineraria e delle Tecnologie Ambientali, Alma Mater Studiorum - Universita di Bologna, via Terracini n.28, 40131 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    A novel consequence-based approach was applied to the inherent safety assessment of the envisaged hydrogen production, distribution and utilization systems, in the perspective of the widespread hydrogen utilization as a vehicle fuel. Alternative scenarios were assessed for the hydrogen system chain from large scale production to final utilization. Hydrogen transportation and delivery was included in the analysis. The inherent safety fingerprint of each system was quantified by a set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). Rules for KPIs aggregation were considered for the overall assessment of the system chains. The final utilization stage resulted by large the more important for the overall expected safety performance of the system. Thus, comparison was carried out with technologies proposed for the use of other low emission fuels, as LPG and natural gas. The hazards of compressed hydrogen-fueled vehicles resulted comparable, while reference innovative hydrogen technologies evidenced a potentially higher safety performance. Thus, switching to the inherently safer technologies currently under development may play an important role in the safety enhancement of hydrogen vehicles, resulting in a relevant improvement of the overall safety performance of the entire hydrogen system. (author)

  18. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  19. Fluoride retention in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Correia Cavalcante SOUZA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This single-blind, randomized, crossover study aimed at assessing the long-term fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments. The study volunteers (n = 38 were residents of an area with fluoridated drinking water. They were administered four treatments, each of which lasted for one week: twice-daily placebo dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice and once-daily fluoride mouthrinse, and thrice-daily fluoride dentifrice. At the end of each treatment period, samples of unstimulated saliva and dental biofilm were collected 8 h after the last oral hygiene procedure. Fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm were analyzed using a specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm 8 h after the last use of fluoride products did not differ among treatments. The results of this study suggest that treatments with home-use fluoride products have no long-term effect on fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm of residents of an area with a fluoridated water supply.

  20. Fluoride retention in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Daniela Correia Cavalcante; Maltz, Marisa; Hashizume, Lina Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This single-blind, randomized, crossover study aimed at assessing the long-term fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments. The study volunteers (n = 38) were residents of an area with fluoridated drinking water. They were administered four treatments, each of which lasted for one week: twice-daily placebo dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice and once-daily fluoride mouthrinse, and thrice-daily fluoride dentifrice. At the end of each treatment period, samples of unstimulated saliva and dental biofilm were collected 8 h after the last oral hygiene procedure. Fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm were analyzed using a specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm 8 h after the last use of fluoride products did not differ among treatments. The results of this study suggest that treatments with home-use fluoride products have no long-term effect on fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm of residents of an area with a fluoridated water supply.

  1. Heterocontrole da fluoretação da água de abastecimento público em Bauru, SP, Brasil External control over the fluoridation of the public water supply in Bauru, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Ramires

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a fluoretação da água de abastecimento público, comparando os resultados obtidos com dados prévios de fluoretação. MÉTODOS: O estudo foi realizado de março de 2004 a 2005, na cidade de Bauru, Estado de São Paulo. Mensalmente, em datas estabelecidas por sorteio, foram coletadas 60 amostras de água nos 19 setores de abastecimento, totalizando 737 amostras. A concentração de flúor presente nas amostras de água foi determinada em duplicata, utilizando-se o eletrodo íon sensível (Orion 9609, acoplado ao potenciômetro. Uma vez analisadas, as amostras foram classificadas como aceitáveis ou inaceitáveis de acordo com a concentração de flúor. A análise estatística empregada foi do tipo descritiva. RESULTADOS: A concentração média de flúor observada nos diferentes meses de coleta variou entre 0,37 e 1,00 mg/l. Cerca de 85% das amostras foram classificadas como aceitáveis. CONCLUSÕES: Comparados com dados de estudos prévios realizados na cidade, foi observada uma melhoria nas condições de fluoretação da água de abastecimento, um ano após a implantação do heterocontrole. A implantação do monitoramento da fluoretação da água de abastecimento por sistemas de vigilância deve ser incentivada, sendo fundamental para o controle da cárie dentária.OBJECTIVE: To assess the fluoridation of the public water supply and compare these results with previous data. METHODS: The study was carried out from March 2004-2005 in Bauru, a city of Southeastern Brazil. Every month, on dates established randomly, 60 water samples were collected from the 19 supply sectors of the city, totaling 737 samples. The fluoride concentration in the water samples was determined in duplicate, using an ion-specific electrode (Orion 9609 coupled to a potentiometer. Following analysis, the samples were classified as acceptable or unacceptable according to their fluoride concentration. Descriptive statistical analysis was utilized

  2. Waste biomass toward hydrogen fuel supply chain management for electricity: Malaysia perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Izatul Husna; Ibrahim, Jafni Azhan; Othman, Abdul Aziz

    2016-08-01

    Green energy is becoming an important aspect of every country in the world toward energy security by reducing dependence on fossil fuel import and enhancing better life quality by living in the healthy environment. This conceptual paper is an approach toward determining physical flow's characteristic of waste wood biomass in high scale plantation toward producing gas fuel for electricity using gasification technique. The scope of this study is supply chain management of syngas fuel from wood waste biomass using direct gasification conversion technology. Literature review on energy security, Malaysia's energy mix, Biomass SCM and technology. This paper uses the theoretical framework of a model of transportation (Lumsden, 2006) and the function of the terminal (Hulten, 1997) for research purpose. To incorporate biomass unique properties, Biomass Element Life Cycle Analysis (BELCA) which is a novel technique develop to understand the behaviour of biomass supply. Theoretical framework used to answer the research questions are Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) framework and Sustainable strategy development in supply chain management framework

  3. Environmental fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marier, J.R.; Rose, D.

    1971-01-01

    Modern-day man is probably exposed to more environmental fluoride than was heretofore suspected, and consideration must be given to the total ingestion from various sources as well as the types of fluoride present in air, foods, beverages, and other commodities. An effort should also be made to study the symptomology of chronic fluorine intoxication, especially the early non-skeletal manifestations of arthritic-like symptoms that may be complicated by metabolic and/or nutritional inadequacies. Finally, it must be emphasized again that dental fluorosis (i.e. mottling) will only be seen in subjects who have been exposed to fluoride during the time when the enamel of the permanent teeth is being formed, and its absence cannot be assumed to indicate freedom from other fluoride-induced effects including effects of organofluorides and their metabolites. 168 references.

  4. Corresponding-states behavior of a dipolar model fluid with variable dispersion interactions and its relevance to the anomalies of hydrogen fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Volker C.; Leroy, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    More than two decades ago, the elusiveness of a liquid-vapor equilibrium and a corresponding critical point in simulations of the supposedly simple model of dipolar hard spheres came as a surprise to many liquid matter theorists. van Leeuwen and Smit [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 3991 (1993)] showed that a minimum of attractive dispersion interactions among the dipolar particles may be needed to observe regular fluid behavior. Here, we adopt their approach and use an only slightly modified model, in which the original point dipole is replaced by a dipole moment produced by charges that are separated in space, to study the influence of dispersion interactions of variable strength on the coexistence and interfacial properties of a polar fluid. The thermophysical properties are discussed in terms of Guggenheim's corresponding-states approach. In this way, the coexistence curve, the critical compressibility factor, the surface tension, Guggenheim's ratio, and modifications of Guldberg's and Trouton's rules (related to the vapor pressure and the enthalpy of vaporization) are analyzed. As the importance of dispersion is decreased, a crossover from simple-fluid behavior to that characteristic of strongly dipolar systems takes place; for some properties, this transition is monotonic, but for others it occurs non-monotonically. For strongly dipolar systems, the reduced surface tension is very low, whereas Guggenheim's ratio and Guldberg's ratio are found to be high. The critical compressibility factor is smaller, and the coexistence curve is wider and more skewed than for simple fluids. For very weak dispersion, liquid-vapor equilibrium is still observable, but the interfacial tension is extremely low and may, eventually, vanish marking the end of the existence of a liquid phase. We discuss the implications of our findings for real fluids, in particular, for hydrogen fluoride.

  5. Corresponding-states behavior of a dipolar model fluid with variable dispersion interactions and its relevance to the anomalies of hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Volker C; Leroy, Frédéric

    2016-06-14

    More than two decades ago, the elusiveness of a liquid-vapor equilibrium and a corresponding critical point in simulations of the supposedly simple model of dipolar hard spheres came as a surprise to many liquid matter theorists. van Leeuwen and Smit [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 3991 (1993)] showed that a minimum of attractive dispersion interactions among the dipolar particles may be needed to observe regular fluid behavior. Here, we adopt their approach and use an only slightly modified model, in which the original point dipole is replaced by a dipole moment produced by charges that are separated in space, to study the influence of dispersion interactions of variable strength on the coexistence and interfacial properties of a polar fluid. The thermophysical properties are discussed in terms of Guggenheim's corresponding-states approach. In this way, the coexistence curve, the critical compressibility factor, the surface tension, Guggenheim's ratio, and modifications of Guldberg's and Trouton's rules (related to the vapor pressure and the enthalpy of vaporization) are analyzed. As the importance of dispersion is decreased, a crossover from simple-fluid behavior to that characteristic of strongly dipolar systems takes place; for some properties, this transition is monotonic, but for others it occurs non-monotonically. For strongly dipolar systems, the reduced surface tension is very low, whereas Guggenheim's ratio and Guldberg's ratio are found to be high. The critical compressibility factor is smaller, and the coexistence curve is wider and more skewed than for simple fluids. For very weak dispersion, liquid-vapor equilibrium is still observable, but the interfacial tension is extremely low and may, eventually, vanish marking the end of the existence of a liquid phase. We discuss the implications of our findings for real fluids, in particular, for hydrogen fluoride.

  6. Other Fluoride Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Other Fluoride Products Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... August 17, 2001;50(RR-14):1–42. Fluoride Products Fluoride Toothpaste Form Concentrations of fluoride in ...

  7. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bottled water and fluoride. Does bottled water contain fluoride? Bottled water products may contain fluoride, depending on ... How can I find out the level of fluoride in bottled water? The FDA does not require ...

  8. Other Fluoride Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Other Fluoride Products Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Use the information listed below to compare the other fluoride products that may lower the risk for ...

  9. DFT study of hydrogen fluoride and sulfur trioxide interactions on the surface of Pt-decorated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Ali Shokuhi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigate the adsorption properties of hydrogen florid (HF) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) on the surface of platinum decorated graphene (PtG) using density functional theory. We found one optimized configuration for HF and two ones for SO3 upon adsorption on the surface of PtG. Our result show significant adsorption on PtG with calculated energy adsorption of -73.6 (-54.2 BSSE) kJ/mol for HF at its only position and -172.4 (-144.8 BSSE) and -62.7 (-53.7 BSSE) kJ/mol for SO3 at its two positions; P1 and P2, respectively), whereas there is weak physisorption of these analytes on pristine graphene (PG). Results of charge analyses reveled interesting net charge transfer; while the direction of charge is from HF to PtG, reverse direction is found for SO3 for its two configurations. To deep understand the concept of adsorption properties, we used orbital analyses including density of states for interaction of mentioned analytes on the surface of PtG.

  10. Development of a reaxff reactive force field for silicon/oxygen/hydrogen/fluoride interactions and applications to hydroxylation and friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Jejoon

    higher strain energy. In addition, we found three distinct hydroxylation paths -- H3O+ formation reaction from the adsorbed water, proton donation from H3O+, and the direct dissociation of the adsorbed water molecule. Because water molecules and their hydrogen bond network behave differently with respect to temperature ranges, silanol formation is also affected by temperature. The formation of surface hydroxyl in an amorphous silica double slit displays a similar tendency: SiOH formation prefers high-strain sites. Silanol formation related with H3O + formation and dissociation is observed in hydroxylation of amorphous SiO2, similar with the results from silica nano wire simulation. These results are particularly relevant to the tribological characteristics of surfaces, enabling the prediction of the attachment site of the lubrication film on silica surfaces with a locally strained geometry.

  11. Natural fluoride levels from public water supplies in Piauí State, Brazil Concentração de flúor in natura em águas de abastecimento público no Piauí, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiene Saibrosa da Silva

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the natural fluoride concentrations in public water supplies in Piauí State, Brazil, in order to identify cities in risk for high prevalence of dental fluorosis. For each city, two samples of drinking water were collected in the urban area: one from the main public water supply and another from a public or residential tap from the same source. Fluoride analyses were carried out in duplicate using a specific ion electrode and TISAB II. From a total of 222 cities in Piauí, 164 (73.8% samples were analyzed. Urban population in these towns corresponds to 92.5% of the whole state with an estimated population of 1,654,563 inhabitants from the total urban population (1,788,590 inhabitants. A total of 151 cities showed low fluoride levels (O objetivo deste trabalho foi realizar um levantamento dos teores residuais de flúor (F in natura da água de abastecimento em municípios do Piauí para identificar localidades com risco de elevada prevalência de fluorose dentária. Para cada município, foram coletadas duas amostras da água de abastecimento da zona urbana, uma amostra da principal fonte de abastecimento público do município e a outra de uma torneira pública ou residencial abastecida pela mesma fonte. As análises de flúor foram realizadas em duplicata, utilizando um eletrodo específico e TISAB II. Dos 222 municípios do Piauí, 164 (73,8% enviaram amostras para análise. A população urbana desses municípios corresponde a 92,5% (1.654.536 habitantes da população urbana total do estado (1.788.590 habitantes. Observou-se que 151 municípios apresentam baixos teores residuais de flúor ( 0,81 mg/L. Conclui-se que a maioria dos municípios do Piauí possui água de abastecimento com baixos teores de flúor residual. O risco de uma elevada prevalência de fluorose dentária pelo flúor residual da água de abastecimento é pouco provável. Estudos sobre a prevalência de fluorose dentária no Piau

  12. Fluoride release from newly marketed fluoride varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Beth L; Bartoloni, Joseph A; Hensley, Donna M; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2012-03-01

    New fluoride varnishes have been marketed that reportedly release more fluoride (Enamel Pro) or release fluoride more slowly (Vanish XT). The purpose of this study was to compare the amount and rate of fluoride release of new fluoride varnishes with other traditional fluoride varnishes. Extracted molars were cut into block sections. The enamel surfaces of the sections were painted with Enamel Pro, Duraphat, Vanish, or Vanish XT fluoride varnishes. One group was not treated and served as a negative control. The tooth sections were immersed in artificial saliva. The concentration of fluoride in parts per million was measured after the first 30 minutes, daily for the first week, and weekly until the level was below the limit of detection. Fluoride release was plotted over time. Cumulative fluoride release and rate of release (slope) were analyzed using one-way ANOVA/Tukey (α = .05). Enamel Pro had the greatest cumulative fluoride release. There was no significant difference between Duraphat and Vanish. Vanish XT had the lowest cumulative fluoride release. The rate of fluoride release from 1 week to limit of detection was Enamel Pro > Vanish > Duraphat > Vanish XT. The two newly marketed fluoride varnishes (Enamel Pro and Vanish XT) had significantly different fluoride release from the two conventional fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Vanish).

  13. Fluoridation Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... level in water is not enough to prevent tooth decay; however, some groundwater and natural springs can have ... the tooth’s surface, or enamel. Water fluoridation prevents tooth decay by providing frequent and consistent contact with low ...

  14. Caries status in 16 year-olds with varying exposure to water fluoridation in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullen, J

    2012-12-01

    Most of the Republic of Ireland\\'s public water supplies have been fluoridated since the mid-1960s while Northern Ireland has never been fluoridated, apart from some small short-lived schemes in east Ulster.

  15. [Enamel fluoride uptake following fluoride application and fluoride precipitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, Wolfgang; Lennon, Aine M; Trage, Katrin; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This study is on fluoride uptake into enamel following fluoride precipitation with calcium hydroxide. Five specimens each from 12 bovine incisors were polished, covered with a salivary pellicle, and distributed into five groups (n=12). A fluoride solution (43,500 ppm F from magnesiumfluorosilicate, copper-(II)-fluorosilicate and sodium-fluoride, pH 2; Tiefenfluorid Touchierlösung, Humanchemie) and Ca(OH)2-solution (Tiefenfluorid Nachtouchierlösung) were applied subsequently in group TN. "Touchierlosung" only was used in group T, sodium-fluoride (43,500 ppm F, pH 2) in group NaF, and aminefluoride (Elmex fluid, 10,000 ppm F, pH 4) in group EF. No fluoride was used in group NK (negative control). Following rinsing and 24 h storage in artificial saliva surface KOH-soluble fluoride content (KOHF), and structurally bound fluoride content (SBF) from three layers (0-33, 33-66 and 66-99 pm) was determined by fluoride electrode procedures. KOHF (median in microg/cm2) of NK was below the lower limit of quantification of the fluoride electrode. The other group values were significantly higher (Mann-Whitney test, p precipitation reaction with Ca(OH)2 following fluoridation did not increase enamel fluoride uptake.

  16. Fluoride intake from fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by young children in Kuwait: a non-fluoridated community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpata, Enosakhare S; Behbehani, Jawad; Akbar, Jaber; Thalib, Lukman; Mojiminiyi, Olusegun

    2014-06-01

    To determine the pattern of fluid consumption, fluoride intake from the fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by children aged 1-9 years in Kuwait, a nonfluoridated community. Using the cluster sampling technique, children aged 1-9 years were chosen from 2000 randomly selected households in Kuwait. Questionnaires were then administered to their mothers to determine the children's daily fluid intake. Fluoride concentrations in tap water as well as all brands of bottled water and beverages consumed by the children were measured, using the fluoride ion-specific electrode. Fluoride excretion was determined in 400 randomly selected children, based on fluoride/creatinine ratio. The mean daily fluid consumption by the children was high, being 1115-1545 ml. About 40% of the fluid intake was plain (tap and bottled) water and approximately 10% of the children drank bottled water exclusively. Fluoride concentration in tap water was low (0.04±SD 0.02 ppm), but was higher in bottled water (0.28±SD 0.40 ppm). Mean daily fluoride ingestion from fluids was 0.013-0.018 mg/kg body weight (bw). Even after allowing for fluoride ingestion from other sources, mean daily fluoride ingestion was still below 0.1 mg/kg bw set by the United States of America Institute of Medicine as the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level for moderate enamel fluorosis in children aged up to 8 years. Furthermore, the mean daily urinary fluoride excretion of 128-220 μg was below the provisional standard of 360-480 μg for optimal fluoride usage by children aged 3-5 years. Fluoride ingestion from fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by the children were below the recommendations for optimal fluoride usage. Thus, there is room for an upward adjustment of fluoride level in public drinking water supplies in Kuwait, as a caries preventive measure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Hydrogen production from formic acid in pH-stat fed-batch operation for direct supply to fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Tai Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Enterobacter asburiae SNU-1 harvested after cultivation was used as a whole cell biocatalyst, for the production of hydrogen. Formic acid was efficiently converted to hydrogen using the harvested cells with an initial hydrogen production rate and total hydrogen production of 491 ml/l/h and 6668 ml/l, respectively, when 1 g/l of whole cell enzyme was used. Moreover, new pH-stat fed-batch operation was conducted, and total hydrogen production was 1.4 times higher than that of batch operation. For practical application, bio-hydrogen produced from formic acid using harvested cells was directly applied to PEMFC for power generation.

  18. Oxidation of Fluoroalkanesulfonyl fluoride/hydrogen peroxide/base/acetone System with Benzyl Alcohol Derivatives%氟烷磺酰氟/双氧水/碱/丙酮体系与苄醇衍生物的氧化反应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严兆华; 胡伟; 田伟生; 许云

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of fluoroalkanesulfonyl fluoride/hydrogen peroxide/base/acetone system with six benzyl alcohol derivative substrates was reported. Fluoroalkanesulfonyl fluorides(RfSO2F) include 5-H-3-oxa-l ,1,2, 2,4,4,5, 5-octafluoropentanesulfonyl fluoride ( HCF2CF2OCF2CF2SO2F ) , perfluorobutanesulfonyl fluoride (n-C4F9SO2F) and perfluorooctanesulfonyl fluoride( n-C8F17SO2F). The optimized reaction condition was n ( Substrate) : n ( Rf SO2 F):n(H2O2):?( NaOH) = 1 : 4 : 8 : 8, solvent was acetone, reaction temperature was 20 °C and reaction time was 24 h. Yield of product ketones was 23%—92%. A plausible mechanism was proposed. Experimental results showed that in-situ generated fluorinatedalkano persulfonic acid intermediate could efficiently oxidize acetone and resulted dimethyl dioxirane could oxidize benzyl alcohol derivatives yielding corresponding ketones. The oxidizing ability of fluoroalkanesulfonyl fluoride/hydrogen peroxide/base/acetone system for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol derivatives is similar to that of the traditional Oxone/CH3COCH3 system. A novel method for the in-situ generation of dimethyl dioxirane was developed.%研究了氟烷磺酰氟/双氧水/氢氧化钠/丙酮体系与6个苄醇衍生物的氧化反应,其中氟烷磺酰氟包括HCF2CF2OCF2 CF2SO2F,n-C4F9 SO2F和n-C8F17SO2F.最优反应条件为n(苄醇衍生物)∶n(氟烷磺酰氟)∶n(双氧水)∶n(氢氧化钠)=1∶4∶8∶8,溶剂为丙酮,反应温度为20℃,反应时间为24 h.产物酮的收率为23% ~92%.探讨了该氧化反应的机理,原位生成的氟烷基过氧磺酸中间体可将丙酮氧化为二甲基二氧杂环丙烷,进而将反应体系中共存的苄醇衍生物氧化成相应的产物酮.氟烷磺酰氟/双氧水/氢氧化钠/丙酮体系原位生成的二甲基二氧杂环丙烷氧化苄位羟基的能力和传统的Oxone/CH3COCH3体系相当.本研究提供了一种新颖的原位制备二甲基二氧杂环丙烷的方法.

  19. Water fluoridation in 40 Brazilian cities: 7 year analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzely Adas Saliba MOIMAZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Fluoride levels in the public water supplies of 40 Brazilian cities were analyzed and classified on the basis of risk/benefit balance. Material and Methods Samples were collected monthly over a seven-year period from three sites for each water supply source. The samples were analyzed in duplicate in the laboratory of the Center for Research in Public Health - UNESP using an ion analyzer coupled to a fluoride-specific electrode. Results A total of 19,533 samples were analyzed, of which 18,847 were artificially fluoridated and 686 were not artificially fluoridated. In samples from cities performing water fluoridation, 51.57% (n=9,720 had fluoride levels in the range of 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L; 30.53% (n=5,754 were below 0.55 mg F/L and 17.90% (n=3,373 were above 0.84 mg F/L (maximum concentration=6.96 mg F/L. Most of the cities performing fluoridation that had a majority of samples with fluoride levels above the recommended parameter had deep wells and more than one source of water supply. There was some variability in the fluoride levels of samples from the same site and between collection sites in the same city. Conclusions The majority of samples from cities performing fluoridation had fluoride levels within the range that provides the best combination of risks and benefits, minimizing the risk of dental fluorosis while preventing dental caries. The conduction of studies about water distribution systems is suggested in cities with high natural fluoride concentrations in order to optimize the use of natural fluoride for fluoridation costs and avoid the risk of dental fluorosis.

  20. Fluorescent Sensing of Fluoride in Cellular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F- detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F- including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F- are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F-, mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be developed

  1. Potentiometric Determination of Fluoride Concentration in Beers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudenes, Juan Ramón; Hardisson, Arturo; Paz, Soraya; Rubio, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Angel José; Burgos, Antonio; Revert, Consuelo

    2017-04-26

    Beer is a widely consumed drink throughout the world, and because its manufacture involves the use of water, beer can be, in some cases, a source of fluorides. For this reason, the objective of this study was to determine the concentration of fluorides in 50 samples of beers from different sources sold in two different types of container (aluminum can and glass bottle). The possible significant differences between the different types of packaging and the intake of fluoride from the consumption of these beers were evaluated. The concentration of fluoride in beers has been determined using the potentiometric method of fluoride determination by standard addition. The concentration of fluoride ranged between 0.06 and 1.77 mg/L. In general, the concentration was below 1 mg/L, except for three beer samples from Ireland and the USA, whose concentration was over 1.5 mg/L. No significant differences were found between the types of packaging. The contribution of fluoride to the diet from beer consumption is not high (fluoride in the water supply.

  2. Exraction and separation of CERIUM(IV)/FLUORINE in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y; J. G. He; X. X. Xue; Ru, H. Q.; X. W. Huang; Yang, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the extraction and separation of cerium/fluorine in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent has been studied. The UV-vis spectra suggest that Zr6+ and Al3+ can scrub the F- from [CeF2] 2+ complex. The separation and conductivity studies show that aluminum salt is the most suitable fluoride coordination agent, and an ion-exchange reaction is involved between Ce4+/ [CeF2] 2+ and hydrogen ion.

  3. Occupational fluoride exposure. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, H.C. (Univ. of California, San Francisco); Smith, F.A.

    1977-01-01

    Effects of airborne fluoride on industrial health are discussed with regard to acute and chronic effects. Injuries to lungs and skin from acute exposures are described. Chronic effects are discussed with regard to industrial sources of fluoride and air concentrations vs. urinary concentrations of fluoride. An extensive literature review is presented in the form of a table showing responses in man exposed to industrial airborne fluorides. Osteosclerosis is discussed with regard to the fluoride air standard, bone fluoride, and air fluoride concentrations. Occupational exposures to fluoride are also discussed with regard to arthritis, shortness of breath, asthma, upper respiratory infections, chronic respiratory disease, effects on kidneys, effects on pregnancy, and indices of fluoride intoxication. A table is presented showing references to studies on responses in neighborhood residents exposed to fluoride emissions. (HLW)

  4. Avaliação da fluoretação da água do sistema de abastecimento público na Ilha de São Luís, Maranhão, Brasil Evaluation of fluoride levels in the public water supply in São Luis Island, Maranhão State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadidja Dayane Sousa do Carmo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar os níveis de flúor na água de abastecimento público da Ilha de São Luís (MA. Aplicou-se uma amostragem estratificada, considerando-se as estações de tratamento de água (06 e os bairros abastecidos (46. A análise dos teores de flúor na água foi feita através de um eletrodo específico. A concentração nas amostras variou de 0,05 a 0,84 ppm de flúor. Apenas uma estação de tratamento (Italuís apresentou-se dentro do limite aceitável de fluoretação. A fluoretação da água de abastecimento público na Ilha de São Luís necessita de ajustes para se obter prevenção da cárie, evidenciando a importância de um controle externo para avaliação dos teores de flúor.The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fluoride levels in public water supply in São Luís island, Maranhão State, Brazil, during the month of October of 2006. A stratification sampling was applied, considering the water treatment station (06 and the different districts (46. For fluoride analysis it was used a specific ion electrode. The fluoride concentration varied for 0.05 to 0.84 ppm. Only one water treatment station (Italuís presented an ideal concentration of fluoride. It was concluded that the fluoride levels need adjustments, evidencing that it is essential an external control for monitoring of those levels in public water supply of São Luis.

  5. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  6. Fluoride Analysis. Training Module 5.200.2.77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with fluoride analysis procedures. Included are objectives, an instructor guide, student handouts, and a list of reference material. This module considers the determination of fluoride in water supplies using the SPANDS and electrode…

  7. Development of Electrolysis System Powered by Solar-Cell Array to Supply Hydrogen Gas for Fuel-Cell Energy Resource Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priambodo, Purnomo Sidi; Yusivar, Feri; Subiantoro, Aries; Gunawan, Ridwan

    2009-09-01

    The huge demand of energy worldwide and the depletion of fossil based energy, is a strong reason to rapidly develop any kind of renewable energy resources, which has economical advantages and zero pollution effect. One of the renewable energy technologies aimed in this paper is the generation of electric-energy based on fuel-cell technology, where the input hydrogen (H2) gas is supplied by electrolysis system powered by renewable energy system based on solar cell. In this paper, the authors explain the development of electrolysis system which is powered by solar cell array to supply hydrogen for fuel-cell system. The authors explain in detail how to design an efficient electrolysis system to obtain high ratio conversion of electric energy to hydrogen gas volume. It includes the explanation of the usage of multiple anodes with a single cathode for many solar cell inputs in a single electrolysis system. Hereinafter this is referred as multiple anode electrolysis system. This multiple anode electrolysis system makes the management of hydrogen gas becomes more efficient and effective by using only a single hydrogen gas storage system. This paper also explain the careful design of the resistance value of the electrolysis system to protect or avoid the solar cell panel to deliver excessive current to the electrolysis system which can cause damage on the solar cell panel. Moreover, the electrolyte volume detector is applied on the system as a tool to measure the electrolyte concentration to assure the system resistance is still in the allowed range. Further, the hydrogen gas produced by electrolysis system is stored into the gas storage which consists of silica-gel purifier, first stage low pressure gas bottle, vacuum pump, and second stage high pressure gas bottle. In the first step, the pump will vacuum the first bottle. The first bottle will collect the hydrogen from the electrolysis system through the silica gel to get rid of water vapor. When the first bottle

  8. Vinte e quatro meses de heterocontrole da fluoretação das águas de abastecimento público de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Twenty-four months of external control of fluoride levels in the public water supply in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Garcia Lima

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi monitorar, mensalmente, os níveis de flúor na água de abastecimento público de Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, bem como verificar a validade da formação de grupos de heterocontrole. Pelotas foi dividida em 16 pontos geográficos, incluindo as três Estações de Tratamento da água e a coleta foi feita de novembro de 1999 a outubro de 2001, em duplicata. Após a coleta, as amostras foram enviadas ao Laboratório de Vigilância Sanitária de Flúor da Universidade do Vale do Itajaí, onde a análise foi feita utilizando-se o método eletrométrico (Orion 920A/Eletrodo Orion 9609. Após 24 meses, 764 unidades amostrais foram coletadas e verificou-se uma inconstância nos resultados, predominando níveis insuficientes de flúor até o primeiro trimestre de 2001, quando houve um significativo aumento no número de unidades amostrais com uma concentração de flúor ideal (0,6-0,9ppmF, porém, há o surgimento de pontos revelando um excesso de fluoretos (> 1ppmF. Os resultados permitiram concluir que o heterocontrole é fundamental para buscar a manutenção de um correto programa de FAAP.The aim of the present study was monthly evaluation of fluoride levels in the public water supply in Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, and the validity of forming external control groups. Pelotas was divided into 16 geographic regions, including the three public water treatment stations. Water samples were collected from November 1999 to October 2001. Two samples were drawn from each region. Samples were sent to the Fluoride Health Surveillance Laboratory at Universidade do Vale do Itajaí. Fluoride analysis used an electrometric method (Orion 920 A/Electrometer Orion 9609. After 24 months, 764 samples were collected, demonstrating a discontinuity in the fluoride levels. There was an increase in the number of samples with an ideal concentration of fluoride. However, several points with excessive fluoride levels (> 0.9ppm

  9. Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine is the world's 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed. PMID:24719570

  10. Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Peckham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine is the world’s 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed.

  11. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... well. What do I need to know about fluoride and groundwater from a well? Fluoride is present ... well has less than the recommended level of fluoride for preventing tooth decay? The recommended fluoride level ...

  12. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Fluoride and Water KidsHealth > For Parents > Fluoride and Water ... in healthy tooth development and cavity prevention. About Fluoride Fluoride, which exists naturally in water sources, is ...

  13. Fluoride varnish or fluoride mouth rinse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, M K; Klausen, B J; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In many Danish communities, school-based fluoride programs are offered to children with high caries risk in adjunct to tooth brushing. The purpose of this field trial was to compare the caries-preventive effectiveness of two different fluoride programs in 6-12 year olds. BASIC RESEARCH...... different schools were enrolled after informed consent and their class unit was randomly allocated to one of two fluoride programs. INTERVENTIONS: One group received a semi-annual fluoride varnish applications (FV) and the other group continued with an existing program with fluoride mouth rinses once per...... in caries development over two years among children participating in a school-based fluoride varnish or mouth rinse program....

  14. Round-the-clock power supply and a sustainable economy via synergistic integration of solar thermal power and hydrogen processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gençer, Emre; Mallapragada, Dharik S; Maréchal, François; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-12-29

    We introduce a paradigm-"hydricity"-that involves the coproduction of hydrogen and electricity from solar thermal energy and their judicious use to enable a sustainable economy. We identify and implement synergistic integrations while improving each of the two individual processes. When the proposed integrated process is operated in a standalone, solely power production mode, the resulting solar water power cycle can generate electricity with unprecedented efficiencies of 40-46%. Similarly, in standalone hydrogen mode, pressurized hydrogen is produced at efficiencies approaching ∼50%. In the coproduction mode, the coproduced hydrogen is stored for uninterrupted solar power production. When sunlight is unavailable, we envision that the stored hydrogen is used in a "turbine"-based hydrogen water power (H2WP) cycle with the calculated hydrogen-to-electricity efficiency of 65-70%, which is comparable to the fuel cell efficiencies. The H2WP cycle uses much of the same equipment as the solar water power cycle, reducing capital outlays. The overall sun-to-electricity efficiency of the hydricity process, averaged over a 24-h cycle, is shown to approach ∼35%, which is nearly the efficiency attained by using the best multijunction photovoltaic cells along with batteries. In comparison, our proposed process has the following advantages: (i) It stores energy thermochemically with a two- to threefold higher density, (ii) coproduced hydrogen has alternate uses in transportation/chemical/petrochemical industries, and (iii) unlike batteries, the stored energy does not discharge over time and the storage medium does not degrade with repeated uses.

  15. A fluoretação da água de abastecimento público e seus benefícios no controle da cárie dentária: cinqüenta anos no Brasil Fifty years of fluoridation of public water supplies in Brazil: benefits for the control of dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Ramires

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A fluoretação da água de abastecimento público representa uma das principais e mais importantes medidas de saúde pública no controle da cárie dentária. O objetivo deste trabalho foi o de reafirmar, através de uma revisão de literatura, a importância e o alcance da fluoretação no controle da cárie dentária. Um dos meios mais efetivos para manter constante a presença de flúor na cavidade bucal, fundamental para controle da cárie dentária, a fluoretação da água é reconhecida como um importante fator para o declínio da prevalência da cárie dentária. Portanto, além de ser mantida, deve ser monitorada, a fim de que o teor de flúor seja mantido dentro dos padrões adequados para o controle da cárie e prevenção da fluorose dentária.Fluoridation of public water supplies is among the most important public health measures for control of dental caries. Through a review of the literature, this study intends to reaffirm the importance and scope of fluoridation for caries control, as this is acknowledged as one of the most effective ways of ensuring the constant presence of fluoride in the oral cavity, which is vital for controlling caries. Water fluoridation is rated as an important factor for reducing caries, meaning that it should be maintained and also monitored, ensuring adequate fluoride levels for controlling caries while avoiding dental fluorosis.

  16. Fluoride in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - fluoride ... bones and teeth. Too much fluoride in the diet is very rare. Rarely, infants who get too ... of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods from the ...

  17. Concept and cost of a pipeline system to supply hydrogen to fuel cell cars in Germany; Konzept und Kosten eines Pipelinesystems zur Versorgung des deutschen Strassenverkehrs mit Wasserstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieg, Dennis

    2012-11-01

    Fuel cells and hydrogen have the potential to be essential contributors for meeting the challenges of the future traffic sector. The key challenges include: - reducing global and local emissions - reducing import dependencies - preserving Germany's competitiveness - ensuring sufficient availability of the energy carrier Hydrogen is assumed to be the most appropriate energy carrier, since it can be produced via any primary energy and in terms of security is comparable to natural gas. In the long run, renewable energy, e.g. via wind power electrolysis, will make emission-free driving feasible. In order to use hydrogen to fuel cars, a comprehensive distribution infrastructure is required. This is completely different than the case of conventional fuels such as gasoline or diesel. Large amounts of hydrogen can be transported in a gaseous state in pipelines, as is common practice for natural gas. This option has not been examined to date. In particular, at the moment no suitable material has been identified for transporting hydrogen, which degrades the stability of the pipe. The aim of this thesis was to design a technical concept for a pipeline system that would make it possible to supply hydrogen to fuel cell cars. Using the assumptions of the study GermanHy, crucial technical questions were investigated. These questions comprise aspects such as general material requirements, feed-in, transportation and feed-out of the hydrogen. With respect to the material challenges, different potential possibilities are provided in order to ensure that no embrittlement will occur. Taking Germany as an example, the design and length of the pipeline system were investigated as well as the related economic and ecological aspects. A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted in order to calculate the probability density of both the investment and the specific cost. These results were placed in the overall context by calculating the economic impact of production, storage and fuelling

  18. Analysis of the interactions between difluoroacetylene and one or two hydrogen fluoride molecules based on calculated spin–spin coupling constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Provasi, Patricio F.; Caputo, María Cristina; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical study of FCCF:(HF)n complexes, with n = 1 and 2, has been carried out by means of ab initio computational methods. Two types of complexes are formed: those with FH···p interactions and those with FH···FC hydrogen bonds. The indirect spin–spin coupling constants have been calculated ...

  19. Best mix of primary energy resources by renewable energy and fossil fuel with CCS in view of security,stability and sustainability——A vision on hydrogen supply chain by organic chemical hydride method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junichi; SAKAGUCHI

    2010-01-01

    The best mix scenario by renewable energy and fossil fuel with or without CCS(Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage) would be a solution to compromise Greenhouse Gases emission issue caused by carbon dioxide(CO2),and depletion of crude oil and natural gas reserves.As fossil fuel with pre-combustion CCS means hydrogen manufacturing and also hydrogen can be produced via electrolysis with renewable energy,it is desirable to establish transportation and storage systems of hydrogen as a clean energy.In this paper a vision on Hydrogen Supply Chain by Organic Chemical Hydride(OCH) Method as well as comparison of CCS configuration are discussed.

  20. 2012年山西省饮水型氟、砷中毒病区改水工程监测结果分析%Analysis of monitoring results of fluoride-safe water supply projects in drinking water type of fluorosis and arsenic poisoning areas in Shanxi Province in 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏飞; 王正辉; 吴赵明

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the implementation of prevention and control measures for water quality improvement in drinking water type of fluorosis and arsenic poisoning areas,to investigate the operating condition of fluoride-safe water supply projects,and to comprehensively evaluate the project's quality and its effectiveness on water quality improvement.Methods According to the "Shanxi Province Drinking Water-Borne Fluorosis and Arsenic Poisoning Fluoride-Safe Water Supply Projects Monitoring Programme",in October 2012-June 2013,45 counties in the province were selected to monitor fluorosis and arsenic poisoning.The running condition of fluoridesafe water supply projects was investigated.One factory water sample was collected to determine the water fluoride (arsenic) concentration.Meanwhile,3 tap water samples were collected to determine the water fluoride (arsenic)concentration in each village,using the "Standards for Drinking Water Quality" (GB/T 5750.5-2006).Results Totally 1 804 fluoride-safe water supply projects had been surveyed,and 1 673 were in normal condition,accounting for 92.7%.The number of projects supplying fluoride-safe water was 1 328,accounting for 73.6%,benefiting a population of 2.636 779 million people.A total of 2 277 villages were investigated,and 1 826 villages had fluoride-safe water,accounting for 80.2% of the investigated villagcs.One hundred and forty-five arsenic-safe water supply projects in drinking water type of arsenic poisoning areas were investigated,and 138 were in normal condition,accounting for 95.2%.One hundred and forty-three arsenic-safe water supply projects were qualified,accounting for 98.6%,benefiting a population of 295 240 people.One hundred and fifty-nine villages in drinking water-borne arsenic poisoning areas were investigated,and 156 villages were qualified in water arsenic,accounting for 98.1% of the investigated villages.Conclusions The qualified rate of fluoride-safe water supply projects is relatively

  1. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  2. Fluoride concentration in water at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station of Bauru, SP Concentração de fluoreto na água do setor abastecido pela Estação de Tratamento de Água de Bauru, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Simonetti Lodi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the fluoride concentration in the public water supply at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station of Bauru and classify the samples as acceptable or unacceptable according to the fluoride concentration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: samples were collected from 30 areas at two periods, October 2002 and March 2003. The fluoride concentration in the samples was determined in duplicate, using an ion sensitive electrode (Orion 9609 connected to a potentiometer (Procyon, model 720. Samples with fluoride concentration ranging from 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L were considered acceptable, and those whose concentration was outside this range as unacceptable. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics. RESULTS: the fluoride concentration of the water samples varied between 0.31 and 2.01 mg F/L. Nearly 56% of the samples were classified as acceptable. CONCLUSION: the variations in fluoride concentration at the area supplied by the Water Treatment Station reinforce the need of constant monitoring for maintenance of adequate fluoride levels in the public water supply.OBJETIVO: Analisar a concentração de fluoreto da água de abastecimento público do setor abastecido pela Estação de Tratamento de Água de Bauru e classificar as amostras em aceitáveis ou inaceitáveis de acordo com a concentração de flúor. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram coletadas 238 amostras de 30 bairros em duas etapas, Outubro de 2002 e Março de 2003. A concentração de fluoreto presente nas amostras foi determinada em duplicata, utilizando-se o eletrodo íon sensível (Orion 9609, acoplado ao potenciômetro (Procyon, modelo 720. As amostras com concentração de flúor variando entre 0,55 e 0,84 mg F/L foram consideradas como aceitáveis e aquelas cuja concentração estava fora do intervalo, como inaceitáveis. Os dados foram analisados por meio de estatística descritiva. RESULTADOS: A concentração de fluoreto das amostras de água variou entre 0,31 e 2,01 mg F

  3. Diethylenetriaminium hexafluoridotitanate(IV fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lhoste

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, (C6H21N4[TiF6]F, was synthesized by the reaction of TiO2, tris(2-aminoethylamine, HF and ethanol at 463 K in a microwave oven. The crystal structure consists of two crystallographically independent [TiF6]2− anions, two fluoride anions and two triply-protonated tris(2-aminoethylamine cations. The Ti atoms are coordinated by six F atoms within slightly distorted octahedra. The anions and cations are connected by intermolecular N—H...F hydrogen bonds.

  4. Custo da fluoretação das águas de abastecimento público, estudo de caso ­ Município de São Paulo, Brasil, período de 1985-2003 Cost of fluoridating the public water supply: a study case in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, 1985-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Frias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do artigo é estimar o custo da fluoretação das águas de abastecimento público no Município de São Paulo no período de 1985-2003. Para o cálculo da composição de custos da fluoretação das águas levou-se em conta os seguintes custos: (a capital inicial de instalação; (b produto químico (ácido fluorsilícico; (c operacionalização do sistema (manutenção do sistema, energia elétrica e recursos humanos; e (d controle dos teores de flúor. A ação do flúor mostrou-se efetiva, pois para a idade de 12 anos observou-se redução de 73% na experiência de cárie dentária, sendo que em 1986 a média do índice CPO-D era de 6,47 (6,12-6,82 e em 2002 foi de 1,75 (1,48-2,92. Nesta idade-índice 40% das crianças apresentaram CPO-D = 0 em 2002. O custo médio per capita/ano na Cidade de São Paulo foi de R$ 0,08 (US$ 0,03 em 2003. O custo acumulado em 18 anos de implantação do sistema de fluoretação foi de R$ 1,44 (US$ 0,97 per capita.The aim of this study was to estimate the cost of fluoridating the public water supply in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, from 1985 to 2003. Cost calculation for fluoridation of the public water supply used the following: capital cost of initial installation, chemical product (hydrofluosilicic acid, system's operational cost (maintenance, electricity, and human resources, and monitoring fluoride levels. Fluoridation was effective, since there was a decrease of 73% in dental caries in 12-year-olds ­ mean DMF was 6.47 (6.12-6.82 in 1986, having decreased to 1.75 (1.48-2.92 in 2002. In this age group, 40% of children presented DMF = 0 in 2002. Average cost per inhabitant/year for 2003 was R$ 0.08 (US$ 0.03. The accumulated cost for 18 years of implementation and maintenance of the fluoridation system was R$ 1.44 (US$ 0.97 per capita.

  5. Fluoride toothpastes and fluoride mouthrinses for home use

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Rugg-Gunn; Jolan Bánóczy

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To provide a brief commentary review of fluoride-containing toothpastes and mouthrinses with emphasis on their use at home. Toothpastes and mouthrinses are just two of many ways of providing fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. The first investigations into incorporating fluoride into toothpastes and mouthrinses were reported in the middle 1940s. Unlike water fluoridation (which is ‘automatic fluoridation’), fluoride-containing toothpastes and fluoride-containing mouthrins...

  6. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  7. Synthesis of reagents for fluoride technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gordienko; P.; S.; Kolzunov; V.; A.; Dostovalov; V.; A.; Kaidalova; T.; A.

    2005-01-01

    Growing demand for fluorinating reagents to be used in rare-metal industry has stimulated conducting research in the field of production for these reagents. That is why the fluorinating reagents production has recently formed an independent segment of industry. Main industrial fluorinating reagents include hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, technical ammonium hydrodifluoride, fluorosilicic acid and its salts. To produce technical etching acid, fluor-spar with calcium fluoride content at least 92% is used in most cases. To produce anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, fluor-spar with calcium fluoride content 96 %-97 % is necessary. The fluorine-containing raw materials refinement from silica by means of flotation makes the fluorinating reagents production substantially more expensive. In this work we have attempted to process unconcentrated raw materials by fluorine removal in the form of volatile silicon tetrafluoride. In this process silicon tetrafluoride was recovered by liquid ammonia with subsequent hydrolysis of the formed ammonia hexafluorosilicate. Hydrolysis occurred according to the reaction:(NH4)2 SiF6 + 4NH3 + 2 H2O= 6NH4F+ SiO2 The products of the ammonia hexafluorosilicate hydrolysis included ammonia fluoride and amorphous silica gel ("white soot") as by-product. This "white soot" was of high purity-with main component content 99.95% and total admixture content 0.05%. Silica gel is a superfine material with specific surface of 267.6 m2/g and is recommended as filler in the production of rubber, plastics and for other applications.Ammonia fluoride was transformed into ammonia hydrodifluoride (main processing product) according to the reaction:2NH4F→NH3+NH4 HF2 It was stated that the NH4F: NH4 HF2 ratio depends on boiling point temperature-with its increase the ammonia hydrofluoride concentration in solution increases as well.

  8. Hydrogen photoproduction in green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii sustainable over 2 weeks with the original cell culture without supply of fresh cells nor exchange of the whole culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Takafumi; Yamashita, Kyohei; Okada, Norihide; Isono, Takumi; Momose, Daisuke; Mineki, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    Unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are known to make hydrogen photoproduction under the anaerobic condition with water molecules as the hydrogen source. Since the hydrogen photoproduction occurs for a cell to circumvent crisis of its survival, it is only temporary. It is a challenge to realize persistent hydrogen production because the cells must withstand stressful conditions to survive with alternation of generations in the cell culture. In this paper, we have found a simple and cost-effective method to sustain the hydrogen production over 14 days in the original culture, without supply of fresh cells nor exchange of the culture medium. This is achieved for the cells under hydrogen production in a sulfur-deprived culture solution on the {anaerobic, intense light} condition in a desiccator, by periodically providing a short period of the recovery time (2 h) with a small amount of TAP(+S) supplied outside of the desiccator. As this operation is repeated, the response time of transition into hydrogen production (preparation time) is shortened and the rate of hydrogen production (build up time) is increased. The optimum states of these properties favorable to the hydrogen production are attained in a few days and stably sustained for more than 10 days. Since generations are alternated during this consecutive hydrogen production experiment, it is suggested that the improved hydrogen production properties are inherited to next generations without genetic mutation. The properties are reset only when the cells are placed on the {sulfur-sufficient, aerobic, moderate light} conditions for a long time (more than 1 day at least).

  9. Exraction and separation of CERIUM(IV/FLUORINE in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the extraction and separation of cerium/fluorine in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent has been studied. The UV-vis spectra suggest that Zr6+ and Al3+ can scrub the F- from [CeF2] 2+ complex. The separation and conductivity studies show that aluminum salt is the most suitable fluoride coordination agent, and an ion-exchange reaction is involved between Ce4+/ [CeF2] 2+ and hydrogen ion.

  10. Thermal atomic layer etching of crystalline aluminum nitride using sequential, self-limiting hydrogen fluoride and Sn(acac){sub 2} reactions and enhancement by H{sub 2} and Ar plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Nicholas R.; Sun, Huaxing; Sharma, Kashish [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); George, Steven M., E-mail: Steven.George@Colorado.Edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder, Colorado 80309 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Thermal atomic layer etching (ALE) of crystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) films was demonstrated using sequential, self-limiting reactions with hydrogen fluoride (HF) and tin(II) acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}] as the reactants. Film thicknesses were monitored versus number of ALE reaction cycles at 275 °C using in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). A low etch rate of ∼0.07 Å/cycle was measured during etching of the first 40 Å of the film. This small etch rate corresponded with the AlO{sub x}N{sub y} layer on the AlN film. The etch rate then increased to ∼0.36 Å/cycle for the pure AlN films. In situ SE experiments established the HF and Sn(acac){sub 2} exposures that were necessary for self-limiting surface reactions. In the proposed reaction mechanism for thermal AlN ALE, HF fluorinates the AlN film and produces an AlF{sub 3} layer on the surface. The metal precursor, Sn(acac){sub 2}, then accepts fluorine from the AlF{sub 3} layer and transfers an acac ligand to the AlF{sub 3} layer in a ligand-exchange reaction. The possible volatile etch products are SnF(acac) and either Al(acac){sub 3} or AlF(acac){sub 2}. Adding a H{sub 2} plasma exposure after each Sn(acac){sub 2} exposure dramatically increased the AlN etch rate from 0.36 to 1.96 Å/cycle. This enhanced etch rate is believed to result from the ability of the H{sub 2} plasma to remove acac surface species that may limit the AlN etch rate. The active agent from the H{sub 2} plasma is either hydrogen radicals or radiation. Adding an Ar plasma exposure after each Sn(acac){sub 2} exposure increased the AlN etch rate from 0.36 to 0.66 Å/cycle. This enhanced etch rate is attributed to either ions or radiation from the Ar plasma that may also lead to the desorption of acac surface species.

  11. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse......, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam...

  12. Fluorides and non-fluoride remineralization systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaechi, Bennett T; van Loveren, Cor

    2013-01-01

    Caries develops when the equilibrium between de- and remineralization is unbalanced favoring demineralization. De- and remineralization occur depending on the degree of saturation of the interstitial fluids with respect to the tooth mineral. This equilibrium is positively influenced when fluoride, calcium and phosphate ions are added favoring remineralization. In addition, when fluoride is present, it will be incorporated into the newly formed mineral which is then less soluble. Toothpastes may contain fluoride and calcium ions separately or together in various compounds (remineralization systems) and may therefore reduce demineralization and promote remineralization. Formulating all these compounds in one paste may be challenging due to possible premature calcium-fluoride interactions and the low solubility of CaF2. There is a large amount of clinical evidence supporting the potent caries preventive effect of fluoride toothpastes indisputably. The amount of clinical evidence of the effectiveness of the other remineralization systems is far less convincing. Evidence is lacking for head to head comparisons of the various remineralization systems. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Probability of foliar injury for Acer sp. based on foliar fluoride concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Andrew M; Dixon, Murray J; Terry, Debbie T; Todd, Aaron K; Luciani, Michael A; Williamson, Michele L; Roszak, Danuta S; Farias, Kim A

    2016-12-01

    Fluoride is considered one of the most phytotoxic elements to plants, and indicative fluoride injury has been associated over a wide range of foliar fluoride concentrations. The aim of this study was to determine the probability of indicative foliar fluoride injury based on Acer sp. foliar fluoride concentrations using a logistic regression model. Foliage from Acer nedundo, Acer saccharinum, Acer saccharum and Acer platanoides was collected along a distance gradient from three separate brick manufacturing facilities in southern Ontario as part of a long-term monitoring programme between 1995 and 2014. Hydrogen fluoride is the major emission source associated with the manufacturing facilities resulting with highly elevated foliar fluoride close to the facilities and decreasing with distance. Consistent with other studies, indicative fluoride injury was observed over a wide range of foliar concentrations (9.9-480.0 μg F(-) g(-1)). The logistic regression model was statistically significant for the Acer sp. group, A. negundo and A. saccharinum; consequently, A. negundo being the most sensitive species among the group. In addition, A. saccharum and A. platanoides were not statistically significant within the model. We are unaware of published foliar fluoride values for Acer sp. within Canada, and this research provides policy maker and scientist with probabilities of indicative foliar injury for common urban Acer sp. trees that can help guide decisions about emissions controls. Further research should focus on mechanisms driving indicative fluoride injury over wide ranging foliar fluoride concentrations and help determine foliar fluoride thresholds for damage.

  14. Re-energizing energy supply: Electrolytically-produced hydrogen as a flexible energy storage medium and fuel for road transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonts, Bernd; Schiebahn, Sebastian; Görner, Klaus; Lindenberger, Dietmar; Markewitz, Peter; Merten, Frank; Stolten, Detlef

    2017-02-01

    ;Energiewende;, which roughly translates as the transformation of the German energy sector in accordance with the imperatives of climate change, may soon become a byword for the corresponding processes most other developed countries are at various stages of undergoing. Germany's notable progress in this area offers valuable insights that other states can draw on in implementing their own transitions. The German state of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) is making its own contribution to achieving the Energiewende's ambitious objectives: in addition to funding an array of 'clean and green' projects, the Virtual Institute Power to Gas and Heat was established as a consortium of seven scientific and technical organizations whose aim is to inscribe a future, renewable-based German energy system with adequate flexibility. Thus, it is tasked with conceiving of and evaluating suitable energy path options. This paper outlines one of the most promising of these pathways, which is predicated on the use of electrolytically-produced hydrogen as an energy storage medium, as well as the replacement of hydrocarbon-based fuel for most road vehicles. We describe and evaluate this path and place it in a systemic context, outlining a case study from which other countries and federated jurisdictions therein may draw inspiration.

  15. PRODUCTION OF THORIUM FLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariasen, W.H.

    1959-08-11

    A process is presented for producing anhydrous thorium fluoride comprising the step of contacting a saturated aqueous solution of thorium nitrate with an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid having a concentration of about 45 to 50% by weight at a temperature above 70 deg C whereby anhydrous thorium fluoride precipitates.

  16. Environmental characteristics of regional groundwater in relation to fluoride poisoning in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Zhu, Wan Hua

    1991-07-01

    More and more data indicated that high- or low-fluoride-bearing drinking water led to endemic diseases in which fluoride poisoning was caused by high levels of fluoride (fluoride ion content >1.0 mg/I) in drinking water. Fluoride poisoning in North China is characterized by pathological changes of bones and teeth. Much attention has been devoted to the study of fluoride-bearing groundwater in North China because regionally groundwater has been the main source of water supply, and fluoride poisoning has developed to the extent that it affects human health seriously. Results from the studies in North China summarized in this article indicate that regional high-fluoride-bearing groundwater has a regular distribution corresponding with the development of endemic fluoride poisoning and has something to do with paleogeographic and paleoclimatic conditions, geology, and hydrogeology, especially with types of hydrogeochemistry, pH value of groundwater, degree of mineralization, and so forth. High-fluoride-bearing groundwater in relation to fluorosis occurs mainly in North China, and many effective measures have been taken to reduce the fluoride content in drinking water and to cure the disease after analyzing the distribution and environmental characteristics of high-fluoride-bearing groundwater.

  17. Dental fluorosis and urinary fluoride in 10-12 years old adolescents of Bushehr port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giti Javan

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoride increases tooth resistance to dental caries, but mild toxicity due to excessive ingestion of fluoride can cause dental fluorosis. Drinking water naturally contains fluoride and is a major source of fluoride. In Bushehr port, drinking water is supplied from limestone springs with normal fluoride levels but dental fluorosis is observed. Methods: A total of 95 native school children (between the ages of 10-12 years old were randomly selected from four Bushehr port regions. Dental fluorosis, height and weight were examined. Probable attributing factors of dental fluorosis were also questioned. A 16 to 18 hours urinary fluoride concentration was measured with a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results: Dental fluorosis in four upper incisors was apparent in 52.6 % of the subjects. The urinary fluoride concentration was 2.18 mg/lit. Fluoride concentration in drinking water of schools ranged from 0.41 to 0.58 mg/lit. Forty percent of subjects were caries free. Conclusion: In spite of the normal range of fluoride concentration in the drinking water of Bushehr, dental fluorosis and urinary fluoride concentration are higher than the recommended ranges. Therefore, it is necessary to further investigate the amount and effects of fluoride ingestion in residents of Bushehr province.

  18. [Ten years of external control over water fluoridation in Chapecó, Santa Catarina State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizzi, Mirvaine; Peres, Marco Aurélio

    2008-09-01

    This study aimed to analyze fluoride concentration in the public water supply in Chapecó, Santa Catarina State, Brazil, from 1995 to 2005 and to assess the effectiveness of a fluoridation quality intervention in 2003. A total of 989 water samples were analyzed. Fluoride concentrations were classified according to three different criteria used in Brazil. The city conducted a political and legal intervention in 2003. The Prais-Winsten procedure was used to evaluate the fluoride concentrations over time. In the ten years, the water fluoridation system showed 46%, 32%, and 43% of adequate samples, depending on the criterion. Prior to the municipal intervention, the proportion of adequate samples was 40%, 26%, and 36%, increasing to 63%, 49%, and 61% after the intervention, according to the three criteria. Fluoride concentration improved after the municipal intervention. On-going surveillance is recommended, including water fluoridation, dental caries, and dental fluorosis.

  19. Hydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Y.

    2011-09-19

    There is a tremendous source of entropic energy available from the salinity difference between river water and seawater, but this energy has yet to be efficiently captured and stored. Here we demonstrate that H(2) can be produced in a single process by capturing the salinity driven energy along with organic matter degradation using exoelectrogenic bacteria. Only five pairs of seawater and river water cells were sandwiched between an anode, containing exoelectrogenic bacteria, and a cathode, forming a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell. Exoelectrogens added an electrical potential from acetate oxidation and reduced the anode overpotential, while the reverse electrodialysis stack contributed 0.5-0.6 V at a salinity ratio (seawater:river water) of 50. The H(2) production rate increased from 0.8 to 1.6 m(3)-H(2)/m(3)-anolyte/day for seawater and river water flow rates ranging from 0.1 to 0.8 mL/ min. H(2) recovery, the ratio of electrons used for H(2) evolution to electrons released by substrate oxidation, ranged from 72% to 86%. Energy efficiencies, calculated from changes in salinities and the loss of organic matter, were 58% to 64%. By using a relatively small reverse electrodialysis stack (11 membranes), only ~1% of the produced energy was needed for pumping water. Although Pt was used on the cathode in these tests, additional tests with a nonprecious metal catalyst (MoS(2)) demonstrated H(2) production at a rate of 0.8 m(3)/m(3)/d and an energy efficiency of 51%. These results show that pure H(2) gas can efficiently be produced from virtually limitless supplies of seawater and river water, and biodegradable organic matter.

  20. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical appl

  1. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical

  2. Studies on fluoride complexing of hexavalent actinides using a fluoride ion selective electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, R.M.; Chaudhuri, N.K.; Rizvi, G.H.; Patil, S.K.

    1985-08-01

    Complex formation between actinide(VI) and fluoride ions in aqueous solutions was investigated using a fluoride ion selective electrode (F-ISE). As fairly high acidity used to suppress hydrolysis of the actinide(VI) ions, significant liquid junction potentials (Esub(j)) existed in the system. An iterative procedure was developed for computing free hydrogen ion concentration (Hsup(+)) as it could not be measured directly, using data obtained with F-ISE. Esub(j) values were estimated from known (Hsup(+)) and the stability constants of fluoride complexes of actinide(VI) ions were calculated following King and Gallagher's method using a computer program. The stability constants were found to follow the order U(VI) > Np(VI) > Pu(VI). (author). 18 refs.; 3 figs.; 9 tables.

  3. FORMATION OF PHOSPHATE-CONTAINING CALCIUM-FLUORIDE AT THE EXPENSE OF ENAMEL, HYDROXYAPATITE AND FLUORAPATITE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHRISTOFFERSEN, J; CHRISTOFFERSEN, MR; ARENDS, J; LEONARDSEN, ES

    1995-01-01

    During the caries process complex reactions involving calcium, phosphate, hydrogen and fluoride ions as main species take place. In this study the precipitation and dissolution reactions occurring in suspensions of enamel, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and fluorapatite (FAP) on addition of fluoride were inve

  4. A receptor incorporating OH, NH and CH binding motifs for a fluoride selective chemosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Li, Yongjun; Yu, Yanwen; Liu, Taifeng; Cheng, Songhua; Liu, Huibiao; Li, Yuliang

    2012-06-14

    An anion receptor combined different types of hydrogen bond donors such as OH, NH and CH groups has been synthesized. By rotation of the sub methyl group, this receptor showed evident (1)H NMR response to both fluoride and sulfate, while colorimetric and fluorescent responses were only observed in the presence of fluoride.

  5. FORMATION OF PHOSPHATE-CONTAINING CALCIUM-FLUORIDE AT THE EXPENSE OF ENAMEL, HYDROXYAPATITE AND FLUORAPATITE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHRISTOFFERSEN, J; CHRISTOFFERSEN, MR; ARENDS, J; LEONARDSEN, ES

    1995-01-01

    During the caries process complex reactions involving calcium, phosphate, hydrogen and fluoride ions as main species take place. In this study the precipitation and dissolution reactions occurring in suspensions of enamel, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and fluorapatite (FAP) on addition of fluoride were

  6. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich,...

  7. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Kata Rošin-Grget; Kristina Peroš; Ivana Šutej; Krešimir Bašić

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F–) into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard t...

  8. Attitudes towards the use of fluorides for oral health among Islamic clerics in Kelantan Province, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazita, Y; Jaafar, N; Doss, J G; Rahman, M M A

    2013-03-01

    To assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of Imams (Islamic clerics) concerning fluoride toothpaste and fluoridated water to improve oral health in Kelantan. Cross sectional study of Imams in 65 registered mosques in Pasir Puteh district, Kelantan. Face-to-face interview, using structured questionnaire and some open ended questions. Most of the 83 interviewees (82% participation rate) were unsure whether their toothpaste contained fluoride (64%), only 25% were sure. More than one-third (37%) were using fluoridated piped water. Most (87%) had little knowledge of fluorides and more than two-thirds (69%) had lacked positive attitudes towards its use. Television (54%) was the most common source of information about fluorides, followed by newspapers (9%). The main reasons given among the few who opposed fluoride use were i) fear of dangerous side effects (4%) and ii) uncertainty about the halal status of fluoride (2%), Attitudes were not associated with the use of fluoridated water supply (p=0.999), age (p=0.103), income (p=0.540) and location (p=0.999). Over two-thirds of Imams had little knowledge of and lacked positive attitudes towards fluoride use in toothpaste and piped water supplies.

  9. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  10. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-01

    the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste. DESIGN: Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste......: There was a statistically significant increase in the 6-h fluoride excretion after application of both experimental varnishes, with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste (P toothpaste was used, the mean fluoride excretion was 0.20 mg/6 h after application of Duraphat and 0.29 mg/6 h...... after application of Profluorid Varnish (P = 0.18). CONCLUSIONS: Topical applications of 0.1 mL of fluoride varnish significantly increased the 6-h fluoride excretion. As some individuals displayed excretion levels exceeding the optimal fluoride exposure, a restricted use of fluoride toothpaste...

  11. Preparation and optimization of calcium fluoride particles for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeser, Joachim; Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Pieles, Uwe; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-07-01

    Fluorides are used in dental care due to their beneficial effect in tooth enamel de-/remineralization cycles. To achieve a desired constant supply of soluble fluorides in the oral cavity, different approaches have been followed. Here we present results on the preparation of CaF2 particles and their characterization with respect to a potential application as enamel associated fluoride releasing reservoirs. CaF2 particles were synthesized by precipitation from soluble NaF and CaCl2 salt solutions of defined concentrations and their morphology analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. CaF2 particles with defined sizes and shapes could be synthesized by adjusting the concentrations of the precursor salt solutions. Such particles interacted with enamel surfaces when applied at fluoride concentrations correlating to typical dental care products. Fluoride release from the synthesized CaF2 particles was observed to be largely influenced by the concentration of phosphate in the solution. Physiological solutions with phosphate concentration similar to saliva (3.5 mM) reduced the fluoride release from pure CaF2 particles by a factor of 10-20 × as compared to phosphate free buffer solutions. Fluoride release was even lower in human saliva. The fluoride release could be increased by the addition of phosphate in substoichiometric amounts during CaF2 particle synthesis. The presented results demonstrate that the morphology and fluoride release characteristics of CaF2 particles can be tuned and provide evidence of the suitability of synthetic CaF2 particles as enamel associated fluoride reservoirs.

  12. The status of community water fluoridation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, M W

    1990-01-01

    discovery. Without a major increase in emphasis at the highest policy levels within local, State, and Federal health agencies, fluoridation objectives currently proposed for inclusion in the year 2000 national health objectives are not likely to be achieved. More private sector involvement and better coordination of efforts among all levels of government will be necessary to make significant improvements in progress toward universal fluoridation of all public water supplies in the United States.

  13. Fluoridation: strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, R

    1981-07-01

    Of 19 referenda on community water fluoridation held in the first six months of 1980, 17 were defeated. Among the postulated reasons are a growing distrust of government and the health establishment. The public remains largely ignorant of the purpose and benefits of fluoridation. The emotionalism surrounding the issue has made it difficult to generate public support outside of the health professions. Opponents have also learned to fight fluoridation with increasingly sophisticated techniques. Some of the strategies used in recent successful campaigns in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon are described; recommendations that can be applied to communities considering fluoridation include careful wording of ballot measures so they are unequivocally clear and simple; timing ballot measures with elections likely to draw the largest voter turnout; broadening the base of political and financial support; using a figurehead if possible; and making maximum use of the media.

  14. Toxic fluoride gas emissions from lithium-ion battery fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Petra; Blomqvist, Per; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2017-08-30

    Lithium-ion battery fires generate intense heat and considerable amounts of gas and smoke. Although the emission of toxic gases can be a larger threat than the heat, the knowledge of such emissions is limited. This paper presents quantitative measurements of heat release and fluoride gas emissions during battery fires for seven different types of commercial lithium-ion batteries. The results have been validated using two independent measurement techniques and show that large amounts of hydrogen fluoride (HF) may be generated, ranging between 20 and 200 mg/Wh of nominal battery energy capacity. In addition, 15-22 mg/Wh of another potentially toxic gas, phosphoryl fluoride (POF3), was measured in some of the fire tests. Gas emissions when using water mist as extinguishing agent were also investigated. Fluoride gas emission can pose a serious toxic threat and the results are crucial findings for risk assessment and management, especially for large Li-ion battery packs.

  15. Feasibility and costs of water fluoridation in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsani Jonathon P

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoridation of public water supplies remains the key potential strategy for prevention of dental caries. The water supplies of many remote Indigenous communities do not contain adequate levels of natural fluoride. The small and dispersed nature of communities presents challenges for the provision of fluoridation infrastructure and until recently smaller settlements were considered unfavourable for cost-effective water fluoridation. Technological advances in water treatment and fluoridation are resulting in new and more cost-effective water fluoridation options and recent cost analyses support water fluoridation for communities of less than 1,000 people. Methods Small scale fluoridation plants were installed in two remote Northern Territory communities in early 2004. Fluoride levels in community water supplies were expected to be monitored by local staff and by a remote electronic system. Site visits were undertaken by project investigators at commissioning and approximately two years later. Interviews were conducted with key informants and documentation pertaining to costs of the plants and operational reports were reviewed. Results The fluoridation plants were operational for about 80% of the trial period. A number of technical features that interfered with plant operation were identified and addressed though redesign. Management systems and the attitudes and capacity of operational staff also impacted on the effective functioning of the plants. Capital costs for the wider implementation of these plants in remote communities is estimated at about $US94,000 with recurrent annual costs of $US11,800 per unit. Conclusion Operational issues during the trial indicate the need for effective management systems, including policy and funding responsibility. Reliable manufacturers and suppliers of equipment should be identified and contractual agreements should provide for ongoing technical assistance. Water fluoridation units should

  16. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014. Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  17. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014 Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  18. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014. Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  19. Permeability and fluoride release of lining materials containing amine fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbö, H; Eriksen, H M

    1976-11-01

    The addition of amine fluorides to a copal recin (Copalite) and a chlorine caoutchouc varnish (Pergut S-40) has been studied. The permeability of Copalite films was only slightly increased whereas the excellent film-forming qualities of Pergut S-40 were destroyed by the addition of fluorides. A high fluoride release was found initially from test films of the materials but within 2-3 weeks a decrease to very low fluoride levels was observed.

  20. Reducing Exposure to High Fluoride Drinking Water in Estonia—A Countrywide Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermitte, Ene; Saava, Astrid; Karro, Enn

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is a naturally occurring contaminant in groundwater in Estonia. There are several regions in Estonia with fluoride contents in public water supplies as high as 7 mg/L. Long-term exposure to high-fluoride drinking water may have several adverse health effects, primarily dental fluorosis. The opportunities for exposure reduction rely highly on water treatment technologies. Since 2004 public water suppliers in Estonia have made efforts to diminish fluoride content in drinking water systems. A follow-up study on a country level was carried out in 2004–2012 to analyze the changes in population exposure to excessive (over 1.5 mg/L) fluoride in drinking water and to get information about the reduction methods applied by public water supplies (PWS) to optimize the fluoride levels in public water system. The results showed that bigger PWS have been more effective in fluoride reduction measures than small PWS. The main methods used to lower the fluoride content were reverse osmosis technology and replacement of water sources with new ones (new drilled wells). As a result of all the measures taken the overall high-fluoride exposure has been reduced substantially (82%). PMID:24637908

  1. [Exposure to fluorides from drinking water in the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Vázquez, R; Bonilla-Petriciolet, A

    2001-08-01

    Determine the fluoride content in all the wells that supply drinking water to the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico, in order to establish the population's degree of exposure. The fluoride content of the 126 wells that supply drinking water to the city of Aguascalientes was determined, using the SPADNS method, in accordance with two Mexican regulations, NMX-AA-77-1982 and NMX-014-SSAI-1993. Using that data, we created fluoride isopleth maps showing the distribution of fluoride concentrations in the water supplies for the city of Aguascalientes. We also estimated exposure doses for the city's inhabitants. The mean analysis uncertainty was 3.9%. Seventy-three wells had a fluoride concentration of" 1.5 mg/L, which was the maximum permissible value set by the Mexican standards then in effect. All the maximum exposure doses surpassed the minimum risk level set by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) of the Department of Health and Human Services of the United States of America. In the children under 1 year of age, even the minimum does was slightly higher than the ATSDR risk level. From estimating the fluoride exposure doses caused by water consumption in the city of Aguascalientes and comparing those doses with ones from other states in Mexico, we concluded that the fluoride intake in Aguascalientes represents a potential risk for inhabitants' health. The fluoride content of the city's drinking water should be reduced to 0.69 mg/L.

  2. [Operational control of water fluoridation in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Lucianne Cople; Valença, Ana Maria Gondim; Soares, Eduardo Lúcio; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the operational control of water fluoridation at the city water supply plant in Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from January to December 2000. The water treatment supervisor filled out a questionnaire on the control of water fluoridation. In addition, water samples were collected every two weeks for fluoride analysis before and after treatment. Samples were analyzed by an independent laboratory using an ion-specific electrode. According to the water treatment supervisor, the entire process for controlling fluoride concentration in the water was rigorous and complied with Brazilian guidelines, but according to testing, 96% of samples were inadequate in terms of risks/benefits of fluoride use from water. The information obtained from the plant supervisor and the test data were thus mutually inconsistent. Based on these data, an independent water fluoride concentration control program is needed to ensure the benefits of dental caries prevention for the population.

  3. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-20

    The efficacy and safety of combined use of topical fluoride products are essential issues that must be monitored. To assess urinary excretion of fluoride after application of two different dental varnishes containing 2.26% fluoride in 3- to 4-year-old children and to compare the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste. Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste. After a 1-week run-in period, 0.1 mL of the two fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Profluorid Varnish) was topically applied in a randomized order. Baseline and experimental urine was collected during 6-h periods. The fluoride content was determined with an ion-sensitive electrode. There was a statistically significant increase in the 6-h fluoride excretion after application of both experimental varnishes, with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste (P fluoridated toothpaste was used, the mean fluoride excretion was 0.20 mg/6 h after application of Duraphat and 0.29 mg/6 h after application of Profluorid Varnish (P = 0.18). Topical applications of 0.1 mL of fluoride varnish significantly increased the 6-h fluoride excretion. As some individuals displayed excretion levels exceeding the optimal fluoride exposure, a restricted use of fluoride toothpaste in connection with the varnish applications would decrease fluoride exposure. © 2017 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Fluoridation of the public water supply and prevalence of dental fluorosis in a peripheral district of the municipality of Bauru, SP Fluoretação da água de abastecimento público e prevalência de fluorose dentária em bairro da periferia de Bauru, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Ramires

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to assess the fluoride concentration in the public water supply and the prevalence of dental fluorosis in schoolchildren between 7 and 15 years old, living in a peripheral district of the municipality of Bauru. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For this, fifty two water samples were collected on three different days of one week. These samples were analyzed for fluoride by means of the ion-sensitive electrode method (Orion 9609 coupled to a potentiometer (Procyon, model 720. In this method, 1.0 mL of TISAB II (Orion was added to 1.0 mL of the sample. For the epidemiological survey of fluorosis, 52 schoolchildren of both genders, aged between 7 and 15 were assessed, with prior authorization from their caretakers. Only one person examined the children, after supervised toothbrushing and drying with cotton wool rolls. The TF index was used. RESULTS: The fluoride concentrations in the water samples ranged from 0.62 to 1.20 mg/L, with a mean of 0.9 mg/L. The prevalence of dental fluorosis was 33%, with severity ranging from TF1 to TF4 (Kappa of 0.73 and concordance of 83.33%. CONCLUSIONS: The results from the analysis of water samples indicated a fluoride concentration greater than recommended for Bauru. The fluorosis levels found were higher than expected for a peripheral district, in which water is one of the few sources of fluoride.OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a concentração de flúor na água de abastecimento público e a prevalência de fluorose dentária de escolares entre 7 e 15 anos de idade, residentes em um bairro da periferia de Bauru. MATÉRIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram coletadas 52 amostras de água durante três dias de uma semana e analisadas utilizando-se o eletrodo íon sensível (Orion 9609, acoplado a um potenciômetro (Procyon, modelo 720, com 1,0 mL da amostra à qual foi adicionado 1,0 mL de TISAB II (Orion. Para o levantamento epidemiológico de fluorose foram examinados 52 escolares entre 7 e 15 anos de idade

  5. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p...

  6. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after an el...... brushing with fluoride toothpaste....

  7. Fluoride resistance in Streptococcus mutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Fluoride has been used as the most effective anti-caries agent for over five decades. It functions not only on the dental hard tissues, but also as an antimicrobial agent. It is known that oral bacteria are able to develop resistance to fluoride, which may affect the effectiveness of fluoride in

  8. Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    i 2N E ihhhhh1112h MEmhhhhEEEohhhhE I.’....momo 111111111’-20 LA ’Ll2. AFWL-TR-86-37 AFWL-TR- 86-37 oT C ,l C ’-’ N HEAVY METAL FLUORIDE GLASSES 0nI...Secwrit CkasmfcationJ HEAVY METAL FLUORIDE GLASSES 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Reisfield, Renata; and Eyal, Mrek 13. TYPE OF REPORT 113b. TIME COVERED 114...glasses containing about 50 mole% of ZrF4 [which can be replaced by HfF 4 or TIF 4 (Refs. 1-3) or heavy metal fluorides based on PbF2 and on 3d-group

  9. Relationships of human plasma fluoride and bone fluoride to age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, F.M.; Tinanoff, N.; Moutinho, M.; Anstey, M.B.; Waziri, M.H.

    1976-04-01

    There is evidence that fluoride levels in plasma correlate with the fluoride content in bones. The authors determined whether or not fluoride in plasma and bones might correlate with age. In 41 in-patients at the University Hospital, Iowa City, 36 of whom had been residing in fluoridated communities plasma fluoride was determined in the fasting stage by the fluoride ion selective electrode. The teeth of these children were compared with those of a neighboring city where the natural fluoride content in drinking water was 0.1 ppm. For the second sampling 42 months following the beginning of the program only 10 and 11 year old children - who had been 6 and 7 years old at the beginning of the experiment - were selected. Twenty-five boys and girls in each group were compared with a similar group of children as controls. After 28 months (approximately 33 rinsing with sodium fluoride solution) the DMF index in the fluoride-treated children was 18.4% less than in the controls. In the second group among 10 and 11 year old children after 42 months with 55 rinsings the difference was 35.0%. The author acknowledged that factors other than applications of sodium fluoride may have contributed to the prevention of caries in the fluoride-treated groups.

  10. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, F

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the in vitro fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions. Poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks (Perspex, n=3 per group) were painted with 80 ± 5 mg fluoride varnish (n=10) and placed into artificial saliva for 30 min. Then, blocks were placed into either 1% citric acid (pH 2.27) or 0.3% citric acid (pH 3.75) solutions (n=3 per solution and varnish) for 30 min with the solutions being replaced every 5 min. Saliva and acid solutions were analyzed for fluoride content. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA (varnish, solution, time). The three-way interaction was significant (p>0.0001). Fluoride release and release patterns varied considerably between varnishes. Fluoride release in saliva varied by a factor of more than 10 between varnishes. Some varnishes (CavityShield, Nupro, ProFluorid, Vanish) showed higher fluoride release in saliva than during the first 5 min of acid exposure, whereas other varnishes (Acclean, Enamel-Pro, MI Varnish, Vella) showed the opposite behavior. There was little difference between acidic solutions. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes varies considerably and also depends on the dissolution medium. Bearing in mind the limitations of laboratory research, the consumption of acidic drinks after fluoride varnish application should be avoided to optimize the benefit/risk ratio.

  11. Response of grapevines to fluoride under field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, F.

    1983-07-01

    Grapevines (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) were fumigated in open-top chambers with hydrogen fluoride for 64 days at mean atmospheric fluoride concentrations of 0.17 or 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/. Other grapevines grown under ambient conditions in the vineyard or maintained in control chambers were exposed to 0.13 or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, respectively. Leaves of grapevines exposed to 0.28, 0.17, 0.13, or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ accumulated up to 85, 55, 20, or 11 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/, respectively. Foliar necrosis was observed on plants exposed to 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, but no injury symptoms were observed at 0.17 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ or in control plants. Grapevines growing under ambient conditions had significantly greater mean bunch weight, peduncle weight, number of grapes per bunch, and leaf protein levels than the fumigated treatments. However, these differences may be associated with a chamber effect rather than with an effect of fluoride on grapevines. No significant differences were found between treatments for grape potential alcohol content, fruit acids, number of bunches or grapes per vine, fresh weight of grapes, or leaf chlorophyll content, despite foliar fluoride concentrations in the highest fluoride fumigation level reaching 85 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/. No evidence was found of significant fluoride accumulation in berries or canes. 26 references, 4 tables.

  12. Fluoride level in public water supplies of cities from the northwest region of São Paulo State, Brazil Concentração de flúor nas águas de abastecimento público de municípios da região noroeste do estado de São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemre Adas Saliba

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available It may be difficult for small and medium cities to obtain information about the fluoride content of public water, because of the lack of equipments and technicians. This study aimed to analyze the fluoride levels of the water supplied by the public treatment stations of 40 cities situated in the northwest region of São Paulo State, during a period of 6 months, to verify if fluoridation occurs in a continuous manner and if the fluoride levels are within the recommended. Maps of the water distribution system were obtained from the water treatment companies and utilized to randomize the addresses of the collection sites, so that they included all regions with treated water sources. One water sample by month was collected and analyzed in duplicate using an ion-specific-electrode. Samples with 0.6 to 0.8 mgF/L were considered acceptable. In the 38 cities that regularly provided the samples in the 6 months of the study, water from 144 collection sites was collected and a total of 864 samples were analyzed, of which 61.81 percent were classified as unacceptable. It was observed that 33 cities performed fluoridation but in 78.79 percent of these cities there were variations in the fluoride level among the sites and in the same site during the period of study. One can conclude that most of these cities do not control the fluoride levels in the public water, since fluoridation occurs in a discontinuous manner and in most of the situations not within the recommended concentrations.Municípios de pequeno e médio porte podem ter dificuldades em realizar o controle da adição de flúor nas águas de abastecimento público em função da falta de infra-estrutura laboratorial e técnica. Este estudo realizou análises do teor de flúor das águas de abastecimento de 40 municípios situados na região noroeste do estado de São Paulo, durante 6 meses, para verificar se a adição ocorre de forma contínua e se os teores adicionados encontram-se dentro dos par

  13. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... an electronic search for literature published in English between 2003 and 2014. The included papers were assessed for their risk of bias and the results were narratively synthesized due to study heterogeneity. The quality of evidence was expressed according to GRADE. RESULTS: A total of 19 papers were included...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse...

  15. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  16. Distributed H2 Supply for Fuel Cell Utility Vehicles Year 6 - Activity 3.5 - Development fo a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almlie, Jay

    2012-04-15

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a high-pressure hydrogen production system that reforms a liquid organic feedstock and water at operating pressures up to 800 bar (~12,000 psig). The advantages of this system include the elimination of energy-intensive hydrogen compression, a smaller process footprint, and the elimination of gaseous or liquid hydrogen transport. This system could also potentially enable distributed hydrogen production from centralized coal. Processes have been investigated to gasify coal and then convert the syngas into alcohol or alkanes. These alcohols and alkanes could then be easily transported in bulk to distributed high-pressure water-reforming (HPWR)-based systems to deliver hydrogen economically. The intent of this activity was to utilize the EERC’s existing HPWR hydrogen production process, previously designed and constructed in a prior project phase, as a basis to improve operational and production performance of an existing demonstration unit. Parameters to be pursued included higher hydrogen delivery pressure, higher hydrogen production rates, and the ability to refill within a 5-minute time frame.

  17. Ion-chromatographic determination of chloride and fluoride in electrolyte from the halogen tin-plating process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, W; Ellis, J

    1984-06-01

    A simple and rapid procedure is proposed for the determination of chloride and free fluoride in tin electroplating fluid. Suppressor-column ion-chromatography is used after oxidation of hexafluorostannate(II) to hexafluorostannate(IV) with hydrogen peroxide. Concurrent determination of tin(II) and total tin then allows calculation of the concentrations of fluoride, hexafluorostannate(II) and hexafluorostannate(IV).

  18. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  19. How Does Fluoride Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Movies & More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading 7 Videos: Kids Talk About ... There's fluoride in your toothpaste and even in your water. But how does it work to keep teeth ...

  20. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Conclusions. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%. In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67% and Switzerland (85%. In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method.

  1. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B; Zholobak, Nadezhda M; Baranchikov, Alexander E; Ryabova, Anastasia V; Ivanov, Vladimir K

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF3:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF3 nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of an empirical model for fluoride removal from photovoltaic wastewater by electrocoagulation process

    KAUST Repository

    Drouiche, Nadjib

    2011-05-01

    Electrocoagulation experiments were conducted with bipolar aluminium electrodes to determine the optimum conditions for the fluoride removal from synthetic photovoltaic wastewater. A high fluoride concentration in community water supplies can cause fluorosis which has a detrimental effect on human health in particular on teeth and bones. A full 23 factorial design of experiments was used to obtain the best conditions of fluoride removal from water solutions. The three factors considered were initial fluoride concentration, applied potential, and supporting electrolyte dosage. Two levels for each factor were used; supporting electrolyte (0 and 100), applied potential (10 and 30 V), and initial fluoride concentration (20 and 25 mg/L). Results showed that the optimum conditions for fluoride removal from photovoltaic wastewater containing an initial fluoride concentration of 20 mg/L were a supporting electrolyte dose of 100 mg/L and an applied potential of 30 V. These gave a residual fluoride concentration of 8.6 mg/L which was below the standard discharge limit. A mathematical equation showing the relation between residual fluoride concentration and the effective variables was also developed. © 2011 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  3. Industrial fluoride pollution: chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall Island cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krook, L.; Maylin, G.A.

    1979-04-01

    An aluminum plant on the south bank of the St. Lawrence River, southwest of Cornwall Island, Ontario, Canada, has emitted 0.816 metric tons of fluoride daily since 1973. Considerably higher amounts were emitted from 1959 to 1973. The plant was designated as the major source of fluoride emissions impacting on Cornwall Island. Cattle located on this island showed signs of chronic fluoride poisoning. This poisoning was manifested clinically by stunted growth and dental fluorosis to a degree of severe interference with drinking and mastication. This Cornwall Island herds study indicates that the established tolerance level of fluoride for performance of dairy and beef cattle is not valid since the tolerance level was set based on experiments with healthy calves which were exposed to dietary fluoride from 3 to 4 months of age and not on cattle which were chronically exposed to fluoride from conception to death. 56 references.

  4. Exposure to High Fluoride Drinking Water and Risk of Dental Fluorosis in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ene Indermitte

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess exposure to drinking water fluoride and evaluate the risk of dental fluorosis among the Estonian population. The study covered all 15 counties in Estonia and 93.7% of population that has access to public water supplies. In Estonia groundwater is the main source for public water supply systems in most towns and rural settlements. The content of natural fluoride in water ranges from 0.01 to 7.20 mg/L. The exposure to different fluoride levels was assessed by linking data from previous studies on drinking water quality with databases of the Health Protection Inspectorate on water suppliers and the number of water consumers in water supply systems. Exposure assessment showed that 4% of the study population had excessive exposure to fluoride, mainly in small public water supplies in western and central Estonia, where the Silurian-Ordovician aquifer system is the only source of drinking water. There is a strong correlation between natural fluoride levels and the prevalence of dental fluorosis. Risk of dental fluorosis was calculated to different fluoride exposure levels over 1.5 mg/L.

  5. Fluoride Content in Alcoholic Drinks

    OpenAIRE

    Goschorska, Marta; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Ra?, Monika Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of alcoholic drinks as a potential source of dietary fluoride by means of measuring fluoride levels in selected alcoholic drinks available on the Polish market that are also diverse in terms of the percentage content of ethanol. The study was conducted on 48 types of drinks with low, medium, and high alcohol content available on the Polish market and offered by various manufacturers, both Polish and foreign. Fluoride concentrations in individual ...

  6. Fluoride ion release and solubility of fluoride enriched interim cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Block, Jonathan; Melamed, Guy; Dolev, Eran; Matalon, Shlomo; Ormianer, Zeev

    2014-08-01

    Interim and definitive restorations cemented with interim cements for a prolonged interval are susceptible to bacterial infiltration and caries formation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the long-term fluoride release and solubility of aged ZnO-based interim cements enriched separately with 0.4% NaF and SnF2. Four different brands of cements (Tempbond, Tempbond NE, Procem, and Freegenol) were tested for fluoride release and solubility. For every test, 6 disk specimens of each cement with NaF and SnF2, and 6 with no fluoride enrichment (control) were fabricated, for a total of 72 specimens. The disks were incubated in deionized water. Fluoride ion release was recorded at 1, 7, 14, 21, 63, 91, and 182 days. Solubility was calculated as weight percent after 90 days of incubation. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance with repeated measures and the Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc test (Pfluorides released fluoride ions for at least 182 days. Cements mixed with NaF released more fluoride ions than those mixed with SnF2 (P.97), indicating a diffusion-controlled fluoride release. Cement and fluoride types were the main affecting factors in fluoride ion release. The addition of fluorides slightly increased the solubility of the cements. Given their long-term sustained and diffusive controlled release, these fluorides, particularly NaF when mixed with ZnO-based interim cements, may be useful for caries prevention under provisionally cemented restorations. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrastructural evaluation of enamel after dental bleaching associated with fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, John A; Bittencourt, Bruna; Michel, Milton; Sabino, Nilson; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara M M

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects on human enamel after two bleaching procedures: with a fluoridated bleaching agent and with topical fluoride application postbleaching. It used 43 enamel blocks (3 mm(2) ) that were ground flat (600-2,000 grit) and polished with polishing paste (one and one-fourth). Specimens were randomly divided into three groups according to the bleaching procedure: (1) control group, (2) hydrogen peroxide 35% (HPF) and topical application of fluoride 1.23%, and (3) HP 38% (OP) with fluoride in its composition. Bleaching agents were used according to the manufacturer's instructions. Three methodologies were used: nanoindentation, to observe surface hardness and elastic modulus; atomic force microscopy, to observe surface roughness (R(a) - R(z)); and scanning electron microscopy, to observe the enamel surface effects. Group OP had a decrease in the elastic modulus after bleaching, which was recovered at 14 days. An increased roughness (R(a); 32%) was observed on group HPF and had an increased erosion on enamel surface (67%). It was concluded that topical application of fluoride, after using the nonfluoridated whitening agent, increased the roughness values and erosion of enamel.

  8. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  9. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  10. [Fluoride content in potable water and drinks. Connection with dental caries prevention and dental fluorosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borinskiĭ, Iu N; Rumiantsev, V A; Borinskaia, E Iu; Beliaev, V V

    2009-01-01

    Content of fluoride by ion selective electrode in potable water (municipal water supply, bottled, from draw-wells and springs), in juices of industrial and compotes of domestic preparation, in drinks of various grades of the tea made by water with unequal contents of fluorine was analyzed. Fluoride entered organism of the population in non-control mode more often in minimum quantities that explained, in certain measures a wide caries incidence. Granting of the information upon concentration of fluorides in potable water, juices and drinks used by population would allow people to adjust this microelement intake in the organism with the purpose of preventing of dental caries and fluorosis.

  11. Fluoride Content in Alcoholic Drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goschorska, Marta; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Rać, Monika Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of alcoholic drinks as a potential source of dietary fluoride by means of measuring fluoride levels in selected alcoholic drinks available on the Polish market that are also diverse in terms of the percentage content of ethanol. The study was conducted on 48 types of drinks with low, medium, and high alcohol content available on the Polish market and offered by various manufacturers, both Polish and foreign. Fluoride concentrations in individual samples were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. The highest fluoride levels were determined in the lowest percentage drinks (less than 10 % v/v ethanol), with the lowest fluoride levels observed in the highest percentage drinks (above 40 % v/v ethanol). In terms of types of alcoholic drinks, the highest fluoride levels were determined in beers and wines, while the lowest levels were observed in vodkas. These data confirm the fact that alcoholic beverages need to be considered as a significant source of fluoride delivered into the body.

  12. Development and characterization of gelatin and ethylcellulose microparticles designed as platforms to delivery fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Francisco, Lizziane M B; Cerquetani, Juliana A; Bruschi, Marcos L

    2013-11-01

    To develop and characterize microparticles containing fluoride sources (FS) from sodium fluoride, sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP) or aminofluoride and evaluate their characteristics as fluoride delivery systems. Ethylcellulose microparticles containing fluoride (EM) were prepared by emulsification of ethyl acetate dispersion containing polymer and FS (ethylcellulose:FS ratio of 1:0.25 wt/wt) with aqueous external phase containing polysorbate 80 (0.8% vol/vol) using the volume ratio (organic:aqueous) of 1:5. The organic solvent was evaporated; microparticles were collected by centrifuging, washed with deionized water and freeze-dried. Gelatin microparticles containing FS (GM) was obtained by dispersion of the natural polymer in water, adding FS (6:1 wt/wt) and 20% (wt/wt) of mannitol. The final dispersions were spray-dried. Particle morphology and size were investigated using optical microscopy. The content of fluoride ions in the microparticles was quantified using a potentiometric method. The encapsulation efficiency and in vitro release profile of fluoride was also determined. Microparticles exhibited polydispersity and mean diameters fluoride ions from microparticles was shown to be modified, fitted first order and guided by Fickian diffusion. Microparticles prepared with ethylcellulose or gelatin can be used as platform for oral delivery of fluoride, providing a means to increase the local supply of this ion in a controlled manner, providing an increased protection against caries. Moreover, further investigations are needed to demonstrate this property in vivo.

  13. Ultrastructural changes in the cemento-enamel junction after vital tooth bleaching with fluoride and fluoride-free agents - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasic, Jovanka; Kesic, Ljiljana; Popovic, Jelena; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Marija; Stankovic, Sasa; Barac, Radomir

    2012-03-01

    The impact of bleaching on the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) is not well known. Due to frequent sensitivity of the cervical region of teeth after the vital bleaching, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphological features of the CEJ of human teeth after application of fluoridated and fluoride-free bleaching agents, as well as post-bleaching fluoridation treatment, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Thirty-five extracted permanent human teeth were longitudinally cut, yielding 70 specimens. Thirty specimens were randomly divided into the 3 experimental groups, and 20 specimens, were used as (2) control groups, each: negative (untreated) control group; positive control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide; experimental group 1, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); experimental group 2, treatment with a mixture of 10% CP and fluoride; and experimental group 3, treatment with 10% CP and 2% sodium fluoride gel applied 30 minutes after bleaching. Experimental groups were treated 8 h per day for 14 days. The samples were examined by SEM. The bleaching materials tested caused morphological changes to the surface of the CEJ. There was a statistically significant difference between experimental groups (Kruskal Wallis Test chi-square=11,668; p<0.005). Mean value of experimental group 2 scores showed statistically significant difference from groups 1 and 3. Bleaching gel with fluorides does not significantly change morphological appearance of the CEJ and represents a better choice than the hard tissue fluoridation process after bleaching.

  14. Deployment of hydrogen supply chain for fuel market in 2050: Design and development of a decision support system for scenarios analysis; Deploiement de la chaine logistique de l'hydrogene pour le marche des carburants en 2050: Conception et developpement d'un outil d'optimisation pour l'analyse de scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patay, E.

    2008-07-15

    The deployment of a market for hydrogen energy is a new problem, considered by governments, industrialists and scientists to meet global targets of greenhouse gases emissions reduction and to ensure security in energy supply. In this context, the optimization problem of scheduling the deployment until 2050 of the hydrogen supply chain for fuel market throughout a country has been the object of our study. We get support of Air Liquide Company, his experience and experts in production and distribution of industrial hydrogen, to build an approach to the problem meeting the requirements of an industrial context. After defining and characterizing the optimization problem through a systemic analysis of the distribution infrastructure, we proposed a method suited to its resolution. Monte Carlo simulations enabled us to develop cost functions. Then we developed a heuristic algorithm for approximate optimization of these cost functions. Our approach has necessitated the definition of simulation rules, a design of experiment and a regression method, as well as a heuristic algorithm adapted to the structure of the problem. The specification, development and use of software tools have helped to validate the chosen methodology for the optimization of the uncertain problem of our study. The scenario of evolution has created a reference to validate the model and provide some analysis for early studies of deployment. (author)

  15. Strategic Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    March 7, 2003. [29] Velis, Lil. “ Publishing Industry : Supply Chain Strategy in Action,” briefing presented to ICAF Strategic Supply Seminar, May 6...Lambert and Stock, page 48. [32] Velis, Lil. “ Publishing Industry : Supply Chain Strategy in Action,” briefing presented to ICAF Strategic Supply

  16. Topical fluoride for caries prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyant, Robert J.; Tracy, Sharon L.; Anselmo, Theresa (Tracy); Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D.; Donly, Kevin J.; Frese, William A.; Hujoel, Philippe P.; Iafolla, Timothy; Kohn, William; Kumar, Jayanth; Levy, Steven M.; Tinanoff, Norman; Wright, J. Timothy; Zero, Domenick; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Meyer, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A panel of experts convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs presents evidence-based clinical recommendations regarding professionally applied and prescription-strength, home-use topical fluoride agents for caries prevention. These recommendations are an update of the 2006 ADA recommendations regarding professionally applied topical fluoride and were developed by using a new process that includes conducting a systematic review of primary studies. Types of Studies Reviewed The authors conducted a search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library for clinical trials of professionally applied and prescription-strength topical fluoride agents—including mouthrinses, varnishes, gels, foams and pastes—with caries increment outcomes published in English through October 2012. Results The panel included 71 trials from 82 articles in its review and assessed the efficacy of various topical fluoride caries-preventive agents. The panel makes recommendations for further research. Practical Implications The panel recommends the following for people at risk of developing dental caries: 2.26 percent fluoride varnish or 1.23 percent fluoride (acidulated phosphate fluoride) gel, or a prescription-strength, home-use 0.5 percent fluoride gel or paste or 0.09 percent fluoride mouthrinse for patients 6 years or older. Only 2.26 percent fluoride varnish is recommended for children younger than 6 years. The strengths of the recommendations for the recommended products varied from “in favor” to “expert opinion for.” As part of the evidence-based approach to care, these clinical recommendations should be integrated with the practitioner's professional judgment and the patient's needs and preferences. PMID:24177407

  17. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  18. Growth of fluoride treated Kalanchoe pinnata plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H.N.; Applegate, H.G.

    1962-01-01

    Kalanchoe pinnata plants can absorb fluoride through roots. The absorption is related to the amount of fluoride applied to the soil. There appeared to be a relationship between the amount of fluoride adsorbed and the subsequent growth of the plants. Plants which adsorbed the largest amounts of fluoride had the greatest increase in growth.

  19. Fluoride-induced chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, O; Jouvin, M H; De Vernejoul, M C; Druet, P

    1987-08-01

    Renal fluoride toxicity in human beings is difficult to assess in the literature. Although experimental studies and research on methoxyflurane toxicity have shown frank renal damage, observations of renal insufficiency related to chronic fluoride exposure are scarce. We report a case of fluoride intoxication related to potomania of Vichy water, a highly mineralized water containing 8.5 mg/L of fluoride. Features of fluoride osteosclerosis were prominent and end-stage renal failure was present. The young age of the patient, the long duration of high fluoride intake, and the absence of other cause of renal insufficiency suggest a causal relationship between fluoride intoxication and renal failure.

  20. Portland Water Fluoridation: A Newspaper Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Allison; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Lewis, Patricia Ryan

    2017-03-01

    Portland, Oregon is the largest city in the United States without community water fluoridation (CWF). A newspaper analysis was conducted of the failed 2013 CWF campaign to evaluate anti-fluoridation and pro-fluoridation messaging provided by newspapers during the campaign. News content was categorized by type and slant (pro-fluoridation, anti-fluoridation, or neutral) and 34 variables were tabulated (23 anti-fluoridation, 11 pro-fluoridation). Results showed overall messaging was slightly pro-fluoridation, as compared to anti-fluoridation or neutral content (35%, 32%, and 33% respectively). Editorial content was 85% pro-fluoridation and 15% anti-fluoridation. The most frequent anti-fluoridation variables were alternatives to water fluoridation, mass/forced medication and concerns about the political process. Conversely, tooth decay and social justice were the most commonly cited pro-fluoridation variables. Newspapers can be influential in shaping public policy opinions in the fight for community water fluoridation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Assessment of Fluoride Levels in Different Brands of Black and Green Tea Consumed in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mojarad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Tea is one of the most commonly consumed drinks in the world. Tea is recognized as a source of fluoride whose intake may increase the risk of developing dental fluorosis, particularly if other sources of fluoride augment the intake. Since the amount of fluoride in different types of tea consumed in our country is unknown, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the fluoride level of 22 commercial brands of tea popular in Iran. Materials & Methods: This descriptive study was conducted to assess the fluoride content of black tea (10 brands, bagged black tea (9 brands, and green tea (3 brands. 2 g from three samples of each tea brand taken out randomly were added to 200 ml deionized water and boiled for 10 minutes. After the infusion temperature coming down to the room temperature, the infusion was filtered and its volume made up to 200 ml by adding deionized water. The fluoride levels were measured using ion-selective electrode, and reported as mg/lit. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The Fluoride content was found 1.51 mg/lit in black tea bag, 1.038 mg/lit in green tea and 0.869±0.360 mg/lit in black tea sticks. (P<0.05, However, there was no statistically sig-nificant difference of fluoride concentration between green tea and black tea sticks(P= 0.52. Conclusion: This study showed that fluoride content of some tea brands were so high that drinking a few cups daily may increase the risk of developing dental fluorosis. Therefore, their consumption must be limited particularly in children, and in all inhabitants of regions with high fluoride levels in water supply.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 19 (4:36-42

  2. [Fluoride intake through consumption of water from municipal network in the INMA-Gipuzkoa cohort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Zabala, Ana; Santa-Marina, Loreto; Otazua, Mónica; Ayerdi, Mikel; Galarza, Ane; Gallastegi, Mara; Ulibarrena, Enrique; Molinuevo, Amaia; Anabitarte, Asier; Ibarluzea, Jesús

    2017-05-22

    To estimate fluoride intake through consumption of water from the municipal network in pregnant women and their children from the INMA-Gipuzkoa cohort and to compare these intakes with recommended levels. In Euskadi (Spain), fluoridation of drinking water is compulsory in water supplies for more than 30,000 inhabitants. 575 pregnant women (recruitment, 2006-2008) and 424 4-year-old children (follow-up, 2010-2012) have been included. Fluoride levels in drinking water were obtained from the water consumption information system of the Basque Country (EKUIS). Water consumption habits and socioeconomic variables were obtained by questionnaire. 74.9% and 87.7% of women and children consumed water from the municipal network. Average fluoride levels in fluoridated water were 0.805 (SD: 0.194) mg/L during baseline recruitment and 0.843 (SD: 0.080) mg/L during follow up, at 4 years old of the children. Average and 95th percentile of fluoride intake were 0.015 and 0.026mg/kg per day in women and 0.033 and 0.059mg/kg per day in children. Considering only fluoride provided by drinking water, 8.71% of children living in fluoridated areas exceeded intake level recommended by the European Food Safety Authority, consisting in 0.05mg/kg per day. The results show that ingested levels of fluoride through consumption of municipal water can exceed the recommended levels in children and encourages further studies that will help in fluoridation policies of drinking water in the future. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Cury,Jaime A.; Saul M Paiva; Tenuta,Livia M.A; Oliveira,Maria José L.; Martins, Carolina C.

    2013-01-01

    The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF) rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride-TSF) in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80) or children's toothpaste (n = 78)). The esti...

  4. Polygeneration smart grids. A solution for the supply of electricity, potable water and hydrogen as fuel for transportation in remote areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriakarakos, George; Mohamed, Essam S.; Papadakis, George [Agricultural Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Natural Resources and Agricultural Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the concept of polygeneration smart grids along with experimental results taken during winter 2009-2010 of a pilot polygeneration smart grid focusing on the evolution of the control strategy. In this smart grid the energy of the sun and the wind is harvested by photovoltaic panels and a wind turbine. The system products are electrical energy, potable water through desalination and hydrogen as both medium term energy storage and transportation fuel. Potable water is also used as seasonal energy storage. The components of the system include PV, a wind turbine, batteries, a PEM fuel cell, a PEM electrolyzer, metal hydride tank, hydrogen vehicle refueling subsystem, reverse osmosis desalination unit, data logging system and a control system. Two different controllers have been developed and tested for this smart grid; an ON/OFF controller which operates the electrolyzer, fuel cell and desalination unit at preset points and a fuzzy logic controller which allows for part load operation. The system is installed at the Agricultural University of Athens and the experimental process is ongoing. (orig.)

  5. AVALIAÇÃO DA PREVALÊNCIA DE CÁRIE DENTÁRIA EM ESCOLARES DO MUNICÍPIO DE PIRACICABA, SP, BRASIL, APÓS 25 ANOS DE FLUORETAÇÃO DAS ÁGUAS DE ABASTECIMENTO PÚBLICO EVALUATION OF DENTAL CARIES PREVALENCE IN STUDENTS FROM PIRACICABA, SP, BRAZIL, AFTER 25 YEARS OF FLUORIDATION OF THE PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Tarkany BASTING

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available A fluoretação das águas de abastecimento público é considerada o método de prevenção de cáries mais efetivo em termos de abrangência coletiva. Além disso, trata-se de uma medida simples, econômica, segura e eficaz. Graças a essa medida, associada ao uso de dentifrícios fluoretados e aos programas preventivos implantados nos municípios, o país experimenta uma redução da prevalência de cárie. Este trabalho tem por objetivo avaliar a evolução das prevalências de cárie dentária nos anos de 1971 (início da fluoretação das águas de abastecimento público, 1977, 1980, 1992 e 1996, na cidade de Piracicaba, SP, Brasil. Comparando-se as prevalências de cárie em escolares de 7 a 12 anos, de ambos os sexos, nos anos de 1971 a 1996, verificou-se uma redução do índice CPOD de 79%. Foi observado que, no levantamento epidemiológico de 1996, o índice CPOD foi igual a 2,0 para os 12 anos de idade, superando as metas da OMS para o ano 2000. Verificou-se uma redução de cárie estatisticamente significante (no nível de 5%, ao se compararem as prevalências em escolares de Piracicaba nos últimos 25 anos de fluoretação das águas de abastecimento. Busca-se discutir os resultados desses levantamentos com os de outras localidades, bem como fazer uma análise em relação às recomendações da OMS para o ano 2000 e 2010.The fluoridation of public water supply is considered the most effective method of dental caries prevention for a community. Furthermore, it is a simple, economic, secure and efficient procedure. By using this method, associated with fluoridated toothpastes and preventive programs implanted in some cities, the country experiments a decrease in dental caries prevalence. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evolution of the dental caries prevalence in 1971 (when the fluoridation of public water supply began, 1977, 1980, 1992 and 1996 in Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. Comparing the dental caries prevalence in male

  6. An in vitro assessment of fluoride uptake by tooth enamel from four different fluoride dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, V H; Anegundi, R T

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fluoride uptake by tooth enamel with four different fluoride dentifrices. Sixty human premolars extracted for orthodontic purpose were selected for the study. The teeth were covered with nail varnish leaving a window of 4 × 4 mm on the enamel surface of the buccal and lingual sides. The teeth were demineralised and were divided into four groups with 15 teeth in each group. The buccal window served as experimental and the lingual as control. The teeth were immersed in toothpaste slurry containing: sodium fluoride (Group A); sodium monofluorophosphate (Group B); stannous fluoride (Group C) and amine fluoride (Group D). The fluoride content in the etched superficial enamel layer in the windows was analysed using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. Within the parameters of this study, the uptake of fluoride was statistically significant in Group D (p fluoride by tooth enamel in an increasing order was Group A fluoride had the highest fluoride uptake.

  7. Ultrastructural changes in the cemento-enamel junction after vital tooth bleaching with fluoride and fluoride-free agents – a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasic, Jovanka; Kesic, Ljiljana; Popovic, Jelena; Mitić, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Marija; Stankovic, Sasa; Barac, Radomir

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The impact of bleaching on the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) is not well known. Due to frequent sensitivity of the cervical region of teeth after the vital bleaching, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphological features of the CEJ of human teeth after application of fluoridated and fluoride-free bleaching agents, as well as post-bleaching fluoridation treatment, by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Material/Methods Thirty-five extracted permanent human teeth were longitudinally cut, yielding 70 specimens. Thirty specimens were randomly divided into the 3 experimental groups, and 20 specimens, were used as (2) control groups, each: negative (untreated) control group; positive control group treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide; experimental group 1, bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); experimental group 2, treatment with a mixture of 10% CP and fluoride; and experimental group 3, treatment with 10% CP and 2% sodium fluoride gel applied 30 minutes after bleaching. Experimental groups were treated 8 h per day for 14 days. The samples were examined by SEM. Results The bleaching materials tested caused morphological changes to the surface of the CEJ. There was a statistically significant difference between experimental groups (Kruskal Wallis Test chi-square=11,668; pfluorides does not significantly change morphological appearance of the CEJ and represents a better choice than the hard tissue fluoridation process after bleaching. PMID:22367139

  8. FLUORIDE TOXICITY – A HARSH REALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandlapalli Pavani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many incidents of fluoride toxicity whether it is acute or chronic. Fluoride toxicity is an environmental hazard which arises from the upper layers of geological crust and is dissolved in water. Prolonged drinking of such water causes chronic fluoride toxicity. Use of fluoride containing compounds for various purposes such as dental products, metal, glass, refrigerator and chemical industries act as a source of fluoride poisoning and increase the risk of toxicity. This review reflects the deleterious effects of fluorides on various organs in the physiological system.

  9. Taurine Ameliorates Renal Oxidative Damage and Thyroid Dysfunction in Rats Chronically Exposed to Fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedara, Isaac A; Ojuade, Temini Jesu D; Olabiyi, Bolanle F; Idris, Umar F; Onibiyo, Esther M; Ajeigbe, Olufunke F; Farombi, Ebenezer O

    2017-02-01

    Excessive exposure to fluoride poses several detrimental effects to human health particularly the kidney which is a major organ involved in its elimination from the body. The influence of taurine on fluoride-induced renal toxicity was investigated in a co-exposure paradigm for 45 days using five groups of eight rats each. Group I rats received normal drinking water alone, group II rats were exposed to sodium fluoride (NaF) in drinking water at 15 mg/L alone, group III received taurine alone at a dose of 200 mg/kg group IV rats were co-administered with NaF and taurine (100 mg/kg), while group V rats were co-administered with NaF and taurine (200 mg/kg). Administration of taurine significantly reversed the fluoride-mediated decrease in absolute weight and organo-somatic index of the kidney in the exposed rats. Taurine significantly prevented fluoride-induced elevation in plasma urea and creatinine levels in the exposed rats. Moreover, taurine restored fluoride-mediated decrease in the circulatory concentrations of triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and the ratio of triiodothyronine to thyroxine. Taurine ameliorated fluoride-mediated decrease in renal antioxidant status by significantly enhancing the antioxidant enzyme activities as well as glutathione level in the exposed rats. Additionally, taurine inhibited fluoride-induced renal oxidative damage by markedly decreasing the hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde levels as well as improved the kidney architecture in the treated rats. Collectively, taurine protected against fluoride-induced renal toxicity via enhancement of thyroid gland function, renal antioxidant status, and histology in rats.

  10. Fluoride bioavailability in saliva and plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Different fluoride formulations may have different effects on caries prevention. It was the aim of this clinical study to assess the fluoride content, provided by NaF compared to amine fluoride, in saliva and plaque. Methods Eight trained volunteers brushed their teeth in the morning for 3 minutes with either NaF or amine fluoride, and saliva and 3-day-plaque-regrowth was collected at 5 time intervals during 6 hours after tooth brushing. The amount of collected saliva and plaque was measured, and the fluoride content was analysed using a fluoride sensitive electrode. All subjects repeated all study cycles 5 times, and 3 cycles per subject underwent statistical analysis using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results Immediately after brushing the fluoride concentration in saliva increased rapidly and dropped to the baseline level after 360 minutes. No difference was found between NaF and amine fluoride. All plaque fluoride levels were elevated after 30 minutes until 120 minutes after tooth brushing, and decreasing after 360 minutes to baseline. According to the highly individual profile of fluoride in saliva and plaque, both levels of bioavailability correlated for the first 30 minutes, and the fluoride content of saliva and plaque was back to baseline after 6 hours. Conclusions Fluoride levels in saliva and plaque are interindividually highly variable. However, no significant difference in bioavailability between NaF and amine fluoride, in saliva, or in plaque was found. PMID:22230722

  11. Studies of fluoride varnishes in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppä, L

    1991-01-01

    Despite the artificial fluoridation of drinking water in Kuopio, part of the children have high caries incidence. We therefore started our studies on fluoride varnishes in 1977 in an attempt to find a feasible means of applying fluoride topically in children at high risk of caries. In our first trial, the sodium fluoride varnish Duraphat was found to be effective in preventing caries, but the effectiveness of the silane fluoride varnish Fluor Protector could not be unequivocally established, despite the fact that Fluor Protector deposited markedly more fluoride in enamel than Duraphat. In a second study in children in a low-fluoride area, use of Duraphat was found to be more effective than fortnightly fluoride rinses or Fluor Protector. Increasing the frequency of application from two to four times a year did not increase the effectiveness of Duraphat even in highly caries-prone children in a 2-year trial. On the basis of peak values of fluoride in parotid saliva after application, use of either fluoride varnishes was considered safe. Although the fluoride content of the enamel remained elevated for at least two years after discontinuation of treatment with both varnishes, the caries preventive effect did not continue after the applications were stopped. This shows that increasing the fluoride content of enamel is not the main mechanism by which fluoride varnishes prevent caries, and that the applications need to be continued as long as caries is a problem.

  12. Methods of using ionic liquids having a fluoride anion as solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoria, Philip; Maiti, Amitesh; Gash, Alexander; Han, Thomas Yong; Orme, Christine; Fried, Laurence

    2011-12-06

    A method in one embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having a fluoride anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of about 90.degree. C. or less during the contacting. A method in another embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having an acetate or formate anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of less than about 90.degree. C. during the contacting.

  13. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface; with more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix/mineral interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the doserelated decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffleended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As

  14. Chronic fluoride toxicity: dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2-3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface. With more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the dose-related decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffle-ended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As further

  15. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application

    OpenAIRE

    Ella A. Naumova; Christoph Dickten; Rico Jung; Florian Krauss; Henrik Rübesamen; Katharina Schmütsch; Tudor Sandulescu; Stefan Zimmer; Wolfgang H. Arnold

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately afte...

  16. [Dental fluorosis and dental caries prevalence in Senegalese children living in a high-fluoride area and consuming a poor fluoridated drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, M; Diawara, C K; Ndiaye, K R; Yam, A A

    2008-01-01

    The role of fluoride in dental caries prevention when applied at optimal levels is well established. However, ingestion of excessive fluoride during tooth development can cause structural changes in tooth enamel named fluorosis. At Gandiaye a city situated in the Senegalese endemic fluorosis area, the main water supply provided by a unique drilling with highly fluoridated water has broken down in 1996. Since then, the drinking water comes from wells which have poor levels of fluorides. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis and tooth decays in children born and reared continuously at Gandiaye after the stoppage of the drills and who were drinking water well. Water samples were collected from two wells and analyzed using a spectrometer and a specific fluoride electrode. The prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis was evaluated according to Dean's method, and the caries experience was measured using the DMF teeth index in 150 children aged from 6 to 8 years. The fluoride levels in the water well were comprised between 0.03 ppm and 0.09 ppm according to the method used. The prevalence of dental fluorosis was 39.33% with the predominance of the very low to low fluorosis forms. The tooth decay prevalence was 48.66% and the mean DMF tooth was 0.98. A significant relationship was found between the dental fluorosis and the low caries levels. A low to moderate dental fluorosis associated with a significant decrease of caries prevalence was found in children living in a high-fluoride area and consuming poorly fluorided water.

  17. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    1997-01-01

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was me

  18. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was

  19. Water Fluoridation Reporting System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  20. Removal of fluoride from aqueous phase by biosorption onto algal biosorbent Spirogyra sp.-IO2: Sorption mechanism elucidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkata Mohan, S. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500007 (India)]. E-mail: vmohan_s@yahoo.com; Ramanaiah, S.V. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500007 (India); Rajkumar, B. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500007 (India); Sarma, P.N. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500007 (India)]. E-mail: sarma1950@yahoo.com

    2007-03-22

    This communication presents results pertaining to the adsorptive studies carried out on fluoride removal onto algal biosorbent (Spirogyra IO2). Batch sorption studies were performed and the results revealed that biosorbent demonstrated ability to adsorb the fluoride. Influence of varying the conditions for removal of fluoride, such as the fluoride concentration, the pH of aqueous solution, the dosage of adsorbent, the temperature on removal of fluoride, and the adsorption-desorption studies were investigated. Sorption interaction of fluoride on to algal species obeyed the pseudo first order rate equation. Experimental data showed good fit with the Langmuir's adsorption isotherm model. Fluoride sorption was found to be dependent on the aqueous phase pH and the uptake was observed to be greater at lower pH. Maximum fluoride sorption was observed at operating 30 deg. C operating temperature. Adsorption-desorption of fluoride into inorganic solutions and distilled water was observed and this indicated the combined effect of ion exchange and physical sorption phenomena. Significant changes in the FT-IR spectra was observed after fluoride sorption which is indicative of the participation of surface function groups associated with hydrogen atoms in the carboxylic groups in sorption interaction. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis a marginal increase in the area for the binding energy peak at 287.4 eV was observed which could be due to the formation of -C-F- bonds. Thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis of the fluoride loaded sorbent showed that the biosorbent underwent three steps decomposition process when heated from 25 to 100 deg. C. The maximum weight loss was observed to be between 200 and 400 deg. C and 700 and 800 deg. C.

  1. Fluoridering af drikkevandet i Danmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Spliid, Henrik; Bruvo, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Første gang sammenhængen mellem caries (huller i tænderne) og fluoridindholdet i drikkevand blev diskuteret i vandværkskredse i Danmark var ved årsmødet i 1958. Her blev det oplyst, at fluorid i drikkevand beskytter mod caries, men man konstaterede også, at der nok ikke var stemning for fluorid......-tilsætning til drikkevandet (fluoridering). Siden da er emnet ikke taget op. Formålet med dette indlæg er at besvare spørgsmålene: 1. Er der behov for fluoridering af drikkevandet i Danmark? 2. Er der alternativer? Hvordan påvirker blødgøring af vand og andre vandbehandlingsmetoder dental caries hos børn og unge......? Som baggrund herfor vil vi redegøre for resultaterne af et netop afsluttet studium af sammenhængen mellem caries og drikkevandets sammensætning, specielt m.h.t. luoridindholdet og vandets calciumindhold (hårdhed). Undersøgelsen bekræfter, at fluorid i drikkevand i væsentlig grad beskytter mod caries...

  2. The Effect of Fluoride in Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, L. R.; Gallagher, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of fluoride on bone tissue and the possible role of fluoride in the treatment of osteoporosis. At present, fluoride treatment should be restricted to clinical trials until its risks and benefits have been further evaluated. (Author/MT)

  3. Fluoride in African groundwater: Occurrence and mitigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasak, S.; Griffioen, J.; Feenstra, L.

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride in groundwater has both natural and anthropogenic sources. Fluoride bearing minerals, volcanic gases and various industrial and agricultural activities can contribute to high concentrations. High intake of fluoride from drinking water is the main cause of fluorosis and may lead to many othe

  4. 硼氢化钠制氢技术在质子交换膜燃料电池中的研究进展%Recent advances in the study of sodium borohydride hydrolysis for pure hydrogen supply to PEM fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉晓

    2009-01-01

    硼氢化钠储氢量高达10.6%,安全、无爆炸危险,携带和运输方便;供氢系统设备简单,启动速度快,产氢速度可调,因此是一个非常良好的氢载体,是为质子交换膜燃料电池供氢的理想储氢介质.硼氢化钠供氢系统也已逐步应用于质子交换膜燃料电池电源中.介绍了这种制氢方式的几项关键技术:硼氢化钠水解制氢催化剂、硼氢化钠制氢反应器、氢气净化系统等在质子交换膜燃料电池中的研究进展,并指出了今后的研究发展方向.%Sodium borohydride contains hydrogen as high as 10.6%, and it is safe, no fire and explosion danger, and portable. This hydrogen supply system has the features of simple structure, fast starting, and adjustable hydrogen production speed. Therefore, sodium borohydride is a very promising hydrogen carrier and a perfect medium for pure hydrogen supply to proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In fact, the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen supply to PEMFC is in the way to real application. This review summarizes the recent advances in this hydrogen generation system including catalysts, reactors and purification methods, and the direction for sequent research is also discussed.

  5. Fluoride: its role in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Maria Andaló Tenuta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of decades of research on fluoride and the recognition of its role as the cornerstone of dental caries reduction in the last fifty years, questions still arise on its use at community, self-applied and professional application levels. Which method of fluoride delivery should be used? How and when should it be used? How can its benefits be maximized and still reduce the risks associated with its use? These are only some of the challenging questions facing us daily. The aim of this paper is to present scientific background to understand the importance of each method of fluoride use considering the current caries epidemiological scenario, and to discuss how individual or combined methods can be used based on the best evidence available.

  6. Molten fluorides for nuclear applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie. Delpech

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of pyrochemistry is being increasingly acknowledged and becomes unavoidable in the nuclear field. Molten salts may be used for fuel processing and spent fuel recycling, for heat transfer, as a homogeneous fuel and as a breeder material in fusion systems. Fluorides that are stable at high temperature and under high neutron flux are especially promising. Analysis of several field cases reveals that corrosion in molten fluorides is essentially due to the oxidation of metals by uranium fluoride and/or oxidizing impurities. The thermodynamics of this process are discussed with an emphasis on understanding the mass transfer in the systems, selecting appropriate metallic materials and designing effective purification methods.

  7. Fluoride varnish applications and caries incidence in pre-schoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keightley, Alexander J; Taylor, Greig D

    2014-09-01

    A two year placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomised control trial in 1-4-year-old children. Children were recruited from low income families in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with access to a fluoridated public water supply. Both groups received oral hygiene instruction along with provision of toothbrushes and 1450 ppm F- toothpaste. The control group had a placebo fluoride varnish applied every six months. The intervention group had 22,600 ppm F- varnish applied every six months. Clinical examinations for the presence of caries were conducted at baseline and at each subsequent six monthly visit. The primary outcome was the proportion of children in each group that went on to clinically develop any new carious surfaces using the ICDAS criteria. The number of new carious surfaces was assessed as a secondary outcome, both at the enamel and dentine level. The study also reported on the safety and acceptability of the varnish. Two hundred children participated in the trial, 91% were followed up at two years and adherence to the six-monthly applications was 84% in the intervention and 85% in control groups. The results did not show a significant difference for the development of new lesions between the two groups. In the fluoride varnish group 36% had developed new dentinal lesions compared to 47% in the placebo group, a difference of -10.8% (95% CI -24.9 to 3.3, p = 0.14). In relation to caries increment, at the enamel level, this was a mean of 2.0 teeth in the fluoride varnish group and 2.8 teeth in the placebo group, a difference of -0.8 (95% CI -2.0 to 0.4, p = 0.19). At the dentine level, caries increment was a mean of 1.8 teeth in the fluoride varnish group and 2.5 in the placebo group, a difference of -0.7 (95% CI -1.9 to 0.4, p = 0.23). Two minor complaints related to taste and appearance of the varnish were recorded and no safety events were reported. Whilst no significant difference was found, the authors note that this does not indicate ineffectiveness of

  8. Microcratering in Polyvinylidene Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Anthony John

    Dust is defined as macroparticles as small as a few molecules up to several micrometers in diameter. In the context of space exploration, it was originally seen only as a technical obstacle to applications; dust can damage instrument surfaces, coat mating surfaces preventing proper seals, and impair or obstruct measurements. Because of the ubiquity of dust in the solar system and its role in the origin of planets and other bodies, the study of dust and related phenomena has evolved to a scientific subdiscipline which can provide us insight into the origins and evolution of our solar system. In order to facilitate this, a hypervelocity dust accelerator has been built at the University of Colorado at Boulder and is being used to probe impact phenomena, dust mitigation techniques, dust detection techniques, and more. One such dust detector is a Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) dust detector. The PVDF dust detector is very lightweight and consumes little power. Due to these properties, PVDF detectors can potentially be used on any spacecraft to gain information on the local dust environment. It is not fully understood how this PVDF dust detector signal is generated, so at present can only be used as a dust counter. In this thesis I discuss the importance of the study of dust phenomena, describe the accelerator experiment, and describe a study conducted to determine the underlying physical principles of PVDF dust detectors. This included measuring crater size scaling laws, measuring the detailed shape of craters, and applying this data to simulations of the signals being generated by PVDF detectors.

  9. High-fluoride groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N Subba

    2011-05-01

    Fluoride (F(-)) is essential for normal bone growth, but its higher concentration in the drinking water poses great health problems and fluorosis is common in many parts of India. The present paper deals with the aim of establishment of facts of the chemical characteristics responsible for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater, after understanding the chemical behavior of F(-) in relation to pH, total alkalinity (TA), total hardness (TH), carbonate hardness (CH), non-carbonate hardness (NCH), and excess alkalinity (EA) in the groundwater observed from the known areas of endemic fluorosis zones of Andhra Pradesh that have abundant sources of F(-)-bearing minerals of the Precambrians. The chemical data of the groundwater shows that the pH increases with increase F(-); the concentration of TH is more than the concentration of TA at low F(-) groundwater, the resulting water is represented by NCH; the TH has less concentration compared to TA at high F(-) groundwater, causing the water that is characterized by EA; and the water of both low and high concentrations of F(-) has CH. As a result, the F(-) has a positive relation with pH and TA, and a negative relation with TH. The operating mechanism derived from these observations is that the F(-) is released from the source into the groundwater by geochemical reactions and that the groundwater in its flowpath is subjected to evapotranspiration due to the influence of dry climate, which accelerates a precipitation of CaCO(3) and a reduction of TH, and thereby a dissolution of F(-). Furthermore, the EA in the water activates the alkalinity in the areas of alkaline soils, leading to enrichment of F(-). Therefore, the alkaline condition, with high pH and EA, and low TH, is a more conducive environment for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater.

  10. Fluoride and lead adsorption on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuguang; LI Yanhui

    2004-01-01

    The properties and applications of CNT have been studied extensively since Iijima discovered them in 1991[1,2]. They have exceptional mechanical properties and unique electrical property, highly chemical stability and large specific surface area. Thus far, they have widely potential applications in many fields. They can be used as reinforcing materials in composites[3], field emissions[4], hydrogen storage[5], nanoelectronic components[6], catalyst supports[7], adsorption material and so on. However, the study on the potential application of CNT, environmental protection field in particular, was hardly begun.Long[8] et al. reported that CNT had a significantly higher dioxin removal efficiency than that of activated carbon. The Langmuir adsorption constant is 2.7 × 1052, 1.3 × 1018 respectively. The results indicated that CNT is potential candidate for the removal of micro-organic pollutants. However, the reports on the CNT used as fluoride and heavy metal adsorbent are seldom.In this paper, A novel material, alumina supported on carbon nanotubes (Al2O3/CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and Al(NO3)3. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra demonstrate that alumina is amorphous, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that CNT and alumina are homogeneously mixed. Furthermore, the fluoride adsorption behavior on the surface of Al2O3/CNT has been investigated and compared with other adsorbents. The results indicate that Al2O3/CNT has a high adsorption capacity, with a saturation adsorption capacity of 39.4 mg/g. It is also found that the adsorption capacity of Al2O3/CNT is 3.0~4.5 times that of γ-Al2O3while almost equal to that of IRA-410 polymeric resin at 25 ℃. The adsorption isotherms of fluoride on Al2O3/CNT is fit the Freundlich equation well, optimal pH ranging from 5.0 to 9.0.Also in this paper, a novel material, modified carbon nanotubes (CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and HNO3 under boiling condition. Infrared spectroscopy (IR

  11. Hydrogen energy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzano, F J; Braun, C [eds.

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to define the near term and long term prospects for the use of hydrogen as an energy delivery medium. Possible applications of hydrogen are defined along with the associated technologies required for implementation. A major focus in the near term is on industrial uses of hydrogen for special applications. The major source of hydrogen in the near term is expected to be from coal, with hydrogen from electric sources supplying a smaller fraction. A number of potential applications for hydrogen in the long term are identified and the level of demand estimated. The results of a cost benefit study for R and D work on coal gasification to hydrogen and electrolytic production of hydrogen are presented in order to aid in defining approximate levels of R and D funding. A considerable amount of data is presented on the cost of producing hydrogen from various energy resources. A key conclusion of the study is that in time hydrogen is likely to play a role in the energy system; however, hydrogen is not yet competitive for most applications when compared to the cost of energy from petroleum and natural gas.

  12. The effect of water fluoride concentration on dental caries and fluorosis in five Iran provinces: A multi-center two-phase study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Gholamhossein; Valaie, Nasser; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Water fluoride level is unknown in many regions of Iran. Besides, only few non-controlled studies world-wide have assessed the effect of water fluoride on dental fluorosis and caries. We aimed to measure the fluoride level of 76 water supplies in 54 cities and evaluate the effect of fluoride on dental caries and fluorosis in a large multi-project study. Materials and Methods: In the first phase (cross-sectional), fluoride levels of 76 water tanks in 54 cities/villages in five provinces of Iran were randomly evaluated in five subprojects. In the second phase (retrospective cohort), 1127 middle school children (563 cohort and 564 control subjects) in the high and low ends of fluoride concentration in each subproject were visited. Their decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) and fluorosis states were assessed. The data were analyzed using Chi-square, Mann-Whitney U and independent-samples t-test (α = 0.05). Results: Mean fluoride level was 0.298 ± 0.340 mg/L in 54 cities/villages. Only eight water tanks had fluoride levels within the normal range and only one was higher than normal and the rest (67 tanks) were all at low levels. Overall, a significant association was observed between fluoride level and fluorosis. However, this was not the case in all areas, as in 2 of 5 provinces, the effect of fluoride on fluorosis was not confirmed. In 4 of the 5 areas studied, there was a significant link between fluoride level and DMFT. Conclusion: Extremely low fluoride levels in Iran cities are an alarming finding and need attention. Higher fluoride is likely to reduce dental caries while increasing fluorosis. This finding was not confirmed in all the areas studied. PMID:25709672

  13. Association of Down's syndrome and water fluoride level: a systematic review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonagh Marian

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A review of the safety and efficacy of drinking water fluoridation was commissioned by the UK Department of Health to investigate whether the evidence supported a beneficial effect of water fluoridation and whether there was any evidence of adverse effects. Down's syndrome was one of the adverse effects reported. The aim of this review is to examine the evidence for an association between water fluoride level and Down's syndrome. Methods A systematic review of research. Studies were identified through a comprehensive literature search, scanning citations and online requests for papers. Studies in all languages which investigated the incidence of Down's syndrome in areas with different levels of fluoride in their water supplies were included. Study inclusion and quality was assessed independently by 2 reviewers. A qualitative analysis was conducted. Results Six studies were included. All were ecological in design and scored poorly on the validity assessment. The estimates of the crude relative risk ranged from 0.84 to 3.0. Four studies showed no significant associations between the incidence of Down's syndrome and water fluoride level and two studies by the same author found a significant (p Conclusions The evidence of an association between water fluoride level and Down's syndrome incidence is inconclusive.

  14. Water fluoridation in the Blue Mountains reduces risk of tooth decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R W; Hsiau, A C Y; Dennison, P J; Patterson, A; Jalaludin, B

    2009-12-01

    In April 1992, the fluoride concentration in the Blue Mountains water supply was adjusted to 1 mg/L. Baseline dmft/DMFT has been determined in children attending schools in the region and in the adjacent reference region of Hawkesbury, fluoridated since 1968. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the water fluoridation programme in the Blue Mountains. In 2003, children attending the same schools were sampled. Residential history data were obtained by questionnaire and caries experience was assessed according to WHO guidelines. The analysis was restricted to lifelong resident children aged 5-11 years. The baseline and follow-up dmft scores for Blue Mountains children aged 5-8 years were 2.36 and 0.67, respectively. The age-adjusted decrease in odds of experiencing one or more dmft due to fluoridation was 0.26 (CI(95) 0.19, 0.37). The corresponding DMFT scores for Blue Mountains children aged 8-11 were 0.76 and 0.21 and the corresponding decrease in odds of experiencing one or more DMFT due to fluoridation was 0.25 (CI(95) 0.16, 0.40). Tooth decay reduction observed in the Blue Mountains corresponds to high rates reported elsewhere and demonstrates the substantial benefits of water fluoridation.

  15. Distribution of fluoride in groundwater of Maku area, northwest of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari Moghaddam, Asghar; Fijani, Elham

    2008-11-01

    High fluoride groundwater occurs in Maku area, in the north of West Azarbaijan province, northwest of Iran. Groundwater is the main source of drinking water for the area residents. Groundwater samples were collected from 72 selected points including 40 basaltic and 32 nonbasaltic springs and wells, in two stages, during June and August 2006. The areas with high fluoride concentrations have been identified, and the possible causes for its variation have been investigated. Regional hydrogeochemical investigation indicates that water-rock interaction is probably the main reason for the high concentration of ions in groundwater. The concentration of F- in groundwater is positively correlated with that of HCO3 - and Na+, indicating that groundwater with high HCO3 - and Na+ concentrations help to dissolve some fluoride-rich minerals. All of the water samples, collected from the basaltic areas do not meet the water quality standards for fluoride concentration and some other parameters. Hence, it is not suitable for consumption without any prior treatment. Inhabitants of the area that obtain their drinking water supplies from basaltic springs and wells are suffering from dental fluorosis. The population of the study area is at a high risk due to excessive fluoride intake especially when they are unaware of the amount of fluoride being ingested due to lack of awareness.

  16. Nursing Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Nursing Supplies Page Content Article Body Throughout most of ... budget. (Nursing equipment also makes wonderful baby gifts.) Nursing Bras A well-made nursing bra that comfortably ...

  17. The role of fluoride in erosion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Young, Alix; Ganss, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The role of fluoride in erosion therapy has long been questioned. However, recent research has yielded positive results. In this chapter, an overview of the literature is provided regarding the application of fluorides in the prevention and treatment of erosion and erosive wear. The results are presented and discussed for different fluoride sources such as monovalent and polyvalent fluorides, and for different vehicles such as toothpastes, solutions and rinses, as well as varnishes and gels. It is concluded that fluoride applications are very likely to be of use in the preventive treatment of erosive wear. Most promising are high-concentration, acidic formulations and the polyvalent fluoride sources, with the best evidence available for stannous fluoride. However, the evidence base for clinical effectiveness is still small. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Comparison of salivary fluoride levels following use of dentifrices containing different concentrations of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagpal D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Many industrialized countries have reported a decline in caries prevalence over the past few decades. These reductions have been related to the regular use of fluoride dentifrices. Fluoride dentifrices are the most cost-effective and efficient means of caries prevention. However, there have been concerns regarding the risk of fluorosis in children due to the ingestion of dentifrices. This has led to the use of dentifrices with low concentration of fluoride. Salivary fluoride levels after tooth-brushing have been shown to be related to the anticaries efficacy of fluoride dentifrices. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the concentration of fluoride in the dentifrice, on the salivary fluoride level in children. Twenty children in the age group of five to six years were randomly selected and divided into two groups using, either 500ppm or 1000ppm fluoride dentifrice (sodium monofluorophosphate. Salivary fluoride levels at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, minutes after brushing were estimated. The data collected was statistically evaluated using the unpaired t-test. The results showed that salivary fluoride levels following use of 500ppm fluoride dentifrice were significantly lower than 1000ppm fluoride dentifrice. The low salivary fluoride levels may thereby reduce the anticaries efficacy. Hence, the pros and cons of recommending a low fluoride concentration dentifrice must be judiciously considered.

  19. Fluoride remediation using floating macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Six aquatic macrophytes, such as Pistia stratiotes, Ceratophyllum demersum, Nymphoides indica, Lemna major, Azolla pinnata,and Eichhornia crassipes were considered for remove fluoride from aqueous solution. Five different concentrations (10, 30, 50, and 100 ppm of fluoride solution were taken in 1 L plastic container. Fixed weight (20 g of macrophytes along with 500 ml fluoride solution was taken in each plastic container for 72 hours observation. Results demonstrated all the macrophytes show highest fluoride removal during 24 h to 48 h, but after 72 h their efficiency reduced drastically. The species N. indica showed better removal efficiency than other experimental macrophytes. In general, pigment measurement data indicated higher concentration at 72 h. However, Pistia sp. showed higher concentration of pigmentation at intermediate time interval (48 h. Higher level of dry weight to fresh weight ratio was recorded for L. major and A. pinnata at all concentrations, excepting at 10 ppm. In addition, all macrophytes showed lower RGR at higher concentration. Isotherm study indicated that macrophyte C. demersum is a good fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm whereas L. major with Langmuir isotherm during 24 hours.

  20. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  1. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  2. Alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The knowledge of background alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children is of utmost importance for introducing optimal and safe caries preventive measures for both individuals and communities. The aim of this study was to assess the daily fluoride intake analyzing duplicate samples of food and beverages. An attempt was made to calculate the daily intake of fluoride from food and swallowed toothpaste. Methods Daily alimentary fluoride intake was measured in a group of 36 children with an average age of 4.75 years and an average weight of 20.69 kg at baseline, by means of a double plate method. This was repeated after six months. Parents recorded their child's diet over 24 hours and collected duplicated portions of food and beverages received by children during this period. Pooled samples of food and beverages were weighed and solid food samples were homogenized. Fluoride was quantitatively extracted from solid food samples by a microdiffusion method using hexadecyldisiloxane and perchloric acid. The content of fluoride extracted from solid food samples, as well as fluoride in beverages, was measured potentiometrically by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results Average daily fluoride intake at baseline was 0.389 (SD 0.054) mg per day. Six months later it was 0.378 (SD 0.084) mg per day which represents 0.020 (SD 0.010) and 0.018 (SD 0.008) mg of fluoride respectively calculated per kg bw/day. When adding the values of unwanted fluoride intake from the toothpaste shown in the literature (0.17-1.21 mg per day) the estimate of the total daily intake of fluoride amounted to 0.554-1.594 mg/day and recalculated to the child's body weight to 0.027-0.077 mg/kg bw/day. Conclusions In the children studied, observed daily fluoride intake reached the threshold for safe fluoride intake. When adding the potential fluoride intake from swallowed toothpaste, alimentary intake reached the optimum range for daily fluoride intake. These results showed that

  3. Environmental evaluation of fluoride in drinking water at "Los Altos de Jalisco," in the central Mexico region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Roberto; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge

    Naturally occurring fluoride has been detected and quantified in drinking water in several cities of the "Los Altos de Jalisco" (LAJ) region. LAJ is located in the northeastern part of the state of Jalisco-Mexico, covering an area of 16,410 km2 with a population of 696,318 in 20 municipalities. Drinking water comes mainly from groundwater aquifers, located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which is a volcanic region characterized by hydrothermal activity. Results indicated that water supply from 42% of the municipalities had a fluoride concentration over the Mexican standards of 1.5 mg/L. It is important to notice that there are three cities, Lagos de Moreno (1.66-5.88 mg/L F(-)), Teocaltiche (3.82-18.58 mg/L F(-)), and Encarnación de Díaz (2.58-4.40 mg/L F(-)) where all water samples resulted in fluoride concentration over the maximum contaminant level. The total population from these three cities is over 122,000 inhabitants. Another important city with high levels of fluoride in the water supply was Tepatitlán de Morelos (2 wells with 6.54 and 13.47 mg/L F(-)). In addition to water supply, 30 samples of brand-name bottled water were tested. Surprisingly, 8 samples (27%) demonstrated fluoride level over the standards, mainly Agua de Lagos with 5.27 mg/L. Fluoridated table salt (200-300 mg/kg F(-)) is another important source of fluoride. A large number of people living in the region, mainly school children, might be under adverse health risk because they are consuming contaminated drinking water. It is well known that long-term exposure to water with high levels of fluoride produces severe health problems.

  4. Synthesis and Anion Recognition of Novel Molecular Tweezer Receptors Based on Carbonyl Thiosemicarbazide for Fluoride Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI,Wei; ZHANG,You-Ming; WEI,Tai-Bao

    2008-01-01

    Three title compounds have been designed and synthesized in high yields as novel anion receptors, which show a higher selectivity for F- than other halide ions. The binding properties for fluoride ions of the receptors have been examined by UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy, indicating that a 1 : 1 stoichiometry complex is formed between the receptors and fluoride ions through hydrogen bonding interactions in DMSO solution. In addition, because these receptors have more binding points, they have better binding properties for anions than the molecular tweezer receptors based on thiourea we reported last time.

  5. New Neutral Receptors for Fluoride Based on Calix[4]arene Bearing Thiourea and Amide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘顺英; 徐括喜; 何永炳; 秦海娟; 孟令芝

    2005-01-01

    Two-armed neutral anion receptors (4,5), calix[4]arenes beating thiourea and amide binding sites, were prepared and examined their anion-binding ability by the UV-vis spectra. The results of non-linear curve fitting and Job plot indicate that 4 or 5 forms 1:1 stoichiometry complex with fluoride by hydrogen bonding interactions. Receptors 4 and 5 have an excellent selectivity for fluoride but have no binding ability with acetate, dihydrogen phosphate and the halogen anions (Cl-,Br-,I-).

  6. Fissure seal or fluoride varnish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deery, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register and the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry PlatformStudy selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) with at least 12 months follow-up, in which fissure sealants, or fissure sealants together with fluoride varnishes, were compared with fluoride varnishes alone for preventing caries in occlusal surfaces of permanent teeth of children and adolescents.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. Studies were grouped and analysed on the basis of sealant material type (resin-based sealant and glass ionomer-based sealant, glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer) and different follow-up periods. Odds ratio were calculated for caries or no caries on occlusal surfaces of permanent molar teeth. Mean differences were calculated for continuous outcomes and data. Evidence quality was assessed using GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methods.ResultsEight RCTs involving a total of 1747 children aged five to ten years of age were included. Three trials compared resin-based fissure sealant versus fluoride varnish. Results from two studies (358 children) after two years were combined. Sealants prevented more caries, pooled odds ratio (OR) = 0.69 (95%CI; 0.50 to 0.94). One trial with follow-up at four and nine years found that the caries-preventive benefit for sealants was maintained, with 26% of sealed teeth and 55.8% of varnished teeth having developed caries at nine years. Evidence for glass-ionomer sealants was of low quality. One split-mouth trial analysing 92 children at two-year follow-up found a significant difference in favour of resin-based fissure sealant together with fluoride varnish compared with fluoride varnish only (OR

  7. The prevalence of dental fluorosis in relation to water or salt fluoridation and reported use of fluoride toothpaste in school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagheri, D; McLoughlin, J; Clarkson, J J

    2007-03-01

    To compare prevalence of dental fluorosis (DF) in permanent teeth in children whose domestic water supply was fluoridated since birth with that in a community where fluoridated salt was available. A second aim was to analyse the relationship between DF prevalence and reported use of fluoride toothpaste in early childhood. Cross-sectional study. A representative, random sample of 12-year-old children was examined in water fluoridated Dublin (Ireland) and non-water fluoridated Freiburg (Germany), where fluoridated salt was available. DF was recorded using the Dean's Index. The child's early experience of toothpaste use was recorded using a questionnaire. 377 children in Dublin and 322 children in Freiburg were examined. In Dublin 11.7% of the whole sample had a 'Questionable' level of DF, 9.8% had 'Very Mild', 3.7% had 'Mild' and 0.3% had 'Moderate' fluorosis. The corresponding percentages in Freiburg for all children were 10.9%, 4.0%, 3.4% and 0%. The results suggest that children in Dublin started brushing their teeth at an older age than in Freiburg, but no difference in DF levels was found between 'early' and 'late' users. Fisher's test revealed that the difference in DF levels between the two populations was statistically significant (p=0.03). The prevalence of aesthetically important DF ('Mild' and 'Moderate') was low and similar in both communities and considerably lower than the expected level at water fluoridation concentrations of 1 ppm. However, the prevalence of 'Very Mild' fluorosis was twice as frequent in Dublin than in Freiburg.

  8. Urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after intake of fluoridated milk and use of fluoride-containing toothpaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, M; Twetman, S; Hultgren Talvilahti, A

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after drinking fluoridated milk with 0.185 mg F and 0.375 mg F and to study the impact of use of fluoride toothpaste. Basic research design: Double-blind cross-over study. Participants: Nine healthy children, 2.5-4.5 years...... of age. Intervention: In a randomized order, participants drank 1.5 dl milk once daily for 7 days with no fluoride added (control), 0.185 mg fluoride added and 0.375 mg fluoride added. The experiment was performed twice with (Part I) and without (Part II) parental tooth brushing with 1,000 ppm fluoride...... toothpaste. The fluoride content in the piped drinking water was 0.5 mg F/L. Main outcome measure: Urinary fluoride excretion. Results: The 24-hour urinary fl uoride excretion/kg body weight varied from 0.014 mg F for the placebo intervention and non-fluoride toothpaste to 0.027 mg F for the 0.375 mg...

  9. Global affordability of fluoride toothpaste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmgren Christopher J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Dental caries remains the most common disease worldwide and the use of fluoride toothpaste is a most effective preventive public health measure to prevent it. Changes in diets following globalization contribute to the development of dental caries in emerging economies. The aim of this paper is to compare the cost and relative affordability of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries. The hypothesis is that fluoride toothpaste is not equally affordable in high-, middle- and low-income countries. Methods Data on consumer prices of fluoride toothpastes were obtained from a self-completion questionnaire from 48 countries. The cost of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries was compared and related to annual household expenditure as well as to days of work needed to purchase the average annual usage of toothpaste per head. Results The general trend seems to be that the proportion of household expenditure required to purchase the annual dosage of toothpaste increases as the country's per capita household expenditure decreases. While in the UK for the poorest 30% of the population only 0.037 days of household expenditure is needed to purchase the annual average dosage (182.5 g of the lowest cost toothpaste, 10.75 days are needed in Kenya. The proportion of annual household expenditure ranged from 0.02% in the UK to 4% in Zambia to buy the annual average amount of lowest cost toothpaste per head. Conclusion Significant inequalities in the affordability of this essential preventive care product indicate the necessity for action to make it more affordable. Various measures to improve affordability based on experiences from essential pharmaceuticals are proposed.

  10. Analysis of production models and hydrogen supply for urban collective transportation buses: a case study at Foz do Iguacu; Analise de modelos de producao e abastecimento de hidrogenio para onibus de transporte coletivo urbano: estudo de caso em Foz do Iguacu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riveros-Godoy, Gustavo [Universidade Nacional de Assuncao (Paraguay). Faculdade de Ciencias Quimicas]. E-mail: riveros@qui.una.py; Cavaliero, Carla; Peres, Ennio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica

    2008-07-01

    Even though technical-economical barriers still exist for the development of an economy based in the hydrogen, these difficulties are opportunities for the appearance of new business of goods and services, energetic matrix diversification, focusing of researches activities, development and support to provide sustainability to the new economy. This study presents the technical-economical comparison of hydrogen production and supply models, using the so-called Spilled Turbinable Energy of the Itaipu Hydroelectric Power Plant and available for the transport sector. The substitution of the urban collective diesel bus fleet with fuel cell buses in Foz do Iguacu city was used as a case study in this work. (author)

  11. Dipotassium hydrogencarbonate fluoride monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Kahlenberg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of the title compound, K2(HCO3F·H2O, were obtained as a secondary product after performing flux synthesis experiments aimed at the preparation of potassium rare earth silicates. The basic building unit of the structure is an [(HCO3(H2OF]2− zigzag chain running parallel to [001]. Both types of anions as well as the water molecules reside on mirror planes perpendicular to [010] at y = 0.25 and y = 0.75, respectively. Linkage between the different constituents of the chains is provided by O—H...O and O—H...F hydrogen bonding. The K+ cations are located between the chains and are coordinated by two F and five O atoms in form of a distorted monocapped trigonal prism.

  12. Preparation and characterization of γ-AlOOH @CS magnetic nanoparticle as a novel adsorbent for removing fluoride from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhen; Chen, Wei; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Yu; Dong, Changlong

    2015-04-01

    For this study, a novel adsorbent of γ-AlOOH @CS (pseudoboehmite and chitosan shell) magnetic nanoparticles (ACMN) with magnetic separation capabilities was developed to remove fluoride from drinking water. The adsorbent was first characterized, and then its performance in removing fluoride was evaluated. Kinetic data demonstrated rapid fluoride adsorption with more than 80% fluoride adsorption within the initial 20 min and equilibrium reached in 60 min. Based on the results of kinetic and isotherm models, the fluoride adsorption process on the ACMN's surface was a monolayer adsorption on a homogeneous surface. Thermodynamic parameters presented that the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The mechanism for the adsorption involved electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding. Moreover, the calculated adsorption capacity of the ACMN for fluoride using the Langmuir model was 67.5 mg/g (20°C, pH=7.0±0.1), higher than other fluoride removal adsorbents. This nanoadsorbent performed well over a pH range of 4-10. The study found that PO4(3-) was the co-existing anion most able to hinder the nanoparticle's fluoride adsorption, followed by NO3(-) then Cl(-). Experimental results suggest that ACMN is a promising adsorbent for treating fluoride-contaminated water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Groundwater fluoride enrichment in an active rift setting: Central Kenya Rift case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olaka, Lydia A., E-mail: lydiaolaka@gmail.com [Department of Geology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi (Kenya); Wilke, Franziska D.H. [Geoforschungs Zentrum, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Olago, Daniel O.; Odada, Eric O. [Department of Geology, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi (Kenya); Mulch, Andreas [Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, Senckenberganlage 25, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Institut für Geowissenschaften, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Altenhöferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Musolff, Andreas [UFZ-Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Hydrogeology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater is used extensively in the Central Kenya Rift for domestic and agricultural demands. In these active rift settings groundwater can exhibit high fluoride levels. In order to address water security and reduce human exposure to high fluoride in drinking water, knowledge of the source and geochemical processes of enrichment are required. A study was therefore carried out within the Naivasha catchment (Kenya) to understand the genesis, enrichment and seasonal variations of fluoride in the groundwater. Rocks, rain, surface and groundwater sources were sampled for hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations, the data was statistically and geospatially analyzed. Water sources have variable fluoride concentrations between 0.02–75 mg/L. 73% exceed the health limit (1.5 mg/L) in both dry and wet seasons. F{sup −} concentrations in rivers are lower (0.2–9.2 mg/L) than groundwater (0.09 to 43.6 mg/L) while saline lake waters have the highest concentrations (0.27–75 mg/L). The higher values are confined to elevations below 2000 masl. Oxygen (δ{sup 18}O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic values range from − 6.2 to + 5.8‰ and − 31.3 to + 33.3‰, respectively, they are also highly variable in the rift floor where they attain maximum values. Fluoride base levels in the precursor vitreous volcanic rocks are higher (between 3750–6000 ppm) in minerals such as cordierite and muscovite while secondary minerals like illite and kaolinite have lower remnant fluoride (< 1000 ppm). Thus, geochemical F{sup −} enrichment in regional groundwater is mainly due to a) rock alteration, i.e. through long residence times and natural discharge and/or enhanced leakages of deep seated geothermal water reservoirs, b) secondary concentration fortification of natural reservoirs through evaporation, through reduced recharge and/or enhanced abstraction and c) through additional enrichment of fluoride after volcanic emissions. The findings are useful to help improve water management

  14. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J

  15. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  16. Focus on fluorides: update on the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M

    2014-06-01

    Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluoride Varnishes--Is There a Correlation Between Fluoride Release and Deposition on Enamel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolis, Carlo; Härtli, Gian Peider; Lendenmann, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride uptake of enamel after application of fluoride varnishes was compared with fluoride release into artificial saliva. The hypothesis was that fluoride uptake is higher for products exhibiting faster fluoride release. Fluoride varnishes, i.e. Fluor Protector S, Duraphat, MI Varnish, Clinpro White Varnish, Profluorid Varnish and Enamel Pro Varnish were applied on bovine enamel specimens. Subsequently, specimens were incubated in artificial saliva. After removal of the varnishes, surface bound fluoride was extracted with potassium hydroxide and measured with an ion-selective electrode. Structurally bound fluoride was etched from the same specimens with perchloric acid. Fluoride release of varnish films into artificial saliva was measured for comparison. After 4 h in artificial saliva, the highest total enamel fluoride uptake of 47.9 μg F·cm-² was found with Fluor Protector S, followed by Enamel Pro Varnish with 22.1 μg F·cm-². The other products ranged between 12-16 μg F·cm-². This was several times higher than the negative control. Fluoride uptake did not correlate with release into artificial saliva. During the first 4 h, Duraphat released the lowest and MI Varnish the highest amount of fluoride with 7.7 and 249 μg F·cm-², respectively. The fluoride uptake of these two products was not statistically different. Enamel fluoride uptake cannot be predicted from the fluoride release rate of a product. Hence, based on the results of this study, fluoride release into artificial saliva is no measure for the efficacy of a fluoride varnish.

  18. Focus on Fluorides: Update on the Use of Fluoride for the Prevention of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M.

    2014-01-01

    Declarative Title: Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Background Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Methods Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Conclusions The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. PMID:24929594

  19. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, 18F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  20. Exposure to fluoridated water and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder prevalence among children and adolescents in the United States: an ecological association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Ashley J; Till, Christine

    2015-02-27

    Epidemiological and animal-based studies have suggested that prenatal and postnatal fluoride exposure has adverse effects on neurodevelopment. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between exposure to fluoridated water and Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) prevalence among children and adolescents in the United States. Data on ADHD prevalence among 4-17 year olds collected in 2003, 2007 and 2011 as part of the National Survey of Children's Health, and state water fluoridation prevalence from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) collected between 1992 and 2008 were utilized. State prevalence of artificial water fluoridation in 1992 significantly positively predicted state prevalence of ADHD in 2003, 2007 and 2011, even after controlling for socioeconomic status. A multivariate regression analysis showed that after socioeconomic status was controlled each 1% increase in artificial fluoridation prevalence in 1992 was associated with approximately 67,000 to 131,000 additional ADHD diagnoses from 2003 to 2011. Overall state water fluoridation prevalence (not distinguishing between fluoridation types) was also significantly positively correlated with state prevalence of ADHD for all but one year examined. Parents reported higher rates of medically-diagnosed ADHD in their children in states in which a greater proportion of people receive fluoridated water from public water supplies. The relationship between fluoride exposure and ADHD warrants future study.

  1. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell carbon: A calcium-rich promising adsorbent for fluoride removal from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, V; Rajkumar, S; Murugesh, S; Darchen, A

    2012-07-30

    Tamarindus indica fruit shells (TIFSs) are naturally calcium rich compounds. They were impregnated with ammonium carbonate and then carbonized, leading to ammonium carbonate activated ACA-TIFS carbon. The resulting materials and carbon arising from virgin fruit shells V-TIFS were characterized and assayed as adsorbent for the removal of fluoride anions from groundwater. The fluoride scavenging ability of TIFS carbons was due to naturally dispersed calcium compounds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that TIFS carbon contained a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. Batch studies on the fluoride removal efficiency of TIFS carbons with respect to contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, and co-ion interference were conducted. Applicability of various kinetic models (viz., pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich) and sorption isotherms were tested for batch techniques. The fluoride removal capacity of TIFS carbons was found to be 91% and 83% at a pH of 7.05 for V-TIFS and ACA-TIFS carbons, respectively. The practical applicability of TIFS carbons using groundwater samples was approved. The fluoride removal was greater in groundwater without hydrogen carbonate ions than those containing these ions. The characterizations of fluoride unloaded and loaded TIFS carbons were done by SEM and XRD studies.

  2. 76 FR 37129 - Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F-18) Injection, 10 to 200 Millicuries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F... Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (sodium fluoride F-18) injection, 10... FLUORIDE F 18 injection, 10 to 200 mCi/mL, if all other legal and regulatory requirements are met. FOR...

  3. External control of the public water supply in 29 Brazilian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzely Adas Saliba Moimaz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The fluoridation of public water supplies is considered the most efficient public health measure for dental caries prevention. However, fluoride levels in the public water supply must be kept constant and adequate for the population to gain preventive benefit. The aim of this study was to analyze fluoride levels in the public water supply of 29 Brazilian municipalities during a 48-month period from November 2004 to October 2008. Three collection sites were defined for each source of municipal public water supply. Water samples were collected monthly and analyzed at the Research Laboratory of the Nucleus for Public Health (NEPESCO, Public Health Postgraduate Program, Araçatuba Dental School (UNESP. Of the 6862 samples analyzed, the fluoride levels of 53.5% (n = 3671 were within the recommended parameters, those of 30.4% (n = 2084 were below these parameters, and those of 16.1% (n = 1107 were above recommended values. Samples from the same collection site showed temporal variability in fluoride levels. Variation was also observed among samples from collection sites with different sources within the same municipality. Although 53.5% of the samples contained the recommended fluoride levels, these findings reinforce the importance of monitoring to minimize the risk of dental fluorosis and to achieve the maximum benefit in the prevention of dental caries.

  4. Salivary fluoride levels after use of high-fluoride dentifrice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Glauber Campos; Cruz, Priscila Figueiredo; Bohn, Ana Clarissa Cavalcante Elvas; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate salivary fluoride (F) availability after toothbrushing with a high-F dentifrice. Twelve adult volunteers took part in this crossover and blind study. F concentration in saliva was determined after brushing with a high-F dentifrice (5000 µg F/g) or with a conventional F concentration dentifrice (1100 µg F/g) followed by a 15 mL distilled water rinse. Samples of nonstimulated saliva were collected on the following times: before (baseline), and immediately after spit (time = 0) and after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. F analysis was performed with a fluoride-sensitive electrode and the area under curve of F salivary concentration × time (µg F/mL × min(-1)) was calculated. At baseline, no significant difference was found among dentifrices (P > 0.05). After brushing, both dentifrices caused an elevated fluoride level in saliva; however salivary F concentration was significantly higher at all times, when high-F dentifrice was used (P dentifrices (P dentifrice enhanced the bioavailability of salivary F, being an option for caries management in patients with high caries risk.

  5. Arsenic and fluoride in the groundwater of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armienta, M A; Segovia, N

    2008-08-01

    Concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above Mexican drinking water standards have been detected in aquifers of various areas of Mexico. This contamination has been found to be mainly caused by natural sources. However, the specific processes releasing these toxic elements into groundwater have been determined in a few zones only. Many studies, focused on arsenic-related health effects, have been performed at Comarca Lagunera in northern México. High concentrations of fluoride in water were also found in this area. The origin of the arsenic there is still controversial. Groundwater in active mining areas has been polluted by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic-rich minerals contaminate the fractured limestone aquifer at Zimapán, Central México. Tailings and deposits smelter-rich fumes polluted the shallow granular aquifer. Arsenic contamination has also been reported in the San Antonio-El Triunfo mining zone, southern Baja California, and Santa María de la Paz, in San Luis Potosí state. Even in the absence of mining activities, hydrogeochemistry and statistical techniques showed that arsenopyrite oxidation may also contaminate water, as in the case of the Independencia aquifer in the Mexican Altiplano. High concentrations of arsenic have also been detected in geothermal areas like Los Azufres, Los Humeros, and Acoculco. Prevalence of dental fluorosis was revealed by epidemiological studies in Aguascalientes and San Luis Potosí states. Presence of fluoride in water results from dissolution of acid-volcanic rocks. In Mexico, groundwater supplies most drinking water. Current knowledge and the geology of Mexico indicate the need to include arsenic and fluoride determinations in groundwater on a routine basis, and to develop interdisciplinary studies to assess the contaminant's sources in all enriched areas.

  6. Renal fluoride excretion in children following topical application of fluoride varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hoyos, F; Barbería, E; García-Camba, P; Varela, M

    2012-12-01

    To demonstrate that the application of dental fluoride varnishes in children increases urinary fluoride excretion. From a randomly assembled group of 42 children aged between 5 and 8 years, residing in a community with non-fluoridated water, spot urinary samples were taken before the topical application of dental fluoride varnish and 2 hours afterwards. In an age-matched control group of 16 children from the same community, who received no treatment, samples were taken the same way. The urinary excretion of fluoride was analysed by determining fluoride ion (F-) level and fluoride/creatinine (F/Cr) ratio in the urine. In the study group, the average pre- and post-treatment F/Cr ratios were 0.42 and 1.38 mg/g, respectively (p fluoride varnish leads to a significant increase in urine F-, which is attributable to the application of the product.

  7. Estimated fluoride intake of 6-month-old infants in four dietary regions of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophaug, R H; Singer, L; Harland, B F

    1980-02-01

    Eleven composite food groups comprising the infant "market basket" food collections for 1977 or 1978 from each of four dietary regions of the United States were analyzed for their fluoride content. Based upon the determined fluoride content of each composite and Food and Drug Administration estimates of food consumption the daily fluoride intake of an average 6-month-old infant residing in each of the dietary regions was calculated. The daily fluoride intake varied from 0.207 mg/day in Grand Rapids, Mich. (north central dietary region) to 0.541 mg/day in Orlando, Fla. (south dietary region). Flouride intakes of 0.272 and 0.354 mg/day were calculated for Philadelphia, Pa. (northeast dietary region) and Los Angeles, Calif. (west dietary region), respectively. The fluoride content of the water supplies ranged from 0.37 ppm (Los Angeles) to 1.04 ppm (Grand Rapids). Drinking water, dairy products and substitutes (other than milk), and grain and cereal products contributed 44 to 80% of the daily fluoride intake. In three of the four dietary regions the daily fluoride intake was less than the optimum level of 0.05 mg/kg body weight.

  8. The Fluoride Content of Yerba Mate Depending on the Country of Origin and the Conditions of the Infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukomska, A; Jakubczyk, K; Maciejewska, D; Baranowska-Bosiacka, I; Janda, K; Goschorska, M; Chlubek, D; Bosiacka, B; Gutowska, I

    2015-10-01

    There are many reports of the positive effect of yerba mate on the human body. Elemental composition analysis of yerba mate revealed the presence of many microelements and macroelements, but there is no literature data referencing the content and the effect of the method of preparing the yerba mate infusion on the amount of released fluoride and thus the amount of this element supplied to the human body. Therefore, in the traditional way (cold and hot), we prepared infusions of yerba mate from different countries and determined in samples content of fluoride using potentiometric method. Hot infusions resulted in statistically significant (p = 0.03) increases in the amount of fluoride released from the dried material to the water, compared to brewing with water at room temperature. The successive refills of hot water also resulted in a release of the same amount of fluoride, although smaller than the infusion with water at room temperature (at the third refill, it was statistically significantly smaller at p = 0.003). With an increase in the number of hot water refills, the amount of fluoride released from the sample portion significantly decreased. Similar results were recorded when analyzing samples depending on the country of origin. The amount of fluoride released into the water differed statistically significantly depending on the country of origin. The most fluoride was determined in the infusions of yerba mate from Argentina and the least in infusions from Paraguay.

  9. Análise da fluoretação da água de abastecimento público da zona urbana do município de Campo Grande (MS Water fluoridation analysis of Campo Grande (MS urban zone public supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Luiz Lessa Bellé

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve por objetivo analisar a concentração de fluoreto na água que flui das torneiras da zona urbana do município de Campo Grande (MS. Para tanto, foram coletadas amostras de água de 21 escolas situadas nos sete subdistritos da cidade, em três oportunidades diferentes para análise do teor de fluoreto, determinada pelo método do eletrodo específico (medidor de fluoreto combinado Orion 9609 BN, acoplado a um potenciômetro digital EA-940 da Orion. Os resultados mostraram que 63,5% das amostras coletadas apresentaram níveis aceitáveis (entre 0,6 a 0,8 ppm de fluoreto e 36,5%, níveis inaceitáveis. Em relação à condição dos locais de coleta, 76,2% foram consideradas adequadas e 23,8%, inadequadas.The objective of this study was to analyze the fluoride concentration on the water that flows of the tap in the urban area of the city of Campo Grande (MS. For the fluoride concentration analysis, it was collected water samples of 21 schools placed in the 7 sub districts of the city, in 3 different opportunities, was made by the specific electrode method (using an Orion 9609 BN combined fluoride measuring electrode, coupled with an Orion EA-940 digital potentiometer. The results showed that 63.5% of the water samples presented acceptable fluoride levels (between 0.60 and 0.80 ppm and 36.5%, unacceptable levels. In relation to the condition of the collect places, 76.2% were considered appropriate and 23.8% were inappropriate.

  10. Fluoride Removal from pretreated Photovoltaic Wastewater by Electrocoagulation: An Investigation of The Effect of Operational Parameters

    KAUST Repository

    Drouiche, Nadjib

    2012-03-20

    In this paper, application of electrocoagulation using common iron electrode to a simulated photovoltaic wastewater after precipitation with lime (Ca(OH)2) was investigated. Electrocoagulation process delivers the coagulant in situ as the sacrificial anode corrodes, while the simultaneous evolution of hydrogen at the cathode allows pollutant removal by flotation. Several working parameters, such as initial pH, applied potential and distance between the electrodes, were studied in an attempt to achieve higher fluoride removal efficiency. The optimum conditions for the process were identified as pH = 6, the distance between electrodes = 1 and an applied potential of 30 V. Furthermore fluoride removal is under the direct discharge standards.Results showed high effectivenessof the electrocoagulation method in removing fluoride from aqueous solutions.

  11. Oxidative aliphatic C-H fluorination with manganese catalysts and fluoride ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Xiongyi; Groves, John T

    2013-12-01

    Fluorination is a reaction that is useful in improving the chemical stability and changing the binding affinity of biologically active compounds. The protocol described here can be used to replace aliphatic, C(sp(3))-H hydrogen in small molecules with fluorine. Notably, isolated methylene groups and unactivated benzylic sites are accessible. The method uses readily available manganese porphyrin and manganese salen catalysts and various fluoride ion reagents, including silver fluoride (AgF), tetrabutylammonium fluoride and triethylamine trihydrofluoride (TREAT·HF), as the source of fluorine. Typically, the reactions afford 50-70% yield of mono-fluorinated products in one step. Two representative examples, the fragrance component celestolide and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen, are described; they produced useful isolated quantities (250-300 mg, ~50% yield) of fluorinated material over periods of 1-8 h. The procedures are performed in a typical fume hood using ordinary laboratory glassware. No special precautions to rigorously exclude water are required.

  12. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F.

    2007-01-01

    A relatively simple and economical process and apparatus for concentrating hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution at the point of use have been invented. The heart of the apparatus is a vessel comprising an outer shell containing tubular membranes made of a polymer that is significantly more permeable by water than by hydrogen peroxide. The aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to be concentrated is fed through the interstitial spaces between the tubular membranes. An initially dry sweep gas is pumped through the interiors of the tubular membranes. Water diffuses through the membranes and is carried away as water vapor mixed into the sweep gas. Because of the removal of water, the hydrogen peroxide solution flowing from the vessel at the outlet end is more concentrated than that fed into the vessel at the inlet end. The sweep gas can be air, nitrogen, or any other gas that can be conveniently supplied in dry form and does not react chemically with hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Determination of Fluoride in Various Samples and Some Infusions Using a Fluoride Selective Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    TOKALIOĞLU, Şerife; Kartal, Şenol; ŞAHİN, Uğur

    2004-01-01

    The determination of fluoride in some environmental samples was performed using a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Fluoride concentrations were determined in drinking waters (from different provinces, districts and villages in Turkey), fruit juices, bottled water samples, toothpastes and tooth powders, liquors of Turkish coffee, coffee, linden, rose hip, and various brand tea infusions, and dust samples collected from the Erciyes University campus car park. The average fluoride conc...

  14. Relationship between fluoride concentration in drinking water and mortality rate from uterine cancer in Okinawa prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohyama, E

    1996-12-01

    The Okinawa Islands located in the southern-most part of Japan were under U.S. administration from 1945 to 1972. During that time, fluoride was added to the drinking water supplies in most regions. The relationship between fluoride concentration in drinking water and uterine cancer mortality rate was studied in 20 municipalities of Okinawa and the data were analyzed using correlation and multivariate statistics. The main findings were as follows. (1) A significant positive correlation was found between fluoride concentration in drinking water and uterine cancer mortality in 20 municipalities (r = 0.626, p divorce rate, this association was considerably significant. (3) Furthermore, the time trends in the uterine cancer mortality rate appear to be related to changes in water fluoridation practices.

  15. Hydrogen application dynamics and networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E. [Air Liquide Large Industries, Champigny-sur-Marne (France)

    2010-12-30

    The Chemical Industry consumes large volumes of hydrogen as raw material for the manufacture of numerous products (e.g. polyamides and polyurethanes account for 60% of hydrogen demand). The hydrogen demand was in the recent past and will continue to be driven by the polyurethane family. China will host about 60% of new hydrogen needs over the period 2010-2015 becoming the first hydrogen market next year and reaching 25% of market share by 2015 (vs. only 4% in 2001). Air Liquide supplies large volumes of Hydrogen (and other Industrial Gases) to customers by on-site plants and through pipeline networks which offer significant benefits such as higher safety, reliability and flexibility of supply. Thanks to its long term strategy and heavy investment in large units and pipeline networks, Air Liquide is the Industrial Gas leader in most of the world class Petrochemical basins (Rotterdam, Antwerp, US Gulf Coast, Yosu, Caojing,..) (orig.)

  16. Estuarine response of fluoride - Investigations in Azhikode Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Joseph, T.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Concentrations of fluoride in Azhikode estuarine region (Kerala, India) were measured as a function of chlorinity during the different seasons. The type of behaviour indicated that fluoride was regulated by sea water incursion alone. Fluoride...

  17. Magnesium Fluoride Reduction Vessel Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-26

    Carolina Metals, the fluoride is reduced to power by means of a Mikro #2 hemmer mill (Figure 5). The material is then separated into the different...The jolter table previously referred to in the liner pro - ceasing operation, is the knockout station. As shown in Figure 36, the vessel is inverted...was much more extensive than normally performed to establish the quality of thý metal pro - duced using the MgF2 liners. There are no indications of

  18. Fluoride Importance in Controlling Caries and Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s. Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, se...

  19. Fluoride Importance in Controlling Caries and Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s. Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, se...

  20. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  1. Effect of titanium tetrafluoride, amine fluoride and fluoride varnish on enamel erosion in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A; Ruben, JL; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of 1 and 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) gels, amine fluoride (AmF) 1 and 0.25% and a fluoride varnish (FP) on the prevention of dental erosion. Two experimental groups served as controls, one with no pretreatment and another one pre-treated with a fluoride

  2. Batch and Column Operations for the Removal of Fluoride from Aqueous Solution Using Bottom Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.T. Ramesh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people rely on drinking water that contains excess fluoride. In fluoride endemic areas, especially small communities with staggered habitat, defluoridation of potable water supply is still a problem. In this study, adsorption potential of bottom ash was investigated for defluoridation of drinking water using batch and continuous fixed bed column studies. Batch sorptive defluoridation conducted under experimental conditions such as pH, temperature, particle size, agitation time and dosage. Adsorption isotherms have been modeled by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The fluoride sorption capacity at breakthrough point for bottom ash was greatly influenced by bed depth. The results were then analyzed using the Bed Depth Service Time (BDST Model and various performance parameters like Adsorption Capacity, Critical Bed Depth, and Adsorption Rate Constant were evaluated. With the observed data Thomas model and Yoon Nelson Model fitted well and constants are found.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.60.2.1396

  3. Effect of low-concentration daily topical fluoride application on fluoride release of giomer and compomer: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Dhull

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: To determine the effect of low-concentration daily topical fluoride application on fluoride release of Giomer and Compomer and to compare the amount of fluoride release from Giomer to that of Compomer. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight specimens of each Giomer and Compomer were divided into four treatment groups, namely, control group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once-daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm twice-daily group and fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once-daily + fluoridated mouthwash (225 ppm group. Each specimen was suspended in demineralising solution for 6 h and remineralising solution for 18 h. Fluoride release was measured in both the demineralising solution and the remineralising solution daily for 21 days. Total daily fluoride release for each specimen was calculated by adding the amount released in the demineralising solution to that released in the remineralising solution. Results and Conclusion: The fluoride release (ppm was found to be higher in Giomer when compared with Compomer. The fluoride released from Giomer and Compomer was significantly higher in the acidic demineralising solution than in the neutral remineralising solution. It was found that increasing fluoride exposure significantly increased fluoride release from Giomer and Compomer. It was found that the fluoride release from the subgroups of Giomer and Compomer was in the following order: fluoridated dentifrice twice-daily > fluoridated dentifrice once-daily + fluoridated mouthwash > fluoridated dentifrice once-daily > control group. It was found that Giomer showed a greater fluoride uptake Compomer.

  4. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stange, Sy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Couture, Aaron J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mckigney, Edward A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Del Sesto, Rico E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilbertson, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reifarth, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  5. Gramicidin D enhances the antibacterial activity of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, James W.; ZHOU, ZHIYUAN; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is a toxic anion found in many natural environments. One of the major bacterial defenses against fluoride is the cell envelope, which limits passage of the membrane-impermeant fluoride anion. Accordingly, compounds that enhance the permeability of bacterial membranes to fluoride should also enhance fluoride toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that the pore-forming antibiotic gramicidin D increases fluoride uptake in B. subtilis and that the antibacterial activity of this compound...

  6. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Clifton M.; Erin C. Holahan; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing i...

  7. Fluoride assay methodology for carbonated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, Judith R; Levy, Steven M; Wefel, James S; Patterson, Kristine Y; Cutrufelli, Rena; Pehrsson, Pamela R; Holden, Joanne M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review different methodological techniques used for the assessment of fluoride in carbonated beverages, and compare results using a fluoride ion electrode direct read method with and without a prior decarbonation treatment. The carbonated beverages in this study were either purchased locally at grocery stores in Iowa City, Iowa, or purchased as part of a national representative sampling approach included in the National Fluoride Database and Intake Assessment Study (NFDIAS). The samples were compared with and without a decarbonating process. Soda pop and beer samples were analyzed by removing a 1-ml sample and adding a 1-ml buffer solution. The fluoride concentration of the sample and buffer combination was then determined using a fluoride ion specific electrode. There was no significant difference in the fluoride concentration of the samples with or without prior decarbonation. The mean absolute difference between the soda pop group with and without decarbonation was 0.01 ppm F, while results from the beer samples showed variation of 0.00 to 0.02 parts per million fluoride (ppm F). These differences were not statistically significant for the soda pop or beer groups (P=.50 and P=.74, respectively). Whether or not decarbonation was conducted prior to analysis, the fluoride assay results were the same. Therefore, decarbonation of soda pop and beer was deemed unnecessary prior to fluoride analysis.

  8. High fluoride exposure in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, V A; Gitelman, H J

    1990-04-01

    The observation of higher plasma flouride levels in our hemodialysis (HD) patients than our continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients (4.0 +/- 0.5 mumol/L [n = 17] v 2.5 +/- 0.3 mumol/L [n = 17], P less than 0.005) prompted an evaluation of fluoride metabolism during HD. We found that serum fluoride was completely ultrafiltrable across cuprophane membranes (99% +/- 4%) and that HD produced acute changes in plasma fluoride levels that correlated well with the fluoride gradient between plasma and dialysis fluid at the start of dialysis. Our HD fluids contained significantly higher fluoride concentrations than were present in commercially prepared peritoneal dialysis fluid. Our fluids are prepared from fluoridated tap water that is purified by reverse osmosis (RO). We conclude that the different concentrations of fluoride in our dialysis fluids account for the differences in the plasma flouride concentrations between our dialysis groups. Since many HD units rely on RO systems to purify fluoridated tap water, it is likely that many HD patients are being exposed inadvertently to increased concentrations of fluoride.

  9. Application of fluoride iontophoresis to improve remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H E; Kwon, H K; Kim, B I

    2009-10-01

    Iontophoresis is generally used to maximize the therapeutic action of drugs in medicine. This technique can be used to improve the remineralization effect of topical fluoride applications in dentistry. The aim of this study was to compare the remineralization effect of fluoride iontophoresis (FI) with the conventional fluoride application (CFA) method in vitro. Sixty bovine enamel specimens were divided into three groups: no fluoride treatment, CFA and FI. Fluoride was applied to the demineralized specimens for 4 min in each experimental group. The types of fluoride system used for application were 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (12 300 p.p.m. F, pH 3.5) and 2% sodium fluoride solution (9050 p.p.m. F, pH 7) in the experimental groups. All the specimens were then placed in a remineralizing solution for 24 h. This cycle was repeated five times. An iontophoresis device (0.4 mA, 12 V) was used in the FI groups. The efficacy of this technique was evaluated by measuring changes in the surface microhardness and lesion depth of the specimens using confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Data were analysed using anova and Tukey's post hoc test (P fluoride application methods (P > 0.05). When the lesion depth was measured using CLSM imaging, there was also no significant difference between the FI and CFA groups (P > 0.05). In conclusion, FI was not significantly superior to CFA in terms of the remineralization effect.

  10. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren, C.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Deng, D.M.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR w

  11. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren, C.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Deng, D.M.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR

  12. Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit shell carbon: A calcium-rich promising adsorbent for fluoride removal from groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivasankar, V., E-mail: vsivasankar@tce.edu [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering (Autonomous), Madurai 625015, Tamil Nadu (India); Rajkumar, S. [Department of Chemistry, Thiagarajar College of Engineering (Autonomous), Madurai 625015, Tamil Nadu (India); Murugesh, S. [Department of Chemistry, SACS M.A.V.M.M. Engineering College, Madurai 625301, Tamil Nadu (India); Darchen, A. [UMR CNRS No. 6226 Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, ENSCR, Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes, Cedex 7 (France)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbonization of Tamarind fruit shell improved its defluoridation efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcium carbonate particles were involved in the defluoridation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorbent dose, pH, and fluoride concentration showed significant effects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum adsorption of fluoride was achieved at pH 7-8. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prepared carbons were efficient in treating three natural waters. - Abstract: Tamarindus indica fruit shells (TIFSs) are naturally calcium rich compounds. They were impregnated with ammonium carbonate and then carbonized, leading to ammonium carbonate activated ACA-TIFS carbon. The resulting materials and carbon arising from virgin fruit shells V-TIFS were characterized and assayed as adsorbent for the removal of fluoride anions from groundwater. The fluoride scavenging ability of TIFS carbons was due to naturally dispersed calcium compounds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that TIFS carbon contained a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate. Batch studies on the fluoride removal efficiency of TIFS carbons with respect to contact time, pH, initial fluoride concentration, and co-ion interference were conducted. Applicability of various kinetic models (viz., pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich) and sorption isotherms were tested for batch techniques. The fluoride removal capacity of TIFS carbons was found to be 91% and 83% at a pH of 7.05 for V-TIFS and ACA-TIFS carbons, respectively. The practical applicability of TIFS carbons using groundwater samples was approved. The fluoride removal was greater in groundwater without hydrogen carbonate ions than those containing these ions. The characterizations of fluoride unloaded and loaded TIFS carbons were done by SEM and XRD studies.

  13. Naphthalenyl appended semicarbazone as ;turn on; fluorescent chemosensor for selective recognition of fluoride ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheer, Sabeel M.; Haribabu, Jebiti; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S. P.; Karvembu, Ramasamy; Sreekanth, Anandaram

    2017-10-01

    The reaction of 1-isocyanatonaphthalene with hydrazine hydrate in presence of acetone resulted in the formation of napthyl based semicarbazone (1). The compound has been characterized using UV-Visible, FT-IR, NMR, mass spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) tools. The interaction between 1 and fluoride ion has been investigated by means of UV-Visible and fluorescence spectra. The fluoride ion sensing mechanism of 1 has been studied by hybrid density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods. The added fluoride ion formed intermolecular hydrogen bonds with the protons of N1sbnd H1 and N2sbnd H2 groups of 1 in the ground state. The N1sbnd H1 proton which is closer to naphthalene moiety prefers to bind fluoride anion in the excited state after deprotonation, which lead to excited state proton transfer (ESPT). The fluoride ion sensing process shows a moderate (31.99 kcal/mol) Gibbs free energy. To understand the dynamic features, the transition state (TS) calculation is performed and the change in entropy is found to be -0.6259 kJ/mol, which shows that the sensing process is thermodynamically allowed.

  14. Interaction between a transition-metal fluoride and a transition-metal hydride: water-mediated hydrofluoric acid evolution following fluoride solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierotti, Michele R; Rossin, Andrea; Gobetto, Roberto; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2013-11-04

    The reaction between the nickel(II) PCP pincer fluoride complex ((tBu)PCP)Ni(F) [(tBu)PCP = 2,6-C6H3(CH2P(t)Bu2)2] and the tungsten(II) carbonyl hydride CpW(H)(CO)3 (Cp = η(5)-C5H5(-)) leads to hydrofluoric acid evolution and formation of the bimetallic isocarbonylic species [CpW(CO)2(μ-κ,C:κ,O-CO)···Ni((tBu)PCP)]. The process has been monitored through multinuclear ((19)F, (31)P{(1)H}, (1)H) variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, collecting (19)F T1 data values for a fluoride ligand bound to a transition metal. The extremely short relaxation time (minimum value of 13 ms at 193 K) is ascribed to the large chemical shift anisotropy of the Ni-F bond (688 ppm). The in-depth NMR analysis has revealed that the fluoride-hydride interaction is not direct but water-mediated, at odds with what was previously observed for the "hydride-hydride" case ((tBu)PCP)Ni(H)/CpW(H)(CO)3. Kinetic measurements have unveiled that the first step of the overall mechanism is thought to be solvation of the fluoride ligand (as a result of Ni-F···H2O hydrogen bonding), while further reaction of the solvated fluoride with CpW(H)(CO)3 is extremely slow and competes with the side reaction of fluoride replacement by a water molecule on the nickel center to form the [((tBu)PCP)Ni(H2O)](+) aquo species. Finally, density functional theory analysis of the solvation process through a discrete + continuum model has been accomplished, at the M06//6-31+G(d,p) level of theory, to support the mechanistic hypothesis.

  15. Urinary fluoride output in children following the use of a dual-fluoride varnish formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Polido Kaneshiro Olympio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the bioavailability of fluoride after topical application of a dual-fluoride varnish commercially available in Brazil, when compared to DuraphatTM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The urinary fluoride output was evaluated in seven 5-year-old children after application of the fluoride varnishes, in two different phases. In the first phase (I, children received topical application of the fluoride varnish Duofluorid XII (2.92% fluorine, calcium fluoride + 2.71% fluorine, sodium fluoride, FGM TM. After 1-month interval (phase II, the same amount (0.2 mL of the fluoride varnish Duraphat (2.26% fluorine, sodium fluoride, ColgateTM was applied. Before each application all the volunteers brushed their teeth with placebo dentifrice for 7 days. Urinary collections were carried out 24 h prior up to 48 h after the applications. Fluoride intake from the diet was also estimated. Fluoride concentration in diet samples and urine was analyzed with the fluoride ion-specific electrode and a miniature calomel reference electrode coupled to a potentiometer. Data were tested by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (p<0.05. RESULTS: There were significant differences in the urinary fluoride output between phases I and II. The use of Duofluorid XII did not significantly increase the urinary fluoride output, when compared to baseline levels. The application of Duraphat caused a transitory increase in the urinary fluoride output, returning to baseline levels 48 h after its use. CONCLUSIONS: The tested varnish formulation, which has been shown to be effective in in vitro studies, also can be considered safe.

  16. Dug Well Recharge Method for Insitu Mitigation of Fluoride Contamination in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, G.; Lakshmanan, E.; Gunalan, J.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater with fluoride concentration exceeding 1.5 mg/l is not suitable for drinking water supply as it may cause health issues such as dental and skeletal fluorosis to humans. Several million people around the world has been affected by fluorosis. The objective of the study is to mitigate the problem of fluoride contamination in groundwater by increasing groundwater recharge through a dug well recharge system. The study was carried out in a part of Vaniyar river basin, northwest Tamil Nadu, India where fluorosis is prevalent. A cylindrical pit of 1m diameter and 1.5 m height was constructed during May 2014 at a distance of about 4 m from a dug well existing in this area. This cylindrical pit was divided into 3 compartments and one of them was filled with gravel and one with sand. The third compartment was kept empty for inspection and maintenance. The rainfall collected in a funnel shaped depression was allowed to pass through these compartments to discharge in the nearby dug well through a pipe. The concentration of the fluoride in groundwater from this well was had been monitoring on bi-monthly basis from the year 2012 to 2014. After construction of dug well recharge system, the groundwater level has raised by about 5 m and the fluoride concentration has decreased from 3.1 mg/l to 1.44 mg/l due to recharge. The concentration of fluoride and groundwater level is being monitored on daily basis from June 2014. It is evident that the recharge system constructed is working well and the concentration of fluoride in groundwater is within the permissible limit. The advantage of this dug well recharge system is its low cost and the ease of implementation. Thus this pilot study on dug well recharge system demonstrated it's potential in reducing the concentration of fluoride in groundwater which is more beneficial to the society as they cannot afford the well proven water treatment methods.

  17. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  18. Biogas and Hydrogen Systems Market Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bush, Brian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Melaina, Marc [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This analysis provides an overview of the market for biogas-derived hydrogen and its use in transportation applications. It examines the current hydrogen production technologies from biogas, capacity and production, infrastructure, potential and demand, as well as key market areas. It also estimates the production cost of hydrogen from biogas and provides supply curves at a national level and at point source.

  19. Biogas and Hydrogen Systems Market Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bush, Brian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Melaina, Marc [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This analysis provides an overview of the market for biogas-derived hydrogen and its use in transportation applications. It examines the current hydrogen production technologies from biogas, capacity and production, infrastructure, potential and demand, as well as key market areas. It also estimates the production cost of hydrogen from biogas and provides supply curves at a national level and at point source.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Longevity of Fluoride Release From three Different Fluoride Varnishes – An Invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, NM; Poornima, P; Nagaveni, NB; Neena, IE; Bharath, KP

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluoride varnishes play a pivotal role in inhibition of dental caries by increasing remineralization. Aim To determine the longevity of fluoride release from 3 different fluoride varnishes over a period of time through salivary fluoride estimation. Materials and Methods Twenty four extracted human deciduous anterior teeth were divided into four groups, i.e., ClinproTM XT, Flouritop SR, Flourprotector and Control group. Fluoride varnishes were applied on 3mm x 3mm window on labial surface of the teeth and then the teeth were immersed and stored in artificial saliva. The concentration of fluoride in ppm was measured after 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months. Fluoride release at each time interval for different groups was statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Post Hoc Tukey’s test. Results Although all the fluoride varnishes released fluoride, with greatest release observed during 1st week by Fluoritop SR (66.92±16.30ppm), ClinproTM XT Varnish released consistently and substantially more fluoride than Fluoritop SR and Fluorprotector during 6 months analysis (pVarnish released consistently and substantially more fluoride than other tested products. PMID:27656559

  1. Fluoride intake and its safety among heavy tea drinkers in a British fluoridated city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, G N

    1991-01-01

    Tea-drinking in very young children has been studied in a British city. The results suggested that the fluoride in tea would, in some cases, be sufficient to influence caries. Clinical findings to some extent supported this. The main purpose of the investigation reported here was to determine maximum possible fluoride intake in adults who were heavy tea drinkers in a fluoridated city and relate it to toxic thresholds. Heavy tea drinkers were traced through Health Visitors and voluntary organizations and the volumes and fluoride concentrations of their drinks were measured. Even the highest intake found (9 mg) is below the probable intake in Bartlett, Texas (8 ppm of fluoride), in relation to which no undesirable symptoms have been reported (Leone et al. 1954). This confirms the safety of fluoridation. The effects on fluoride concentration of evaporating soft and hard fluoride-containing waters to small bulk were compared. The results showed ceilings of 3 ppm of fluoride in hard water and about 14 ppm in soft water, much higher than the levels expected on the basis of the usually stated solubility of CaF2 (16 or 8 ppm of fluoride). However, under normal household conditions, it is most unlikely that dangerous levels of fluoride would be ingested from boiled water.

  2. Review on fluoride, with special emphasis on calcium fluoride mechanisms in caries prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M

    1997-10-01

    Low concentrations of fluoride have a beneficial effect on enamel and dentin de- and remineralization. After fluoride treatments, such as topical applications, rinses or dentifrices, salivary fluoride concentrations decrease exponentially in a biphasic manner to very low concentrations within a few hours. For treatments to be effective over periods longer than the brushing and the following salivary clearance, fluoride needs to be deposited and slowly released. Calcium fluoride (or like) deposits act in such a way, owing to a surface covering of phosphate and/or proteins, which makes the CaF2 less soluble under in vivo conditions than in a pure form in inorganic solutions. Moreover, due to the phosphate groups on the surface of the calcium fluoride globules, fluoride is assumed to be released with decreasing pH when the phosphate groups are protonated in the dental plaque.

  3. Determination of fluoride content in drinking water and tea infusions using fluoride ion selective electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Potentiometric analysis of fluoride content (as F- ion in solutions by using fluoride ion-selective electrode is simple, reliable and cheap. Very small concentrations of fluoride-ions (to 10-6 mol/dm3 can be determined by fluoride selective electrode, with regulation of ion strength of a solution and control of concentration of hydroxide ions and interfering ions of metals. The influence of pH and complexing ions of metals can be successfully regulated by the TISAB solution and by preserving pH value in the range from 5.00 to 7.00. The content of fluorides in the samples can be determined by the method of direct potentiometer, and in the case of very low concentration by standard addition method. In this paper it was analyzed the determination of fluoride ions concentration in bottled mineral waters and water from Belgrade plumbing in two Belgrade districts (Palilula and Novi Beograd and in tea, by using the fluoride selective electrode. It was determined that the content of fluoride ions in bottled mineral water significantly differs from values given on declaration, and that content of fluoride ions varies over a period of time. The content of fluoride ions in water from plumbing in two Belgrade districts at the time of analysis was significantly increased and exceeded values given in Regulation for drinking water quality. The received results from the analysis of fluorides in teas show that fluorides exist in teas in different concentrations. There are also differences between the same kinds of tea, which is noted with mint (Mentha piperitae folium, as a consequence of differences between soils where it was planted. As taking of fluorides, according to World Health Organisation recommendation (WHO, is limited in the range from 2 to 4 mg per day, it is necessary to give the content of fluorides on all products that are used in human consumption.

  4. Ion release from, and fluoride recharge of a composite with a fluoride-containing bioactive glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Harry B.; Gwinner, Fernanda; Mitchell, John C.; Ferracane, Jack L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Materials that are capable of releasing ions such as calcium and fluoride, that are necessary for remineralization of dentin and enamel, have been the topic of intensive research for many years. The source of calcium has most often been some form of calcium phosphate, and that for fluoride has been one of several metal fluoride or hexafluorophosphate salts. Fluoride-containing bioactive glass (BAG) prepared by the sol-gel method acts as a single source of both calcium and fluoride ions in aqueous solutions. The objective of this investigation was to determine if BAG, when added to a composite formulation, can be used as a single source for calcium and fluoride ion release over an extended time period, and to determine if the BAG-containing composite can be recharged upon exposure to a solution of 5,000 ppm fluoride. Methods BAG 61 (61% Si; 31% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) and BAG 81 (81% Si; 11% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) were synthesized by the sol gel method. The composite used was composed of 50/50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA, 0.8% EDMAB, 0.4% CQ, and 0.05% BHT, combined with a mixture of BAG (15%) and strontium glass (85%) to a total filler load of 72% by weight. Disks were prepared, allowed to age for 24 h, abraded, then placed into DI water. Calcium and fluoride release was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy and fluoride ion selective electrode methods, respectively, after 2, 22, and 222 h. The composite samples were then soaked for 5 min in an aqueous 5,000 ppm fluoride solution, after which calcium and fluoride release was again measured at 2, 22, and 222 h time points. Results Prior to fluoride recharge, release of fluoride ions was similar for the BAG 61 and BAG 81 composites after 2 h, and also similar after 22 h. At the four subsequent time points, one prior to, and three following fluoride recharge, the BAG 81 composite released significantly more fluoride ions (pfluoride, although the BAG 81 composite was recharged more than the BAG 61 composite. The BAG 61

  5. FLUORIDE LEVELS IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE RICE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    2013-05-05

    May 5, 2013 ... There are several studies reporting the dietary intake of fluoride from water, ..... fluoride in rice samples showed the trend BR > ERR > NERICA > JR > RR > EWR. .... in cooked rice in Iran ranged from 0.2-1.6 mg F/kg [2].

  6. HOUSEHOLD PURIFICATION OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATED MAGADI (TRONA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    Purification of fluoride contaminated magadi is studied using bone char sorption and calcium precipitation. The bone char treatment is found to be workable both in columns and in batches where the magadi is dissolved in water prior to treatment. The concentrations in the solutions were 89 g magadi...... treatment method. A procedure for purification of fluoride contaminated magadi at household level is described....

  7. Inhibition of erosive wear by fluoride varnish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J. L.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride products with a protective mechanical component are advantageous in the prevention of erosive wear. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of fluoride varnish (FV) in the prevention of wear due to erosion and combined erosion and toothbrush abras

  8. Inhibition of erosive wear by fluoride varnish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J. L.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride products with a protective mechanical component are advantageous in the prevention of erosive wear. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of fluoride varnish (FV) in the prevention of wear due to erosion and combined erosion and toothbrush

  9. CORRELATION AMONG FLUORIDE AND METALS IN IRRIGATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    For comparative analysis of fluoride and metals in soil and water, water samples were ..... one is from rapidly soluble fluoride complex like cryolite (Na3AlF6) found in water ..... Atlabachew, M.; Chandravanshi, B.S.; Zewge, F.; Redi, M. Toxicol.

  10. Drinking Water Fluoride Levels for a City in Northern Mexico (Durango Determined Using a Direct Electrochemical Method and Their Potential Effects on Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Molina Frechero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is ingested primarily through consuming drinking water. When drinking water contains fluoride concentrations >0.7 parts per million (ppm, consuming such water can be toxic to the human body; this toxicity is called “fluorosis.” Therefore, it is critical to determine the fluoride concentrations in drinking water. The objective of this study was to determine the fluoride concentration in the drinking water of the city of Durango. The wells that supply the drinking water distribution system for the city of Durango were studied. One hundred eighty-nine (189 water samples were analyzed, and the fluoride concentration in each sample was quantified as established by the law NMX-AA-077-SCFI-2001. The fluoride concentrations in such samples varied between 2.22 and 7.23 ppm with a 4.313 ± 1.318 ppm mean concentration. The highest values were observed in the northern area of the city, with a 5.001 ± 2.669 ppm mean value. The samples produced values that exceeded the national standard for fluoride in drinking water. Chronic exposure to fluoride at such concentrations produces harmful health effects, the first sign of which is dental fluorosis. Therefore, it is essential that the government authorities implement water defluoridation programs and take preventative measures to reduce the ingestion of this toxic halogen.

  11. Deglycosylation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan by hydrogen fluoride in pyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C A; Krueger, R; Schwartz, N B

    1985-04-01

    The original deglycosylation procedure using HF/pyridine has been modified for maximal removal of carbohydrate from chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, with minimal alteration of the core protein. Gas-liquid chromatography analysis after treatment for various times showed that 95% of xylose and mannose and 70-85% of other sugars were removed within 30 min, indicating that almost all chondroitin sulfate chains and about 80% of N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were removed. In contrast to the loss of carbohydrate, no change in amino acid composition or loss of immunoreactivity occurred. Longer treatment of up to 16 h resulted in little additional removal of carbohydrate, but did cause a significant decrease in solubility and recovery of the deglycosylated product. Optimal removal of xylose residues after about 1 h was also shown by maximal acceptor activity of the product in a xylosyltransferase assay. Rapid removal of the HF reagent by vacuum evacuation and ion-exchange chromatography, coupled with the reduced time of treatment allowed recovery of an intact, homogenous protein core that is amenable to structural and sequence studies.

  12. Reactivity of aminodeoxyalditols and derivatives in hydrogen fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Jens Chr.

    to the corresponding 2,5-anhydrides were achieved. These compounds can be recognized as muscarine analogues or precursors. The general mechanism of the reactions was evaluated by 13C NMR spectroscopic studies of the acyloxonium ion intermediates.A series of 1-deoxy-1-trifluoroacetamido-hexitols was prepared...

  13. Fluoride Importance in Controlling Caries and Fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s. Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, severity and risk factors for fluorosis, and to describe the trend of fluorosis among Indian children. The study also aimed of exploring the effect of the change in fluoride exposure on dental fluorosis and caries. Establishing an appropriate use of fluoride toothpaste could be successful in reducing fluorosis without a significant increase in caries experience.

  14. Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the objectives of a hydrogen energy systems technology study directed toward determining future demand for hydrogen based on current trends and anticipated new uses and identifying the critical research and technology advancements required to meet this need with allowance for raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects. Attention is focused on historic production and use of hydrogen, scenarios used as a basis for projections, projections of energy sources and uses, supply options, and technology requirements and needs. The study found more than a billion dollar annual usage of hydrogen, dominated by chemical-industry needs, supplied mostly from natural gas and petroleum feedstocks. Evaluation of the progress in developing nuclear fusion and solar energy sources relative to hydrogen production will be necessary to direct the pace and character of research and technology work in the advanced water-splitting areas.

  15. Perfil epidemiológico de cárie dentária em crianças de 12 anos de idade, residentes em cidades fluoretadas e não fluoretadas, na Região Centro-Oeste do Estado de São Paulo, Brasil An epidemiological profile of dental caries in 12-year-old children residing in cities with and without fluoridated water supply in the central western area of the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Helena de Carvalho Sales-Peres

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo pautou em analisar o perfil epidemiológico de cárie dentária na Região Centro-Oeste do Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, em crianças de 12 anos de idade, segundo o gênero, comparando o índice CPOD em municípios fluoretados e não fluoretados. Foram utilizados os dados do Levantamento Epidemiológico do Estado de São Paulo - 1998, referentes à Direção Regional de Saúde - DIR X, representada por oito municípios. A amostra foi composta por 485 escolares, de ambos os gêneros, distribuídos pelos municípios. Os resultados demonstraram que na cidade de Pederneiras (médio porte, com flúor o CPOD foi igual a 7,06, valor maior do que o encontrado no Brasil em 1986. A maior prevalência de cárie dentária ocorreu nos meninos, quando comparados às meninas, demonstrando uma nova tendência à cárie dentária na região centro-oeste. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre CPOD de municípios de mesmo porte, independente da presença ou ausência de flúor na água, sugerindo o fenômeno da convergência. Possivelmente, pela ação da ingestão de outras fontes de flúor e a presença do efeito "halo". A prevalência de cárie na região esteve "alta", com CPOD igual a 4,82, não atingindo as metas para o ano 2000.This study aimed to analyze the epidemiological profile of dental caries in the central western region of the State of São Paulo, Brazil, focusing on 12-year-old children by gender, comparing the DMFT index in fluoridated and non-fluoridated cities. The study used data from the Epidemiological Surveys in the State of São Paulo, 1998, pertaining to the 10th Regional Health Directorate, including 8 cities. The sample consisted of 485 schoolchildren, both boys and girls, distributed by city. In Pederneiras (a medium-sized city with a fluoridated water supply, DMFT was 7.06, higher than the Brazilian national mean for 1986. Boys showed a higher prevalence of dental caries than girls, showing

  16. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175... Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride... the purpose of this section, poly(vinyl fluoride) resins consist of basic resins produced by the...

  17. Fluoride in saliva and dental biofilm after 1500 and 5000 ppm fluoride exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staun Larsen, Line; Baelum, Vibeke; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Richards, Alan; Nyvad, Bente

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this randomized, double-blind, crossover study was to measure fluoride in saliva and 7-day-old biofilm fluid and biofilm solids after rinsing three times per day for 3 weeks with 0, 1500, or 5000 ppm fluoride (NaF). Following the 3-week wash-in/wash-out period, including 1 week of biofilm accumulation, saliva and biofilm samples were collected from 12 participants immediately before (background fluoride), and 10, 30, and 60 min after a single rinse. Biofilm samples were separated into fluid and solids, and samples were analyzed using a fluoride electrode (microanalysis). The background fluoride concentration was statistically significantly higher in the 5000 compared to the 1500 ppm F rinse group in all three compartments (22.3 and 8.1 μM in saliva, 126.8 and 58.5 μM in biofilm fluid, and 10,940 and 4837 μmol/kg in biofilm solids). The 1-h fluoride accumulation for the 5000 ppm F rinse was higher than for the 1500 ppm F rinse in all three compartments, although not statistically significant for saliva and biofilm solids. Regular exposure to 5000 ppm fluoride elevates background fluoride concentrations in saliva, biofilm fluid, and biofilm solids compared to 1500 ppm fluoride. Increasing the fluoride concentration almost 3.5 times (from 1500 to 5000 ppm) only elevates the background fluoride concentrations in saliva, biofilm fluid, and biofilm solids twofold. Even though fluoride toothpaste may be diluted by saliva, the results of the present study indicate that use of 5000 ppm fluoride toothpaste might lead to improved caries control.

  18. Effect of Discontinuation of Fluoride Intake from Water and Toothpaste on Urinary Excretion in Young Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime A. Cury

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available As there is no homeostatic mechanism for maintaining circulating fluoride (F in the human body, the concentration may decrease and increase again when intake is interrupted and re-started. The present study prospectively evaluated this process in children exposed to F intake from water and toothpaste, using F in urine as a biomarker. Eleven children from Ibiá, Brazil (with sub-optimally fluoridated water supply aged two to four years who regularly used fluoridated toothpaste (1,100 ppm F took part in the study. Twenty-four-hour urine was collected at baseline (Day 0, F exposure from water and toothpaste as well as after the interruption of fluoride intake from water and dentifrice (Days 1 to 28 (F interruption and after fluoride intake from these sources had been re-established (Days 29 to 34 (F re-exposure. Urinary volume was measured, fluoride concentration was determined and the amount of fluoride excreted was calculated and expressed in mg F/day. Urinary fluoride excretion (UFE during the periods of fluoride exposure, interruption and re-exposure was analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. Mean UFE was 0.25 mg F/day (SD: 0.15 at baseline, dropped to a mean of 0.14 mg F/day during F interruption (SD: 0.07; range: 0.11 to 0.17 mg F/day and rose to 0.21 (SD: 0.09 and 0.19 (SD: 0.08 following F re-exposure. The difference between baseline UFE and the period of F interruption was statistically significant (p < 0.05, while the difference between baseline and the period of F re-exposure was non-significant (p > 0.05. The findings suggest that circulating F in the body of young children rapidly decreases in the first 24 hours and again increases very fast after discontinuation and re-exposure of F from water and toothpaste.

  19. NNSA TRITIUM SUPPLY CHAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrick, Steven [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Cordaro, Joseph [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Founds, Nanette [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA; Chambellan, Curtis [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA

    2013-08-21

    Savannah River Site plays a critical role in the Tritium Production Supply Chain for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The entire process includes: • Production of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) at the Westinghouse WesDyne Nuclear Fuels Plant in Columbia, South Carolina • Production of unobligated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) in Portsmouth, Ohio • Irradiation of TPBARs with the LEU at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Reactor • Extraction of tritium from the irradiated TPBARs at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at Savannah River Site • Processing the tritium at the Savannah River Site, which includes removal of nonhydrogen species and separation of the hydrogen isotopes of protium, deuterium and tritium.

  20. Hydrogen, nitrogen and syngas enriched diesel combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Christodoulou, Fanos

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University On-board hydrogen and syngas production is considered as a transition solution from fossil fuel to hydrogen powered vehicles until problems associated with hydrogen infrastructure, distribution and storage are resolved. A hydrogen- or syngas-rich stream, which substitutes part of the main hydrocarbon fuel, can be produced by supplying diesel fuel in a fuel-reforming reactor, integrated within ...

  1. Theoretical proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Narayan C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji; Viggiano, Al A

    2010-12-23

    Proton affinity and fluoride affinity of nerve agent VX at all of its possible sites were calculated at the RI-MP2/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31G* and RI-MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G* levels, respectively. The protonation leads to various unique structures, with H(+) attached to oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms; among which the nitrogen site possesses the highest proton affinity of -ΔE ∼ 251 kcal/mol, suggesting that this is likely to be the major product. In addition some H(2), CH(4) dissociation as well as destruction channels have been found, among which the CH(4) + [Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-S-(CH(2))(2)-N(+)(iPr)═CHMe] product and the destruction product forming Et-O-P(═O)(Me)-SMe + CH(2)═N(+)(iPr)(2) are only 9 kcal/mol less stable than the most stable N-protonated product. For fluoridization, the S-P destruction channel to give Et-O-P(═O)(Me)(F) + [S-(CH(2))(2)-N-(iPr)(2)](-) is energetically the most favorable, with a fluoride affinity of -ΔE ∼ 44 kcal. Various F(-) ion-molecule complexes are also found, with the one having F(-) interacting with two hydrogen atoms in different alkyl groups to be only 9 kcal/mol higher than the above destruction product. These results suggest VX behaves quite differently from surrogate systems.

  2. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  3. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerheber, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings. PMID:23840230

  4. Characterisation of a new adsorbent (beta cyclodextrin modified hybrid hydrous iron-zirconium oxide) to remove fluoride from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Indranil

    2017-04-01

    Prolonged use of fluoride contaminated water (>1.5mg L -1) causes serious problems to public health and ultimately leads to skeletal fluorosis. There is an urgent need to develop more efficient fluoride scavenging materials for designing water filters. A simple and efficient adsorbent (CHIZO, beta-Cyclodextrin (b-CD) amended hydrous iron-zirconium hybrid oxide), has been developed, characterised and tested. The results indicate the efficacy of CHIZO on fluoride removal from an aqueous solution. The agglomerated micro structured composite material has several new features such as very poor crystallinity confirmed from TEM images. BET experiment reveals a surface area of 0.2070 m2 g- 1 and pore volume of 0.0476 cm3 g -1. The findings also indicate the highly pH dependent fluoride adsorption by CHIZO which decreases with an increase in pH, and pseudo-second order kinetics control the reaction.Isotherm study indicates Langmuir isotherm was the best fit model to describe the adsorption equilibrium. Significantly higher monolayer adsorption capacity of fluoride (31.35 mg g -1) than the host hydrous Fe-Zr oxide (8.21 mg g -1) at pH 7.0 and 303 K was observed. Thermodynamic parameter indicates spontaneous nature of CHIZO which is due to the exothermic nature of the reaction. Apart from this phosphate and sulphate have some impact (interference) on fluoride adsorption. b-CD forms inclusion complexes by taking up fluoride ions from water into its central cavity. Several factors are involved regarding high efficacy of the system such as the release of enthalpy-rich water molecules from its cavity, electrostatic interactions, hydrogen bonding and release of conformational strain. However, the regeneration is difficult because of probable entrapping of fluoride inside the cavity of b-CD with hydrogen bonding. It has been found that only 0.9 g of CHIZO is able to reduce the fluoride level to below 1.0 mg L -1 in one-litre of fluoride spiked (5.0 mg L- 1) natural water sample

  5. Determination of the stability constant of Np(V) fluoride complex using a fluoride ion selective electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, R.M.; Rizvi, G.H.; Chaudhuri, N.K.; Patil, S.K. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiochemistry Div.)

    1985-04-01

    Fluoride complexing of Np(V) was studied using fluoride ion selective electrode (F-ISE). Free fluoride ion concentrations in the presence of Np(V) were measured at 0.1 and 0.01M ionic strength. The data were used to calculate the stability constant of the fluoride complex of Np(V) and the values obtained are reported.

  6. Estado de salud bucodental de escolares residentes en localidades abastecidas con agua de consumo humano de muy alto y muy bajo contenido de fluoruros State of oral health among schoolchildren living in towns supplied with drinking water containing very high and very low levels of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Azcurra

    1995-10-01

    ña a concentração é de 0,19mg/l. A proporção de escolares (6-7 e 12-13 anos que não apresentaram cárie foi significativamente maior em Sampacho do que em Porteña, enquanto, que os índices ceo-d, ceo-s, CPO-D e CPO-S resultaram consideravelmente mais altos nesta última localidade. A severidade da doença de cárie nas crianças de 12-13 anos de Sampacho esteve compreendida entre as categorias baixa e moderada (CPO-D = 2,53, enquanto que em suas similares em Porteña atingiu o grau de moderada e alta (CPO-D=4,41. Não se registrou nenhum caso de fluorose dental em Porteña enquanto que em Sampacho houve uma alta proporção de crianças que apresentou fluoroses leve (6-7 anos e leve ou intensa (12-13 anos. Os níveis salivares de cálcio, fosfatos, tiocianato, proteínas totais e lg A secretora foram muito similares nos escolares de ambas localidades, e também entre crianças com diferentes tipos de cárie e diferentes graus de gravidade de fluorose. Conclui-se ser necessária a aplicação de medidas sanitárias urgentes (preventivas ou curativas para reduzir ou controlar as doenças de cárie em Porteña e a fluorose dental em Sampacho.The results of a cross sectional epidemiological survey for the purpose of evaluating the state of dental health of schoolchildren (aged 6-7 and 12-13 living in Sampacho and Porteña, two towns in the Province of Córdoba (Argentina, supplied with drinking water containing quite different levels of fluoride, are described and analized. In Sampacho, F- level is 9.05 mg/l. while in Porteña the concentration is of 0.19 mg/l. The proportion of scholchildren (aged 6-7 and 12-13 without caries was significaticantly higher in Sampacho than in Porteña, while the dmf-t, dmf-s, DMF-Tand DMF-S indexes were considerably higher in the latter place. The severity of caries in children (age 12-13 living in Sampacho ranged from low to moderate (DMF-T=2.53, whilst in Porteña the range went from moderate to high (DMF-T=4.41. No cases of

  7. Acid demineralization susceptibility of dental enamel submitted to different bleaching techniques and fluoridation regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomão, Dlf; Santos, Dm; Nogueira, Rd; Palma-Dibb, Rg; Geraldo-Martins, Vr

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the acid demineralization susceptibility of bleached dental enamel submitted to different fluoride regimens. One hundred bovine enamel blocks (6×6×3 mm) were randomly divided into 10 groups (n=10). Groups 1 and 2 received no bleaching. Groups 3 to 6 were submitted to an at-home bleaching technique using 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP; G3 and G4) or 10% carbamide peroxide (CP; G5 and G6). Groups 7 to 10 were submitted to an in-office bleaching technique using 35% HP (G7 and G8) or 35% CP (G9 and G10). During bleaching, a daily fluoridation regimen of 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF) solution was performed on groups 3, 5, 7, and 9, while weekly fluoridation with a 2% NaF gel was performed on groups 4, 6, 8, and 10. The samples in groups 2 to 10 were pH cycled for 14 consecutive days. The samples from all groups were then assessed by cross-sectional Knoop microhardness at different depths from the outer enamel surface. The average Knoop hardness numbers (KHNs) were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The comparison between groups 1 and 2 showed that the demineralization method was effective. The comparison among groups 2 to 6 showed the same susceptibility to acid demineralization, regardless of the fluoridation method used. However, the samples from groups 8 and 10 showed more susceptibility to acid demineralization when compared with group 2 (penamel to acid demineralization. However, the use of 35% HP and 35% CP must be associated with a daily fluoridation regimen, otherwise the in-office bleaching makes the bleached enamel more susceptible to acid demineralization.

  8. Fluoride Adsorption by Pumice from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Mahvi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drinking water provides many vital elements for the human body, but the presence of some dissolved elements more than permissible concentration can endanger human health. Among the dissolved elements in drinking water, fluoride is noticeable, because both the very low or very high concentrations have adverse health impacts such as dental caries. Therefore, fluoride concentration should be kept in acceptable levels. In this study Pumice was used for fluoride removal. It was found that Fluoride sorption kinetic was fitted by pseudo-second-order model. The maximum sorption capacity of Pumice was found to be 13.51 mg/g at laboratory temperature (24°C. Maximum sorption study occurred at pH= 3. Results of Isotherm showed the fluoride sorption has been well fitted with Freundlich isotherm model. This study has demonstrated that Pumice can be used as effective adsorbents for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent prepared in this study was cheap and efficient in removal of fluoride than other adsorbents.

  9. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J. [UJV - Nuclear Research Institute, Research Centre Rez, CZ-250 68 Husinec - Rez 130 (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  10. Topical fluoride as a cause of dental fluorosis in children

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, MCM; Lo, ECM; Glenny, AM; Tsang, BWK; Worthington, HV; Marinho, VCC

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For many years, topical use of fluorides has gained greater popularity than systemic use of fluorides. A possible adverse effect associated with the use of topical fluoride is the development of dental fluorosis due to the ingestion of excessive fluoride by young children with developing teeth. OBJECTIVES: To describe the relationship between the use of topical fluorides in young children and the risk of developing dental fluorosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: Electronic search of the Cochra...

  11. A study of fluoride groundwater occurrence in Nathenje, Lilongwe, Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msonda, K. W. M.; Masamba, W. R. L.; Fabiano, E.

    A study was carried out to determine fluoride concentration in groundwaters of Nathenje area situated in Lilongwe District in the central region of Malawi. Water samples were collected from 176 boreholes and shallow wells during different months in 2001 and 2002. Samples were then analysed for fluoride by using a fluoride electrode and an ion selective meter. The results showed that fluoride concentrations for the rainy season varied from dental fluorosis in areas where the fluoride concentration was high.

  12. A fluoride release-adsorption-release system applied to fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suljak, J P; Hatibovic-Kofman, S

    1996-09-01

    This investigation compared the initial fluoride release and release following refluoridation of three resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (Photac-Fil Applicap, Vitremer, and Fuji II LC) and a new polyacid-modified resin composite material (Dyract). After daily flouride release was measured for 8 days, specimens were refluoridated in 1,000-ppm solutions of fluoride ion for 10 minutes and fluoride release was measured for 5 days. Two further 5-day refluoridation-release periods were carried out. All materials released fluoride initially. Photac released the most; Dyract released the least. Initial release was greatest over the first few days. All materials released significantly more fluoride for 24 to 48 hours after refluoridation. Less fluoride was released with each successive refluoridation for the three glass-ionomer cements. The release from the Dyract compomer remained at a comparatively constant and significantly lower level following each refluoridation.

  13. The role of nonbonding interactions and the presence of fluoride on the conformational isomerism of 1,2-ethanediol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Weslley G. D. P.; Silla, Josué M.; Cormanich, Rodrigo A.; Fernandes, Sergio A.; Freitas, Matheus P.

    2016-07-01

    This work reports the analysis of the effects ruling the conformational preference of 1,2-ethanediol (1,2-ED) using theoretical calculations, since there is no general consensus about the role of intramolecular hydrogen bond on the conformational isomerism of 1,2-ED. While the predominance of the gauche conformers along with the Osbnd Csbnd Csbnd O fragment relative to the trans ones was found to be mainly due to hyperconjugation, the orientation of the hydroxyl groups is better described by a balance between low steric hindrance and high stabilization from hyperconjugation than by intramolecular hydrogen bond. Nevertheless, the presence of a fluoride anion induces a conformational change in 1,2-ED that maximizes hydrogen bonds between the fluoride and the hydroxyl groups. This effect was observed experimentally by the shift of 1H(O) and 19F NMR signals upon complexation, then suggesting that compounds containing the 1,2-ED moiety can be possible anion transporters.

  14. Applications of the use of the renewable energies, solar power and wind power, for the securing of hydrogen, as power supply of the fuel cells; Obtencion de hidrogeno, a partir de la electrolisis del agua mediante energias renovables almacenamiento y aplicaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Martin, J. J.; Martin, I.; Aperribay, V.; San Martin, J. I.; Arrieta, J. M.; Zuazua, J.; Romero, E.

    2004-07-01

    The object of the presented communication is to show the applications of the use of the renewable energies, particularly the solar power and the wind power, for the securing of hydrogen, as power supply of the fuel cells. The electrical energy produced in the solar badges and in the windpowers is, principally, injected into the electrical networks, for his transport, distribution and consumption, if the network the demand. The novel aspect is, that if the network does not demand potency, this one is transformed into hydrogen at the same photovoltaic station or into the base of the tower of the windpower and, later, stored to feed the fuel cells, not producing to him any type of element pollutant, since the residual element is the water. (Author)

  15. Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONISCHAK

    1976-01-01

    The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

  16. Development of electrochemical separation methods from molten fluoride salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straka, M.; Tulackova, R.; Chuchvalcova Bimova, K. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, 250 68 Husinec, Rez 130, (Czech Republic)

    2008-07-01

    Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is liquid-fueled reactor that can be used for actinide burning, production of electricity, production of hydrogen, and production of fissile fuels (breeding). The MSR concept was identified, along with five other concepts, as a suitable candidate of cooperative development by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The MSR concept takes into account a circulating molten fluoride salts fuel mixture. Use of liquid fuel mixture results in possibility of its continuous (online) reprocessing. Within the proposed MSR fuel cycle, the electro-separation methods are considered as important techniques. The main aim of this work is to determine the electrochemical behaviour of selected actinides and lanthanides, which represents the fissile material and fission products, in suitable molten fluoride media as the general framework of our work is to verify the separation capability of the electrochemical methods and proposal of its integration into the MSR fuel cycle. Presented results were obtained by the method of cyclic voltammetry. The experimental set-up, preparation of the melt and results of selected measurements are presented in this paper and electrochemical behaviour of uranium and selected lanthanides are demonstrated by respective voltammograms evaluation. (authors)

  17. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B.; Zholobak, Nadezhda M. [Zabolotny Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv D0368 (Ukraine); Baranchikov, Alexander E. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ryabova, Anastasia V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Vladimir K., E-mail: van@igic.ras.ru [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus.

  18. Prospecting for safe (low fluoride groundwater in the Eastern African Rift: the Arumeru District (Northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ghiglieri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A multidisciplinary research effort, including geological, hydrogeological, hydro-chemical, geophysical and hydrological investigations, was aimed at locating a source of safe groundwater for a district of northern Tanzania, within the western branch of the East Africa Rift Valley, where water shortage is common and much of the surface water carries unacceptable levels of dissolved fluoride. The 440 km2 study area lies in the northern part of Arumeru district and is dominated by Mt. Meru (4565 m a.s.l.. The local climate is semi-arid, with distinct wet and dry seasons. Four hydrogeological complexes were identified, occurring within different volcanic formations, either alone or superimposed upon one another. The groundwater flow system was interpreted from the spatial distribution of the springs, combined with a lithology- and geometry-based reconstruction of the aquifers. The dominant pattern consists of a multi-directional flow from the higher elevations in the south towards the lower areas in the north, but this is complicated by structures such as grabens, faults, lava domes and tholoids. After the identification of the major fluoride source, an interference pattern between groundwater and high fluoride surface water was drawn. Finally, vertical electrical soundings were performed to define the location of aquifers in regions where release of fluoride was prevented. The methodological approach for the prospecting of safe water in a semi-arid, fluoride polluted region was validated by the drilling of a 60 m deep well capable of supplying at least 3.8 l/s of low fluoride, drinkable water.

  19. [Remineralization of artificial root caries by fluoride dentifrice of different fluoride concentration in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Chun; Yu, Shao-Jie; Hu, De-Yu

    2010-12-01

    Although the effectiveness of fluoride dentifrice in remineralizing enamel caries has been established, the optimum fluoride concentration for remineralization root caries has not been defined. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the effect of 1.1g/L, 1.45g/L and 5g/L fluoride dentifrices in remineralization of artificial root caries. Sound human tooth fragments obtained from the cervical portion of root were stored in a demineralization solution for 96h at 37 degrees centigrade to induce artificial root caries lesions. The fragments were then randomly divided into four treatment groups including 1.1g/L, 1.45g/L, 5g/L fluoride dentifrice group and non-fluoride dentifrice control group. The demineralized samples were pH-cycled through treatment solutions, acidic buffer and neutral buffer for 8 days at 6 cycles per day. The samples were evaluated using electrical caries monitor(ECM), polarized light microscopy (PLM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The data was analyzed using ANOVA with SPSS13.0 software package. Variations of LgECM, total fluorescence and average fluorescence from CLSM after remineralization in fluoride dentifrice groups were significantly higher than those in the control group(Pdentifrice group were significantly higher than those in the 1.1g/L and 1.45g/L fluoride dentifrice groups(Pdentifrice groups. A wider mineral band was seen in the 5g/L fluoride dentifrice group than in the 1.1g/L and 1.45g/L fluoride dentifrice groups. Fluoride dentifrice is effective in remineralizing artificial root caries and 5g/L fluoride dentifrice has better effect than 1.1g/L and 1.45g/L fluoride dentifrices.

  20. Fluoride content in plaque solids and fluid after ingestion of fluoridated milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mier, Esperanza A; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Buckley, Christine; Weitz, Andrea; Villa, Alberto; Zero, Domenick T

    2013-09-01

    This study explored differences in dental biofilm solids and fluid fluoride after ingestion of NaF or Na2FPO3 in milk or non-fluoridated milk. Eighteen volunteers ingested 1 mg fluoride in 200 mL of milk or 200 mL of non-fluoridated milk. Biofilm samples were collected at baseline, 30, 60, and 240 min and biofilm solids and fluid were micro-analyzed for fluoride. Analysis of variance was performed and the total delivery, retention, and clearance of fluoride to biofilm solids and fluid were estimated as the area under the curve between 0 and 240 min. No statistically significant differences were found for baseline values. Biofilm fluid fluoride values ranged from 0.11 ± 0.05 to 0.21 ± 0.08 µg F/mL while biofilm solid values ranged from 0.62 ± 0.39 to 1.75 ± 1.16 µg F/g. Biofilm fluid values were significantly lower at 60 min for Na2FPO3 in milk. Clearance profiles for biofilm fluid diverged after the initial 60 min. Na2FPO3 had a smaller area under the curve from 60 to 240 min than NaF. Results of this study indicate that the release and clearance of fluoride in biofilm vary among fluoridation compounds and that the concentrations in biofilm solids and fluid also vary and are not correlated to each other in many cases.

  1. Removal of fluoride from fluoride-bering cerium sulfate solution by hydrous zirconium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. He

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the removal of fluoride from fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution by amorphous hydrous zirconium oxide was studied. The FTIR, SEM, EDS and UV-vis spectra show that fluoride is successfully adsorbed on hydrous zirconium oxide, and cerium exists as Ce4+ in solution. The study indicates that it is feasible to separate fluorine and cerium from fluorine-bearing rare earth sulfate solution using hydrous zirconium oxide, and eliminate the influence of fluoride on the extraction separation of rare earths.

  2. Dental fluorosis and skeletal fluoride content as biomarkers of excess fluoride exposure in marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Death, Clare; Coulson, Graeme; Kierdorf, Uwe; Kierdorf, Horst; Morris, William K; Hufschmid, Jasmin

    2015-11-15

    Particulate and gaseous fluoride emissions contaminate vegetation near fluoride-emitting industries, potentially impacting herbivorous wildlife in neighboring areas. Dental fluorosis has been associated with consumption of fluoride-contaminated foliage by juvenile livestock and wildlife in Europe and North America. For the first time, we explored the epidemiology and comparative pathology of dental fluorosis in Australian marsupials residing near an aluminium smelter. Six species (Macropus giganteus, Macropus rufogriseus, Wallabia bicolor, Phascolarctos cinereus, Trichosurus vulpecula, Pseudocheirus peregrinus) demonstrated significantly higher bone fluoride levels in the high (n=161 individuals), compared to the low (n=67 individuals), fluoride areas (pdental lesions considered characteristic of dental fluorosis in eutherian mammals. Within the high-fluoride area, 67% of individuals across the six species showed dental enamel lesions, compared to 3% in the low-fluoride areas. Molars that erupted before weaning were significantly less likely to display pathological lesions than those developing later, and molars in the posterior portion of the dental arcade were more severely fluorotic than anterior molars in all six species. The severity of dental lesions was positively associated with increasing bone fluoride levels in all species, revealing a potential biomarker of excess fluoride exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. TD-DFT study on the excited-state proton transfer in the fluoride sensing of a turn-off type fluorescent chemosensor based on anthracene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping; Ding, Jun-Xia; Chu, Tian-Shu

    2012-11-01

    The sensing mechanism for fluoride chemosensor based on anthracene structure has been investigated by DFT and TDDFT methods. The results show that the similar geometries in S(0) and S(1) states in the absence of the fluoride anion induce the local excited (LE) state over the anthracene moiety, which is responsible for the strong fluorescence. The fluorescence quenching phenomenon for F-coordinated complex can be explained by the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process from benzylic amide to anthracene moiety. Moreover, the strong electronegativity for fluoride anion in the F-complex constructs the intermolecular hydrogen bond of N-H…F in the ground state. In contrast, the upper proton in the urea group close to phenyl group prefers to bind fluoride anion in S(1) state of the F-complex, and it presents excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) to form another hydrogen bond like N…H-F, which has been confirmed by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the potential energy curve of S(1) state for the function of N-H bond. In this novel and efficient fluoride fluorescent chemosensor based on anthracene, the anthracene moiety is regarded as not only the fluorescent source, but the template for introducing the binding sites for fluoride anion.

  4. High density fluoride glass calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Q.; Scheltzbaum, J.; Akgun, U.

    2014-04-01

    The unprecedented radiation levels in current Large Hadron Collider runs, and plans to even increase the luminosity creates a need for new detector technologies to be investigated. Quartz plates to replace the plastic scintillators in current LHC calorimeters have been proposed in recent reports. Quartz based Cherenkov calorimeters can solve the radiation damage problem, however light production and transfer have proven to be challenging. This report summarizes the results from a computational study on the performance of a high-density glass calorimeter. High-density, scintillating, fluoride glass, CHG3, was used as the active material. This glass has been developed specifically for hadron collider experiments, and is known for fast response time, in addition to high light yield. Here, the details of a Geant4 model for a sampling calorimeter prototype with 20 layers, and its hadronic as well as electromagnetic performances are reported.

  5. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  6. FLUORIDE REMOVAL BY ADSORPTION ON THERMALLY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    is strong correlation between fluoride removal capacity and gibbsite content of the soil. From this .... obtained from market were tested in the same experiments. The soil ... prepared from this stock solution by dilution with distilled water. In order ...

  7. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J

  8. Materials processing apparatus development for fluoride glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Guy A.; Kosten, Sue; Workman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride glasses have great potential for optical fiber communications due to the high transmittance when no microcrystallites occur during drawing operations. This work has developed apparatus to test the occurrence of microcrystallites during recrystallization in reduced gravity on the KC-135. The apparatus allows fluoride glass fiber, such as ZBLAN, to be melted and recrystallized during both the low and high g portions the parabolic flight.

  9. Graphitic carbon grown on fluorides by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerng, Sahng-Kyoon; Lee, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong Seung; Chun, Seung-Hyun

    2013-01-03

    We study the growth mechanism of carbon molecules supplied by molecular beam epitaxy on fluoride substrates (MgF2, CaF2, and BaF2). All the carbon layers form graphitic carbon with different crystallinities depending on the cation. Especially, the growth on MgF2 results in the formation of nanocrystalline graphite (NCG). Such dependence on the cation is a new observation and calls for further systematic studies with other series of substrates. At the same growth temperature, the NCG on MgF2 has larger clusters than those on oxides. This is contrary to the general expectation because the bond strength of the carbon-fluorine bond is larger than that of the carbon-oxygen bond. Our results show that the growth of graphitic carbon does not simply depend on the chemical bonding between the carbon and the anion in the substrate.

  10. Can hydrogen win?: exploring scenarios for hydrogen fuelled vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Muncaster, Katherine Aminta

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the conditions under which hydrogen might succeed in Canada’s transportation sector in a carbon-constrained world. Long-run simulations were created using CIMS, a hybrid energy-economy model that is technologically explicit, behaviourally realistic, and incorporates drivers of technological change. A hydrogen supply submodel was built to simulate economies of scale in infrastructure. Capital costs, technology performance, infrastructure, fuel prices, and other conditions w...

  11. Topical laser application enhances enamel fluoride uptake and tribological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Y-R; Lin, T-T; Huang, J-S; Peng, S-R; Shieh, D-B

    2013-07-01

    Topical fluoride treatment prevents dental caries. However, the resulting calcium-fluoride-like deposits are soft and have poor wear resistance; therefore, frequent treatment is required. Lasers quickly heat surfaces and can be made portable and suitable for oral remedies. We examined the morphology, nanohardness, elastic modulus, nanowear, and fluoride uptake of fluoride-treated enamel followed by CO2 laser irradiation for 5 and 10 sec, respectively. We found that laser treatments significantly increased the mechanical properties of the calcium-fluoride-like deposits. The wear resistance of the calcium-fluoride-like deposits improved about 34% after laser irradiation for 5 sec and about 40% following irradiation for 10 sec. We also found that laser treatments increased fluoride uptake by at least 23%. Overall, laser treatment significantly improved fluoride incorporation into dental tissue and the wear resistance of the protective calcium-fluoride layer.

  12. Analysis of fluoride concentration in solutions prepared at dispensing pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pizzatto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fluoride plays an important role in oral health promotion and is considered important in dental caries prevention both in children and adults. Fluoride is widely used at high-risk conditions of caries, when the use of fluoride-containing mouthwashes is recommended, considering that fluoride itself reduces the risk of dental caries. Objective: To evaluate the fluoride concentration in solutions prepared at different dispensing pharmacies in the city of Curitiba – PR, Brazil. Material and methods: The analysis of fluoride concentration was preformed through Ion Chromatography method (DIONEX. Results: The results obtained through this analysis showed that all solutions presented fluoride concentration above that required in the dentist’s prescription, varying between 5.48% and 24.02% more fluoride, at absolute concentration. Conclusion: This finding highlights the increasing risk of fluoride acute intoxication in cases of accidental ingestion of the solution.

  13. Fluoride release and uptake capacities of fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Nuray; Turgut, Melek D

    2003-01-01

    Many fluoride-releasing dental materials are being sold on the basis of their cariostatic properties. However, the amount fluoride release of these materials is still uncertain. This study investigated the fluoride release and uptake characteristics of four flowable resin composites (Heliomolar Flow, Tetric Flow, Wave, Perma Flo), one flowable compomer (Dyract flow), one conventional glass ionomer cement mixed with two different powder/liquid ratios (ChemFlex Syringeable and ChemFlex Condensable), one packable resin composite (SureFil), one ion-releasing composite (Ariston pHc) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer). Seven discs (6-mm diameter and 1.5-mm height) were prepared for each material. Each disc was immersed in 3.5 ml of deionized water within a plastic vial and stored at 37 degrees C. The deionized water was changed every 24 hours and the release of fluoride was measured for 30 days. At the end of this period, the samples were recharged with 2 ml of 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel for four minutes. Then, all samples were reassessed for an additional 10 days. The fluoride release of all samples was measured with a specific fluoride electrode and an ionanalyzer. Statistical analyses were conducted using two-way repeated measure ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests. For all tested materials, the greatest fluoride release was observed after the first day of the study (p0.05). Ariston pHc released the highest amount of fluoride, followed by ChemFlex Syringeable, Vitremer and ChemFlex Condensable. There were statistically significant differences among these materials (p<0.05). Fluoride release of all materials were significantly increased after the first day following refluoridation and Ariston pHc released the greatest among all materials (p<0.01). At the end of two days of refluoridation, the fluoride release rate for each material dropped quickly and stabilized within three days.

  14. The effective use of fluorides in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A.; Petersen, Poul Erik; Lennon, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research and development was concerned with waterborne fluorides, both naturally occurring and added, and their effects on the prevalence and incidence of dental caries and dental fluorosis. In the latter half of the 20th century, the focus of research was on fluoride toothpastes and mouth rinses. More recently, systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on: recent water fluoridation schemes in California, USA; salt fluoridation in Jamaica; milk fluoridation in Chile; and the development of "affordable" fluoride toothpastes in Indonesia. Common themes are the concern to reduce demands for compliance with fluoride regimes that rely upon action by individuals and their families, and the issue of cost. We recommend that a community should use no more than one systemic fluoride (i.e. water or salt or milk fluoridation) combined with the use of fluoride toothpastes, and that the prevalence of dental fluorosis should be monitored in order to detect increases in or higher-than-acceptable levels. PMID:16211158

  15. Well Waters Fluoride in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISI Ogbu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal fluoride levels in drinking water have been associated with adverse health effects. To determine the fluoride content of well waters in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, water samples from 50 artisan wells chosen by multistage sampling procedure from the 5 zones of Enugu municipality were analyzed in duplicates for their fluoride content. The zonal mean values were 0.60, 0.70, 0.62, 0.62, and 0.63 mg/L for Abakpa Nike, Achara Layout, Obiagu/ Ogui, Trans Ekulu and Uwani, respectively (p<0.05. The mean value for the whole city was 0.63 mg/L. Although, the mean level of fluoride recorded in this study is currently within safe limits (1.5 mg/L, WHO 2011, it is important to monitor continuously the fluoride content of well waters in the municipality in view of the increasing industrial activities going on in the city and heavy reliance on well water for domestic purposes and the widespread use of consumer products containing fluoride.

  16. Prevalence of early childhood caries in non-fluoridated rural areas of Chile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Espinoza-Espinoza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early Childhood Caries (ECC is a serious public health concern worldwide, especially in communities without water fluoridation. Objective: To determine the prevalence of ECC in 2 and 3 year old children attending rural daycare centers without access to water fluoridation. Methods: A cross-sectional study at community level was performed during 2012. The eligible population was composed of 2 and 3 year-old children from rural daycare centers located in non-fluoridated areas in regions La Araucanía, Los Ríos, and Los Lagos, Chile. Four calibrated examiners (ICC=0.83 measured the prevalence of dental caries based on criteria proposed by the WHO. Data were analyzed using chi-square test, t-test and logistic regression models. Results: The study sample consisted of 587 children; two-year-olds accounted for 53.32%, and 52.47% were female. Prevalence of ECC was 51.62% with a mean dmft index of 2.53. Region de la Araucanía had the highest ECC prevalence (52.79%. Variables that showed association were age, OHI-S and type of health insurance coverage (p<0.05. Conclusion: A high prevalence of ECC was found in areas with a non-fluoridated water supply.

  17. Fluoride and bacterial content of bottled drinking water versus municipal tap water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythri H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water is a divine gift. People quench their thirst without questioning the source of water. But, apprehension about contaminants in municipal water supplies along with increased fear of fluorosis made bottled drinking water as one of the important tradable commodities. Objectives: The objectives of the study were to determine and compare the fluoride and bacterial contents of commercially available bottled drinking water and municipal tap water in Davangere city, Karnataka. Materials and Methods: Fifty samples of 10 categories of bottled drinking water with different batch numbers were purchased and municipal water from different sources were collected. Fluoride levels were determined by an ion-selective electrode. Water was cultured quantitatively and levels of bacteria were calculated as colony-forming units (CFUs per milliliter. Results: Descriptive analysis of water samples for fluoride concentration was in the range of 0.07-0.33 for bottled drinking water, Bisleri showing the highest of 0.33. A comparison of the mean values of microbial count for bottled drinking water with that of municipal tap water showed no statistically significant difference, but was more than the standard levels along with the presence of fungus and maggots. Conclusion: The fluoride concentration was below the optimal level for both municipal tap water and bottled drinking water. CFUs were more than the recommended level in both municipal tap water and bottled drinking water.

  18. An exposure and risk assessment for fluoride and trace metals in black tea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofuoglu, Sait C. [Izmir Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Research Center, Guelbahce, Urla 35430 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: cemilsofuoglu@iyte.edu.tr; Kavcar, Pinar [Izmir Institute of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Research Center, Guelbahce, Urla 35430 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: pinarkavcar@iyte.edu.tr

    2008-10-30

    Exposure and associated health risks for fluoride and trace metals in black tea were estimated. Fifty participants were randomly recruited to supply samples from the tea that they drink, and self-administer a questionnaire that inquired about personal characteristics and daily tea intake. Analyzed trace metals included aluminum, arsenic, barium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, manganese, nickel, strontium, and zinc. Fluoride and four metals (Al, Cr, Mn, Ni) were detected in all samples while barium was detected only in one sample. The remaining metals were detected in >60% of the samples. Fluoride and aluminum levels in instant tea bag samples were greater than in loose tea samples (p < 0.05) while the differences in elemental concentrations of loose and pot bag tea samples were not significant. Median and 90th percentile daily tea intake rates were estimated as 0.35 and 1.1 l/day, respectively. Neither fluoride nor aluminum levels in black tea were found to associate with considerable risks of fluorosis and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. However, carcinogenic risk levels for arsenic were high; R > 1.0 x 10{sup -6} even at the median level. According to sensitivity analysis, daily tea intake was the most influencing variable to the risk except for arsenic for which the concentration distribution was of more importance.

  19. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M; Holahan, Erin C; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing is needed. A new filter-paper absorption method to assess the 1-min bioavailable fluoride concentration was developed to meet this need. This method utilizes coiled filter paper that rapidly absorbs the aqueous phase of the dentifrice slurry followed by centrifugation to recover that fluid for fluoride measurement via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The analytical method was used to successfully determine the total fluoride and 1-min bioavailable fluoride in eight dentifrice products containing sodium fluoride (NaF), disodium monofluorophosphate (Na2FPO3, MFP), stannous fluoride (SnF2), or NaF with amorphous calcium phosphate (NaF + ACP). The results showed that some of the dentifrices tested had significantly lower potentially available fluoride than the total fluoride. For a MFP-containing sample, aged seven years past its expiry date, there was significant reduction in the bioavailable fluoride compared to MFP products that were not aged. Other than the aged MFP and the SnF2-containing samples the bioavailable fluoride for all products tested had at least 80 % of the label fluoride concentration. The filter paper absorption method yielded reproducible results for the products tested with MFP samples showing the largest variations. PMID:25821392

  20. Cancer incidence and mortality in workers exposed to fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P; Olsen, J H; Jensen, O M;

    1992-01-01

    Although a recent bioassay showed increased frequency of bone cancer in rats with high oral intake of fluoride, the data are reported as equivocal evidence of carcinogenicity. In humans, occupational fluoride exposure may cause skeletal fluorosis, and our earlier follow-up of fluoride-exposed wor......Although a recent bioassay showed increased frequency of bone cancer in rats with high oral intake of fluoride, the data are reported as equivocal evidence of carcinogenicity. In humans, occupational fluoride exposure may cause skeletal fluorosis, and our earlier follow-up of fluoride...

  1. Utilization of waste phosphogypsum to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and its application towards removal of fluoride from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Deyi, E-mail: xixizhang@lut.cn [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); State Key Laboratory of Gansu Advanced Non-ferrous Metal Materials, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Luo, Heming; Zheng, Liwen; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hongxia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Huixia [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel approach on recycle of waste phosphogypsum was exploited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphogypsum was utilized to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with high purity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer nHAp derived from PG exhibits excellent adsoprtion capacity for fluoride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluoride adsorbs onto nHAp mainly by electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond. - Abstract: In the present study, waste phosphogypsum (PG) was utilized firstly to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAp) via microwave irradiation technology. The nHAp derived from PG exhibited a hexagonal structure with the particle size about 20 nm Multiplication-Sign 60 nm and high purity. Meanwhile, the adsorption behaviour of fluoride onto the nHAp derived from PG was investigated to evaluate the potential application of this material for the treatment of the wastewater polluted with fluoride. The results indicate that the nHAp derived from PG can be used as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir-Freundlich model were 19.742, 26.108, 36.914 and 40.818 mg F{sup -}/g nHAp for 298, 308, 318 and 328 K, respectively. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was found to provide the best correlation of the used experimental data compared to the pseudo-first order and the adsorption isotherm could be well defined by Langmuir-Freundlich equation. The adsorption mechanism investigation shows that electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond are the main driving force for fluoride uptake onto nHAp derived from waste PG.

  2. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, Yeen; Sandham, John; Rumachik, Elena N.; Ruben, Jan L.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. Methods: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  3. Plaque formation and lactic acid production after use of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride mouthrinse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerardu, V.A.M.; Buijs, M.; Loveren, C. van; Cate, J.M. ten

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was lo determine the effects of 3 wk of daily rinsing with amine fluoride/stannous fluoride (AmF/SnF2) mouthrinse on plaque formation at buccal and interproximal sites, and on the acid production in plaque. in a randomized clinical trial with 30 participants. The amount of plaq

  4. Fluoride release, recharge and flexural properties of polymethylmethacrylate containing fluoridated glass fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bakri, I A; Swain, M V; Naoum, S J; Al-Omari, W M; Martin, E; Ellakwa, A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoridated glass fillers on fluoride release, recharge and the flexural properties of modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Specimens of PMMA denture base material with various loading of fluoridated glass fillers (0%, 1%, 2.5%, 5% and 10% by weight) were prepared. Flexural properties were evaluated on rectangular specimens (n = 10) aged in deionized water after 24 hours, 1 and 3 months. Disc specimens (n = 10) were aged for 43 days in deionized water and lactic acid (pH 4.0) and fluoride release was measured at numerous intervals. After ageing, specimens were recharged and fluoride re-release was recorded at 1, 3 and 7 days after recharge. Samples containing 2.5%, 5% and 10% glass fillers showed significantly (p glass fillers specimens. All experimental specimens exhibited fluoride release in both media. The flexural strength of specimens decreased in proportion to the percentage filler inclusion with the modulus of elasticity values remaining within ISO Standard 1567. The modified PMMA with fluoridated glass fillers has the ability to release and re-release fluoride ion. Flexural strength decreased as glass filler uploading increased. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Fluoride concentration in plaque in adolescents after topical application of different fluoride varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sköld-Larsson, K; Modéer, T; Twetman, S

    2000-03-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the fluoride (F) concentration in plaque after a single topical application of different fluoride varnishes with contrasting levels of F. Thirty adolescents (12-17 years) with fixed orthodontic appliances were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Bifluoride (6% F), Duraphat (2.23% F) and Fluor Protector (0.1% F). The varnishes were applied after professional cleaning in one upper quadrant, leaving the opposite quadrant untreated according to the split-mouth technique. Pooled plaque samples from each quadrant were collected at baseline and 3 days, 7 days and 30 days after the varnish treatment, and fluoride was analysed by microdiffusion. All fluoride varnishes increased the fluoride concentration in plaque compared with baseline, and the mean values varied between 23 and 138 ng F/mg after 3 days, depending on varnish F concentration. Compared with the control quadrant, statistically significant elevations were recorded for Bifluoride after 3 days and 7 days and Duraphat after 3 days, while no significant differences were revealed in the Fluor Protector group. The fluoride concentration in plaque was back to baseline levels for all participants in the Duraphat group after 7 days, while some individuals in the Bifluoride and Fluor Protector groups still registered slightly increased levels after 30 days. The results suggest that fluoride varnish treatments resulted in elevated fluoride levels in plaque adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances for a period of up to 1 week, although different patterns was disclosed for the various brands.

  6. Intraoral fluoride levels after use of conventional and high-fluoride dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessan, Juliano P; Conceição, Juliana M; Grizzo, Larissa T; Székely, Melinda; Fazakas, Zita; Buzalaf, Marília Ar

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate saliva and plaque as indicators of intraoral fluoride (F) levels after the use of conventional and high-fluoride dentifrices. Subjects were randomly assigned to brush their teeth with conventional (1000 ppm F), high-fluoride (5000 ppm F), and placebo dentifrices (fluoride free) for 10 days, following a double-blind, crossover protocol. Saliva and plaque samples were collected on the morning of the 5(th) and 10th days, respectively at 1 and 12 h after brushing, and analyzed with an ion-selective electrode after HMDS-facilitated diffusion. Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA, Tukey's test and Spearman's correlation coefficient (p dentifrices when compared to values obtained for placebo, except plaque 12 h after the use of conventional dentifrice. A positive and significant correlation was found between fluoride concentrations in plaque and saliva for both times of sample collection. Both indicators assessed were able to detect significant differences among treatments and between times after brushing. The use of a high-fluoride dentifrice is able to significantly increase intraoral fluoride levels throughout the day, being therefore a useful therapy for patients at high caries risk. A dentifrice with high fluoride concentration could be regarded as a useful therapy of F delivery for high caries-risk patients, since intraoral F levels were sustained throughout most of the day after using this formulation.

  7. Effect of titanium tetrafluoride, amine fluoride and fluoride varnish on enamel erosion in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A; Ruben, JL; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of 1 and 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) gels, amine fluoride (AmF) 1 and 0.25% and a fluoride varnish (FP) on the prevention of dental erosion. Two experimental groups served as controls, one with no pretreatment and another one pre-treated with a

  8. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  9. Pit and fissure sealants or fluoride varnishes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglia, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite the general advances in dental care, dental caries is still a global health problem affecting many children. Occlusal surfaces of first permanent molars are the most susceptible sites in the developing permanent dentition. Dentists should use sealants or fluoride varnish - as well as other means - to limit the onset of tooth decay. Application of sealants is a recommended procedure to prevent or control caries. Sealing occlusal surfaces of newly erupted permanent molars in children and teenagers delays caries onset up to 48 months compared with unsealed teeth. However longer follow-ups shows a reduction of the preventive effect [Tikhonova et al., 2015]. A review of 2013 pointed out how sealants are effective in high risk children, however information about the benefits of sealing in other conditions is still scant [Ahovuo-Saloranta et al., 2013]. Fluoride varnishes are frequently used to prevent early childhood caries and reduce caries increment in very young children [Weintraub et al., 2006] and in the most vulnerable populations, where the prevalence of caries is higher and specialist visits are occasional [Chu et al., 2010]. Many studies have reported the effectiveness of different types and forms of fluoride agents in preventing dental caries among children and adolescents [Divaris et al., 2013]. A review clarifies that professional application of a 5% sodium fluoride varnish leads to remineralisation of early enamel caries in children. Solutions of 38% silver diamine fluoride are effective in arresting active dentine caries [Gao et al., 2016]. The last systematic review [Ahovuo-Saloranta et al., 2016], comparing pit and fissure sealants with fluoride varnishes explains that the pooled estimate slightly favours resin sealants over fluoride varnishes at two years. At four and nine years, the only comparative study (with high drop-out rates) found more caries on fluoride-varnished occlusal surfaces than on resin-sealed surfaces. There is evidence

  10. Removal of fluoride from fluoride contaminated industrial waste water by electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vijaya A; Nanoti, Madan V

    2003-01-01

    Wastewater containing fluoride are generally treated with lime or calcium salt supplemented with aluminium salts. Wastewater generated from different industries does not always behave in the same way due to the presence of interfering contaminants. A number of techniques have been developed and studied for the removal of excessive fluoride. Most of these are based on use of aluminium salt. In alum coagulation the sorption properties of product of hydrolysis of aluminium salts and capacity of fluoride for complex formation plays a very important role. These hydrolysis products of aluminium can be produced by passing direct current through aluminium electrode. The text presented in the paper deals with the various aspect of removal of fluoride by electrolysis using aluminium electrode from fluoride chemical based industrial wastewater.

  11. Influence of the method of fluoride administration on toxicity and fluoride concentrations in Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.; Schuler, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Young Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were administered NaF for 16 d either in their diet or by esophageal intubation. Based on the total fluoride ion (Emg F-) intake over the l6-d experimental period, fluoride administered by intubation was at least six times more toxic than that fed in the diet. Dietary concentrations of 1,000 ppm F- (Emg F- for 16 d = approx. 144) produced no mortality, whereas intubated doses produced 73% or greater mortality in all groups administered 54 mg F- /kg/d or more (Emg F- for 16 d _ approx. 23 mg). GraphIc companson of the regression of log F- ppm in femurs/mg F- intake showed that fluoride levels in the femurs of quail administered fluoride by intubation were higher than in those administered fluoride in the diet.

  12. The effect of fluoride exposure on the load-deflection properties of superelastic nickel-titanium-based orthodontic archwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Ramazanzadeh, Barat-Ali; Sabzevari, Berahman; Ahrari, Ali

    2012-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that fluoride prophylactic agents may cause hydrogen absorption in NiTi wires and degrade their mechanical properties. To investigate the effect of a fluoride mouthwash on load-deflection characteristics of three types of nickel-titanium-based orthodontic archwires. Twenty maxillary 0.016 inch round specimens from each of the single-strand NiTi (Rematitan 'Lite'), multi-strand NiTi (SPEED Supercable) and Copper NiTi (Damon Copper NiTi) wires were selected. The specimens were kept in either 0.2% NaF or artificial saliva solutions at 37 degrees C for 24 hours (N = 10). The wire load-deflection properties were measured by a Zwick testing machine, using a three-point bending test. An un-paired student's t-test, a one-way ANOVA and a Tukey post-hoc test were used to assess statistical significance. Immersion in NaF solution affected the load-deflection properties of NiTi wires. The unloading forces at 0.5 and 1.0 mm deflections were significantly lower in fluoride-treated specimens compared with the control groups (p fluoride- and saliva-treated specimens (p > 0.05). The results suggested that subjecting NiTi wires to fluoride agents decreased associated unloading forces, especially at lower deflections, and may result in delayed tooth alignment.

  13. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  14. Hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Sloan, E.D.

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to the storage of hydrogen. The invention relates especially to storing hydrogen in a clathrate hydrate. The clathrate hydrate according to the present invention originates from a composition, which comprises water and hydrogen, as well as a promotor compound. The promotor comp

  15. Root caries in areas with and without fluoridated water at the Southeast region of São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Berta Rihs

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate root caries prevalence in areas with and without water fluoridation at the Southeast region of São Paulo State, in the adult population, employees of public and private schools, and elderly population. Epidemiological surveys were conducted according to the World Health Organization guidelines (1997, including 1,475 dentate individuals aged 35 to 44 years and 65 to 74 years, living in cities representing the southeast of São Paulo State, with (n=872 or without (n=603 fluoridated water supply. Statistical analysis was performed by Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests at a significance level of 5%. The prevalence of root caries was 15.6% for the 35-44-year-old age group and 31.8% for the 65-74-year-old age group . There were no statistically significant differences (p>0.05 in the occurrence of root caries according to water fluoridation, although individuals living at non-fluoridated areas presented higher percentage of missing teeth; also, there was higher mean number of intact roots at fluoridated areas (p<0.05. Most individuals with gingival recession, both adults and elderly, did not have root caries experience. In this study, root caries prevalence was lower in areas with fluoridated water. Due to the reduced prevalence of edentulism and increased number of people keeping their natural teeth for a longer period, a future increase in root caries is expected, highlighting the importance of studies related to water fluoridation and its relationship with the oral health of adults and elderly, especially referring to tooth root.

  16. Fusion Energy for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J. R.; Steinberg, M.; Salzano, F.; Benenati, R.; Dang, V.; Fogelson, S.; Isaacs, H.; Kouts, H.; Kushner, M.; Lazareth, O.; Majeski, S.; Makowitz, H.; Sheehan, T. V.

    1978-09-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

  17. Molecular anions sputtered from fluorides

    CERN Document Server

    Gnaser, H

    2002-01-01

    The emission of negatively charged ions from different fluoride samples (LiF, CaF sub 2 , LaF sub 3 and HfF sub 4) induced by sputtering with a 14.5-keV Cs sup + ion beam was studied. Sputtered ions were detected in a high-sensitivity double-focusing mass spectrometer. In particular, the possible existence of small doubly charged negative molecular ions was investigated. But whereas singly charged species of the general type MF sub n sup - (where M represents a metal atom) were detected with high abundances, stable dianions were observed in an unambiguous way only for one molecule: HfF sub 6 sup 2 sup -. The flight time through the mass spectrometer of approx 35 mu s establishes a lower limit with respect to the intrinsic lifetime of this doubly charged ion. For singly charged anions abundance distributions and, in selected cases, emission-energy spectra were recorded. For two ion species (Ca sup - and HfF sub 5 sup -) isotopic fractionation effects caused by the (velocity dependent) ionization process were d...

  18. The future of fluorides and other protective agents in erosion prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, Adrian; Carvalho, Thiago Saads

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of fluoride in caries prevention has been convincingly proven. In recent years, researchers have investigated the preventive effects of different fluoride formulations on erosive tooth wear with positive results, but their action on caries and erosion prevention must be based on different requirements, because there is no sheltered area in the erosive process as there is in the subsurface carious lesions. Thus, any protective mechanism from fluoride concerning erosion is limited to the surface or the near surface layer of enamel. However, reports on other protective agents show superior preventive results. The mechanism of action of tin-containing products is related to tin deposition onto the tooth surface, as well as the incorporation of tin into the near-surface layer of enamel. These tin-rich deposits are less susceptible to dissolution and may result in enhanced protection of the underlying tooth. Titanium tetrafluoride forms a protective layer on the tooth surface. It is believed that this layer is made up of hydrated hydrogen titanium phosphate. Products containing phosphates and/or proteins may adsorb either to the pellicle, rendering it more protective against demineralization, or directly to the dental hard tissue, probably competing with H(+) at specific sites on the tooth surface. Other substances may further enhance precipitation of calcium phosphates on the enamel surface, protecting it from additional acid impacts. Hence, the future of fluoride alone in erosion prevention looks grim, but the combination of fluoride with protective agents, such as polyvalent metal ions and some polymers, has much brighter prospects. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Elevated antibody to D-alanyl lipoteichoic acid indicates caries experience associated with fluoride and gingival health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Willis L

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Acidogenic, acid-tolerant bacteria induce dental caries and require D-alanyl glycerol lipoteichoic acid (D-alanyl LTA on their cell surface. Because fluoride inhibits acid-mediated enamel demineralization, an elevated antibody response to D-alanyl LTA may indicate subjects with more acidogenic bacteria and, therefore, an association of DMFT with fluoride exposure and gingival health not apparent in low responders. Methods Cluster analysis was used to identify low antibody content. Within low and high responders (control and test subjects, the number of teeth that were decayed missing and filled (DMFT, or decayed only (DT were regressed against fluoride exposure in the water supply and from dentrifice use. The latter was determined from gingival health: prevalences of plaque (PL and bleeding on probing (BOP, and mean pocket depth (PD. Age was measured as a possible confounding cofactor. Results In 35 high responders, DMFT associated with length of exposure to fluoridated water (F score, PL and BOP (R2 = 0.51, p 2 = 0.26, p 2 = 0.57, p 2 = 0.12, p Conclusion Caries associates with gingival health and fluoridated water exposure in high D-alanyl LTA antibody responders.

  20. Hydrogen Energy by Means of Proton Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf

    , but matching supply and demand in time as well as in form calls for new engineering solutions. Hydrogen as energy carrier and energy storage medium has often been mentioned as an option for the future. A protons is an elementary particles, but at the same time the ion of hydrogen. When hydrogen (H2......) is extracted from water (H2O) it can happen via formation of protons (hydrogen ions, H+) which must be transported away by proton conducting materials to form molecular hydrogen (H2). This process is called electrolysis and converts electrical energy into the chemical energy of a fuel. The reverse process...

  1. The International oil price and hydrogen competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Anders Chr.

    2007-01-01

    Natural gas based hydrogen is expected to provide most of the hydrogen supply in the period prior to and during at least the first years of market introduction of automotive hydrogen and fuel cell technology in large scale. Due to the natural gas price dependency of the international oil price the hydrogen cost level that is required for competitiveness of hydrogen and fuel cell technology depends on the oil price. This gives rise to the question: At which oil price will natural gas based ...

  2. The influence of saliva on the dissolution of calcium fluoride after application of different fluoride gels in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Elmar; Polydorou, Olga; Lussi, Adrian; Kielbassa, Andrej M; Altenburger, Markus J

    2010-10-01

    To determine the formation and dissolution of calcium fluoride on the enamel surface after application of two fluoride gel-saliva mixtures. From each of 80 bovine incisors, two enamel specimens were prepared and subjected to two different treatment procedures. In group 1, 80 specimens were treated with a mixture of an amine fluoride gel (1.25% F-; pH 5.2; 5 minutes) and human saliva. In group 2, 80 enamel blocks were subjected to a mixture of sodium fluoride gel (1.25% F; pH 5.5; 5 minutes) and human saliva. Subsequent to fluoride treatment, 40 specimens from each group were stored in human saliva and sterile water, respectively. Ten specimens were removed after each of 1 hour, 24 hours, 2 days, and 5 days and analyzed according to potassium hydroxide-soluble fluoride. Application of amine fluoride gel resulted in a higher amount of potassium hydroxide-soluble fluoride than did sodium fluoride gel 1 hour after application. Saliva exerted an inhibitory effect according to the dissolution rate of calcium fluoride. However, after 5 days, more than 90% of the precipitated calcium fluoride was dissolved in the amine fluoride group, and almost all potassium hydroxide-soluble fluoride was lost in the sodium fluoride group. Calcium fluoride apparently dissolves rapidly, even at almost neutral pH. Considering the limitations of an in vitro study, it is concluded that highly concentrated fluoride gels should be applied at an adequate frequency to reestablish a calcium fluoride-like layer.

  3. Fluoride removal from water by zirconium (IV) doped chitosan bio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    bio-composite was at par with commercial alumina to mitigate water fluoride limit .... analyzed for residual fluoride concentration by ion selective ..... zirconium (IV) doped chitosan were reused in another ... desalination in India: Review Article.

  4. State and National Water Fluoridation System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  5. Chemically modified field effect transistors with nitrite or fluoride selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, Martijn M.G.; Snellink-Ruël, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johan F.J.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1998-01-01

    Polysiloxanes with different types of polar substituents are excellent membrane materials for nitrite and fluoride selective chemically modified field effect transistors (CHEMFETs). Nitrite selectivity has been introduced by incorporation of a cobalt porphyrin into the membrane; fluoride selectivity

  6. Chemically modified field effect transistors with nitrite or fluoride selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, M.M.G.; Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    Polysiloxanes with different types of polar substituents are excellent membrane materials for nitrite and fluoride selective chemically modified field effect transistors (CHEMFETs). Nitrite selectivity has been introduced by incorporation of a cobalt porphyrin into the membrane; fluoride selectivity

  7. Fluoride removal studies in water using natural materials : technical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluoride removal studies in water using natural materials : technical note. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL ... The removal of fluoride was attempted using natural materials such as red soil, ...

  8. Thermodynamic data-base for metal fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Lee, Byung Gik; Kang, Young Ho and others

    2001-05-01

    This study is aimed at collecting useful data of thermodynamic properties of various metal fluorides. Many thermodynamic data for metal fluorides are needed for the effective development, but no report of data-base was published. Accordingly, the objective of this report is to rearrange systematically the existing thermodynamic data based on metal fluorides and is to use it as basic data for the development of pyrochemical process. The physicochemical properties of various metal fluorides and metals were collected from literature and such existing data base as HSC code, TAPP code, FACT code, JANAF table, NEA data-base, CRC handbook. As major contents of the thermodynamic data-base, the physicochemical properties such as formation energy, viscosity, density, vapor pressure, etc. were collected. Especially, some phase diagrams of eutectic molten fluorides are plotted and thermodynamic data of liquid metals are also compiled. In the future, the technical report is to be used as basic data for the development of the pyrochemical process which is being carried out as a long-term nuclear R and D project.

  9. Fluoride and chlorhexidine release from filled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C; Zhang, N-Z; Anusavice, K J

    2010-09-01

    Resin-based materials that release either fluoride or chlorhexidine have been formulated for inhibiting caries activity. It is not known if the two agents, when incorporated into one material, would interact and affect their release potential. We hypothesized that the ratio of fluoride to chlorhexidine incorporated into a resin, and the pH of the storage medium, will affect their releases from the material. The material investigated contained 23 wt% of filler, and the ratios of calcium fluoride to chlorhexidine diacetate were 8/2, 5/5, and 2/8. The release was conducted in pH 4, 5, and 6 acetate buffers. The results showed that release of either agent increased as the pH of the medium decreased. The presence of fluoride salt substantially reduced the chlorhexidine release, while the presence of a specific quantity of chlorhexidine significantly increased fluoride release. This interaction can be utilized to optimize the release of either agent for therapeutic purposes.

  10. Selecting effective hydrogen production and delivery options for mining applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curran, K.M. [Air Liquide Canada Inc., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-11-15

    This paper explored solutions to the challenges facing underground mining operations with respect to diesel powered equipment that results in increased ventilation requirements. The use of hydrogen as a fuel offers benefits in the area of reduced particulate and toxic emissions when it is used both in an internal combustion engine and when the energy of hydrogen is converted to electricity via a fuel cell. This paper examined the economics associated with 4 portions of the hydrogen supply chain for 3 commercially available methods for hydrogen supply. The 4 elements of each supply chain were production, distribution, storage and dispensing. The 3 methods for supply included gaseous product delivered by tube trailers; gaseous hydrogen onsite production through electrolysis; and, liquid hydrogen delivery. The choice of hydrogen supply mode was shown to be a complex process that must take into account all elements of the supply chain in terms of the end user defined by flow rate, pressure and purity. The cost of energy must also be considered, both for onsite production and for the transport cost of any delivered product. It was concluded that gaseous hydrogen offers flexibility in lower flow situations while liquid hydrogen offers the most economic supply method when distance from the liquid source is manageable by bulk tanker. 14 figs.

  11. Fabrication of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) Nanofibers Containing Nickel Nanoparticles as Future Energy Server Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Faheem A; Cantu, Travis; Macossay, Javier; Kim, Hern

    2011-04-01

    In the present study, we introduce Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofibers containing nickel (Ni) nanoparticles (NPs) as a result of an electrospinning. Typically, a colloidal solution consisting of PVDF/Ni NPs was prepared to produce nanofibers embedded with solid NPs by electrospinning process. The resultant nanostructures were studied by SEM analyses, which confirmed well oriented nanofibers and good dispersion of Ni NPs over them. The XRD results demonstrated well crystalline feature of PVDF and Ni in the obtained nanostructures. Physiochemical aspects of prepared nano-structures were characterized for TEM which confirmed nanofibers were well-oriented and had good dispersion of Ni NPs. Furthermore, the prepared nano-structures were studied for hydrogen production applications. Due to high surface to volume ratio of nanofibers form than the thin film ones, there was tremendous increase in the rate of hydrogen production. Overall, results satisfactorily confirmed the use of these materials in hydrogen production.

  12. Thiourea Based Tweezer Anion Receptors for Selective Sensing of Fluoride Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,You-Ming; CAO,Cheng; WEI,Wei; WEI,Tai-Bao

    2007-01-01

    Three 3,3'-di(4-substituted-phenyl)-1,1'-isophthaloylbis(thiourea) compounds were designed as novel neutral anion receptors, and synthesized by simple steps in good yields. The single crystal structure of receptor 1 shows that a solvent molecule was captured by the host molecule through intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Moreover, it was self-assembled as a supramolecular system for the presence of abundant inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding and π-π interactions between phenyl groups. Their application as anion receptors has been examined by UV-Vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy, showing that they had a higher selectivity for fluoride than other halides. The host and guest formed a 1∶1 stoichiometry complex through hydrogen bonding interactions in the first step, then following a process of deprotonation in presence of an excess of F- in the solvent of DMF.

  13. Hydrogen-selective membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

    1995-09-19

    A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2}s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

  14. [Dental fluorosis prevalence in eight cohorts of Mexicans born during the implementation of the Fluoridated Domestic Salt National Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova-Rosado, Alejandro José; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Casanova-Rosado, Juan Fernando; Vallejos-Sánchez, Ana Alicia; de la Rosa-Santillana, Rubén; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Martha; Villalobos-Rodelo, Juan José; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    to determine the effect of birth cohort on dental fluorosis in Mexican schoolchildren during the implementation of the national program to fluoridate domestic salt. in a cross-sectional study we examined 1,644 schoolchildren 6-13 years old born between 1985-1992 in Campeche, México; a community where there is negligible naturally available fluoride in water supplies. Dental fluorosis was assessed with the Dean’s index in the permanent dentition. Questionnaires were used to identify diverse socio-demographic and socio-economic variables. In the statistical analysis logistic regression was used. the prevalence of fluorosis was 15.5%. In the multivariate model,we observed fluorosis was associated with larger family sizes (OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84-0.99) and female sex (OR: 0.74; 95%CI: 0.57-0.98). Furthermore, using the cohort of 1985 as a comparison group, no significant dental fluorosis differences were found with those born between 1986-1987; in contrast, in the cohorts born between 1989-1992 the risk of dental fluorosis increased by almost four times (p fluorosis was low compared to other studies in Mexico. In this community with negligible fluoride in water supplies the likelihood of dental fluorosis increased as the windows of susceptibility in birth cohorts were closer to the chronologic beginning of the national domestic salt fluoridation program in 1991. This trend was more apparent after 1991.

  15. Estimated fluoride doses from toothpastes should be based on total soluble fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria José L; Martins, Carolina C; Paiva, Saul M; Tenuta, Livia M A; Cury, Jaime A

    2013-11-01

    The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF) rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride-TSF) in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80) or children's toothpaste (n = 78)). The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight) of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children's toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p toothpaste was found regarding the ingested dose based on TSF (0.039 ± 0.005 and 0.039 ± 0.005 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p > 0.05). The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children's toothpaste is used.

  16. A simple and colorimetric fluoride receptor and its fluoride-responsive organogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Xudong, E-mail: 081022009@fudan.edu.cn [College of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Yuhua Road 70, Shijiazhuang 050080 (China); Li Yajuan [College of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Yuhua Road 70, Shijiazhuang 050080 (China); Yin Yaobing; Yu Decai [College of Science, Hebei University of Engineering, 199 South street of Guangming, Handan 056038 (China)

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a new p-nitrophenylhydrozine-based anion receptor 1 containing cholesterol group had been designed and synthesized. It could selectively recognize fluoride among different anions tested with color changes from pale yellow to red for visual detection. Simultaneously, it could gel in cyclohexane, and the gel was also fluoride-responsive. When treated with TBAF (tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride), the gel could undergo gel-sol transition accompanied by color, morphology and surface changes. The binding mechanism had been investigated by UV-vis and {sup 1}HNMR (proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra) titrations. From SEM (scanning electron microscope), SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering), IR (Infrared Spectroscopy) and CA (contact angle) experiments, it was indicated that the addition of F{sup -} could destroy the molecule assembly of host 1 in the gel state, thus resulting in the gel-to-sol transition due to the binding site competition effect. To the best of our knowledge, this was the simplest fluoride-responsive organogel with high selectivity. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel kind receptor for selective recognition of fluoride had been designed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its organogel was also fluoride-responsive. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the simplest fluoride-responsive organogel with high selectivity.

  17. Method for the analysis of total fluoride in fluoride-releasing dental varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, C M; Coleman, S S

    2014-01-01

    Today's fluoride-releasing varnishes (F-varnish) contain a wide variety of ingredients which present analytical challenges for measuring their total fluoride content. This study reports improved methods to measure fluoride content in F-varnishes. Six different commercially available F-varnishes that contain difluorosilane (0.1% F) or NaF (2.26% F) alone or in combination with calcium-phosphates were analyzed. In a vial, 1-3 drops (0.05-0.15 g) of varnish product was dispensed, dissolved in chloroform, equilibrated in TISAB and analyzed via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The average weight percentage of fluoride for all F-varnishes containing NaF ranged from 2.03 to 2.24% F, which is within 90% of the declared label concentration of 2.26% F. Analysis of the difluorosilane-containing product required an additional hydrolysis step. ANOVA found no significant difference between the 5% NaF varnishes at p fluoride analysis yields reliable and reproducible results and can be used for a wide variety of F-varnishes. The standard uncertainty for this method is ±4%. This method may become the basis for national and international standards that ensure the F-varnish products used in clinical practice have the fluoride content declared in the product literature. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Method for the Analysis of Total Fluoride in Fluoride-Releasing Dental Varnishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, C.M.; Coleman, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Today’s fluoride-releasing varnishes (F-varnish) contain a wide variety of ingredients which present analytical challenges for measuring their total fluoride content. This study reports improved methods to measure fluoride content in F-varnishes. Six different commercially available F-varnishes that contain difluorosilane (0.1% F) or NaF (2.26% F) alone or in combination with calcium-phosphates were analyzed. In a vial, 1–3 drops (0.05–0.15 g) of varnish product was dispensed, dissolved in chloroform, equilibrated in TISAB and analyzed via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The average weight percentage of fluoride for all F-varnishes containing NaF ranged from 2.03 to 2.24% F, which is within 90% of the declared label concentration of 2.26% F. Analysis of the difluorosilane-containing product required an additional hydrolysis step. ANOVA found no significant difference between the 5% NaF varnishes at p fluoride analysis yields reliable and reproducible results and can be used for a wide variety of F-varnishes. The standard uncertainty for this method is ±4%. This method may become the basis for national and international standards that ensure the F-varnish products used in clinical practice have the fluoride content declared in the product literature. PMID:24557443

  19. Economic and technical analysis of distributed utility benefits for hydrogen refueling stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannucci, J.J.; Eyer, J.M.; Horgan, S.A. [Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA (United States); Schoenung, S.M. [Longitude 122 West, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This paper discusses the potential economic benefits of operating hydrogen refueling stations to supplying pressurized hydrogen for vehicles, and supplying distributed utility generation, transmission and distribution peaking needs to the utility. The study determined under what circumstances using a hydrogen-fueled generator as a distributed utility generation source, co-located with the hydrogen refueling station components (electrolyzer and storage), would result in cost savings to the station owner, and hence lower hydrogen production costs.

  20. A cross-sectional study to assess the intelligence quotient (IQ) of school going children aged 10-12 years in villages of Mysore district, India with different fluoride levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Shibu Thomas; Sunitha, S

    2015-01-01

    Besides dental and skeletal fluorosis, excessive fluoride intake can also affect the central nervous system without first causing the physical deformities associated with skeletal fluorosis. With the existence of widespread endemic fluorosis in India, the possible adverse effect of elevated fluoride in drinking water on the Intelligence Quotient (IQ) level of children is a potentially serious public health problem. This study assessed the Intelligence Quotient (IQ) of school going children aged 10-12 years in villages of Mysore district with different fluoride levels. In this cross-sectional study, 405 school children aged 10-12 years were selected from three villages in Mysore district with normal fluoride (1.20 mg F/l), low fluoride (0.40 mg F/l) and high fluoride (2.20 mg F/l) in their water supplies. A pre designed questionnaire was used to collect the required data for the survey which included socio demographic details, oral hygiene practices, diet history, body mass index and dental fluorosis. Intelligence Quotient was assessed using Raven's colored Progressive Matrices Test. In bivariate analysis, significant relationships were found between water fluoride levels and Intelligence Quotient of school children (P children with IQ below 90, i.e. below average IQ was larger compared to normal and low fluoride village. Age, gender, parent education level and family income had no significant association with IQ. School children residing in area with higher than normal water fluoride level demonstrated more impaired development of intelligence when compared to school children residing in areas with normal and low water fluoride levels. Thus, children's intelligence can be affected by high water fluoride levels.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of fluoride in toddlers after application of 5% sodium fluoride dental varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Taves, Donald M; Kim, Amy S; Watson, Gene E; Horst, Jeremy A

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of dental caries (tooth decay) among preschool children is increasing, driven partially by an earlier age of onset of carious lesions. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends application of 5% sodium fluoride varnish at intervals increasing with caries risk status, as soon as teeth are present. However, the varnishes are marketed for treatment of tooth sensitivity and are regulated as medical devices rather than approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for prevention of dental caries (tooth decay). The objective of this research is to examine the safety of use in toddlers by characterizing the absorption and distribution profile of a currently marketed fluoride varnish. We measured urinary fluoride for 5 hours after application of fluoride varnish to teeth in 6 toddlers aged 12 to 15 months. Baseline levels were measured on a separate day. The urine was extracted from disposable diapers, measured by rapid diffusion, and extrapolated to plasma levels. The mean estimated plasma fluoride concentration was 13 μg/L (SD, 9 μg/L) during the baseline visit and 21 μg/L (SD, 8 μg/L) during the 5 hours after treatment. Mean estimated peak plasma fluoride after treatment was 57 μg/L (SD, 22 μg/L), and 20 μg/kg (SD, 4 μg/L) was retained on average. Retained fluoride was 253 times lower than the acute toxic dose of 5 mg/kg. Mean plasma fluoride after placement of varnish was within an SD of control levels. Occasional application of fluoride varnish following American Academy of Pediatrics guidance is safe for toddlers. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated use...

  3. Cancer incidence and mortality in workers exposed to fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P; Olsen, J H; Jensen, O M

    1992-01-01

    Although a recent bioassay showed increased frequency of bone cancer in rats with high oral intake of fluoride, the data are reported as equivocal evidence of carcinogenicity. In humans, occupational fluoride exposure may cause skeletal fluorosis, and our earlier follow-up of fluoride...

  4. Uses of sodium fluoride varnish in dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C H; Lo, Edward

    2008-06-01

    Fluoride varnish is developed to prolong the contact time between fluoride and tooth surface, so that the tooth becomes more resistant to caries attack. The active ingredient of fluoride varnish is usually 5% sodium fluoride, (22,600 ppm fluoride). Studies have found that fairly insoluble globules of calcium fluoride-like material formed on the tooth surface after topical fluoride application. These globules act as a reservoir of fluoride in the mouth for a prolonged period of time. Systematic reviews corroborate evidence for the efficacy of fluoride varnish in the prevention of dental caries. Sodium fluoride varnish is used to prevent caries development, arrest early enamel and even soft dentine caries through promotion of remineralization of carious tooth substance. It is also used to treat tooth hypersensitivity. Some use it as a provisional luting agent by itself or combined with other provisional luting agents for cementing provisional crowns. Fluoride varnish has recently gained much attention in dentistry because it is quick and easy to apply. It sets rapidly on teeth, and gagging and swallowing is unusual. Side-effects or complications of its use are rare. Studies show that fluoride varnish is safe for young children and the risk of dental fluorosis is minimal. The simplicity of its application makes it very suitable and practical for use in dental clinics and outreach dental services, especially in young children and in other special needs groups.

  5. 49 CFR 179.102-4 - Vinyl fluoride, stabilized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl fluoride, stabilized. 179.102-4 Section 179...-4 Vinyl fluoride, stabilized. Each tank used to transport vinyl fluoride, stabilized, must comply... subchapter), Type 304, 304L, 316 or 316L, in which case impact tests are not required; or (2) Steel complying...

  6. Health effects of fluoride pollution caused by coal burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, M.; Tadano, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Tamura, K.; Chen, X. [Regional Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, 305-0083 Ibaraki (Japan); Asanuma, S. [Japan Institute of Rural Medicine, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Saku Central Hospital, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Kondo, T. [Matsumoto Dental College, Shiojiri, Nagano (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Otsuma Women' s University, Tama, Tokyo (Japan); Ji, R.; Liang, C.; Cao, S. [Institute of Environmental Health and Engineering, Beijing (China); Hong, Z. [Shanxi Maternity and Children' s Hospital, Taiyuan (China)

    2001-04-23

    Recently a huge amount of fluoride in coal has been released into indoor environments by the combustion of coal and fluoride pollution seems to be increasing in some rural areas in China. Combustion of coal and coal bricks is the primary source of gaseous and aerosol fluoride and these forms of fluoride can easily enter exposed food products and the human respiratory tract. Major human fluoride exposure was caused by consumption of fluoride contaminated food, such as corn, chilies and potatoes. For each diagnostic syndrome of dental fluorosis, a log-normal distribution was observed on the logarithm of urinary fluoride concentration in students in China. Urinary fluoride content was found to be a primary health indicator of the prevalence of dental fluorosis in the community. In the fluorosis areas, osteosclerosis in skeletal fluorosis patients was observed with a high prevalence. A biochemical marker of bone resorption, urinary deoxypyridinoline content was much higher in residents in China than in residents in Japan. It was suggested that bone resorption was stimulated to a greater extent in residents in China and fluoride may stimulate both bone resorption and bone formation. Renal function especially glomerular filtration rate was very sensitive to fluoride exposure. Inorganic phosphate concentrations in urine were significantly lower in the residents in fluorosis areas in China than in non-fluorosis area in China and Japan. Since airborne fluoride from the combustion of coal pollutes extensively both the living environment and food, it is necessary to reduce fluoride pollution caused by coal burning.

  7. Risk and sustainability analysis of complex hydrogen infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Marangon, A.; Carcassi, M.

    2016-01-01

    -based fuels. Therefore, future hydrogen supply and distribution chains will have to address several objectives. Such a complexity is a challenge for risk assessment and risk management of these chains because of the increasing interactions. Improved methods are needed to assess the supply chain as a whole......Building a network of hydrogen refuelling stations is essential to develop the hydrogen economy within transport. Additional, hydrogen is regarded a likely key component to store and convert back excess electrical power to secure future energy supply and to improve the quality of biomass...

  8. HOUSEHOLD PURIFICATION OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATED MAGADI (TRONA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    Purification of fluoride contaminated magadi is studied using bone char sorption and calcium precipitation. The bone char treatment is found to be workable both in columns and in batches where the magadi is dissolved in water prior to treatment. The concentrations in the solutions were 89 g magadi....../L and 95 and 400 mg F/L respectively in natural and synthetic solutions. The fluoride removal capacities observed were 4.6 mg F/g bone char for the column system and 2.7 mg F/g bone char for the batch system in case of synthetic magadi solution. It is however concluded that the batch system is the best...... treatment method. A procedure for purification of fluoride contaminated magadi at household level is described....

  9. Multivariate statistical analysis for fluoride occurrence in groundwater in the Northern region of Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salifu, A.; Petrusevski, B.; Ghebremichael, K.; Buamah, R.; Amy, G.

    2012-10-01

    The presence of excess fluoride in groundwater in the Northern region of Ghana has resulted in the closure of many boreholes for drinking water supply to avoid the incidence of fluorosis and other related health effects. The fluoride concentration in 357 groundwater samples from the area ranged between 0.0 and 11.6 mg/L, with a mean value of 1.13 mg/L. Piper graphical classification, correlation coefficients, principal component analysis (PCA) and thermodynamic calculations were used as an approach to gain insight into the groundwater chemical composition and to help understand the dominant mechanisms influencing the occurrence of high fluoride waters. Spatial join procedure was used to examine the relationship between the underlying geology of the study area and fluoride distribution. Six groundwater types were identified for the area: Ca-Mg-HCO3, Ca-Mg-SO4, Na-Cl, Na-SO4, Na-HCO3 and mixed water type. PCA performed on the groundwater chemical data resulted in 4 principal components (PCs) explaining 72% of the data variance. The PCs represented the predominant processes controlling the groundwater chemistry in the study area which include; mineral dissolution reactions, ion exchange processes and evapotranspiration processes. PHREEQC calculations for saturation indices for the groundwater samples indicated they were largely saturated with respect to calcite and under-saturated with respect to fluorite, suggesting that dissolution of fluorite may be occurring in the areas where it is present. A review of the PCA results and an evaluation of the equilibrium state of the groundwater based on the saturation indices, suggest that some of the processes controlling the overall groundwater chemistry in the study area also influenced the fluoride enrichment. These predominant processes include the dissolution of the mineral fluorite, anion exchange processes (F-/OH-) involving clay minerals and evapotranspiration processes. Elevated fluoride levels in the study area were

  10. Multivariate statistical analysis for fluoride occurrence in groundwater in the Northern region of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salifu, A; Petrusevski, B; Ghebremichael, K; Buamah, R; Amy, G

    2012-10-01

    The presence of excess fluoride in groundwater in the Northern region of Ghana has resulted in the closure of many boreholes for drinking water supply to avoid the incidence of fluorosis and other related health effects. The fluoride concentration in 357 groundwater samples from the area ranged between 0.0 and 11.6mg/L, with a mean value of 1.13mg/L. Piper graphical classification, correlation coefficients, principal component analysis (PCA) and thermodynamic calculations were used as an approach to gain insight into the groundwater chemical composition and to help understand the dominant mechanisms influencing the occurrence of high fluoride waters. Spatial join procedure was used to examine the relationship between the underlying geology of the study area and fluoride distribution. Six groundwater types were identified for the area: Ca-Mg-HCO(3), Ca-Mg-SO(4), Na-Cl, Na-SO(4), Na-HCO(3) and mixed water type. PCA performed on the groundwater chemical data resulted in 4 principal components (PCs) explaining 72% of the data variance. The PCs represented the predominant processes controlling the groundwater chemistry in the study area which include; mineral dissolution reactions, ion exchange processes and evapotranspiration processes. PHREEQC calculations for saturation indices for the groundwater samples indicated they were largely saturated with respect to calcite and under-saturated with respect to fluorite, suggesting that dissolution of fluorite may be occurring in the areas where it is present. A review of the PCA results and an evaluation of the equilibrium state of the groundwater based on the saturation indices, suggest that some of the processes controlling the overall groundwater chemistry in the study area also influenced the fluoride enrichment. These predominant processes include the dissolution of the mineral fluorite, anion exchange processes (F(-)/OH(-)) involving clay minerals and evapotranspiration processes. Elevated fluoride levels in the study

  11. Vitrification of strontium-90 fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, D.M.; Schulz, W.W.

    1977-04-01

    At Hanford, strontium-90 is removed from high-level nuclear fuel reprocessing waste and converted to strontium-90 fluoride. This /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ is doubly encapsulated in high-integrity containers which are placed under water in monitored storage pools. Conversion of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ to a more immobile compound may be necessary and/or desirable as part of the overall plan for the long-term management of Hanford Defense Wastes. Glasses containing up to 40 mass percent SrF/sub 2/ and having leach rates in the range 1 x 10/sup -8/ to 1 x 10/sup -5/ gram Sr/(m/sup 2/ . s) (1 x 10/sup -7/ to 1 x 10/sup -4/ g Sr/cm/sup 2/ . day)) have now been prepared. From 0.2 to 5 percent of the fluorine is volatilized during the melting of the glass batch at temperatures up to 1500/sup 0/K. At present, the heat generation limit for commercial glasses stored at a nuclear waste repository is 5 kW per canister. All glasses described here would exceed that limit by more than a factor of five. The stored /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ may be treated separately from the bulk of Hanford waste, in which case it would be diluted to an acceptable power level with inert chemicals in the glass batch. Another option is to blend the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ with the bulk of the other Hanford wastes when those wastes are converted to some immobile form.

  12. Clean energy and the hydrogen economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, N P; Kurban, Z

    2017-07-28

    In recent years, new-found interest in the hydrogen economy from both industry and academia has helped to shed light on its potential. Hydrogen can enable an energy revolution by providing much needed flexibility in renewable energy systems. As a clean energy carrier, hydrogen offers a range of benefits for simultaneously decarbonizing the transport, residential, commercial and industrial sectors. Hydrogen is shown here to have synergies with other low-carbon alternatives, and can enable a more cost-effective transition to de-carbonized and cleaner energy systems. This paper presents the opportunities for the use of hydrogen in key sectors of the economy and identifies the benefits and challenges within the hydrogen supply chain for power-to-gas, power-to-power and gas-to-gas supply pathways. While industry players have already started the market introduction of hydrogen fuel cell systems, including fuel cell electric vehicles and micro-combined heat and power devices, the use of hydrogen at grid scale requires the challenges of clean hydrogen production, bulk storage and distribution to be resolved. Ultimately, greater government support, in partnership with industry and academia, is still needed to realize hydrogen's potential across all economic sectors.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Enhanced fluoride sorption by mechanochemically activated kaolinites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenakshi, S; Sundaram, C Sairam; Sukumar, Rugmini

    2008-05-01

    Kaolinite clay obtained from the mines was processed and studied for its fluoride sorption capacity. The surface area of the clay mineral was increased from 15.11 m(2)/g (raw) to 32.43 m(2)/g (activated) by mechanochemical activation. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to optimize various equilibrating conditions like the effect of contact time, dosage, pH for both raw and micronized kaolinites (RK and MK). The effect of other interfering anions on the defluoridation capacity (DC) of the sorbents was studied. Sorption of fluoride by the sorbents was observed over a wide pH range of 3-11. The studies revealed there is an enhanced fluoride sorption on MK. FTIR and XRD were used for the characterization of the sorbent. The surface morphology of the clay material was observed using SEM. The adsorption of fluoride was studied at three different temperatures, viz., 303, 313 and 323 K. The sorption data obtained at optimized conditions were subjected to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Sorption intensity (1/n) (0.770-0.810) has been evaluated using Freundlich isotherm, whereas the values of sorption capacity Q(0) (0.609, 0.714 and 0.782 mg/g) and binding energy b (0.158, 0.145 and 0.133 L/mg) at three different temperatures have been estimated using Langmuir isotherm. Adsorption process was found to be controlled by both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption of fluoride on MK is endothermic and a spontaneous process. The kinetic studies indicate that the sorption of fluoride on MK follows pseudo-first-order and intraparticle diffusion models.

  14. Enhanced fluoride sorption by mechanochemically activated kaolinites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meenakshi, S. [Department of Chemistry, Gandhigram Rural University, Gandhigram 624302, Tamilnadu (India)], E-mail: drs_meena@rediffmail.com; Sundaram, C. Sairam [Department of Science and Humanities, Karaikal Polytechnic College, Karaikal 609609, Puducherry (India); Sukumar, Rugmini [Chemical Sciences and Technologies, Regional Research Laboratory, Trivandrum 695019, Kerala (India)

    2008-05-01

    Kaolinite clay obtained from the mines was processed and studied for its fluoride sorption capacity. The surface area of the clay mineral was increased from 15.11 m{sup 2}/g (raw) to 32.43 m{sup 2}/g (activated) by mechanochemical activation. Batch adsorption studies were conducted to optimize various equilibrating conditions like the effect of contact time, dosage, pH for both raw and micronized kaolinites (RK and MK). The effect of other interfering anions on the defluoridation capacity (DC) of the sorbents was studied. Sorption of fluoride by the sorbents was observed over a wide pH range of 3-11. The studies revealed there is an enhanced fluoride sorption on MK. FTIR and XRD were used for the characterization of the sorbent. The surface morphology of the clay material was observed using SEM. The adsorption of fluoride was studied at three different temperatures, viz., 303, 313 and 323 K. The sorption data obtained at optimized conditions were subjected to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Sorption intensity (1/n) (0.770-0.810) has been evaluated using Freundlich isotherm, whereas the values of sorption capacity Q{sup 0} (0.609, 0.714 and 0.782 mg/g) and binding energy b (0.158, 0.145 and 0.133 L/mg) at three different temperatures have been estimated using Langmuir isotherm. Adsorption process was found to be controlled by both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption of fluoride on MK is endothermic and a spontaneous process. The kinetic studies indicate that the sorption of fluoride on MK follows pseudo-first-order and intraparticle diffusion models.

  15. Fluoride removal using lanthanum incorporated chitosan beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansiwal, Amit; Thakre, Dilip; Labhshetwar, Nitin; Meshram, Siddharth; Rayalu, Sadhana

    2009-11-01

    Highly selective material based on naturally occurring biomaterial namely chitosan has been designed for the defluoridation of water. Lanthanum incorporated chitosan beads (LCB) were prepared using precipitation method. The synthesis was optimized by varying different synthesis parameters namely lanthanum loading, complexation and precipitation time, strength of ammonia solution used for precipitation, drying time, etc. Lanthanum incorporated chitosan beads were characterized using SEM, FTIR, XRD and EDX. Surface area of LCB was observed to be 2.76 m(2)g(-1). The equilibrium adsorption data fitted well to Langmuir adsorption isotherm and showing maximum fluoride adsorption capacity of 4.7 mg g(-1) with negligible lanthanum release. Kinetic study reveals that adsorption of fluoride is fast and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. The effect of pH was also studied and the best efficiency was observed at pH 5. Presence of sulphate, nitrate and chloride marginally affected the removal efficiency, however drastic reduction in fluoride uptake was observed in the presence of carbonate and bicarbonate. Negative value of change in free energy (DeltaG degrees) and positive value of change in entropy (DeltaS degrees) suggest the adsorption of fluoride by LCB is feasible and spontaneous process. Positive value of change in enthalpy (DeltaH degrees) suggests the process of fluoride adsorption is endothermic in nature. Regeneration study reveals that 1M ammonium chloride solution appears to be the promising regeneration media showing 81.22% regeneration. The adsorption capacity of LCB was similar in fluoride-contaminated ground water collected from Dhar district of Madhya Pradesh, India, as compared to simulated water.

  16. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  17. Health supply chain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Rolf; Gallagher, Pat

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * The actual application of supply chain practice and disciplines required for service delivery improvement within the current health environment. * A rationale for the application of Supply Chain Management (SCM) approaches to the Health sector. * The tools and methods available for supply chain analysis and benchmarking. * Key supply chain success factors.

  18. Modification of zeolities with ammonium fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, E.J.

    1988-05-17

    A method for enhancing the shape selectivity and adjusting catalytic activity of a crystalline zeolite, including a highly siliceous zeolite, is disclosed. Such a method involves contacting the zeolite with an ammonium fluoride solution in the absence of an aluminum source, optionally contacting the treated zeolite with a warm aqueous solution of an ammonium salt, and then calcining the fluoride and ammonium treated zeolite to produce a more shape selective zeolite material. Such treated zeolite are useful in catalysts which promote shape selective conversion of organic compounds including, for example, hydrocarbon cracking reactions.

  19. Distribution of fluoride and calcium in plaque biofilms after the use of conventional and low-fluoride dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessan, Juliano Pelim; Pinto Alves, Karina Mirela Ribeiro; Italiani, Flávia de Moraes; Ramires, Irene; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Whitford, Gary Milton; Toumba, Kyriacos Jack; Robinson, Colin; Buzalaf, Marilia Afonso Rabelo

    2014-07-01

    The distribution of fluoride and calcium in plaque after the use of fluoride dentifrices has not yet been determined. To evaluate fluoride and calcium distribution in sections of biofilms generated in situ after the use of conventional and low-fluoride dentifrices. Children (n = 11, 8–10 years old) brushed with placebo (fluoride-free), low-fluoride (513 mgF/kg), and conventional (1072 mgF/kg) dentifrices twice daily for 1 week, following a double-blind, cross-over protocol. Biofilms were generated using Leeds in situ devices, which were collected 1 and 12 h after brushing, and sectioned through their depth. Sections were grouped (10 x 5 μm) for fluoride and calcium analysis. Sections 4 lm thick were used for image analysis and determination of biomass fraction. Results were analysed by ANOVA, Tukey’s test, and linear regression analysis (P dentifrices tested, and these ions were directly correlated throughout most of biofilm’s sections. Results for conventional dentifrice were significantly higher than for the placebo, but did not differ from those for the low-fluoride dentifrice. The use of a low-fluoride dentifrice did not promote a higher fluoride uptake in inner biofilms’ sections, as hypothesized. As plaque fluoride was significantly elevated only after the use of the conventional dentifrice, the recommendation of low-fluoride formulations should be done with caution, considering both risks and benefits.

  20. Comparative evaluation of fluoride release from PRG-composites and compomer on application of topical fluoride: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhull K

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: To determine the fluoride release from Giomer and Compomer, using different topical fluoride regimes, and to compare the amount of fluoride release from giomer with that of compomer. Materials and Method: Forty-eight specimens of each giomer and compomer were divided into four treatment groups, namely, control group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm twice daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once daily + fluoridated mouthwash (225 ppm group. Each specimen was suspended in demineralizing solution for six hours and remineralizing solution for 18 hours. Fluoride release was measured in both the demineralizing solution and remineralizing solution daily for seven days. Total daily fluoride release for each specimen was calculated by adding the amount released in the demineralizing solution to that released in remineralizing solution. Results and Conclusion: The fluoride release (ppm was found to be more in Giomer when compared to Compomer. The fluoride released from Giomer and Compomer was significantly greater in the acidic demineralizing solution than in the neutral remineralizing solution. It was found that increasing fluoride exposure significantly increased fluoride release from the giomer and compomer. It was found that the fluoride release from the subgroups of giomer and compomer was in the following order: fluoridated dentifrice twice daily > fluoridated dentifrice once daily + fluoridated mouthwash > fluoridated dentifrice once daily > control group. It was found that the giomer showed a greater fluoride uptake than the compomer.

  1. Hydrogen Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The series of absorption or emission lines that are characteristic of the hydrogen atom. According to the Bohr theory of the hydrogen atom, devised by Danish physicist Neils Bohr (1885-1962) in 1913, the hydrogen atom can be envisaged as consisting of a central nucleus (a proton) around which a single electron revolves. The electron is located in one of a number of possible permitted orbits, each...

  2. Synthesis of complex fluorides for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepleton, Seth Eugene

    Large single crystals of alkali metal fluorides are desirable for many reasons. Fluoride laser crystals have a wide transmission range and on account of their low phonon energies, many efficient laser emissions have been obtained from 285 nm to 4.34 microm.1,2 Inorganic fluoride single crystals feature large bandgaps, very wide optical transmittance ranges from vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) to mid-IR wavelength regions, lower refractive indices than those of oxides, and typically lower phonon energies (which drastically reduce multiphonon relaxation rates of rare earth ions).3 The main goal of this work was to investigate the hydrothermal synthesis of alkali metal fluorides. Melt techniques have been used thoroughly to research a variety of fluoride systems and showed many phases that were inaccessible due to incongruent melting or phase stability. The existence of these phases was shown but never characterized or grown as a crystalline material. Solution growth in supercritical water was an ideal way to attempt the synthesis of novel compounds and phases. New synthetic routes to known phases and compounds also arose as a part of this work. Optically clear colorless crystals of K2BeF4 were synthesized up to 2 mm in size, and showed no phase transitions up to 1029 K, which suggests paraelectricitys at room temperature, contradicting previous reports.4 Attempts to incorporate a rare earth ion into the fluoroberyllate lattice proved unsuccessful however reactions between beryllium fluoride and lanthanide fluorides could be exploited as a synthetic route to single crystal rare earth fluorides. Hydrothermal reactions with KF produced crystals of three different phases: hexagonal KY2F7, trigonal KYF4 and orthorhombic K2YF5. All were optically clear, colorless crystals, with the K2YF5 crystals growing the largest. This compound is beneficial due to its application as a radiation dosimeter and laser host. 5,6 Optical quality colorless crystals of RbY2F7 and CsY2F7 up to 4 mm in

  3. Fluoride in Drinking Water -Its Effects and Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Gopal

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of fluoride in water, its metabolism, excretion. effect oingestion in human and cattle system and methods of fluoridation and defluoridation have been discussed. The presence of fluoride in waters occurring in India, with special reference to Rajasthan desert has been reviewed. Based on the survey and physico-chemical analyses of about 2,700 water samples of Rajasthan, distribution of fluoride in this area has been discussed wrth reference to drinking water standards. A water resources map showing concentrations of fluoride in four arid districts of Rajasthan is also presented.

  4. Effect of fluoride ion on the stability of DNA hairpin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Zhai, Weili; Gong, Hongling; Liu, Yanhui; Chen, Hu

    2017-06-01

    Fluoride prevents tooth decay as an additive in oral hygiene products, while high dose intake of fluoride from contaminated drinking water leads to fluorosis. Here we studied the effect of fluoride ion on the stability of DNA double helix using magnetic tweezers. The equilibrium critical force decreases with increasing concentration of fluoride in the range from 1 mM to 100 mM. Our results give the first quantitative measurement of DNA stability in the presence of fluoride ion, which might disturb DNA-related biological processes to cause fluorosis.

  5. [Chemical form changes of exogenous water solution fluoride and bioavailability in tea garden soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hui-Mei; Peng, Chuan-Yi; Chen, Jing; Hou, Ru-Yan; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2013-11-01

    Pot experiments and the sequential extraction method were conducted to study the chemical form changes of exogenous water solution fluoride in tea garden soil and their contribution to fluoride accumulation of tea plant. The results showed that the background concentration of all chemical forms of fluoride had little changes with time treatment, which was in a relatively stable state. The exogenous water solution fluoride adding to the soils was rapidly transformed to other fractions. Under the 10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment, the concentration of water solution fluoride increased firstly and then decreased with time treatment, the concentration of organic matter fluoride and Fe/Mn oxides fluoride decreased, the concentration of exchangeable fluoride was not different before and after the treatment (P > 0.05), and the concentration of residual fluoride was in a relatively stable state; under the 200 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment, the concentration of water solution fluoride, Fe/Mn oxides fluoride and organic matter fluoride decreased with time treatment, the concentration of exchangeable fluoride increased firstly and then decreased, showed no difference before and after the treatment (P > 0.05), and the concentration of residual fluoride increased, with some differences compared with 10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment. The concentration of total fluoride in root, stem and leaf had significant differences under 0-10 mg x kg(-1) fluoride treatment (P 0.05). Step regression analysis suggested the contribution of all chemical forms of fluoride to the concentration of water solution fluoride and total fluoride of root, stem and leaf had some differences, there was a remarkable regression relationship among the content of total fluoride in leaf and water solution fluoride, organic matter fluoride, Fe/Mn oxides fluoride and residual fluoride in soil, however, no significant difference for water solution fluoride of leaf was found.

  6. Assessment of total and soluble fluoride content in commercial dentifrices in Davangere: A cross sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    D J Veeresh; Umesh Wadgave

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The major reason for decline in dental caries across globe is because of widespread use of fluoride dentifrices. For a fluoride dentifrice to be effective in the control of dental caries, an adequate concentration of the fluoride must be soluble. Objective: To assess soluble fluoride and total fluoride content in selected commercial dentifrices in Davangere. Materials and Methods: The soluble fluoride and total fluoride content in six selected commercial dentifrices in Davangere...

  7. Geochemistry of fluoride in the Black Creek aquifer system of Horry and Georgetown Counties, South Carolina--and its physiological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zack, Allen L.

    1980-01-01

    High concentrations of fluoride in ground-water supplies in certain areas of Horry and Georgetown Counties, S.C., have been the cause of dental fluorosis (tooth mottling) among persons who have lived in these areas and have ingested the water as children. Geochemical evidence and laboratory experiments demonstrate that fluorapatite in the form of fossil shark teeth is the source of fluoride, and that the fluoride ions are liberated to the ground-water system through anion exchange, rather than by dissolution. Calcite-cemented quartz sand in the upper third of the Black Creek Formation of Late Cretaceous age contains the fossil shark teeth. As ground water progresses downdip, the calcite matrix dissolves and hydrolyzes, releasing bicarbonate, hydroxyl, and calcium ions. The calcium ions are immediately exchanged for sodium ions adsorbed on sodium-rich clays, and the bicarbonate ions accumulate. As the shark teeth are exposed, the hydroxyl ions in solution exchange with fluoride ions on fluorapatite surfaces. Experiments using fossil shark teeth show that sodium chloride in solution inhibits the rate of exchange of fluoride ions from tooth surfaces for hydroxyl ions in solution. The amount of fluoride removed from water and exchanged for hydroxyl ions in the presence of pure hydroxylapatite (hog teeth) was greater in saline water than in freshwater.

  8. Fluoride geochemistry of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: I. Aqueous fluoride speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Blaine, McCleskey R.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal water samples from Yellowstone National Park (YNP) have a wide range of pH (1–10), temperature, and high concentrations of fluoride (up to 50 mg/l). High fluoride concentrations are found in waters with field pH higher than 6 (except those in Crater Hills) and temperatures higher than 50 °C based on data from more than 750 water samples covering most thermal areas in YNP from 1975 to 2008. In this study, more than 140 water samples from YNP collected in 2006–2009 were analyzed for free-fluoride activity by ion-selective electrode (ISE) method as an independent check on the reliability of fluoride speciation calculations. The free to total fluoride concentration ratio ranged from 99% at high pH. The wide range in fluoride activity can be explained by strong complexing with H+ and Al3+ under acidic conditions and lack of complexing under basic conditions. Differences between the free-fluoride activities calculated with the WATEQ4F code and those measured by ISE were within 0.3–30% for more than 90% of samples at or above 10−6 molar, providing corroboration for chemical speciation models for a wide range of pH and chemistry of YNP thermal waters. Calculated speciation results show that free fluoride, F−, and major complexes (HF(aq)0">HF(aq)0, AlF2+, AlF2+">AlF2+and AlF30">AlF30) account for more than 95% of total fluoride. Occasionally, some complex species like AlF4-">AlF4-, FeF2+, FeF2+">FeF2+, MgF+ and BF2(OH)2-">BF2(OH)2- may comprise 1–10% when the concentrations of the appropriate components are high. According to the simulation results by PHREEQC and calculated results, the ratio of main fluoride species to total fluoride varies as a function of pH and the concentrations and ratios of F and Al.

  9. [New recommendations concerning the fluoride content of toddler toothpaste - consequences for systemic application of fluoride].

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, K G

    2002-01-01

    A group of experts from 4 European countries who gathered at a convention at Basel in November 1998, arrived at the recommendation to increase the fluoride (= F) content of toddler toothpastes from 250 ppm to 500 ppm. It was recommended to make parents brush the children's teeth with a pea-size piece of this toothpaste once a day, starting when the first deciduous teeth were erupting. Routine application of F-tablets would no longer be routinely prescribed, but restricted to individual indications in special high caries risk cases. This recommendation did not consider previous ones and was based exclusively on new scientific, mainly epidemiological evidence. In April 2000 the recommendation was officially issued by the German scientific dental association DGZMK.A careful case-control study resulted in the analysis of the risk to develop mottling of enamel under the influence of fluoridated water (1 ppm F) and fluoride toothpaste (1000 ppm F) when used in early childhood. It was found that excessive use of the fluoride toothpaste doubled the fluorosis risk, whereas when fluoride supplements (tablets, drops) were given the risk was about 20 times higher than without a fluoride supplement. Experiments in Germany and the Netherlands had shown that remineralisation of enamel under influence of 500 ppm F is achieved much more quickly than under application of 250 ppm F. A panel of WHO experts came to the conclusion that there was no evidence for the effectiveness of toothpastes containing less than 500 ppm. Statistics from the Netherlands have shown that the amount of fluoride tablets sold there is barely sufficient for the use by a quarter of all children 0 to 4 years old. In contrast to this low level of acceptance of fluoride tablets, fluoride toothpastes is widely accepted. It is their extensive use which explains the marked improvement of dentitions among the youth in this country during the last 20 years; the influence of topical fluoride gels, varnishes and other

  10. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  11. Fluoride in Dental Biofilm Varies across Intra-Oral Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, Line; Baelum, Vibeke; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló

    2017-01-01

    Information on differences in biofilm fluoride concentration across intra-oral regions may help explain the distribution of caries within the dentition. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe the fluoride concentration in saliva and in biofilm fluid and biofilm solids across 6 intra......-oral regions. Unstimulated whole saliva was collected from 42 participants and biofilm harvested from the buccal sites in the 4 molar and 2 anterior regions. Samples were collected at least 1 h after use of fluoride dentifrice. No attempt was made to control the participants' food consumption or use of other...... topical agents. Centrifuged saliva, biofilm fluid, and biofilm solids were analysed for fluoride using a fluoride ion-selective electrode, adapted for microanalysis. Fluoride in biofilm varied across intra-oral regions. The mean biofilm fluid fluoride concentrations across the oral cavity ranged from 11...

  12. The effective use of fluorides in public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research......, systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on...... and their families, and the issue of cost. We recommend that a community should use no more than one systemic fluoride (i.e. water or salt or milk fluoridation) combined with the use of fluoride toothpastes, and that the prevalence of dental fluorosis should be monitored in order to detect increases in or higher...

  13. Prevention of dental caries through the effective use of fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    , lifestyles, and the existence of preventive oral health programmes. Research conducted in high income countries documents that systematic use of fluoride reduces the burden of dental caries; such research is scarce in low and middle income countries. Objectives: This article reviews the evidence on effective...... use of fluoride, highlights the public health approach to fluoridation, and clarifies how automatic fluoridation contributes to breaking social inequities in dental caries. Data collection: Scientific publications on fluoride administration stored in PubMed/Medline and caries data from the WHO...... databank. Outcome: Dental caries identified from national surveys or country relevant data; extraction of scientific reports is based on their public health relevance. Conclusions: The article outlines the history of fluoridation programmes and describes the sound evidence on automatic fluoridation through...

  14. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis.

  15. Adverse effects of fluoride towards thyroid hormone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enggar Abdullah Idris MZ

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An easily ionized fluoride compound like Sodium Fluoride (NaF has been used thus far as a dental caries prevention substance. However, fluoride ions also have a negative effect because it is very toxic. Several types of research on the effect of fluoride on guinea pigs and human beings indicate the presence synthesis obstruction of T3 and T4 that causes declined production, known as hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism condition may obstruct tissue growth process and metabolism so as to impact various body organ systems. Preventive efforts against hypothyroidism caused by fluoride include avoiding diffusible fluoride compound intake, like NaF, in a long run systemic use, whereas efforts to overcome fluoride intoxication include consuming food that is rich in calcium, vitamin D, and antioxidant.

  16. Supply reliability and dynamic safety analysis of an alternative energy supply chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbert-Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee; Markert, Frank; Jacobsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the integration of risk and supply chain modelling by means of analysing a case concerning a Hydrogen Refuelling Station in Berlin. It presents a framework that can analyse an energy supply chain and at the same time enables easy reporting and presentation of various results...... by utilizing Dis-crete Event Simulation (DES). The industrial implication of this work is to provide practitioners with an anal-ysis framework for improved decision support. The novelty of this paper is the approach to model a supply chain together with a dynamically modelled event tree-based approach...

  17. Crystal Structures of Fluoride and Chloride Complexes of Tris[(2-benzimidazolyl)methyl]amine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structures of fluoride and chloride complexes of tris[(2-benzimida-zolyl)methyl]amine 1 were characterized by X-ray crystallography.1 adopts C3 symmetrical geometry and cone-like conformation so as to allow its three NHs to associate with the anions through hydrogen bonds.Despite the different sizes of the anions, the two crystals are unexpectedly isostructural.The binding ability of the anions of 1 in solution was also studied by using of UV-vis spectroscopy.

  18. Fluoride Anion Recognition by a Multifunctional Urea Derivative: An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jana; Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Sampedro, Diego; Marqués-López, Eugenia; Herrera, Raquel P.; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate the ability of a multifaceted N,N′-disubstituted urea to selectively recognize fluoride anion (F−) among other halides. This additional function is now added to its already reported organocatalytic and organogelator properties. The signaling mechanism relies on the formation of a charge-transfer (CT) complex between the urea-based sensor and F¯ in the ground state with a high association constant as demonstrated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The nature of the hydrogen bonding interaction between the sensor and F¯ was established by 1H-NMR studies and theoretical calculations. Moreover, the recovery of the sensor was achieved by addition of methanol. PMID:27171087

  19. Preparation and properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride nanocomposites blended with graphene oxide coated silica hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Fu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide coated silica hybirds (SiO2-GO were fabricated through electrostatic assembly in this work, then blended with poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF by solution mixing to make PVDF nanocomposites. The interfacial interaction was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, polarized optical microscopy (POM and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The results showed that the interfacial interaction was enhanced by adding of SiO2-GO and strong hydrogen bonds were observed. The as-made nanocomposites were investigated using standard tensile test and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA measurements, mechanical properties of PVDF with SiO2-GO hybrids showed limited improvement.

  20. Design and performance of a lead fluoride detector as a luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Benito, R.; Khaneft, D. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany); O' Connor, C., E-mail: colton@mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Capozza, L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany); Diefenbach, J. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Gläser, B.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F.E.; Rodríguez Piñeiro, D. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    Precise luminosity measurements for the OLYMPUS two-photon exchange experiment at DESY were performed by counting scattering events with alternating beams of electrons and positrons incident on atomic electrons in a gaseous hydrogen target. Final products of Møller, Bhabha, and pair annihilation interactions were observed using a pair of lead fluoride Cherenkov calorimeters with custom housings and electronics, adapted from a system used by the A4 parity violation experiment at MAMI. This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of these detectors. An explanation of the Monte Carlo methods used to simulate the physical processes involved both at the scattering vertices and in the detector apparatus is also included.

  1. Fluoride Anion Recognition by a Multifunctional Urea Derivative: An Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Jana; Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Sampedro, Diego; Marqués-López, Eugenia; Herrera, Raquel P; Díaz Díaz, David

    2016-05-09

    In this work we demonstrate the ability of a multifaceted N,N'-disubstituted urea to selectively recognize fluoride anion (F(-)) among other halides. This additional function is now added to its already reported organocatalytic and organogelator properties. The signaling mechanism relies on the formation of a charge-transfer (CT) complex between the urea-based sensor and F¯ in the ground state with a high association constant as demonstrated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The nature of the hydrogen bonding interaction between the sensor and F¯ was established by ¹H-NMR studies and theoretical calculations. Moreover, the recovery of the sensor was achieved by addition of methanol.

  2. Fluoride concentration in urine after silver diamine fluoride application on tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, D. L.; Bahar, A.; Gunawan, H. A.; Adiatman, M.; Rahardjo, A.; Maharani, D. A.; Toptanci, I. R.; Yavuz, I.

    2017-08-01

    Silver Diammine Fluoride (SDF), which contains fluoride, is known to inhibit tooth enamel demineralization and increase fluoride concentrations in saliva and urine. The aim of this study is to analyze the fluoride concentration in urine after application of SDF on tooth enamel. Urine from four subjects was collected prior to, 30 minutes after, and two and three hours after the application of SDF, and an ion-selective electrode was used to measure the fluoride concentrations. There was no significant difference between time 1 and time 2, time 1 and time 3, time 1 and time 4, time 2 and 3 (p > 0.05), and there was a significant difference between time 2 and time 4 as well as time 3 and time 4 (p < 0.05). There was a decrease in the concentration of fluoride ions in urine from the baseline to 30 minutes after application, and an increase from baseline to two and three hours after the application of SDF.

  3. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime A. Cury

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride—TSF in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80 or children’s toothpaste (n = 78. The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children’s toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p 0.05. The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children’s toothpaste is used.

  4. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maria José L.; Martins, Carolina C.; Paiva, Saul M.; Tenuta, Livia M. A.; Cury, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF) rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride—TSF) in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80) or children’s toothpaste (n = 78)). The estimated dose (mg F/day/Kg of body weight) of TF or TSF ingested was calculated from the chemical analysis of the toothpastes. Although the ingested dose of TF from the family toothpastes was higher than that from the children’s toothpastes (0.074 ± 0.007 and 0.039 ± 0.003 mg F/day/Kg, respectively; p 0.05). The fluoride dose ingested by children from toothpastes may be overestimated if based on the TF of the product. This finding suggests that the ingested dose should be calculated based on TSF. Dose of TSF ingested by children is similar whether family or children’s toothpaste is used. PMID:24189183

  5. Fluoride varnish or fluoride mouth rinse? A comparative study of two school-based programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, M K; Klausen, B J; Twetman, S

    2016-03-01

    In many Danish communities, school-based fluoride programs are offered to children with high caries risk in adjunct to tooth brushing. The purpose of this field trial was to compare the caries-preventive effectiveness of two different fluoride programs in 6-12 year olds. Clinical controlled trial. The 2-year study was conducted in Public Dental Clinics in a multicultural low-socioeconomic suburban area of Odense, Denmark with an elevated prevalence of caries compared to the city average. 1,018 children (aged 6-12 years) from 9 different schools were enrolled after informed consent and their class unit was randomly allocated to one of two fluoride programs. One group received a semi-annual fluoride varnish applications (FV) and the other group continued with an existing program with fluoride mouth rinses once per week (FMR). All children received oral hygiene instructions and comprehensive dental care at the local Public Dental Clinics throughout the study period. Increment of caries lesions in permanent teeth at both cavitated and initial caries levels. The groups were balanced at baseline. After two years, 961 children (94.4%) were reexamined. The FV group showed a mean DMFS increment of 0.36 compared to 0.41 in the FMR group. The corresponding values for initial caries lesions were 0.83 and 0.91 respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in caries development over two years among children participating in a school-based fluoride varnish or mouth rinse program.

  6. Solid electrolytes for fluoride ion batteries: ionic conductivity in polycrystalline tysonite-type fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongeat, Carine; Reddy, M Anji; Witter, Raiker; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2014-02-12

    Batteries based on a fluoride shuttle (fluoride ion battery, FIB) can theoretically provide high energy densities and can thus be considered as an interesting alternative to Li-ion batteries. Large improvements are still needed regarding their actual performance, in particular for the ionic conductivity of the solid electrolyte. At the current state of the art, two types of fluoride families can be considered for electrolyte applications: alkaline-earth fluorides having a fluorite-type structure and rare-earth fluorides having a tysonite-type structure. As regard to the latter, high ionic conductivities have been reported for doped LaF3 single crystals. However, polycrystalline materials would be easier to implement in a FIB due to practical reasons in the cell manufacturing. Hence, we have analyzed in detail the ionic conductivity of La(1-y)Ba(y)F(3-y) (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.15) solid solutions prepared by ball milling. The combination of DC and AC conductivity analyses provides a better understanding of the conduction mechanism in tysonite-type fluorides with a blocking effect of the grain boundaries. Heat treatment of the electrolyte material was performed and leads to an improvement of the ionic conductivity. This confirms the detrimental effect of grain boundaries and opens new route for the development of solid electrolytes for FIB with high ionic conductivities.

  7. Oral fluoride retention after professional topical application in children with caries activity: comparison between 1.23% fluoride foam and fluoride gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Claudia Costa Ribeiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated fluoride retention in the saliva of children with caries activity after topical fluoride application in the form of gel and foam. Methods: A cross-sectional, blind and randomized study, conducted with ten caries-active children aged between 8 and 10 years, in two stage, with a washout interval of two weeks between them. The treatments consisted of: a application of 2mL acidulated phosphate fluoride of the gel type in a mold and b application of 2mL acidulated phosphate fluoride of the foam type in a mold. After the washout, the treatments were inverted. Non-stimulated saliva was collected from the children at the times of 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes after topical fluoride application. For statistical analysis the Student’s-t test was used, with a level of significance of 5%. Results: Saliva analysis was performed using a fluoride-specific electrode (ISE25F/ Radiometer, Copenhagen, Denmark at the Aquatic Science Center of the Federal University of Marana, which revealed differences after 5 minutes (p=0.0055 and 15 minutes (p=0.0208. The topical application of fluoride in the gel form revealed a higher concentration of fluoride in the saliva. Conclusion: There were differences in the retention of fluoride in the saliva of children with caries activity after the topical application of fluoride gel and the topical application of fluoride foam after 5 and 15 minutes of their application. The topical application of fluoride foam is recommended, on the basis of the lower probability of toxicity during its use.

  8. Sorption of sulfuryl fluoride by food commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriranjini, Venkata-rao; Rajendran, Somiahnadar

    2008-08-01

    The use of sulfuryl fluoride, a structural fumigant for termite and woodborer control, has recently been expanded to treating stored food commodities and food facilities. There is, however, a lack of data on the sorption of sulfuryl fluoride by food commodities. Knowledge about sorption is important in the context of effective treatment and residues. When sulfuryl fluoride was applied at a dose of 50 g m(-3) to various food commodities (total 68) with 300 g per replicate in 0.75 L gas wash bottles (fumigation chambers) at 25 +/- 1 degrees C, in most cases (81%) the gas concentrations in the free space of the commodities exceeded 50 g m(-3) (range 51-80 g m(-3)) at the end of 24 h exposure. In chambers without the substrate, an average concentration of 49.7 g m(-3) was recorded. About 54% of the commodities showed low-level ( 50%). The latter include white oats (terminal gas concentration 17.8 g m(-3)), some of the decorticated split pulses (24.0-29.3 g m(-3)), chickpea flour (26.3 g m(-3)), dried ginger (29.0 g m(-3)), refined wheat flour (30.3 g m(-3)) and coriander powder (40.5 g m(-3)). In unfumigated control commodities, owing to interfering volatiles, Fumiscope readings in the range 0-13 were noted. Sulfuryl fluoride has the advantage of a low or moderate level of sorption with the majority of the food commodities.

  9. Actinide measurements by AMS using fluoride matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornett, R.J., E-mail: Jack.Cornett@uottawa.ca [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Kazi, Z.H. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Zhao, X.-L. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Chartrand, M.G. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Charles, R.J.; Kieser, W.E. [André E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Actinides can be measured by alpha spectroscopy (AS), mass spectroscopy or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We tested a simple method to separate Pu and Am isotopes from the sample matrix using a single extraction chromatography column. The actinides in the column eluent were then measured by AS or AMS using a fluoride target matrix. Pu and Am were coprecipitated with NdF{sub 3}. The strongest AMS beams of Pu and Am were produced when there was a large excess of fluoride donor atoms in the target and the NdF{sub 3} precipitates were diluted about 6–8 fold with PbF{sub 2}. The measured concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am agreed with the concentrations in standards of known activity and with two IAEA certified reference materials. Measurements of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am made at A.E. Lalonde AMS Laboratory agree, within their statistical uncertainty, with independent measurements made using the IsoTrace AMS system. This work demonstrated that fluoride targets can produce reliable beams of actinide anions and that the measurement of actinides using fluorides agree with published values in certified reference materials.

  10. ADSORPTIVE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE FROM WATER USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    fluoride solutions for adsorption and analysis were prepared by diluting an ..... The rate constant k2, can be determined by plotting t/qt vs. t based on ... aqueous solution is complex process and the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-.

  11. Effects of fluoridated milk on root dentin remineralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang H Arnold

    Full Text Available The prevalence of root caries is increasing with greater life expectancy and number of retained teeth. Therefore, new preventive strategies should be developed to reduce the prevalence of root caries. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of fluoridated milk on the remineralization of root dentin and to compare these effects to those of sodium fluoride (NaF application without milk.Thirty extracted human molars were divided into 6 groups, and the root cementum was removed from each tooth. The dentin surface was demineralized and then incubated with one of the following six solutions: Sodium chloride NaCl, artificial saliva, milk, milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Serial sections were cut through the lesions and investigated with polarized light microscopy and quantitative morphometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The data were statistically evaluated using a one-way ANOVA for multiple comparisons.The depth of the lesion decreased with increasing fluoride concentration and was the smallest after incubation with artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. SEM analysis revealed a clearly demarcated superficial remineralized zone after incubation with milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Ca content in this zone increased with increasing fluoride content and was highest after artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride incubation. In the artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride group, an additional crystalline layer was present on top of the lesion that contained elevated levels of F and Ca.Incubation of root dentin with fluoridated milk showed a clear effect on root dentin remineralization, and incubation with NaF dissolved in artificial saliva demonstrated a stronger effect.

  12. Fluoride in the environment and its metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Vinay Kumar; Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Damodaran, Thukkaram

    2011-01-01

    The presence of environmental fluoride and its impact on human health is well documented. When consumed in adequate quantity, fluoride prevents dental caries, assists in the formation of dental enamels, and prevents deficiencies in bone mineralization. At excessive exposure levels, ingestion of fluoride causes dental fluorosis skeletal fluorosis, and manifestations such as gastrointestinal, neurological, and urinary problems. The distribution of fluoride in the environment is uneven and largely is believed to derive from geogenic causes. The natural sources of fluoride are fluorite, fluorapatite, and cryolite, whereas anthropogenic sources include coal burning, oil refining, steel production, brick-making industries, and phosphatic fertilizer plants, among others. Among the various sources of fluoride in the environment, those of anthropogenic origin have occasionally been considered to be major ones. The gourndwater is more susceptible to fluoride accumulation and contamination than are other environmental media, primarily because of its contact with geological substrates underneath. The high fluoride concentration in water usually reflects the solubility of fluoride (CaF₂). High concentrations are also often associated with soft, alkaline, and calcium-deficient waters. The fluoride compounds that occur naturally in drinking water are almost totally bioavailable (90%) and are completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. As a result, drinking water is considered to be the potential source of fluoride that causes fluorosis. Because the bioavailability of fluoride is generally reduced in humans when consumed with milk or a calcium-rich diet, it is highly recommended that the inhabitants of fluoride-contaminated areas should incorporate calcium-rich foods in their routine diet. Guidelines for limiting the fluoride intake from drinking water have been postulated by various authorities. Such limits are designed to protect public health and should reflect all

  13. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  14. Prospects of solar thermal hydrogen production processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pregger, Thomas; Krewitt, Wolfram [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, Department of Systems Analysis and Technology Assessment, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Graf, Daniela; Sattler, Christian; Roeb, Martin; Moeller, Stephan [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, Department of Solar Research, Linder Hoehe, D-51147 Cologne (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    This article provides a critical discussion of prospects of solar thermal hydrogen production in terms of technological and economic potentials and their possible role for a future hydrogen supply. The study focuses on solar driven steam methane reforming, thermochemical cycles, high temperature water electrolysis and solar methane cracking. Development status and technological challenges of the processes and objectives of ongoing research are described. Estimated hydrogen production costs are shown in comparison to other options. A summary of current discussions and today's scenarios of future use of hydrogen as an energy carrier and a brief overview on the development status of end-use technologies characterise uncertainties whether hydrogen could emerge as important energy carrier until 2050. Another focus is on industrial hydrogen demand in areas with high direct solar radiation which may be the main driver for the further development of solar thermal hydrogen production processes in the coming decades. (author)

  15. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  16. Hydrogen carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  17. Fluoride concentrations in the water of Maringá, Brazil, considering the benefit/risk balance of caries and fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmara Tatiely Pedroso BERGAMO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current Brazilian law regarding water fluoridation classification is dichotomous with respect to the risks of and benefits for oral diseases, and fluoride (F concentrations less than 0.6 or above 0.8 mg F/L are considered outside the normal limits. Thus, the law does not consider that both caries and fluorosis are dependent on the dosage and duration of fluoride exposure because they are both chronic diseases. Therefore, this study evaluated the quality of water fluoridation in Maringá, PR, Brazil, considering a new classification for the concentration of F in water the supply, based on the anticaries benefit and risk of fluorosis (CECOL/USP, 2011. Water samples (n = 325 were collected monthly over one year from 28 distribution water networks: 20 from treatment plants and 8 from artesian wells. F concentrations were determined using a specific ion electrode. The average F concentration was 0.77 mg F/L (ppm F, ranging from 0.44 to 1.22 mg F/L. Considering all of the water samples analyzed, 83.7% of them presented from 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L, and according to the new classification used, they would provide maximum anticaries benefit with a low risk of fluorosis. This percentage was lower (75.4% in the water samples supplied from artesian wells than from those distributed by the treatment plant (86%. In conclusion, based on the new classification of water F concentrations, the quality of water fluoridation in Maringá is adequate and is within the range of the best balance between risk and benefit.

  18. The prospects for hydrogen as an energy carrier: an overview of hydrogen energy and hydrogen energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, Marc A.; Koohi-Fayegh, Seama [Ontario Univ., Oshawa, ON (Canada). Inst. of Technology

    2016-02-15

    Hydrogen is expected to play a key role as an energy carrier in future energy systems of the world. As fossil-fuel supplies become scarcer and environmental concerns increase, hydrogen is likely to become an increasingly important chemical energy carrier and eventually may become the principal chemical energy carrier. When most of the world's energy sources become non-fossil based, hydrogen and electricity are expected to be the two dominant energy carriers for the provision of end-use services. In such a ''hydrogen economy,'' the two complementary energy carriers, hydrogen and electricity, are used to satisfy most of the requirements of energy consumers. A transition era will bridge the gap between today's fossil-fuel economy and a hydrogen economy, in which non-fossil-derived hydrogen will be used to extend the lifetime of the world's fossil fuels - by upgrading heavy oils, for instance - and the infrastructure needed to support a hydrogen economy is gradually developed. In this paper, the role of hydrogen as an energy carrier and hydrogen energy systems' technologies and their economics are described. Also, the social and political implications of hydrogen energy are examined, and the questions of when and where hydrogen is likely to become important are addressed. Examples are provided to illustrate key points. (orig.)

  19. Fiscal 1998 research report on International Clean Energy Network using Hydrogen Conversion (WE-NET). Subtask 2. Research on promotion of international cooperation (research on standardization of hydrogen energy technologies); 1998 nendo suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET) sub task. 2. Kokusai kyoryoku suishin no tame no chosa kento (suiso energy gijutsu hyojunka ni kansuru chosa kento)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal 1998 research result on the basic research on standardization of hydrogen energy technologies, and ISO/TC197. As for the standardization, in relation to the hydrogen station in the WE-NET second phase research, the laws related to handling of gaseous hydrogen, and the basic issues on facility and safe handling were studied. As for ISO/TC197, the following draft standards were examined: Fuel supply system interface for liquid hydrogen vehicles, fuel tank for liquid hydrogen vehicles, container for liquid hydrogen transport, specification of hydrogen fuel, hydrogen fuel supply facility for air ports, gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen mixture fuel system for vehicles, gaseous hydrogen fuel connector for vehicles, gaseous hydrogen fuel tank for vehicles, and basic items for hydrogen system safety. Final examination of the fuel supply system interface for liquid hydrogen vehicles, and the specification of hydrogen fuel was finished, and these are scheduled to be registered for ISO. (NEDO)

  20. Plasma fluoride and enamel fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angmar-Månsson, B; Ericsson, Y; Ekberg, O

    1976-11-24

    It is postulated that tissue fluid F concentrations are the primary determinants of flouride effects on bones and developing teeth and that these concentrations are dependent on, or mirrored by, blood plasma F. It has earlier been shown that the plasma F levels are dependent on the dietary F supply as well as on skeletal F concentration. Fasting and post-ingestion or postinjection plasma F levels have been determined in rats on F doses that cause different degrees of enamel fluorosis. The results indicate that temporary peak values rather than elevated fasting values are responsible for the occurrence of enamel fluorosis and that the peak values must approach about 10 muM in order to block enamel formation by the ameloblasts. The diagnostic and prognostic importance of plasma F determinations is discussed.

  1. Geochemical occurrences of arsenic and fluoride in bedrock groundwater: a case study in Geumsan County, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joo Sung

    2012-01-01

    Bedrock groundwaters in Geumsan County, Korea, were surveyed to investigate the distribution and geochemical behaviors of arsenic and fluoride, mobilized through geogenic processes. The concentrations were enriched up to 113 μg/L for arsenic and 7.54 mg/L for fluoride, and 16% of 150 samples exceeded World Health Organization drinking water guidelines for each element. Simple Ca-HCO(3) groundwater types and positive correlations with pH, Ca, SO(4), and HCO(3) were characteristics of high (>10 μg/L) As groundwaters. The oxidation reaction of sulfide minerals in metasedimentary rocks and locally mineralized zones seems to be ultimately responsible for the existence of arsenic in groundwater. Desorption process under high pH conditions may also control the arsenic mobility in the study area. High (>1.5 mg/L) F groundwaters were found in the Na-HCO(3) type and with greater depth. Fluoride seemed to be enriched by deep groundwater interaction with granitic rocks, and continuous supply to shallow Ca-HCO(3)-type groundwater kept the concentration high. In the study area, drinking water management should include periodic As and F monitoring in groundwater.

  2. The effects of acidic fluoride solutions on early enamel erosion in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortsjö, C; Jonski, G; Thrane, P S; Saxegaard, E; Young, A

    2009-01-01

    Acidic fluoride solutions may reduce dental erosion. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different acidic fluoride solutions on enamel dissolution using an established in vivo model. When possible 4 anterior teeth (255 teeth in a total of 67 subjects) were isolated and exposed to 0.01 M citric acid. The acid was collected in test tubes before (etch I) and 5 min after (etch II) application of test fluoride preparations. Acidic fluoride solutions (pH range 1.5-2.9), i.e. SnF(2), TiF(4) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) (all approx. 0.1 M F), HF (0.027, 0.055, 0.082 M F) and neutral NaF solution (0.1 M F) as control were applied to the labial surfaces of the teeth for 1 min (6 ml/min). Enamel dissolution was examined by chemical analysis of calcium content in the citric acid etch solutions using atom absorption spectrometry. The change in calcium concentration (DeltaCa) and the percentage of mean calcium reduction were calculated from the difference in calcium loss between etch I and etch II. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and Kruskal-Wallis tests with Dunn's multiple comparison. Results showed a mean DeltaCa of 0.671 mg/l (SD 0.625) for SnF(2), and ranged from 0.233 mg/l (SD 0.248) for the weakest HF solution to 0.373 mg/l (SD 0.310) for the strongest HF solution. This represented a 67% reduction in enamel dissolution for SnF(2) and a 40-76% reduction for the HF solutions. No reduction was observed for TiF(4) or NaF. The types of metal, pH and fluoride concentration are all important for the in vivo effect. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Dual-Anode Nickel/Hydrogen Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, Randall F.; Ryan, Timothy P.

    1994-01-01

    Use of two hydrogen anodes in nickel/hydrogen cell reduces ohmic and concentration polarizations contributing to internal resistance, yielding cell with improved discharging performance compared to single-anode cell. Dual-anode concept incorporated into nickel/hydrogen cells of individual pressure-vessel type (for use aboard spacecraft) and common pressure-vessel type, for use on Earth to store electrical energy from photovoltaic sources, "uninterruptible" power supplies of computer and telephone systems, electric vehicles, and load leveling on power lines. Also applicable to silver/hydrogen and other metal/gas batteries.

  4. Security of supply

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Paul Isbell revisits the energy security debate; John Gault considers European security and natural gas supplies; William C. Ramsay discusses security of energy supplies in a global market; Hasan M. Qabazard outlines OPEC’s abiding commitment to energy security.

  5. Arsenic from community water fluoridation: quantifying the effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Emily; Shapiro, Howard; Li, Ye; Minnery, John G; Copes, Ray

    2016-04-01

    Community water fluoridation is a WHO recommended strategy to prevent dental carries. One debated concern is that hydrofluorosilicic acid, used to fluoridate water, contains arsenic and poses a health risk. This study was undertaken to determine if fluoridation contributes to arsenic in drinking water, to estimate the amount of additional arsenic associated with fluoridation, and compare this to the National Sanitation Foundation/American National Standards Institute (NSF/ANSI) standard and estimates from other researchers. Using surveillance data from Ontario drinking water systems, mixed effects linear regression was performed to examine the effect of fluoridation status on the difference in arsenic concentration between raw water and treated water samples. On average, drinking water treatment was found to reduce arsenic levels in water in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated systems by 0.2 μg/L. However, fluoridated systems were associated with an additional 0.078 μg/L (95% CI 0.021, 0.136) of arsenic in water when compared to non-fluoridated systems (P = 0.008) while controlling for raw water arsenic concentrations, types of treatment processes, and source water type. Our estimate is consistent with concentrations expected from other research and is less than 10% of the NSF/ANSI standard of 1 μg/L arsenic in water. This study provides further information to inform decision-making regarding community water fluoridation.

  6. Effects of different amine fluoride concentrations on enamel remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, E A; Niemann, N; Aretz, L; Arnold, W H

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of decreasing fluoride concentrations on repeated demineralizing challenges on human enamel. In 24 teeth, 3mm×3mm windows were prepared on the buccal and lingual sides and treated in a cycling demineralization-remineralization model. Remineralization was achieved with 100, 10 and 0.1 ppm fluoride from anime fluoride. Coronal sections were cut through the artificial lesions, and three sections per tooth were investigated using polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with quantitative element analysis. The morphology of the lesions was studied, and the extensions of the superficial layer and the body of the lesion were measured. Using element analysis, the Ca, P and F content were determined. The body of the lesion appeared remineralized after application of 100 ppm fluoride, while remineralization of the lesion was less successful after application of 10 and 0.1 ppm fluoride. The thickness of the superficial layer increased with decreasing fluoride concentrations, and also the extension of the body of the lesion increased. Ca and P content increased with increasing fluoride concentrations. The effectiveness of fluoride in enamel remineralization increased with increasing fluoride concentration. A consistently higher level of fluoride in saliva should be a goal in caries prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Fluoride urinary excretion in Mexico City's preschool children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-López, María Lilia Adriana; Hernández-Guerrero, Juan Carlos; Jiménez-Farfán, Dolores; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Murrieta-Pruneda, Francisco; López-Jiménez, Georgina

    2008-01-01

    The assessment of urinary fluoride excretion during dental developing stage has been reported for different countries with community fluoride programs. Also, one of the factors that could influence on retention and excretion of fluoride is the deficient nutrition so the aim of this study was to determine fluoride urinary excretion by a group of preschool children with and without malnutrition. Urinary samples from 24 hours were collected from 60 preschool children selected by convenience from Iztapalapa area of Mexico City, 30 with malnutrition and 30 with standard nutritrional status by weight for age. The samples were analyzed by fluoride especific electrode. Orion 720A. The average concentration of fluoride in urine from preschool children with and without malnutrition were 0.89 +/- 0.4 mg/L and 0.80 +/- 0.3 mg/L, respectively. The mean of 24 hours total fluoride excreted were 367 +/- 150 microg/24 hrs. in malnutrition children and 355 +/- 169 microg/24 hrs. for those with standard nutritional status. There were no differences statistically significant between groups. The urinary fluoride excretion for children with and without malnutrition were in the optimal range of fluoridation for the prevention of caries decay. Malnutrition was no associated with changes on fluoride orine concentration and excretion rates.

  8. Fluoride removal by adsorption on thermally treated lateritic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefyalew Gomoro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of lateritic soils to remove fluoride from water has been studied. Important issues considered in the study include the relation between the mineral composition of soils and their ability to remove fluoride, the effect of thermal treatment of the soil on fluoride removal; the predominant fluoride containing species remain in the treated water and the possible mechanism of fluoride removal by lateritic soils. The fluoride removal capacity of thermally treated lateritic soils used in this study is in the range of 22 to 47 mmol/kg. The maximum capacity of 47 mmol/kg was obtained for RGS fired at 500 oC. The results obtained indicate that there is strong correlation between fluoride removal capacity and gibbsite content of the soil. From this it can be concluded that gibbsite is the active component in lateritic soils that strongly influence the fluoride removal capability. Speciation analysis reveals that at low initial fluoride concentrations the dissolution of gibbsite is facilitated by the adsorption of fluoride onto gibbsite. This may result in the formation of aluminum fluoro complexes in water.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v26i3.5

  9. Caries prevention through the fluoridation of milk. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánóczy, Jolán; Rugg-Gunn, Andrew J

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of 50 years experience of milk fluoridation and draw conclusions about the applicability of the method. Fluoridated milk was first investigated in the early 1950s, almost simultaneously in Switzerland, the USA and Japan. Stimulated by the favourable results obtained from these early studies, the establishment of The Borrow Dental Milk Foundation (subsequently The Borrow Foundation) in England gave an excellent opportunity for further research, both clinical and non-clinical, and a productive collaboration with the World Health Organization from the early 1980s onwards. Numerous peer-reviewed publications in international journals showed clearly the bioavailability of fluoride in milk, and increased concentrations of fluoride in saliva, dental plaque, dental enamel and dentine, and urine, after consumption of fluoridated milk. Clinical trials were initiated in the 1980s--some of these can be classed as randomised controlled trials, while most of the clinical studies were community preventive programs. These evaluations showed clearly that the optimal daily intake of fluoride in milk is effective in preventing dental caries. At present, milk fluoridation programs are running continuously in about ten countries of the world. Fluoridation of milk can be recommended as a caries preventive measure where the fluoride concentration in drinking water is suboptimal, caries experience in children is significant, and there is an existing school milk program. The program should aim to provide fluoridated milk for at least 200 days per year and should commence before the children are 4 years of age.

  10. Effect of laser irradiation on the fluoride uptake of silver diamine fluoride treated dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, May L; Ito, Leticia; Zhang, C F; Lo, Edward C M; Chu, C H

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the fluoride uptake of dentine treated with a 38 % silver diamine fluoride (SDF) solution and laser irradiation at sub-ablative energy levels. Fifteen human dentine slices were prepared and divided into four samples each. Four types of laser were chosen: CO2 (10,600 nm), Er:YAG (2,940 nm), Nd:YAG (1,064 nm) and Diode (810 nm). First, the four samples from 12 of the dentine slices were treated with SDF, and then irradiated by one of the four types of laser at three different settings. One sample was untreated and acted as a control. The setting that rendered the highest fluoride uptake was selected. Second, the remaining dentine slices were treated with SDF and irradiated by the four lasers with the selected settings. Fluoride uptake was assessed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry at the dentine surface and up to 20 μm below the surface. The selected settings were CO2 irradiation at 1.0 W for 1 s, Er:YAG irradiation at 0.5 W for 20 s, Nd:YAG irradiation at 2.0 W for 1 s and diode irradiation at 3.0 W for 3 s. The fluoride content (weight %) at the dentine surface following CO2, Er:YAG, Nd:YAG and diode irradiation was 6.91 ± 3.15, 4.09 ± 1.19, 3.35 ± 2.29 and 1.73 ± 1.04, respectively. CO2 and Er:YAG irradiation resulted in higher fluoride uptake than Nd:YAG and diode irradiation at all levels (p fluoride uptake in the SDF-treated dentine than Nd:YAG laser and diode laser irradiation.

  11. Parabens do not increase fluoride uptake by dental enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Silva Tramontino

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate whether methylparaben and propylparaben, which present a similar chemical structure, increase fluoride uptake by demineralized dental enamel when present in buffered solutions. Methods: The study comprised an in vitro experiment using blocks of bovine dental enamel with artificial carious lesions. Enamel blocks were exposed to the following treatment (n=12: fluoride solution (200 ppm fluoride - control; solution containing fluoride and 13 mM methylparaben; solution containing fluoride and 13 mM propylparaben in 35% propylene glycol; solution containing fluoride in 35% propylene glycol. All solutions were buffered (0.01 M cacodilate and the pH was adjusted to 6.27. The blocks were exposed to the treatment solutions in the proportion of 2 ml per mm2 of exposed enamel area and fluoride formed was estimated after removing an enamel layer by acid etching. Fluoride extracted was determined by ion specific electrode and the amount of enamel removed was estimated by phosphorus analysis. ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test were used for statistical analysis, with significance level at 5%. Results: The dental blocks of treatment groups containing both parabens and the control group presented similar fluoride concentration in enamel and no statistical difference was observed among them (p>0.05. The dental blocks of treatment group containing fluoride and propylene glycol showed the lowest value of fluoride present in enamel, which was significantly different from the control and fluoride and methylparaben groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: Methyl and propylparaben in a buffered solution do not enhance fluoride uptake by demineralized dental enamel.

  12. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loveren, C; Hoogenkamp, M A; Deng, D M; ten Cate, J M

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR were preincubated at pH 7 or 4 with NaF, the amine fluorides Olaflur and Dectaflur and amine chloride controls. After preincubations, enolase and ATPase activities of the cells were assessed. Enolase activity was more inhibited after preincubation at pH 7 with NaF than with Olaflur. Amine chloride stimulated, although not with statistical significance, the enolase activity of both strains. After preincubation at pH 4 the enolases were strongly inactivated, but the fluoride-resistant strain's enolase to a lesser extent. The results suggested that amine acts to protect enolase activity against the detrimental low pH effect. Gene sequencing showed that the enolase genes of the fluoride-resistant and fluoride-sensitive strain were identical. ATPase activity was not reduced after NaF preincubation at either pH 7 or pH 4. The amine fluorides and their chloride controls in the preincubation mixture reduced the ATPase activity significantly at both pH values. In conclusion, our results showed that preincubation with amine fluoride did not inhibit enolase activity more effectively than NaF. The amine part of the molecule may protect enolase activity against preincubations at low pH. ATPase activity was not inhibited by NaF preincubation but was significantly inhibited after preincubation with amine fluorides and amine chlorides. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The Norwegian hydrogen guide 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen technologies are maturing at rapid speed, something we experience in Norway and around the globe every day as demonstration projects for vehicles and infrastructure expand at a rate unthinkable of only a few years ago. An example of this evolution happened in Norway in 2009 when two hydrogen filling stations were opened on May the 11th, making it possible to arrange the highly successful Viking Rally from Oslo to Stavanger with more than 40 competing teams. The Viking Rally demonstrated for the public that battery and hydrogen-electric vehicles are technologies that exist today and provide a real alternative for zero emission mobility in the future. The driving range of the generation of vehicles put into demonstration today is more than 450 km on a full hydrogen tank, comparable to conventional vehicles. As the car industry develops the next generation of vehicles for serial production within the next 4-5 years, we will see vehicles that are more robust, more reliable and cost effective. Also on the hydrogen production and distribution side progress is being made, and since renewable hydrogen from biomass and electrolysis is capable of making mobility basically emission free, hydrogen can be a key component in combating climate change and reducing local emissions. The research Council of Norway has for many years supported the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, and The Research Council firmly believes that hydrogen and fuel cell technologies play a crucial role in the energy system of the future. Hydrogen is a flexible transportation fuel, and offers possibilities for storing and balancing intermittent electricity in the energy system. Norwegian companies, research organisations and universities have during the last decade developed strong capabilities in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, capabilities it is important to further develop so that Norwegian actors can supply high class hydrogen and fuel cell technologies to global markets

  14. Catalytic membrane reactors based on macroporous silicon for hydrogen production

    OpenAIRE

    Vega Bru, Didac; Hernández Díaz, David; López, E. (Eduardo); Jiménez, Nuria; Todorov Trifonov, Trifon; Rodríguez Martínez, Ángel; Alcubilla González, Ramón; Llorca Piqué, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    The typology of using hydrogen as an energy carrier and its implementation in portable fuel cells has motivated a considerable research interest in the development of new efficient hydrogen production technologies. Hydrogen storage and manipulation is however a problematic and hazardous issue. Therefore, the low temperature on-site steam reforming of alcohols for hydrogen supply offers a nice solution to safety and storage issues, while providing several environment advantages […] Peer Rev...

  15. Utilization of waste phosphogypsum to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and its application towards removal of fluoride from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deyi; Luo, Heming; Zheng, Liwen; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hongxia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Huixia

    2012-11-30

    In the present study, waste phosphogypsum (PG) was utilized firstly to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAp) via microwave irradiation technology. The nHAp derived from PG exhibited a hexagonal structure with the particle size about 20 nm × 60 nm and high purity. Meanwhile, the adsorption behaviour of fluoride onto the nHAp derived from PG was investigated to evaluate the potential application of this material for the treatment of the wastewater polluted with fluoride. The results indicate that the nHAp derived from PG can be used as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir-Freundlich model were 19.742, 26.108, 36.914 and 40.818 mg F(-)/g nHAp for 298, 308, 318 and 328 K, respectively. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was found to provide the best correlation of the used experimental data compared to the pseudo-first order and the adsorption isotherm could be well defined by Langmuir-Freundlich equation. The adsorption mechanism investigation shows that electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond are the main driving force for fluoride uptake onto nHAp derived from waste PG.

  16. Dental fluorosis in populations from Chiang Mai, Thailand with different fluoride exposures - Paper 2: The ability of fluorescence imaging to detect differences in fluorosis prevalence and severity for different fluoride intakes from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrady Michael G

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the ability of fluorescence imaging to detect a dose response relationship between fluorosis severity and different levels of fluoride in water supplies compared to remote photographic scoring in selected populations participating in an observational, epidemiological survey in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Methods Subjects were male and female lifetime residents aged 8-13 years. For each child the fluoride content of cooking water samples (CWS was assessed to create categorical intervals of water fluoride concentration. Fluorescence images were taken of the maxillary central incisors and analyzed for dental fluorosis using two different software techniques. Output metrics for the fluorescence imaging techniques were compared to TF scores from blinded photographic scores obtained from the survey. Results Data from 553 subjects were available. Both software analysis techniques demonstrated significant correlations with the photographic scores. The metrics for area effected by fluorosis and the overall fluorescence loss had the strongest association with the photographic TF score (Spearman’s rho 0.664 and 0.652 respectively. Both software techniques performed well for comparison of repeat fluorescence images with ICC values of 0.95 and 0.85 respectively. Conclusions This study supports the potential use of fluorescence imaging for the objective quantification of dental fluorosis. Fluorescence imaging was able to discriminate between populations with different fluoride exposures on a comparable level to remote photographic scoring with acceptable levels of repeatability.

  17. Dental fluorosis in populations from Chiang Mai, Thailand with different fluoride exposures - paper 2: the ability of fluorescence imaging to detect differences in fluorosis prevalence and severity for different fluoride intakes from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Michael G; Ellwood, Roger P; Srisilapanan, Patcharawan; Korwanich, Narumanas; Taylor, Andrew; Goodwin, Michaela; Pretty, Iain A

    2012-08-21

    To assess the ability of fluorescence imaging to detect a dose response relationship between fluorosis severity and different levels of fluoride in water supplies compared to remote photographic scoring in selected populations participating in an observational, epidemiological survey in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Subjects were male and female lifetime residents aged 8-13 years. For each child the fluoride content of cooking water samples (CWS) was assessed to create categorical intervals of water fluoride concentration. Fluorescence images were taken of the maxillary central incisors and analyzed for dental fluorosis using two different software techniques. Output metrics for the fluorescence imaging techniques were compared to TF scores from blinded photographic scores obtained from the survey. Data from 553 subjects were available. Both software analysis techniques demonstrated significant correlations with the photographic scores. The metrics for area effected by fluorosis and the overall fluorescence loss had the strongest association with the photographic TF score (Spearman's rho 0.664 and 0.652 respectively). Both software techniques performed well for comparison of repeat fluorescence images with ICC values of 0.95 and 0.85 respectively. This study supports the potential use of fluorescence imaging for the objective quantification of dental fluorosis. Fluorescence imaging was able to discriminate between populations with different fluoride exposures on a comparable level to remote photographic scoring with acceptable levels of repeatability.

  18. Design of seasonal hydrogen storage systems for the energy supply by solar radiation, wind power and environmental heat; Auslegung saisonaler Wasserstoffspeicher fuer die Energieversorgung aus Solarstrahlung, Windkraft und Umgebungswaerme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meurer, H.C.

    2000-07-01

    In the present study a design procedure for hydrogen storage systems in power plants with renewable energy is presented. The storage system consists of an electrolyzer, gas storage in high pressure tanks and reconversion into electricity by a fuel cell. This work is based on the experiences made by construction and operation of the demonstration plant PHOEBUS Juelich for Photovoltaik, Elektrolyse, Brennstoffzelle und Systemtechnik (photovoltaics, electrolysis, fuel cell and system engineering) at the Research Centre Juelich. These systems are treated by dynamic simulation in a high temporal resolution. The seasonal and the stochastical behaviour of the yield of renewable energy and energy consumption is taken into account by simulating over a time span of 17 years using measured meteorological data. For optimization the autarky-limit-procedure is introduced. A cost model is applied to the results of the simulation. The autarky-limit describes the correlation between the capacity of the installed gas tank and the rated power of the installed converters for renewable energy in case of exactly self-sufficient plant operation. Using the autarky-limit procedure, it is possible to size all major components for long-term operation at minimal costs. The procedure is applied for a modelled consumer at Research Centre Juelich site. Various configurations of the storage system are investigated and compared. More generalized statements about a reasonable use of hydrogen storage are derived from the results. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird ein Auslegungsverfahren fuer Wasserstoffspeicher in Energieversorgungsanlagen mit erneuerbaren Energietraegern vorgestellt. Der Speicherpfad besteht aus Elektrolyse, Gasspeicherung in Hochdrucktanks und Rueckverstromung in einer Brennstoffzelle. Die Basis der Arbeit bilden die Erfahrungen mit Bau und Betrieb der Demonstrationsanlage PHOEBUS Juelich fuer Photovoltaik, Elektrolyse, Brennstoffzelle und Systemtechnik im

  19. Analysis of differentially expressed genes between fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals in midgut of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Heying; Li, Gang; He, Qingling; Zhang, Huaguang; Xu, Anying

    2016-08-15

    Fluoride tolerance is an economically important trait of silkworm. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) of the dominant endurance to fluoride (Def) gene in Bombyx mori has been constructed before. Here, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of midgut of fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals of Def NILs by using high-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformatics tools, and identified differentially expressed genes between these individuals. A total of 3,612,399 and 3,567,631 clean tags for the libraries of fluoride-endurable and fluoride-sensitive individuals were obtained, which corresponded to 32,933 and 43,976 distinct clean tags, respectively. Analysis of differentially expressed genes indicates that 241 genes are differentially expressed between the two libraries. Among the 241 genes, 30 are up-regulated and 211 are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. Pathway enrichment analysis demonstrates that genes related to ribosomes, pancreatic secretion, steroid biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, steroid biosynthesis, and glycerolipid metabolism are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. qRT-PCR was conducted to confirm the results of the DGE. The present study analyzed differential expression of related genes and tried to find out whether the crucial genes were related to fluoride detoxification which might elucidate fluoride effect and provide a new way in the fluorosis research.

  20. Spatial distribution mapping of drinking water fluoride levels in Karnataka, India: fluoride-related health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Chitta R; Shahnawaz, Khijmatgar; Kumari, Divya; Chowdhury, Avidyuti; Bedi, Raman; Lynch, Edward; Harding, Stewart; Grootveld, Martin

    2016-11-01

    (1) To estimate the concentrations of fluoride in drinking water throughout different zones and districts of the state of Karnataka. (2) To investigate the variation of fluoride concentration in drinking water from different sources, and its relationships to daily temperature and rainfall status in the regional districts. (3) To develop an updated fluoride concentration intensity map of the state of Karnataka, and to evaluate these data in the context of fluoride-related health effects such as fluorosis and their prevalence. Aqueous standard solutions of 10, 100 and 1,000 ppm fluoride (F(-)) were prepared with analytical grade Na(+)/F(-) and a buffer; TISAB II was incorporated in both calibration standard and analysis solutions in order to remove the potentially interfering effects of trace metal ions. This analysis was performed using an ion-selective electrode (ISE), and mean determination readings for n = 5 samples collected at each Karnataka water source were recorded. The F(-) concentration in drinking water in Karnataka state was found to vary substantially, with the highest mean values recorded being in the north-eastern zone (1.61 ppm), and the lowest in the south-western one (only 0.41 ppm). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that there were very highly significant 'between-zone' and 'between-districts-within-zones' sources of variation (p water source F(-) levels within this state. The southern part of Karnataka has low levels of F(-) in its drinking water, and may require fluoridation treatment in order to mitigate for dental caries and further ailments related to fluoride deficiency. However, districts within the north-eastern region have contrastingly high levels of fluoride, an observation which has been linked to dental and skeletal fluorosis. This highlights a major requirement for interventional actions in order to ensure maintenance of the recommended range of fluoride concentrations (0.8-1.5 ppm) in Karnataka's drinking water