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Sample records for hydrogen desorbing kinetics

  1. The kinetic isotope effect of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium absorbed and desorbed by titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Gang; Cao Xiaohua; Long Xinggui

    2008-06-01

    p-t curves of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium absorption at 550-750 degree C and desorption at 350-550 degree C by titanium were investigated. The rate constants of absorption and desorption for hydrogen, deuterium and tritium on each temperature are determined and the activation energy values obtained by this analysis are (55.6 ± 2.4) kJ·mol -1 , (110.2 ± 3.0) kJ·mol -1 and (155.5 ± 3.2) kJ·mol -1 for absorption and (27.1±0.4) KJ·mol -1 , (42.3 ± 1.9) kJ·mol -1 and (62.1±1.6) kJ·mol -1 for desorption respectively. The activation energy value of tritium absorption is highest which shows titanium tritiation is hardest. The activation energy value of tritium desorption is highest and it also can prove that titanium tritide is stablest. There are remarkable kinetic hydrogen isotope effects when titanium absorb and desorb hydrogen, deuterium and tritium. (authors)

  2. TEM studies of nanostructure in melt-spun Mg-Ni-La alloy manifesting enhanced hydrogen desorbing kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Miwa, T.; Sasaki, K.; Kuroda, K.

    2009-01-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of a magnesium-rich Mg-Ni-La alloy prepared by melt-spinning are significantly improved by nanostructure formation during crystallization and activation. It can absorb and desorb ∼5 wt% hydrogen at temperatures as low as 200 deg. C in moderate time periods. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies on this alloy indicate that the nanostructure, consisting of LaH 3 and Mg 2 NiH 4 nano-particles dispersed homogeneously in MgH 2 matrices after hydrogenation, is rather stable at temperatures below 300 deg. C but undergoes coarsening and segregation of these particles and matrices above ∼400 deg. C. These structural changes have been confirmed by electron energy-loss spectroscopic (EELS) imaging as well as high-resolution TEM techniques. A new EELS peak associated with a plasmon excitation in the MgH 2 phase (H-plasmon) is found for the first time in this study. By imaging the H-plasmon peak, the hydrogen distribution in the alloy has been clearly visualized. We have succeeded in observing the hydrogen desorption process at ∼400 deg. C in-situ in the microscope using this EELS imaging technique.

  3. DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN DESORBED THROUGH THERMAL CALORIMETRY IN A HIGH STRENGTH STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina A. Asmus

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The following study aims to quantify the release activation energy (Ea of hydrogen (H from lattice sites, reversible or irreversible, where the H can be trapped. Moreover, enthalpy changes associated with the main hydrogen (H trapping sites can be analyzed by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. In this technique, the peak temperature measurement is determined at two different heating rates, 3ºC/min y 5ºC/min, from ambient temperature to 500°C. In order to simulate severe conditions of hydrogen income into resulfurized high strength steel, electrolytic permeation tests were performed on test tubes suitable for fatigue tests. Sometimes during charging, H promoters were aggregated to electrolytic solution. Subsequently, the test tubes were subjected to flow cycle fatigue tests. Finally, irreversible trap which anchor more strongly H atoms are MnS inclusions. Its role on hydrogen embrittlement during fatigue tests is conclusive.

  4. Molecular Beam-Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (MB-TDS Monitoring of Hydrogen Desorbed from Storage Fuel Cell Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge H. F. Ribeiro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Different types of experimental studies are performed using the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA MlNi3.6Co0.85Al0.3Mn0.3 (Ml: La-rich mischmetal, chemically surface treated, as the anode active material for application in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. The recently developed molecular beam—thermal desorption spectrometry (MB-TDS technique is here reported for detecting the electrochemical hydrogen uptake and release by the treated HSA. The MB-TDS allows an accurate determination of the hydrogen mass absorbed into the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA, and has significant advantages in comparison with the conventional TDS method. Experimental data has revealed that the membrane electrode assembly (MEA using such chemically treated alloy presents an enhanced surface capability for hydrogen adsorption.

  5. Molecular Beam-Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (MB-TDS) Monitoring of Hydrogen Desorbed from Storage Fuel Cell Anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Rui F M; Santos, Diogo M F; Sequeira, Cesar A C; Ribeiro, Jorge H F

    2012-02-06

    Different types of experimental studies are performed using the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA) MlNi 3.6 Co 0.85 Al 0.3 Mn 0.3 (Ml: La-rich mischmetal), chemically surface treated, as the anode active material for application in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The recently developed molecular beam-thermal desorption spectrometry (MB-TDS) technique is here reported for detecting the electrochemical hydrogen uptake and release by the treated HSA. The MB-TDS allows an accurate determination of the hydrogen mass absorbed into the hydrogen storage alloy (HSA), and has significant advantages in comparison with the conventional TDS method. Experimental data has revealed that the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) using such chemically treated alloy presents an enhanced surface capability for hydrogen adsorption.

  6. Improved hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of magnesium-based alloy via addition of yttrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tai; Li, Qiang; Liu, Ning; Liang, Chunyong; Yin, Fuxing; Zhang, Yanghuan

    2018-02-01

    Yttrium (Y) is selected to modify the microstructure of magnesium (Mg) to improve the hydrogen storage performance. Thereby, binary alloys with the nominal compositions of Mg24Yx (x = 1-5) are fabricated by inexpensive casting technique. Their microstructure and phase transformation during hydriding and dehydriding process are characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis. The isothermal hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics are also measured by a Sievert's-type apparatus at various temperatures. Typical multiphase structures of binary alloy can be clearly observed. All of these alloys can reversibly absorb and desorb large amount of hydrogen at proper temperatures. The addition of Y markedly promotes the hydrogen absorption kinetics. However, it results in a reduction of reversible hydrogen storage capacity. A maximum value of dehydrogenation rate is observed with the increase of Y content. The Mg24Y3 alloy has the optimal desorption kinetic performance, and it can desorb about 5.4 wt% of hydrogen at 380 °C within 12 min. Combining Johnson-Mehl-Avrami kinetic model and Arrhenius equation, the dehydrogenation activation energy of the alloys are evaluated. The Mg24Y3 alloy also has the lowest dehydrogenation activation energy (119 kJ mol-1).

  7. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide kinetics in water radiolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Kazuhiro; Sundin, Sara; LaVerne, Jay A.

    2018-04-01

    The kinetics of the formation and reaction of hydrogen peroxide in the long time γ- radiolysis of water is examined using a combination of experiment with model calculations. Escape yields of hydrogen peroxide on the microsecond time scale are easily measured with added radical scavengers even with substantial amounts of initial added hydrogen peroxide. The γ-radiolysis of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions without added radical scavengers reach a steady state limiting concentration of hydrogen peroxide with increasing dose, and that limit is directly proportional to the initial concentration of added hydrogen peroxide. The dose necessary to reach that limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration is also proportional to the initial concentration, but dose rate has a very small effect. The addition of molecular hydrogen to aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide leads to a decrease in the high dose limiting hydrogen peroxide concentration that is linear with the initial hydrogen concentration, but the amount of decrease is not stoichiometric. Proton irradiations of solutions with added hydrogen peroxide and hydrogen are more difficult to predict because of the decreased yields of radicals; however, with a substantial increase in dose rate there is a sufficient decrease in radical yields that hydrogen addition has little effect on hydrogen peroxide decay.

  9. Hydrogen electrode reaction: A complete kinetic description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaino, P.M.; Gennero de Chialvo, M.R.; Chialvo, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetic description of the hydrogen electrode reaction (HER) in the whole range of overpotentials (-0.2 < η (V) < 0.40) is presented. The Volmer-Heyrovsky-Tafel mechanism was solved considering simultaneously the following items: (i) the diffusional contribution of the molecular hydrogen from and towards the electrode surface, (ii) the forward and backward reaction rates of each elementary step and (iii) a Frumkin type adsorption for the reaction intermediate. In order to verify the descriptive capability of the kinetic expressions derived, an experimental study of the HER was carried out on a rotating platinum disc electrode in acid solution. From the correlation of these results the elementary kinetic parameters were evaluated and several aspects related to the kinetic mechanism were discussed. Finally, the use of these kinetic expressions to interpret results obtained on microelectrodes is also analysed

  10. Beneficial effect of carbon on hydrogen desorption kinetics from Mg–Ni–In alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermak, J.; Kral, L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Beneficial effect of graphitic carbon was observed. ► The effect is optimal up to c opt . ► Above c opt , phase decomposition occurs. ► Indium in studied Mg–Ni-based alloys prevents oxidation. - Abstract: In the present paper, hydrogen desorption kinetics from hydrided Mg–Ni–In–C alloys was investigated. A chemical composition that substantially accelerates hydrogen desorption was found. It was observed that carbon improves the hydrogen desorption kinetics significantly. Its beneficial effect was found to be optimum close to the carbon concentration of about c C ≅ 5 wt.%. With this composition, stored hydrogen can be desorbed readily at temperatures down to about 485 K, immediately after hydrogen charging. This can substantially shorten the hydrogen charging/discharging cycle of storage tanks using Mg–Ni-based alloys as hydrogen storage medium. For higher carbon concentrations, unwanted phases precipitated, likely resulting in deceleration of hydrogen desorption and lower hydrogen storage capacity.

  11. MODELING STYRENE HYDROGENATION KINETICS USING PALLADIUM CATALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Justino

    Full Text Available Abstract The high octane number of pyrolysis gasoline (PYGAS explains its insertion in the gasoline pool. However, its use is troublesome due to the presence of gum-forming chemicals which, in turn, can be removed via hydrogenation. The use of Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic models was evaluated for hydrogenation of styrene, a typical gum monomer, using Pd/9%Nb2O5-Al2O3 as catalyst. Kinetic models accounting for hydrogen dissociative and non-dissociative adsorption were considered. The availability of one or two kinds of catalytic sites was analyzed. Experiments were carried out in a semi-batch reactor at constant temperature and pressure in the absence of transport limitations. The conditions used in each experiment varied between 16 - 56 bar and 60 - 100 ºC for pressure and temperature, respectively. The kinetic models were evaluated using MATLAB and EMSO software. Models using adsorption of hydrogen and organic molecules on the same type of site fitted the data best.

  12. Superior hydrogen storage kinetics of MgH2 nanoparticles doped with TiF3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, L.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Y.T.; Zheng, J.; Li, X.G.

    2007-01-01

    MgH 2 nanoparticles were obtained by hydriding ultrafine magnesium particles which were prepared by hydrogen plasma-metal reaction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show that the obtained sample is almost pure MgH 2 phase, without residual magnesium and with an average particle size of ∼300 nm. Milled with 5 wt.% TiF 3 as a doping precursor in a hydrogen atmosphere, the sample desorbed 4.5 wt.% hydrogen in 6 min under an initial hydrogen pressure of ∼0.001 bar at 573 K and absorbed 4.2 wt.% hydrogen in 1 min under ∼20 bar hydrogen at room temperature. Compared with MgH 2 micrometer particles doped with 5 wt.% TiF 3 under the same conditions as the MgH 2 nanoparticles, it is suggested that decrease of particle size is beneficial for enhancing absorption capacity at low temperatures, but has no effect on desorption. In addition, the catalyst was mainly responsible for improving the sorption kinetics and its catalytic mechanism is discussed

  13. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    during the HP decomposition. The model assumes that the enzyme decay is controlled by an inactivation stoichiometry related to the HP decomposition. In order to make the model easily applicable, it is furthermore assumed that the COD is a proxy of the active biomass concentration of the water and thereby......Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... reared or the nitrifying bacteria in the biofilters at concentrations required to eliminating pathogens. This calls for quantitative insight into the fate of the disinfectant residuals during water treatment. This paper presents a kinetic model that describes the HP decomposition in aquaculture water...

  14. Hydrogen atom kinetics in capacitively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunomura, Shota; Katayama, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Isao

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen (H) atom kinetics has been investigated in capacitively coupled very high frequency (VHF) discharges at powers of 16-780 mW cm-2 and H2 gas pressures of 0.1-2 Torr. The H atom density has been measured using vacuum ultra violet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) with a micro-discharge hollow cathode lamp as a VUV light source. The measurements have been performed in two different electrode configurations of discharges: conventional parallel-plate diode and triode with an intermediate mesh electrode. We find that in the triode configuration, the H atom density is strongly reduced across the mesh electrode. The H atom density varies from ˜1012 cm-3 to ˜1010 cm-3 by crossing the mesh with 0.2 mm in thickness and 36% in aperture ratio. The fluid model simulations for VHF discharge plasmas have been performed to study the H atom generation, diffusion and recombination kinetics. The simulations suggest that H atoms are generated in the bulk plasma, by the electron impact dissociation (e + H2 \\to e + 2H) and the ion-molecule reaction (H2 + + H2 \\to {{{H}}}3+ + H). The diffusion of H atoms is strongly limited by a mesh electrode, and thus the mesh geometry influences the spatial distribution of the H atoms. The loss of H atoms is dominated by the surface recombination.

  15. Kinetics of Dicyclopentadiene Hydrogenation Using PD/C Catalyst

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skála, D.; Hanika, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 45, 3-4 (2003), s. 105-108 ISSN 1335-3055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : hydrogenation * dicyclopentadiene * kinetics Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  16. A kinetic study of the electrochemical hydrogenation of ethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedighi, S.; Gardner, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we have examined the kinetics of the electrochemical hydrogenation of ethylene in a PEM reactor. While in itself this reaction is of little industrial interest, this reaction can be looked upon as a model reaction for many of the important hydrogenation processes including the refining of heavy oils and the hydrogenation of vegetable oils. To study the electrochemical hydrogenation of ethylene, several experimental techniques have been used including polarization measurements, measurement of the composition of the exit gases and potential step, transient measurements. The results show that the hydrogenation reaction proceeds rapidly and essentially to completion. By fitting the experimental transient data to the results from a zero-dimensional mathematical model of the process, a set of kinetic parameters for the reactions has been obtained that give generally good agreement with the experimental results. It seems probable that similar experimental techniques could be used to study the electrochemical hydrogenation of other unsaturated organic molecules of more industrial significance.

  17. Kinetic of martensitic transformations induced by hydrogen in the austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio P. de; Saavedra, A.; Miranda, P.E.V. de

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray diffractometry technique was used, with an automatic data acquisition system to determine the kinetics of hydrogen induced martensitic phase transformations in an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel type, used in nuclear power plants. Hydrogenation was performed cathodically in a 1N sulfuric acid solution, containing 100 mg/l of arsenic trioxide, at 50 0 C, during 2 hours and with a current density of 200 A/m 2 . It was found that the microstructure of the steel plays a role on the generation of hydrogen induced martensitic phases and surface micro cracks. Both kinetics were slower on a pre-cold rolled steel. (Author) [pt

  18. Transport kinetics of hydrogen permeable lanthanum tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenstein, Andreas

    2017-01-24

    The electrical conductivity relaxation technique is a widely used method to determine the oxygen transport parameters of mixed ionic-electronic conductors. In recent years, it has been modified to investigate the hydration behavior of proton conducting mixed conductors, giving access to up to four transport parameters in a single relaxation experiment, the diffusion coefficients and surface reaction rates of hydrogen and oxygen. In this work, the transport properties of the fluorite type protonic conductor lanthanum tungstate have been investigated by means of electrical conductivity relaxation. The experiments were performed in a temperature range from 650 C to 950 C, in a pO{sub 2} range from 3 mbar to 100 mbar and in a pH{sub 2}O range from 10 mbar to 100 mbar and in dry atmosphere. At high temperatures, the conductivity relaxation curve follows the expected two-fold non-monotonic behavior upon hydration. At low temperatures, however, the contribution of the fast hydrogen kinetic decreases and by a further decrease of the temperature, the relaxation shows two-fold monotonic behavior. The power factors - the contribution of each single fold relaxation curve to the resulting two-fold relaxation curve, which is a superposition - have been derived to explain the behavior mentioned above. The activation energy of the oxygen incorporation is rather low. Hence, oxidation experiments were performed in dry atmospheres in order to investigate if the origin of the oxygen species is relevant. The results revealed higher activation energies, which was expected, but also higher absolute values of the surface reaction rate and the diffusion coefficient. Oxidation experiments with increasing humidity revealed that the increased diffusivity cannot be attributed to the total concentrations of electron holes and proton interstitials. First experiments using spectroscopic relaxation, which is dependent on the concentration of hydroxy-anions only, were performed. Absorption bands

  19. Microstructure and kinetics evolution in MgH2–TiO2 pellets after hydrogen cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirabile Gattia, D.; Di Girolamo, G.; Montone, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • MgH 2 was ball milled with TiO 2 anatase phase and expanded graphite to prepare pellets. • Different pellets have been prepared at different compression load. • Pellets were repeatedly cycled under hydrogen pressure to simulate tank exercise and verify their stability. • The compression load highly affects the stability of the pellets to cycling. • Microstructural evolution of the particles due to cycling have been observed. - Abstract: The interest in Mg-based hydrides for solid state hydrogen storage is associated to their capability to reversibly absorb and desorb large amounts of hydrogen. In this work MgH 2 powder with 5 wt.% TiO 2 was ball milled for 10 h. The as-milled nanostructured powder was enriched with 5 wt.% of Expanded Natural Graphite (ENG) and then compacted in cylindrical pellets by cold pressing using different loads. Both the powder and the pellets were subjected to kinetic and thermodynamic tests using a Sievert’s type gas reaction controller, in order to study the microstructural and kinetic changes which took place during repeated H 2 absorption and desorption cycles. The pellets exhibited good kinetic performance and durability, even if the pressure of compaction revealed to be an important parameter for their mechanical stability. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of as-prepared and cycled pellets were carried out to investigate the evolution of their microstructure. In turn the phase composition before and after cycling was analyzed by X-ray diffraction

  20. Hydrogen vacancies facilitate hydrogen transport kinetics in sodium hydride nanocrystallites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.; Eijt, S.W.H.

    2008-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations based on density-functional theory, of the vacancy-mediated hydrogen migration energy in bulk NaH and near the NaH(001) surface. The estimated rate of the vacancy mediated hydrogen transport, obtained within a hopping diffusion model, is consistent with the reaction

  1. Superior hydrogen storage kinetics of MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles doped with TiF{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, L. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Y.T. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zheng, J. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, X.G. [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)]. E-mail: xgli@pku.edu.cn

    2007-08-15

    MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles were obtained by hydriding ultrafine magnesium particles which were prepared by hydrogen plasma-metal reaction. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show that the obtained sample is almost pure MgH{sub 2} phase, without residual magnesium and with an average particle size of {approx}300 nm. Milled with 5 wt.% TiF{sub 3} as a doping precursor in a hydrogen atmosphere, the sample desorbed 4.5 wt.% hydrogen in 6 min under an initial hydrogen pressure of {approx}0.001 bar at 573 K and absorbed 4.2 wt.% hydrogen in 1 min under {approx}20 bar hydrogen at room temperature. Compared with MgH{sub 2} micrometer particles doped with 5 wt.% TiF{sub 3} under the same conditions as the MgH{sub 2} nanoparticles, it is suggested that decrease of particle size is beneficial for enhancing absorption capacity at low temperatures, but has no effect on desorption. In addition, the catalyst was mainly responsible for improving the sorption kinetics and its catalytic mechanism is discussed.

  2. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwarno Suwarno

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is reactive toward hydrogen forming metal hydride which has a potential application in      energy storage and conversion. Titanium hydride has been widely studied for hydrogen storage, thermal storage, and battery electrodes applications. A special interest is using titanium for hydrogen production in a hydrogen sorption-enhanced steam reforming of natural gas. In the present work, non-isothermal dehydrogenation kinetics of titanium hydride and kinetics of hydrogenation in gaseous flow at isothermal conditions were investigated. The hydrogen desorption was studied using temperature desorption spectroscopy (TDS while the hydrogen absorption and desorption in gaseous flow were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The present work showed that the path of dehydrogenation of the TiH2 is d®b®a hydride phase with possible overlapping steps occurred. The fast hydrogen desorption rate observed at the TDS main peak temperature were correlated with the fast transformation of the d-TiH1.41 to b-TiH0.59. In the gaseous flow, hydrogen absorption and desorption were related to the transformation of b-TiH0.59 Û d-TiH1.41 with 2 wt.% hydrogen reversible content. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 21st November 2016; Revised: 20th March 2017; Accepted: 9th April 2017; Available online: 27th October 2017; Published regularly: December 2017 How to Cite: Suwarno, S., Yartys, V.A. (2017. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (3: 312-317  (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.810.312-317

  3. The kinetics of hydrogen removal from liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwyther, J.R.; Whittingham, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    The rates of hydrogen removal from liquid sodium-sodium hydride mixtures have been measured as a function of sodium stirring rate at temperatures up to 420 0 C. Two techniques have been employed - removal under continuous evacuation in which hydrogen flow rates were measured using a capillary flow technique and by argon purging in which hydrogen concentrations in the argon carrier gas were measured by gas chromatography. The results have been used to assess the feasibility of thermal decomposition of sodium hydride for the regeneration of hydride-laden LMFBR cold traps. Studies on the kinetics of desorption of hydrogen from solution in liquid sodium at temperatures up to 400 0 C are also presented and possible kinetic mechanisms discussed. (orig.)

  4. Kinetics of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, V.; McAdam, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    Under the influence of tritium β-radiation, 1,4-dioxan undergoes hydrogen exchange with the solvent water. The inhibition of the reaction by known electron scavengers (Ag + , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Zn 2+ , H 3 + O) and also by species with high reactivity towards hydroxyl radicals but negligible reactivity towards solvated electrons (N 3 - , Br - , SCN - ) has been examined in detail. γ-irradiation similarly induces hydrogen exchange. The action of scavengers is interpreted as requiring the involvement of two separately scavengeable primary radiolysis products in the sequence of reactions leading to exchange. The presence of electron scavengers, even at high concentration, does not totally inhibit the exchange, and a secondary exchange route, involving a low vacancy state of inhibitor cations, is considered responsible for the 'unscavengeable' portion of the reaction, by providing an alternative exchange route. Analogies are drawn between the exchange reaction and other radiation-induced reactions that are thought to involve spur processes. Some implication of radiation-chemical studies in water-alcohol mixtures are indicated. (author)

  5. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression.

  6. Kinetics of Platinum-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Tiffany A.; Colombo, D. Philip, Jr.

    2003-07-01

    CIBA Vision Corporation markets a contact lens cleaning system that consists of an AOSEPT disinfectant solution and an AOSEPT lens cup. The disinfectant is a buffered 3.0% m/v hydrogen peroxide solution and the cup includes a platinum-coated AOSEPT disc. The hydrogen peroxide disinfects by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses found on the contact lenses. Because the concentration of hydrogen peroxide needed to disinfect is irritating to eyes, the hydrogen peroxide needs to be neutralized, or decomposed, before the contact lenses can be used again. A general chemistry experiment is described where the kinetics of the catalyzed decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide are studied by measuring the amount of oxygen generated as a function of time. The order of the reaction with respect to the hydrogen peroxide, the rate constant, and the energy of activation are determined. The integrated rate law is used to determine the time required to decompose the hydrogen peroxide to a concentration that is safe for eyes.

  7. Kinetics of gaseous uranium hexafluoride reaction with hydrogen chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezubchenko, A.N.; Ilyukhin, A.I.; Merzlyakov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    Kinetics of decrease of concentration of gaseous uranium hexafluoride in reaction with hydrogen chloride at temperatures close to room ones, was investigated by the method of IR spectroscopy. It was established that the process represented the first order reaction by both UF 6 and HCl. Activation energy of the reaction was determined: 7.6 ± 0.7 kcal/mol. Specific feature of reaction kinetics was noted: inversely proportional dependence of effective constant on UF 6 initial pressure. 5 refs., 3 figs

  8. Kinetics with deactivation of methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation for hydrogen energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, G; Marin, A; Wyss, C; Mueller, S; Newson, E [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The methylcyclohexane dehydrogenation step to recycle toluene and release hydrogen is being studied as part of a hydrogen energy storage project. The reaction is performed catalytically in a fixed bed reactor, and the efficiency of this step significantly determines overall system economics. The fresh catalyst kinetics and the deactivation of the catalyst by coke play an important role in the process analysis. The main reaction kinetics were determined from isothermal experiments using a parameter sensitivity analysis for model discrimination. An activation energy for the main reaction of 220{+-}11 kJ/mol was obtained from a two-parameter model. From non-isothermal deactivation in PC-controlled integral reactors, an activation energy for deactivation of 160 kJ/mol was estimated. A model for catalyst coke content of 3-17 weight% was compared with experimental data. (author) 3 figs., 6 refs.

  9. Microstructure and kinetics evolution in MgH{sub 2}–TiO{sub 2} pellets after hydrogen cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirabile Gattia, D., E-mail: daniele.mirabile@enea.it; Di Girolamo, G.; Montone, A.

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • MgH{sub 2} was ball milled with TiO{sub 2} anatase phase and expanded graphite to prepare pellets. • Different pellets have been prepared at different compression load. • Pellets were repeatedly cycled under hydrogen pressure to simulate tank exercise and verify their stability. • The compression load highly affects the stability of the pellets to cycling. • Microstructural evolution of the particles due to cycling have been observed. - Abstract: The interest in Mg-based hydrides for solid state hydrogen storage is associated to their capability to reversibly absorb and desorb large amounts of hydrogen. In this work MgH{sub 2} powder with 5 wt.% TiO{sub 2} was ball milled for 10 h. The as-milled nanostructured powder was enriched with 5 wt.% of Expanded Natural Graphite (ENG) and then compacted in cylindrical pellets by cold pressing using different loads. Both the powder and the pellets were subjected to kinetic and thermodynamic tests using a Sievert’s type gas reaction controller, in order to study the microstructural and kinetic changes which took place during repeated H{sub 2} absorption and desorption cycles. The pellets exhibited good kinetic performance and durability, even if the pressure of compaction revealed to be an important parameter for their mechanical stability. Scanning Electron Microscopy observations of as-prepared and cycled pellets were carried out to investigate the evolution of their microstructure. In turn the phase composition before and after cycling was analyzed by X-ray diffraction.

  10. Improved hydrogen sorption kinetics in wet ball milled Mg hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Li

    2011-05-04

    In this work, wet ball milling method is used in order to improve hydrogen sorption behaviour due to its improved microstructure of solid hydrogen materials. Compared to traditional ball milling method, wet ball milling has benefits on improvement of MgH{sub 2} microstructure and further influences on its hydrogen sorption behavior. With the help of solvent tetrahydrofuran (THF), wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder has much smaller particle size and its specific surface area is 7 times as large as that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder. Although after ball milling the grain size is decreased a lot compared to as-received MgH{sub 2} powder, the grain size of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is larger than that of dry ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder due to the lubricant effect of solvent THF during wet ball milling. The improved particle size and specific surface area of wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder is found to be determining its hydrogen sorption kinetics especially at relatively low temperatures. And it also shows good cycling sorption behavior, which decides on its industrial applicability. With three different catalysts MgH{sub 2} powder shows improved hydrogen sorption behavior as well as the cyclic sorption behavior. Among them, the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst is found to be the most effective one in this work. Compared to the wet ball milled MgH{sub 2} powder, the particle size and specific surface area of the MgH{sub 2} powder with catalysts are similar to the previous ones, while the grain size of the MgH{sub 2} with catalysts is much finer. In this case, two reasons for hydrogen sorption improvement are suggested: one is the reduction of the grain size. The other may be as pointed out in some literatures that formation of new oxidation could enhance the hydrogen sorption kinetics, which is also the reason why its hydrogen capacity is decreased compared to without catalysts. After further ball milling, the specific surface area of wet ball milled Mg

  11. Reduction kinetics of zinc and cadmium sulfides with hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgenev, I.S.; Kabisov, I.Kh.; Zviadadze, G.N.; Vasil'eva, O.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Kinetics of reduction processes of zinc sulfide in the temperature range 800-1100 deg C and of cadmium sulfide 600-900 deg C has been stodied. Activation energies and reaction order in terms of hydrogen are calculated. Thermodynamic processes of reduction depend on aggregate state of the metal formed. For vaporous zinc in the temperature range 1050-950 deq C activation energy constitutes 174 kJ/mol, for liquid in the range 900-850 deg - 151 kJ/mol and reaction order in terms of hydrogen is 1.0. For vaporous cadmium in the temperature range 900-700 deg C activation energy constitutes 144 kJ/mol and reaction order in terms of hydrogen is 0.86, for liquid in the range 675-600 deg C 127 kJ/mol and 0.8 respectively. The processes of zinc and cadmium sulfide reduction proceed in kinetic regime and are limited by the rate of chemical reaction

  12. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrel, L.; Chopin, J.

    1996-01-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40 o C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H + ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I 2 ], [IO 3 - ], [H 2 O 2 ] and [H + ]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs

  13. Equilibrium amide hydrogen exchange and protein folding kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yawen

    1999-01-01

    The classical Linderstrom-Lang hydrogen exchange (HX) model is extended to describe the relationship between the HX behaviors (EX1 and EX2) and protein folding kinetics for the amide protons that can only exchange by global unfolding in a three-state system including native (N), intermediate (I), and unfolded (U) states. For these slowly exchanging amide protons, it is shown that the existence of an intermediate (I) has no effect on the HX behavior in an off-pathway three-state system (I↔U↔N). On the other hand, in an on-pathway three-state system (U↔I↔N), the existence of a stable folding intermediate has profound effect on the HX behavior. It is shown that fast refolding from the unfolded state to the stable intermediate state alone does not guarantee EX2 behavior. The rate of refolding from the intermediate state to the native state also plays a crucial role in determining whether EX1 or EX2 behavior should occur. This is mainly due to the fact that only amide protons in the native state are observed in the hydrogen exchange experiment. These new concepts suggest that caution needs to be taken if one tries to derive the kinetic events of protein folding from equilibrium hydrogen exchange experiments

  14. Microstructure and hydrogen sorption kinetics of Mg nanopowders with catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, A.; Fatay, D.; Spassov, T.

    2007-01-01

    MgH 2 powders were ball-milled with and without catalysts (Nb 2 O 5 ) under hydrogen in a high-energy mill for 10 h. Morphological, structural and microstructural characterization of the nanocomposites, including particle and crystallite size distribution were carried out before and after hydrogen absorption. In order to study the above-mentioned microstructural parameters imaging and X-ray scattering techniques (high-resolution X-ray diffractometry) have been employed. The effect of the particle and grain size on the hydriding/dehydriding kinetics of ball-milled MgH 2 + catalyst powders was analyzed. The grain and particle size reduction enhances substantially the hydriding/dehydriding

  15. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrel, L [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPNS, CEN Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chopin, J [Laboratoire d` Electrochimie Inorganique, ENSSPICAM, Marseille (France)

    1996-12-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40{sup o}C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H{sup +} ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I{sub 2}], [IO{sub 3}{sup -}], [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] and [H{sup +}]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs.

  16. Kinetics on NiZn Bimetallic Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution via Selective Dehydrogenation of Methylcyclohexane to Toluene

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam

    2017-01-18

    Liquid organic chemical hydrides are effective hydrogen storage media for easy and safe transport. The chemical couple of methylcyclohexane (MCH) and toluene (TOL) has been considered one of the feasible cycles for a hydrogen carrier, but the selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL has been reported using only Pt-based noble metal catalysts. This study reports MCH dehydrogenation to TOL using supported NiZn as a selective, non-noble-metal catalyst. A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to provide insight into the site requirements and reaction mechanism for MCH dehydrogenation to TOL, which were compared with those for cyclohexane (CH) dehydrogenation to benzene (BZ). The kinetic measurements carried out at 300-360°C showed an almost zero order with respect to MCH pressure in the high-pressure region (≥10 kPa) and nearly a positive half order with respective to H pressure (≤40 kPa). These kinetic data for the dehydrogenation reaction paradoxically indicate that hydrogenation of a strongly chemisorbed intermediate originating from TOL is the rate-determining step. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation confirms that the dehydrogenated TOL species at the aliphatic (methyl) position group (CHCH) were strongly adsorbed on the surface, which must be hydrogenated to desorb as TOL. This hydrogen-assisted desorption mechanism explains the essential role of excess H present in the feed in maintaining the activity of the metallic surface for hydrogenation. The rate of the CH to BZ reaction was less sensitive to H pressure than that of MCH to TOL, which can be explained by the absence of a methyl group in the structure, which in turn reduces the binding energy of the adsorbed species. DFT suggests that the improved TOL selectivity by adding Zn to Ni was due to Zn atoms preferentially occupying low-coordination sites on the surface (the corner and edge sites), which are likely the unselective sites responsible for the C-C dissociation of the

  17. Kinetics on NiZn Bimetallic Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution via Selective Dehydrogenation of Methylcyclohexane to Toluene

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh Ali, Anaam; Jedidi, Abdesslem; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Cavallo, Luigi; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Liquid organic chemical hydrides are effective hydrogen storage media for easy and safe transport. The chemical couple of methylcyclohexane (MCH) and toluene (TOL) has been considered one of the feasible cycles for a hydrogen carrier, but the selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL has been reported using only Pt-based noble metal catalysts. This study reports MCH dehydrogenation to TOL using supported NiZn as a selective, non-noble-metal catalyst. A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to provide insight into the site requirements and reaction mechanism for MCH dehydrogenation to TOL, which were compared with those for cyclohexane (CH) dehydrogenation to benzene (BZ). The kinetic measurements carried out at 300-360°C showed an almost zero order with respect to MCH pressure in the high-pressure region (≥10 kPa) and nearly a positive half order with respective to H pressure (≤40 kPa). These kinetic data for the dehydrogenation reaction paradoxically indicate that hydrogenation of a strongly chemisorbed intermediate originating from TOL is the rate-determining step. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation confirms that the dehydrogenated TOL species at the aliphatic (methyl) position group (CHCH) were strongly adsorbed on the surface, which must be hydrogenated to desorb as TOL. This hydrogen-assisted desorption mechanism explains the essential role of excess H present in the feed in maintaining the activity of the metallic surface for hydrogenation. The rate of the CH to BZ reaction was less sensitive to H pressure than that of MCH to TOL, which can be explained by the absence of a methyl group in the structure, which in turn reduces the binding energy of the adsorbed species. DFT suggests that the improved TOL selectivity by adding Zn to Ni was due to Zn atoms preferentially occupying low-coordination sites on the surface (the corner and edge sites), which are likely the unselective sites responsible for the C-C dissociation of the

  18. Kinetic stabilities of double, tetra- and hexarosette hydrogen-bonded assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.J.; Neuteboom, Edda E.; Paraschiv, V.; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David

    2002-01-01

    A study of the kinetic stabilities of hydrogen-bonded double, tetra-, and hexarosette assemblies, comprising 36, 72, and 108 hydrogen bonds, respectively, is described. The kinetic stabilities are measured using both chiral amplification and racemization experiments. The chiral amplification studies

  19. Synergistic methane formation kinetics for hydrogen impact on carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasz, A.A.; Davis, J.W.

    1986-06-01

    A physical/chemical model is presented for the reaction kinetics for methane formation from carbon, due to bombardment by energetic (∼ 100's eV) H + ions and thermal (∼ 1 eV) H 0 atoms. While the model was developed for H + and H 0 , it can be readily applied to non-hydrogenic energetic particles (ions or atoms, e.g., Ar + , He + , He) in combination with thermal (∼ 1 eV) hydrogen (again ions or atoms) impacting on carbon. Both collisional (in the case of the energetic particles) and chemical reaction processes are included. Special cases of sub-eV H 0 alone, energetic H + alone and combined H 0 plus H + were considered and fitted to experimental data. Generally good agreement was found between theoretical predictions and experimental results over the experimental flux and H + energy ranges studied (H 0 flux: 6x10 14 - 7x10 15 H 0 /cm 2 s, H + flux: 6x10 12 - 5x10 15 H + /cm 2 s, H + energy: 300 eV/H + and 1 keV/H + )

  20. Elementary Processes and Kinetic Modeling for Hydrogen and Helium Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Celiberto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report cross-sections and rate coefficients for excited states colliding with electrons, heavy particles and walls useful for the description of H 2 /He plasma kinetics under different conditions. In particular, the role of the rotational states in resonant vibrational excitations of the H 2 molecule by electron impact and the calculation of the related cross-sections are illustrated. The theoretical determination of the cross-section for the rovibrational energy exchange and dissociation of H 2 molecule, induced by He atom impact, by using the quasi-classical trajectory method is discussed. Recombination probabilities of H atoms on tungsten and graphite, relevant for the determination of the nascent vibrational distribution, are also presented. An example of a state-to-state plasma kinetic model for the description of shock waves operating in H 2 and He-H 2 mixtures is presented, emphasizing also the role of electronically-excited states in affecting the electron energy distribution function of free electrons. Finally, the thermodynamic properties and the electrical conductivity of non-ideal, high-density hydrogen plasma are finally discussed, in particular focusing on the pressure ionization phenomenon in high-pressure high-temperature plasmas.

  1. Thermodynamic modelling and kinetics of hydrogen absorption associated with phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondor, G.; Lexcellent, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    The intermetallic are used for hydrogen pressure containers in order to avoid leaks in the case of an hybrid container. The hydrogen atoms are absorbed by the intermetallic which act as a hydrogen sponge. This hydrogen absorption must be modelled for the container design. The Pressure-composition isotherms describe the equilibrium. Out of this equilibrium the kinetics are controlled by different processes, without taking into account the phase transformations. The author presents a new model of the p-c isotherms with the hydrogen absorption kinetics. (A.L.B.)

  2. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  3. In situ NMR studies of hydrogen storage kinetics and molecular diffusion in clathrate hydrate at elevated hydrogen pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuchi, T. [Okayama Univ., Misasa, Tottori (Japan); Moudrakovski, I.L.; Ripmeester, J.A. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences

    2008-07-01

    The challenge of storing high-density hydrogen into compact host media was investigated. The conventional storage scheme where an aqueous solution is frozen with hydrogen gas is too slow for practical use in a hydrogen-based society. Therefore, the authors developed a faster method whereby hydrogen was stored into gas hydrates. The hydrogen gas was directly charged into hydrogen-free, crystalline hydrate powders with partly empty lattices. The storage kinetics and hydrogen diffusion into the hydrate was observed in situ by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in a pressurized tube cell. At pressures up to 20 MPa, the storage was complete within 80 minutes, as observed by growth of stored-hydrogen peak into the hydrate. Hydrogen diffusion within the crystalline hydrate media is the rate-determining step of current storage scheme. Therefore, the authors measured the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen molecules using the pulsed field gradient NMR method. The results show that the stored hydrogen is very mobile at temperatures down to 250 K. As such, the powdered hydrate media should work well even in cold environments. Compared with more prevailing hydrogen storage media such as metal hydrides, clathrate hydrates have the advantage of being free from hydrogen embrittlement, more chemically durable, more environmentally sound, and economically affordable. It was concluded that the powdered clathrate hydrate is suitable as a hydrogen storage media. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Novel Desorber for Online Drilling Mud Gas Logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackowski, Marcin; Tobiszewski, Marek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the construction solution and experimental results of a novel desorber for online drilling mud gas logging. The traditional desorbers use mechanical mixing of the liquid to stimulate transfer of hydrocarbons to the gaseous phase that is further analyzed. The presented approach is based on transfer of hydrocarbons from the liquid to the gas bubbles flowing through it and further gas analysis. The desorber was checked for gas logging from four different drilling muds collected from Polish boreholes. The results of optimization studies are also presented in this study. The comparison of the novel desorber with a commercial one reveals strong advantages of the novel one. It is characterized by much better hydrocarbons recovery efficiency and allows reaching lower limits of detection of the whole analytical system. The presented desorber seems to be very attractive alternative over widely used mechanical desorbers.

  5. Novel Desorber for Online Drilling Mud Gas Logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Lackowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the construction solution and experimental results of a novel desorber for online drilling mud gas logging. The traditional desorbers use mechanical mixing of the liquid to stimulate transfer of hydrocarbons to the gaseous phase that is further analyzed. The presented approach is based on transfer of hydrocarbons from the liquid to the gas bubbles flowing through it and further gas analysis. The desorber was checked for gas logging from four different drilling muds collected from Polish boreholes. The results of optimization studies are also presented in this study. The comparison of the novel desorber with a commercial one reveals strong advantages of the novel one. It is characterized by much better hydrocarbons recovery efficiency and allows reaching lower limits of detection of the whole analytical system. The presented desorber seems to be very attractive alternative over widely used mechanical desorbers.

  6. Kinetics of hydrogen adsorption on MgH{sub 2}/CNT composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rather, Sami ullah, E-mail: rathersami@gmail.com; Taimoor, Aqeel Ahmad; Muhammad, Ayyaz; Alhamed, Yahia Abobakor; Zaman, Sharif Fakhruz; Ali, Arshid Mahmood

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Hydrogen adsorption comparisons of commercial, milled, and MgH{sub 2} composite. • Hydrogen adsorption capacity and kinetics improves tremendously by CNT embedding. • Unsteady state modeling and simulation of adsorption kinetics. - Abstract: Magnesium hydride (MgH{sub 2})–carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite has been prepared by high-energy ball milling method and their experimental and kinetic hydrogen adsorption studies was assessed. Hydrogen adsorption studies were performed by Sievert’s volumetric apparatus and kinetic evaluation was conducted by surface chemistry and Langmuir–Hinshelwood–Hougen–Watson (LHHW) type mode. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were performed. Hydrogen adsorption capacity of commercial MgH{sub 2}, milled MgH{sub 2}, and MgH{sub 2}/CNT composite are found to be 0.04, 0.057, and 0.059 g (H{sub 2})/g (MgH{sub 2}) at 673 K and hydrogen pressure of 4.6 MPa. Addition of 5 wt% of CNTs to MgH{sub 2} proved to be very critical to enhance hydrogen adsorption as well as to improve its kinetics. It was observed that hydrogen adsorption is not in quasi-state equilibrium and is modeled using kinetic rate laws.

  7. Kinetics and mechanism of nitrobenzene hydrogenation to phenylhydroxylamine in rhenium thiocomplexes solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenyako, G.I.; Belousov, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on kinetics of nitrobenzene hydrogenation to phenylhydroxylamine in dimethylformamide solutions of rhenium thiocomplexes. The mechanism of hydrogenation was suggested. Formation of hydride catalyst complex represents the first stage of the process. Kinetic equation derived on the basis of suggested mechanism corresponds satisfactorily with experimental results. Thermodynamic parameters of separate process stages calculated on the basis of equilibrium constant values testify as well to the benefit of suggested mechanism

  8. Hydrogen desorption kinetics from zirconium hydride and zirconium metal in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride is important in many nuclear design and safety applications. In this paper, a coordinated experimental and modeling study has been used to explicitly demonstrate the applicability of existing kinetic theories for hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride and α-zirconium. A static synthesis method was used to produce δ-zirconium hydride, and the crystallographic phases of the zirconium hydride were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Three obvious stages, involving δ-zirconium hydride, a two-phase region, and α-zirconium, were observed in the hydrogen desorption spectra of two zirconium hydride specimens with H/Zr ratios of 1.62 and 1.64, respectively, which were obtained using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). A continuous, one-dimensional, two-phase moving boundary model, coupled with the zero- and second-order kinetics of hydrogen desorption from δ-zirconium hydride and α-zirconium, respectively, has been developed to reproduce the TDS experimental results. A comparison of the modeling predictions with the experimental results indicates that a zero-order kinetic model is valid for description of hydrogen flux away from the δ-hydride phase, and that a second-order kinetic model works well for hydrogen desorption from α-Zr if the activation energy of desorption is optimized to be 70% of the value reported in the literature

  9. The role of surface oxides on hydrogen sorption kinetics in titanium thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjixenophontos, Efi; Michalek, Lukas; Roussel, Manuel; Hirscher, Michael; Schmitz, Guido

    2018-05-01

    Titanium is presently discussed as a catalyst to accelerate the hydrogenation kinetics of hydrogen storage materials. It is however known that H absorption in Ti decisively depends on the surface conditions (presence or absence of the natural surface oxide). In this work, we use Ti thin films of controlled thickness (50-800 nm) as a convenient tool for quantifying the atomic transport. XRD and TEM investigations allow us to follow the hydrogenation progress inside the film. Hydrogenation of TiO2/Ti bi-layers is studied at 300 °C, for different durations (10 s to 600 min) and at varying pressures of pure H2 atmosphere. Under these conditions, the hydrogenation is found to be linear in time. By comparing films with and without TiO2, as well as by studying the pressure dependence of hydrogenation, it is demonstrated that hydrogen transport across the oxide represents the decisive kinetic barrier rather than the splitting of H2 molecules at the surface. Hydrogenation appears by a layer-like reaction initiated by heterogeneous nucleation at the backside interface to the substrate. The linear growth constant and the H diffusion coefficient inside the oxide are quantified, as well as a reliable lower bound to the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in Ti is derived. The pressure dependence of hydrogen absorption is quantitatively modelled.

  10. Kinetic Characteristics of Hydrogen Transfer Through Palladium-Modified Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriev, I. S.; Frolov, V. Yu.; Bolotin, S. N.; Baryshev, M. G.; Kopytov, G. F.

    2018-01-01

    The paper deals with hydrogen transfer through Pd-23%Ag alloy membrane, the surface of which is modified by the electrolytic deposition of highly dispersed palladium. The dependence between the density of hydrogen flow and its excess pressure on the input surface of membrane is well approximated by the first-order curve. This fact indicates that the process of hydrogen permeability is defined by its dissociation on the input surface. Activation energy of this process is 47.9 kJ/mol which considerably exceeds that of the process of hydrogen transfer through palladium (22-30 kJ/mol). This confirms the fact that the chemisorption is a rate-controlling step of the hydrogen transfer through membrane.

  11. Kinetics of the excited muonic hydrogen in the mixtures of hydrogen isotopes in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystritskij, V.M.; Kravtsov, A.V.; Popov, N.P.

    1989-01-01

    De-excitation of the excited muonic hydrogen in the mixture of hydrogen isotopes and helium is considered. The method is proposed which allows one to determine the rates of the muon transfer from the excited muonic hydrogen to helium nuclei, as well as the probability of the direct muon atomic capture by nuclei of hydrogen isotopes. 20 refs.; 4 figs

  12. Electrochemical permeation tests on the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption of palladium and iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dafft, E.G.

    1977-01-01

    Electrochemical permeation tests were performed to investigate the kinetics of the hydrogen development and hydrogen absorption. The cathode side of the samples was galvanostatically cathodically polarized in different electrolyte solutions with and without additions. THe hydrogen atoms diffusing out of the opposite side for iron and α-palladium were oxidized with potentiostatic, sufficiently anodic polarization. The thus registered stationary current is proportional to the hydrogen activity on the cathode side. Test apparatus and conditions are described. The measurements on iron are discussed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  13. Tailoring Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides towards Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state hydrogen storage using various materials is expected to provide the ultimate solution for safe and efficient on-board storage. Complex hydrides have attracted increasing attention over the past two decades due to their high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. In this account, we review studies from our lab on tailoring the thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides, including metal alanates, borohydrides and amides. By changing the material composition and structure, developing feasible preparation methods, doping high-performance catalysts, optimizing multifunctional additives, creating nanostructures and understanding the interaction mechanisms with hydrogen, the operating temperatures for hydrogen storage in metal amides, alanates and borohydrides are remarkably reduced. This temperature reduction is associated with enhanced reaction kinetics and improved reversibility. The examples discussed in this review are expected to provide new inspiration for the development of complex hydrides with high hydrogen capacity and appropriate thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Kinetic Monte Carlo study on the evolution of silicon surface roughness under hydrogen thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Junzhuan; Pan, Lijia; Yu, Linwei; Zheng, Youdou; Shi, Yi, E-mail: yshi@nju.edu.cn

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • The KMC method is adopted to investigate the relationships between surface evolution and hydrogen thermal treatment conditions. • The reduction in surface roughness is divided into two stages at relatively low temperatures, both exhibiting exponential dependence on the time. • The optimized surface structure can be obtained by precisely adjusting thermal treatment temperatures and hydrogen pressures. - Abstract: The evolution of a two-dimensional silicon surface under hydrogen thermal treatment is studied by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, focusing on the dependence of the migration behaviors of surface atoms on both the temperature and hydrogen pressure. We adopt different activation energies to analyze the influence of hydrogen pressure on the evolution of surface morphology at high temperatures. The reduction in surface roughness is divided into two stages, both exhibiting exponential dependence on the equilibrium time. Our results indicate that a high hydrogen pressure is conducive to obtaining optimized surfaces, as a strategy in the applications of three-dimensional devices.

  15. Thermodynamic and kinetics models of hydrogen absorption bound to phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondor, G.; Lexcellent, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    In order to design hydrogen gaseous pressure tanks, the absorption (desorption) of hydrogen has to be described and modelled. The equilibrium state can be described by the 'H 2 gas pressure - H 2 composition in the intermetallic compounds - isotherms' (PCI) curves. Several models of PCI curves already exist. At the beginning of the absorption, the hydrogen atoms and the intermetallic compounds form a solid solution (α phase). When the hydrogen concentration increases, a phase transformation appears changing the α solid solution into an hydride (β phase) (solid solution + H 2 ↔ hydride). When all the solid solution has been transformed into hydride, the absorbed hydrogen atoms are in β phase. A new thermodynamic model has been developed in order to take into account this transition phase. The equilibrium state is then given by a relation between the H 2 gas pressure and the H 2 concentration in the intermetallic compound for a fixed external temperature. Two kinetics models have been developed too; at first has been considered that the kinetics depend only of the entire concentration in the intermetallic compound and of the difference between the applied pressure and the equilibrium pressure. Then, has been considered that the hydrogen concentration changes in the metallic matrix. In this last case, for each hydrogenation process, the absorption velocity is calculated to determine the slowest local process which regulates the local evolution of the hydrogen concentration. These two models are based on the preceding thermodynamic model of the PCI curves. (O.M.)

  16. Hydrogen exchange kinetics changes upon formation of the soybean trypsin inhibitor: trypsin complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, C.K.; Ellis, L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The hydrogen exchange kinetics of the complex of trypsin--soybean trypsin inhibitor (Kunitz) have been compared to the calculated sum of the exchange kinetics for the inhibitor and trypsin measured separately. The exchange rates observed for the complex are substantially less than the sum of the exchange rates in the two individual proteins. These results cannot be accounted for by changes in intermolecular or intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The decrease in exchange rates in the complex are ascribed to changes in solvent accessibility in the component proteins. (U.S.)

  17. KINETIC BEHAVIOR IN THE HYDROGENATION OF FURFURAL OVER IR CATALYSTS SUPPORTED ON TIO2

    OpenAIRE

    ROJAS, HUGO; MARTÍNEZ, JOSÉ J.; REYES, PATRICIO

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the liquid-phase hydrogenation of furfuraldehyde to furfuryl alcohol over Ir catalysts supported over TiO2 was studied in the temperature range of 323 to 373 K. The effect of furfural concentration, hydrogen pressure and the solvent effect were also studied. A high selectivity towards furfuryl alcohol was demonstrated. Initial rates describes the order global of the reaction. The experimental data could also be explained using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model with of a single-si...

  18. Kinetics of Butyrate, Acetate, and Hydrogen Metabolism in a Thermophilic, Anaerobic, Butyrate-Degrading Triculture

    OpenAIRE

    Ahring, Birgitte K.; Westermann, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism were determined with butyrate-limited, chemostat-grown tricultures of a thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium together with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic rod. Kinetic parameters were determined from progress curves fitted to the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation. The apparent half-saturation constants, Km, for butyrate, acetate, and dissolved hyd...

  19. Dissolution kinetics of lead telluride in alkali solutions of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilova, M.G.; Sveshnikova, L.L.; Stavitskaya, T.A.; Repinskij, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Dissolution kinetics of lead telluride in alkali solutions of hydrogen peroxide was investigated. Dependences of change of PbTe dissolution rate on concentration of hydrogen peroxide and alkali in the solution were obtained. It is shown that dissolution rate of lead telluride is affected by dissolution rate of lead oxide, representing the product of ReTe dissolution. The obtained regularities can be explained by change of solution structure with increase of KOH concentration and by the state of hydrogen peroxide in the solution

  20. A feasible kinetic model for the hydrogen oxidation on ruthenium electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, M.S.; Gennero de Chialvo, M.R.; Chialvo, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen oxidation reaction (hor) was studied on a polycrystalline ruthenium electrode in H 2 SO 4 solution at different rotation rates (ω). The experimental polarization curves recorded on steady state show the existence of a maximum current with a non-linear dependence of the current density on ω 1/2 . On the basis of the Tafel-Heyrovsky-Volmer kinetic mechanism, coupled with a process of inhibition of active sites by the reversible electroadsorption of hydroxyl species, it was possible to appropriately describe the origin of the maximum current. The corresponding set of kinetic parameters was also calculated from the correlation of the experimental results with the proposed kinetic model.

  1. Kinetics of hydrogen reduction of titanium-doped molybdenum dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Qian; Marin-Flores, Oscar; Hu, Shuozhen; Scudiero, Louis; Ha, Su; Norton, M. Grant

    2015-01-01

    Ti-doped MoO 2 was synthesized to broaden the oxygen-to-carbon ratio operating range of MoO 2 for partial oxidation of long-chain hydrocarbons by increasing the redox stability. The structure modification causes the hydrogen reduction mechanism to change from three-dimensional nuclei growth with an activation energy of 61.3 kJ mol −1 to a three-dimensional hydrogen diffusion limited model with an activation energy of 317.9 kJ mol −1 . Because of the enhanced redox stability, Ti-doped MoO 2 has potential as an alternative anode in direct liquid-fed solid oxide fuel cells

  2. The hydrogen evolution and oxidation kinetics during overdischarging of sealed nickel-metal hydride batteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayeb, A.; Otten, W.M.; Mank, A.J.G.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen evolution and oxidation kinetics in NiMH batteries have been investigated under temperature-controlled, steady-state, overdischarging conditions within a temperature range of 10 and 50°C and at discharging currents of 1–330 mA (0.0009 to 0.3 C rate). In situ Raman spectroscopic analyses

  3. Synthesis of Mg2Cu nanoparticles on carbon supports with enhanced hydrogen sorption kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Au, Y.S.; Ponthieu, M.; van Zwienen, M.; Zlotea, C.; Cuevas, F.; de Jong, K.P.; de Jongh, P.E.

    2013-01-01

    The reaction kinetics and reversibility for hydrogen sorption were investigated for supported Mg2Cu nanoparticles on carbon. A new preparation method is proposed to synthesize the supported alloy nanoparticles. The motivation of using a support is to separate the nanoparticles to prevent sintering

  4. Thermodynamics and kinetics of graphene chemistry: a graphene hydrogenation prototype study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Buu Q; Gordon, Mark S

    2016-12-07

    The thermodynamic and kinetic controls of graphene chemistry are studied computationally using a graphene hydrogenation reaction and polyaromatic hydrocarbons to represent the graphene surface. Hydrogen atoms are concertedly chemisorped onto the surface of graphene models of different shapes (i.e., all-zigzag, all-armchair, zigzag-armchair mixed edges) and sizes (i.e., from 16-42 carbon atoms). The second-order Z-averaged perturbation theory (ZAPT2) method combined with Pople double and triple zeta basis sets are used for all calculations. It is found that both the net enthalpy change and the barrier height of graphene hydrogenation at graphene edges are lower than at their interior surfaces. While the thermodynamic product distribution is mainly determined by the remaining π-islands of functionalized graphenes (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2013, 15, 3725-3735), the kinetics of the reaction is primarily correlated with the localization of the electrostatic potential of the graphene surface.

  5. Kinetics of hydrogen in chromospheres of red dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruevich, E.A.; Katsova, M.M.; Livshits, M.A.; AN SSSR, Moscow

    1990-01-01

    A method is suggested and solution is conducted of the stationary equations for an 8-level hydrogen atom with an approximate account for lines radiative transfer in an optically thick layer. Ionization and excitation of hydrogen atoms are caused by electron collisions; the influence of photospheric radiation was neglected. The medium stays motionless, and the photon escape from the layer is connected with gradual diffusion in frequency during multiple scatterings. Mean over the layer probabilities of photon escape are introduced into the stationary equations. They are determined for a finite-thickness layer with an uniform distribution of primary photon sources and with an absorption coefficient accounting for Stark and Doppler effects. As an example of application of the calculations, an interpretation is presented of the data on the Balmer decrement in the maximum of the stellar flare of YZ CMi on March 4, 1985. It is shown that the transition from a steep Balmer decrement to a mildly sloping one is due to a decrease of the photon escape probability in the higher members of Balmer series, i.e. the lines later than H γ

  6. Understanding the kinetics of sulfate reduction in brines by hydrogen: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, D.M.

    1988-07-01

    Experiments were conducted with mixtures of hydrogen gas and each of PBB1 and PBB3 brines to examine the reduction kinetics of sulfate in high ionic strength solutions. Results from the experiments with brines showed that the kinetics of sulfate reduction is slower in high ionic strength solutions than the kinetics in low ionic strength solutions. However, the kinetic mechanism does not seem to alter the slow kinetics, but the addition of much larger quantities of sulfide, about 40 mM, does accelerate the reduction of sulfate. Since the proposed reaction mechanism for the reduction of sulfate by hydrogen gas involves the reaction of sulfide with sulfate, slow initial kinetics in the absence of sulfide is understandable, but also implies an unknown rate-limiting reaction. Precipitation of calcium sulfate(s) and calcium sulfide may limit the sulfide and sulfate concentrations to low values. The coexistence of anhydrite and oldhamite may indicate a part of the Ca-S-H 2 O that has not yet been investigated. 6 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution:. ionic strength effects and temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, Frank; Elias, Horst; Wannowius, Klaus J.

    Conductometry was used to study the kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite, HSO -3, by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous non-buffered solution at the low concentration level of 10 -5-10 -6 M, typically found in cloud water. The kinetic data confirm that the rate law reported for the pH range 3-6 at higher concentration levels, rate= kH·[H +]·[HSO -3]·[H 2O 2], is valid at the low concentration level and at low ionic strength Ic. At 298 K and Ic=1.5×10 -4 M, third-order rate constant kH was found to be kH=(9.1±0.5)×10 7 M -2 s -1. The temperature dependence of kH led to an activation energy of Ea=29.7±0.9 kJ mol -1. The effect of the ionic strength (adjusted with NaCl) on rate constant kH was studied in the range Ic=2×10 -4-5.0 M at pH=4.5-5.2 by conductometry and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The dependence of kH on Ic can be described with a semi-empirical relationship, which is useful for the purpose of comparison and extrapolation. The kinetic data obtained are critically compared with those reported earlier.

  8. Searching out the hydrogen absorption/desorption limiting reaction factors: Strategies allowing to increase kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeaiter, Ali, E-mail: ali.zeaiter@femto-st.fr; Chapelle, David; Nardin, Philippe

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A macro scale thermodynamic model that simulates the response of a FeTi-X hydride tank is performed, and validated experimentally. • A sensibility study to identify the most influent input variables that can changes very largely the reaction rate. - Abstract: Hydrogen gas has become one of the most promising energy carriers. Main breakthrough concerns hydrogen solid storage, specially based on intermetallic material use. Regarding the raw material abundance and cost, the AB type alloy FeTi is an auspicious candidate to store hydrogen. Its absorption/desorption kinetics is a basic hindrance to common use, compared with more usual hydrides. First, discussions based on literature help us identifying the successive steps leading to metal hydriding, and allow to introduce the physical parameters which drive or limit the reaction. This analysis leads us to suggest strategies in order to increase absorption/desorption kinetics. Attention is then paid to a thermofluidodynamic model, allowing to describe a macroscopic solid storage reactor. Thus, we can achieve a simulation which describes the overall reaction inside the hydrogen reactor and, by varying the sub-mentioned parameters (thermal conductivity, the powder granularity, environment heat exchange…), we attempt to hierarchy the reaction limiting factors. These simulations are correlated to absorption/desorption experiments for which pressure, temperature and hydrogen flow are recorded.

  9. Kinetics of tritium isotope exchange between liquid pyrrole and gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolarz, A.

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of tritium isotope exchange between liquid pyrrole and gaseous hydrogen has been studied over the temperature range of 290-303 K. The reaction was carried out in the presence of platinum black but in spite of that, it appeared to be relatively slow. The kinetics of the exchange reaction studied could be described by the simple McKay equation. The results obtained suggest that diffusion is the rate-determining step. A mechanism of exchange is proposed. (author) 10 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Kinetic study of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase in a flow-mix microcalorimetric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidaleo, Marcello; Lavecchia, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by the enzyme catalase was studied at pH 7.4 in the temperature range 10-30 deg. C. Experiments were performed by the LKB-2277 Thermal Activity Monitor equipped with a flow-mix cylinder. The calorimetric reaction unit was schematised as a tubular reactor operating under plug-flow conditions. A first-order kinetic expression, with respect to both the substrate and the enzyme, was used to describe the rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Regression analysis of calorimetric data provided a molar reaction enthalpy of -87.55 kJ mol -1 and an activation energy of 11 kJ mol -1 . Analysis of model residuals and the normal probability plot indicated that the results obtained were statistically significant

  11. Kinetics of hydrogen evolution in the thermal dissociation of the hydride ZrNiH /SUB 2.8/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernavskii, P.A.; Lunin, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen evolution in the thermal decomposition of ZrNiH /SUB 2.8/ has been studied. The kinetic curve has two rate maxima. It is presumed that the second maximum is related to the phenomenon of critical inhibition that accompanies the phase transition. Apparent activation energies were determined for hydrogen evolution in argon and argon-ethylene atmospheres. The apparent energy increases in the argon-ethylene mixture. On the basis of the activation energy measurements it is presumed that the rate-determining step in hydrogen evolution is either the formation of hydrogen molecules from atoms on the surface of the lateral diffusion of atomic hydrogen. In the region of hydrogen concentration in the hydride corresponding to the phase transition, the rate-determining step is hydrogen diffusion in the hydride

  12. Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Kinetics of Nanocrystalline and Amorphous Mg₂Ni-type Alloy by Melt Spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang-Huan; Li, Bao-Wei; Ren, Hui-Ping; Li, Xia; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Dong-Liang

    2011-01-18

    Mg₂Ni-type Mg₂Ni 1-x Co x (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) alloys were fabricated by melt spinning technique. The structures of the as-spun alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of the alloys were measured by an automatically controlled Sieverts apparatus. The electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics of the as-spun alloys was tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. The results show that the as-spun (x = 0.1) alloy exhibits a typical nanocrystalline structure, while the as-spun (x = 0.4) alloy displays a nanocrystalline and amorphous structure, confirming that the substitution of Co for Ni notably intensifies the glass forming ability of the Mg₂Ni-type alloy. The melt spinning treatment notably improves the hydriding and dehydriding kinetics as well as the high rate discharge ability (HRD) of the alloys. With an increase in the spinning rate from 0 (as-cast is defined as spinning rate of 0 m/s) to 30 m/s, the hydrogen absorption saturation ratio () of the (x = 0.4) alloy increases from 77.1 to 93.5%, the hydrogen desorption ratio () from 54.5 to 70.2%, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient (D) from 0.75 × 10 - 11 to 3.88 × 10 - 11 cm²/s and the limiting current density I L from 150.9 to 887.4 mA/g.

  13. In situ hydrogen consumption kinetics as an indicator of subsurface microbial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S.H.; Smith, R.L.; Suflita, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are few methods available for broadly assessing microbial community metabolism directly within a groundwater environment. In this study, hydrogen consumption rates were estimated from in situ injection/withdrawal tests conducted in two geochemically varying, contaminated aquifers as an approach towards developing such a method. The hydrogen consumption first-order rates varied from 0.002 nM h-1 for an uncontaminated, aerobic site to 2.5 nM h-1 for a contaminated site where sulfate reduction was a predominant process. The method could accommodate the over three orders of magnitude range in rates that existed between subsurface sites. In a denitrifying zone, the hydrogen consumption rate (0.02 nM h-1) was immediately abolished in the presence of air or an antibiotic mixture, suggesting that such measurements may also be sensitive to the effects of environmental perturbations on field microbial activities. Comparable laboratory determinations with sediment slurries exhibited hydrogen consumption kinetics that differed substantially from the field estimates. Because anaerobic degradation of organic matter relies on the rapid consumption of hydrogen and subsequent maintenance at low levels, such in situ measures of hydrogen turnover can serve as a key indicator of the functioning of microbial food webs and may be more reliable than laboratory determinations. ?? 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  14. Effect of the strong metal-support interaction on hydrogen sorption kinetics of Pd-capped switchable mirrors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgschulte, A.; Westerwaal, R.J.; Rector, J.H.; Dam, B.; Griessen, R.P.; Schoenes, J.

    2004-01-01

    The morphology and electronic structure of Pd clusters grown on oxidized yttrium surfaces are investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The hydrogen sorption mediated by the Pd clusters is determined from the optically monitored switching kinetics of

  15. Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism in a thermophilic, anaerobic, butyrate-degrading triculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahring, B K; Westermann, P

    1987-02-01

    Kinetics of butyrate, acetate, and hydrogen metabolism were determined with butyrate-limited, chemostat-grown tricultures of a thermophilic butyrate-utilizing bacterium together with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic rod. Kinetic parameters were determined from progress curves fitted to the integrated form of the Michaelis-Menten equation. The apparent half-saturation constants, K(m), for butyrate, acetate, and dissolved hydrogen were 76 muM, 0.4 mM, and 8.5 muM, respectively. Butyrate and hydrogen were metabolized to a concentration of less than 1 muM, whereas acetate uptake usually ceased at a concentration of 25 to 75 muM, indicating a threshold level for acetate uptake. No significant differences in K(m) values for butyrate degradation were found between chemostat- and batch-grown tricultures, although the maximum growth rate was somewhat higher in the batch cultures in which the medium was supplemented with yeast extract. Acetate utilization was found to be the rate-limiting reaction for complete degradation of butyrate to methane and carbon dioxide in continuous culture. Increasing the dilution rate resulted in a gradual accumulation of acetate. The results explain the low concentrations of butyrate and hydrogen normally found during anaerobic digestion and the observation that acetate is the first volatile fatty acid to accumulate upon a decrease in retention time or increase in organic loading of a digestor.

  16. Kinetics of hydrogen release from dissolutions of ammonia borane in different ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valero-Pedraza, María José; Martín-Cortés, Alexandra; Navarrete, Alexander; Bermejo, María Dolores; Martín, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia borane is a promising hydrogen storage material that liberates hydrogen by thermolysis at moderate temperatures, but it also presents major limitations for practical applications including a long induction time before the initiation of hydrogen release and a difficult regeneration. Previous works have demonstrated that by dissolution of ammonia borane into several ionic liquids, and particularly in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride bmimCl, the induction period at the beginning of the thermolysis is eliminated, but some problems persist, including foaming and the formation of a residue after thermolysis that is insoluble in the ionic liquid. In this work, the release of hydrogen from ammonia borane dissolved in different ionic liquids has been analyzed, measuring the kinetics of hydrogen release, visually following the evolution of the sample during the process using pressure glass tube reactors, and analyzing the residue by spectroscopic techniques. While dissolutions of ammonia borane in most ionic liquids analyzed show similar properties as dissolutions in bmimCl, using ionic liquids with bis(trifluoromethylsulfanyl)imide Tf_2N anion the foaming problem is reduced, and in some cases the residue remains dissolved in the ionic liquid, while with ionic liquids with choline anion higher hydrogen yields are achieved that indicate that the decomposition of ammonia borane proceeds through a different path. - Highlights: • Hydrogen release from ammonia borane dissolved in 13 ionic liquids has been studied. • Induction time is shortened and hydrogen release rate is accelerated in all cases. • The best results are obtained using ionic liquids with Tf_2N anion. • Ch cation ionic liquids enable higher H_2 yield, but cyclotriborazane is produced.

  17. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen defect pairs in SrTiO3 from density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A density functional theory investigation of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen–hydrogen defect interactions in the cubic SrTiO3 perovskite is presented. We find a net attraction between two hydrogen atoms with an optimal separation of ∼2.3 Å. The energy gain is ca. 0.33 eV comp...

  18. Thermogravimetric study of the kinetics of lithium titanate reduction by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonak, Sagar; Rakesh, R.; Jain, Uttam; Mukherjee, Abhishek; Kumar, Sanjay; Krishnamurthy, Nagaiyar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Li 2 TiO 3 powder is synthesized by the gel combustion route. • Activation energy of reduction of Li 2 TiO 3 by H 2 found out to be 27.45 kJ/mol H 2 . • Non-stoichiometric phase of Li 2 TiO 3 is formed in hydrogen atmosphere. • One-dimensional diffusion appears to be the most probable mechanism of reduction. - Abstract: The lithium titanate powder was synthesized by gel-combustion route. The mechanism and the kinetics of hydrogen interaction with lithium titanate powder were studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetric technique. Lithium titanate underwent reduction in hydrogen atmosphere which led to the formation of oxygen deficient non-stoichiometric compound in lithium titanate. One-dimensional diffusion appeared to be the most probable reaction mechanism. The activation energy for reduction of lithium titanate under hydrogen atmosphere was found to be 27.4 kJ/mol/K. Structural changes after hydrogen reduction in lithium titanate were observed in X-ray diffraction analysis

  19. Kinetics of two-stage fermentation process for the production of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Kaushik [Department of Chemical Engineering, G.H. Patel College of Engineering and Technology, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, Gujarat (India); Muthukumar, Manoj; Kumar, Anish; Das, Debabrata [Fermentation Technology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2008-02-15

    Two-stage process described in the present work is a combination of dark and photofermentation in a sequential batch mode. In the first stage glucose is fermented to acetate, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} in an anaerobic dark fermentation by Enterobacter cloacae DM11. This is followed by a successive second stage where acetate is converted to H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in a photobioreactor by photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U. 001. The yield of hydrogen in the first stage was about 3.31molH{sub 2}(molglucose){sup -1} (approximately 82% of theoretical) and that in the second stage was about 1.5-1.72molH{sub 2}(molaceticacid){sup -1} (approximately 37-43% of theoretical). The overall yield of hydrogen in two-stage process considering glucose as preliminary substrate was found to be higher compared to a single stage process. Monod model, with incorporation of substrate inhibition term, has been used to determine the growth kinetic parameters for the first stage. The values of maximum specific growth rate ({mu} {sub max}) and K{sub s} (saturation constant) were 0.398h{sup -1} and 5.509gl{sup -1}, respectively, using glucose as substrate. The experimental substrate and biomass concentration profiles have good resemblance with those obtained by kinetic model predictions. A model based on logistic equation has been developed to describe the growth of R. sphaeroides O.U 001 in the second stage. Modified Gompertz equation was applied to estimate the hydrogen production potential, rate and lag phase time in a batch process for various initial concentration of glucose, based on the cumulative hydrogen production curves. Both the curve fitting and statistical analysis showed that the equation was suitable to describe the progress of cumulative hydrogen production. (author)

  20. Hydrogen absorption kinetics in powdered V + 80 wt.% LaNi5 composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Tirpude, Amit; Taxak, Manju; Krishnamurthy, Nagaiyar

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Vanadium prevents the pulverization of LaNi 5 . •H absorption capacity LaNi 5 –V composite is higher than LaNi 5 . •H absorption kinetics of LaNi 5 –V composite is relatively faster than V and LaNi 5 . •Fermi energy level of LaNi 5 –V composite lowered by vanadium addition. -- Abstract: The hydrogen absorption behavior of V + 80 wt.% LaNi 5 composite, LaNi 5 and V has been investigated. The LaNi 5 –V composite was prepared by high energy ball-milling technique using high pure vanadium and LaNi 5 powder. Lattice expansion of the composite has been observed in X-ray analysis which indicates the solid solution formation. Presence of free V and traces of V 2 O 5 phase were also observed in the composite. The hydrogen absorption capacity and absorption kinetics of the composite showed improvement as compared to LaNi 5 . The improved kinetics of the composite has been co-related to the change in lattices parameter, Fermi energy level and catalytic property of vanadium. Integrity of the composite has found to be effective even after 20 numbers of hydriding and dehydriding cycles due to the presence of vanadium

  1. Kinetics, isotope effects, and mechanism for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on supported nickel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.; Masuda, H.; Imai, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Baba, S.; Murakami, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Kinetics and hydrogen-deuterium isotope effects in the methanation of adsorbed CO molecules on a Ni/SiO 2 catalyst were precisely measured by using pulse surface reaction rate analysis (PSRA). When a CO pulse was injected into flowing hydrogen, it was immediately adsorbed on the catalyst and gradually hydrogenated to CH 4 and H 2 O. The amounts of CH 4 and H 2 O produced by the hydrogenation of the adsorbed CO were determined up to various times, and it was found that CH 4 and H 2 O were produced at the same rate. When O 2 instead of CO was injected, H 2 O was immediately produced. From these results, the rate-determining step of the reaction was found to be C-O bond dissociation of an adsorbed CO molecule or a partially hydrogenated CO species. By PSRA, the rate constant for the C-O bond dissocition process per adsorbed CO molecule (k/sub H/) was determined at various temperatures, and the Arrhenius parameters of the rate constant were obtained. The rate constant in flowing deuterium (k/sub D/) was also determined. it was found that k/sub D/ is considerably larger than k/sub H/, indicating an inverse isotope effect. The average value of k/sub H//k/sub D/ was 0.75. From these results, it was concluded that adsorbed CO is not directly dissociated to surface carbon and oxygen atoms but it is partially hydrogenated before C-O bond dissociation under the conditions of the PSRA experiment. 8 figures

  2. Kinetic energy of solid and liquid para-hydrogen: a path integral Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoppi, M.; Neumann, M.

    1992-01-01

    The translational (center of mass) kinetic energy of solid and liquid para-hydrogen have been recently measured by means of Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering. We have evaluated the same quantity, in similar thermodynamic conditions, by means of Path Integral Monte Carlo computer simulation, modelling the system as composed of a set of spherical molecules interacting through a pairwise additive Lennard-Jones potential. In spite of the crude approximations on the interaction potential, the agreement is excellent. The pressure was also computed by means of the same simulations. This quantity, compared with the equation of state for solid para-hydrogen given by Driessen and Silvera, gives an agreement of a lesser quality and a negative value for the liquid state. We attribute this discrepancy to the limitations of the Lennard-Jones potential. (orig.)

  3. Time-resolved pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry probes gaseous proteins structural kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    A pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) method has been developed for rapid monitoring of the exchange kinetics of protein ions with D2O a few milliseconds after electrospray ionization (ESI). The stepwise gradual evolution of HDX of multiply charged protein ions was monitored using the pulsed HDX mass spectrometry technique. Upon introducing a very short pulse of D2O (in the μs to ms time scale) into the linear ion trap (LIT) of a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer, bimodal distributions were detected for the ions of cytochrome c and ubiquitin. Mechanistic details of HDX reactions for ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase were uncovered and the structural transitions were followed by analyzing the kinetics of HDX.

  4. Solid-state reaction kinetics and optical studies of cadmium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Madhu; Gupta, Rashmi; Singh, Harjinder; Bamzai, K. K.

    2018-04-01

    The growth of cadmium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate was successfully carried out by using room temperature solution technique i.e., gel encapsulation technique. Grown crystals were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structure of the grown crystal belongs to orthorhombic crystal system and crystallizes in centrosymmetric space group. Kinetics of the decomposition of the grown crystals were studied by non-isothermal analysis. Thermo gravimetric / differential thermo analytical (TG/DTA) studies revealed that the grown crystal is stable upto 119 °C. The various steps involved in the thermal decomposition of the material have been analysed using Horowitz-Metzger, Coats-Redfern and Piloyan-Novikova equations for evaluating various kinetic parameters. The optical studies shows that the grown crystals possess wide transmittance in the visible region and significant optical band gap of 5.5ev with cut off wavelength of 260 nm.

  5. Solid-state reaction kinetics of neodymium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rashmi; Slathia, Goldy; Bamzai, K. K.

    2018-05-01

    Neodymium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate (NdMHP) crystals were grown by using gel encapsulation technique. Structural characterization of the grown crystals has been carried out by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) and it revealed that NdMHP crystals crystallize in orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pbca. Kinetics of the decomposition of the grown crystals has been studied by non-isothermal analysis. The estimation of decomposition temperatures and weight loss has been made from the thermogravimetric/differential thermo analytical (TG/DTA) in conjuncture with DSC studies. The various steps involved in the thermal decomposition of the material have been analysed using Horowitz-Metzger, Coats-Redfern and Piloyan-Novikova equations for evaluating various kinetic parameters.

  6. Kinetic Monte-Carlo modeling of hydrogen retention and re-emission from Tore Supra deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, A.; Schneider, R.; Warrier, M.; Roubin, P.; Martin, C.; Richou, M.

    2009-01-01

    A multi-scale model has been developed to study the reactive-diffusive transport of hydrogen in porous graphite [A. Rai, R. Schneider, M. Warrier, J. Nucl. Mater. (submitted for publication). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnucmat.2007.08.013.]. The deposits found on the leading edge of the neutralizer of Tore Supra are multi-scale in nature, consisting of micropores with typical size lower than 2 nm (∼11%), mesopores (∼5%) and macropores with a typical size more than 50 nm [C. Martin, M. Richou, W. Sakaily, B. Pegourie, C. Brosset, P. Roubin, J. Nucl. Mater. 363-365 (2007) 1251]. Kinetic Monte-Carlo (KMC) has been used to study the hydrogen transport at meso-scales. Recombination rate and the diffusion coefficient calculated at the meso-scale was used as an input to scale up and analyze the hydrogen transport at macro-scale. A combination of KMC and MCD (Monte-Carlo diffusion) method was used at macro-scales. Flux dependence of hydrogen recycling has been studied. The retention and re-emission analysis of the model has been extended to study the chemical erosion process based on the Kueppers-Hopf cycle [M. Wittmann, J. Kueppers, J. Nucl. Mater. 227 (1996) 186].

  7. An Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, Robers [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Dryer, Frederick [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Ju, Yiguang [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2013-09-30

    An integrated and collaborative effort involving experiments and complementary chemical kinetic modeling investigated the effects of significant concentrations of water and CO2 and minor contaminant species (methane [CH4], ethane [C2H6], NOX, etc.) on the ignition and combustion of HHC fuels. The research effort specifically addressed broadening the experimental data base for ignition delay, burning rate, and oxidation kinetics at high pressures, and further refinement of chemical kinetic models so as to develop compositional specifications related to the above major and minor species. The foundation for the chemical kinetic modeling was the well validated mechanism for hydrogen and carbon monoxide developed over the last 25 years by Professor Frederick Dryer and his co-workers at Princeton University. This research furthered advance the understanding needed to develop practical guidelines for realistic composition limits and operating characteristics for HHC fuels. A suite of experiments was utilized that that involved a high-pressure laminar flow reactor, a pressure-release type high-pressure combustion chamber and a high-pressure turbulent flow reactor.

  8. Palladium mixed-metal surface-modified AB5-type intermetallides enhance hydrogen sorption kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Denys

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface engineering approaches were adopted in the preparation of advanced hydrogen sorption materials, based on ‘low-temperature’, AB5-type intermetallides. The approaches investigated included micro-encapsulation with palladium and mixed-metal mantles using electroless plating. The influence of micro-encapsulation on the surface morphology and kinetics of hydrogen charging were investigated. It was found that palladium-nickel (Pd-Ni co-deposition by electroless plating significantly improved the kinetics of hydrogen charging of the AB5-type intermetallides at low hydrogen pressure and temperature, after long-term pre-exposure to air. The improvement in the kinetics of hydrogen charging was credited to a synergistic effect between the palladium and nickel atoms in the catalytic mantle and the formation of an ‘interfacial bridge’ for hydrogen diffusion by the nickel atoms in the deposited layer. The developed surface-modified materials may find application in highly selective hydrogen extraction, purification, and storage from impure hydrogen feeds.

  9. Kinetics of the hydrogen production reaction in a copper-chlorine water splitting plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2009-01-01

    The exothermic reaction of HCl with particulate Cu occurs during hydrogen production step in the thermochemical copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) water splitting cycle. In this paper, this chemical reaction is modeled kinetically, and a parametric study is performed to determine the influences of particle size, temperature and molar ratios on the reaction kinetics. It is determined that the residence time of copper particles varies between 10 and 100 s, depending on the operating conditions. The hydrogen conversion at equilibrium varies between 55 and 85%, depending on the reaction temperature. The heat flux at the particle surface, caused by the exothermic enthalpy of reaction, reaches about 3,000 W/m 2 when the particle shrinks to 0.1% from its initial size. A numerical algorithm is developed to solve the moving boundary Stefan problem with a chemical reaction. It predicts the shrinking of copper particles based on the hypothesis that the chemical reaction and heat transfer are decoupled. The model allows for estimation of the temperature of the copper particle, assumed spherical, in the radial direction. The maximum temperature at the interface is higher than the melting point of CuCl by 10-50 o C, depending on the assumed operating conditions. (author)

  10. Role of point defects and additives in kinetics of hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Walle, Chris

    2010-03-01

    First-principles computational studies of hydrogen interactions with storage materials can provide direct insight into the processes of H uptake and release, and may help in developing guidelines for designing storage media with improved storage capacity and kinetics. One important conclusion is that the defects involved in kinetics of semiconducting or insulating H-storage materials are charged, and hence their formation energy is Fermi-level dependent and can be affected by the presence of impurities that change the Fermi level [1,2]. This provides an explanation for the role played by transition-metal impurities in the kinetics of NaAlH4 and related materials. Desorption of H and decomposition of NaAlH4 requires not only mass transport of H but also of Al and/or Na. This process is mediated by native defects. We have investigated the structure, stability, and migration enthalpy of native defects based on density functional theory. The results allow us to estimate diffusion activation energies for the defects that may be involved in mass transport. Most of the relevant defects exist in charge states other than neutral, and consideration of these charge states is essential for a proper description of kinetics. We propose specific new mechanisms to explain the observed activation energies and their dependence on the presence of impurities. We have also expanded our studies to materials other than NaAlH4. In the case of LiBH4 and Li4BN3H10 we have found that the calculations have predictive power in terms of identifying which impurities will actually enhance kinetics. Other complex hydrides that we are currently investigating include Li2NH and LiNH2. [4pt] [1] A. Peles and C. G. Van de Walle, Phys. Rev. B 76, 214101 (2007). [0pt] [2] C. G. Van de Walle, A. Peles, A. Janotti, and G. B. Wilson-Short, Physica B 404, 793 (2009).

  11. A kinetic model for quantitative evaluation of the effect of hydrogen and osmolarity on hydrogen production by Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacchi Guido

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus has attracted increased interest as an industrial hydrogen (H2 producer. The aim of the present study was to develop a kinetic growth model for this extreme thermophile. The model is based on Monod kinetics supplemented with the inhibitory effects of H2 and osmotic pressure, as well as the liquid-to-gas mass transfer of H2. Results Mathematical expressions were developed to enable the simulation of microbial growth, substrate consumption and product formation. The model parameters were determined by fitting them to experimental data. The derived model corresponded well with experimental data from batch fermentations in which the stripping rates and substrate concentrations were varied. The model was used to simulate the inhibition of growth by H2 and solute concentrations, giving a critical dissolved H2 concentration of 2.2 mmol/L and an osmolarity of 0.27 to 29 mol/L. The inhibition by H2, being a function of the dissolved H2 concentration, was demonstrated to be mainly dependent on H2 productivity and mass transfer rate. The latter can be improved by increasing the stripping rate, thereby allowing higher H2 productivity. The experimentally determined degree of oversaturation of dissolved H2 was 12 to 34 times the equilibrium concentration and was comparable to the values given by the model. Conclusions The derived model is the first mechanistically based model for fermentative H2 production and provides useful information to improve the understanding of the growth behavior of C. saccharolyticus. The model can be used to determine optimal operating conditions for H2 production regarding the substrate concentration and the stripping rate.

  12. Kinetic modelling of slurry polymerization of ethylene with a polymer supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst (hydrogen)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shariati, A.

    1996-12-31

    The kinetics of polymerization of ethylene catalyzed by a polymer supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst were investigated in a semi-batch reactor system. The influences of six polymerization variables were investigated using a central composite design. The variables were monomer partial pressure, catalyst loading, co-catalyst loading, catalyst particle size and hydrogen to monomer ratio. The influence of temperature on rate and polymer properties were investigated. Empirical models were fitted to the experimental data to quantify the effects of the polymerization variables on the rate characteristics and polymer properties. The rate of polymerization exhibited a first order dependency with respect to monomer partial pressure, but a nonlinear relationship with respect to catalyst loading. In the absence of hydrogen, the polymerization rate showed a non-decaying profile at the centre point conditions for the other variables. Catalyst loading and catalyst particle size had a negligible effect on weight-and-number-average molecular weights, while increasing co-catalysts loading lowered the molecular weights, as did increased temperature and hydrogen concentration. refs., figs.

  13. Efficient hydrogen production on MoNi4 electrocatalysts with fast water dissociation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Tao; Liu, Pan; Liao, Zhongquan; Liu, Shaohua; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Chen, Mingwei; Zschech, Ehrenfried; Feng, Xinliang

    2017-05-01

    Various platinum-free electrocatalysts have been explored for hydrogen evolution reaction in acidic solutions. However, in economical water-alkali electrolysers, sluggish water dissociation kinetics (Volmer step) on platinum-free electrocatalysts results in poor hydrogen-production activities. Here we report a MoNi4 electrocatalyst supported by MoO2 cuboids on nickel foam (MoNi4/MoO2@Ni), which is constructed by controlling the outward diffusion of nickel atoms on annealing precursor NiMoO4 cuboids on nickel foam. Experimental and theoretical results confirm that a rapid Tafel-step-decided hydrogen evolution proceeds on MoNi4 electrocatalyst. As a result, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst exhibits zero onset overpotential, an overpotential of 15 mV at 10 mA cm-2 and a low Tafel slope of 30 mV per decade in 1 M potassium hydroxide electrolyte, which are comparable to the results for platinum and superior to those for state-of-the-art platinum-free electrocatalysts. Benefiting from its scalable preparation and stability, the MoNi4 electrocatalyst is promising for practical water-alkali electrolysers.

  14. Kinetic Modeling of a Silicon Refining Process in a Moist Hydrogen Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Morita, Kazuki

    2018-06-01

    We developed a kinetic model that considers both silicon loss and boron removal in a metallurgical grade silicon refining process. This model was based on the hypotheses of reversible reactions. The reaction rate coefficient kept the same form but error of terminal boron concentration could be introduced when relating irreversible reactions. Experimental data from published studies were used to develop a model that fit the existing data. At 1500 °C, our kinetic analysis suggested that refining silicon in a moist hydrogen atmosphere generates several primary volatile species, including SiO, SiH, HBO, and HBO2. Using the experimental data and the kinetic analysis of volatile species, we developed a model that predicts a linear relationship between the reaction rate coefficient k and both the quadratic function of p(H2O) and the square root of p(H2). Moreover, the model predicted the partial pressure values for the predominant volatile species and the prediction was confirmed by the thermodynamic calculations, indicating the reliability of the model. We believe this model provides a foundation for designing a silicon refining process with a fast boron removal rate and low silicon loss.

  15. Influence of the evaporation rate and the evaporation mode on the hydrogen sorption kinetics of air-exposed magnesium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, A.; Knystautas, E.J.; Huot, J.; Schulz, R.

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown that the hydrogen sorption properties of air-exposed magnesium films are influenced by the deposition parameters such as the evaporation rate or the evaporation mode used during their preparation. As the evaporation rate increases, the structure of the film tends to be highly oriented along the [002] direction and the kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption are faster. Moreover, the hydrogen sorption kinetics of magnesium films prepared with an electron beam source under a high vacuum are faster by almost a factor of two compared to those prepared using resistive heating under low vacuum. These two parameters reduce drastically the activation and the incubation period during hydrogen absorption and desorption, respectively

  16. Dispersive kinetic model for the non-isothermal reduction of nickel oxide by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adnadevic, Borivoj; Jankovic, Bojan

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of the non-isothermal reduction process of powder nickel oxide samples using hydrogen was investigated by temperature-programmed experiments at the different constant heating rates. The new procedure for the determination of density distribution function of activation energies (ddfE a ), evaluated from the experimentally obtained non-isothermal conversion curves, was developed. The analytical relationships between the corresponding thermo-kinetic parameters for the investigated reduction process were established. From the influence of heating rate on the basic characteristics of ddfE a 's, it was concluded that the evaluated ddfE a 's are completely independent of the heating rate (v h ). It was found that the value of activation energy at the peak of the distribution curve (E a,max ), at all considered heating rates, is in good agreement with the value of E a,0 (96.6 kJ mol -1 ) calculated from the isoconversional dependence of activation energy, in the conversion range of 0.20≤α≤0.60. From the appearances of the true compensation effect, it was concluded that the factor that produces the changes of kinetic parameter values is a conversion fraction (α). Using the model prediction, the experimentally obtained conversion curves are completely described by the evaluated distribution curves (g(E a ) vhj ) at all considered heating rates. It was concluded that the assumption about the distribution of potential energies of oxygen vacancies presented in NiO samples leads to the distribution of activation energies, which determine the kinetics of non-isothermal reduction processes

  17. Modeling of hydrogen production methods: Single particle model and kinetics assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.S.; Bellan, J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The investigation carried out by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is devoted to the modeling of biomass pyrolysis reactors producing an oil vapor (tar) which is a precursor to hydrogen. This is an informal collaboration with NREL whereby JPL uses the experimentally-generated NREL data both as initial and boundary conditions for the calculations, and as a benchmark for model validation. The goal of this investigation is to find drivers of biomass fast-pyrolysis in the low temperature regime. The rationale is that experimental observations produce sparse discrete conditions for model validation, and that numerical simulations produced with a validated model are an economic way to find control parameters and an optimal operation regime, thereby circumventing costly changes in hardware and tests. During this first year of the investigation, a detailed mathematical model has been formulated for the temporal and spatial accurate modeling of solid-fluid reactions in biomass particles. These are porous particles for which volumetric reaction rate data is known a priori and both the porosity and the permeability of the particle are large enough to allow for continuous gas phase flow. The methodology has been applied to the pyrolysis of spherically symmetric biomass particles by considering previously published kinetics schemes for both cellulose and wood. The results show that models which neglect the thermal and species boundary layers exterior to the particle will generally over predict both the pyrolysis rates and experimentally obtainable tar yields. An evaluation of the simulation results through comparisons with experimental data indicates that while the cellulose kinetics is reasonably accurate, the wood pyrolysis kinetics is not accurate; particularly at high reactor temperatures. Current effort in collaboration with NREL is aimed at finding accurate wood kinetics.

  18. Improving the Kinetics and Thermodynamics of Mg(BH4)2 for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brandon [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Klebanoff, Lennie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Stavila, Vitalie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Heo, Tae Wook [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ray, Keith [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lee, Jonathan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Baker, Alex [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kang, ShinYoung [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yu, Hui-Chia [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Thornton, Katsuyo [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-10-31

    The objective of this project is to (1) combine theory, synthesis, and characterization across multiple scales to understand the intrinsic kinetic and thermodynamic limitations in MgB2/Mg(BH4)2; (2) construct and apply a flexible, validated, multiscale theoretical framework for modeling (de)hydrogenation kinetics of the Mg-B-H system and related metal hydrides; and (3) devise strategies for improving kinetics and thermodynamics, particularly through nanostructuring and doping. The project has an emphasis on understanding and improving rehydrogenation of MgB2, which has generally been less explored and is key to enabling practical use.

  19. Simulation of uranium oxides reduction kinetics by hydrogen. Reactivities of germination and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, C.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is to simulate the reduction by hydrogen of the tri-uranium octo-oxide U 3 O 8 (obtained by uranium trioxide calcination) into uranium dioxide. The kinetics curves have been obtained by thermal gravimetric analysis, the hydrogen and steam pressures being defined. The geometrical modeling which has allowed to explain the trend of the kinetics curves and of the velocity curves is an anisotropic germination-growth modeling. The powder is supposed to be formed of spherical grains with the same radius. The germs of the new UO 2 phase appear at the surface of the U 3 O 8 grains with a specific germination frequency. The growth reactivity is anisotropic and is very large in the tangential direction to the grains surface. Then, the uranium dioxide growths inside the grain and the limiting step is the grain surface. The variations of the growth reactivity and of the germination specific frequency in terms of the gases partial pressures and of the temperature have been explained by two different mechanisms. The limiting step of the growth mechanism is the desorption of water in the uranium dioxide surface. Concerning the germination mechanism the limiting step is a water desorption too but in the tri-uranium octo-oxide surface. The same geometrical modeling and the same germination and growth mechanisms have been applied to the reduction of a tri-uranium octo-oxide obtained by calcination of hydrated uranium trioxide. The values of the germination specific frequency of this solid are nevertheless weaker than those of the solid obtained by direct calcination of the uranium trioxide. (O.M.)

  20. The impact of surface composition on Tafel kinetics leading to enhanced electrochemical insertion of hydrogen in palladium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriyeva, Olga; Hamm, Steven C.; Knies, David L.; Cantwell, Richard; McConnell, Matt

    2018-05-01

    Our previous work experimentally demonstrated the enhancement of electrochemical hydrogen insertion into palladium by modifying the chemical composition of the cathode surface with Pb, Pt and Bi, referred to as surface promoters. The experiment demonstrated that an optimal combination of the surface promoters led to an increase in hydrogen fugacity of more than three orders of magnitude, while maintaining the same current density. This manuscript discusses the application of Density Functional Theory (DFT) to elucidate the thermodynamics and kinetics of observed enhancement of electrochemical hydrogen insertion into palladium. We present theoretical simulations that: (1) establish the elevation of hydrogen's chemical potential on Pb and Bi surfaces to enhance hydrogen insertion, (2) confirm the increase of a Tafel activation barrier that results in a decrease of the reaction rate at the given hydrogen overpotential, and (3) explain why the surface promoter's coverage needs to be non-uniform, namely to allow hydrogen insertion into palladium bulk while simultaneously locking hydrogen below the surface (the corking effect). The discussed DFT-based method can be used for efficient scanning of different material configurations to design a highly effective hydrogen storage system.

  1. Kinetic modeling of levulinic acid hydrogenation to gamma-valerolactone in water using a carbon supported Ru catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piskun, A.S.; van de Bovenkamp, H.H.; Rasrendra, C.B.; Winkelman, J.G.M.; Heeres, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    gamma-Valerolactone (GVL) is considered a very interesting green, bio-based platform chemical with highapplication potential for the production of both biofuels and biobased chemicals. In this contribution, wereport a kinetic study on the hydrogenation of levulinic acid (LA) to 4-hydroxypentanoic

  2. Unravelling the dependence of hydrogen oxidation kinetics on the size of Pt nanoparticles by in operando nanoplasmonic temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wettergren, Kristina; Hellman, Anders; Cavalca, Filippo Carlo

    2015-01-01

    We use a noninvasive nanoscale optical-temperature measurement method based on localized surface plasmon resonance to investigate the particle size-dependence of the hydrogen oxidation reaction kinetics on model supported Pt nanocatalysts at atmospheric pressure in operando. With decreasing average...

  3. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Y. [Nuclear Research Center–Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Moreh, R. [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Shchur, Ya. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, 1 Svientsitskii str., L’viv 79011 (Ukraine)

    2016-02-07

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance R{sub OO}, being a measure of the HB strength.

  4. On the mean kinetic energy of the proton in strong hydrogen bonded systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.; Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K.; Shchur, Ya.

    2016-01-01

    The mean atomic kinetic energies of the proton, Ke(H), and of the deuteron, Ke(D), were calculated in moderate and strongly hydrogen bonded (HB) systems, such as the ferro-electric crystals of the KDP type (XH 2 PO 4 , X = K, Cs, Rb, Tl), the DKDP (XD 2 PO 4 , X = K, Cs, Rb) type, and the X 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 superprotonic conductors (X = K, Rb). All calculations utilized the simulated partial phonon density of states, deduced from density functional theory based first-principle calculations and from empirical lattice dynamics simulations in which the Coulomb, short range, covalent, and van der Waals interactions were accounted for. The presently calculated Ke(H) values for the two systems were found to be in excellent agreement with published values obtained by deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements carried out using the VESUVIO instrument of the Rutherford Laboratory, UK. The Ke(H) values of the M 3 H(SO 4 ) 2 compounds, in which the hydrogen bonds are centro-symmetric, are much lower than those of the KDP type crystals, in direct consistency with the oxygen-oxygen distance R OO , being a measure of the HB strength

  5. Kinetics of isotopic exchange of [1-3H]saccharides with hydrogen using palladium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Kayumov, V.G.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kaminskij, Yu.L.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics was studied of the isotopic exchange of [1- 3 H]saccharides with hydrogen on palladium catalysts. The effect was studied of different factors on the rate of isotopic exchange, e.g., of the composition and structure of saccharides, their concentration in the solution (C), the type of catalyst and of the buffer solution. It was found that by reduced rate of isotopic exchange with hydrogen, all studied saccharides may be arranged into a series independent of the type of catalyst in accordance with the sequence of declining coefficient of relative mobility of l-H atoms during the reaction. Linear dependence was found to exist between the rate constant of the isotopic exchange reaction (r) and the coefficient of relative lability. It was also found that in the range of low concentrations the observed rate constants of isotopic exchange were not dependent on concentration and in the range of higher concentrations, r decreased with increasing C. This character of dependence is justified by the side effect of the processes of sorption on the catalyst. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 4 refs

  6. Kinetics of Natural Detoxification of Hydrogen Cyanide Contained In Retted Cassava Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the kinetics of natural detoxification of hydrogen cyanide contained in retted cassava roots. Retting is traditional fermentation of cassava, performed to soften the roots. During retting, cyanide diffuses into water used for the retting. The fresh cassava roots (bitter and sweet varieties used for this experiment were separately retted at ambient 0 temperature of 30 C. The cyanide content and pH were monitored daily. From the analysis of the experimental results, a first order consecutive rate equation is an adequate tool for explaining the mechanism of HCN reduction (or decay in retted cassava roots. The detoxification constants for the bound cyanide in the bitter and sweet cassava roots were 0.378/day and 0.438/day respectively, while that of the free hydrogen cyanide were 0.63/day and 0.74/day for the bitter and sweet varieties respectively. Cassava tubers from different species cannot be fermented with the same retting condition unless they have same or close functional properties.

  7. Proton NMR investigation of heme pocket mobility in hemoglobin via hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic mobility of heme cavity, the active site of Hb, was investigated by analyzing the hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of the proximal histidyl ring NH of various kinds of Hbs with the aid of the high field Fourier Transform 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The exchange reaction occurs faster in oxy or R-state Hb than in deoxy or T-state Hb and there exists a good correlation between the oxygen affinity of Hb and the heme pocket mobility reflected in the hydrogen exchange rate. The effect of pH on the exchange is dramatically different for the two subunits of Hb A. Studying the exchange characteristics of mutant Hbs and chemically modified Hbs not only showed the existence of three well-defined localized paths for transmission of conformational changes between different heme pockets through a 1 b 2 subunit interface, but also indicated that the heme pocket mobility is regulated by the quaternary state of Hb as well as by the ligation state of Hb. Finally, the effect of the quaternary state on the heme pocket mobility is separated from that of the ligation by following the exchange reactions in Hbs where only their quaternary structure transition can be achieved without changing their ligation states by adjusting experimental conditions such as adding inositol hexaphosphate

  8. Real-time hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics via supercharged electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Harry J; Williams, Evan R

    2010-11-01

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) rate constants of bovine ubiquitin in an ammonium acetate solution containing 1% of the electrospray ionization (ESI) "supercharging" reagent m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) were obtained using top-down, electron transfer dissociation (ETD) tandem mass spectrometry (MS). The supercharging reagent replaces the acid and temperature "quench" step in the conventional MS approach to HDX experiments by causing rapid protein denaturation to occur in the ESI droplet. The higher charge state ions that are produced with m-NBA are more unfolded, as measured by ion mobility, and result in higher fragmentation efficiency and higher sequence coverage with ETD. Single amino acid resolution was obtained for 44 of 72 exchangeable amide sites, and summed kinetic data were obtained for regions of the protein where adjacent fragment ions were not observed, resulting in an overall spatial resolution of 1.3 residues. Comparison of these results with previous values from NMR indicates that the supercharging reagent does not cause significant structural changes to the protein in the initial ESI solution and that scrambling or back-exchange is minimal. This new method for top-down HDX-MS enables real-time kinetic data measurements under physiological conditions, similar to those obtained using NMR, with comparable spatial resolution and significantly better sensitivity.

  9. Understanding the Relationship Between Kinetics and Thermodynamics in CO 2 Hydrogenation Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeletic, Matthew S. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Hulley, Elliott B. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Helm, Monte L. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Mock, Michael T. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Appel, Aaron M. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Wiedner, Eric S. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Linehan, John C. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States

    2017-08-14

    Linear free-energy relationships have been identified that link the kinetic activity for catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to formate with the thermodynamic driving force for the rate-limiting steps of catalysis. Cobalt and rhodium bis(diphosphine) complexes with different hydricities (G°H-), acidities (pKa), and free energies for H2 addition (G°H2) were examined. Catalytic CO2 hydrogenation was studied under 1.8 and 20 atm of pressure (1:1 CO2:H2) at room temperature in tetrahydrofuran with a spread of turnover frequencies (TOF) ranging from 0 to 74,000 h-1. The catalysis was followed by 1H and 31P NMR in real time under all conditions to yield information about the rate determining step. Catalysts exhibiting the highest activities were found to have hydride transfer and hydrogen addition steps that were each downhill by approximately 6 to 7 kcal/mol, and the deprotonation step was thermoneutral. The research by M.S.J., A.M.A., E.S.W., and J.C.L. was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The research by E.B.H., M.L.H., and M.T.M. (X-ray crystallography, synthesis) was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The authors thank Dr. Samantha A. Burgess for assistance in collecting cyclic voltammetry data. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Enhanced hydrogen reaction kinetics of nanostructured Mg-based composites with nanoparticle metal catalysts dispersed on supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Yeong; Tuck, Mark; Kondakindi, Rajender; Seo, Chan-Yeol; Dehouche, Zahir; Belkacemi, Khaled

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen reaction kinetics of nanocrystalline MgH 2 co-catalyzed with Ba 3 (Ca 1+x Nb 2-x )O 9-δ (BCN) proton conductive ceramics and nanoparticle bimetallic catalyst of Ni/Pd dispersed on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) support has been investigated. The nanoparticle bimetallic catalysts of Ni/Pd supported by SWNTs were synthesized based on a novel polyol method using NiCl 2 .6H 2 O, PdCl 2 , NaOH and ethylene glycol (EG). The nanostructured Mg composites co-catalyzed with BCN and bimetallic supported catalysts exhibited stable hydrogen desorption capacity of 6.3-6.7 wt.% H 2 and the significant enhancement of hydrogen desorption kinetics at 230-300 deg. C in comparison to either non-catalyzed MgH 2 or the nanocomposite of MgH 2 catalyzed with BCN

  11. Kinetic Studies on State of the Art Solid Oxide Cells – A Comparison between Hydrogen/Steam and Reformate Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Graves, Christopher R.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigated – hydrogen/steam and refor......Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigated – hydrogen....../steam fuel split into two processes with opposing temperature behavior in the reformate fuels. An 87.5% reduction in active electrode area diminishes the gas conversion impedance in the hydrogen/steam fuel at high fuel flow rates. In both reformates, the second and third lowest frequency processes merged...

  12. Hydrogen absorption kinetics and structural properties of Mg85Ni10Ca5 and Mg90Ni10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masakazu; Saito, Katsushi; Towata, Shin-ichi

    2005-01-01

    Mg 85 Ni 10 Ca 5 and Mg 90 Ni 10 were prepared by melting mixtures of the elements in mild steel crucibles and pouring them into copper molds. Hydrogen absorption kinetics and structural properties of the alloys were characterized by the volumetric method using a Sievert's apparatus, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystallite size of Mg in Mg 85 Ni 10 Ca 5 , which is evaluated by XRD peak broadening, is about 50% smaller than that in Mg 90 Ni 10 . In addition, the nanometer-scale structure composed of Mg, Mg 2 Ni, Mg 2 Ca was observed in Mg 85 Ni 10 Ca 5 . Mg 85 Ni 10 Ca 5 shows better hydrogen absorption kinetics than Mg 90 Ni 10 in the temperature range of room temperature to 573 K. The better absorption kinetics of Mg 85 Ni 10 Ca 5 is mainly attributed to the nanometer-scale structure

  13. Kinetic Modeling of Methionine Oxidation in Monoclonal Antibodies from Hydrogen Peroxide Spiking Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Ada; Lam, Xanthe M; Kuehl, Christopher; Grauschopf, Ulla; Wang, Y John

    2015-01-01

    When isolator technology is applied to biotechnology drug product fill-finish process, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) spiking studies for the determination of the sensitivity of protein to residual peroxide in the isolator can be useful for assessing a maximum vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP) level. When monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug products were spiked with H2O2, an increase in methionine (Met 252 and Met 428) oxidation in the Fc region of the mAbs with a decrease in H2O2 concentration was observed for various levels of spiked-in peroxide. The reaction between Fc-Met and H2O2 was stoichiometric (i.e., 1:1 molar ratio), and the reaction rate was dependent on the concentrations of mAb and H2O2. The consumption of H2O2 by Fc-Met oxidation in the mAb followed pseudo first-order kinetics, and the rate was proportional to mAb concentration. The extent of Met 428 oxidation was half of that of Met 252, supporting that Met 252 is twice as reactive as Met 428. Similar results were observed for free L-methionine when spiked with H2O2. However, mAb formulation excipients may affect the rate of H2O2 consumption. mAb formulations containing trehalose or sucrose had faster H2O2 consumption rates than formulations without the sugars, which could be the result of impurities (e.g., metal ions) present in the excipients that may act as catalysts. Based on the H2O2 spiking study results, we can predict the amount Fc-Met oxidation for a given protein concentration and H2O2 level. Our kinetic modeling of the reaction between Fc-Met oxidation and H2O2 provides an outline to design a H2O2 spiking study to support the use of VPHP isolator for antibody drug product manufacture. Isolator technology is increasing used in drug product manufacturing of biotherapeutics. In order to understand the impact of residual vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP) levels on protein product quality, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) spiking studies may be performed to determine the sensitivity of monoclonal antibody

  14. The use of desorbing agents in electrodialytic remediation of harbour sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrøm, Gunvor Marie; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2006-01-01

    Electrodialytic removal of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd from contaminated harbour sediment was made with the emphasis of testing the effectiveness of different desorbing agents: HCl, NaCl, citric acid, lactic acid, ammonium citrate and distilled water. Extraction experiments with the desorbing agents were...

  15. Field-controlled electron transfer and reaction kinetics of the biological catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongki Choi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Controlled reaction kinetics of the bio-catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide has been achieved using an electrostatic technique. The technique allowed independent control of 1 the thermodynamics of the system using electrochemical setup and 2 the quantum mechanical tunneling at the interface between microperoxidase-11 and the working electrode by applying a gating voltage to the electrode. The cathodic currents of electrodes immobilized with microperoxidase-11 showed a dependence on the gating voltage in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, indicating a controllable reduction reaction. The measured kinetic parameters of the bio-catalytic reduction showed nonlinear dependences on the gating voltage as the result of modified interfacial electron tunnel due to the field induced at the microperoxidase-11-electrode interface. Our results indicate that the kinetics of the reduction of hydrogen peroxide can be controlled by a gating voltage and illustrate the operation of a field-effect bio-catalytic transistor, whose current-generating mechanism is the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water with the current being controlled by the gating voltage.

  16. Kinetic analysis on photocatalytic degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide on nanosized porous TiO2 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iis Sopyan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the UV illumination-assisted degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, hydrogen sulfide, and ammonia on highly active nanostructured-anatase and rutile films were investigated. It was found that the anatase film showed a higher photocatalytic activity than the counterpart did, however, the magnitude of difference in the photocatalytic activity of both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide. To elucidate the reasons for the observation, the adsorption characteristics and the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of the three reactants on both films were analyzed. The adsorption analysis examined using a simple Langmuir isotherm, showed that adsorbability on both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide, which can be explained in terms of the decreasing electron-donor capacity. Acetaldehyde and ammonia adsorbed more strongly and with higher coverage on anatase film (1.2 and 5.6 molecules/nm2, respectively than on rutile (0.6 and 4.7 molecules/nm2, respectively. Conversely, hydrogen sulfide molecules adsorbed more strongly on rutile film (0.7 molecules/nm2 than on anatase (0.4 molecules/nm2. Exposure to UV light illumination brought about the photocatalytic oxidation of the three gases in contact with both TiO2 films, and the decrease in concentration were measured, and their kinetics are analyzed in terms of the Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetic model. From the kinetic analysis, it was found that the anatase film showed the photocatalytic activities that were factors of ~8 and ~5 higher than the rutile film for the degradation of gaseous ammonia and acetaldehyde, respectively. However, the activity was only a factor of ~1.5 higher for the photodegradation of hydrogen sulfide. These observations are systematically explained by the charge separation efficiency and the adsorption characteristics of each catalyst as well as by the physical and electrochemical properties of each

  17. Co-fermentation of sewage sludge with ryegrass for enhancing hydrogen production: Performance evaluation and kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-11-01

    The low C/N ratio and low carbohydrate content of sewage sludge limit its application for fermentative hydrogen production. In this study, perennial ryegrass was added as the co-substrate into sludge hydrogen fermentation with different mixing ratios for enhancing hydrogen production. The results showed that the highest hydrogen yield of 60mL/g-volatile solids (VS) added was achieved when sludge/perennial ryegrass ratio was 30:70, which was 5 times higher than that from sole sludge. The highest VS removal of 21.8% was also achieved when sludge/perennial ryegrass ratio was 30:70, whereas VS removal from sole sludge was only 0.7%. Meanwhile, the co-fermentation system simultaneously improved hydrogen production efficiency and organics utilization of ryegrass. Kinetic analysis showed that the Cone model fitted hydrogen evolution better than the modified Gompertz model. Furthermore, hydrogen yield and VS removal increased with the increase of dehydrogenase activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and its protein complex by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Antina, E. V.

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study of oxidation reactions of bilirubin and its complex with albumin was carried out in aqueous solutions under the action of hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen at different pH values. Free radical oxidation of the pigment in both free and bound forms at pH 7.4 was shown not to lead to the formation of biliverdin, but to be associated with the decomposition of the tetrapyrrole chromophore into monopyrrolic products. The effective and true rate constants of the reactions under study were determined. It was assumed that one possible mechanism of the oxidation reaction is associated with the interaction of peroxyl radicals and protons of the NH groups of bilirubin molecules at the limiting stage with the formation of a highly reactive radical intermediate. The binding of bilirubin with albumin was found to result in a considerable reduction in the rate of the oxidation reaction associated with the kinetic manifestation of the protein protection effect. It was found that the autoxidation of bilirubin by molecular oxygen with the formation of biliverdin at the intermediate stage can be observed with an increase in the pH of solutions.

  19. Correlation between Gas Bubble Formation and Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Kinetics at Nanoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianjin; Luo, Long

    2018-04-17

    We report the correlation between H 2 gas bubble formation potential and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) activity for Au and Pt nanodisk electrodes (NEs). Microkinetic models were formulated to obtain the HER kinetic information for individual Au and Pt NEs. We found that the rate-determining steps for the HER at Au and Pt NEs were the Volmer step and the Heyrovsky step, respectively. More interestingly, the standard rate constant ( k 0 ) of the rate-determining step was found to vary over 2 orders of magnitude for the same type of NEs. The observed variations indicate the HER activity heterogeneity at the nanoscale. Furthermore, we discovered a linear relationship between bubble formation potential ( E bubble ) and log( k 0 ) with a slope of 125 mV/decade for both Au and Pt NEs. As log ( k 0 ) increases, E bubble shifts linearly to more positive potentials, meaning NEs with higher HER activities form H 2 bubbles at less negative potentials. Our theoretical model suggests that such linear relationship is caused by the similar critical bubble formation condition for Au and Pt NEs with varied sizes. Our results have potential implications for using gas bubble formation to evaluate the HER activity distribution of nanoparticles in an ensemble.

  20. Two-dimensional kinetic model for the evaporation of hydrogen pellets in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, B.V.; Umov, A.P.; Tsendin, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of the evaporation of a hydrogen fuel pellet in a hot plasma is solved for the case with a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution and a nonuniform evaporation over the surface of the pellet. An expression derived for the evaporation rate N describes this rate within 10% as a function of the temperature, the plasma density, and the pellet radius. The values found for N are only slightly higher than the values calculated in the model of Parks et al. [Nucl. Fusion 17, 539 (1977)], Milora and Foster [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 6, 578, (1978)], and Parks and Turnbull [Phys. Fluids 21, 1735 (1978)]. The reason is a mutual cancellation of some factors ignored in that model: the electron distribution as a function of energy and angle and the nonuniformity of the evaporation. In a kinetic model, the heat flux to the pellet is carried by electrons with an initial energy (6--8)T/sub e/. This circumstance explains why the electric fields have only a weak effect on the evaporation rate near the surface. A refined model is used to calculate the evaporation rates in existing devices

  1. Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Kinetics of Nanocrystalline and Amorphous Mg2Ni-type Alloy by Melt Spinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ping Ren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mg2Ni-type Mg2Ni1−xCox (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 alloys were fabricated by melt spinning technique. The structures of the as-spun alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of the alloys were measured by an automatically controlled Sieverts apparatus. The electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics of the as-spun alloys was tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. The results show that the as-spun (x = 0.1 alloy exhibits a typical nanocrystalline structure, while the as-spun (x = 0.4 alloy displays a nanocrystalline and amorphous structure, confirming that the substitution of Co for Ni notably intensifies the glass forming ability of the Mg2Ni-type alloy. The melt spinning treatment notably improves the hydriding and dehydriding kinetics as well as the high rate discharge ability (HRD of the alloys. With an increase in the spinning rate from 0 (as-cast is defined as spinning rate of 0 m/s to 30 m/s, the hydrogen absorption saturation ratio ( of the (x = 0.4 alloy increases from 77.1 to 93.5%, the hydrogen desorption ratio ( from 54.5 to 70.2%, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient (D from 0.75 × 10−11 to 3.88 × 10−11 cm2/s and the limiting current density IL from 150.9 to 887.4 mA/g.

  2. Kinetics of the decomposition and the estimation of the stability of 10% aqueous and non-aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zun Maria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the stability of 10% hydrogen peroxide aqueous and non-aqueous solutions with the addition of 6% (w/w of urea was evaluated. The solutions were stored at 20°C, 30°C and 40°C, and the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide proceeded according to first-order kinetics. With the addition of the urea in the solutions, the decomposition rate constant increased and the activation energy decreased. The temperature of storage also affected the decomposition of substance, however, 10% hydrogen peroxide solutions prepared in PEG-300, and stabilized with the addition of 6% (w/w of urea had the best constancy.

  3. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Kinetic Study of 2-Methylfuran and 2,5-Dimethylfuran Hydrogenation over 7 nm Platinum Cubic Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Aliaga, Cesar; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Alayoglu, Selim; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2011-01-01

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements obtained from gas chromatography were used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) over cubic Pt nanoparticles of 7 nm

  4. An investigation on hydrogen storage kinetics of nanocrystalline and amorphous Mg2Ni1-xCox (x = 0-0.4) alloy prepared by melt spinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yanghuan; Li Baowei; Ren Huipin; Ding Xiaoxia; Liu Xiaogang; Chen Lele

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The investigation of the structures of the Mg 2 Ni 1-x Co x (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) alloys indicates that a nanocrystalline and amorphous structure can be obtained in the experiment alloys by melt spinning technology. The substitution of Co for Ni facilitates the glass formation in the Mg 2 Ni-type alloy. And the amorphization degree of the alloys visibly increases with increasing Co content. → Both the melt spinning and Co substitution significantly improve the hydrogen storage kinetics of the alloys. The hydrogen absorption saturation ratio (R t a ) and hydrogen desorption ratio (R t d ) as well as the high rate discharge ability (HRD) increase with rising spinning rate and Co content. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient (D), the Tafel polarization curves and the electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) measurements show that the electrochemical kinetics notably increases with rising spinning rate and Co content. → Furthermore, all the as-spun alloys, when the spinning rate reaches to 30 m/s, have nearly same hydrogen absorption kinetics, indicating that the hydrogen absorption kinetics of the as-spun alloy is predominately controlled by diffusion ability of hydrogen atoms. - Abstract: In order to improve the hydrogen storage kinetics of the Mg 2 Ni-type alloys, Ni in the alloy was partially substituted by element Co, and melt-spinning technology was used for the preparation of the Mg 2 Ni 1-x Co x (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) hydrogen storage alloys. The structures of the as-cast and spun alloys are characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. The hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics of the alloys were measured by an automatically controlled Sieverts apparatus. The electrochemical hydrogen storage kinetics of the as-spun alloys is tested by an automatic galvanostatic system. The hydrogen diffusion coefficients in the alloys are calculated by virtue of potential-step method. The electrochemical impedance spectrums (EIS) and the Tafel

  5. A Kinetic Platform to Determine the Fate of Hydrogen Peroxide in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin J Adolfsen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is used by phagocytic cells of the innate immune response to kill engulfed bacteria. H2O2 diffuses freely into bacteria, where it can wreak havoc on sensitive biomolecules if it is not rapidly detoxified. Accordingly, bacteria have evolved numerous systems to defend themselves against H2O2, and the importance of these systems to pathogenesis has been substantiated by the many bacteria that require them to establish or sustain infections. The kinetic competition for H2O2 within bacteria is complex, which suggests that quantitative models will improve interpretation and prediction of network behavior. To date, such models have been of limited scope, and this inspired us to construct a quantitative, systems-level model of H2O2 detoxification in Escherichia coli that includes detoxification enzymes, H2O2-dependent transcriptional regulation, enzyme degradation, the Fenton reaction and damage caused by •OH, oxidation of biomolecules by H2O2, and repair processes. After using an iterative computational and experimental procedure to train the model, we leveraged it to predict how H2O2 detoxification would change in response to an environmental perturbation that pathogens encounter within host phagosomes, carbon source deprivation, which leads to translational inhibition and limited availability of NADH. We found that the model accurately predicted that NADH depletion would delay clearance at low H2O2 concentrations and that detoxification at higher concentrations would resemble that of carbon-replete conditions. These results suggest that protein synthesis during bolus H2O2 stress does not affect clearance dynamics and that access to catabolites only matters at low H2O2 concentrations. We anticipate that this model will serve as a computational tool for the quantitative exploration and dissection of oxidative stress in bacteria, and that the model and methods used to develop it will provide important templates for the

  6. Hydrogen absorption kinetics of niobium with an ion-plated nickel overlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, K.

    1981-01-01

    The hydrogen absorption rate for nickel-ion-plated niobium was measured as a function of hydrogen pressure and temperature. The observed absorption curves of c(mean)/csub(e) against time (c(mean) and csub(e) are the mean and equilibrium hydrogen concentrations respectively) exhibited a marked hydrogen pressure dependence below 628 K but this was less marked above 723 K. The results were analysed on the basis of the proposed model that the rate-determining step is the hydrogen permeation through the nickel overlayer and that the permeation is driven by the hydrogen activity difference between the two interfaces, namely the H 2 -Ni and Ni-Nb interfaces. The marked pressure dependence can be attributed to the fact that the hydrogen activity coefficient in nickel is constant and that in niobium it varies markedly with concentration, i.e. with hydrogen pressure and temperature. It was also found that the change in the nickel overlayer structure caused by the dilatation of bulk niobium during hydrogen absorption enhances the hydrogen absorption rates. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen absorption rate is also discussed in comparison with that for tantalum with a vacuum-deposited nickel overlayer. (Auth.)

  7. Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation into Higher Hydrocarbons and Oxygenates: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Bounds and Progress with Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Gonzalo

    2017-03-22

    Under specific scenarios, the catalytic hydrogenation of CO 2 with renewable hydrogen is considered a suitable route for the chemical recycling of this environmentally harmful and chemically refractory molecule into added-value energy carriers and chemicals. The hydrogenation of CO 2 into C 1 products, such as methane and methanol, can be achieved with high selectivities towards the corresponding hydrogenation product. More challenging, however, is the selective production of high (C 2+ ) hydrocarbons and oxygenates. These products are desired as energy vectors, owing to their higher volumetric energy density and compatibility with the current fuel infrastructure than C 1 compounds, and as entry platform chemicals for existing value chains. The major challenge is the optimal integration of catalytic functionalities for both reductive and chain-growth steps. This Minireview summarizes the progress achieved towards the hydrogenation of CO 2 to C 2+ hydrocarbons and oxygenates, covering both solid and molecular catalysts and processes in the gas and liquid phases. Mechanistic aspects are discussed with emphasis on intrinsic kinetic limitations, in some cases inevitably linked to thermodynamic bounds through the concomitant reverse water-gas-shift reaction, which should be considered in the development of advanced catalysts and processes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Study on the effects of titanium oxide based nanomaterials as catalysts on the hydrogen sorption kinetics of magnesium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Anderson de Farias; Jardim, Paula Mendes; Santos, Dilson Silva dos, E-mail: anderso.n@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Conceicao, Monique Osorio Talarico da [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda (UniFOA), RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Magnesium hydride is highly attractive for hydrogen storage in solid state in reason of its high gravimetric capacity (7,6 wt% of H{sub 2}) and low density (1,7 g/cm³), making it a promissory candidate for mobile applications [1]. However, its low sorption kinetics and desorption temperature are the main obstacles for its application. In the present study the catalytic role of TiO{sub 2} based nanomaterials with different morphologies on the sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2} was evaluated. The additions consisted on titanate nanotubes (TTNT-Low), TiO{sub 2} nanorods (TTNT-550) and nanoparticles (KA-100, TTNT-ACID). Transmission and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (S/TEM) associated with X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) mapping was used to characterize the catalysts' morphology and crystalline structure and their dispersion within magnesium hydride, altogether with other characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and BET technique for structure and surface area analysis. The sorption kinetics were evaluated by means of a volumetric gas absorption/desorption (Sievert-type) apparatus. The results indicated that all additives improved the sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}, but the samples with TTNT-550 (TiO{sub 2} nanorods) and TTNT-ACID (TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles) presented the best and the second best performances, respectively, suggesting that the 1D morphology may promote a slightly superior kinetics than particulate catalysts. (author)

  9. Study of hydrogen mobility by hydrogen-deuterium exchange. II. Theoretical kinetic study in alkyl and amino-alkyl pyrimidines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pompon, Alain

    1975-01-01

    Alkyl groups bound to the pyrimidine ring can be deuterium substituted on the carbon adjacent to the ring, in acidic D 2 O; kinetic equations corresponding to various exchange mechanism hypothesis are established. It is shown that theoretical and experimental results can be compared in order to precise the mechanism and to measure the characteristic parameters of the exchange reaction [fr

  10. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H](4+) ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å(2) and 446 Å(2); the [M + 3H](3+) ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å(2) and 367 Å(2). Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H](3+) ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H](4+) ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H](4+) ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  11. Kinetics of Oxidation of Cobalt(III Complexes of a Acids by Hydrogen Peroxide in the Presence of Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide oxidation of pentaamminecobalt(III complexes of α-hydroxy acids at 35°C in micellar medium has been attempted. In this reaction the rate of oxidation shows first order kinetics each in [cobalt(III] and [H2O2]. Hydrogen peroxide induced electron transfer in [(NH35 CoIII-L]2+ complexes of α-hydroxy acids readily yields 100% of cobalt(II with nearly 100% of C-C bond cleavage products suggesting that it behaves mainly as one equivalent oxidant in micellar medium. With unbound ligand also it behaves only as C-C cleavage agent rather than C-H cleavage agent. With increasing micellar concentration an increase in the rate is observed.

  12. Chemical Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Allylic Sites by 3O2; Implications for Combustion Modeling and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Simmie, John M; Somers, Kieran P; Goldsmith, C Franklin; Curran, Henry J

    2017-03-09

    Hydrogen atom abstraction from allylic C-H bonds by molecular oxygen plays a very important role in determining the reactivity of fuel molecules having allylic hydrogen atoms. Rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction by molecular oxygen from molecules with allylic sites have been calculated. A series of molecules with primary, secondary, tertiary, and super secondary allylic hydrogen atoms of alkene, furan, and alkylbenzene families are taken into consideration. Those molecules include propene, 2-butene, isobutene, 2-methylfuran, and toluene containing the primary allylic hydrogen atom; 1-butene, 1-pentene, 2-ethylfuran, ethylbenzene, and n-propylbenzene containing the secondary allylic hydrogen atom; 3-methyl-1-butene, 2-isopropylfuran, and isopropylbenzene containing tertiary allylic hydrogen atom; and 1-4-pentadiene containing super allylic secondary hydrogen atoms. The M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory was used to optimize the geometries of all of the reactants, transition states, products and also the hinder rotation treatments for lower frequency modes. The G4 level of theory was used to calculate the electronic single point energies for those species to determine the 0 K barriers to reaction. Conventional transition state theory with Eckart tunnelling corrections was used to calculate the rate constants. The comparison between our calculated rate constants with the available experimental results from the literature shows good agreement for the reactions of propene and isobutene with molecular oxygen. The rate constant for toluene with O 2 is about an order magnitude slower than that experimentally derived from a comprehensive model proposed by Oehlschlaeger and coauthors. The results clearly indicate the need for a more detailed investigation of the combustion kinetics of toluene oxidation and its key pyrolysis and oxidation intermediates. Despite this, our computed barriers and rate constants retain an important internal consistency. Rate constants

  13. Site-Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition of Propane: Mass spectrometric methods, equilibrium temperature dependence, and kinetics of exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Ponton, C.; Kitchen, N.; Lloyd, M. K.; Lawson, M.; Formolo, M. J.; Eiler, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Intramolecular isotope ordering can constrain temperatures of synthesis, mechanisms of formation, and/or source substrates of organic compounds. Here we explore site-specific hydrogen isotope variations of propane. Statistical thermodynamic models predict that at equilibrium methylene hydrogen (-CH2-) in propane will be 10's of per mil higher in D/H ratio than methyl hydrogen (-CH3) at geologically relevant temperatures, and that this difference is highly temperature dependent ( 0.5-1 ‰/°C). Chemical-kinetic controls on site-specific D/H in propane could constrain the mechanisms, conditions and extents of propane synthesis or destruction. We have developed a method for measuring the difference in D/H ratio between methylene and methyl hydrogen in propane by gas source mass spectrometry. The data were measured using the Thermo Fisher Double Focusing Sector high resolution mass spectrometer (DFS), and involve comparison of the D/H ratios of molecular ion (C3H8+) and the ethyl fragmental ion (C2H5+). We demonstrate the accuracy and precision of this method through analysis of D-labeled and independently analyzed propanes. In the exchange experiments, propane was heated (100-200 oC) either alone or in the presence of D-enriched water (δD=1,1419 ‰ SMOW), with or without one of several potentially catalytic substrates for hours to weeks. Propane was found to exchange hydrogen with water vigorously at 200 °C in the presence of metal catalysts. In the presence of Ni catalyst, methylene hydrogen exchanges 2.5 times faster than methyl hydrogen. Hydrogen exchange in the presence of Pd catalyst is more effective and can equilibrate hydrogen isotope distribution on propane on the order of 7 days. Isotopic exchange in the presence of natural materials have also been tested, but is only measurable in the methylene group at 200 °C. High catalytic activity of Pd permits attainment of a bracketed, time-invariant equilibrium state that we use to calibrate the site

  14. Growth kinetics of hydrogen sulfide oxidizing bacteria in corroded concrete from sewers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Lens, Piet N.L.; Nielsen, Jeppe L.; Bester, Kai; Nielsen, Asbjorn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by microbes present on concrete surfaces of sewer pipes is a key process in sewer corrosion. The growth of aerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria from corroded concrete surfaces was studied in a batch reactor. Samples of corrosion products, containing sulfur oxidizing bacteria, were suspended in aqueous solution at pH similar to that of corroded concrete. Hydrogen sulfide was supplied to the reactor to provide the source of reduced sulfur. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen was monitored. The utilization rates of both hydrogen sulfide and oxygen suggested exponential bacterial growth with median growth rates of 1.25 d -1 and 1.33 d -1 as determined from the utilization rates of hydrogen sulfide and oxygen, respectively. Elemental sulfur was found to be the immediate product of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation. When exponential growth had been achieved, the addition of hydrogen sulfide was terminated leading to elemental sulfur oxidation. The ratio of consumed sulfur to consumed oxygen suggested that sulfuric acid was the ultimate oxidation product. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first study to determine the growth rate of bacteria involved in concrete corrosion with hydrogen sulfide as source of reduced sulfur.

  15. Improvement of hydrogen storage kinetics in ball-milled magnesium doped with antimony

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír; Roupcová, Pavla

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 9 (2017), s. 6144-6151 ISSN 0360-3199 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Hydrogen * Hydrogen storage * Storage capacity * Magnesium alloys * Antimony Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 3.582, year: 2016

  16. Investigation of hydrogen micro-kinetics in metals with ion beam implantation and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, T.S.; Peng, H.B.; Lv, H.Y.; Han, Y.C.; Grambole, D.; Herrmann, F.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important subjects in the fusion material research is to study the hydrogen and helium concentration, diffusion and evolution in the structure material of fusion reactor, since the hydrogen and helium can be continuously produced by the large dose fast neutron irradiation on material. Various analysis Methods can be used, but the ion beam analysis method has some advantages for studying the hydrogen behaviors in nano- or micrometer resolution. In this work, the hydrogen motion and three-dimensional distribution after implantation into metal has been studied by resonance NRA, micro-ERDA and XRD etc Methods. The resolution of the H-depth-profile is in nanometer level and the lateral resolution can be reached to 2 micrometers. The evolution of hydrogen depth-profile in a titanium sample has been studied versus the change of normal stress in samples. Evident hydrogen diffusion has been observed, while a normal stress is changed in the range of 107-963 MPa. A new phase transformation during the hydrogenation is observed by the in-situ XRD analysis. The further study on the hydrogen behaviors in the structure materials of fusion reactor is in plan. (authors)

  17. Merging Iron Catalysis and Biocatalysis-Iron Carbonyl Complexes as Efficient Hydrogen Autotransfer Catalysts in Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama

    2016-09-29

    A dual catalytic iron/lipase system has been developed and applied in the dynamic kinetic resolution of benzylic and aliphatic secondary alcohols. A detailed study of the Knölker-type iron complexes demonstrated the hydrogen autotransfer of alcohols to proceed under mild reaction conditions and allowed the combination with the enzymatic resolution. Different racemic alcohols were efficiently converted to chiral acetates in good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  18. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernusca, S.; Winter, HP.; Aumayr, F.; Díez Muiño, R.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2003-04-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to "projectile molecular effects" (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials.

  19. Merging Iron Catalysis and Biocatalysis-Iron Carbonyl Complexes as Efficient Hydrogen Autotransfer Catalysts in Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama; Alandini, Nurtalya; Rueping, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    A dual catalytic iron/lipase system has been developed and applied in the dynamic kinetic resolution of benzylic and aliphatic secondary alcohols. A detailed study of the Knölker-type iron complexes demonstrated the hydrogen autotransfer of alcohols to proceed under mild reaction conditions and allowed the combination with the enzymatic resolution. Different racemic alcohols were efficiently converted to chiral acetates in good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  20. EFFECT OF DIATOMEAOUS EARTH TREATMENT USING HYDROGEN CHLORIDE AND SULFURIC ACID ON KINETICS OF CADMIUM(II ADSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryono Nuryono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, treatment of diatomaceous earth, Sangiran, Central Java using hydrogen chloride (HCl and sulfuric acid (H2SO4 on kinetics of Cd(II adsorption in aqueous solution has been carried out. The work was conducted by mixing an amount of grounded diatomaceous earth (200 mesh in size with HCl or H2SO4 solution in various concentrations for two hours at temperature range of 100 - 150oC. The mixture was then filtered and washed with water until the filtrate pH is approximately 7 and then the residue was dried for four hours at a temperature of 70oC. The product was used as an adsorbent to adsorb Cd(II in aqueous solution with various concentrations. The Cd(II adsorbed was determined by analyzing the rest of Cd(II in the solution using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The effect of treatment was evaluated from kinetic parameter of adsorption rate constant calculated based on the simple kinetic model. Results showed  that before equilibrium condition reached, adsorpstion of Cd(II occurred through two steps, i.e. a step tends to follow a reaction of irreversible first order  (step I followed by reaction of reversible first order (step II. Treatment with acids, either hydrogen chloride or sulfuric acid, decreased adsorption rate constant for the step I from 15.2/min to a range of 6.4 - 9.4/min.  However, increasing concentration of acid (in a range of concentration investigated did not give significant and constant change of adsorption rate constant. For step II process,  adsorption involved physical interaction with the sufficient low adsorption energy (in a range of 311.3 - 1001 J/mol.     Keywords: adsorption, cdmium, diatomaceous earth, kinetics.

  1. The kinetics of Cr layer coated on TiNi films for hydrogen absorption

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of hydrogen absorption on electrical resistance with temperature ... pressure by thermal evaporation on the glass substrate at room temperature. ... and charging rate becomes faster in comparison to FeTi and TiNi thin films.

  2. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  3. Kinetic Models Study of Hydrogenation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Vacuum Gas Oil and Basrah Crude Oil Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzher M. Ibraheem

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available             The aim of this research is to study the kinetic reaction models for catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic content for Basrah crude oil (BCO and vacuum gas oil (VGO derived from Kirkuk crude oil which has the boiling point rang of (611-833K.            This work is performed using a hydrodesulphurization (HDS pilot plant unit located in AL-Basil Company. A commercial (HDS catalyst cobalt-molybdenum (Co-Mo supported in alumina (γ-Al2O3 is used in this work. The feed is supplied by North Refinery Company in Baiji. The reaction temperatures range is (600-675 K over liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV range of (0.7-2hr-1 and hydrogen pressure is 3 MPa with H2/oil ratio of 300 of Basrah Crude oil (BCO, while the corresponding conditions for vacuum gas oil (VGO are (583-643 K, (1.5-3.75 hr-1, 3.5 MPa and 250  respectively .            The results showed that the reaction kinetics is of second order for both types of feed. Activation energies are found to be 30.396, 38.479 kJ/mole for Basrah Crude Oil (BCO and Vacuum Gas Oil (VGO respectively.

  4. Investigation of the kinetics of the reactions of oxidation, nitration, and hydrogenation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adda, Y.

    1955-06-01

    Various physico-chemical methods have been used to investigate the kinetics of the oxidation hydridation and nitridation of uranium. The experimental results show that the kinetics of these reactions are influenced by many factors also the Pilling and Bedworth rule is valid only under very limited conditions. The disagreement between this rule and the experimental results could be explained by the existence of numerous mechanical faults in the compounds obtained by the dry corrosion of the metal. (author) [fr

  5. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Ling-Ling; Lv, Cun-Qin; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H_2 molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H_2. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of C−H/C−C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H_2 dissociation and

  6. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ling-Ling; Lv, Cun-Qin; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2017-07-01

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H2 molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H2. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of Csbnd H/Csbnd C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H2 dissociation and

  7. A DFT study and micro-kinetic analysis of acetylene selective hydrogenation on Pd-doped Cu(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ling-Ling [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Lv, Cun-Qin, E-mail: lcq173@126.com [College of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009, Shanxi Province (China); Wang, Gui-Chang, E-mail: wangguichang@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Semi-hydrogenation of acetylene in a hydrogen-rich stream is an industrially important process. Inspired by the recent experiments that Cu(111) surface doped by a small number of Pd atoms can exhibit excellent catalytic performance toward the dissociation of H{sub 2} molecule as well as the high selective hydrogenation of acetylene as compared with pure Cu and Pd metal alone at low-temperature, here we performed systematic first-principles calculations to investigate the corresponding reaction mechanism related to the acetylene hydrogenation processes on single atom alloys (SAAs) and monolayer Pd/Cu(111) (i.e.,1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111)) model catalysts in detail, and to explore the possible factors controlling the high selectivity on SAAs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the SAA catalyst has higher selectivity for the ethylene formation than that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111), and lower activity for the acetylene conversion compared with that of 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111). The relatively high selectivity on SAA is mainly due to the facile desorption of ethylene and moderate activity in the dissociation of molecular H{sub 2}. The main factor which lowers the selectivity towards the ethylene formation on 1.00 ML Pd/Cu(111) is that this system has a higher capacity to promote the breaking of C−H/C−C bonds, which leads to the formation of carbonaceous deposits and polymers such as benzene, and thus reduces the selectivity for the ethylene formation. Meanwhile, it was found that the desorption energy of ethylene on these two surfaces was smaller than the energy barrier of further hydrogenation, which results in the absence of ethane on these two systems. Micro-kinetic model analysis provides a further valuable insight into the evidence for the key factors controlling the catalytic activity and selectivity towards the selective hydrogenation of acetylene. Our findings may help people to design a highly selective hydrogenation catalyst by controlling the balance between the H{sub 2

  8. A kinetic model of the formation of organic monolayers on hydrogen-terminated silicon by hydrosilation of alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, M; Carlsson, S; Hong, Q; Patole, S N; Lie, L H; Houlton, A; Horrocks, B R

    2005-12-22

    We have analyzed a kinetic model for the formation of organic monolayers based on a previously suggested free radical chain mechanism for the reaction of unsaturated molecules with hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces (Linford, M. R.; Fenter, P. M.; Chidsey, C. E. D. J. Am. Chem. Soc 1995, 117, 3145). A direct consequence of this mechanism is the nonexponential growth of the monolayer, and this has been observed spectroscopically. In the model, the initiation of silyl radicals on the surface is pseudo first order with rate constant, ki, and the rate of propagation is determined by the concentration of radicals and unreacted Si-H nearest neighbor sites with a rate constant, kp. This propagation step determines the rate at which the monolayer forms by addition of alkene molecules to form a track of molecules that constitute a self-avoiding random walk on the surface. The initiation step describes how frequently new random walks commence. A termination step by which the radicals are destroyed is also included. The solution of the kinetic equations yields the fraction of alkylated surface sites and the mean length of the random walks as a function of time. In mean-field approximation we show that (1) the average length of the random walk is proportional to (kp/ki)1/2, (2) the monolayer surface coverage grows exponentially only after an induction period, (3) the effective first-order rate constant describing the growth of the monolayer and the induction period (kt) is k = (2ki kp)1/2, (4) at long times the effective first-order rate constant drops to ki, and (5) the overall activation energy for the growth kinetics is the mean of the activation energies for the initiation and propagation steps. Monte Carlo simulations of the mechanism produce qualitatively similar kinetic plots, but the mean random walk length (and effective rate constant) is overestimated by the mean field approximation and when kp > ki, we find k approximately ki0.7kp0.3 and Ea = (0.7Ei+ 0.3Ep

  9. Reaction kinetics of hydrogen atom abstraction from isopentanol by the H atom and HO2˙ radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parab, Prajakta Rajaram; Heufer, K Alexander; Fernandes, Ravi Xavier

    2018-04-25

    Isopentanol is a potential next-generation biofuel for future applications to Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine concepts. To provide insights into the combustion behavior of isopentanol, especially to its auto-ignition behavior which is linked both to efficiency and pollutant formation in real combustion systems, detailed quantum chemical studies for crucial reactions are desired. H-Abstraction reaction rates from fuel molecules are key initiation steps for chain branching required for auto-ignition. In this study, rate constants are determined for the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from isopentanol by the H atom and HO2˙ radical by implementing the CBS-QB3 composite method. For the treatment of the internal rotors, a Pitzer-Gwinn-like approximation is applied. On comparing the computed reaction energies, the highest exothermicity (ΔE = -46 kJ mol-1) is depicted for Hα abstraction by the H atom whereas the lowest endothermicity (ΔE = 29 kJ mol-1) is shown for the abstraction of Hα by the HO2˙ radical. The formation of hydrogen bonding is found to affect the kinetics of the H atom abstraction reactions by the HO2˙ radical. Further above 750 K, the calculated high pressure limit rate constants indicate that the total contribution from delta carbon sites (Cδ) is predominant for hydrogen atom abstraction by the H atom and HO2˙ radical.

  10. Determination of Desorbed Species During Heating of AgI-Mordenite Provided by ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croes, Kenneth James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garino, Terry J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mowry, Curtis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This study is focused on describing the desorbed off gases due to heating of the AgIMordenite (MOR) produced at ORNL for iodine (I2) gas capture from nuclear fuel aqueous reprocessing. In particular, the interest is for the incorporation of the AgI-MOR into a waste form, which might be the Sandia developed, low temperature sintering, Bi-Si oxide based, Glass Composite Material (GCM). The GCM has been developed as a waste form for the incorporation any oxide based getter material. In the case where iodine may be released during the sintering process of the GCM, additional Ag flake is added as further insurance in total iodine capture and retention. This has been the case for the incorporated ORNL developed AgIMOR. Thermal analysis studies were carried out to determine off gasing processes of ORNL AgIMOR. Independent of sample size, ~7wt% of total water is desorbed by 225°C. This includes both bulk surface and occluded water, and are monitored as H2O and OH. Of that total, ~5.5wt% is surface water which is removed by 125°C, and 1.5wt% is occluded (in zeolite pore) water. Less than ~1 wt% total water continues to desorb, but is completely removed by 500°C. Above 300°C, the detectable remaining desorbing species observed are iodine containing compounds, including I and I2.

  11. FUNDAMENTAL KINETICS OF SUPERCRITICAL COAL LIQUEFACTION: EFFECT OF CATALYSTS AND HYDROGEN-DONOR SOLVENTS; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin J. McCoy; J.M. Smith

    1998-01-01

    This report outlines a distribution kinetics approach to macromolecular reactions that has been applied to several processes. The objective was to develop an understanding of high-temperature, dense-phase thermolytic processes for complex macromolecular systems, such as coal. Experiments and theory are described for chemical models that simulate depolymerization of coal. The approach has been exceptionally successful for the model macromolecular systems. Development of a novel chemical reaction engineering analysis, based on distribution kinetics, was a major accomplishment of the current research

  12. Probing the hydrogen equilibrium and kinetics in zeolite imidazolate frameworks via molecular dynamics and quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantatosaki, Evangelia; Jobic, Hervé; Kolokolov, Daniil I; Karmakar, Shilpi; Biniwale, Rajesh; Papadopoulos, George K

    2013-01-21

    The problem of simulating processes involving equilibria and dynamics of guest sorbates within zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF) by means of molecular dynamics (MD) computer experiments is of growing importance because of the promising role of ZIFs as molecular "traps" for clean energy applications. A key issue for validating such an atomistic modeling attempt is the possibility of comparing the MD results, with real experiments being able to capture analogous space and time scales to the ones pertained to the computer experiments. In the present study, this prerequisite is fulfilled through the quasi-elastic neutron scattering technique (QENS) for measuring self-diffusivity, by elaborating the incoherent scattering signal of hydrogen nuclei. QENS and MD experiments were performed in parallel to probe the hydrogen motion, for the first time in ZIF members. The predicted and measured dynamics behaviors show considerable concentration variation of the hydrogen self-diffusion coefficient in the two topologically different ZIF pore networks of this study, the ZIF-3 and ZIF-8. Modeling options such as the flexibility of the entire matrix versus a rigid framework version, the mobility of the imidazolate ligand, and the inclusion of quantum mechanical effects in the potential functions were examined in detail for the sorption thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen and also of deuterium, by employing MD combined with Widom averaging towards studying phase equilibria. The latter methodology ensures a rigorous and efficient way for post-processing the dynamics trajectory, thereby avoiding stochastic moves via Monte Carlo simulation, over the large number of configurational degrees of freedom a nonrigid framework encompasses.

  13. Hydrogen kinetics studies of MgH2-FeTi composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Priyanka; Jangir, Mukesh; Singh, Ramvir; Sharma, V. K.; Jain, I. P.

    2018-05-01

    MgH2 + x wt% FeTi (x=10, 25, 50) nano composites were ball milled to get nano structured material and characterized for structural, morphological and thermal properties. XRD of the milled samples revealed the formation of MgH2, FeTi, Fe2Ti and H0.06FeTi phases. Morphological studies by SEM were undertaken to investigate the effect of hydrogenation of nanostructure alloy. EDX confirmed elemental composition of the as-prepared alloy. TGA studies showed higher desorption temperature for milled MgH2 compared to x wt% FeTi added MgH2. Activation energy for hydrogen desorption was found to be -177.90, -215.69, -162.46 and -87.93 kJ/mol for milled MgH2 and Mg2+x wt% FeTi (10, 25, 50), showing 89.97 kJ/ mol reduction in activation energy for 50 wt% alloy additives resulting in improved hydrogen storage capacity. DSC investigations were carried out to investigate the effect of alloy on hydrogen absorption behavior of MgH2.

  14. Dual Studies on a Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange of Resorcinol and the Subsequent Kinetic Isotope Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Richard; Kim, Iris; Chao, Weyjuin Eric; Moore, Jennifer; Jung, Kyung Woon

    2014-01-01

    An efficient laboratory experiment has been developed for undergraduate students to conduct hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange of resorcinol by electrophilic aromatic substitution using D[subscript 2]O and a catalytic amount of H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4]. The resulting labeled product is characterized by [superscript 1]H NMR. Students also…

  15. Qualitative relations between the kinetics of sintering in hydrogen and the observed microstructures of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, B.; Delmas, R.; Caillat, F.; Lacombe, P.

    1975-01-01

    The microscopic study of uranium dioxide sintered in hydrogen, together with density measurements, shows on the one hand that the large scale appearance of pores trapped at the grain boundaries in the course of sintering has the effect of practically stopping densification, and on the other hand that this particular microstructure is stable over a wide range of time and temperature. (author)

  16. Kinetics and the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide removal by biochar derived from rice hull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Guofeng; Liu, Liang; Chen, Ping; Shen, Guoqing; Li, Qiwu

    2016-05-01

    The biochar derived from rice hull was evaluated for its abilities to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The biochar derived from rice hull was evaluated for its abilities to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The different pyrolysis temperature has great influence on the adsorption of H2S. At the different pyrolysis temperature, the H2S removal efficiency of rice hull-derived biochar was different. The adsorption capacities of biochar were 2.09 mg·g(-1), 2.65 mg·g(-1), 16.30 mg·g(-1), 20.80 mg·g(-1), and 382.70 mg·g(-1), which their pyrolysis temperatures were 100 °C, 200 °C, 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C respectively. Based on the Yoon-Nelson model, it analyzed the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochar. The paper focuses on the biochar derived from rice hull-removed hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The different pyrolysis temperatures have great influence on the adsorption of H2S. At the different pyrolysis temperatures, the H2S removal efficiency of rice hull-derived biohar was different. The adsorption capacities of biochar were 2.09, 2.65, 16.30, 20.80, and 382.70 mg·g(-1), and their pyrolysis temperatures were 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 °C, respectively. Based on the Yoon-Nelson model, the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochar was analyzed.

  17. Ortho-para forms of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium: radiation and self-induced conversion kinetics and equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyper, J.W.; Briggs, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    The theory of the ortho-para transitions in H 2 , D 2 , and T 2 is developed. Experimental and calculated values of the ortho-para compositions of the three hydrogen isotopes mentioned in the literature are correlated as a function of temperature, and are discussed critically. The kinetics of the radiation and self-induced ortho-para transitions are reviewed. In general, the radiation-induced transitions are more rapid than the self-induced transitions. We estimate (based on data for other systems) that the β-ray-induced ortho-para transitions in liquid D 2 or T 2 would be fast, with a half time on the order of a few minutes. Experiments are proposed to study these transitions in the liquid phase using infrared spectroscopy

  18. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernusca, S.; Winter, H.P.; Aumayr, F.; Diez Muino, R.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials

  19. Annealing Kinetic Model Using Fast and Slow Metastable Defects for Hydrogenated-Amorphous-Silicon-Based Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Yeop Myong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-component kinetic model employing “fast” and “slow” metastable defects for the annealing behaviors in pin-type hydrogenated-amorphous-silicon- (a-Si:H- based solar cells is simulated using a normalized fill factor. Reported annealing data on pin-type a-Si:H-based solar cells are revisited and fitted using the model to confirm its validity. It is verified that the two-component model is suitable for fitting the various experimental phenomena. In addition, the activation energy for annealing of the solar cells depends on the definition of the recovery time. From the thermally activated and high electric field annealing behaviors, the plausible microscopic mechanism on the defect removal process is discussed.

  20. Swelling and hydrolysis kinetics of Kraft pulp fibers in aqueous 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jia; Abushammala, Hatem; Pereira, Laura Barcellos; Laborie, Marie-Pierre

    2016-11-20

    1Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate ([Bmim]HSO4) is efficient at extracting cellulose nanocrystals from pulp fibers. To shed some light on the respective contributions of swelling and hydrolysis of pulp fibers by [Bmim]HSO4, the physical, structural and morphological characteristics of hardwood Kraft pulp fibers were monitored under various conditions of temperature, water content and time. Swelling was largely compounded by hydrolysis at the highest temperatures (120°C) as evidenced by mass loss and reduced degree of polymerization (DPn) at this temperature. At 120°C only, water content appeared to play a significant role on the extent of hydrolysis. At this temperature, a heterogeneous kinetic model involving weak links and amorphous regions best described the experimental data. Hydrolysis rates were maximum at 25% water content in the aqueous ionic liquid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular projectile effects for kinetic electron emission from carbon- and metal-surfaces bombarded by slow hydrogen ions

    CERN Document Server

    Cernusca, S; Aumayr, F; Diez-Muino, R; Juaristi, J I

    2003-01-01

    Total yields for kinetic electron emission (KE) have been determined for impact of hydrogen monomer-, dimer- and trimer-ions (impact energy <10 keV) on atomically clean surfaces of carbon-fiber inforced graphite used as first-wall armour in magnetic fusion devices. The data are compared with KE yields for impact of same projectile ions on atomically clean highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and polycrystalline gold. We discuss KE yields for the different targets if bombarded by equally fast molecular and atomic ions in view to 'projectile molecular effects' (different yields per proton for equally fast atomic and molecular ions), which are expected from calculated electronic projectile energy losses in these target materials.

  2. Kinetic Studies on Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions: Oxidation of Glucose, Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide and Their Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhimin; Raffel, Ryan A.; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Goodisman, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of the glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction of glucose with O2, which produces gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the catalase-assisted breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen, have been measured via the rate of O2 depletion or production. The O2 concentrations in air-saturated phosphate-buffered salt solutions were monitored by measuring the decay of phosphorescence from a Pd phosphor in solution; the decay rate was obtained by fitting the tail of the phosphorescence intensity profile to an exponential. For glucose oxidation in the presence of glucose oxidase, the rate constant determined for the rate-limiting step was k = (3.0 ± 0.7) ×104 M−1s−1 at 37°C. For catalase-catalyzed H2O2 breakdown, the reaction order in [H2O2] was somewhat greater than unity at 37°C and well above unity at 25°C, suggesting different temperature dependences of the rate constants for various steps in the reaction. The two reactions were combined in a single experiment: addition of glucose oxidase to glucose-rich cell-free media caused a rapid drop in [O2], and subsequent addition of catalase caused [O2] to rise and then decrease to zero. The best fit of [O2] to a kinetic model is obtained with the rate constants for glucose oxidation and peroxide decomposition equal to 0.116 s−1 and 0.090 s−1 respectively. Cellular respiration in the presence of glucose was found to be three times as rapid as that in glucose-deprived cells. Added NaCN inhibited O2 consumption completely, confirming that oxidation occurred in the cellular mitochondrial respiratory chain. PMID:19348778

  3. Hydrogen/Oxygen Reactions at High Pressures and Intermediate Temperatures: Flow Reactor Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations into hydrogen oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures has been conducted. The experiments were carried out in a high pressure laminar flow reactor at 50 bar pressure and a temperature range of 600–900 K. The equivalence ratio......, the mechanism is used to simulate published data on ignition delay time and laminar burning velocity of hydrogen. The flow reactor results show that at reducing, stoichiometric, and oxidizing conditions, conversion starts at temperatures of 750–775 K, 800–825 K, and 800–825 K, respectively. In oxygen atmosphere......, ignition occurs at the temperature of 775–800 K. In general, the present model provides a good agreement with the measurements in the flow reactor and with recent data on laminar burning velocity and ignition delay time....

  4. Beneficial effect of carbon on hydrogen desorption kinetics from Mg–Ni–In alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 546, JAN (2013), s. 129-137 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068; GA ČR GA106/09/0814; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Energy storage materials * Hydrogen absorbing materials * Metal hydrides Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 2.726, year: 2013

  5. A Kinetic Study of a Homodienyl-[1,5]-Hydrogen Shift in a Vinylaziridine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, David Ackland; Hussenius, Anita; Somfai, Peter

    1996-01-01

    The thermal rearrangement of an N-substituted vinylaziridine to the corresponding Z-allylic amine, i.e. a homodienyl-[1,5]-hydrogen shift was studied at various temperatures in the reange 40 90 oC, and NMR spectroscopy was used to follow the reactiuon. The activation enthalpiies and entropies...... measured clearly indicate a concerted mechanism for the rearrangement, via a cyclic transition state....

  6. The kinetics of Cr layer coated on TiNi films for hydrogen absorption

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of hydrogen absorption on electrical resistance with temperature for TiNi and TiNi–Cr thin films was investigated. The TiNi thin films of thickness 800 Å were deposited at different angles ( = 0°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 75°) under 10−5 Torr pressure by thermal evaporation on the glass substrate at room temperature.

  7. One-step reduced kinetics for lean hydrogen-air deflagration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Galisteo, D.; Sanchez, A.L. [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Univ. Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes 28911 (Spain); Linan, A. [ETSI Aeronauticos, Pl. Cardenal Cisneros 3, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Williams, F.A. [Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    A short mechanism consisting of seven elementary reactions, of which only three are reversible, is shown to provide good predictions of hydrogen-air lean-flame burning velocities. This mechanism is further simplified by noting that over a range of conditions of practical interest, near the lean flammability limit all reaction intermediaries have small concentrations in the important thin reaction zone that controls the hydrogen-air laminar burning velocity and therefore follow a steady state approximation, while the main species react according to the global irreversible reaction 2H{sub 2} + O{sub 2} {yields} 2H{sub 2}O. An explicit expression for the non-Arrhenius rate of this one-step overall reaction for hydrogen oxidation is derived from the seven-step detailed mechanism, for application near the flammability limit. The one-step results are used to calculate flammability limits and burning velocities of planar deflagrations. Furthermore, implications concerning radical profiles in the deflagration and reasons for the success of the approximations are clarified. It is also demonstrated that adding only two irreversible direct recombination steps to the seven-step mechanism accurately reproduces burning velocities of the full detailed mechanism for all equivalence ratios at normal atmospheric conditions and that an eight-step detailed mechanism, constructed from the seven-step mechanism by adding to it the fourth reversible shuffle reaction, improves predictions of O and OH profiles. The new reduced-chemistry descriptions can be useful for both analytical and computational studies of lean hydrogen-air flames, decreasing required computation times. (author)

  8. A study on the kinetics of hydrogen reduction of molybdenum disulphide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehdi Afsahi, M.; Sohrabi, Morteza; Vasant Kumar, R.; Ale Ebrahim, Habib

    2008-01-01

    In order to achieve direct reduction of molybdenite in presence of a sulphur scavenger such as CaO such that SO 2 emission is completely avoided, it is important to maximise the rate of the partial reaction involving molybdenite and hydrogen (without lime) given the low thermodynamic driving force for this reaction. Accordingly, reaction of molybdenum disulphide powders with hydrogen was investigated by thermogravimetric method. Effect of temperature and concentration on the reaction rate was studied under such conditions that resistance to mass transfer arising from external film, between particles and intra-grain was negligible. The operating temperature ranged between 973 and 1173 K while the hydrogen concentration was varied between 30 and 100%. The experimental data obtained under the above conditions were analyzed by applying 'the shrinking unreacted core model'. The reduction reaction was found to be first order with respect to the gaseous reactant. Pre-exponential factor and activation energy have been determined to be 3.91 x 10 3 cm min -1 and 139.0 kJ mol -1 , respectively. Activation energy obtained from a fitted model, agreed well with the values determined from the model-free methods using isothermal measurements

  9. A study on the kinetics of hydrogen reduction of molybdenum disulphide powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdi Afsahi, M. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tehran 15914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); University of Cambridge, Department of Materials Sciences and Metallurgy, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mma50@cam.ac.uk; Sohrabi, Morteza [Amirkabir University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tehran 15914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vasant Kumar, R. [University of Cambridge, Department of Materials Sciences and Metallurgy, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Ale Ebrahim, Habib [Amirkabir University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tehran 15914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-10

    In order to achieve direct reduction of molybdenite in presence of a sulphur scavenger such as CaO such that SO{sub 2} emission is completely avoided, it is important to maximise the rate of the partial reaction involving molybdenite and hydrogen (without lime) given the low thermodynamic driving force for this reaction. Accordingly, reaction of molybdenum disulphide powders with hydrogen was investigated by thermogravimetric method. Effect of temperature and concentration on the reaction rate was studied under such conditions that resistance to mass transfer arising from external film, between particles and intra-grain was negligible. The operating temperature ranged between 973 and 1173 K while the hydrogen concentration was varied between 30 and 100%. The experimental data obtained under the above conditions were analyzed by applying 'the shrinking unreacted core model'. The reduction reaction was found to be first order with respect to the gaseous reactant. Pre-exponential factor and activation energy have been determined to be 3.91 x 10{sup 3} cm min{sup -1} and 139.0 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. Activation energy obtained from a fitted model, agreed well with the values determined from the model-free methods using isothermal measurements.

  10. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented.

  11. Hydrogen storage thermodynamics and kinetics of LaMg11Ni + x wt.% Ni (x = 100, 200) alloys synthesized by mechanical milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yanghuan; Jia, Zhichao; Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing; Yuan, Zeming; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Dongliang; Hou, Zhonghui

    2016-01-01

    LaMg 11 Ni + x wt.% Ni (x = 100, 200) composite hydrogen storage alloys with a nanocrystalline/amorphous structure were synthesized using ball milling technology. The effects of Ni content and milling time on hydrogen storage thermodynamics and dynamics of the alloys were investigated systematically. The hydrogen desorption properties were assessed using a Sieverts apparatus and differential scanning calorimetry. The thermodynamic parameters for the hydrogen absorption and desorption were calculated using the Van't Hoff equation. The hydrogen desorption activation energies of the hydrogenated alloys were also estimated by Arrhenius and Kissinger methods. Results indicate that the amount of Ni added has no effect on the thermodynamics of the alloys, but it significantly improves their absorption and desorption kinetics. Furthermore, the milling time has a great influence on the hydrogen storage properties. To be specific, the hydrogen absorption capacities reach the maximum values with the variation of milling time, and the hydrogen desorption activation energy obviously decreases with increasing milling time.

  12. High-yield hydrogen production from biomass by in vitro metabolic engineering: Mixed sugars coutilization and kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A.; Martin del Campo, Julia; Myung, Suwan; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Bakovic, Allison; Castro, Roberto; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K.; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W. W.; Senger, Ryan S.; Zhang, Y.-H. Percival

    2015-01-01

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a fuel offers enhanced energy conversion efficiency and tremendous potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, but producing it in a distributed, carbon-neutral, low-cost manner requires new technologies. Herein we demonstrate the complete conversion of glucose and xylose from plant biomass to H2 and CO2 based on an in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway. Glucose and xylose were simultaneously converted to H2 with a yield of two H2 per carbon, the maximum possible yield. Parameters of a nonlinear kinetic model were fitted with experimental data using a genetic algorithm, and a global sensitivity analysis was used to identify the enzymes that have the greatest impact on reaction rate and yield. After optimizing enzyme loadings using this model, volumetric H2 productivity was increased 3-fold to 32 mmol H2⋅L−1⋅h−1. The productivity was further enhanced to 54 mmol H2⋅L−1⋅h−1 by increasing reaction temperature, substrate, and enzyme concentrations—an increase of 67-fold compared with the initial studies using this method. The production of hydrogen from locally produced biomass is a promising means to achieve global green energy production. PMID:25848015

  13. High-yield hydrogen production from biomass by in vitro metabolic engineering: Mixed sugars coutilization and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A; Martin del Campo, Julia; Myung, Suwan; Sun, Fangfang; You, Chun; Bakovic, Allison; Castro, Roberto; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W W; Senger, Ryan S; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2015-04-21

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a fuel offers enhanced energy conversion efficiency and tremendous potential to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, but producing it in a distributed, carbon-neutral, low-cost manner requires new technologies. Herein we demonstrate the complete conversion of glucose and xylose from plant biomass to H2 and CO2 based on an in vitro synthetic enzymatic pathway. Glucose and xylose were simultaneously converted to H2 with a yield of two H2 per carbon, the maximum possible yield. Parameters of a nonlinear kinetic model were fitted with experimental data using a genetic algorithm, and a global sensitivity analysis was used to identify the enzymes that have the greatest impact on reaction rate and yield. After optimizing enzyme loadings using this model, volumetric H2 productivity was increased 3-fold to 32 mmol H2⋅L(-1)⋅h(-1). The productivity was further enhanced to 54 mmol H2⋅L(-1)⋅h(-1) by increasing reaction temperature, substrate, and enzyme concentrations--an increase of 67-fold compared with the initial studies using this method. The production of hydrogen from locally produced biomass is a promising means to achieve global green energy production.

  14. Kinetic energy measurement of hydrogen in LHD peripheral plasma with a multi-wavelength-range fine-resolution spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Mizushiri, Keisuke; Nishioka, Tomomi; Shikama, Taiichi; Iwamae, Atsushi; Goto, Motoshi; Morita, Shigeru; Hasuo, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    We have simultaneously measured high resolution emission spectra of the hydrogen atomic Balmer-α, -β, -γ lines and molecular Fulcher-α band for a LHD peripheral plasma generated under a central magnetic field strength of 0.4 T. It is found that the velocity distributions of excited atoms calculated from the Balmer-α, -β, and -γ line shapes show similar profiles to each other. The translational kinetic energy corresponding to the average velocity is about 13 eV, which is about 300 times larger than the rotational energy of hydrogen molecules estimated from the line intensities in the Fulcher-α band. The velocity distributions differ from Maxwellian and have a high velocity tail over 1x10 5 m/s. A correlation between the high velocity tail and the electron temperature and density is seen and suggesting the excited atoms having such high velocities to be generated by the charge exchange collisions from high velocity protons in the peripheral region.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide release kinetics into saliva from different whitening products: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Duarte Nuno da Silva; da Mata, António Duarte Sola Pereira; Silveira, João Miguel Lourenço; Marques, Joana Rita Oliveira Faria; Amaral, João Pedro de Almeida Rato; Guilherme, Nuno Filipe Rito Parada Marques

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study is to compare salivary hydrogen peroxide (HP) release kinetics and potential toxicity of systemic exposure of four different whitening products. A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a Portuguese dental faculty clinic. Two hundred forty volunteers were randomized to eight intervention groups. Participants were randomly assigned to receive active or placebo applications of one of four different products: Opalescence 10% PF™ (OPL), Vivastyle® 10%™ (VS10%), Vivadent Paint On Plus™ (PO+), and Trés White Supreme™ (TWS). Saliva collection was obtained by established methods at different times. The HP salivary content was determined by a photometric method. Salivary HP variations, total amount of salivary HP, and counts of subjects above the safe daily HP dose were the main outcome measures. All whitening systems significantly released HP to the saliva when compared to placebo, and all showed different release kinetics. The adaptable tray system (TWS) presented a risk increase of 37% [20-54%, 95% confidence interval] when compared to the other systems. The use of an adaptable tray whitening system with higher concentration of HP increases the toxicity potential.

  16. Degradation kinetics and mechanism of trace nitrobenzene by granular activated carbon enhanced microwave/hydrogen peroxide system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dina; Zeng, Honghu; Liu, Jie; Yu, Xiaozhang; Liang, Yanpeng; Lu, Lanjing

    2013-07-01

    The kinetics of the degradation of trace nitrobenzene (NB) by a granular activated carbon (GAC) enhanced microwave (MW)/hydrogen peroxide (H202) system was studied. Effects of pH, NB initial concentration and tert-butyl alcohol on the removal efficiency were examined. It was found that the reaction rate fits well to first-order reaction kinetics in the MW/GAC/H202 process. Moreover, GAC greatly enhanced the degradation rate of NB in water. Under a given condition (MW power 300 W, H202 dosage 10 mg/L, pH 6.85 and temperature (60 +/- 5)degrees C), the degradation rate of NB was 0.05214 min-1when 4 g/L GAC was added. In general, alkaline pH was better for NB degradation; however, the optimum pH was 8.0 in the tested pH value range of 4.0-12.0. At H202 dosage of 10 mg/L and GAC dosage of 4 g/L, the removal of NB was decreased with increasing initial concentrations of NB, indicating that a low initial concentration was beneficial for the degradation of NB. These results indicated that the MW/GAC/H202 process was effective for trace NB degradation in water. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that a hydroxyl radical addition reaction and dehydrogenation reaction enhanced NB degradation.

  17. Plutonium(IV) peroxide formation in nitric medium and kinetics Pu(VI) reduction by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, C.; Adnet, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Reduction of plutonium (VI) to Pu(IV) with hydrogen peroxide is a step in industrial processes used to purify plutonium nitrate solutions. This operation must be carefully controlled, in order to avoid any formation of the Pu(IV) peroxide green precipitate and to obtain exclusively Pu(IV). This led us to study the acidity and Pu and H 2 O 2 concentrations influences on the precipitate appearance and to perform a Pu(VI) reduction kinetic study on a wide range of acidities ([HNO 3 ]: 0.5 to 8 M), plutonium concentrations ([Pu(VI)]: 0.1 to 0.8 M) and [H 2 O 2 ]/[Pu(VI)] ratio (from 1 to 8). Thus, the domain of Pu(IV) peroxide formation and the reactional paths were established. With the exception of 0.5 M nitric acid medium, the kinetic curves show two distinct regims: the first one corresponds to an induction period where the Pu(VI) concentration doesn't change, the second corresponds to a linear decrease of Pu(VI). An increase of the temperature greatly accelerates the Pu(VI) reduction rate while [H 2 O 2 ]/[Pu(VI)] has almost no influence. The Pu(VI) total reduction time decreases when initial concentration of plutonium increases. By increasing nitric acid concentration from 0.5 M to 6 M, the total Pu(VI) reduction time decreases. This time increases when [HNO 3 ] varies from 6 M to 8 M. (orig.)

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of the furan peroxide formation in the reaction of furfural with hydrogen peroxide in the presence and absence of sodium molybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunskaya, E.P.; Badovskaya, L.A.; Kaklyugina, T.Ya.; Poskonin, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    Kinetics of the initial stage of the reaction of furfural with hydrogen peroxide are studied in the presence of Na 2 MoO 4 in water and without catalytic additions in n-butanol. Organic peroxide having in its disposal Mo(6), which is the only product on the initial stage of the reaction, is formed since the first minutes of oxidation of furfural by hydrogen peroxide with the presence of Na 2 MoO 4 . The mechanisms of conversion of furfural in the Na 2 MoO 4 - H 2 O system and its oxidation by peroxide without sodium molybdate are discussed. Schemes of formation of furfural complexes based on the results of kinetic studies are suggested. Comparison of obtained data demonstrates that presence of the sodium molybdates in the reaction medium trends to change of reaction procedure in the hydrogen peroxide [ru

  19. Kinetics of solid-phase in ion exchange on tin hydrogen phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kislitsyn, M.N.; Ketsko, V.A.; Yaroslavtsev, A.B.

    2004-01-01

    Solid state reactions in mixture of tin hydrogen phosphate and alkali metal (M=Na, K, Cs) chlorides have been studied both in the mode of polythermal heating and at a fixed temperature, using data of X-ray phase and thermogravimetric analyses. In the range 400-750 Deg C solid state ion exchange reactions occur in the systems studied and yield mono-- and dialkali phosphates MHSn(PO 4 ) 2 and M 2 Sn(PO 4 ) 2 . Counter diffusion coefficients for alkali metal cations and protons in the matrices of compositions MHSn(PO 4 ) 2 and M 2 Sn(PO 4 ) 2 have been determined [ru

  20. Hydrogen storage in binary and ternary Mg-based alloys. A comprehensive experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalisvaart, W.P.; Harrower, C.T.; Haagsma, J.; Zahiri, B.; Luber, E.J.; Ophus, C.; Miltin, D. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada); Poirier, E.; Fritzsche, H. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This study focuses on hydrogen sorption properties of cosputtered 1.5 micrometer thick Mg-based films with Al, Fe and Ti as alloying elements. We show that ternary Mg-Al-Ti and Mg-Fe-Ti alloys in particular display remarkable sorption behavior: at 200 C, the films are capable of absorbing 4-6 wt.% hydrogen in seconds, and desorbing in minutes. Furthermore, this sorption behavior is stable for over 100 ab- and desorption cycles for Mg-Al-Ti and Mg-Fe-Ti alloys. No degradation in capacity or kinetics is observed. Based on these observations, some general design principles for Mg-based hydrogen storage alloys are suggested. For Mg-Fe-Ti, encouraging preliminary results on multilayered systems are also presented. (orig.)

  1. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  2. Ultrafine Nanocrystalline CeO2@C-Containing NaAlH4 with Fast Kinetics and Good Reversibility for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Ke; Li, You; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2015-12-21

    A nanocrystalline CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite is successfully synthesized in situ by hydrogenating a NaH-Al mixture doped with CeO2@C. Compared with NaAlH4 , the as-prepared CeO2@C-containing NaAlH4 composite, with a minor amount of excess Al, exhibits significantly improved hydrogen storage properties. The dehydrogenation onset temperature of the hydrogenated [NaH-Al-7 wt % CeO2@C]-0.04Al sample is 77 °C lower than that of the pristine sample because of a reduced kinetic barrier. More importantly, the dehydrogenated sample absorbs ∼4.7 wt % hydrogen within 35 min at 100°C and 10 MPa of hydrogen. Compositional and structural analyses reveal that CeO2 is converted to CeH2 during ball milling and that the newly formed CeH2 works with the excess of Al to synergistically improve the hydrogen storage properties of NaAlH4. Our findings will aid in the rational design of novel catalyst-doped complex hydride systems with low operating temperatures, fast kinetics, and long-term cyclability. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The role of hydrogen bonding on kinetics of rearrangement of heterocyclic aldoximes in perchloric acide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzouz, A.S.; Abdullah, K.A.; Al-Niemi, I.

    1995-01-01

    Four paris of syn and anti aromatic heterocyclic aldoximes as 2-thiophenealdoxime, 2- furfuraladoxime, 2-pyridinealdoxime and 2-pyrrolealdoxime are prepared. The strcutures of these geometrical isomers are confirmed by the meaasurements of their U.V. I, R and melting points. Experiments show the existence of these aldoximers in an intramolecular hy-drogen bonding with variable strength depending on the hetero ztoms in the aldoximes. The first order rate constants of the rearrangement of syn aldoximes follow the order of hetero S>O>N, while the anti aldoximes show irregular order, Factors governing the aniti constants of the rearrangement of syn and anti aldoximes are analysed. Activation parameters are estimated and discussed on the basis of isokinetic relation-ship. The differences in physical and spectroscpic behavior of aldoximes lead to an important suggestion regarding the configuration of oxime. (author). 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Detailed kinetic and heat transport model for the hydrolysis of lignocellulose by anhydrous hydrogen fluoride vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rorrer, G.L.; Mohring, W.R.; Lamport, D.T.A.; Hawley, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Anhydrous Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) vapor at ambient conditions efficiently and rapidly hydrolyzed lignocellulose to glucose and lignin. The unsteady-state reaction of HF vapor with a single lignocellulose chip was mathematically modeled under conditions where external and internal mass-transfer resistances were minimized. The model incorporated physical adsorption of HF vapor onto the lignocellulosic matrix and solvolysis of cellulose to glucosyl fluoride by adsorbed HF into the differential material and energy balance expressions. Model predictions for the temperature distribution and global glucose yield in the HF-reacting lignocellulose chip as a function of reaction time and HF vapor stream temperature agreed reasonably with the complimentary experimental data. The model correctly predicted that even when mass-transfer resistances for the reaction of HF vapor with a single lignocellulose chip are minimized, external and internal heat-transfer resistances are still significant.

  5. Kinetic modeling study of homogeneous ignition of dimethyl ether/hydrogen and dimethyl ether/methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Hong; Ke, Xichun; Shen, Zhenxing

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Kinetic effects on the homogeneous ignitions of DME/H_2 and DME/CH_4 were studied. • Ignition delays with different DME blending ratio were determined and analyzed. • Different DME ignition combustion trends are found for H_2 and CH_4 addition. • Key elementary reactions are identified at different DME ratios and temperatures. - Abstract: Homogeneous ignition combustion of different proportion DME/H_2 and DME/CH_4 blend fuels in the air is investigated through the numerical simulation with the detailed chemistry at the low and high temperatures in this paper. The emphasis is the assessment of the kinetic effects involved in the ignition combustion of DME/H_2 and DME/CH_4 dual-fuel. It is found that the homogeneous ignition process has a clear distinction at the different temperatures. At the low temperature (900 K), the ignition delay times of DME/H_2 blends and DME/CH_4 blends both show an increase with a decrease of the DME blending ratio; furthermore, it is observed that CH_4 addition is more effective than H_2 addition in terms of delaying the DME homogeneous ignition due to the stable molecular structure of CH_4. At the high temperature (1400 K), with the decrease of DME blending ratio, the ignition delay time of DME/CH_4 blends is still increased, whereas, the ignition delay time of DME/H_2 blends is shortened. Sensitivity analysis, reaction path analysis and main pollutant species calculation are carried out and key elementary reactions involved in homogeneous ignition of DME/H_2 and DME/CH_4 dual fuel are also identified in this paper.

  6. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Yadav, Pramod K.; Ballou, David P.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be −123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  7. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  9. Kinetic theory of weakly ionized dilute gas of hydrogen-like atoms of the first principles of quantum statistics and dispersion laws of eigenwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyusarenko, Yurii V.; Sliusarenko, Oleksii Yu.

    2017-11-01

    We develop a microscopic approach to the construction of the kinetic theory of dilute weakly ionized gas of hydrogen-like atoms. The approach is based on the statements of the second quantization method in the presence of bound states of particles. The basis of the derivation of kinetic equations is the method of reduced description of relaxation processes. Within the framework of the proposed approach, a system of common kinetic equations for the Wigner distribution functions of free oppositely charged fermions of two kinds (electrons and cores) and their bound states—hydrogen-like atoms— is obtained. Kinetic equations are used to study the spectra of elementary excitations in the system when all its components are non-degenerate. It is shown that in such a system, in addition to the typical plasma waves, there are longitudinal waves of matter polarization and the transverse ones with a behavior characteristic of plasmon polaritons. The expressions for the dependence of the frequencies and Landau damping coefficients on the wave vector for all branches of the oscillations discovered are obtained. Numerical evaluation of the elementary perturbation parameters in the system on an example of a weakly ionized dilute gas of the 23Na atoms using the D2-line characteristics of the natrium atom is given. We note the possibility of using the results of the developed theory to describe the properties of a Bose condensate of photons in the diluted weakly ionized gas of hydrogen-like atoms.

  10. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide on Authentic Mineral Dust: Effects of Relative Humidity and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liubin; Zhao, Yue; Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming

    2015-09-15

    Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on mineral dust seems to be an important sink for SO2. However, kinetic data about this reaction on authentic mineral dust are scarce and are mainly limited to low relative humidity (RH) conditions. In addition, little is known about the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in this reaction. Here, we investigated the uptake kinetics of SO2 on three authentic mineral dusts (i.e., Asian mineral dust (AMD), Tengger desert dust (TDD), and Arizona test dust (ATD)) in the absence and presence of H2O2 at different RHs using a filter-based flow reactor, and applied a parameter (effectiveness factor) to the estimation of the effective surface area of particles for the calculation of the corrected uptake coefficient (γc). We found that with increasing RH, the γc decreases on AMD particles, but increases on ATD and TDD particles. This discrepancy is probably due to the different mineralogy compositions and aging extents of these dust samples. Furthermore, the presence of H2O2 can promote the uptake of SO2 on mineral dust at different RHs. The probable explanations are that H2O2 rapidly reacts with SO2 on mineral dust in the presence of adsorbed water, and OH radicals, which can be produced from the heterogeneous decomposition of H2O2 on the mineral dust, immediately react with adsorbed SO2 as well. Our results suggest that the removal of SO2 via the heterogeneous reaction on mineral dust is an important sink for SO2 and has the potential to alter the physicochemical properties (e.g., ice nucleation ability) of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere.

  11. Reaction of hydrogen with Ag(111): binding states, minimum energy paths, and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Alejandro; Schlunke, Anna; Haynes, Brian S

    2006-08-31

    The interaction of atomic and molecular hydrogen with the Ag(111) surface is studied using periodic density functional total-energy calculations. This paper focuses on the site preference for adsorption, ordered structures, and energy barriers for H diffusion and H recombination. Chemisorbed H atoms are unstable with respect to the H(2) molecule in all adsorption sites below monolayer coverage. The three-hollow sites are energetically the most favorable for H chemisorption. The binding energy of H to the surface decreases slightly up to one monolayer, suggesting a small repulsive H-H interaction on nonadjacent sites. Subsurface and vacancy sites are energetically less favorable for H adsorption than on-top sites. Recombination of chemisorbed H atoms leads to the formation of gas-phase H(2) with no molecular chemisorbed state. Recombination is an exothermic process and occurs on the bridge site with a pronounced energy barrier. This energy barrier is significantly higher than that inferred from experimental temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies. However, there is significant permeability of H atoms through the recombination energy barrier at low temperatures, thus increasing the rate constant for H(2) desorption due to quantum tunneling effects, and improving the agreement between experiment and theory.

  12. A theoretical and shock tube kinetic study on hydrogen abstraction from phenyl formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Hongbo; Liu, Dapeng; Wu, Junjun; Ma, Liuhao; Ren, Wei; Farooq, Aamir

    2018-06-12

    The hydrogen abstraction reactions of phenyl formate (PF) by different radicals (H/O(3P)/OH/HO2) were theoretically investigated. We calculated the reaction energetics for PF + H/O/OH using the composite method ROCBS-QB3//M06-2X/cc-pVTZ and that for PF + HO2 at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The high-pressure limit rate constants were calculated using the transition state theory in conjunction with the 1-D hindered rotor approximation and tunneling correction. Three-parameter Arrhenius expressions of rate constants were provided over the temperature range of 500-2000 K. To validate the theoretical calculations, the overall rate constants of PF + OH → Products were measured in shock tube experiments at 968-1128 K and 1.16-1.25 atm using OH laser absorption. The predicted overall rate constants agree well with the shock tube data (within 15%) over the entire experimental conditions. Rate constant analysis indicates that the H-abstraction at the formic acid site dominates the PF consumption, whereas the contribution of H-abstractions at the aromatic ring increases with temperature. Additionally, comparisons of site-specific H-abstractions from PF with methyl formate, ethyl formate, benzene, and toluene were performed to understand the effects of the aromatic ring and side-chain substituent on H-abstraction rate constants.

  13. Mechanism and kinetics of the electrocatalytic reaction responsible for the high cost of hydrogen fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Goddard, William A; An, Qi; Xiao, Hai; Merinov, Boris; Morozov, Sergey

    2017-01-25

    The sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a major impediment to the economic use of hydrogen fuel cells in transportation. In this work, we report the full ORR reaction mechanism for Pt(111) based on Quantum Mechanics (QM) based Reactive metadynamics (RμD) simulations including explicit water to obtain free energy reaction barriers at 298 K. The lowest energy pathway for 4 e - water formation is: first, *OOH formation; second, *OOH reduction to H 2 O and O*; third, O* hydrolysis using surface water to produce two *OH and finally *OH hydration to water. Water formation is the rate-determining step (RDS) for potentials above 0.87 Volt, the normal operating range. Considering the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism involving protons from the solvent, we predict the free energy reaction barrier at 298 K for water formation to be 0.25 eV for an external potential below U = 0.87 V and 0.41 eV at U = 1.23 V, in good agreement with experimental values of 0.22 eV and 0.44 eV, respectively. With the mechanism now fully understood, we can use this now validated methodology to examine the changes upon alloying and surface modifications to increase the rate by reducing the barrier for water formation.

  14. Hydrogenation of the alpha,beta-Unsaturated Aldehydes Acrolein, Crotonaldehyde, and Prenal over Pt Single Crystals: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliewer, C.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-11-26

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the surface reaction intermediates during the hydrogenation of three {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehydes, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal, over Pt(111) at Torr pressures (1 Torr aldehyde, 100 Torr hydrogen) in the temperature range of 295K to 415K. SFG-VS data showed that acrolein has mixed adsorption species of {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-trans, {eta}{sub 2}-di-{sigma}(CC)-cis as well as highly coordinated {eta}{sub 3} or {eta}{sub 4} species. Crotonaldehyde adsorbed to Pt(111) as {eta}{sub 2} surface intermediates. SFG-VS during prenal hydrogenation also suggested the presence of the {eta}{sub 2} adsorption species, and became more highly coordinated as the temperature was raised to 415K, in agreement with its enhanced C=O hydrogenation. The effect of catalyst surface structure was clarified by carrying out the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde over both Pt(111) and Pt(100) single crystals while acquiring the SFG-VS spectra in situ. Both the kinetics and SFG-VS showed little structure sensitivity. Pt(100) generated more decarbonylation 'cracking' product while Pt(111) had a higher selectivity for the formation of the desired unsaturated alcohol, crotylalcohol.

  15. Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Model of Adsorber/desorber of Silica Gel-Water Adsorption Heat Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Zwarycz-Makles

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper comparison of an analytical and a numerical model of silica gel/water adsorber/desorber was presented. Adsorber/desorber as a part of the two–bed single–stage adsorption heat pump was discussed. The adsorption heat pump under consideration consists of an evaporator, two adsorber/desorber columns and a condenser. During operation of assumed adsorption heat pump only heat and mass transfer was taken into account. The both presented mathematical models were created to describe the temperature, heat and concentration changes in the adsorber/desorber and consequently to describe the performance of the adsorption heat pump. Adsorption equilibrium was described by the Dubinin-Astachov model. Adsorption and desorption process dynamics was described by application of the linear driving force model (LDF. In the analysis temperatures of evaporation and condensation were constant.

  16. Corona discharge secondary ionization of laser desorbed neutral molecules from a liquid matrix at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turney, Kevin [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Harrison, W.W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)]. E-mail: harrison@chem.ufl.edu

    2006-06-15

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is studied at atmospheric pressure using liquid sampling methods. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer couples to an open sample stage accessed by a UV laser for desorption and ionization. Also coupled to the sampling state is a corona discharge for auxiliary ionization of desorbed neutral molecules. The interaction of the laser desorption and corona ionization is studied for a range of desorption conditions, showing enhanced analyte ionization, but the effect is analytically advantageous only at low desorption rates. The effect of corona discharge voltage was also explored. The decoupling of neutral molecule formation and subsequent ionization provides an opportunity to study each process separately.

  17. Corona discharge secondary ionization of laser desorbed neutral molecules from a liquid matrix at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, Kevin; Harrison, W.W.

    2006-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is studied at atmospheric pressure using liquid sampling methods. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer couples to an open sample stage accessed by a UV laser for desorption and ionization. Also coupled to the sampling state is a corona discharge for auxiliary ionization of desorbed neutral molecules. The interaction of the laser desorption and corona ionization is studied for a range of desorption conditions, showing enhanced analyte ionization, but the effect is analytically advantageous only at low desorption rates. The effect of corona discharge voltage was also explored. The decoupling of neutral molecule formation and subsequent ionization provides an opportunity to study each process separately

  18. Kinetics of exchange between zero-, one-, and two-hydrogen-bonded states of methyl and ethyl acetate in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuntonov, Lev; Pazos, Ileana M; Ma, Jianqiang; Gai, Feng

    2015-03-26

    It has recently been shown that the ester carbonyl stretching vibration can be used as a sensitive probe of local electrostatic field in molecular systems. To further characterize this vibrational probe and extend its potential applications, we studied the kinetics of chemical exchange between differently hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) ester carbonyl groups of methyl acetate (MA) and ethyl acetate (EA) in methanol. We found that, while both MA and EA can form zero, one, or two H-bonds with the solvent, the population of the 2hb state in MA is significantly smaller than that in EA. Using a combination of linear and nonlinear infrared measurements and numerical simulations, we further determined the rate constants for the exchange between these differently H-bonded states. We found that for MA the chemical exchange reaction between the two dominant states (i.e., 0hb and 1hb states) has a relaxation rate constant of 0.14 ps(-1), whereas for EA the three-state chemical exchange reaction occurs in a predominantly sequential manner with the following relaxation rate constants: 0.11 ps(-1) for exchange between 0hb and 1hb states and 0.12 ps(-1) for exchange between 1hb and 2hb states.

  19. Surface kinetics for catalytic combustion of hydrogen-air mixtures on platinum at atmospheric pressure in stagnation flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, H.; Sato, J.; Williams, F. A.

    1995-03-01

    Experimental studies of the combustion of premixed hydrogen-air mixtures impinging on the surface of a heated platinum plate at normal atmospheric pressure were performed and employed to draw inferences concerning surface reaction mechanisms and rate parameters applicable under practical conditions of catalytic combustion. Plate and gas temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and concentration profiles of major stable species in the gas were measured by gas-chromatographic analyses of samples withdrawn by quartz probes. In addition, ignition and extinction phenomena were recorded and interpreted with the aid of a heat balance at the surface and a previous flow-field analysis of the stagnation-point boundary layer. From the experimental and theoretical results, conclusions were drawn concerning the surface chemical-kinetic mechanisms and values of the elementary rate parameters that are consistent with the observations. In particular, the activation energy for the surface oxidation step H + OH → H 2O is found to be appreciably less at these high surface coverages than in the low-coverage limit.

  20. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of Bi(III based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenylfluorone by hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOFIJA M. RANČIĆ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A new reaction was suggested and a new kinetic method was elaborated for determination of Bi(III in solution, based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenyl-fluorone (PF by hydrogen peroxide in ammonia buffer. By application of spectrophotometric technique, a limit of quantification (LQ of 128 ng cm-3 was reached, and the limit of detection (LD of 37 ng cm-3 was obtained, where LQ was defined as the ratio signal:noise = 10:1 and LD was defined as signal 3:1 against the blank. The RSD value was found to be in the range 2.8–4.8 % for the investigated concentration range of Bi(III. The influence of some ions upon the reaction rate was tested. The method was confirmed by determining Bi(III in a stomach ulcer drug (“Bicit HP”, Hemofarm A.D.. The obtained results were compared to those obtained by AAS and good agreement of results was obtained.

  1. Influence of γ-irradiation on the transport kinetics of hydrogen in pre-transition oxidized Zircaloy-4 at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Frantz A., E-mail: frantz.martin@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d' Etude de la Corrosion Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dauvois, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.dauvois@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire de Radiolyse et de la Matière Organique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Esnouf, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.esnouf@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire de Radiolyse et de la Matière Organique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); CEA, DSM, IRAMIS, LIDYL, PCR, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fourdrin, Chloé, E-mail: chloe.fourdrin@culture.gouv.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, Laboratoire de Radiolyse et de la Matière Organique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jomard, François, E-mail: francois.jomard@uvsq.fr [CNRS/UVSQ, UMR 8635, GEMAC, 45 avenue des Etats Unis – Bâtiment Fermat, F-78035 Versailles (France); Chêne, Jacques, E-mail: chene_jacques@orange.fr [CNRS/CEA, UMR 8587, LECA – CEA, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-10-15

    In a context of nuclear fuel reprocessing, the free-of-fuel hulls and ends of cladding tubes are compacted. The possibility of hydrogen degasing or absorption from/into these tubes has been studied with and without gamma irradiation at 293 K by means of deuterium as isotopic tracer for hydrogen. Under irradiation, as without, the hydrides present in the Zircaloy-4 hulls seem stable. The oxide layer present at the surface of the hulls allows a slow diffusion of deuterium, and the irradiation appeared to have no specific effect on the diffusion process: in both cases, hydrogen diffusion coefficients of the order of 5·10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} have been found. The subsurface activity of deuterium is increased by one order of magnitude at least under irradiation, probably due to an activation of the dissociation/absorption kinetic steps. - Highlights: • Hydrogen diffusion coefficients at RT in zirconia grain boundaries were determined. • γ irradiation increases the hydrogen subsurface activity when exposed to H{sub 2} gas. • The dense thin zirconia film is not altered much by HNO{sub 3} exposure at 90 °C for 24 h. • Hydrogen desorption from Zr hydrides was studied at room temperature under γ rays.

  2. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Kinetic Study of 2-Methylfuran and 2,5-Dimethylfuran Hydrogenation over 7 nm Platinum Cubic Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Aliaga, Cesar

    2011-04-28

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements obtained from gas chromatography were used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) over cubic Pt nanoparticles of 7 nm average size, synthesized by colloidal methods and cleaned by ultraviolet light and ozone treatment. Reactions carried out at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range of 20-120 °C produced dihydro and tetrahydro species, as well as ring-opening products (alcohols) and ring-cracking products, showing high selectivity toward ring opening throughout the entire temperature range. The aromatic rings (MF and DMF) adsorbed parallel to the nanoparticle surface. Results yield insight into various surface reaction intermediates and the reason for the significantly lower selectivity for ring cracking in DMF hydrogenation compared to MF hydrogenation. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Reduction of hydrogen desorption temperature of ball-milled MgH2 by NbF5 addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recham, N.; Bhat, V.V.; Kandavel, M.; Aymard, L.; Tarascon, J.-M.; Rougier, A.

    2008-01-01

    Enhanced sorption properties of ball-milled MgH 2 are reported by adding NbF 5 . Among various catalyst amounts, 2 mol% of NbF 5 reveals to be the optimum concentration leading to significant reduction of the desorption temperature as well as faster kinetics of ball-milled MgH 2 . At 200 deg. C, temperature at which MgH 2 does not show any activity, MgH 2NbF 5 /2mol% composite desorbs 3.2 wt.% of H 2 in 50 mins. Interestingly, the addition of NbF 5 is also associated with an increase in the desorption pressure. At 300 deg. C, MgH 2NbF 5 /2mol% composite starts to desorb hydrogen at 600 mbar in comparison with 1 mbar for MgH 2 . Further improvements were successfully achieved by pre-grinding NbF 5 prior to ball-milling the catalyst with MgH 2 . Such pre-ground NbF 5 catalyzed MgH 2 composite desorbs 3 wt.% of H 2 at 150 deg. C. Improved properties are associated with smaller activation energies down to values close to the enthalpy of formation of MgH 2 . Finally, the mechanism at the origin of the enhancement is discussed in terms of catalyst stability, MgF 2 formation and electronic density localization

  4. Kinetics of methane decomposition to CO{sub x}-free hydrogen and carbon nanofiber over Ni-Cu/MgO catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghei, Maryam; Karimzadeh, Ramin [Chemical Engineering Department, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran); Rashidi, Alimorad; Izadi, Nosrat [Research Center of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Tehran (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    Kinetic modeling of methane decomposition to CO{sub x}-free hydrogen and carbon nanofiber has been carried out in the temperature range 550-650 C over Ni-Cu/MgO catalyst from CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2} mixtures at atmospheric pressure. Assuming the different mechanisms of the reaction, several kinetic models were derived based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood type. The optimum value of kinetic parameters has been obtained by Genetic Algorithm and statistical analysis has been used for the model discrimination. The suggested kinetic model relates to the mechanism when the dissociative adsorption of methane molecule is the rate-determining stage and the estimated activation energy is 50.4 kJ/mol in agreement with the literature. The catalyst deactivation was found to be dependent on the time, reaction temperature, and partial pressures of methane and hydrogen. Inspection of the behavior of the catalyst activity in relation to time, led to a model of second order for catalyst deactivation. (author)

  5. Time-kill kinetic analysis of antimicrobial chemotherapy based on hydrogen peroxide photolysis against Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirato, Midori; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Lingström, Peter; Niwano, Yoshimi; Örtengren, Ulf

    2017-08-01

    A recently developed antimicrobial technique utilizing hydroxyl radicals generated by hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) photolysis represents a promising new therapy for preventing and treating dental caries. The present study compared the antimicrobial time-kill kinetics of H 2 O 2 photolysis, conventional antiseptics, and antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) against biofilm-forming Streptococcus mutans (cariogenic bacteria) grown on hydroxyapatite disks. H 2 O 2 photolysis was performed by irradiating the biofilm immersed in 3% H 2 O 2 with 365-nm light-emitting diode (LED) light at an irradiance of 1000mW/cm 2 for up to 1.5min. Antiseptic treatments consisted of 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate, 0.5% povidone-iodine, and 3% H 2 O 2 . The biofilm was immersed in each antiseptic for up to 4min. aPDT was performed by irradiating the biofilm immersed in 100μM methylene blue or toluidine blue O with 655-nm laser light at 1000mW/cm 2 for up to 4min. Based on the time-kill assay, the decimal reduction value (D-value) of each treatment was determined. With a D-value of 0.06min, H 2 O 2 photolysis exhibited the highest bactericidal effect against biofilm-forming S. mutans. In contrast, antiseptics and aPDT exerted a slower bactericidal effect, with D-values of 0.9-2.7min. In conclusion, the antimicrobial technique based on H 2 O 2 photolysis using 365-nm LED represents a strong adjunctive chemotherapy for dental caries treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The interactive effect of fungicide residues and yeast assimilable nitrogen on fermentation kinetics and hydrogen sulfide production during cider fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Thomas F; Peck, Gregory M; O'Keefe, Sean F; Stewart, Amanda C

    2017-01-01

    Fungicide residues on fruit may adversely affect yeast during cider fermentation, leading to sluggish or stuck fermentation or the production of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which is an undesirable aroma compound. This phenomenon has been studied in grape fermentation but not in apple fermentation. Low nitrogen availability, which is characteristic of apples, may further exacerbate the effects of fungicides on yeast during fermentation. The present study explored the effects of three fungicides: elemental sulfur (S 0 ) (known to result in increased H 2 S in wine); fenbuconazole (used in orchards but not vineyards); and fludioxonil (used in post-harvest storage of apples). Only S 0 led to increased H 2 S production. Fenbuconazole (≥0.2 mg L -1 ) resulted in a decreased fermentation rate and increased residual sugar. An interactive effect of yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) concentration and fenbuconazole was observed such that increasing the YAN concentration alleviated the negative effects of fenbuconazole on fermentation kinetics. Cidermakers should be aware that residual fenbuconazole (as low as 0.2 mg L -1 ) in apple juice may lead to stuck fermentation, especially when the YAN concentration is below 250 mg L -1 . These results indicate that fermentation problems attributed to low YAN may be caused or exacerbated by additional factors such as fungicide residues, which have a greater impact on fermentation performance under low YAN conditions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Kinetic study of hydrogen-material interactions in nickel base alloy 600 and stainless steel 316L through coupled experimental and numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, Caitlin-Mae

    2015-01-01

    In France all of the nuclear power plant facilities in service today are pressurized water reactors (PWR). Some parts of the PWR in contact with the primary circuit medium, such as the steam generator tubes (fabricated in nickel base alloy A600) and some reactor core internal components (fabricated in stainless steel 316L), can fall victim to environmental degradation phenomena such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In the late 1950's, H. Coriou observed experimentally and predicted this type of cracking in alloys traditionally renowned for their SCC resistance (A600). Just some 20 to 30 years later his predictions became a reality. Since then, numerous studies have focused on the description and comprehension of the SCC phenomenon in primary water under reactor operating conditions. In view of reactor lifetime extension, it has become both critical and strategic to be capable of simulating SCC phenomenon in order to optimize construction materials, operating conditions, etc. and to understand the critical parameters in order to limit the damage done by SCC. This study focuses on the role hydrogen plays in SCC phenomenon and in particular H-material interactions. Hydrogen, from primary medium in the form of dissolved H gas or H from the water, can be absorbed by the alloy during the oxidation process taking place under reactor operating conditions. Once absorbed, hydrogen may be transported across the material, diffusing in the interstitial sites of the crystallographic structure and interacting with local defects, such as dislocations, precipitates, vacancies, etc. The presence of these [local defect] sites can slow the hydrogen transport and may provoke local H accumulation in the alloy. This accumulation could modify the local mechanical properties of the material and favor premature rupture. It is therefore essential to identify the nature of these H-material interactions, specifically the rate of H diffusion and hydrogen trapping kinetics at these

  8. Plume characteristics and dynamics of UV and IR laser-desorbed oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrigan, Tony L; Timson, David J; Hunniford, C Adam; Catney, Martin; McCullough, Robert W

    2012-05-01

    Laser desorption of dye-tagged oligonucleotides was studied using laser-induced fluorescence imaging. Desorption with ultra violet (UV) and infra-red (IR) lasers resulted in forward directed plumes of molecules. In the case of UV desorption, the initial shot desorbed approximately seven-fold more material than subsequent shots. In contrast, the initial shot in IR desorption resulted in the ejection of less material compared to subsequent shots and these plumes had a component directed along the path of the laser. Thermal equilibrium of the molecules in the plume was achieved after approximately 25 μs with a spread in molecular temperature which was described by a modified Maxwell-Boltzmann equation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Method and apparatus for surface characterization and process control utilizing radiation from desorbed particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, L.C.; Kraus, J.S.; Tolk, N.H.; Traum, M.M.; Tully, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Emission of characteristic electromagnetic radiation in the infrared, visible, or UV from excited particles, typically ions, molecules, or neutral atoms, desorbed from solid surfaces by an incident beam of low-momentum probe radiation has been observed. Disclosed is a method for characterizing solid surfaces based on the observed effect, with low-momentum probe radiation consisting of electrons or photons. Further disclosed is a method for controlling manufacturing processes that is also based on the observed effect. The latter method can, for instance, be advantageously applied in integrated circuit-, integrated optics-, and magnetic bubble device manufacture. Specific examples of applications of the method are registering of masks, control of a direct-writing processing beam, end-point detection in etching, and control of a processing beam for laser- or electron-beam annealing or ion implantation

  10. Development of a kinetic model of hydrogen absorption and desorption in magnesium and analysis of the rate-determining step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yuta; Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2018-05-01

    Mg is promising as a new light-weight and low-cost hydrogen-storage material. We construct a numerical model to represent the hydrogen dynamics on Mg, comprising dissociative adsorption, desorption, bulk diffusion, and chemical reaction. Our calculation shows a good agreement with experimental data for hydrogen absorption and desorption on Mg. Our model clarifies the evolution of the rate-determining processes as absorption and desorption proceed. Furthermore, we investigate the optimal condition and materials design for efficient hydrogen storage in Mg. By properly understanding the rate-determining processes using our model, one can determine the design principle for high-performance hydrogen-storage systems.

  11. Low concentration volatile organic pollutants removal in combined adsorber-desorber-catalytic reactor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsenijević Zorana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs from numerous emission sources is of crucial importance due to more rigorous demands on air quality. Different technologies can be used to treat the VOCs from effluent gases: absorption, physical adsorption, open flame combustion, thermal and catalytic incineration. Their appropriateness for the specific process depends on several factors such as efficiency, energy consumption, secondary pollution, capital investments etc. The distinctive features of the catalytic combustion are high efficiency and selectivity toward be­nign products, low energy consumption and absence of secondary polluti­on. The supported noble catalysts are widely used for catalytic incineration due to their low ignition temperatures and high thermal and chemical stability. In our combined system adsorption and desorption are applied in the spouted bed with draft tube (SBDT unit. The annular zone, loaded with sorbent, was divided in adsorption and desorption section. Draft tube enabled sorbent recirculation between sections. Combustion of desorbed gases to CO2 and water vapor are realized in additive catalytic reactor. This integrated device provided low concentrations VOCs removal with reduced energy consumption. Experiments were conducted on a pilot unit of 220 m3/h nominal capacity. The sorbent was activated carbon, type K81/B - Trayal Corporation, Krusevac. A sphere shaped commercial Pt/Al2O3 catalyst with "egg-shell" macro-distribution was used for the investigation of xylene deep oxidation. Within this paper the investigations of removal of xylene vapors, a typical pollutant in production of liquid pesticides, in combined adsorber/desorber/catalytic reactor system is presented.

  12. Kinetic modeling of hydrogenation and hydro-denitrogenation mechanisms on sulfurated catalysts; Etude par modelisation cinetique des mecanismes d'hydrogenation et d'hydrodesazotation sur catalyseurs sulfures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penet, H.

    1998-10-23

    Toluene hydrogenation on a NiMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied at 350 deg. C as a function of the partial pressures of H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. This experimental study shows the following facts: the effect of the H{sub 2}S partial pressure on the hydrogenation rate is complex. The order with respect to H{sub 2}S varies between -0.05 and -0.5 as the pressure varies between 0.125 and 3 bar; in the presence of NH{sub 3}, the H{sub 2}S inhibiting effect is enhanced. Kinetic modeling was performed with the Chemkin II/Surface Chemkin II software package. On the basis of the effect of contact time and H{sub 2}S on toluene hydrogenation, the adsorption by heterolytic dissociation of H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S was selected. H{sub 2} provides hydride species (H{sup -}) attacking the aromatic ring in a first step. Proton addition during the hydrogenation of the first double bond is the limiting step. In the presence of ammonia. the kinetic modeling shows that the catalyst surface is modified and that the displacement of the H{sub 2}S adsorption equilibrium is expected. The NH{sub 3} adsorption mode could not be clearly discriminated between a simple adsorption through coordination and an adsorption through protonation. This model was applied to the hydro-denitrogenation of 2,6-diethyl-aniline at 350 deg. C on NiMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst and showed that the limitation step is the hydrogenation of the aromatic ring. (author)

  13. Hydrogenation of naphthalene on NiMo- Ni- and Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro-Gezork, Ana Cristina Alves; Winterbottom, John Mike [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Natividad, Reyna [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemistry, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Colon Esq. Tollocan, Toluca, Edo. de Mexico, Mexico CP 50120 (Mexico)

    2008-01-30

    The importance of the hydrodearomatisation (HDA) is increasing together with tightening legislation of fuel quality and exhaust emissions. The present study focuses on hydrogenation (HYD) kinetics of the model aromatic compound naphthalene, found in typical diesel fraction, in n-hexadecane over a NiMo (nickel molybdenum), Ni (nickel) and Ru (ruthenium) supported on trilobe alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) catalysts. Kinetic reaction expressions based on the mechanistic Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) model were derived and tested by regressing the experimental data that translated the effect of both naphthalene and hydrogen concentration at a constant temperature (523.15 and 573.15 K over the NiMo catalyst and at 373.15 K over the Ni and Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts) on the initial reaction rate. The L-H equation, giving an adequate fit to the experimental data with physically meaningful parameters, suggested a competitive adsorption between hydrogen and naphthalene over the presulphided NiMo catalyst and a non-competitive adsorption between these two reactants over the prereduced Ni and Ru/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. In addition, the adsorption constant values indicated that the prereduced Ru catalyst was a much more active catalyst towards naphthalene HYD than the prereduced Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or the presulphided NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. (author)

  14. Estudio cinético de la descomposición catalizada de peróxido de hidrógeno sobre carbón activado Kinetic study of the catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide on activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elihu Paternina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic study of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by activated carbon was carried out. The effect of concentrations of reactants and temperature were experimentally studied. Kinetic data were evaluated using differential method of initial rates of reaction. When a typical kinetic law for reactions in homogeneous phase is used, first order of reaction is obtained for hydrogen peroxide and activated carbon, and activation energy of 27 kJ mol-1 for the reaction was estimated. Experimentally was observed that surface of activated carbon is chemically modified during decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, based on this result a scheme of reaction was proposed and evaluated. Experimental data fits very well to a Langmuir- Hinshelwood kinetic model and activation energy of 40 kJ mol-1 was estimated for reaction in heterogeneous phase.

  15. Ir4+-Doped NiFe LDH to expedite hydrogen evolution kinetics as a Pt-like electrocatalyst for water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian-Qian; Hou, Chun-Chao; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Yang, Xiao; Shi, Rui; Chen, Yong

    2018-06-06

    NiFe-layered double hydroxide (NiFe LDH) is a state-of-the-art oxygen evolution reaction (OER) electrocatalyst, yet it suffers from rather poor catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) due to its extremely sluggish water dissociation kinetics, severely restricting its application in overall water splitting. Herein, we report a novel strategy to expedite the HER kinetics of NiFe LDH by an Ir4+-doping strategy to accelerate the water dissociation process (Volmer step), and thus this catalyst exhibits superior and robust catalytic activity for finally oriented overall water splitting in 1 M KOH requiring only a low initial voltage of 1.41 V delivering at 20 mA cm-2 for more than 50 h.

  16. Influence of hydrogen on the behaviour of metals - Mechanical and kinetic properties of fatigue cracking of steady (ZXNCTD-26-15) and unsteady (Z2CN-18-10) austenitic stainless steels. Role of heat treatments and of cathodic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huwarts, Pascale; Habashi, Mahmoud

    1984-01-01

    In a context which is characterized by an increased demand in high resistance stainless steels, austenitic stainless steels with structural hardening have been notably studied. These are ductile materials in over-hardened state, therefore machinable, and can be hardened by ageing heat treatment after machining. The author reports the study of the tensile and resilience mechanical behaviour, and of the kinetic fatigue cracking of three austenitic stainless steels in presence of hydrogen. One of them is unsteady and belongs to the 300 family, whereas the two others are grades of a steady steel with structural hardening (26 pc Ni - 15 pc Cr). The author more particularly focused on the influence of thermal treatments and of phase transformation on hydrogen-induced embrittlement of these steels. After a bibliographical study on austenitic stainless steels and on their behaviour with respect to hydrogen, the author reports a detailed analysis of the studied steels. He reports tests and their results, and discusses the role of microstructure in the mechanical behaviour of these steels in presence and in absence of cathodic hydrogen [fr

  17. Impact of Nanostructuring on the Phase Behavior of Insertion Materials: The Hydrogenation Kinetics of a Magnesium Thin Film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bannenberg, L.J.; Schreuders, H.; van Eijck, L.; Heringa, J.R.; Steinke, N.J.; Dalgliesh, RM; Dam, B.; Mulder, F.M.; van Well, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructuring is widely applied in both battery and hydrogen materials to improve the performance of these materials as energy carriers. Nanostructuring changes the diffusion length as well as the thermodynamics of materials. We studied the impact of nanostructuring on the hydrogenation in a model

  18. Kinetics and mechanisms of the oxidation of alcohols and hydroxylamines by hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by methyltrioxorhenium, MTO, and the oxygen binding properties of cobalt Schiff base complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauche, Timothy [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Catalysis is a very interesting area of chemistry, which is currently developing at a rapid pace. A great deal of effort is being put forth by both industry and academia to make reactions faster and more productive. One method of accomplishing this is by the development of catalysts. Enzymes are an example of catalysts that are able to perform reactions on a very rapid time scale and also very specifically; a goal for every man-made catalyst. A kinetic study can also be carried out for a reaction to gain a better understanding of its mechanism and to determine what type of catalyst would assist the reaction. Kinetic studies can also help determine other factors, such as the shelf life of a chemical, or the optimum temperature for an industrial scale reaction. An area of catalysis being studied at this time is that of oxygenations. Life on this earth depends on the kinetic barriers for oxygen in its various forms. If it were not for these barriers, molecular oxygen, water, and the oxygenated materials in the land would be in a constant equilibrium. These same barriers must be overcome when performing oxygenation reactions on the laboratory or industrial scale. By performing kinetic studies and developing catalysts for these reactions, a large number of reactions can be made more economical, while making less unwanted byproducts. For this dissertation the activation by transition metal complexes of hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen coordination will be discussed.

  19. High sensitivity detection of desorbed biomolecules by photoionization with tunable VUV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.F.; Calaway, W.F.; Veryovkin, I.V.; Pellin, M.J.; Lewellen, J.W.; Li, Y.; Milton, S.V.; King, B.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The spectral region from 7 to 11eV has two attributes that make it attractive for biomolecule photoionization: 1. high photoionization cross sections, leading to high detection efficiency, and 2. overlap with nearly all first ionization energies of biomolecules, allowing possible control over fragmentation by accessing different final states via tuning. The lack of available tunable lasers in this energy range has generally hindered exploitation of these features thus far. A free-electron laser in operation at Argonne National Laboratory provides high pulse energy, widely tunable VUV pulses of 300 fs duration. Coupled with a novel time-of-flight mass spectrometer, this laser is able to photoionize and detect biomolecules, including peptides and nucleosides. Either laser desorption or primary ion beams are used to desorb sample material, followed by photoionization with a VUV laser. The instrument uses novel ion optics to extract photoions from a large volume while maintaining high mass resolution. This approach is capable of yielding dramatically improved detection limits over more conventional methods such as MALDI and SIMS. In the case of the common peptide substance P, for example, a substantial improvement over the MALDI signal was observed using VUV photoionization with very little observed fragmentation of the molecule. Nucleosides and cisplatin were also measured with typically order of magnitude improvements in signal. These and other examples show clearly the benefits that can be obtained in high sensitivity mass spectrometry of biomolecules with the increasing availability of VUV laser sources

  20. The kinetic and mechanical aspects of hydrogen-induced failure in metals. Ph.D. Thesis, 1971

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Premature hydrogen-induced failure observed to occur in many metal systems involves three stages of fracture: (1) crack initiation, (2) stable slow crack growth, and (3) unstable rapid crack growth. The presence of hydrogen at some critical location on the metal surface or within the metal lattice was shown to influence one or both of the first two stages of brittle fracture but has a negligible effect on the unstable rapid crack growth stage. The relative influence of the applied parameters of time, temperature, etc., on the propensity of a metal to exhibit hydrogen induced premature failure was investigated.

  1. Dependence of hydrogen-induced lattice defects and hydrogen embrittlement of cold-drawn pearlitic steels on hydrogen trap state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshida, Tomoki; Takai, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the hydrogen state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility and hydrogen-induced lattice defects were evaluated for cold-drawn pearlitic steel that absorbed hydrogen in two trapping states. Firstly, tensile tests were carried out under various conditions to evaluate hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. The results showed that peak 2 hydrogen, desorbed at temperatures above 200 °C as determined by thermal desorption analysis (TDA), had no significant effect on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. In contrast, hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased in the presence of peak 1 hydrogen, desorbed from room temperature to 200 °C as determined by TDA, at temperatures higher than −30 °C, at lower strain rates and with higher hydrogen content. Next, the same effects on hydrogen-induced lattice defects were also evaluated by TDA using hydrogen as a probe. Peak 2 hydrogen showed no significant effect on either hydrogen-induced lattice defects or hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. It was found that hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed under the conditions where hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased. This relationship indicates that hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility was higher under the conditions where the formation of hydrogen-induced lattice defects tended to be enhanced. Since hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed by the interaction between hydrogen and strain were annihilated by annealing at a temperature of 200 °C, they were presumably vacancies or vacancy clusters. One of the common atomic-level changes that occur in cold-drawn pearlitic steel showing higher hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility is the formation of vacancies and vacancy clusters

  2. Hydrogen kinetics in a-Si:H and a-SiC:H thin films investigated by real-time ERD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halindintwali, S., E-mail: shalindintwali@uwc.ac.za [Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Khoele, J. [Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Nemroaui, O. [Department of Mechatronics, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, P.O. Box 1906, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Comrie, C.M. [Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Theron, C.C. [Physics Department, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa)

    2015-04-15

    Hydrogen effusion from hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si{sub 1−x}C{sub x}:H) thin films during a temperature ramp between RT and 600 °C was studied by in situ real-time elastic recoil detection analysis. Point to point contour maps show the hydrogen depth profile and its evolution with the ramped temperature. This paper proposes a diffusion limited evolution model to study H kinetic properties from total retained H contents recorded in a single ramp. In a compact a-Si:H layer where H predominantly effuses at high temperatures between 500 and 600 °C, an activation energy value of ∼1.50 eV and a diffusion pre-factor of 0.41 × 10{sup −4} cm{sup 2}/s were obtained. Applied to an non-stoichiometric a-Si{sub 1−x}C{sub x}:H film in the same range of temperature, the model led to reduced values of activation energy and diffusion prefactor of ∼0.33 eV and 0.59 × 10{sup −11} cm{sup 2}/s, respectively.

  3. Kinetic formulae for muon-catalyzed fusion of hydrogen isotopes and their application to the description of the data for pure deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gula, A.

    1987-01-01

    The data on the time distributions of muon-catalyzed fusion (μCF) events in pure deuterium targets published before 1987 are analysed using the kinetic formalism developed by the author and collaborators in a series of papers. The formalism enables one to describe these time distributions in an arbitrary mixture of hydrogen isotopes with strict inclusion of registration efficiency and dead time. The kinetic formulae for such distributions can be readily obtained using a prescription based on the theory of signal-flow graphs even for very complicated kinetic situations, thus, allowing one to avoid the simplifying assumptions which have been usually made in earlier analyses. Practically all important processes forming the muon-catalysis chain can be strictly taken into account in the approximation of constant transition rates. Consecutive μCF cycles can be described separately, which provides a useful tool in data analysis. The developed formalism is applied to the existing data for pure deuterium. First cycle-by-cycle time distributions reported for room temperature by the Gatchina group are analysed. 93 refs., 14 figs. (author)

  4. High surface area niobium oxides as catalysts for improved hydrogen sorption properties of ball milled MgH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, V.V.; Rougier, A.; Aymard, L.; Nazri, G.A.; Tarascon, J.-M.

    2008-01-01

    We report, high surface area (up to 200 m 2 /g) nanocrystalline niobium oxide (so called p-Nb 2 O 5 ) synthesized by 'chimie douce' route and its importance in enhancing the hydrogen sorption properties of MgH 2 . p-Nb 2 O 5 induces faster kinetics than commonly used commercial Nb 2 O 5 (c-Nb 2 O 5 ) when ball milled with MgH 2 (named (MgH 2 ) catalyst ) by reducing the time of desorption from 35 min in (MgH 2 ) c-Nb 2 O 5 to 12 min in (MgH 2 ) p-Nb 2 O 5 at 300 deg. C. The BET surface area of as-prepared Nb 2 O 5 was tuned by heat treatment and its effect on sorption properties was studied. Among them, both p-Nb 2 O 5 and Nb 2 O 5 :350 (p-Nb 2 O 5 heated to 350 deg. C with a BET specific surface area of 46 m 2 /g) desorb 5 wt.% within 12 min, exhibiting the best catalytic activity. Furthermore, thanks to the addition of high surface area Nb 2 O 5 , the desorption temperature was successfully lowered down to 200 deg. C, with a significant amount of desorbed hydrogen (4.5 wt.%). In contrast, the composite (MgH 2 ) c-Nb 2 O 5 shows no desorption at this 'low' temperature

  5. A Microscale Approach to Chemical Kinetics in the General Chemistry Laboratory: The Potassium Iodide Hydrogen Peroxide Iodine-Clock Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattsangi, Prem D.

    2011-01-01

    A microscale laboratory for teaching chemical kinetics utilizing the iodine clock reaction is described. Plastic pipets, 3 mL volume, are used to store and deliver precise drops of reagents and the reaction is run in a 24 well plastic tray using a total 60 drops of reagents. With this procedure, students determine the rate of reaction and the…

  6. The toxicity of cationic surfactant HDTMA-Br, desorbed from surfactant modified zeolite, towards faecal indicator and environmental microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Peter J; Fallowfield, Howard J

    2017-10-05

    Surfactant Modified Zeolite (SMZ) represents a versatile, cost-effective permeable reactive material, capable of treating multiple classes of contaminants. The potential for HDTMA-Br, a cationic surfactant commonly used to modify zeolite, to desorb from the zeolite surface has been identified as a potential issue for the ongoing use of SMZ in water remediation contexts. This paper investigates the toxicity of HDTMA-Br towards enteric virus surrogates, F-RNA bacteriophage MS2 and E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, and soil microflora. The concentration of surfactant desorbing from SMZ was quantified through a bioassay using E. coli. Results showed HDTMA-Br concentrations of ≥10 -5 M were toxic to MS2, ≥10 -4 M were toxic to E. coli and ≥10 -6 M were toxic to B. subtilis. No toxic relationship was established between HDTMA-Br and soil microflora. Desorption of ≥10 -4 M of HDTMA-Br was shown for the two SMZ samples under the mixing conditions used. Effects of this surfactant on total soil microflora were ambiguous since no toxic relationship could be established, however, HDTMA-Br, at concentrations desorbing from SMZ, were shown to impact the soil bacterium B. subtilis. Further research is required to determine the effect of this surfactant on microbial populations and species diversity in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An Approach for Measuring the Sorptive Behavior of Odorants Using a Multifunction Thermal Desorber Unit: Preliminary Tests on Reduced Sulfur Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Woo Joo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the sorptive behavior of reduced sulfur compounds (RSC was investigated using a combination of thermal desorber (TD unit and gas chromatography (GC. To examine the sorptive properties of RSC on textile materials, two types of experiments were conducted under experimental conditions favorable for sorptive processes. In all the experiments, gaseous standards of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide were supplied to initiate the adsorption processes on textile pieces. The textile pieces were then forced to release those adsorbed RSC under a fixed condition. It was found that the extent of adsorption, if evaluated quantitatively, occurred at approximately 1/1000 to 1/100 of the level of RSC standards supplied originally to induce adsorption. It also indicated that RSC adsorption was affected very sensitively by the initial exposure durations to induce RSC adsorption with an exponential decrease in relative recovery (RR values with increasing exposure time. The relative sorptive patterns, when compared between different RSCs, were affected most sensitively by such factors as molecular weight and/or physical contact conditions.

  8. Hydrogen retention properties of lithium film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Koh; Yamauchi, Yuji; Hirohata, Yuko; Hino, Tomoaki; Mori, Kintaro

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen retention properties of Li films and lithium oxide-lithium hydroxide (Li 2 O-LiOH) mixed films were investigated by two methods, hydrogen ion irradiation and hydrogen glow discharge. In a case of the hydrogen ion irradiation, thermal desorption spectrum of hydrogen retained in Li 2 O-LiOH film had two desorption peaks at around 470 K and 570 K. The ratio between retained hydrogen and Li atom was about 0.7. In a case of the hydrogen glow discharge, the hydrogen was also gettered in Li film during the discharge. The ratio of H/Li was almost 0.9. Most of gettered hydrogen desorbed by a baking with a temperature of 370 K. On the contrary, when the Li film exposed to the atmosphere was irradiated by the hydrogen plasma, the desorption of H 2 O was observed in addition to the adsorption of H 2 . (author)

  9. Effect of Human and Bovine Serum Albumin on kinetic Chemiluminescence of Mn (III-Tetrakis (4-Sulfonatophenyl Porphyrin-Luminol-Hydrogen Peroxide System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Yahya Kazemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with an attempt to study the effect of human and bovine serum albumin on kinetic parameters of chemiluminescence of luminol-hydrogen peroxide system catalyzed by manganese tetrasulfonatophenyl porphyrin (MnTSPP. The investigated parameters involved pseudo-first-order rise and fall rate constant for the chemiluminescence burst, maximum level intensity, time to reach maximum intensity, total light yield, and values of the intensity at maximum CL which were evaluated by nonlinear least square program KINFIT. Because of interaction of metalloporphyrin with proteins, the CL parameters are drastically affected. The systems resulted in Stern-Volmer plots with values of 3.17×105 and 3.7×105M−1 in the quencher concentration range of 1.5×10−6 to 1.5×10−5 M for human serum albumin (HSA and bovine serum albumin (BSA, respectively.

  10. Simulation of uranium oxides reduction kinetics by hydrogen. Reactivities of germination and growth; Modelisation de la cinetique de reduction d`oxydes d`uranium par l`hydrogene. Reactivites de germination et de croissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, C

    1997-12-04

    The aim of this work is to simulate the reduction by hydrogen of the tri-uranium octo-oxide U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (obtained by uranium trioxide calcination) into uranium dioxide. The kinetics curves have been obtained by thermal gravimetric analysis, the hydrogen and steam pressures being defined. The geometrical modeling which has allowed to explain the trend of the kinetics curves and of the velocity curves is an anisotropic germination-growth modeling. The powder is supposed to be formed of spherical grains with the same radius. The germs of the new UO{sub 2} phase appear at the surface of the U{sub 3}O{sub 8} grains with a specific germination frequency. The growth reactivity is anisotropic and is very large in the tangential direction to the grains surface. Then, the uranium dioxide growths inside the grain and the limiting step is the grain surface. The variations of the growth reactivity and of the germination specific frequency in terms of the gases partial pressures and of the temperature have been explained by two different mechanisms. The limiting step of the growth mechanism is the desorption of water in the uranium dioxide surface. Concerning the germination mechanism the limiting step is a water desorption too but in the tri-uranium octo-oxide surface. The same geometrical modeling and the same germination and growth mechanisms have been applied to the reduction of a tri-uranium octo-oxide obtained by calcination of hydrated uranium trioxide. The values of the germination specific frequency of this solid are nevertheless weaker than those of the solid obtained by direct calcination of the uranium trioxide. (O.M.) 45 refs.

  11. The effect of preparation conditions and the ionizing radiation on the kinetics of cupric oxide reduction by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospisil, M.; Taras, P.

    1977-01-01

    Cupric oxide reduction in the temperature interval 170 to 350 degC was studied by thermogravimetry. The reduction kinetics can be quantitatively described by the modified Prout-Tompkinson equation, with the apparent activation energy varying within the limits (4.94 to 5.82)x10 4 J/mol. Irregularities observed during the reduction of the oxide of the oxalate origin are due to the high content of the metallic phase. The p-semiconducting nature of these oxides was proved for all samples. The effect of the pre-irradiation of samples with γ-rays (with an absorbed dose of (1.4 to 4.75)x10 6 J/kg) on the reduction kinetics depends on the origin of the cupric oxide. In contrast to NiO no correlation between the content of super-stoichiometric oxygen and the reduction kinetics was found. After irradiation with γ-rays or with fast neutrons at a dose of 79.8 J/kg the reduction rate increases and the activation energy decreases regardless of the oxide origin. At the same time the concentration of the ionic form of super-stoichiometric oxygen increases. (author)

  12. Experimental, kinetic and numerical modeling of hydrogen production by catalytic reforming of crude ethanol over a commercial catalyst in packed bed tubular reactor and packed bed membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboudheir, Ahmed; Akande, Abayomi; Idem, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    reactor. The model was based on the coupling of mass, momentum and energy balance equations as well as our new kinetic model developed for this process.The simulation results for crude ethanol conversion were found to be in accordance with the experimental data obtained at various operating conditions. In addition, the predicted variations of the concentration and temperature profiles for our process. In the radial direction indicate that the assumption of plug flow and isothermal behaviour is justified within certain kinetics operating conditions. However, even within these operating conditions, our results have proven that the axial dispersion terms in the balance equations (mass, momentum and energy) cannot be neglected, especially in the hypothetical industrial case presented in this work for the reforming of crude ethanol. In addition, in the experimental study of the application of a porous membrane reactor for the crude ethanol reforming process conducted to compare with that for the packed bed tubular reactor, it was found that the membrane reactor outperformed the packed bed tubular reactor in terms of crude ethanol conversion and hydrogen production. This is due to the function of the membrane reactor to shift the thermodynamic equilibrium in favour of the conversion of crude ethanol to hydrogen according to Le Catelier-Braun's law.(Author)

  13. Kinetic evidence for the formation of discrete 1,4-dehydrobenzene intermediates. Trapping by inter- and intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer and observation of high-temperature CIDNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockhart, Thomas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Comita, Paul B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Bergman, Robert G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1981-07-01

    Upon heating, alkyl-substituted cis-1,2-diethynyl olefins undergo cyclization to yield reactive 1,4-dehydrobenzenes; the products isolated may be derived from either unimolecular or bimolecular reactions of the intermediate. (Z)-4,5-Diethynyl-4-octene (4) undergoes rearrangement to yield 2,3-di-n-propyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene (17). Solution pyrolysis of 4 in inert aromatic solvents produces three unimolecular products, (Z)-dodeca-4,8-diyn-6-ene (7), benzocyclooctene (9), and o-allyl-n-propylbenzene (10), in high yield. When 1,4-cyclohexadiene is added to the pyrolysis solution as a trapping agent, high yields of the reduced product o-di-n-propylbenzene (12) are obtained. The kinetics of solution pyrolysis of 4 in the presence and absence of trapping agent establish that 2,3-di-n-propyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene is a discrete intermediate on the pathway leading to products. When the reaction was run in the heated probe of an NMR spectrometer, CIDNP was observed in 10. This observation, along with kinetic and chemical trapping evidence, indicates the presence of two additional intermediates, formed from 17 by sequential intramolecular [1,5] hydrogen transfer, on the pathway to products. The observation of CIDNP, coupled with the reactivity exhibited by 17 and the other two intermediates, implicate a biradical description of these molecules. Biradical 17 has been estimated to have a lifetime of about 10-9 s at 200°C and to lie in a well of about 5 kcal/mol with respect to the lowest energy unimolecular pathway ([1,5] hydrogen transfer). Ring opening (expected to be the lowest energy process for 1,4-dehydrobenzenes in which intramolecular hydrogen transfer is unlikely) to the isomeric diethynyl olefin 7 appears to have an activation enthalpy of about 10 kcal/moL Upon thermal reaction in the gas phase (400°C) or in solution in inert solvents (Z)-hexa-2,3-diethyl-1,5-diyn-3-ene (5) rearranges in good yield to the isomeric diethynyl olefin (Z)-deca-3,7-diyn-5-ene (8

  14. Selective heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of ketone (C═O) to alcohol (OH) by magnetite nanoparticles following Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Muhammad Tariq; Balouch, Aamna; Rajar, Kausar; Sirajuddin; Brohi, Imdad Ali; Umar, Akrajas Ali

    2015-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized and effectively employed as heterogeneous catalyst for hydrogenation of ketone moiety to alcohol moiety by NaBH4 under the microwave radiation process. The improvement was achieved in percent recovery of isopropyl alcohol by varying and optimizing reaction time, power of microwave radiations and amount of catalyst. The catalytic study revealed that acetone would be converted into isopropyl alcohol (IPA) with 99.5% yield in short period of reaction time, using 10 μg of magnetite NPs (Fe3O4). It was observed that the catalytic hydrogenation reaction, followed second-order of reaction and the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic mechanism, which elucidated that both reactants get adsorb onto the surface of silica coated magnetite nanocatalyst to react. Consequently, the rate-determining step was the surface reaction of acetone and sodium borohydride. The current study revealed an environment friendly conversion of acetone to IPA on the basis of its fast, efficient, and highly economical method of utilization of microwave irradiation process and easy catalyst recovery.

  15. Efficient Synthesis of Differentiated syn-1,2-Diol Derivatives by Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation-Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of α-Alkoxy-Substituted β-Ketoesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnereau, Laure; Cartigny, Damien; Scalone, Michelangelo; Ayad, Tahar; Ratovelomanana-Vidal, Virginie

    2015-08-10

    Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation was applied to a wide range of racemic aryl α-alkoxy-β-ketoesters in the presence of well-defined, commercially available, chiral catalyst Ru(II) -(N-p-toluenesulfonyl-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine) and a 5:2 mixture of formic acid and triethylamine as the hydrogen source. Under these conditions, dynamic kinetic resolution was efficiently promoted to provide the corresponding syn α-alkoxy-β-hydroxyesters derived from substituted aromatic and heteroaromatic aldehydes with a high level of diastereoselectivity (diastereomeric ratio (d.r.)>99:1) and an almost perfect enantioselectivity (enantiomeric excess (ee)>99 %). Additionally, after extensive screening of the reaction conditions, the use of Ru(II) - and Rh(III) -tethered precatalysts extended this process to more-challenging substrates that bore alkenyl-, alkynyl-, and alkyl substituents to provide the corresponding syn α-alkoxy-β-hydroxyesters with excellent enantiocontrol (up to 99 % ee) and good to perfect diastereocontrol (d.r.>99:1). Lastly, the synthetic utility of the present protocol was demonstrated by application to the asymmetric synthesis of chiral ester ethyl (2S)-2-ethoxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propanoate, which is an important pharmacophore in a number of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ dual agonist advanced drug candidates used for the treatment of type-II diabetes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Effects of three methane mitigation agents on parameters of kinetics of total and hydrogen gas production, ruminal fermentation and hydrogen balance using in vitro technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Wang, Rong; Yang, Shan; Deng, Jin Ping; Tang, Shao Xun; Tan, Zhi Liang

    2016-02-01

    Methane (CH4 ) can be mitigated through directly inhibiting methanogen activity and starving methanogens by hydrogen (H2 ) sink. Three types of mechanism (i.e. bromoethanesulphonate (BES), nitrate and emodin) and doses of CH4 mitigation agents were employed to investigate their pathways of CH4 inhibition. Results indicated that both BES and emodin inhibited CH4 production and altered H2 balance, which could be accompanied by decreased dry matter disappearance (DMD), fractional rate of gH2 formation, volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, ability to produce and use reducing equivalences and molecular H2 , and increased final asymptotic gH2 production, time to the peak of gH2 , discrete lag time of gH2 production and fermentation efficiency. However, emodin decreased gas volume produced by rapidly fermentable components of substrate and the rate of fermentation at early stage of incubation, while BES supplementation inhibited gas volume produced by both rapidly and slowly fermentable components of substrate and the rate of fermentation at middle or late stage of incubation. The nitrate supplementation inhibited CH4 production without affecting VFA profile, because of its dual role as H2 sink and being toxic to methanogens. Nitrate supplementation had more complicated pattern of fermentation, VFA production and profile and H2 balance in comparison to BES and emodin supplementation. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Quasiclassical trajectory study of the molecular beam kinetics of the deuterium atom--hydrogen halide exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raff, L.M.; Suzukawa, H.H. Jr.; Thompson, D.L.

    1975-01-01

    Unadjusted quasiclassical trajectory computations have been carried out to simulate the molecular beam scattering of thermal D atom beams at 2800 degreeK crossed with beams of HCl and HI at 250 degreeK. Total reaction cross sections, energy partitioning distributions, and differential scattering cross sections have been computed for the exchange reactions D+HCl → DCl+H and D+HI → DI+H while total reaction cross sections are reported for the corresponding abstractions, i.e., D+HCl → HD+Cl and D+HI → HD+I. For the exchange reactions, the computed reaction cross sections are within the range estimated from the crossed beam experiments. The calculated average energy partitioned into relative translational motion of products is in near quantitative agreement with the beam results, and the predicted differential scattering cross sections appear to be in qualitative accord with the beam experiments. The over-all agreement between theory and experiment indicates that previously computed values for the thermal rate coefficients for the exchange reactions are of the right order and that a systematic error exists in the interpretation of photolysis data in the hydrogen--hydrogen halide systems

  18. Kinetic hydrogen isotope effects in the concerted mechanism for the hydrolysis of acetals, ketals, and ortho esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliason, R.; Kreevoy, M.M.

    1978-01-01

    The hydrolysis of many ortho esters, and some acetals and ketals, is general acid catalyzed, and in some examples these generate linear Bronsted plots over substantial ranges of catalyst acidity. This suggests that the reaction coordinate is primarily a reorganization of heavy atoms since proton transfer from one oxygen to another has been shown to generate strongly curved Bronsted plots. However, the isotopic fractionation factor for the catalytically active proton in these transition states is substantially less than 1.0; in several examples it is less than 0.5. Such values have been thought to require that the reaction coordinate be largely a motion of the hydrogen giving the low fractionation factor. This dilemma has been resolved by the observation and rationalization of fractionation factors as low as 0.28 for stable, hydrogen bridge-bonded complexes, AHA - . A similar, bounded coordinate is now suggested for the catalytically active protons in question. This permits the reaction coordinate to be pictured. 3 figures, 2 tables

  19. Electrochemical kinetic performances of electroplating Co–Ni on La–Mg–Ni-based hydrogen storage alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan; Tao, Yang; Ke, Dandan; Ma, Yufei [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Han, Shumin, E-mail: hanshm@ysu.edu.cn [Hebei Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The Co–Ni composite coating was prepared by electroplating. • The alloy treated at 10 mA/cm{sup 2} has superior kinetic performances. • The Co–Ni layer accelerates the charge transfer rate on the surface of the alloy. - Abstract: Electroplating Co–Ni treatment was applied to the surface of the La{sub 0.75}Mg{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 3.48} alloy electrodes in order to improve the electrochemical and kinetic performances. The Scanning electron microscope-Energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results showed that the electrodes were plated with a homogeneous Co–Ni alloy film. The alloy coating significantly improved the high rate dischargeability of the alloy electrode, and the HRD value increased to 57.5% at discharge current density 1875 mA/g after the Co–Ni-coating. The exchange current density I{sub 0}, the limiting current density I{sub L} and the oxidation peak current also increased for the coated alloy. The improvement of overall electrode performances was attributed to an enhancement in electro-catalytic activity and conductivity at the alloy surface, owing to the precipitation of the Co–Ni layer.

  20. Hydrogen storage in binary and ternary Mg-based alloys: A comprehensive experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalisvaart, W.P.; Harrower, C.T.; Haagsma, J.; Zahiri, B.; Luber, E.J.; Ophus, C.; Mitlin, D. [Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta and National Research Council Canada, National Institute for Nanotechnology, T6G 2V4, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Poirier, E.; Fritzsche, H. [National Research Council Canada, SIMS, Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    This study focused on hydrogen sorption properties of 1.5 {mu}m thick Mg-based films with Al, Fe and Ti as alloying elements. The binary alloys are used to establish as baseline case for the ternary Mg-Al-Ti, Mg-Fe-Ti and Mg-Al-Fe compositions. We show that the ternary alloys in particular display remarkable sorption behavior: at 200 C the films are capable of absorbing 4-6 wt% hydrogen in seconds, and desorbing in minutes. Furthermore, this sorption behavior is stable over cycling for the Mg-Al-Ti and Mg-Fe-Ti alloys. Even after 100 absorption/desorption cycles, no degradation in capacity or kinetics is observed. For Mg-Al-Fe, the properties are clearly worse compared to the other ternary combinations. These differences are explained by considering the properties of all the different phases present during cycling in terms of their hydrogen affinity and catalytic activity. Based on these considerations, some general design principles for Mg-based hydrogen storage alloys are suggested. (author)

  1. Organic contaminants in soil : desorption kinetics and microbial degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlebaum, W.

    1999-01-01

    The availability of organic contaminants in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g.) soil washing or soil venting) depends on the desorption kinetics of these contaminants from the soil matrix. When the organic contaminants desorb very slow from the

  2. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Requirements in Anaerobic Methane Oxidizing Consortia Exclude Hydrogen, Acetate, and Methanol as Possible Electron Shuttles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, K.B.; Finster, K.; Ramsing, N.B.

    2001-07-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) has long remained an enigma in microbial ecology. In the process the net reaction appears to be an oxidation of methane with sulfate as electron acceptor. In order to explain experimental data such as effects of inhibitors and isotopic signals in biomarkers it has been suggested that the process is carried out by a consortium of bacteria using an unknown compound to shuttle electrons between the participants. The overall change in free energy during AMO with sulfate is very small (?22 kJ mol-1) at in situ concentrations of methane and sulfate. In order to share the available free energy between the members of the consortium, the concentration of the intermediate electron shuttle compound becomes crucial. Diffusive flux of a substrate (i.e, the electron shuttle) between bacteria requires a stable concentration gradient where the concentration is higher in the producing organism than in the consuming organism. Since changes in concentrations cause changes in reaction free energies, the diffusive flux of a catabolic product/substrate between bacteria is associated with a net loss of available energy. This restricts maximal inter-bacterial distances in consortia composed of stationary bacteria. A simple theoretical model was used to describe the relationship between inter-bacterial distances and the energy lost due to concentration differences in consortia. Key parameters turned out to be the permissible concentration range of the electron shuttle in the consortium (i.e., the concentration range that allows both participants to gain sufficient energy) and the stoichiometry of the partial reactions. The model was applied to two known consortia degrading ethanol and butyrate and to four hypothetical methane-oxidizing consortia (MOC) based on interspecies transfer of hydrogen, methanol, acetate, or formate, respectively. In the first three MOCs the permissible distances between producers and consumers of the transferred compounds were

  3. A statistical mechanical theory of proton transport kinetics in hydrogen-bonded networks based on population correlation functions with applications to acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckerman, Mark E; Chandra, Amalendu; Marx, Dominik

    2010-09-28

    Extraction of relaxation times, lifetimes, and rates associated with the transport of topological charge defects in hydrogen-bonded networks from molecular dynamics simulations is a challenge because proton transfer reactions continually change the identity of the defect core. In this paper, we present a statistical mechanical theory that allows these quantities to be computed in an unbiased manner. The theory employs a set of suitably defined indicator or population functions for locating a defect structure and their associated correlation functions. These functions are then used to develop a chemical master equation framework from which the rates and lifetimes can be determined. Furthermore, we develop an integral equation formalism for connecting various types of population correlation functions and derive an iterative solution to the equation, which is given a graphical interpretation. The chemical master equation framework is applied to the problems of both hydronium and hydroxide transport in bulk water. For each case it is shown that the theory establishes direct links between the defect's dominant solvation structures, the kinetics of charge transfer, and the mechanism of structural diffusion. A detailed analysis is presented for aqueous hydroxide, examining both reorientational time scales and relaxation of the rotational anisotropy, which is correlated with recent experimental results for these quantities. Finally, for OH(-)(aq) it is demonstrated that the "dynamical hypercoordination mechanism" is consistent with available experimental data while other mechanistic proposals are shown to fail. As a means of going beyond the linear rate theory valid from short up to intermediate time scales, a fractional kinetic model is introduced in the Appendix in order to describe the nonexponential long-time behavior of time-correlation functions. Within the mathematical framework of fractional calculus the power law decay ∼t(-σ), where σ is a parameter of the

  4. TEM analysis of the microstructure in TiF3-catalyzed and pure MgH2 during the hydrogen storage cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danaie, Mohsen; Mitlin, David

    2012-01-01

    We utilized transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, with a cryogenically cooled sample stage, to detail the microstructure of partially transformed pure and titanium fluoride-catalyzed magnesium hydride powder during hydrogenation cycling. The TiF 3 -catalyzed MgH 2 powder demonstrated excellent hydrogen storage kinetics at various temperatures, whereas the uncatalyzed MgH 2 showed significant degradation in both kinetics and capacity. TEM analysis on the partially hydrogen absorbed and partially desorbed pure Mg(MgH 2 ) revealed a large fraction of particles that were either not transformed at all or were completely transformed. On the other hand, in the MgH 2 +TiF 3 system it was much easier to identify regions with both the hydride and the metal phase coexisting in the same particle. This enabled us to establish the metal hydride orientation relationship (OR) during hydrogen absorption. The OR was determined to be (1 1 0)MgH 2 || (−1 1 0 −1)Mg and [−1 1 1]MgH 2 || [0 1 −1 1]Mg. During absorption the number density of the hydride nuclei does not show a dramatic increase due the presence of TiF 3 . Conversely, during desorption the TiF 3 catalyst substantially increases the number of the newly formed Mg crystallites, which display a strong texture correlation with respect to the parent MgH 2 phase. Titanium fluoride also promotes extensive twinning in the hydride phase.

  5. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of systems of hydrogen isotopes, lithium hydrides, aluminum, and LiAlO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, J.H.; Randall, D.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium might be bred by the 6 Li(n,α)T reaction in a solid lithium alloy or compound in the blanket of a controlled thermonuclear reactor to avoid problems associated with molten lithium or lithium compounds. Li--Al and LiAlO 2 systems containing hydrogen, deuterium, or tritium were studied 10 to 15 years ago at the Savannah River Laboratory. This paper descibes measurements of (1) the distribution of tritium and helium throughout both α and β phases of irradiated Li--Al alloy, (2) the migration rate of tritium to the β phase during moderate heating, (3) equilibrium pressures as functions of temperature of H 2 , D 2 , or T 2 in contact with lithium hydrides + aluminum, Li--Al alloy, or irradiated Li--Al alloy, (4) the equilibrium constant for the reaction LiH + Al → LiAl + 1 / 2 H 2 as a function of temperature, and (5) extraction rates of tritium from irradiated LiAlO 2 targets at elevated temperatures

  6. Kinetic method for determination of molybdenum(6) and tungsten(6) from oxidaton of O-aminophenol with hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejngol'ts, S.U.; Vasnev, A.N.

    1978-01-01

    A new method for determination of Mo(6) and W(6), based on the oxidation of O-aminophenol with hydrogen peroxide, catalysed by Mo and W(6) ions, is suggested. The reaction takes place in the neutral medium at a rather high substrate concentrations. The 1.5 M acetate buffer solution, 0.2N EDTA and 0.1M solution of O-aminophenol in 0.1M HCl were suggested for determination of Mo (0.2N EDTA was used for Fe(3) camouflage). The 1.5M acetate buffer solution with 0.3M K 2 C 2 O 4 xH 2 O additions, for Fe(3) and Mo(6) camouflage, and 0.1M O-aminophenol solution in 0.1M solution of H 2 C 2 O 4 xH 2 O were used for tungsten determination. The range for Mo and W determination is 3x10 -3 and 1x10 -2 mkg/ml respectively. The range of Mo and W concentrations under determination is from 3x10 -3 -10 -2 to 2 mkg/ml. The techniques for the analysis of highly pure substances is developed

  7. [Kinetic characteristics of extracellular catalase from Penicillium piceum F-648 and variants of fungi, adapted to hydrogen peroxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I; Moroz, I V; Pavlovskaia, Zh I; Mikhaĭlova, R V

    2002-01-01

    A comparative kinetic study of extracellular catalases produced by Penicillium piceum F-648 and their variants adapted to H2O2 was performed in culture liquid filtrates. The specific activity of catalase, the maximum rate of catalase-induced H2O2 degradation (Vmax),Vmax/KM ratio, and the catalase inactivation rate constant in the enzymatic reaction (kin, s-1) were estimated in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 30 degrees C. The effective constant representing the rate of catalase thermal inactivation (kin*, s-1) was determined at 45 degrees C. In all samples, the specific activity and KM for catalase were maximum at a protein concentration in culture liquid filtrates of 2.5-3.5 x 10(-4) mg/ml. The effective constants describing the rate of H2O2 degradation (k, s-1) were similar to that observed in the initial culture. These values reflected a twofold decrease in catalase activity in culture liquid filtrates. We hypothesized that culture liquid filtrates contain two isoforms of extracellular catalase characterized by different activities and affinities for H2O2. Catalases from variants 5 and 3 with high and low affinities for H2O2, respectively, had a greater operational stability than the enzyme from the initial culture. The method of adaptive selection for H2O2 can be used to obtain fungal variants producing extracellular catalases with improved properties.

  8. Ge(001):B gas-source molecular beam epitaxy: B surface segregation, hydrogen desorption, and film growth kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.; Greene, J.E. [Materials Science Department, the Coordinated Science Laboratory and the Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    1999-03-01

    Ultrahigh B-doped Ge(001) layers, with concentrations C{sub B} up to 8{times}10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}, were grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy from Ge{sub 2}H{sub 6} and B{sub 2}H{sub 6} at temperatures T{sub s}=325{degree}C (in the surface-reaction-limited regime) and 600{degree}C (in the flux-limited regime). The samples were quenched, D site exchanged for H, and D{sub 2} temperature-programed desorption (TPD) used to determine B coverages {theta}{sub B} as a function of C{sub B} and T{sub s} by comparison with B-adsorbed Ge(001) reference samples with known {theta}{sub B} values. During Ge(001):B film growth, strong surface B segregation to the second layer was observed with surface-to-bulk B concentration ratios ranging up to 6000. The TPD spectra exhibited {alpha}{sub 2} and {alpha}{sub 1} peaks associated with dideuteride and monodeuteride desorption as well as lower-temperature B-induced {alpha}{sub 2}{sup {asterisk}} and {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {asterisk}} peaks associated with deuterium desorption from Ge{sup {asterisk}} surface atoms with B backbonds. Increasing {theta}{sub B} expanded the area under {alpha}{sub 2}{sup {asterisk}} and {alpha}{sub 1}{sup {asterisk}} at the expense of {alpha}{sub 2} and {alpha}{sub 1} and decreased the total D coverage {theta}{sub D}. The TPD results were used to determine the B segregation enthalpy, {minus}0.64 eV, and to explain and model the effects of high B coverages on Ge(001) growth kinetics. At T{sub s}=325{degree}C, where B segregation is kinetically hindered, film deposition rates R{sub Ge} are not a strong function of C{sub B}, exhibiting only a small decrease at C{sub B}{approx_gt}5{times}10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. However, at T{sub s}=600{degree}C, R{sub Ge} decreases by up to 40{percent} with increasing C{sub B}{approx_gt}1{times}10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. This is due primarily to the combination of B-induced Ge dimer vacancies and the deactivation of surface dangling bonds caused by charge transfer

  9. Core--strategy leading to high reversible hydrogen storage capacity for NaBH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Meganne L; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-François

    2012-09-25

    Owing to its high storage capacity (10.8 mass %), sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) is a promising hydrogen storage material. However, the temperature for hydrogen release is high (>500 °C), and reversibility of the release is unachievable under reasonable conditions. Herein, we demonstrate the potential of a novel strategy leading to high and stable hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling for NaBH(4) under mild pressure conditions (4 MPa). By an antisolvent precipitation method, the size of NaBH(4) particles was restricted to a few nanometers (hydrogen at 400 °C. Further encapsulation of these nanoparticles upon reaction of nickel chloride at their surface allowed the synthesis of a core--shell nanostructure, NaBH(4)@Ni, and this provided a route for (a) the effective nanoconfinement of the melted NaBH(4) core and its dehydrogenation products, and (b) reversibility and fast kinetics owing to short diffusion lengths, the unstable nature of nickel borohydride, and possible modification of reaction paths. Hence at 350 °C, a reversible and steady hydrogen capacity of 5 mass % was achieved for NaBH(4)@Ni; 80% of the hydrogen could be desorbed or absorbed in less than 60 min, and full capacity was reached within 5 h. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such performances have been achieved with NaBH(4). This demonstrates the potential of the strategy in leading to major advancements in the design of effective hydrogen storage materials from pristine borohydrides.

  10. Structural and Kinetic Evidence for an Extended Hydrogen-Bonding Network in Catalysis of Methyl Group Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doukov, T.; Hemmi, H.; Drennan, C.; Ragsdale, S.

    2007-01-01

    The methyltetrahydrofolate (CH 3 -H 4 folate) corrinoid-ironsulfur protein (CFeSP) methyltransferase (MeTr) catalyzes transfer of the methyl group of CH3-H4folate to cob(I)amide. This key step in anaerobic CO and CO 2 fixation is similar to the first half-reaction in the mechanisms of other cobalamin-dependent methyltransferases. Methyl transfer requires electrophilic activation of the methyl group of CH 3 -H 4 folate, which includes proton transfer to the N5 group of the pterin ring and poises the methyl group for reaction with the Co(I) nucleophile. The structure of the binary CH 3 -H 4 folate/MeTr complex (revealed here) lacks any obvious proton donor near the N5 group. Instead, an Asn residue and water molecules are found within H-bonding distance of N5. Structural and kinetic experiments described here are consistent with the involvement of an extended H-bonding network in proton transfer to N5 of the folate that includes an Asn (Asn-199 in MeTr), a conserved Asp (Asp-160), and a water molecule. This situation is reminiscent of purine nucleoside phosphorylase, which involves protonation of the purine N7 in the transition state and is accomplished by an extended H-bond network that includes water molecules, a Glu residue, and an Asn residue (Kicska, G. A., Tyler, P. C., Evans, G. B., Furneaux, R. H., Shi, W., Fedorov, A., Lewandowicz, A., Cahill, S. M., Almo, S. C., and Schramm, V. L. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 14489-14498). In MeTr, the Asn residue swings from a distant position to within H-bonding distance of the N5 atom upon CH 3 -H 4 folate binding. An N199A variant exhibits only ∼20-fold weakened affinity for CH 3 -H 4 folate but a much more marked 20,000-40,000-fold effect on catalysis, suggesting that Asn-199 plays an important role in stabilizing a transition state or high energy intermediate for methyl transfer

  11. Hydrogen storage and integrated fuel cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karl J.

    2010-08-24

    Hydrogen is stored in materials that absorb and desorb hydrogen with temperature dependent rates. A housing is provided that allows for the storage of one or more types of hydrogen-storage materials in close thermal proximity to a fuel cell stack. This arrangement, which includes alternating fuel cell stack and hydrogen-storage units, allows for close thermal matching of the hydrogen storage material and the fuel cell stack. Also, the present invention allows for tailoring of the hydrogen delivery by mixing different materials in one unit. Thermal insulation alternatively allows for a highly efficient unit. Individual power modules including one fuel cell stack surrounded by a pair of hydrogen-storage units allows for distribution of power throughout a vehicle or other electric power consuming devices.

  12. Improvement in low-temperature and instantaneous high-rate output performance of Al-free AB5-type hydrogen storage alloy for negative electrode in Ni/MH battery: Effect of thermodynamic and kinetic regulation via partial Mn substituting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wanhai; Zhu, Ding; Tang, Zhengyao; Wu, Chaoling; Huang, Liwu; Ma, Zhewen; Chen, Yungui

    2017-03-01

    A series of Al-free Mn-modified AB5-type hydrogen storage alloys have been designed and the effects of thermodynamic stability and electrochemical kinetics on electrochemical performance via Mn substituting have been investigated. Compared with high-Al alloys, the Al-free alloys in this study have better low-temperature performance and instantaneous high-rate output because of the higher surface catalytic ability. After partial substitution of Ni by Mn, both the hydrogen desorption capacity and plateau pressure decrease, and correspondingly results in an improved thermodynamic stability which is adverse to low-temperature delivery. Additionally, with the improvement of charge acceptance ability and anti-corrosion property via Mn substitution, the room-temperature discharge capacity and cycling stability increase slightly. However, Mn adversely affects the electrochemical kinetics and deteriorates both the surface catalytic ability and the bulk hydrogen diffusion ability, leading to the drop of low-temperature dischargeability, high-rate dischargeability and peak power (Ppeak). Based on the thermodynamic and kinetic regulation and overall electrochemical properties, the optimal composition is obtained when x = 0.2, the discharge capacity is 243.6 mAh g-1 at -40 °C with 60 mA g-1, and the Ppeak attains to 969.6 W kg-1 at -40 °C.

  13. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO{sub x} in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwahara, Takuya [Department of Products Engineering and Environmental Management, Nippon Institute of Technology, 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro-machi, Minamisaitama, Saitama 345-8501 (Japan); Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Okubo, Masaaki, E-mail: mokubo@me.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • High-efficiency continuous diesel NO{sub x} reduction method is proposed. • Characteristics of diesel NO{sub x} adsorption and desorption on adsorbent is provided. • Efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction with nonthermal plasma is evaluated. • Efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction with exhaust gas component recirculation is evaluated. • High NO{sub x} removal efficiency equal to only 1.0% penalty of engine power is achieved. - Abstract: Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO{sub x} emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO{sub x} in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NO{sub x} adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO{sub x} in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO{sub x} in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO{sub x} in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components’ recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO{sub x} reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO{sub x} removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO{sub 2})/kWh for NO{sub x} removal and continuous NO{sub x} reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5–7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power.

  14. High hydrogen desorption properties of Mg-based nanocomposite at moderate temperatures: The effects of multiple catalysts in situ formed by adding nickel sulfides/graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiubo; Chen, Ming; Liu, Peng; Shang, Jiaxiang; Liu, Tong

    2017-12-01

    Nickel sulfides decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has been produced by co-reducing Ni2+ and graphene oxide (GO), and is subsequently ball milled with Mg nanoparticles (NPs) produced by hydrogen plasma metal reaction (HPMR). The nickel sulfides of about 800 nm completely in situ change to MgS, Mg2Ni and Ni multiple catalysts after first hydrogenation/dehydrogenation process at 673 K. The Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite shows the highest hydrogen desorption kinetics and capacity properties, and the catalytic effect order of the additives is NiS/rGO, NiS and rGO. At 573 K, the Mg-NiS/rGO nanocomposite can quickly desorb 3.7 wt% H2 in 10 min and 4.5 wt% H2 in 60 min. The apparent hydrogen absorption and desorption activation energies of the Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite are decreased to 44.47 and 63.02 kJ mol-1, smaller than those of the Mg-5wt%rGO and Mg-5wt%NiS samples. The best hydrogen desorption properties of the Mg-5wt%NiS/rGO nanocomposite can be explained by the synergistic catalytic effects of the highly dispersed MgS, Mg2Ni and Ni catalysts on the rGO sheets, and the more nucleation sites between the catalysts, rGO sheets and Mg matrix.

  15. Hydrogen-exchange kinetics of the indole NH proton of the buried tryptophan in the constant fragment of the immunoglobulin light chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Y.; Goto, Y.; Hamaguchi, K.; Hayashi, F.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kyogoku, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The constant fragment of the immunoglobulin light chain (type λ) has two trytophyl residues at positions 150 and 187. Trp-150 is buried in the interior, and Trp-187 lies on the surface of the molecule. The hydrogen-deuterium exchange kinetics of the indole NH proton Trp-150 were studied at various pH values at 25 0 C by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance. Exchange rates were approximately first order in hydroxyl ion dependence above pH 8, were relatively independent of pH between pH 7 and 8, and decreased below pH 7. On the assumption that the exchange above pH 8 proceeds through local fluctuations of the protein molecule, the exchange rates between pH 7 and 8 through global unfolding were estimated. The exchange rate constant within this pH range at 25 0 C thus estimated was consistent with that of the global unfolding of the constant fragment under the same conditions as those reported previously. The activation energy for the exchange process at pH 7.8 was the same as that for the unfolding process by 2 M guanidine hydrochloride. The exchange rates of backbone NH protons were almost the same as that of the indole NH proton of Trp-150 at pH 7.l. These observations also indicated that the exchange between pH 7 and 8 occurs through global unfolding of the protein molecule and is rate-limited by the unfolding. At around pH 9, on the other hand, the activation energy for the exchange process of the indole NH proton of Trp-150 was smaller than that for the unfolding process, and the exchange rates differed according to the different signals of backbone NH protons. These findings together with the pH dependence of the rate constant indicated that exchange due to local fluctuations is predominant above pH 8

  16. The effects of temperature and pH on the kinetics of reactions between catalase and its suicide substrate hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadermarzi, M; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A

    1997-12-01

    Variation of initial (intact) activity (ai), inactivation rate constant (ki) and the partition ratio (r) of bovine liver catalase in the reaction with its suicide substrate, hydrogen peroxide, were determined in workable ranges of temperature (17-42 degrees C) or pH (5-10.5), using the data of progress curves. The changes of temperature had a slight effect on ai, giving a Q10 of 1.15 for the enzymatic breakdown of H2O2, corresponding to an improved value for its activation energy of 8.8 +/- l kJ.mol-1. In contrast, the ki was greatly increased by elevation of temperature, giving a Q10 of 2.1 for the suicide inactivation reaction of catalase. Consequently, a significant decrease of r was observed by increasing of temperature. In pH studies, decreasing of pH from 7.0 to 5.0 led to reduction of ai whereas the ki value was not effected significantly, possibly due to the parallel changes in affinities to free catalase and compound I for H2O2. Reduction of ki and alpha i were observed at pH > 9.5, where reversible dissociation of tetrameric enzyme into catalytically inactive subunits is possible. The r had a maximum value at pH around 7.5, similar to that of catalase activity. The effect of ionic strength on the above kinetic parameters was studied. There was not an observable influence when the ammonium sulfate concentration was below l M.

  17. Hydrogen interaction kinetics of Ge dangling bonds at the Si0.25Ge0.75/SiO2 interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stesmans, A.; Nguyen Hoang, T.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen interaction kinetics of the GeP b1 defect, previously identified by electron spin resonance (ESR) as an interfacial Ge dangling bond (DB) defect occurring in densities ∼7 × 10 12  cm −2 at the SiGe/SiO 2 interfaces of condensation grown (100)Si/a-SiO 2 /Ge 0.75 Si 0.25 /a-SiO 2 structures, has been studied as function of temperature. This has been carried out, both in the isothermal and isochronal mode, through defect monitoring by capacitance-voltage measurements in conjunction with ESR probing, where it has previously been demonstrated the defects to operate as negative charge traps. The work entails a full interaction cycle study, comprised of analysis of both defect passivation (pictured as GeP b1 -H formation) in molecular hydrogen (∼1 atm) and reactivation (GeP b1 -H dissociation) in vacuum. It is found that both processes can be suitably described separately by the generalized simple thermal (GST) model, embodying a first order interaction kinetics description based on the basic chemical reactions GeP b1  + H 2  → GeP b1 H + H and GeP b1 H → GeP b1  + H, which are found to be characterized by the average activation energies E f  = 1.44 ± 0.04 eV and E d  = 2.23 ± 0.04 eV, and attendant, assumedly Gaussian, spreads σE f  = 0.20 ± 0.02 eV and σE d  = 0.15 ± 0.02 eV, respectively. The substantial spreads refer to enhanced interfacial disorder. Combination of the separately inferred kinetic parameters for passivation and dissociation results in the unified realistic GST description that incorporates the simultaneous competing action of passivation and dissociation, and which is found to excellently account for the full cycle data. For process times t a  ∼ 35 min, it is found that even for the optimum treatment temperature ∼380 °C, only ∼60% of the GeP b1 system can be electrically silenced, still far remote from device grade level. This

  18. A Series of Supramolecular Complexes for Solar Energy Conversion via Water Reduction to Produce Hydrogen: An Excited State Kinetic Analysis of Ru(II,Rh(III,Ru(II Photoinitiated Electron Collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamindri M. Arachchige

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-metal supramolecular complexes have been designed that photochemically absorb solar light, undergo photoinitiated electron collection and reduce water to produce hydrogen fuel using low energy visible light. This manuscript describes these systems with an analysis of the photophysics of a series of six supramolecular complexes, [{(TL2Ru(dpp}2RhX2](PF65 with TL = bpy, phen or Ph2phen with X = Cl or Br. The process of light conversion to a fuel requires a system to perform a number of complicated steps including the absorption of light, the generation of charge separation on a molecular level, the reduction by one and then two electrons and the interaction with the water substrate to produce hydrogen. The manuscript explores the rate of intramolecular electron transfer, rate of quenching of the supramolecules by the DMA electron donor, rate of reduction of the complex by DMA from the 3MLCT excited state, as well as overall rate of reduction of the complex via visible light excitation. Probing a series of complexes in detail exploring the variation of rates of important reactions as a function of sub-unit modification provides insight into the role of each process in the overall efficiency of water reduction to produce hydrogen. The kinetic analysis shows that the complexes display different rates of excited state reactions that vary with TL and halide. The role of the MLCT excited state is elucidated by this kinetic study which shows that the 3MLCT state and not the 3MMCT is likely that key contributor to the photoreduction of these complexes. The kinetic analysis of the excited state dynamics and reactions of the complexes are important as this class of supramolecules behaves as photoinitiated electron collectors and photocatalysts for the reduction of water to hydrogen.

  19. Hydrogen by water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen production by water electrolysis (aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide) is shortly presented with theoretical aspects (thermodynamics and kinetics), and components of the electrolytic cell (structural materials, cathodes, anodes, diaphragms), and examples of industrial processes. (A.B.). 4 figs

  20. Experimental and kinetics studies of aromatic hydrogenation in a two-stage hydrotreating process using NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiW/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owusu-Boakye, A.; Dalai, A.K.; Ferdous, D. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories; Adjaye, J. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2006-10-15

    The degree of hydrogenation of aromatics in light gas oil (LGO) feed from Athabasca bitumen was examined using a two-stage process. Experiments were conducted in a trickle-bed reactor using 2 catalysts, namely nickel molybdenum alumina (NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in stage one and nickel tungsten alumina (NiW/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in the second stage. NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used in the first stage in order to remove nitrogen and sulphur containing heteroatoms. NiW/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used in the second stage for saturation of the aromatic rings in the hydrocarbon species. The catalysts were used under a range of temperature and pressure condition. Temperature and liquid hourly space velocity ranged from 350 to 390 degrees C and 1.0 to 1.5 per hour, respectively. Pressure was kept constant at 11.0 MPa for all experiments. Reaction time results from the two-stage process were compared with those from a single-stage where hydrotreating was performed over NiMo/AL{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Product samples from different feedstocks were analyzed with respect to sulfur, nitrogen and aromatic content. Gasoline selectivity and kinetic parameters for hydrodesulphurization (HDS) or hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) reactions for the feed materials were also compared. The effect of hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S) inhibition on aromatics hydrogenation (HDA) was also kinetically modelled using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood approach. Kinetic analysis of the single-stage hydrotreating process showed that HDA and HDS activities were slowed by the presence of hydrogen sulphide that is produced as a by-product of the HDS process. However, with inter-stage removal of hydrogen sulphide in the two-stage process, significant improvement of the HDA and HDS activities were noted. It was concluded that the experimental data was successfully predicted by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic models. 27 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  1. Hydrodynamics and mass transfer deaeration of water on thermal power plants when used natural gas as a desorbing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, V. I.; Kudryavtseva, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    The technology of low-temperature deaeration of water in thermal power plants was developed. It is proposed to use natural gas supplied to the furnace as desorbing agent in the deaerator instead steam or superheated water. Natural gas has low, often - negative temperature after reducing installs. At the same time, it contains virtually no corrosive gases, oxygen and carbon dioxide, thereby successfully may be used as a stripping agent in water deaeration. The calculation of the energy efficiency of the technology for a typical unit of CHP has shown that achieved a significant annual saving of fuel equivalent in the transition from the traditional method of deaeration of water in the low temperature deaeration. Hydrodynamic and mass transfer indicators were determined for the deaerator thermal power plants using as stripping medium natural gas supplied to the boiler burners. Theoretically required amount and the real specific consumption of natural gas were estimated for deaeration of water standard quality. The calculation of the hydrodynamic characteristics was presented for jet-bubbling atmospheric deaerator with undescended perforated plate when operating on natural gas. The calculation shows the possibility of using commercially available atmospheric deaerators for the application of the new low-temperature water deaeration technology.

  2. Conformer-Specific IR Spectroscopy of Laser-Desorbed Sulfonamide Drugs: Tautomeric and Conformational Preferences of Sulfanilamide and its Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Thomas; Seidel, Sebastian; Müller, Christian W.

    2017-06-01

    Molecules containing the sulfonamide group R^{1}-SO_2-NHR^{2} have a longstanding history as antimicrobial agents. Even though nowadays they are not commonly used in treating humans anymore, they continue to be studied as effective inhibitors of metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrases. These enzymes are important targets for a variety of diseases, such as, for instance, breast cancer, glaucoma, and obesity. Here we present the results of our laser desorption single-conformation UV and IR study of sulfanilamide (NH_2Ph-SO_2-NHR, R=H), a variety of singly substituted derivatives, and their monohydrated complexes. Depending on the substituent, the sulfonamide group can either adopt an amino or an imino tautomeric form. The form prevalent in the crystal is not necessarily also the tautomeric form we identified in the molecular beam after laser desorbing the sample. Furthermore, we explored the effect of complexation with a single water molecule on the tautomeric and conformational preferences of the sulfonamides. Our conformer-specific IR spectra in the NH and OH stretch region (3200-3750 \\wn) suggest that the intra- and intermolecular interactions governing the structures of the monomers and water complexes are surprisingly diverse. We have undertaken both Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) analyses of calculated electron densities to quantitatively characterize the nature and strengths of the intra- and intermolecular interactions prevalent in the monomer and water complex structures.

  3. Optimization and kinetic modeling of cadmium desorption from citrus peels: A process for biosorbent regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njikam, Eloh; Schiewer, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Cadmium was completely and quickly desorbed from grapefruit peels using 0.01 M HNO 3 . The kinetics followed a novel 1st or 2nd order kinetic model, related to the remaining metal bound as the rate-determining reactant concentration. For 0.001 M HNO 3 , desorption was incomplete and the model fit less perfect. Highlights: ► Metal desorption was over 90% complete within 50 min for most desorbents. ► Models for biosorbent desorption kinetics were developed. ► Desorption kinetics best fit a novel first-order model related to remaining metal bound. ► Cd uptake after desorption by HNO 3 was similar to the original uptake. ► The optimal desorbent was 0.1 or 0.01 M acid, being fast, efficient and cheap. - Abstract: Citrus peel biosorbents are efficient in removing heavy metals from wastewater. Heavy metal recovery and sorbent regeneration are important for the financial competitiveness of biosorption with other processes. The desorbing agents HNO 3 , NaNO 3 , Ca(NO 3 ) 2 , EDTA, S, S-EDDS, and Na-Citrate were studied at different concentrations to optimize cadmium elution from orange or grapefruit peels. In most cases, desorption was fast, being over 90% complete within 50 min. However sodium nitrate and 0.001 M nitric acid were less efficient. Several new models for desorption kinetics were developed. While zero-, first- and second-order kinetics are commonly applied for modeling adsorption kinetics, the present study adapts these models to describe desorption kinetics. The proposed models relate to the number of metal-filled binding sites as the rate-determining reactant concentration. A model based on first order kinetics with respect to the remaining metal bound performed best. Cd bound in subsequent adsorption after desorption was similar to the original amount bound for desorption by nitric acid, but considerably lower for calcium nitrate as the desorbent. While complexing agents were effective desorbents, their cost is higher than that

  4. High Density Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Composites with Air Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Dieterich, Mila; Bürger, Inga; Linder, Marc

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In order to combine fluctuating renewable energy sources with the actual demand of electrical energy, storages are essential. The surplus energy can be stored as hydrogen to be used either for mobile use, chemical synthesis or reconversion when needed. One possibility to store the hydrogen gas at high volumetric densities, moderate temperatures and low pressures is based on a chemical reaction with metal hydrides. Such storages must be able to absorb and desorb the hydrogen qu...

  5. Efficient Discovery of Novel Multicomponent Mixtures for Hydrogen Storage: A Combined Computational/Experimental Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolverton, Christopher [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Ozolins, Vidvuds [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Kung, Harold H. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Yang, Jun [Ford Scientific Research Lab., Dearborn, MI (United States); Hwang, Sonjong [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Shore, Sheldon [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2016-11-28

    The objective of the proposed program is to discover novel mixed hydrides for hydrogen storage, which enable the DOE 2010 system-level goals. Our goal is to find a material that desorbs 8.5 wt.% H2 or more at temperatures below 85°C. The research program will combine first-principles calculations of reaction thermodynamics and kinetics with material and catalyst synthesis, testing, and characterization. We will combine materials from distinct categories (e.g., chemical and complex hydrides) to form novel multicomponent reactions. Systems to be studied include mixtures of complex hydrides and chemical hydrides [e.g. LiNH2+NH3BH3] and nitrogen-hydrogen based borohydrides [e.g. Al(BH4)3(NH3)3]. The 2010 and 2015 FreedomCAR/DOE targets for hydrogen storage systems are very challenging, and cannot be met with existing materials. The vast majority of the work to date has delineated materials into various classes, e.g., complex and metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and sorbents. However, very recent studies indicate that mixtures of storage materials, particularly mixtures between various classes, hold promise to achieve technological attributes that materials within an individual class cannot reach. Our project involves a systematic, rational approach to designing novel multicomponent mixtures of materials with fast hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics and favorable thermodynamics using a combination of state-of-the-art scientific computing and experimentation. We will use the accurate predictive power of first-principles modeling to understand the thermodynamic and microscopic kinetic processes involved in hydrogen release and uptake and to design new material/catalyst systems with improved properties. Detailed characterization and atomic-scale catalysis experiments will elucidate the effect of dopants and nanoscale catalysts in achieving fast kinetics and reversibility. And

  6. New efficient hydrogen process production from organosilane hydrogen carriers derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunel, Jean Michel [Unite URMITE, UMR 6236 CNRS, Faculte de Medecine et de Pharmacie, Universite de la Mediterranee, 27 boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille 05 (France)

    2010-04-15

    While the source of hydrogen constitutes a significant scientific challenge, addressing issues of hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery is equally important. None of the current hydrogen storage options, liquefied or high pressure H{sub 2} gas, metal hydrides, etc.. satisfy criteria of size, costs, kinetics, and safety for use in transportation. In this context, we have discovered a methodology for the production of hydrogen on demand, in high yield, under kinetic control, from organosilane hydrogen carriers derivatives and methanol as co-reagent under mild conditions catalyzed by a cheap ammonium fluoride salt. Finally, the silicon by-products can be efficiently recycle leading to an environmentally friendly source of energy. (author)

  7. Modeling of the non isothermal and non isobaric transformations kinetics. Application to the kaolinite de-hydroxylation and to the tri-uranium octo-oxide reduction by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, St.

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this work is to be able to describe transformations, occurring when solids and gases are in non isothermal and non isobaric conditions, with kinetic models. A methodology has been used. Two essential processes have to be taken into account: the germination and the growth. The germs are supposed to be formed (at constant temperature and pressure) in the grains surface with a constant velocity by surface unit, (gamma), called germination surface frequency (number of germs.m -2 .s -1 . The growth velocity is characterized by a growth surface reactivity, (phi) (in mol.m -2 .s -1 ). With an appropriate transformation model, it is possible to obtain the variations of (gamma) and (phi) in terms of the temperature and pressure which are then used in the calculation of the velocity in non isothermal and non isobaric conditions. In order to validate the developed method, two reactions have been studied. For the first one, the kaolinite de-hydroxylation, an anisotropic germination-growth model, where the step limiting the growth is a diffusion step, has been developed in order to explain the experimental kinetic curves. Nevertheless the velocity curves calculated from this model do not allow to describe the reaction for some temperature variations. This result shows the difficulty to precisely determine the germination surface frequency what induces an important approximation on the kinetic curves. The second reaction is the tri-uranium octo-oxide reduction by hydrogen. It has been shown that this reaction occurs according to three successive transformations. A kinetic model has been developed for each of these reactions considering germination as instantaneous. At last, in comparing this model with the experimental velocity curves, a very good agreement has been verified as well as for a temperature variation than for a hydrogen partial pressure change during the reaction. (O.M.)

  8. Kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrogen absorption and release in {beta}-titanium alloys; Kinetik und Thermodynamik der Wasserstoffaufnahme und -abgabe von {beta}-Titanlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, M.; Christ, H.J. [Siegen Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofftechnik

    1998-12-31

    The work reported was intended to yield results allowing to describe as completely as possible the processes of interaction of {beta}-titanium and hydrogen. Three alloys have been selected for the experiments which suitably differ in stability of the {beta} phase. The characterisation of the hydrogen/metal interactions is primarily based on gravimetric measurements. A method was found to determine the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen, which is a significant variable for quantitative characterisation of the hydrogen absorption rate. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] In der Arbeit wird eine moeglichst vollstaendige Beschreibung der Wechselwirkung von {beta}-Titanlegierungen mit Wasserstoff angestrebt. Hierfuer wird mit drei Legierungen gearbeitet, die sich hinsichtlich der Stabilitaet der {beta}-Phase in sinnvoll abgestufter Weise unterscheiden. Fuer die Charakterisierung der Wasserstoff/Metall-Wechselwirkung wurden insbesondere gravimetrische Messungen eingesetzt. Weiterhin wurde die fuer eine quantitative Beschreibung der Wasserstoffaufnahmegeschwindigkeit wichtige Groesse des Diffusionskoeffizienten von Wasserstoff mit einem Verfahren bestimmt. (orig./MM)

  9. Interrelation between hydrogen desorption kinetics and structure of (Mg.sub.2./sub.Ni)H.sub.x./sub. and hydrogenated eutectic (Mg/Mg.sub.2./sub.Ni)H.sub.y./sub

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    289-292, - (2009), s. 167-174 ISSN 1012-0386. [DIMAT 2008, International Conference on Diffusion in Materials /7./. Lanzarote, Canary Islands, 28.10.2008-31.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/07/0010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : magnesium alloys * hydrogen diffusion * hydrogen- storage materials Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics http://www.scientific.net/DDF.289-292.167/

  10. Kinetic Study of the Aroxyl-Radical-Scavenging Activity of Five Fatty Acid Esters and Six Carotenoids in Toluene Solution: Structure-Activity Relationship for the Hydrogen Abstraction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Kazuo; Yoshimoto, Maya; Ishikura, Masaharu; Nagaoka, Shin-Ichi

    2017-08-17

    A kinetic study of the reaction between an aroxyl radical (ArO • ) and fatty acid esters (LHs 1-5, ethyl stearate 1, ethyl oleate 2, ethyl linoleate 3, ethyl linolenate 4, and ethyl arachidonate 5) has been undertaken. The second-order rate constants (k s ) for the reaction of ArO • with LHs 1-5 in toluene at 25.0 °C have been determined spectrophotometrically. The k s values obtained increased in the order of LH 1 LHs 1-5. The k s value for LH 5 was 2.93 × 10 -3 M -1 s -1 . From the result, it has been clarified that the reaction of ArO • with LHs 1-5 was explained by an allylic hydrogen abstraction reaction. A similar kinetic study was performed for the reaction of ArO • with six carotenoids (Car-Hs 1-6, astaxanthin 1, β-carotene 2, lycopene 3, capsanthin 4, zeaxanthin 5, and lutein 6). The k s values obtained increased in the order of Car-H 1 LHs 1-5. The results of detailed analyses of the k s values for the above reaction indicated that the reaction was also explained by an allylic hydrogen abstraction reaction. Furthermore, the structure-activity relationship for the reaction was discussed by taking the result of density functional theory calculation reported by Martinez and Barbosa into account.

  11. XPS study of influence of exposure to air on thermal stability and kinetics of hydrogen decomposition of MgH{sub 2} films obtained by direct hydrogenation from gaseous phase of metallic Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrovolsky, V.D., E-mail: dobersh@ipms.kiev.ua; Khyzhun, O.Y.; Sinelnichenko, A.K.; Ershova, O.G.; Solonin, Y.M.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Air influence on thermal stability of MgH{sub 2} have been studied by XPS. • XPS spectra of MgH{sub 2} films obtained at different hydrogen pressures have been studied. • Changes in the chemical state of MgH{sub 2} films depending on time of exposure to air are analyzed. • Correlation exists between chemical surface condition of MgH{sub 2} films and their thermal stableness. • Process of hydrogen desorption from MgH{sub 2} films is studied using TDS for model samples. - Abstract: Mechanism of influence of exposure to air on thermal stability of MgH{sub 2} obtained by direct hydrogenation from the gas phase, the nature of the hydride sensitivity to the negative impact of air and the role of its surface chemical state have not been studied enough. The present article presents data of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements of the Mg 2s, O 1s, C 1s core-level spectra of surface of hydride MgH{sub 2} films derived by gas phase hydrogenation of model samples of metallic Mg, and the evolution of changes in the chemical state of the surface of the hydride films depending on the time of exposure to air and formation conditions (hydrogen pressure and hydrogenation regime). Based on results of XPS, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermodesorption spectroscopy (TDS), the existence of a relationship (correlation) between chemical surface condition of hydride MgH{sub 2} films obtained at different hydrogen pressures (3.0 MPa and 11.5 MPa) and their thermal stableness and temperature of the beginning of hydride decomposition has been established.

  12. The Improvement of Dehydriding the Kinetics of NaMgH3 Hydride via Doping with Carbon Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Min Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available NaMgH3 perovskite hydride and NaMgH3–carbon nanomaterials (NH-CM composites were prepared via the reactive ball-milling method. To investigate the catalytic effect of CM on the dehydriding kinetic properties of NaMgH3 hydride, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and graphene oxide (GO were used as catalytic additives. It was found that dehydriding temperatures and activation energies (ΔE1 and ΔE2 for two dehydrogenation steps of NaMgH3 hydride can be greatly reduced with a 5 wt. % CM addition. The NH–2.5M–2.5G composite presents better dehydriding kinetics, a lower dehydriding temperature, and a higher hydrogen-desorbed amount (3.64 wt. %, 638 K. ΔE1 and ΔE2 can be reduced by about 67 kJ/mol and 30 kJ/mol, respectively. The results suggest that the combination of MWCNTs and GO is a better catalyst as compared to MWCNTs or GO alone.

  13. Modeling of the non isothermal and non isobaric transformations kinetics. Application to the kaolinite de-hydroxylation and to the tri-uranium octo-oxide reduction by hydrogen; Modelisation de la cinetique de transformations non isothermes et (ou) non isobares. Application a la deshydroxylation de la kaolinite et a la reduction de l'octooxyde de triuranium par l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, St

    2002-12-15

    The aim of this work is to be able to describe transformations, occurring when solids and gases are in non isothermal and non isobaric conditions, with kinetic models. A methodology has been used. Two essential processes have to be taken into account: the germination and the growth. The germs are supposed to be formed (at constant temperature and pressure) in the grains surface with a constant velocity by surface unit, (gamma), called germination surface frequency (number of germs.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}. The growth velocity is characterized by a growth surface reactivity, (phi) (in mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}). With an appropriate transformation model, it is possible to obtain the variations of (gamma) and (phi) in terms of the temperature and pressure which are then used in the calculation of the velocity in non isothermal and non isobaric conditions. In order to validate the developed method, two reactions have been studied. For the first one, the kaolinite de-hydroxylation, an anisotropic germination-growth model, where the step limiting the growth is a diffusion step, has been developed in order to explain the experimental kinetic curves. Nevertheless the velocity curves calculated from this model do not allow to describe the reaction for some temperature variations. This result shows the difficulty to precisely determine the germination surface frequency what induces an important approximation on the kinetic curves. The second reaction is the tri-uranium octo-oxide reduction by hydrogen. It has been shown that this reaction occurs according to three successive transformations. A kinetic model has been developed for each of these reactions considering germination as instantaneous. At last, in comparing this model with the experimental velocity curves, a very good agreement has been verified as well as for a temperature variation than for a hydrogen partial pressure change during the reaction. (O.M.)

  14. The kinetics of hydrogen absorption/desorption within nanostructured composite Ni79.1Co18.6Cu2.3 alloy using resistometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasojević, M.; Maričić, A.; Ribić Zelenović, L.; Krstajić, N.; Spasojević, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Nanostructured Ni 79.1 Co 18.6 Cu 2.3 powder was obtained by electrochemical deposition. ► Correlation observed between electrical conductivity and absorbed hydrogen amount. ► Hydrogen absorption/desorption mechanism was determined. - Abstract: Ni 79.1 Co 18.6 Cu 2.3 powder was obtained by electrochemical deposition from an ammonium sulfate bath. The structure and surface morphology of the powder were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The electrochemically obtained Ni 79.1 Co 18.6 Cu 2.3 alloy contained an amorphous phase and nanocrystals with an average size of 6.8 nm of FCC phase of the solid solution of cobalt and copper in nickel. Nanocrystals were characterized by a high average microstrain value and high minimum density of chaotically distributed dislocations. X-ray analysis also showed that powder hydrogenation at an elevated temperature of up to 200 °C did not change unit cell parameters and mean crystallite size value. SEM images show the formation of two shapes of powder particles: large cauliflower-like particles and small dendritic ones. Powder pressing at 10 MPa and at 25 °C gave samples that were analyzed for hydrogen absorption/desorption within the temperature range of 160–200 °C. Changes in electrical resistivity during absorption/desorption were monitored. The reciprocal value of resistivity (electrical conductivity) was found to increase linearly with increasing amount of absorbed hydrogen. The experimental results were used to propose an absorption/desorption mechanism. The adsorbed hydrogen molecule dissociates on alloy surface, forming adsorbed atoms. Adatoms penetrate and diffuse into the bulk of the alloy, simultaneously donating their electrons to the conduction band of the alloy. The increase in the concentration of free electrons induces a decrease in electrical resistivity. The overall absorption rate during initial absorption is determined by the

  15. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  16. Hydrogen storage and carbon dioxide sequestration in TBAF semi-clathrate hydrates: Kinetics and evolution of hydrate-phase composition by in situ raman spectroscopy - Abstract -

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres Trueba, A.; Radoviæ, I.R.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Kroon, M.C.; Peters, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) represents almost one third of the emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels additionally, CO2 has been identified as the mayor contributor of global warming. Hydrogen (H2), on the other hand, due to its properties is considered a promising energy carrier. Clathrate hydrates

  17. Interactions of the (R) Ru-BINAP Catalytic Complex with an Inorganic Matrix in Stereoselective Hydrogenation of Methylacetoacetate – Kinetic, XPS and DRIFT Studies.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusoň, Petr; Krystyník, Pavel; Dytrych, Pavel; Bártek, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 2 (2016), s. 393-413 ISSN 1878-5190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-14228S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : (R)-Ru-BINAP complex * stereoselective hydrogenation * montmorillonite Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.264, year: 2016

  18. Redox Kinetics and Nonstoichiometry of Ce0.5Zr0.5O2−δ for Water Splitting and Hydrogen Production

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Zhenlong

    2017-04-25

    Water splitting and chemical fuel production as a promising carbon-neutral energy solution relies critically on an efficient electrochemical process over catalyst surfaces. The fundamentals within the surface redox pathways, including the complex interactions of mobile ions and electrons between the bulk and the surface, along with the role of adsorbates and electrostatic fields remain yet to be understood quantitatively. This work presents a detailed kinetics study and nonstoichiometry characterization of Ce0.5Zr0.5O2−δ (CZO), one of the most recognized catalysts for water splitting. The use of CZO leads to >60% improvement in the kinetic rates as compared with undoped ceria with twice the total yield at 700 °C, resulting from the improved reducibility. The peak H2 production rate is 95 μmol g–1 s–1 at 700 °C, and the total production is 750 μmol g–1. A threshold temperature of 650 °C is required to achieve significant H2 production at fast rates. The redox kinetics is modeled using two-step surface chemistry with bulk-to-surface transport equilibrium. Kinetics and equilibrium parameters are extracted, and the model predictions show good agreement with the measurements. The enthalpy of bulk defect formation for CZO is found to be 262 kJ/mol, >40% lower than that of undoped ceria. As oxygen vacancy is gradually filled up, the surface H2O splitting chemistry undergoes a transition from exothermic to endothermic, with the crossover around δ = 0.04 to 0.05, which constrains the further ion incorporation process. Our kinetics study reveals that the H2O splitting process with CZO is kinetics limited at low temperature and transitions to partial-equilibrium with significantly enhanced backward reaction at high temperature. The charge-transfer step is found to be the rate-limiting step for H2O splitting. The detailed kinetics and nonstoichiometric equilibria should be helpful in guiding the design and optimization of CZO as a catalyst, oxygen storage

  19. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  20. Deuteration kinetics of the graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefedov, Alexei; Woell, Christof [KIT, Leopoldshafen (Germany); Paris, Alessio; Calliari, Lucia [FBK-CMM, Trento (Italy); Verbitskiy, Nikolay [MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Wang, Ying; Irle, Stephan [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Fedorov, Alexander [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Haberer, Danny; Knupfer, Martin; Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Oetzelt, Martin [BESSY II, Berlin (Germany); Petaccia, Luca [Elettra, Trieste (Italy); Usachov, Dmitry [St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vyalikh, Denis [St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Sagdev, Hermann [MPI fuer Polymerforschung, Mainz (Germany); Yashina, Lada [MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation); Grueneis, Alexander [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    The kinetics of the hydrogenation/deuteration reaction of graphene was studied by time-dependent x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The graphene layer was then exposed to hydrogen or deuterium atomic gas beams, obtained by thermal cracking in a tungsten capillary at T=3000 K. After each step XPS of the C1s line was performed in order to measure H/C and D/C ratios. We have observed a strong kinetic isotope effect for the hydrogenation/deuteration reaction leading to substantially faster adsorption and higher maximum D/C ratios as compared to H/C (D/C 35% vs. H/C 25%).

  1. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Kjøller, John; Larsen, B.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the hydrogenation characteristics of fine magnesium powder during repeated cycling has been performed using a high-pressure microbalance facility. No effect was found from the cycling regarding kinetics and storage capacity. The reaction rate of the absorption process was fast...... at temperatures around 600 K and above, but the reversed reaction showed somewhat slower kinetics around 600 K. At higher temperatures the opposite was found. The enthalpy and entropy change by the hydrogenation, derived from pressure-concentration isotherms, agree fairly well with those reported earlier....

  2. Hydrogen exchange kinetics in a membrane protein determined by 15N NMR spectroscopy: Use of the INEPT [insensitive nucleus enhancement by polarization transfer] experiment to follow individual amides in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, G.D.; Sykes, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    The coat protein of the filamentous coliphage M13 is a 50-residue polypeptide which spans the inner membrane of the Escherichia coli host upon infection. Amide hydrogen exchange kinetics have been used to probe the structure and dynamics of M13 coat protein which has been solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. In a previous 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study, multiple exponential analysis of the unresolved amide proton envelope revealed the existence of two slow kinetic sets containing a total of about 30 protons. The slower set (15-20 amides) originates from the hydrophobic membrane-spanning region and exchanges at least 10 5 -fold slower than the unstructured, non-H-bonded model polypeptide poly(DL-alanine). Herein the authors use 15 N NMR spectroscopy of biosynthetically labeled coat protein to follow individual, assigned, slowly exchanging amides in or near the hydrophobic segment. The INEPT (insensitive nucleus enhancement by polarization transfer) experiments can be used to transfer magnetization to the 15 N nucleus from a coupled proton; when 15 N-labeled protonated protein is dissolved in 2 H 2 O, the INEPT signal disappears with time as the amide protons are replaced by solvent deuterons. Amide hydrogen exchange is catalyzed by both H + and OH - ions. The time-dependent exchange-out experiment is suitable for slow exchange rates (k ex ). The INEPT experiment was also adapted to measure some of the more rapidly exchanging amides in the coat protein using either saturation transfer from water or exchange effects on the polarization transfer step itself. The results of all of these experiments are consistent with previous models of the coat protein in which a stable segment extends from the hydrophobic membrane-spanning region through to the C-terminus, whereas the N-terminal region is undergoing more extensive dynamic fluctuations

  3. A kinetic model of the hydrogen assisted selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia over Ag/Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamm, Stefanie; Olsson, Louise; Fogel, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    A global kinetic model which describes H2-assisted NH3-SCR over an Ag/Al2O3 monolith catalyst has been developed. The intention is that the model can be applied for dosing NH3 and H2 to an Ag/Al2O3 catalyst in a real automotive application as well as contribute to an increased understanding of th...

  4. A kinetic and ESR investigation of iron(II) oxalate oxidation by hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen as a source of hydroxyl radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, J S; Wood, P M; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1997-01-01

    The reaction of Fe(II) oxalate with hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen was studied for oxalate concentrations up to 20 mM and pH 2-5, under which conditions mono- and bis-oxalate complexes (Fe[II](ox) and Fe[II](ox)2[2-]) and uncomplexed Fe2+ must be considered. The reaction of Fe(II) oxalate...... with hydrogen peroxide (Fe2+ + H2O2 --> Fe3+ + .OH + OH-) was monitored in continuous flow by ESR with t-butanol as a radical trap. The reaction is much faster than for uncomplexed Fe2+ and a rate constant, k = 1 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) is deduced for Fe(II)(ox). The reaction of Fe(II) oxalate with dioxygen...... by oxalate. Further ESR studies with DMPO as spin trap reveal that reaction of Fe(II) oxalate with hydrogen peroxide can also lead to formation of the carboxylate radical anion (CO2-), an assignment confirmed by photolysis of Fe(II) oxalate in the presence of DMPO....

  5. NMR studies of the influence of dodecyl sulfate on the amide hydrogen exchange kinetics of a micelle-solubilized hydrophobic tripeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neil, J.D.J.; Sykes, B.D.

    1989-01-01

    Backbone amide hydrogen exchange measurements are an important source of information about the internal dynamics of proteins. Before such measurements can be interpreted unambiguously, contributions to hydrogen exchange rates from the chemical and physical environment of the amides must be taken into account. Membrane proteins are often solubilized in detergents, yet there have not been any systematic investigations of the possible effects detergents may have on the amide hydrogen exchange rates of proteins. To address this question, the authors have measured individual backbone and carboxyl-terminal amide exchange rates for the amphipathic tripeptide Leu-Val-Ile-amide dissolved in water and dodecyl sulfate micelles. Proton NMR spectroscopy was used to measure exchange using the direct exchange-out into D 2 O technique at 5 degree C and using an indirect steady-state saturation-transfer technique at 25 degree C. The broadening effect of micelle-incorporated spin-labeled fatty acid (12-doxylsterate) on the 1 H NMR spectra of both the detergent and the peptide resonances was used to demonstrate that the tripeptide is intimately associated with the micelle. These experiments help to explain the elevated pH min observed for backbone amides in the sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized M13 coat protein

  6. DNA repair kinetic of hydrogen peroxide and UVA/B induced lesions in peripheral blood leucocytes from xeroderma pigmentosum patients and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Elio A Prieto; Mudry, Marta D; Palermo, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the fine kinetics of DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) syndrome, a complex disorder linked to a deficiency in repair that increases cancer susceptibility. The repair process was evaluated by the comet assay (CA) in cells from 2 XP patients and 9 controls exposed to UVA/B (UVA 366/UVB 280 nm) and H2O2 (150 μM) at temperatures of 4, 15, and 37°C. Samples were taken at 2-min intervals during the first 10 min to analyze the "fine kinetics" repair during the initial phase of the curve, and then at 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, 60, and 120 min. CA evaluation of DNA repair activity points to BER/NER initiation in the first 30 min with both inductors at 37°C and 15°C, but final comet length showed differences according to treatment. Repair kinetics during 120 min showed a good correlation with clinical features in both XP patients. Differences in final comet length were less pronounced in XP cells treated with H2O2 than with UVA/B, probably because the peroxide produces mainly base oxidation but less bulky lesions; UVA/B generates a mixture of both. These findings reinforce the value of CA in testing in DNA repair ability or exposure monitoring.

  7. Discrete Visible Luminescence of Helium Atoms and Molecules Desorbing from Helium Clusters: The Role of Electronic, Vibrational, and Rotational Energy Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Haeften, K.; von Pietrowski, R.; Moeller, T.; Joppien, M.; Moussavizadeh, L.; de Castro, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Discrete visible and near-infrared luminescence of a beam of photoexcited helium clusters is reported. The emission lines are attributed to free helium atoms and molecules desorbing from clusters in electronically excited states. Depending on the excitation energy, various atomic and molecular singlet and triplet states are involved in the relaxation process. With increasing cluster size the intensity of molecular transitions becomes dominant. The temperature of ejected molecules could be estimated to T vib ∼2500 K and T rot ∼450 K and is much higher than that of the cluster itself. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  8. Superior catalytic effect of TiF{sub 3} over TiCl{sub 3} in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}: Catalytic role of fluorine anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L.-P.; Kang, X.-D.; Dai, H.-B.; Liang, Y.; Fang, Z.-Z.; Wang, P.-J. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, P. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)], E-mail: pingwang@imr.ac.cn; Cheng, H.-M. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2009-04-15

    TiF{sub 3} shows a superior catalytic effect over TiCl{sub 3} in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}. Combined phase analysis and microstructure characterization suggest that both titanium halide additives react with host MgH{sub 2} in a similar way. However, systematic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal that the incorporated fluorine (F) differs significantly from its analog chlorine (Cl) in terms of bonding state. The asymmetry of F 1s spectra and the sputtering-induced peak shift suggest that, in addition to the Mg-F bond, a new Ti-F-Mg bonding is formed in the TiF{sub 3}-doped MgH{sub 2}. In contrast, only one stable binding state of Cl is identified in the form of MgCl{sub 2} for the TiCl{sub 3}-doped MgH{sub 2}. In combination with the designed experiments, these findings suggest that the generation of active F-containing species may be responsible for the advantage of TiF{sub 3} over TiCl{sub 3} in improving both the absorption and desorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}. Fundamentally, it emphasizes the functionality of F anion in tuning the activity of compound catalyst.

  9. Superior catalytic effect of TiF3 over TiCl3 in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH2: Catalytic role of fluorine anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L.-P.; Kang, X.-D.; Dai, H.-B.; Liang, Y.; Fang, Z.-Z.; Wang, P.-J.; Wang, P.; Cheng, H.-M.

    2009-01-01

    TiF 3 shows a superior catalytic effect over TiCl 3 in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH 2 . Combined phase analysis and microstructure characterization suggest that both titanium halide additives react with host MgH 2 in a similar way. However, systematic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal that the incorporated fluorine (F) differs significantly from its analog chlorine (Cl) in terms of bonding state. The asymmetry of F 1s spectra and the sputtering-induced peak shift suggest that, in addition to the Mg-F bond, a new Ti-F-Mg bonding is formed in the TiF 3 -doped MgH 2 . In contrast, only one stable binding state of Cl is identified in the form of MgCl 2 for the TiCl 3 -doped MgH 2 . In combination with the designed experiments, these findings suggest that the generation of active F-containing species may be responsible for the advantage of TiF 3 over TiCl 3 in improving both the absorption and desorption kinetics of MgH 2 . Fundamentally, it emphasizes the functionality of F anion in tuning the activity of compound catalyst

  10. Total Synthesis and Stereochemical Assignment of Delavatine A: Rh-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Indene-Type Tetrasubstituted Olefins and Kinetic Resolution through Pd-Catalyzed Triflamide-Directed C-H Olefination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongyin; Wang, Jinxin; Li, Jian; Yang, Fan; Liu, Guodu; Tang, Wenjun; He, Weiwei; Fu, Jian-Jun; Shen, Yun-Heng; Li, Ang; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2017-04-19

    Delavatine A (1) is a structurally unusual isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Incarvillea delavayi. The first and gram-scale total synthesis of 1 was accomplished in 13 steps (the longest linear sequence) from commercially available starting materials. We exploited an isoquinoline construction strategy and developed two reactions, namely Rh-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of indene-type tetrasubstituted olefins and kinetic resolution of β-alkyl phenylethylamine derivatives through Pd-catalyzed triflamide-directed C-H olefination. The substrate scope of the first reaction covered unfunctionalized olefins and those containing polar functionalities such as sulfonamides. The kinetic resolution provided a collection of enantioenriched indane- and tetralin-based triflamides, including those bearing quaternary chiral centers. The selectivity factor (s) exceeded 100 for a number of substrates. These reactions enabled two different yet related approaches to a key intermediate 28 in excellent enantiopurity. In the synthesis, the triflamide served as not only an effective directing group for C-H bond activation but also a versatile functional group for further elaborations. The relative and absolute configurations of delavatine A were unambiguously assigned by the syntheses of the natural product and its three stereoisomers. Their cytotoxicity against a series of cancer cell lines was evaluated.

  11. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  12. Kinetic method of ruthenium ion traces determination, basing on the reaction of oxidation of direct blue 6B, by means of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwinska, T.; Gregorowicz, A.; Matysek-Majewska, D.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive and selective method of determination of ruthenium ion traces (1.10 - 3 μg/cm 3 ) has been worked out. The method is based on oxidation of direct blue 6B by hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions at pH = 0,8 - 1,2 in the presence of ruthenium ions as catalyst. The method has been applied for determination of ruthenium traces in Pt, PdCl 2 , PtCl 4 and RhCl 3 .n H 2 O. In these materials ruthenium has been determined within the range of 1,10 - 2 % - 5,10 - 4 %. (author)

  13. The mechanism of ureido-pyrimidinone:2,7-diamido-naphthyridine complexation and the presence of kinetically controlled pathways in multicomponent hydrogen-bonded systems

    OpenAIRE

    de Greef, T.F.A.; Ligthart, G.B.W.L.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; Meijer, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of association of ureido-pyrimidinone (U) dimers, present either in the 4[1H]-keto form or in the pyrimidin-4-ol form, with 2,7-diamido-1,8-naphthyridine (N) into a complementary heterodimer have been investigated. The formation of heterodimers with 2,7-diamido-1,8-naphthyridine from pyrimidin- 4-ol dimers is much faster than from 4[1H]-pyrimidinone dimers. Using a combination of simple measurements and simulations, evidence for a bimolecular tautomerization step is presented. Fi...

  14. Depth profiling of hydrogen in ferritic/martensitic steels by means of a tritium imaging plate technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Teppei; Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We applied a tritium imaging plate technique to depth profiling of hydrogen in bulk. ► Changes of hydrogen depth profiles in the steel by thermal annealing were examined. ► We proposed a release model of plasma-loaded hydrogen in the steel. ► Hydrogen is trapped at trapping sites newly developed by plasma loading. ► Hydrogen is also trapped at surface oxides and hardly desorbed by thermal annealing. -- Abstract: In order to understand how hydrogen loaded by plasma in F82H is removed by annealing at elevated temperatures in vacuum, depth profiles of plasma-loaded hydrogen were examined by means of a tritium imaging plate technique. Owing to large hydrogen diffusion coefficients in F82H, the plasma-loaded hydrogen easily penetrates into a deeper region becoming solute hydrogen and desorbs by thermal annealing in vacuum. However the plasma-loading creates new hydrogen trapping sites having larger trapping energy than that for the intrinsic sites beyond the projected range of the loaded hydrogen. Some surface oxides also trap an appreciable amount of hydrogen which is more difficult to remove by the thermal annealing

  15. Kinetic modeling of light limitation and sulfur deprivation effects in the induction of hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Part I. Model development and parameter identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchard, Swanny; Pruvost, Jérémy; Degrenne, Benoit; Titica, Mariana; Legrand, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green microalga capable of turning its metabolism towards H2 production under specific conditions. However this H2 production, narrowly linked to the photosynthetic process, results from complex metabolic reactions highly dependent on the environmental conditions of the cells. A kinetic model has been developed to relate culture evolution from standard photosynthetic growth to H2 producing cells. It represents transition in sulfur-deprived conditions, known to lead to H2 production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the two main processes then induced which are an over-accumulation of intracellular starch and a progressive reduction of PSII activity for anoxia achievement. Because these phenomena are directly linked to the photosynthetic growth, two kinetic models were associated, the first (one) introducing light dependency (Haldane type model associated to a radiative light transfer model), the second (one) making growth a function of available sulfur amount under extracellular and intracellular forms (Droop formulation). The model parameters identification was realized from experimental data obtained with especially designed experiments and a sensitivity analysis of the model to its parameters was also conducted. Model behavior was finally studied showing interdependency between light transfer conditions, photosynthetic growth, sulfate uptake, photosynthetic activity and O2 release, during transition from oxygenic growth to anoxic H2 production conditions.

  16. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  17. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on the main kinetic parameters of ATP hydrolysis by ouabain sensitive Na+, K+-ATP-ase in spermatozoa of infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Р. В. Фафула

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is known that Na+,K+-ATP-ase plays important role in physiology of spermatozoa including their motility. Na+,K+-ATP-ase is one of the targets for reactive oxygen species. Hyperproduction of reactive oxygen species can damage sperm cells and it is considered to be as one of the mechanisms of male infertility. Objectives: To evaluate the H2O2 effect on the main kinetic parameters of ATP hydrolysis by ouabain-sensitive Na+,K+-ATPase of spermatozoa of fertile (normozoospermia and infertility men (asthenozoospermia. Materials and methods: Na+, K+-ATP-ase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by production of Pi. Concentration dependencies ware linearized in Lineweaver-Burk plot. Results: Effective inhibitory effect of H2O2 on ouabain-sensitive Na+,K+-ATP-ase activity of sperm cells of fertile and infertile men was demonstrated. The effects of H2O2 on the main kinetic parameters of the ATP hydrolysis with the involvement of Na+, K+-ATP-ase was studied. In the whole range of studied concentrations of ATP the Na+, K+-ATP-ase activity of spermatozoa of fertile and infertile men was reduced in the presence of H2O2 in the incubation medium. However, the optimal activity of the Na+, K+-ATP-ase activity of sperm cells in both normozoospermic and asthenozoospermic men was observed in the presence of 5 mM ATP in the incubation medium. By linearization of concentration curves in Lineweaver-Burk plot the main kinetic parameters of Na+, K+-activated, Mg2+-dependent ATP hydrolysis in the sperm cells of fertile and infertile men were determined. Under the effect of H2O2, the affinity constant of enzyme to ATP in normozoospermic and asthenozoospermic men increases several times. The initial maximum rate of ATP hydrolysis was significantly reduced only in the spermatozoa of fertile men with normozoospermia. Conclusions: Under conditions of H2O2-induced oxidative stress the inhibition of ouabain-sensitive Na+,K+-ATP-ase activity in sperm cells

  18. Kinetics of Hydrogen Radical Reactions with Toluene Including Chemical Activation Theory Employing System-Specific Quantum RRK Theory Calibrated by Variational Transition State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-02

    Pressure-dependent reactions are ubiquitous in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. We employ a new calibration procedure for quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (QRRK) unimolecular rate theory within a chemical activation mechanism to calculate the pressure-falloff effect of a radical association with an aromatic ring. The new theoretical framework is applied to the reaction of H with toluene, which is a prototypical reaction in the combustion chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons present in most fuels. Both the hydrogen abstraction reactions and the hydrogen addition reactions are calculated. Our system-specific (SS) QRRK approach is adjusted with SS parameters to agree with multistructural canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) at the high-pressure limit. The new method avoids the need for the usual empirical estimations of the QRRK parameters, and it eliminates the need for variational transition state theory calculations as a function of energy, although in this first application we do validate the falloff curves by comparing SS-QRRK results without tunneling to multistructural microcanonical variational transition state theory (MS-μVT) rate constants without tunneling. At low temperatures, the two approaches agree well with each other, but at high temperatures, SS-QRRK tends to overestimate falloff slightly. We also show that the variational effect is important in computing the energy-resolved rate constants. Multiple-structure anharmonicity, torsional-potential anharmonicity, and high-frequency-mode vibrational anharmonicity are all included in the rate computations, and torsional anharmonicity effects on the density of states are investigated. Branching fractions, which are both temperature- and pressure-dependent (and for which only limited data is available from experiment), are predicted as a function of pressure.

  19. Nonmonotonic Temperature Dependence of the Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate Constant and Kinetic Isotope Effect of Hydrogen Radical Reaction with Benzene Calculated by Variational Transition-State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G; Xu, Xuefei

    2017-11-30

    The reaction between H and benzene is a prototype for reactions of radicals with aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report calculations of the reaction rate constants and the branching ratios of the two channels of the reaction (H addition and H abstraction) over a wide temperature and pressure range. Our calculations, obtained with an accurate potential energy surface, are based on variational transition-state theory for the high-pressure limit of the addition reaction and for the abstraction reaction and on system-specific quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory calibrated by variational transition-state theory for pressure effects on the addition reaction. The latter is a very convenient way to include variational effects, corner-cutting tunneling, and anharmonicity in falloff calculations. Our results are in very good agreement with the limited experimental data and show the importance of including pressure effects in the temperature interval where the mechanism changes from addition to abstraction. We found a negative temperature effect of the total reaction rate constants at 1 atm pressure in the temperature region where experimental data are missing and accurate theoretical data were previously missing as well. We also calculated the H + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 and D + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 kinetic isotope effects, and we compared our H + C 6 H 6 results to previous theoretical data for H + toluene. We report a very novel nonmonotonic dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on temperature. A particularly striking effect is the prediction of a negative temperature dependence of the total rate constant over 300-500 K wide temperature ranges, depending on the pressure but generally in the range from 600 to 1700 K, which includes the temperature range of ignition in gasoline engines, which is important because aromatics are important components of common fuels.

  20. Adsorption/desorption kinetics of Na atoms on reconstructed Si (111)-7 x 7 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, Amit Kumar Singh; Govind; Shivaprasad, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled nanostructures on a periodic template are fundamentally and technologically important as they put forward the possibility to fabricate and pattern micro/nano-electronics for sensors, ultra high-density memories and nanocatalysts. Alkali-metal (AM) nanostructure grown on a semiconductor surface has received considerable attention because of their simple hydrogen like electronic structure. However, little efforts have been made to understand the fundamental aspects of the growth mechanism of self-assembled nanostructures of AM on semiconductor surfaces. In this paper, we report organized investigation of kinetically controlled room-temperature (RT) adsorption/desorption of sodium (Na) metal atoms on clean reconstructed Si (111)-7 x 7 surface, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The RT uptake curve shows a layer-by-layer growth (Frank-vander Merve growth) mode of Na on Si (111)-7 x 7 surfaces and a shift is observed in the binding energy position of Na (1s) spectra. The thermal stability of the Na/Si (111) system was inspected by annealing the system to higher substrate temperatures. Within a temperature range from RT to 350 o C, the temperature induced mobility to the excess Na atoms sitting on top of the bilayer, allowing to arrange themselves. Na atoms desorbed over a wide temperature range of 370 o C, before depleting the Si (111) surface at temperature 720 o C. The acquired valence-band (VB) spectra during Na growth revealed the development of new electronic-states near the Fermi level and desorption leads the termination of these. For Na adsorption up to 2 monolayers, decrease in work function (-1.35 eV) was observed, whereas work function of the system monotonically increases with Na desorption from the Si surface as observed by other studies also. This kinetic and thermodynamic study of Na adsorbed Si (111)-7 x 7 system can be utilized in fabrication of sensors used in night vision devices.

  1. Ab Initio Theoretical Studies on the Kinetics of Hydrogen Abstraction Type Reactions of Hydroxyl Radicals with CH3CCl2F and CH3CClF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheb, Vahid; Maleki, Samira

    2018-03-01

    The hydrogen abstraction reactions from CH3Cl2F (R-141b) and CH3CClF2 (R-142b) by OH radicals are studied theoretically by semi-classical transition state theory. The stationary points for the reactions are located by using KMLYP density functional method along with 6-311++G(2 d,2 p) basis set and MP2 method along with 6-311+G( d, p) basis set. Single-point energy calculations are performed by the CBS-Q and G4 combination methods on the geometries optimized at the KMLYP/6-311++G(2 d,2 p) level of theory. Vibrational anharmonicity coefficients, x ij , which are needed for semi-classical transition state theory calculations, are computed at the KMLYP/6-311++G(2 d,2 p) and MP2/6-311+G( d, p) levels of theory. The computed barrier heights are slightly sensitive to the quantum-chemical method. Thermal rate coefficients are computed over the temperature range from 200 to 2000 K and they are shown to be in accordance with available experimental data. On the basis of the computed rate coefficients, the tropospheric lifetime of the CH3CCl2F and CH3CClF2 are estimated to be about 6.5 and 12.0 years, respectively.

  2. Hydrogen desorption from mechanically milled carbon micro coils hydrogenated at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshio Furuya; Shuichi Izumi; Seiji Motojima; Yukio Hishikawa

    2005-01-01

    Carbon micro coils (CMC) have been prepared by the catalytic pyrolysis of acetylene at 750-800 C. The as grown coils have an almost amorphous structure and contain about 1 mass% hydrogen. They have 0.1 - 10 mm coil length, 1-5 μm coil diameter, 0.1-0.5 μm coil pitch and about 100 m 2 /g specific surface area. They were graphitized, as maintaining the morphology of the coils, by heat-treating at a higher temperature than 2500 C in Ar atmosphere. The layer space (d) of graphitized CMC was determined to be 0.341 nm, forming a 'herringbone' structure with an inclination of 10-40 degree versus the coiled fiber axis, having a specific surface area of about 8 m 2 /g. The hydrogen absorption behaviors of CMC were investigated from RT to 1200 C by a thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) using a quadrupole mass analyzer. In TDS measurements, pre-existing hydrogen, which was due to the residual acetylene incorporated into CMC on its growing, desorbed from 700 C and peaked at about 900 C. The increment in the main peak of desorbed hydrogen in the as-grown CMC heat-treated at 500 C for 1 h under high pressure of hydrogen gas (1.9 or 8.9 MPa) was not remarkable as is shown in Fig.1. While, in the CMC samples milled mechanically for 1 h at RT using a planetary ball mill, the increase of desorbed hydrogen became to be great with the hydrogen pressure (up to 8.9 MPa) on heat-treating at 500 C, as is shown in Fig.2. In these CMC samples, the building up temperature of the hydrogen desorption was shifted to a lower one and the temperature range of desorption became to be wider than those in the as-grown CMC because of the appearance of another desorption peak at about 600 C in addition to the peak ranging from 850 C to 900 C. The same kind of peak was also slightly observed in as-grown CMC (Fig.1). It is clear that this desorption at about 600 C has contributed to the remarkable increase of desorbed hydrogen in the milled CMC. In this work, values of more than 2 mass% were obtained

  3. Kinetic Isotope Effect Determination Probes the Spin of the Transition State, Its Stereochemistry, and Its Ligand Sphere in Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Oxoiron(IV) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Debasish; Mallick, Dibyendu; Shaik, Sason

    2018-01-16

    This Account outlines interplay of theory and experiment in the quest to identify the reactive-spin-state in chemical reactions that possess a few spin-dependent routes. Metalloenzymes and synthetic models have forged in recent decades an area of increasing appeal, in which oxometal species bring about functionalization of hydrocarbons under mild conditions and via intriguing mechanisms that provide a glimpse of Nature's designs to harness these reactions. Prominent among these are oxoiron(IV) complexes, which are potent H-abstractors. One of the key properties of oxoirons is the presence of close-lying spin-states, which can mediate H-abstractions. As such, these complexes form a fascinating chapter of spin-state chemistry, in which chemical reactivity involves spin-state interchange, so-called two-state reactivity (TSR) and multistate reactivity (MSR). TSR and MSR pose mechanistic challenges. How can one determine the structure of the reactive transition state (TS) and its spin state for these mechanisms? Calculations can do it for us, but the challenge is to find experimental probes. There are, however, no clear kinetic signatures for the reactive-spin-state in such reactions. This is the paucity that our group has been trying to fill for sometime. Hence, it is timely to demonstrate how theory joins experiment in realizing this quest. This Account uses a set of the H-abstraction reactions of 24 synthetic oxoiron(IV) complexes and 11 hydrocarbons, together undergoing H-abstraction reactions with TSR/MSR options, which provide experimentally determined kinetic isotope effect (KIE exp ) data. For this set, we demonstrate that comparing KIE exp results with calculated tunneling-augmented KIE (KIE TC ) data leads to a clear identification of the reactive spin-state during H-abstraction reactions. In addition, generating KIE exp data for a reaction of interest, and comparing these to KIE TC values, provides the mechanistic chemist with a powerful capability to

  4. Hydrogen in trapping states innocuous to environmental degradation of high-strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen in trapping states innocuous to environmental degradation of the mechanical properties of high-strength steels has been separated and extracted using thermal desorption analysis (TDA) and slow strain rate test (SSRT). The high-strength steel occluding only hydrogen desorbed at low temperature (peak 1), as determined by TDA, decreases in maximum stress and plastic elongation with increasing occlusion time of peak 1 hydrogen. Thus the trapping state of peak 1 hydrogen is directly associated with environmental degradation. The trap activation energy for peak 1 hydrogen is 23.4 kJ/mol, so the peak 1 hydrogen corresponds to weaker binding states and diffusible states at room temperature. In contrast, the high-strength steel occluding only hydrogen desorbed at high temperature (peak 2), by TDA, maintains the maximum stress and plastic elongation in spite of an increasing content of peak 2 hydrogen. This result indicates that the peak 2 hydrogen trapping state is innocuous to environmental degradation, even though the steel occludes a large amount of peak 2 hydrogen. The trap activation energy for peak 2 hydrogen is 65.0 kJ/mol, which indicates a stronger binding state and nondiffusibility at room temperature. The trap activation energy for peak 2 hydrogen suggests that the driving force energy required for stress-induced, diffusion during elastic and plastic deformation, and the energy required for hydrogen dragging by dislocation mobility during plastic deformation are lower than the binding energy between hydrogen and trapping sites. The peak 2 hydrogen, therefore, is believed to not accumulate in front of the crack tip and to not cause environmental degradation in spite of being present in amounts as high as 2.9 mass ppm. (author)

  5. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images.......After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  6. Electrochemical modeling of hydrogen storage in hydride-forming electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledovskikh, A.; Danilov, D.; Vermeulen, P.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2009-01-01

    An electrochemical kinetic model (EKM) is developed, describing the electrochemical hydrogen storage in hydride-forming materials under equilibrium conditions. This model is based on first principles of electrochemical reaction kinetics and statistical thermodynamics and describes the complex,

  7. Density Functional Theory Study of the Interaction of Hydrogen with Li6C60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru

    2012-05-03

    Hydrogen storage properties of Li-coated C60 fullerene have been studied using density functional theory within the local density as well as generalized gradient approximation. Hydrogen atoms are found to bind to Li6C60 in two distinct forms, with the first set attaching to C atoms, not linked to Li, in atomic form. Once all such C atoms are saturated with hydrogen, the second set of hydrogen atoms bind quasi-molecularly to the Li atoms, five of which remain in the exohedral and the sixth in the endohedral position. The corresponding hydrogen gravimetric density in Li6C60H40 is 5 wt %. Desorption of hydrogen takes place in succession, the ones bound quasi-molecularly desorbing at a temperature lower than the ones bound atomically. The results are compared with the recent experiment on hydrogen adsorption in Li6C60.

  8. Hydrogen storage in MgH2 - LaNi5 nanocomposites produced by cold rolling under inert atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, J.J.; Silva, W.B.; Leiva, D.R.; Ishikawa, T.T.; Kiminami, C.S.; Botta, W.J.; Floriano, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the addition of LaNi5 in magnesium hydride H-sorption/desorption behavior was addressed. MgH 2 - X mol.% LaNi 5 (X=0.67; 1.50 and 2.54) mixtures were processed by cold rolling (CR) inside a glove box under controlled atmosphere, with oxygen and moisture contents below 0.1 ppm. Structural characterization showed that during the H-absorption/desorption cycles, a mixture of phases consisting of MgH 2 , LaH 3 and Mg 2 NiH 4 is formed, which has an important role in the hydrogen storage kinetic properties. The mixture MgH 2 -1.50 mol.% LaNi 5 was able to absorb/desorb 4.0 wt.% H 2 in less than 15 min at 100 and 280 °C respectively. The DSC analysis showed that the LaNi 5 additive lowers the temperature at which the H-desorption starts in cold rolled MgH 2 by around 50 °C. (author)

  9. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  10. Sulfur tolerance of Pt/mordenites for benzene hydrogenation. Do Bronsted acid sites participate in hydrogenation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, L.; van Ommen, J.G.; Jentys, A.; Lercher, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The comparison of Pt electronic properties studied by in situ XANES and the kinetic study of benzene hydrogenation strongly suggests that the hydrogenation of benzene on Pt/mordenites occurs along two parallel reaction pathways. The routes proposed include (i) the monofunctional hydrogenation of

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF DOPED NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela D.; Li, Qixiu; Badding, John V.; Fonseca, Dania; Gutierrez, Humerto; Sakti, Apurba; Adu, Kofi; Schimmel, Michael

    2010-03-31

    Hydrogen storage materials based on the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto metal-doped nanoporous carbons are studied, in an effort to develop materials that store appreciable hydrogen at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures. We demonstrate that oxidation of the carbon surface can significantly increase the hydrogen uptake of these materials, primarily at low pressure. Trace water present in the system plays a role in the development of active sites, and may further be used as a strategy to increase uptake. Increased surface density of oxygen groups led to a significant enhancement of hydrogen spillover at pressures less than 100 milibar. At 300K, the hydrogen uptake was up to 1.1 wt. % at 100 mbar and increased to 1.4 wt. % at 20 bar. However, only 0.4 wt% of this was desorbable via a pressure reduction at room temperature, and the high lowpressure hydrogen uptake was found only when trace water was present during pretreatment. Although far from DOE hydrogen storage targets, storage at ambient temperature has significant practical advantages oner cryogenic physical adsorbents. The role of trace water in surface modification has significant implications for reproducibility in the field. High-pressure in situ characterization of ideal carbon surfaces in hydrogen suggests re-hybridization is not likely under conditions of practical interest. Advanced characterization is used to probe carbon-hydrogen-metal interactions in a number of systems and new carbon materials have been developed.

  12. STUDY OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lupascu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the underground water of the Hancesti town has been investigated. By oxygen bubbling through the water containing hydrogen sulfide, from the Hancesti well tube, sulfur is deposited in the porous structure of studied catalysts, which decreases their catalytic activity. Concomitantly, the process of adsorption / oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate take place. The kinetic research of the hydrogen sulfide removal from the Hancesti underground water, after its treatment by hydrogen peroxide, proves greater efficiency than in the case of modified carbonic adsorbents. As a result of used treatment, hydrogen sulfide is completely oxidized to sulfates

  13. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  14. Ionization of Interstellar Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1996-09-01

    Interstellar hydrogen can penetrate through the heliopause, enter the heliosphere, and may become ionized by photoionization and by charge exchange with solar wind protons. A fluid model is introduced to study the flow of interstellar hydrogen in the heliosphere. The flow is governed by moment equations obtained from integration of the Boltzmann equation over the velocity space. Under the assumption that the flow is steady axisymmetric and the pressure is isotropic, we develop a method of solution for this fluid model. This model and the method of solution can be used to study the flow of neutral hydrogen with various forms of ionization rate β and boundary conditions for the flow on the upwind side. We study the solution of a special case in which the ionization rate β is inversely proportional to R2 and the interstellar hydrogen flow is uniform at infinity on the upwind side. We solve the moment equations directly for the normalized density NH/NN∞, bulk velocity VH/VN∞, and temperature TH/TN∞ of interstellar hydrogen as functions of r/λ and z/λ, where λ is the ionization scale length. The solution is compared with the kinetic theory solution of Lallement et al. The fluid solution is much less time-consuming than the kinetic theory solutions. Since the ionization rate for production of pickup protons is directly proportional to the local density of neutral hydrogen, the high-resolution solution of interstellar neutral hydrogen obtained here will be used to study the global distribution of pickup protons.

  15. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  16. Interactions between yeast lees and wine polyphenols during simulation of wine aging. II. Analysis of desorbed polyphenol compounds from yeast lees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazauric, Jean-Paul; Salmon, Jean-Michel

    2006-05-31

    In the first part of this work, the analysis of the polyphenolic compounds remaining in the wine after different contact times with yeast lees during simulation of red wine aging was undertaken. To achieve a more precise view of the wine polyphenols adsorbed on lees during red wine aging and to establish a clear balance between adsorbed and remnant polyphenol compounds, the specific analysis of the chemical composition of the adsorbed polyphenolic compounds (condensed tannins and anthocyanins) after their partial desorbtion from yeast lees by denaturation treatments was realized in the second part of the study. The total recovery of polyphenol compounds from yeast lees was not complete, since a rather important part of the initial wine colored polyphenols, especially those with a dominant blue color component, remained strongly adsorbed on yeast lees, as monitored by color tristimulus and reflectance spectra measurements. All anthocyanins were recovered at a rather high percentage (about 62%), and it was demonstrated that they were not adsorbed in relation with their sole polarity. Very few monomeric phenolic compounds were extracted from yeast lees. With the use of drastic denaturing treatments, the total recovery of condensed tannins reached 83%. Such tannins extracted from yeast lees exhibited very high polymeric size and a rather high percentage of galloylated residues by comparison with initial wine tannins, indicating that nonpolar tannins were preferentially desorbed from yeast lees by the extraction treatments.

  17. Capacity retention in hydrogen storage alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anani, A.; Visintin, A.; Srinivasan, S.; Appleby, A. J.; Reilly, J. J.; Johnson, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of our examination of the properties of several candidate materials for hydrogen storage electrodes and their relation to the decrease in H-storage capacity upon open-circuit storage over time are reported. In some of the alloy samples examined to date, only about 10 percent of the hydrogen capacity was lost upon storage for 20 days, while in others, this number was as high as 30 percent for the same period of time. This loss in capacity is attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) hydrogen desorbed from the electrode due to pressure differences between the cell and the electrode sample; and (2) chemical and/or electrochemical degradation of the alloy electrode upon exposure to the cell environment. The former process is a direct consequence of the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the hydride alloy phase and the partial pressure of hydrogen in the hydride phase in equilibrium with that in the electrolyte environment, while the latter is related to the stability of the alloy phase in the cell environment. Comparison of the equilibrium gas-phase dissociation pressures of these alloys indicate that reversible loss of hydrogen capacity is higher in alloys with P(eqm) greater than 1 atm than in those with P(eqm) less than 1 atm.

  18. Modeling of hydrogen desorption from tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guterl, J., E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Smirnov, R.D. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Krasheninnikov, S.I. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Nuclear Research National University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Uberuaga, B.; Voter, A.F.; Perez, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 8754 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen retention in metallic plasma-facing components is among key-issues for future fusion devices. For tungsten, which has been chosen as divertor material in ITER, hydrogen desorption parameters experimentally measured for fusion-related conditions show large discrepancies. In this paper, we therefore investigate hydrogen recombination and desorption on tungsten surfaces using molecular dynamics simulations and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to analyze adsorption states, diffusion, hydrogen recombination into molecules, and clustering of hydrogen on tungsten surfaces. The quality of tungsten hydrogen interatomic potential is discussed in the light of MD simulations results, showing that three body interactions in current interatomic potential do not allow to reproduce hydrogen molecular recombination and desorption. Effects of surface hydrogen clustering on hydrogen desorption are analyzed by introducing a kinetic model describing the competition between surface diffusion, clustering and recombination. Different desorption regimes are identified and reproduce some aspects of desorption regimes experimentally observed.

  19. Hydrogen absorption study of Ti-based alloys performed by melt-spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, R.M.; Lemus, L.F.; Santos, D.S. dos, E-mail: rafaella@metalmat.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEMM/COPPEP/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Metalurgica e de Materiais

    2013-11-01

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption of Ti{sub 53}Zr{sub 27}Ni{sub 20} icosahedral quasicrystal (ICQ) and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} shape memory alloy (SMA) melt-spun ribbons was studied. Samples were exposed to hydrogen gas at 623 K and 4 MPa for 1000 minutes. The total capacity of hydrogen obtained for Ti{sub 53}Zr{sub 27}Ni{sub 20} and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} was 3.2 and 2.4 wt. % respectively. The Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS) of the hydrogenated alloys shows that both alloys start to desorb hydrogen around 750 K. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, performed after hydrogenation, indicate a complete amorphization of the Ti{sub 53}Zr{sub 27}Ni{sub 20} i-phase alloy, while the Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} alloy remained crystalline after hydride formation. (author)

  20. Part I: Structural Characterization of Doped Nanostructured Magnesium: Understanding Disorder for Enhanced Hydrogen Absorption Kinetics Part II: Synthesis, Film Deposition, and Characterization of Quaternary Metal Chalcogenide Nanocrystals for Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Max B.

    The production, storage, and subsequent consumption of energy are at the foundation of all human activity and livelihood. The theme of this dissertation is the pursuit of fundamental understanding of the chemistry of materials that are used for energy production and storage. A strong emphasis is placed on a synthetic foundation that allows for systematic investigation into the fundamental chemistry that controls the applicable properties of the materials of interest. This dissertation is written in the "journals format" style--which is accepted by the Graduate School at Colorado State University--and is based on one peer-reviewed publication that has appeared in Chemistry of Materials as well as two manuscripts to be submitted, one to The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, and one to ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. In order to create a context for these publications, Chapters 1 and 3 provide an overview of the motivations for the projects, and then continue to detail the initial synthetic investigations and considerations for the two projects. In addition to recounting Mg nanocrystals synthetic refinement that was necessary for reproducible hydride kinetic analysis, Chapter 1 also briefly introduces some of the conventional models used for fitting of the hydriding kinetics data. Furthermore, initial investigations into the use of these models for our system are presented. Chapter 2 is a paper to be submitted to The Journal of Physical Chemistry C that describes the local and extended structure characterization of Mg nanocrystals (NCs) with a small amount of nickel added during synthesis. Ni has a dramatic effect on the de/hydriding kinetics of Mg NCs, and this chapter describes the use of a combination of multiple state-of-the-art characterization techniques to gain insight into the structural perturbations due to Ni inclusion in the Mg NCs. This insight is then used to establish the characteristics of Ni inclusion that results in the enhanced hydrogen

  1. Physical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifschitz, E.M.; Pitajewski, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    The textbook covers the subject under the following headings: kinetic gas theory, diffusion approximation, collisionless plasma, collisions within the plasma, plasma in the magnetic field, theory of instabilities, dielectrics, quantum fluids, metals, diagram technique for nonequilibrium systems, superconductors, and kinetics of phase transformations

  2. Effect of microwave irradiation on hydrogen sorption properties of hand mixed MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awad, A.S. [Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB-CNRS, 87 Avenue du Dr Schweitzer, F-33600 Pessac (France); LCPM/PR2N, Université Libanaise, Faculté des Sciences 2, 90656 Jdeidet El Matn (Lebanon); Nakhl, M.; Zakhour, M. [LCPM/PR2N, Université Libanaise, Faculté des Sciences 2, 90656 Jdeidet El Matn (Lebanon); Santos, S.F.; Souza, F.L. [Universidade Federal do ABC, Avenida dos Estados 5001, 09210-580 Santo André – SP (Brazil); Bobet, J.-L., E-mail: jean-louis.bobet@u-bordeaux.fr [Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB-CNRS, 87 Avenue du Dr Schweitzer, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2016-08-15

    The effect of microwave (MW) irradiation on the hydrogen sorption properties of magnesium powder is explored in the present work. MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs (CFs = Carbons Fibers) was prepared by hand mixing, dehydrogenated under microwave irradiation for 20 s and then hydrogenated/dehydrogenated at about 300 °C – 1 MPa and 330 °C–0.03 MPa to investigate the effect of microwave irradiation on the solid/gas sorption properties. It has to be noted that the hydrogen absorption capacity and sorption kinetics of the MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture increased after dehydriding under MW irradiation. The MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture dehydrogenated by microwave irradiation can absorb about 5.8 wt.% and 5.3 wt.% H at 330 and 300 °C, respectively, within 2 h while the as-prepared MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture absorb only 4.6 wt.% H within the same duration. It is also demonstrated that MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture dehydrogenated by microwave irradiation exhibited good hydrogen desorption properties and, as an example, a microwave irradiated sample could release 5.8 wt.% H within 1 h at 330 °C in comparison to the as-prepared MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture which desorbed 4.4 wt.% H within 3 h. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed that the particle sizes of the MW dehydrogenated mixture decreased after several solid/gas sorption cycles. This contribute to the improvement of hydrogen storage properties of the microwaves dehydrogenated MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture. In addition, the hydrogenated MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture show reproducible and better microwave-assisted dehydriding reaction during second microwaves cycle. - Highlights: • Dehydriding reaction of MgH{sub 2} by microwave method. • Effect of microwaves treatment on the hydrogen sorption properties of Mg. • Effect of discontinuous microwaves irradiation.

  3. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  4. Heparin kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swart, C.A.M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125 I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  5. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  6. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, Jay P.; Kramer, Robert; Pourpoint, Timothee L.; Ramachandran, P.V.; Varma, Arvind; Zheng, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  7. Oxidative desulfurization: kinetic modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, S; Uppaluri, R; Purkait, M K

    2009-01-30

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H(2)O(2) over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel.

  8. Oxidative desulfurization: Kinetic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, S.; Uppaluri, R.; Purkait, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing environmental legislations coupled with enhanced production of petroleum products demand, the deployment of novel technologies to remove organic sulfur efficiently. This work represents the kinetic modeling of ODS using H 2 O 2 over tungsten-containing layered double hydroxide (LDH) using the experimental data provided by Hulea et al. [V. Hulea, A.L. Maciuca, F. Fajula, E. Dumitriu, Catalytic oxidation of thiophenes and thioethers with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of W-containing layered double hydroxides, Appl. Catal. A: Gen. 313 (2) (2006) 200-207]. The kinetic modeling approach in this work initially targets the scope of the generation of a superstructure of micro-kinetic reaction schemes and models assuming Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms. Subsequently, the screening and selection of above models is initially based on profile-based elimination of incompetent schemes followed by non-linear regression search performed using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) for the chosen models. The above analysis inferred that Eley-Rideal mechanism describes the kinetic behavior of ODS process using tungsten-containing LDH, with adsorption of reactant and intermediate product only taking place on the catalyst surface. Finally, an economic index is presented that scopes the economic aspects of the novel catalytic technology with the parameters obtained during regression analysis to conclude that the cost factor for the catalyst is 0.0062-0.04759 US $ per barrel

  9. Metal hydrides for hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, H.F.; Badcock, C.C.; Quinzio, M.V.

    1984-01-01

    Metal hydride hydrogen storage in nickel hydrogen (Ni/H 2 ) batteries has been shown to increase battery energy density and improve battery heat management capabilities. However the properties of metal hydrides in a Ni/H 2 battery environment, which contains water vapor and oxygen in addition to the hydrogen, have not been well characterized. This work evaluates the use of hydrides in Ni/H 2 batteries by fundamental characterization of metal hydride properties in a Ni/H 2 cell environment. Hydrogen sorption properties of various hydrides have been measured in a Ni/H 2 cell environment. Results of detailed thermodynamic and kinetic studies of hydrogen sorption in LaNi 5 in a Ni/H 2 cell environment are presented. Long-term cycling studies indicate that degradation of the hydride can be minimized by cycling between certain pressure limits. A model describing the mechanism of hydride degradation is presented

  10. Analysis of hydrogen distribution on Mg-Ni alloy surface by scanning electron-stimulated desorption ion microscope (SESDIM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaga, Atsushi; Hibino, Kiyohide; Suzuki, Masanori; Yamada, Masaaki; Tanaka, Kazuhide; Ueda, Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen distribution and behavior on a Mg-Ni alloy surface are studied by using a time-of-flight electron-stimulated desorption (TOF-ESD) microscopy and a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). The desorbed hydrogen ions are energy-discriminated and distinguished into two characters in the adsorbed states, which belong to Mg 2 Ni grains and the other to oxygen-contaminated Mg phase at the grain boundaries. Adsorbed hydrogen is found to be stable up to 150 deg. C, but becomes thermally unstable around at 200 deg. C

  11. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  12. Modelling of discrete TDS-spectrum of hydrogen desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodchenkova, Natalia I.; Zaika, Yury V.

    2015-12-01

    High concentration of hydrogen in metal leads to hydrogen embrittlement. One of the methods to evaluate the hydrogen content is the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As the sample is heated under vacuumization, atomic hydrogen diffuses inside the bulk and is desorbed from the surface in the molecular form. The extraction curve (measured by a mass-spectrometric analyzer) is recorded. In experiments with monotonous external heating it is observed that background hydrogen fluxes from the extractor walls and fluxes from the sample cannot be reliably distinguished. Thus, the extraction curve is doubtful. Therefore, in this case experimenters use discrete TDS-spectrum: the sample is removed from the analytical part of the device for the specified time interval, and external temperature is then increased stepwise. The paper is devoted to the mathematical modelling and simulation of experimental studies. In the corresponding boundary-value problem with nonlinear dynamic boundary conditions physical- chemical processes in the bulk and on the surface are taken into account: heating of the sample, diffusion in the bulk, hydrogen capture by defects, penetration from the bulk to the surface and desorption. The model aimed to analyze the dynamics of hydrogen concentrations without preliminary artificial sample saturation. Numerical modelling allows to choose the point on the extraction curve that corresponds to the initial quantity of the surface hydrogen, to estimate the values of the activation energies of diffusion, desorption, parameters of reversible capture and hydride phase decomposition.

  13. Modelling of discrete TDS-spectrum of hydrogen desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodchenkova, Natalia I; Zaika, Yury V

    2015-01-01

    High concentration of hydrogen in metal leads to hydrogen embrittlement. One of the methods to evaluate the hydrogen content is the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As the sample is heated under vacuumization, atomic hydrogen diffuses inside the bulk and is desorbed from the surface in the molecular form. The extraction curve (measured by a mass-spectrometric analyzer) is recorded. In experiments with monotonous external heating it is observed that background hydrogen fluxes from the extractor walls and fluxes from the sample cannot be reliably distinguished. Thus, the extraction curve is doubtful. Therefore, in this case experimenters use discrete TDS-spectrum: the sample is removed from the analytical part of the device for the specified time interval, and external temperature is then increased stepwise. The paper is devoted to the mathematical modelling and simulation of experimental studies. In the corresponding boundary-value problem with nonlinear dynamic boundary conditions physical- chemical processes in the bulk and on the surface are taken into account: heating of the sample, diffusion in the bulk, hydrogen capture by defects, penetration from the bulk to the surface and desorption. The model aimed to analyze the dynamics of hydrogen concentrations without preliminary artificial sample saturation. Numerical modelling allows to choose the point on the extraction curve that corresponds to the initial quantity of the surface hydrogen, to estimate the values of the activation energies of diffusion, desorption, parameters of reversible capture and hydride phase decomposition. (paper)

  14. Kinetic Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises.......A kinetic interface for orientation detection in a video training system is disclosed. The interface includes a balance platform instrumented with inertial motion sensors. The interface engages a participant's sense of balance in training exercises....

  15. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  16. Investigation of hydrogen-deformation interactions in β-21S titanium alloy using thermal desorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tal-Gutelmacher, E.; Eliezer, D.; Boellinghaus, Th.

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the investigation of the combined influence of hydrogen and pre-plastic deformation on hydrogen's absorption/desorption behavior, the microstructure and microhardness of a single-phased β-21S alloy. In this study, thermal desorption analyses (TDS) evaluation of various desorption and trapping parameters provide further insight on the relationships between hydrogen absorption/desorption processes and deformation, and their mutual influence on the microstructure and the microhardness of β-21S alloy. TDS spectra were supported by other experimental techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, hydrogen quantity analyses and microhardness tests. Pre-plastic deformation, performed before the electrochemical hydrogenation of the alloy, increased significantly the hydrogen absorption capacity. Its influence was also evident on the notably expanded lattice parameter of β-21S alloy after hydrogenation. However, no hydride precipitation was observed. An interesting softening effect of the pre-deformed hydrogenated alloy was revealed by microhardness tests. TDS demonstrated the significant effect of pre-plastic deformation on the hydrogen evolution process. Hydrogen desorption temperature and the activation energy for hydrogen release increased, additional trap states were observed and the amount of desorbed hydrogen decreased

  17. Hydrogen retention properties of polycrystalline tungsten and helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Koyama, K.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hirohata, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The hydrogen retention properties of a polycrystalline tungsten and tungsten irradiated by helium ions with an energy of 5 keV were examined by using an ECR ion irradiation apparatus and a technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy, TDS. The polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated at RT with energetic hydrogen ions, with a flux of 10 15 H cm -2 and an energy of 1.7 keV up to a fluence of 5 x 10 18 H cm -2 . Subsequently, the amount of retained hydrogen was measured by TDS. The heating temperature was increased from RT to 1000 C, and the heating rate was 50 C min -1 . Below 1000 C, two distinct hydrogen desorption peaks were observed at 200 C and 400 C. The retained amount of hydrogen was observed to be five times smaller than that of graphite, but the concentration in the implantation layer was comparable with that of graphite. Also, the polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated with 5 keV helium ions up to a fluence of 1.4 x 10 18 He cm -2 , and then re-irradiated with 1.7 keV hydrogen ions. The amount of retained hydrogen in this later experiment was close to the value in the case without prior helium ion irradiation. However, the amount of hydrogen which desorbed around the low temperature peak, 200 C, was largely enhanced. The desorption amount at 200 C saturated for the helium fluence of more than 5 x 10 17 He cm -2 . The present data shows that the trapping state of hydrogen is largely changed by the helium ion irradiation. Additionally, 5 keV helium ion irradiation was conducted on a sample pre-implanted with hydrogen ions to simulate a helium ion impact desorption of hydrogen retained in tungsten. The amount of the hydrogen was reduced as much as 50%. (orig.)

  18. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    Focus of this project is on developing new approaches for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. The strategies to accomplish CO reduction are based on favorable thermodynamics manifested by rhodium macrocycles for producing a series of intermediates implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Metalloformyl complexes from reactions of H 2 and CO, and CO reductive coupling to form metallo α-diketone species provide alternate routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics are promising candidates for future development

  19. The analytical utility of thermally desorbed polydimethylsilicone membranes for in-vivo sampling of volatile organic compounds in and on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazanskaia, S; Blackburn, G; Harker, M; Taylor, D; Thomas, C L P

    2008-08-01

    A thermally-desorbed polydimethylsilicone (PDMS) membrane approach with analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been developed and characterised, to enable the VOC arising in, and on skin, from glandular secretions, exogenous materials, products of perfusion from blood, and microbiological metabolites to be sampled in a single procedure. In-vitro studies using a series of volatile fatty acid standards indicated that the recovery efficiency of the technique increased with decreasing volatility; for example, the recovery of hexanoic acid was 3.3 times greater than that for 2-methylpropanoic acid. The relative standard deviation of the methodology decreased with decreasing volatility; RSD = 19% for 2-methylpropanoic acid and RSD = 7% for hexanoic acid. Sampled-mass vs. response relationships were modelled satisfactorily using linear regression analysis with regression coefficients in the range 0.95 to 0.998. In-vivo reproducibility was assessed though the analysis of the responses of 1-dodecane, 3,7-dimethyloct-1-ene, 2-propenoic acid, 2-ethylhexyl ester, 2-ethylhexan-1-ol, butanoic, 2-ethylhexylester, and junipen (1,4-methanoazulene, decahydro-4,8,8-trimethyl-9-methylene-); six compounds selected at random retention times from a GC-MS chromatographic VOC profile of human skin containing several hundred resolved and partially resolved compounds. Five samples were obtained simultaneously from the forearm of a healthy male participant. The in-vivo sample masses were estimated to be in the range 50 pg to 100 ng per sample with observed RSD falling between 15% and 32%; in line with a Horwitz trend. Increasing the sample time from 5 min to 120 min generally resulted in an enrichment of the VOC recovered, and for many VOC substantial increases in sensitivity (x7) were observed over this time range as the PDMS sampling-patch approached equilibrium with the underlying skin. Nevertheless, more volatile components, 2,4,6-trimethylcarbazole for instance, were

  20. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  1. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  2. Dehydriding reaction of Mg(NH2)2-LiH system under hydrogen pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, M.; Noritake, T.; Kitahara, G.; Nakamori, Y.; Towata, S.; Orimo, S.

    2007-01-01

    The dehydriding and structural properties of the 3Mg(NH 2 ) 2 + 12LiH system under hydrogen pressure were investigated using the pressure-composition (p-c) isotherm measurement and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Two distinct regions, a plateau region and a sloping region, can be seen on the p-c isotherms and the amount of the desorbed hydrogen at 523 K was 4.9 mass%. The enthalpy of hydrogenation calculated using a van't Hoff plot was -46 kJ/mol H 2 . The dehydriding reaction was proposed for the 3Mg(NH 2 ) 2 + 12LiH system based on the obtained p-c isotherms and XRD profiles and chemical valences of Li, Mg, N, and H. In the plateau region on the p-c isotherm, Mg(NH 2 ) 2 , Li 4 Mg 3 (NH 2 ) 2 (NH) 4 (tetragonal), and LiH phases coexist and the molar ratio of the Li 4 Mg 3 (NH 2 ) 2 (NH) 4 phase increases (while those of Mg(NH 2 ) 2 and LiH phases decrease) with the amount of the desorbed hydrogen. On the other hand, the mixture of Li 4+x Mg 3 (NH 2 ) 2-x (NH) 4+x + (8-x)LiH (0 ≤ x ≤ 2) is formed and the lattice volume of the Li 4+x Mg 3 (NH 2 ) 2-x (NH) 4+x phase continuously increases with the amount of the desorbed hydrogen in the sloping region on the p-c isotherm

  3. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  4. Kinetics and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous degradation of Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84 by potassium peroxydisulfate (K2S2O8 has been studied in laboratory scale experiments. The effect of the initial concentrations of potassium peroxydisulfate and RY84, pH and temperature on RY84 degradation were also examined. Experimental data were analyzed using first and second-order kinetics. The degradation kinetics of RY84 of the potassium peroxydisulfate process followed the second-order reaction kinetics. These rate constants have an extreme values similar to of 9.493 mM−1min−1 at a peroxydisulfate dose of 4 mmol/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation (Ea and Gibbs free energy (ΔG° were also evaluated. The negative value of ΔGo and Ea shows the spontaneous reaction natural conditions and exothermic nature.

  5. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P.

    2000-05-01

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  6. Solar hydrogen hybrid system with carbon storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zini, G.; Marazzi, R.; Pedrazzi, S.; Tartarini, P.

    2009-01-01

    A complete solar hydrogen hybrid system has been developed to convert, store and use energy from renewable energy sources. The theoretical model has been implemented in a dynamic model-based software environment and applied to real data to simulate its functioning over a one-year period. Results are used to study system design and performance. A photovoltaic sub-system directly drives a residential load and, if a surplus of energy is available, an electrolyzer to produce hydrogen which is stored in a cluster of nitrogen-cooled tanks filled with AX-21 activated carbons. When the power converted from the sun is not sufficient to cover load needs, hydrogen is desorbed from activated carbon tanks and sent to the fuel-cell sub-system so to obtain electrical energy. A set of sub-systems (bus-bar, buck- and boost-converters, inverter, control circuits), handle the electrical power according to a Programmable Logic Control unit so that the load can be driven with adequate Quality of Service. Hydrogen storage is achieved through physisorption (weak van der Waals interactions) between carbon atoms and hydrogen molecules occurring at low temperature (77 K) in carbon porous solids at relatively low pressures. Storage modeling has been developed using a Langmuir-Freundlich 1st type isotherm and experimental data available in literature. Physisorption storage provides safer operations along with good gravimetric (10.8% at 6 MPa) and volumetric (32.5 g/l at 6 MPa) storage capacities at costs that can be comparable to, or smaller than, ordinary storage techniques (compression or liquefaction). Several test runs have been performed on residential user data-sets: the system is capable of providing grid independence and can be designed to yield a surplus production of hydrogen which can be used to recharge electric car batteries or fill tanks for non-stationary uses. (author)

  7. Granulocyte kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Saverymuttu, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    By using density gradient materials enriched with autologous plasma, the authors have been able to isolate granulocutes from other cellular elements and label them with In-111 without separation from a plasma environment. The kinetic behavior of these cells suggests that phenomena attributed to granulocyte activation are greatly reduced by this labeling. Here, they review their study of granulocyte kinetics in health and disease in hope of quantifying sites of margination and identifying principal sites of destruction. The three principle headings of the paper are distribution, life-span, and destruction

  8. Adsorption separation factors for hydrogen--deuterium (H/sub 2/-HD-D/sub 2/) mixtures on synthetic mordenite at 48 to 62/sup 0/K. [Reaction Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parbuzin, V S; Kuryakov, Yu N

    1975-07-01

    The temperature dependence of selectivity has been determined for the adsorption of hydrogen isotopes by sodium mordenite. Heats and entropies of exchange of the isotopic molecules in the gas-zeolite system have been calculated from the experimental results. (auth)

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of alkenes and silanes by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) and a novel application of electrospray mass spectrometry to study the hydrolysis of MTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Haisong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    Conjugated dienes were oxidized by hydrogen peroxide with methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) as catalyst. Methylrhenium bis-peroxide was the major reactive catalyst present. Hydroxyalkenes and trisubstituted silane were also tested. Mechanisms for each of these reactions are presented.

  10. Catalysis and Downsizing in Mg-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianding Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium (Mg-based materials are promising candidates for hydrogen storage due to the low cost, high hydrogen storage capacity and abundant resources of magnesium for the realization of a hydrogen society. However, the sluggish kinetics and strong stability of the metal-hydrogen bonding of Mg-based materials hinder their application, especially for onboard storage. Many researchers are devoted to overcoming these challenges by numerous methods. Here, this review summarizes some advances in the development of Mg-based hydrogen storage materials related to downsizing and catalysis. In particular, the focus is on how downsizing and catalysts affect the hydrogen storage capacity, kinetics and thermodynamics of Mg-based hydrogen storage materials. Finally, the future development and applications of Mg-based hydrogen storage materials is discussed.

  11. Hydrogen storage development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    A summary of the hydride development efforts for the current program year (FY98) are presented here. The Mg-Al-Zn alloy system was studied at low Zn levels (2--4 wt%) and midrange Al contents (40--60 wt%). Higher plateau pressures were found with Al and Zn alloying in Mg and, furthermore, it was found that the hydrogen desorption kinetics were significantly improved with small additions of Zn. Results are also shown here for a detailed study of the low temperature properties of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, and a comparison made between conventional melt cast alloy and the vapor process material.

  12. Active Edge Sites Engineering in Nickel Cobalt Selenide Solid Solutions for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan; Liang, Hanfeng; Zhu, Jiajie; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    free energy for atomic hydrogen adsorption in NiCoSe, identified by temperature-dependent conductivities and density functional theory calculations, the authors have achieved unprecedented fast hydrogen evolution kinetics, approaching that of Pt

  13. Substrate and product inhibition of hydrogen production by the extreme thermophile, Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niel, van E.W.J.; Claassen, P.A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Substrate and product inhibition of hydrogen production during sucrose fermentation by the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus was studied. The inhibition kinetics were analyzed with a noncompetitive, nonlinear inhibition model. Hydrogen was the most severe

  14. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to their hydride form. In addition to this experimental work, a parallel project was carried out to develop a new model of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) that could be used to define the mechanisms of the electrochemical hydrogenation reactions. The EIS technique is capable of probing complex chemical and electrochemical reactions, and our model was written into a computer code that allowed the input of experimental EIS data and the extraction of kinetic parameters based on a best-fit analysis of theoretical reaction schemes. Finally, electrochemical methods for hydrogenating organic and metallo-organic materials have been explored.

  15. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Digby

    2010-01-01

    closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to their hydride form. In addition to this experimental work, a parallel project was carried out to develop a new model of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) that could be used to define the mechanisms of the electrochemical hydrogenation reactions. The EIS technique is capable of probing complex chemical and electrochemical reactions, and our model was written into a computer code that allowed the input of experimental EIS data and the extraction of kinetic parameters based on a best-fit analysis of theoretical reaction schemes. Finally, electrochemical methods for hydrogenating organic and metallo-organic materials have been explored.

  16. Training for power plant personnel on hydrogen production and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickelman, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to address the issue of training for power plant personnel in the area of hydrogen control. The authors experience in the training business indicates that most of the operations and engineering personnel have a very limited awareness of this phenomenon. Topics discussed in this paper include: 1) theory of hydrogen combustion kinetics; 2) incidents involving hydrogen combustion events; 3) normal operations interfacing with hydrogen; 4) accident conditions; and 5) mitigation schemes

  17. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  18. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  19. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  20. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy [Aiken, SC; Ritter, James A [Lexington, SC; Ebner, Armin D [Lexington, SC; Wang, Jun [Columbia, SC; Holland, Charles E [Cayce, SC

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  1. Modification of the properties of Pt-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts by hydrogen at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, P.G.; Froment, G.F.

    1979-08-01

    Pulse reactor studies were performed on the hydrogenolysis of n-pentane and n-hexane at 400/sup 0/C on two commercial reforming catalysts that contained 0.6 and 0.75% platinum on alumina, respectively, and which were calcined in air at 500/sup 0/C, followed by hydrogen-reduction at 400/sup 0/-600/sup 0/C. On catalysts reduced at 400/sup 0/C, hydrogenolysis was the main reaction; with increasing reducing temperature, hydrogenolysis was suppressed and isomerization selectivity increased; at 550/sup 0/C pretreatment temperature, hydrogenolysis was near zero. This selective catalyst deactivation was reversed by oxidizing the catalyst in air at 500/sup 0/C in a similar manner as previously found for sulfided and chlorided catalysts. Temperature-programed desorption of hydrogen adsorbed at 20/sup 0/-600/sup 0/C revealed that the higher the adsorption temperature, the higher the temperature of the hydrogen desorption peaks: the hydrogen adsorbed below 400/sup 0/C desorbed mainly at 50/sup 0/-300/sup 0/C, but the hydrogen adsorbed at higher temperatures desorbed at 300/sup 0/-500/sup 0/C. Apparently, two types of hydrogen adsorb in the two temperature regions, of which the more strongly adsorbed type inhibits hydrogenolysis but not isomerization.

  2. Promoting effect of oxygen for hydrogenation of butadiene over Ni/sub 2/P catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozaki, F.; Kitoh, T.; Sodesawa, T.

    1980-04-01

    When 0-10 mm Hg of oxygen were added to the reaction of 75 mm Hg butadiene and 225 mm Hg hydrogen over dinickel phosphide in a closed circulation system at 40/sup 0/C, increasing amounts of oxygen caused increasing lengths of induction periods followed by hydrogenation at reaction rates which had a maximum at 3 mm Hg oxygen. This maximum rate was about six times higher than the rate without oxygen addition. Adsorption, temperature-programed desorption, IR spectroscopy, and the product distribution of butadiene deuteration showed that two types of oxygen adsorbed on the dinickel phosphide catalyst; molecular oxygen on nickel, which desorbed on evacuation below 50/sup 0/C and which could be displaced by butadiene, was responsible for the induction period; molecular oxygen on phosphorus atoms, which promoted hydrogen adsorption, was responsible for the increased hydrogenation rate.

  3. Zirconium-nickel crystals—hydrogen accumulators: Dissolution and penetration of hydrogen atoms in alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysina, Z. A.; Zaginaichenko, S. Yu.; Shchur, D. V.; Gabdullin, M. T.; Kamenetskaya, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    The calculation of the free energy, thermodynamic equilibrium equations, and kinetic equations of the intermetallic compound Zr2NiH x has been carried out based on molecular-kinetic concepts. The equilibrium hydrogen concentration depending on the temperature, pressure, and energy parameters has been calculated. The absorption-desorption of hydrogen has been studied, and the possibility of the realization of the hysteresis effect has been revealed. The kinetics of the dissolution and permeability of hydrogen is considered, the time dependence of these values has been found, and conditions for the extremum character of their time dependence have been determined. Relaxation times of the dissolution and permeability of hydrogen into the alloy have been calculated. The calculation results are compared with the experimental data available in the literature.

  4. Decarbonylation and hydrogenation reactions of allyl alcohol and acrolein on Pd(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Ratna; Barteau, Mark A.

    1994-11-01

    Allyl alcohol and acrolein reactions on the Pd(110) surface were investigated using temperature programmed desorption. For both unsaturated oxygenates, three coverage-dependent reaction pathways were observed. At low coverages, allyl alcohol decomposed completely to CO, hydrogen and carbonaceous species on the surface. For θ > 0.15 monolayer, ethylene (and small amounts of ethane) desorbed at ca. 295 K. Near saturation coverages, desorption of propanal was detected at ca. 235 K. The parent molecule, allyl alcohol, desorbed only after exposures sufficient to saturate these channels. Acrolein decomposition spectra were similar to those observed for allyl alcohol decomposition on the clean surface. Additional experiments with allyl alcohol on hydrogen- and deuterium-precoveredPd(110) surfaces demonstrated increased hydrogenation of the C 2-hydrocarbon products along with hydrogenation of allyl alcohol to 1-propanol. However, in contrast to previous results for allyl alcohol on the Pd(111) surface, there was no evidence for C-O scission reactions of any C 3 oxygenate on Pd(110).

  5. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etherton, B.P.

    1980-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts which were examined by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The metal particle size and number of particles per area of catalyst increased with increasing metal loading. The particles were approx. 10 A. in diameter, cubo-octahedral shaped, and approx. 80-90% disperse. The STEM electron beam caused negligible damage to the samples. Hydrogen adsorption measurements showed that the hydrogen-iridium atom ratio was 1.2:1-1.3:1 and increased with decreasing metal loading. Temperature-programed desorption showed four types of adsorbed hydrogen desorbing at -90/sup 0/C (I), 15/sup 0/C (IV), 115/sup 0/C (II), and 245/sup 0/C (III). Types II and IV desorb from single atom sites and Types I and III from multiple atom sites. Type I is in rapid equilibrium with the gas phase. All desorption processes appear to be first order. Carbon monoxide adsorbed nondissociatively at 25/sup 0/C with approx. 0.7:1 CO/Ir atom ratio. It adsorbed primarily in linear forms at low coverage, but a bridged form appeared at high coverage.

  6. Physisorption kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    1986-01-01

    This monograph deals with the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of molecules physisorbed on solid surfaces. Although frequent and detailed reference is made to experiment, it is mainly concerned with the theory of the subject. In this, we have attempted to present a unified picture based on the master equation approach. Physisorption kinetics is by no means a closed and mature subject; rather, in writing this monograph we intended to survey a field very much in flux, to assess its achievements so far, and to give a reasonable basis from which further developments can take off. For this reason we have included many papers in the bibliography that are not referred to in the text but are of relevance to physisorption. To keep this monograph to a reasonable size, and also to allow for some unity in the presentation of the material, we had to omit a number of topics related to physisorption kinetics. We have not covered to any extent the equilibrium properties of physisorbed layers such as structures, phase tr...

  7. Laser induced desorption as hydrogen retention diagnostic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zlobinski, Miroslaw

    2016-07-15

    Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is a diagnostic method to measure the hydrogen content in the surface of a material exposed to a hydrogen isotope (H,D,T) plasma. It is developed mainly to monitor hydrogen retention in the walls of magnetic fusion devices that have to limit the amount of their fuel tritium mainly due to safety reasons. The development of fusion increasingly focusses on plasma-wall interactions for which in situ diagnostics like LIDS are required that work during plasma operation and without tile removal. The method has first been developed for thin amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H < 500 nm) layers successfully and is studied in the present work on thick (15 μm) layers, carbon fibre composites (CFCs), bulk tungsten (W), W fuzz and mixed C/W materials. In LID a 3 ms Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser pulse heats a spot of diameter 3 mm with 500 {sup MW}/{sub m{sup 2}} on W to 1800 K at the surface and thus above 1300 K within ca. 0.2 mm depth. On C materials (graphite, CFC, a-C:H) this temperature guarantees a nearly complete (>95%) desorption already within 1.5 ms pulse duration. The retained hydrogen atoms are desorbed locally, recombine to molecules and migrate promptly to the surface via internal channels like pores and grain boundaries. Whereas, in W the retained hydrogen atoms have to diffuse through the bulk material, which is a relatively slow process also directed into the depth. The desorbed hydrogen fraction can thus be strongly reduced to 18-91% as observed here. This fraction is measured by melting the central part of a previously heated spot ca. 40 μm deep with a diameter 2 mm, 3 ms laser pulse, releasing the remaining hydrogen. W samples exposed to different plasmas in TEXTOR, Pilot-PSI, PSI-2, PADOS and PlaQ show that the desorption fraction of LID mainly decreases due to higher sample temperature during plasma exposure. The heat causes deeper hydrogen diffusion and/or stronger hydrogen trapping due to creation of traps with higher

  8. Laser induced desorption as hydrogen retention diagnostic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlobinski, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is a diagnostic method to measure the hydrogen content in the surface of a material exposed to a hydrogen isotope (H,D,T) plasma. It is developed mainly to monitor hydrogen retention in the walls of magnetic fusion devices that have to limit the amount of their fuel tritium mainly due to safety reasons. The development of fusion increasingly focusses on plasma-wall interactions for which in situ diagnostics like LIDS are required that work during plasma operation and without tile removal. The method has first been developed for thin amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:H < 500 nm) layers successfully and is studied in the present work on thick (15 μm) layers, carbon fibre composites (CFCs), bulk tungsten (W), W fuzz and mixed C/W materials. In LID a 3 ms Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser pulse heats a spot of diameter 3 mm with 500 MW / m 2 on W to 1800 K at the surface and thus above 1300 K within ca. 0.2 mm depth. On C materials (graphite, CFC, a-C:H) this temperature guarantees a nearly complete (>95%) desorption already within 1.5 ms pulse duration. The retained hydrogen atoms are desorbed locally, recombine to molecules and migrate promptly to the surface via internal channels like pores and grain boundaries. Whereas, in W the retained hydrogen atoms have to diffuse through the bulk material, which is a relatively slow process also directed into the depth. The desorbed hydrogen fraction can thus be strongly reduced to 18-91% as observed here. This fraction is measured by melting the central part of a previously heated spot ca. 40 μm deep with a diameter 2 mm, 3 ms laser pulse, releasing the remaining hydrogen. W samples exposed to different plasmas in TEXTOR, Pilot-PSI, PSI-2, PADOS and PlaQ show that the desorption fraction of LID mainly decreases due to higher sample temperature during plasma exposure. The heat causes deeper hydrogen diffusion and/or stronger hydrogen trapping due to creation of traps with higher binding energy

  9. The kinetics of hydrogen absorption/desorption within nanostructured composite Ni{sub 79.1}Co{sub 18.6}Cu{sub 2.3} alloy using resistometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spasojevic, M., E-mail: ljiljana.spasojevic51@yahoo.com [Joint Laboratory for Advanced Materials of the Serbian Academy of Science and Arts, Section for Amorphous Systems, Svetog Save 65, 32000 Cacak, Republic of Serbia (Serbia); Faculty of Agronomy Cacak, University of Kragujevac, Cara Dusana 34, 32000 Cacak, Republic of Serbia (Serbia); Maricic, A. [Joint Laboratory for Advanced Materials of the Serbian Academy of Science and Arts, Section for Amorphous Systems, Svetog Save 65, 32000 Cacak, Republic of Serbia (Serbia); Ribic Zelenovic, L. [Joint Laboratory for Advanced Materials of the Serbian Academy of Science and Arts, Section for Amorphous Systems, Svetog Save 65, 32000 Cacak, Republic of Serbia (Serbia); Faculty of Agronomy Cacak, University of Kragujevac, Cara Dusana 34, 32000 Cacak, Republic of Serbia (Serbia); Krstajic, N.; Spasojevic, P. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11000 Belgrade, Republic of Serbia (Serbia)

    2013-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructured Ni{sub 79.1}Co{sub 18.6}Cu{sub 2.3} powder was obtained by electrochemical deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation observed between electrical conductivity and absorbed hydrogen amount. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen absorption/desorption mechanism was determined. - Abstract: Ni{sub 79.1}Co{sub 18.6}Cu{sub 2.3} powder was obtained by electrochemical deposition from an ammonium sulfate bath. The structure and surface morphology of the powder were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The electrochemically obtained Ni{sub 79.1}Co{sub 18.6}Cu{sub 2.3} alloy contained an amorphous phase and nanocrystals with an average size of 6.8 nm of FCC phase of the solid solution of cobalt and copper in nickel. Nanocrystals were characterized by a high average microstrain value and high minimum density of chaotically distributed dislocations. X-ray analysis also showed that powder hydrogenation at an elevated temperature of up to 200 Degree-Sign C did not change unit cell parameters and mean crystallite size value. SEM images show the formation of two shapes of powder particles: large cauliflower-like particles and small dendritic ones. Powder pressing at 10 MPa and at 25 Degree-Sign C gave samples that were analyzed for hydrogen absorption/desorption within the temperature range of 160-200 Degree-Sign C. Changes in electrical resistivity during absorption/desorption were monitored. The reciprocal value of resistivity (electrical conductivity) was found to increase linearly with increasing amount of absorbed hydrogen. The experimental results were used to propose an absorption/desorption mechanism. The adsorbed hydrogen molecule dissociates on alloy surface, forming adsorbed atoms. Adatoms penetrate and diffuse into the bulk of the alloy, simultaneously donating their electrons to the conduction band of the alloy. The increase in the concentration of free

  10. Hydrogenation of stainless steels implanted with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Ramos, L.E. da.

    1989-01-01

    In the present work the effects of both ion implantation and hydrogenation on the fatigue behaviour of an AISI-304 type unstable stainless steel was studied. The material was tested under the following microstructural conditions: annealed; annealed plus hydrogenated; annealed plus ion-implanted; annealed, ion-implanted and hydrogeneted. The hydrogen induced phase transformations were also studied during the outgassing of the samples. The ion implanted was observed to retard the kinetics of the hydrogen induced phase transformations. It was also observed that the nitrogen ion implantation followed by both natural (for about 4 months) and artificial (100 0 C for 6 hours) aging treatments was beneficial to the fatigue life of both non hydrogenated and severely hydrogenated samples. (author) [pt

  11. Questioning hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag, Roel; Mazza, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen is to be compared to electricity, the only widespread and viable alternative. When hydrogen is used to transmit renewable electricity, only 51% can reach the end user due to losses in electrolysis, hydrogen compression, and the fuel cell. In contrast, conventional electric storage technologies allow between 75% and 85% of the original electricity to be delivered. Even when hydrogen is extracted from gasified coal (with carbon sequestration) or from water cracked in high-temperature nuclear reactors, more of the primary energy reaches the end user if a conventional electric process is used instead. Hydrogen performs no better in mobile applications, where electric vehicles that are far closer to commercialization exceed fuel cell vehicles in efficiency, cost and performance. New, carbon-neutral energy can prevent twice the quantity of GHG's by displacing fossil electricity than it can by powering fuel cell vehicles. The same is true for new, natural gas energy. New energy resources should be used to displace high-GHG electric generation, not to manufacture hydrogen

  12. Liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage: catalytic hydrogen generation under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-Long; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Yan, Jun-Min; Zhang, Xin-Bo; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-25

    There is a demand for a sufficient and sustainable energy supply. Hence, the search for applicable hydrogen storage materials is extremely important owing to the diversified merits of hydrogen energy. Lithium and sodium borohydride, ammonia borane, hydrazine, and formic acid have been extensively investigated as promising hydrogen storage materials based on their relatively high hydrogen content. Significant advances, such as hydrogen generation temperatures and reaction kinetics, have been made in the catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous lithium and sodium borohydride and ammonia borane as well as in the catalytic decomposition of hydrous hydrazine and formic acid. In this Minireview we briefly survey the research progresses in catalytic hydrogen generation from these liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  13. Kinetics of interaction from low-energy-ion bombardment of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of interaction from low energy oxygen ion bombardment of carbon and Teflon surfaces have been investigated. The surfaces were bombarded with 4.5 to 93 eV oxygen ions and emitted species were observed with a mass spectrometer. To obtain the kinetic information, the ion beam was square pulse modulated and reaction products were observed as a function of time. The kinetic information is contained in the response of the emitted species to the pulsed ion beam. Oxygen bombardment of carbon produced CO in three parallel branches with each following an adsorption-desorption process. The fast branch, with a rate constants of 12,000/sec, appeared to be sputter induced an was absent below about 19 eV. The medium and slow branches, with rate constants of 850/sec and 45/sec respectively, has little energy dependence and appeared to be due to chemical sputtering from two sites. The ratio of the fraction of the medium branch to that of the slow was constant at 1:3. The bombardment of Teflon produced CF in two parallel branches, with one following a series process and the other an adsorb-desorb process. The rate constant of the other branch were 22,000/sec and 7,000/sec and the rate constant of the other branch was 90/sec. The total signal fell monotonically with decreasing ion energy with the fraction for each branch holding constant at 71% for the series and 29% for the adsorb-desorb

  14. Hydrogen desorption properties of MgH2–Ni–Ni2Si composites prepared by mechanochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Motoki; Higuchi, Eiji; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The MgH 2 –Ni composite showed fast hydrogen desorption rate at 250 °C. ► The MgH 2 –Ni–Ni 2 Si composite showed fast hydrogen desorption rate at 220 °C. ► Nanocrystalline Mg 2 Ni and Mg 2 Si were formed between Mg and adjacent Ni or Si. ► Ni 2 Si did not form any alloys and work as a catalyst. -- Abstract: To improve hydrogen desorbability of Mg, some composites were prepared from MgH 2 , Ni and Ni 2 Si mixed powders by the mechanochemical method. The MgH 2 –Ni(2 mol%)–Ni 2 Si(1 mol%) composite was slower in hydrogen desorption rate at 250 °C than the MgH 2 –Ni(2 mol%) composite, while the hydrogen desorption rate at 220 °C for the former was faster than that for the latter. The XRD pattern of the MgH 2 –Ni(2 mol%) composite showed that after hydrogen desorption at 400 °C small diffraction peaks assigned to Mg 2 Ni were observed with peaks assigned to Mg. They shifted to smaller angles after hydrogen absorption at 250 °C and come back to the original positions after hydrogen desorption at 250 °C, suggesting reversible hydrogen absorption/desorption of Mg 2 Ni. In contrast, Ni 2 Si was not changed over the whole processes. These results indicated that Ni 2 Si worked as a catalyst for hydrogen desorption, leading to the improvement of desorbability at 220 °C

  15. Stochastic kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombino, A.; Mosiello, R.; Norelli, F.; Jorio, V.M.; Pacilio, N.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear system kinetics is formulated according to a stochastic approach. The detailed probability balance equations are written for the probability of finding the mixed population of neutrons and detected neutrons, i.e. detectrons, at a given level for a given instant of time. Equations are integrated in search of a probability profile: a series of cases is analyzed through a progressive criterium. It tends to take into account an increasing number of physical processes within the chosen model. The most important contribution is that solutions interpret analytically experimental conditions of equilibrium (moise analysis) and non equilibrium (pulsed neutron measurements, source drop technique, start up procedures)

  16. Development and Application of Kinetic Spectrophotometric Method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop an improved kinetic-spectrophotometric procedure for the determination of metronidazole (MNZ) in pharmaceutical formulations. Methods: The method is based on oxidation reaction of MNZ by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of Fe(II) ions at pH 4.5 (acetate buffer). The reaction was monitored ...

  17. Lithium hydride hydrolysis: experimental and kinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charton, S.; Maupoix, C.; Brevet, A.; Delaunay, F.; Heintz, O.; Saviot, L.

    2006-01-01

    In this work has been studied the contribution of various analyses techniques in the framework, on the one hand of revealing the mechanisms implied in lithium hydride hydrolysis, and on the other hand of studying the kinetics of hydrogen production. Among the methods recently investigated, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and SIMS seem to be particularly attractive. (O.M.)

  18. Hydrogen storage by reaction between metallic amides and imides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymery, J.B.; Cahen, S.; Tarascon, J.M.; Janot, R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper details the various metal-N-H systems reported in the literature as possible hydrogen storage materials. In a first part, we discuss the hydrogen storage performances of the Li-N-H system and the desorption mechanism of the LiH-LiNH 2 mixture is especially presented. The possibility of storing hydrogen using two other binary systems (Mg-N-H and Ca-N-H) is described in a second part. In the third part of the paper, we discuss about the performances of the highly promising Li-Mg-N-H system, for which a nice reversibility is obtained at 200 C with an experimental hydrogen capacity of about 5.0 wt.%. Other ternary systems, as Li-B-N-H and Li-Al-N-H, are presented in the last part of this review paper. We especially emphasize the performances obtained in our Laboratory at Amiens with a LiAl(NH 2 ) 4 -LiH mixture able to desorb around 6.0 wt.% of hydrogen at only 130 C. (authors)

  19. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  20. Mechanisms of wet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    A research programme is currently under way at BNL and MEL to investigate the possible use of Hydrogen Peroxide with metal ion catalysts as a wet oxidation treatment system for CEGB organic radioactive wastes. The published literature relating to the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and decomposition reactions of hydrogen peroxide is reviewed and the links with practical waste management by wet oxidation are examined. Alternative wet oxidation systems are described and the similarities to the CEGB research effort are noted. (author)

  1. Tolrestat kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.R.; Kraml, M.; Cayen, M.N.; Dubuc, J.; Ryder, S.; Dvornik, D.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of tolrestat, a potent inhibitor of aldose reductase, were examined. Serum concentrations of tolrestat and of total 14 C were measured after dosing normal subjects and subjects with diabetes with 14 C-labeled tolrestat. In normal subjects, tolrestat was rapidly absorbed and disappearance from serum was biphasic. Distribution and elimination t 1/2s were approximately 2 and 10 to 12 hr, respectively, after single and multiple doses. Unchanged tolrestat accounted for the major portion of 14 C in serum. Radioactivity was rapidly and completely excreted in urine and feces in an approximate ratio of 2:1. Findings were much the same in subjects with diabetes. In normal subjects, the kinetics of oral tolrestat were independent of dose in the 10 to 800 mg range. Repetitive dosing did not result in unexpected cumulation. Tolrestat was more than 99% bound to serum protein; it did not compete with warfarin for binding sites but was displaced to some extent by high concentrations of tolbutamide or salicylate

  2. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  3. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of binary MgTi and ternary MgTiX (X=Ni, Si) hydrogen storage alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobichettipalayam Manivasagam, T.; Iliksu, M.; Danilov, D.L.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2017-01-01

    Mg-based hydrogen storage alloys are promising candidate for many hydrogen storage applications because of the high gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity and favourable (de)hydrogenation kinetics. In the present study we have investigated the synthesis and electrochemical hydrogen storage properties

  4. Negative meson capture in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    The processes of deexcitation and capture of negative mesons and hadrons in atomic hydrogen are investigated. Only slow collisions in which the projectile-atom relative velocity is less than one atomic unit are considered, and the motion of the incident particle is treated classically. For each classical trajectory the probability of ionizing the hydrogen atom is determined, together with the energy spectrum of the emitted electron. Ionization probabilities are calculated using the time-dependent formulation of the perturbed stationary state method. Exact two-center electronic wave functions are used for both bound and continuum states. The total ionization cross section and electron energy spectrum have been calculated for negative muons, kaons and antiprotons at incident relative velocities between 0.04 and 1.0 atomic units. The electron energy spectrum has a sharp peak for electron kinetic energies on the order of 10 -3 Rydbergs. The ionization process thus favors the emission of very slow electrons. The cross section for ionization with capture of the incident particle was calculated for relative kinetic energies greater than 1.0 Rydberg. Since ionization was found to occur with the emission of electrons of nearly zero kinetic energy, the fraction of ionizing collisions which result in capture decreases very rapidly with projectile kinetic energy. The energy distributions of slowed down muons and hadrons were also computed. These distributions were used together with the capture cross section to determine the distribution of kinetic energies at which capture takes place. It was found that most captures occur for kinetic energies slightly less than 1.0 Rydbergs with relatively little capture at thermal energies. The captured particles therefore tend to go into very large and loosely found orbits with binding energies less than 0.1 Rydbergs

  5. Hydrogen Plasma Processing of Iron Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Kali Charan; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-06-01

    Iron is currently produced by carbothermic reduction of oxide ores. This is a multiple-stage process that requires large-scale equipment and high capital investment, and produces large amounts of CO2. An alternative to carbothermic reduction is reduction using a hydrogen plasma, which comprises vibrationally excited molecular, atomic, and ionic states of hydrogen, all of which can reduce iron oxides, even at low temperatures. Besides the thermodynamic and kinetic advantages of a hydrogen plasma, the byproduct of the reaction is water, which does not pose any environmental problems. A review of the theory and practice of iron ore reduction using a hydrogen plasma is presented. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects are considered, with molecular, atomic and ionic hydrogen considered separately. The importance of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in overcoming the activation energy barriers, and in transferring energy to the iron oxide, is emphasized. Both thermal and nonthermal plasmas are considered. The thermophysical properties of hydrogen and argon-hydrogen plasmas are discussed, and their influence on the constriction and flow in the of arc plasmas is considered. The published R&D on hydrogen plasma reduction of iron oxide is reviewed, with both the reduction of molten iron ore and in-flight reduction of iron ore particles being considered. Finally, the technical and economic feasibility of the process are discussed. It is shown that hydrogen plasma processing requires less energy than carbothermic reduction, mainly because pelletization, sintering, and cokemaking are not required. Moreover, the formation of the greenhouse gas CO2 as a byproduct is avoided. In-flight reduction has the potential for a throughput at least equivalent to the blast furnace process. It is concluded that hydrogen plasma reduction of iron ore is a potentially attractive alternative to standard methods.

  6. Tunable hydrogen storage in magnesium-transition metal compounds: first-principles calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Er, S.; Tiwari, Dhirendra; Tiwari, D.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, G.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium dihydride (MgH2) stores 7.7 wt % hydrogen but it suffers from a high thermodynamic stability and slow (de)hydrogenation kinetics. Alloying Mg with lightweight transition metals (TM) (=Sc,Ti,V,Cr) aims at improving the thermodynamic and kinetic properties. We study the structure and

  7. Nanoparticle Nucleation Is Termolecular in Metal and Involves Hydrogen: Evidence for a Kinetically Effective Nucleus of Three {Ir3H2x·P2W15Nb3O62}6- in Ir(0)n Nanoparticle Formation From [(1,5-COD)IrI·P2W15Nb3O62]8- Plus Dihydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkar, Saim; Finke, Richard G

    2017-04-19

    The nucleation process yielding Ir(0) ∼300 nanoparticles from (Bu 4 N) 5 Na 3 [(1,5-COD)Ir·P 2 W 15 Nb 3 O 62 ] (abbreviated hereafter as (COD)Ir·POM 8- , where POM 9- = the polyoxometalate, P 2 W 15 Nb 3 O 62 9- ) under H 2 is investigated to learn the true molecularity, and hence the associated kinetically effective nucleus (KEN), for nanoparticle formation for the first time. Recent work with this prototype transition-metal nanoparticle formation system ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014 , 136 , 17601 - 17615 ) revealed that nucleation in this system is an apparent second-order in the precatalyst, A = (COD)Ir·POM 8- , not the higher order implied by classic nucleation theory and its nA ⇌ A n , "critical nucleus", A n concept. Herein, the three most reasonable more intimate mechanisms of nucleation are tested: bimolecular nucleation, termolecular nucleation, and a mechanism termed "alternative termolecular nucleation" in which 2(COD)Ir + and 1(COD)Ir·POM 8- yield the transition state of the rate-determining step of nucleation. The results obtained definitively rule out a simple bimolecular nucleation mechanism and provide evidence for the alternative termolecular mechanism with a KEN of 3, Ir 3 . All higher molecularity nucleation mechanisms were also ruled out. Further insights into the KEN and its more detailed composition involving hydrogen, {Ir 3 H 2x POM} 6- , are also obtained from the established role of H 2 in the Ir(0) ∼300 formation balanced reaction stoichiometry, from the p(H 2 ) dependence of the kinetics, and from a D 2 /H 2 kinetic isotope effect of 1.2(±0.3). Eight insights and conclusions are presented. A section covering caveats in the current work, and thus needed future studies, is also included.

  8. Kinetics of the water formation in the propene epoxidation over gold-titania catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, T.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation were determined for a number of different gold catalysts supported on titania, silica, and silicalite-1. A dual site Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model was able to describe the reaction well. The kinetic parameters are independent of the support. Water was

  9. Chemical kinetic modeling of H{sub 2} applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinov, N.M.; Westbrook, C.K.; Cloutman, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Work being carried out at LLNL has concentrated on studies of the role of chemical kinetics in a variety of problems related to hydrogen combustion in practical combustion systems, with an emphasis on vehicle propulsion. Use of hydrogen offers significant advantages over fossil fuels, and computer modeling provides advantages when used in concert with experimental studies. Many numerical {open_quotes}experiments{close_quotes} can be carried out quickly and efficiently, reducing the cost and time of system development, and many new and speculative concepts can be screened to identify those with sufficient promise to pursue experimentally. This project uses chemical kinetic and fluid dynamic computational modeling to examine the combustion characteristics of systems burning hydrogen, either as the only fuel or mixed with natural gas. Oxidation kinetics are combined with pollutant formation kinetics, including formation of oxides of nitrogen but also including air toxics in natural gas combustion. We have refined many of the elementary kinetic reaction steps in the detailed reaction mechanism for hydrogen oxidation. To extend the model to pressures characteristic of internal combustion engines, it was necessary to apply theoretical pressure falloff formalisms for several key steps in the reaction mechanism. We have continued development of simplified reaction mechanisms for hydrogen oxidation, we have implemented those mechanisms into multidimensional computational fluid dynamics models, and we have used models of chemistry and fluid dynamics to address selected application problems. At the present time, we are using computed high pressure flame, and auto-ignition data to further refine the simplified kinetics models that are then to be used in multidimensional fluid mechanics models. Detailed kinetics studies have investigated hydrogen flames and ignition of hydrogen behind shock waves, intended to refine the detailed reactions mechanisms.

  10. Metastable hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose, V.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the basic physical properties of the metastable 2 2 sub(1/2) state of atomic hydrogen. Applications relying on its special properties, including measurement of the Lamb shift, production of spin-polarized protons and the measurement of molecular electric moments, are discussed. (author)

  11. High-pressure torsion for new hydrogen storage materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edalati, Kaveh; Akiba, Etsuo; Horita, Zenji

    2018-01-01

    High-pressure torsion (HPT) is widely used as a severe plastic deformation technique to create ultrafine-grained structures with promising mechanical and functional properties. Since 2007, the method has been employed to enhance the hydrogenation kinetics in different Mg-based hydrogen storage materials. Recent studies showed that the method is effective not only for increasing the hydrogenation kinetics but also for improving the hydrogenation activity, for enhancing the air resistivity and more importantly for synthesizing new nanostructured hydrogen storage materials with high densities of lattice defects. This manuscript reviews some major findings on the impact of HPT process on the hydrogen storage performance of different titanium-based and magnesium-based materials.

  12. Long-Term Cycling of the Magnesium Hydrogen System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1984-01-01

    Magnesium powder with a grain size of approximately 50γm was hydrogenated for 30 min and dehydrogenated the same time at 390°C, 515 times. A moderate loss in hydrogen storage capacity was observed and was ascribed to a measured decrease in reaction kinetics as the cycle number increased. The time...

  13. Modeling of electrochemical hydrogen storage in metal hydride electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledovskikh, A.; Danilov, D.; Vermeulen, P.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2010-01-01

    The recently presented Electrochemical Kinetic Model (EKM), describing the electrochemical hydrogen storage in hydride-forming materials, has been extended by the description of the solid/electrolyte interface, i.e. the charge transfer kinetics and electrical double layer charging. A complete set of

  14. Modeling of electrochemical hydrogen storage in metal hydride electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ledovskikh, A.; Danilov, D.; Vermeulen, P.; Notten, P.H.L.

    2010-01-01

    The recently presented electrochemical kinetic model, describing the electrochemical hydrogen storage in hydride-forming materials, was extended by the description of the solid/electrolyte interface, i.e., the charge-transfer kinetics and electrical double-layer charging. A complete set of equations

  15. Industrial implications of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressouyre, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two major industrial implications of hydrogen are examined: problems related to the effect of hydrogen on materials properties (hydrogen embrittlement), and problems related to the use and production of hydrogen as a future energy vector [fr

  16. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panella, B.

    2006-09-13

    A great challenge for commercializing hydrogen powered vehicles is on-board hydrogen storage using economic and secure systems. A possible solution is hydrogen storage in light-weight solid materials. Here three principle storage mechanisms can be distinguished: i) absorption of hydrogen in metals ii) formation of compounds with ionic character, like complex hydrides and iii) physisorption (or physical adsorption) of hydrogen molecules on porous materials. Physical adsorption exhibits several advantages over chemical hydrogen storage as for example the complete reversibility and the fast kinetics. Two classes of porous materials were investigated for physical hydrogen storage, i.e. different carbon nanostructures and crystalline metal-organic frameworks possessing extremely high specific surface area. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were measured using a Sieverts' apparatus both at room temperature and at 77 K at pressures up to the saturation regime. Additionally, the adsorption sites of hydrogen in these porous materials were identified using thermal desorption spectroscopy extended to very low temperatures (down to 20 K). Furthermore, the adsorbed hydrogen phase was studied in various materials using Raman spectroscopy at different pressures and temperatures. The results show that the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of porous materials correlates linearly with the specific surface area and is independent of structure and composition. In addition the pore structure of the adsorbent plays an important role for hydrogen storage since the adsorption sites for H2 could be assigned to pores possessing different dimensions. Accordingly it was shown that small pores are necessary to reach high storage capacities already at low pressures. This new understanding may help to tailor and optimize new porous materials for hydrogen storage. (orig.)

  17. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panella, B

    2006-09-13

    A great challenge for commercializing hydrogen powered vehicles is on-board hydrogen storage using economic and secure systems. A possible solution is hydrogen storage in light-weight solid materials. Here three principle storage mechanisms can be distinguished: i) absorption of hydrogen in metals ii) formation of compounds with ionic character, like complex hydrides and iii) physisorption (or physical adsorption) of hydrogen molecules on porous materials. Physical adsorption exhibits several advantages over chemical hydrogen storage as for example the complete reversibility and the fast kinetics. Two classes of porous materials were investigated for physical hydrogen storage, i.e. different carbon nanostructures and crystalline metal-organic frameworks possessing extremely high specific surface area. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were measured using a Sieverts' apparatus both at room temperature and at 77 K at pressures up to the saturation regime. Additionally, the adsorption sites of hydrogen in these porous materials were identified using thermal desorption spectroscopy extended to very low temperatures (down to 20 K). Furthermore, the adsorbed hydrogen phase was studied in various materials using Raman spectroscopy at different pressures and temperatures. The results show that the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of porous materials correlates linearly with the specific surface area and is independent of structure and composition. In addition the pore structure of the adsorbent plays an important role for hydrogen storage since the adsorption sites for H2 could be assigned to pores possessing different dimensions. Accordingly it was shown that small pores are necessary to reach high storage capacities already at low pressures. This new understanding may help to tailor and optimize new porous materials for hydrogen storage. (orig.)

  18. Macrocluster desorption effect caused by single MCI: charges of gold clusters (2-20 nm) desorbed due to electronic processes induced by fission fragment bombardment in nanodispersed gold targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, I.; Jarmiychuk, S.; Kirillov, S.; Novikov, A.; Obnorskii, V.; Pchelintsev, A.; Wien, K.; Reimann, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the charge state of the negatively charged gold nanocluster ions (2-20 nm) that were desorbed from nanodispersed gold islet targets by 252 Cf fission fragments via electronic processes is studied. Mean cluster charge was calculated as a ratio of mean cluster mass to mean mass-to-charge ratio . Cluster masses were measured by means of a collector technique employing transmission electron microscopy and scanning force microscopy, while m/q was measured by means of a tandem TOF-spectrometer. It is shown that the nanocluster ions are mostly multiply charged (2-16e) and the charge increases non-linearly with the cluster size. The results are discussed

  19. Investigation of the kinetics of the reactions of oxidation, nitration, and hydrogenation of uranium; Etude cinetique de l'oxydation, de la nitruration et de l'hydruration de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adda, Y [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-06-15

    Various physico-chemical methods have been used to investigate the kinetics of the oxidation hydridation and nitridation of uranium. The experimental results show that the kinetics of these reactions are influenced by many factors also the Pilling and Bedworth rule is valid only under very limited conditions. The disagreement between this rule and the experimental results could be explained by the existence of numerous mechanical faults in the compounds obtained by the dry corrosion of the metal. (author) [French] Les cinetiques d'oxydation, d'hydruration et de nitruration de l'uranium ont ete etudiees au moyen de differentes methodes physico-chimiques. Les resultats experimentaux obtenus indiquent qu'un grand nombre de facteurs influencent les cinetiques d'attaque et que la regle de Pilling et Bedworth n'est verifiee que dans des cas tres limites. Les desaccords entre cette regle et les resultats experimentaux s'expliqueraient par l'existence de nombreux defauts mecaniques dans les composes obtenus par corrosion seche du metal. (auteur)

  20. The formation of hydrogen in the radiolysis of water in closed volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabakchi, S.A.; Lebedeva, I.E.

    1984-01-01

    By applying the sum total of the elementary reactions involving short-lived particles it is possible to fairly accurately calculate the kinetics of hydrogen formation and of its separation from water, and also to calculate the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and oxygen during radiolysis of pure water and water solutions at room temperature. This paper describes a semi-empirical method to calculate the kinetics of hydrogen formation for certain cases encountered in nuclear power production. (author)

  1. Decomposition and reduction of AUC in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Qingren; Kang Shifang; Zhou Meng

    1987-01-01

    AUC (Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate) conversion processes have been adopted extensively in nuclear fuel cycle. The kinetics investigation of these processes, however, has not yet been reported in detail at the published literatures. In the present work, the decomposition kinetics of AUC in hydrogen has been determined by non-isothermal method. DSC curves are solved with computer by Ge Qingren method. The results show that the kinetics obeys Avrami-Erofeev equation within 90% conversion. The apparent activation energy and preexponent are found to be 113.0 kJ/mol and 7.11 x 10 11 s -1 respectively. The reduction kinetics of AUC decomposition product in hydrogen at the range of 450 - 600 deg C has been determined by isothermal thermogravimetric method. The results show that good linear relationship can be obtained from the plot of conversion vs time, and that the apparent activation energy is found to be 113.9 kJ/mol. The effects of particle size and partial pressure of hydrogen are examined in reduction of AUC decomposition product. The reduction mechanism and the structure of particle are discussed according to the kinetics behaviour and SEM (scanning electron microscope) photograph

  2. The reaction of uranium with moist hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, R.J.; Kay, P.

    1987-10-01

    The reaction of uranium in moist hydrogen at a total pressure of 101 kPa over the temperature range 105 0 -200 0 C and water vapour pressures in the range 5-100 kPa has been examined in a limited thermogravimetric study. It has been shown that initially there is a period during which only linear kinetics are observed with a rate similar to that exhibited in similarly moist argon, i.e. hydrogen has no apparent effect on the reaction. At water vapour pressures of and above 49 kPa, corresponding to hydrogen:water vapour pressure ratios in the range 1:1 to 1:100, over the exposure times studied (not > 20h) only such linear kinetics are observed. Below this water vapour pressure and after an initial period of linear kinetics a continuously increasing reaction rate was observed in some instances resulting from rapid attach on localised areas. The localised reaction rates were approximately 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than the original linear reaction kinetics and the interaction rates in either moist argon or moist air. Comparison with a single experiment carried out at 150 0 C indicated that breakaway rates were approaching that in dry hydrogen. During breakaway attack there was a significant increase in the relative amounts of uranium hydride formed. The duration of the linear kinetics phase was extended by pre-oxidation of the uranium surface, decreasing temperature at a constant water vapour pressure, or increasing water vapour pressure (or water vapour: hydrogen pressure ratio) at a constant temperature. (author)

  3. Water containing deuterium electrolysis to obtain gaseous hydrogen isotope in a high state of purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellanger, Gilbert

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the basic concept is to prepare hydrogen in a high state of purity by electrolysing water using a palladium cathode. During electrolysis, hydrogen is at first adsorbed at the palladium surface, and next it diffuses through it till opposite face of its entry where it is desorbed; thus permitting to regain it in a very pure state for storage. The method can be used from water containing deuterium. To improve hydrogen adsorption, surface effect of palladium must be studied. It was found that heat treatment of palladium improved the hydrogen permeation flux. The diffusivity of hydrogen is controlled by Fick and Sieverts equations in which temperature has a significant influence on permeation rates. Anyway, hydrogen desorption does not cause any difficulty. In a second part, we have studied the isotopic separation factor using water containing deuterium. We remarked in fact that it depends on current density, overpotential, diffusivity of hydrogen and deuterium and isotopic composition of electrolyte as expected. In the last part, we realized an original electrolysis model in a glove-box in which are taken into account the results given before and also the technology components employed in processes involving the use of tritium. (author) [fr

  4. Effects of modified surfaces produced at plasma-facing surface on hydrogen release behavior in the LHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Nobuta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an additional deuterium (D ion irradiation was performed against long-term samples mounted on the helical coil can and in the outer private region in the LHD during the 17th experimental campaign. Based on the release behavior of the D and hydrogen (H retained during the experimental campaign, the difference of release behavior at the top surface and in bulk of modified surfaces is discussed. Almost all samples on the helical coil can were erosion-dominant and some samples were covered with boron or carbon, while a very thick carbon films were formed in the outer private region. In the erosion-dominant area, the D desorbed at much lower temperatures compared to that of H retained during the LHD plasma operation. For the samples covered with boron, the D tended to desorb at lower temperatures compared to H. For the carbon deposition samples, the D desorbed at much higher temperatures compared to no deposition and boron-covered samples, which was very similar to that of H. The D retention capabilities at the top surface of carbon and boron films were 2–3 times higher than no deposition area. The results indicate that the retention and release behavior at the top surface of the modified layer can be different from that of bulk substrate material.

  5. Alternative kinetic energy metrics for Lagrangian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlet, W.; Prince, G.

    2010-11-01

    We examine Lagrangian systems on \\ {R}^n with standard kinetic energy terms for the possibility of additional, alternative Lagrangians with kinetic energy metrics different to the Euclidean one. Using the techniques of the inverse problem in the calculus of variations we find necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of such Lagrangians. We illustrate the problem in two and three dimensions with quadratic and cubic potentials. As an aside we show that the well-known anomalous Lagrangians for the Coulomb problem can be removed by switching on a magnetic field, providing an appealing resolution of the ambiguous quantizations of the hydrogen atom.

  6. Magnesium nanoparticles with transition metal decoration for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquini, Luca; Callini, Elsa; Brighi, Matteo; Boscherini, Federico; Montone, Amelia; Jensen, Torben R.; Maurizio, Chiara; Vittori Antisari, Marco; Bonetti, Ennio

    2011-01-01

    We report on the hydrogen storage behaviour of Mg nanoparticles (NPs) (size range 100 nm–1 μm) with metal-oxide core–shell morphology synthesized by inert gas condensation and decorated by transition metal (TM) (Pd or Ti) clusters via in situ vacuum deposition. The structure and morphology of the as-prepared and hydrogenated NPs is studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction including in situ experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, in order to investigate the relationships with the hydrogen storage kinetics measured by the volumetric Sieverts method. With both Pd and Ti, the decoration deeply improves the hydrogen sorption properties: previously inert NPs exhibit complete hydrogenation with fast transformation kinetics, good stability and reversible gravimetric capacity that can attain 6 wt%. In the case of Pd-decoration, the occurrence of Mg–Pd alloying is observed at high temperatures and in dependence of the hydrogen pressure conditions. These structural transformations modify both the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydride formation, while Ti-decoration has an effect only on the kinetics. The experimental results are discussed in relation with key issues such as the amount of decoration, the heat of mixing between TM and Mg and the binding energy between TM and hydrogen.

  7. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  8. Fuel hydrogen retention of tungsten and the reduction by inert gas glow discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, T., E-mail: tomhino@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Plasma Physics and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Yamauchi, Y.; Kimura, Y. [Laboratory of Plasma Physics and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu-ken 509-5292 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita-shi 565-0872 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The performances of inert gas glow discharges for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention in tungsten were systematically investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the tungsten with rough surface structure, the reduction of fuel hydrogen retention by inert gas discharges is quite small. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The deuterium glow discharge is quite useful to reduce the tritium retention in plasma facing walls in fusion reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The wall baking with temperature higher than 700-800 K is also useful to reduce the tritium retention in plasma facing walls. - Abstract: Polycrystalline tungsten was exposed to deuterium glow discharge followed by He, Ne or Ar glow discharge. The amount of retained deuterium in the tungsten was measured using residual gas analysis. The amount of desorbed deuterium during the inert gas glow discharge was also measured. The amount of retained deuterium was 2-3 times larger compared with a case of stainless steel. The ratios of desorbed amount of deuterium by He, Ne and Ar glow discharges were 4.6, 3.1 and 2.9%, respectively. These values were one order of magnitude smaller compared with the case of stainless steel. The inert gas glow discharge is not suitable to reduce the fuel hydrogen retention for tungsten walls. However, the wall baking with a temperature higher than 700 K is suitable to reduce the fuel hydrogen retention. It is also shown that the use of deuterium glow discharge is effective to reduce the in-vessel tritium inventory in fusion reactors through the hydrogen isotope exchange.

  9. Hydrogen storage in complex hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupu, D.; Biris, A. R.; Misan, I.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell power technologies in mobile and stationary applications. A relevant role of the fuel cell powered vehicles on the market of the transportation systems will be achieved only if the research and development of on-board vehicular hydrogen storage are able to allow a driving range of at least 500 km. The on-board hydrogen storage systems are more challenging due to the space, weight and cost limitations. This range of autonomy between refueling requires materials able to store at least 6.5% weight hydrogen, available at moderate pressures, at the working temperature of the fuel cells and with acceptable cycling stability. The intensive research on the hydrogen storage in alloys and intermetallic of the LaNi 5 , FeTi or Laves phase type compounds, which started more than three decades ago did not resulted in materials of more than about 3% H storage capacities. The 7.5% H content of the Mg hydride is still of attracting interest but though the absorption has been achieved at lower temperatures by ball milling magnesium with various amounts of nickel, the desorption can not be attained at 1 bar H 2 below 280 deg. C and the kinetics of the process is too slow. In the last decade, the attention is focused on another class of compounds, the complex hydrides of aluminum with alkali metals (alanates), due to their high hydrogen content. It was found that doping with Ti-based catalysts improve the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation conditions of NaAlH 4 . Later on, it was shown that ball milling with solid state catalysts greatly improve the hydrogen desorption kinetics of NaAlH 4 , and this also helps to the rehydriding process. The hydrogen desorption from NaAlH 4 occurs in three steps, it shows a reversible storage capacity of 5.5% H and this led to further research work for a better knowledge of its application relating properties. In this work, ball milling experiments on Na

  10. Nanocrystalline Porous Hydrogen Storage Based on Vanadium and Titanium Nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Goncharov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes results of our study of the application of ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD technology for creation of nanoporous thin-film structures that can absorb more than 6 wt.% of hydrogen. Data of mathematical modeling are presented highlighting the structure formation and component creation of the films during their deposition at the time of simultaneous bombardment by mixed beam of nitrogen and helium ions with energy of 30 keV. Results of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed that VNx films consist of 150–200 nm particles, boundaries of which contain nanopores of 10–15 nm diameters. Particles themselves consist of randomly oriented 10–20 nm nanograins. Grain boundaries also contain nanopores (3–8 nm. Examination of the absorption characteristics of VNx, TiNx, and (V,TiNx films showed that the amount of absorbed hydrogen depends very little on the chemical composition of films, but it is determined by the structure pore. The amount of absorbed hydrogen at 0.3 MPa and 20°C is 6-7 wt.%, whereas the bulk of hydrogen is accumulated in the grain boundaries and pores. Films begin to release hydrogen even at 50°C, and it is desorbed completely at the temperature range of 50–250°C. It was found that the electrical resistance of films during the hydrogen desorption increases 104 times.

  11. Hydrogenations of alloys and intermetallic compounds of magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavra, Z.

    1981-08-01

    A kinetic and thermodynamic study of the hydrogenation of alloys and intermetallic compounds of magnesium is presented. It was established that the addition of elements of the IIIA group (Al, Ga, In) to magnesium catalyses its hydrogenation. This is explained by the mechanism of diffusion of magnesium cation vacancies. The hydride Mg 2 NiH 4 was characterized by thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction and NMR measurements. The possibility of forming pseudo-binary compounds of Mg 2 Ni by the substitution of nickel or magnesium was examined. The hydrogenation of the inter-metallic compounds of the Mg-Al system was investigated. It was found that the addition of indium and nickel affected the hydrogenation kinetics. A preliminary study of the hydrogenation of various binary and ternary alloys of magnesium was carried out. (Author)

  12. Investigation of the explosion hazards of hydrogen sulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, A.J.; Sulmistras, A.; Moen, I.O.; Thibault, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    The results of Phase I of an investigation directed towards quantifying the explosion hazards of hydrogen sulphide in air are described. The first phase is focussed on detonation in free hydrogen sulphide/air clouds. Detonation properties, including velocity and pressure, have been calculated and compared with experimental results. The observed detonation structure together with critical tube tests tests are used to assess the detonability of hydrogen sulphide/air mixtures relative to hydrogen and common hydrocarbon gases. Detailed chemical kinetic modelling of hydrogen sulphide combustion in air has been performed to correlate the detonation cell size data and to determine the influence of water vapour on the detonability of hydrogen sulphide in air. Calculations of the blast wave properties for detonation of a hydrogen sulphide/air cloud provide the data required to assess the blast effects of such explosions

  13. Photochemical hydrogen abstractions as radiationless transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, H.D.; Formosinho, S.J.

    1977-01-01

    The tunnel-effect theory of radiationless transitions is applied to the quenching of the uranyl ion excited state by aliphatic compounds. The most important mechanism kinetically is suggested to involve chemical quenching via hydrogen abstraction, and rates for these reactions are analysed theoretically. Good agreement between theory and experiment is observed for a number of alcohols and ethers, and the reactions are suggested to possess considerable charge-transfer character. With t-butanol it is suggested that abstraction occurs preferentially from the hydroxylic hydrogen. Theoretical analysis of the rates of hydrogen abstraction from carboxylic acids suggests that the reaction geometry in this case may be different from the reaction with alcohols or ethers. The possibility that excited uranyl ion can abstract a hydrogen atom from water is examined, and theoretical evidence is presented to suggest that this is the main route for deactivation of uranyl ion lowest excited state in water at room temperature. (author)

  14. Journal Of The Korean Hydrogen Energy Society 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    This book deals with studies such as new ball-milled metal hydride electrode for rechargeable batteries by Noh, Haki; Park, Chung Nyeon, hydrogen absorption by laves phase related BCC solid solution alloys by Etsuo Akiba. The hydrogen absorption kinetics in very thin pd film by Cho, Young Sin; Lee, Jong Suk; Kim, Chang Won. The effect of the ceramic precipitates on the hydrogen solubility in pd alloys by Koh, Je Mann; Lee, Kil Hong; Bada, Seung Nam; Noh, Hak, and AC impedance study of the electrochemical behavior of hydrogen, Oxygen gas mixture at nafion, catalyst electrode interface by Song, S. M and Lee, W. M.

  15. Acoustic emission during hydrogen absorption and desorption in palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, R.; Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission technique has been used to study charging and discharging of hydrogen in palladium. During charging, breaking of oxide film due to surface activation and saturation of hydrogen absorption have been identified by acoustic emission. In the discharging cycle, the desorption of hydrogen from the specimen leads to high AE activity immediately after initiation of discharging, followed by gradual decrease in the acoustic activity, which reaches a minimum upon completion of the desorption. The potential of the acoustic emission technique for studying the kinetics of hydrogen absorption and desorption in metals has been shown. (author)

  16. Evidence For The Production Of Slow Antiprotonic Hydrogen In Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Zurlo, N.; Amsler, C.; Bonomi, G.; Carraro, C.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Doser, M.; Fontana, A.; Funakoshi, R.; Genova, P.; Hayano, R.S.; Jorgensen, L.V.; Kellerbauer, A.; Lagomarsino, V.; Landua, R.; Lodi Rizzini, E.; Macri, M.; Madsen, N.; Manuzio, G.; Mitchard, D.; Montagna, P.; Posada, L.G.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Rotondi, A.; Testera, G.; der Werf, D.P.Van; Variola, A.; Venturelli, L.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We present evidence showing how antiprotonic hydrogen, the quasistable antiproton-proton (pbar-p) bound system, has been synthesized following the interaction of antiprotons with the hydrogen molecular ion (H2+) in a nested Penning trap environment. From a careful analysis of the spatial distributions of antiproton annihilation events, evidence is presented for antiprotonic hydrogen production with sub-eV kinetic energies in states around n=70, and with low angular momenta. The slow antiprotonic hydrogen may be studied using laser spectroscopic techniques.

  17. Trends in the exchange current for hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Bligaard, Thomas; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2005-01-01

    A density functional theory database of hydrogen chemisorption energies on close packed surfaces of a number of transition and noble metals is presented. The bond energies are used to understand the trends in the exchange current for hydrogen evolution. A volcano curve is obtained when measured...... exchange currents are plotted as a function of the calculated hydrogen adsorption energies and a simple kinetic model is developed to understand the origin of the volcano. The volcano curve is also consistent with Pt being the most efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution. (c) 2005...

  18. Destructive hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrisse, H; Dufour, L

    1929-01-21

    Oils of high boiling point, e.g. gas oil, lamp oil, schist oil, brown coal tar etc., are converted into motor benzine by heating them at 200 to 500/sup 0/C under pressure of 5 to 40 kilograms/cm/sup 2/ in the presence of ferrous chloride and gases such as hydrogen, or water gas, the desulfurization of the oils proceeding simultaneously. One kilogram of lamp oil and 100 g. ferrous chloride are heated in an autoclave in the presence of water gas under a pressure of 18 kg/cm/sup 2/ to 380 to 400/sup 0/C. The gaseous products are allowed to escape intermittently and are replaced by fresh water gas. A product distilling between 35 and 270/sup 0/C is obtained.

  19. Cesium removal and kinetics equilibrium: Precipitation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    This task consisted of both non-radioactive and radioactive (tracer) tests examining the influence of potentially significant variables on cesium tetraphenylborate precipitation kinetics. The work investigated the time required to reach cesium decontamination and the conditions that affect the cesium precipitation kinetics

  20. Analysis of oxygen and hydrogen adsorption on Nb(100) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Bai; Wen, Mao; Fukuyama, Seiji; Yokogawa, Kiyoshi; Ichimura, Shingo; Yoshimura, Masamichi

    2006-01-01

    The surface structure of Nb(100) under the condition of cleaning, oxidation and hydrogen adsorption is observed by STM (scanning tunneling microscopy). The results obtained are followings; (1) (3 x 1)-O→(4 x 1)-O→c(2 x 2)-O→clean(1 x 1)structure was observed by atom level, and these atomic models of structures and STM images were verified by the first-principles calculations, (2) when the clean(1 x 1) structure exposed to hydrogen, dissociative adsorption of hydrogen was observed and Nb hydride cluster formed on the surface at room temperature. It was heated at about 450 - 670 K in UHV, the cluster decomposed into hydrogen and (1 x 1) structure with linear defect was formed. The c(2 x 2)-O structure by oxygen adsorption transformed into (1 x 1)-H structure with OH and Nb hydride cluster under hydrogen gas at room temperature. When it was heated in UHV at 640 K, OH desorbed from the surface and (1 x 1) structure with linear defect was generated. The surface of (3 x 1)-O structure was not changed by hydrogen. (S.Y.)

  1. The study on binary Mg-Co hydrogen storage alloys with BCC phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yao; Tsushio, Yoshinori; Enoki, Hirotoshi; Akiba, Etsuo

    2005-01-01

    Novel Mg-Co binary alloys were successfully synthesized by mechanical alloying. These alloys were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron micrograph (TEM), pressure-composition-isotherms measurements (P-C-T) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Both XRD Rietveld analysis and TEM observation confirmed that these binary alloys contain BCC phase and that the BCC phase existed in the range from 37 to 80 at.% Co. The lattice parameter of the BCC phase increased with the increase of the Co content from 37 to 50 at.%. When the Co content reached 50 at.%, the lattice parameter reached a maximum value, and then turned to decrease gradually with further increase of the Co content. Most of Mg-Co BCC alloys absorbed hydrogen at 373 K under 6 MPa of hydrogen pressure. The Mg 60 Co 40 alloy showed the highest hydrogen absorption capacity, about 2.7 mass% hydrogen. However, all the Mg-Co alloys studied did not desorb hydrogen at 373 K. By means of DSC measurements and in situ XRD analysis, it was found that under 4 MPa hydrogen atmosphere, Mg 50 Co 50 alloy transformed from BCC solid solution to Mg 2 CoH 5 tetragonal hydride at 413 K

  2. Study of hydrogenation of Sm2Fe17-yGay by means of X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teresiak, A.; Uhlemann, M.; Kubis, M.; Gebel, B.; Mattern, N.; Mueller, K.-H.

    2000-01-01

    The hydrogenation process of Sm 2 Fe 17-y Ga y (y=0-2) was studied. X-ray investigations show a decreasing hydrogen solubility in the intermetallic alloy with increasing Ga-content from 4.0±0.3 atoms per formula unit for Sm 2 Fe 17 to 2.85±0.05 for Sm 2 Fe 15 Ga 2 . The larger Ga atoms reduce the size of the interstitial sites and thereby the maximum hydrogen concentration is decreased. The behaviour of the lattice parameters a and c with increasing Ga content points to a changed hydrogen distribution on the interstitial sites, becoming more statistical. In situ observations by means of high temperature X-ray diffraction show that the hydrogen absorption process is diffusion controlled. The hydrogen absorption starts at an annealing temperature of 120-140 C in all cases. The solubility of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperature. The hydrogen is completely desorbed above 350 C in all cases. The absorption/desorption process is reversible between room temperature and 400 C. Annealing at temperatures above 400 C leads to the decomposition of the Sm 2 Fe 17 phase, indicated by emerging of α-Fe. The formation of SmH x is established at 600 C. The decomposition temperature increases with increasing Ga-content. Up to 750 C, only Sm 2 Fe 17 is completely decomposed. (orig.)

  3. Carbon monoxide activation by organoactinides: a comparative synthetic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and mechanistic investigation of migratory CO insertion into actinide-carbon and actinide-hydrogen bonds to yield eta2-acyls and eta2-formyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloy, K.G.; Marks, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Reported are results of the synthesis, characterization, and carbon monoxide chemistry of a series of sterically hindered thorium alkyls and hydrides of the type Cp' 2 Th(R)(X) (Cp' = eta 5 -C 5 Me 5 ) where R = H, D, methyl, eta-butyl, and CH 2 -t-Bu and X = OCH-t-Bu 2 , OC 6 H 3 -2,6-t-Bu 2 , and O-t-Bu. In addition, improved syntheses of the known complexes [Cp' 2 Th(μ-H)(H)] 2 , Cp' 2 Th(O-t-Bu)(Cl) and Cp' 2 Th(CH 2 -t-Bu)(Cl) are presented. The alkyl complexes undergo facile, irreversible carbonylation to yield eta 2 -acyls that were characterized by a variety of methods. Infrared Ir and 13 C NMR spectra of these complexes demonstrate that strong meta-(acyl)oxygen bonding takes place, fostering a pronounced carbene-like character. Thus, these complexes are characterized by low C-O Ir infrared stretching frequencies (nu/sub CO/ = 1450-1480 cm -1 ) and low-field 13 C NMR chemical shifts (delta/sub 13 C/ 355-370). The hydrides undergo a rapid, reversible, migratory CO insertion to yield formyls that have been characterized spectroscopically at low temperature. Infrared Ir and 13 C NMR spectra of these species are similar to the corresponding acyls, suggesting an analogous eta 2 structure. Variable-temperature equilibrium data show that the insertion of CO into thorium-hydrogen bonds is exothermic by ca. 5 kcal/mol, and this value is compared to that for the analogous alkyls. The equilibrium was also found to exhibit a distinct equilibrium isotope effect upon deuterium substitution, K/sub H//K/sub D/ = 0.31 at -78 0 C. The carbonylation of the complex Cp' 2 Th(n-Bu)(OCH-t-Bu 2 ) was found to obey a second-order rate law where rate = kP/sub CO/ [complex]. The insertion of CO into the Th-H bond of Cp' 2 Th(H)(OCH-t-Bu 2 ) was found by NMR methods to be first order in metal hydride. 55 references, 3 figures, 6 tables

  4. Plasma kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma kinetic theory is discussed and a comparison made with the kinetic theory of gases. The plasma is described by a modified set of fluid equations and it is shown how these fluid equations can be derived. (UK)

  5. The alteration of intracellular enzymes. III. The effect of temperature on the kinetics of altered and unaltered yeast catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FRASER, M J; KAPLAN, J G

    1955-03-20

    the case of catalase, of desorbing the enzyme from the interface into its rolled-up, soluble, highly specific configuration. While the interfacial hypothesis has successfully withstood this experimental attack, the present data do not provide its unequivocal proof, since they are consistent with any hypothesis of alteration in which the unaltered, intracellular enzyme is in a relatively disordered state by comparison to the altered enzyme. While evidence of an interfacial process in enzyme alteration has been adduced previously, critical proof of the interfacial hypothesis awaits creation of a model system, in which most of the aspects of intracellular alteration can be reproduced. 6. Certain of the changes in kinetic properties following alteration of the intracellular enzyme, such as increased activity and the modified energies and entropies of activation of both enzyme-substrate system and heat destruction of the catalase itself, might be explained by a decrease (two orders of magnitude) in the effective hydrogen ion concentration, allowing the intracellular enzyme to be brought to the same pH as the extracellular medium. If such a pH change does, in fact, occur, it is necessary to invoke the interfacial hypothesis to explain why the unaltered, intracellular enzyme is in equilibrium with a medium whose pH is approximately 2 units lower than that of the cytoplasm itself. 7. It is concluded that kinetic data of this kind may be used to shed light on the structure of a soluble, cytoplasmic enzyme, not attached to any of the formed elements within the cell, yet organized within it in a condition of relatively low structural specificity; further, that information obtained exclusively from a study of the kinetics of the extracted or crystalline enzymes may not, in the case of this enzyme, at least, be extrapolated to the same enzyme within the intact cell.

  6. Hydriding properties of an Mg-Al-Ni-Nd hydrogen storage alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, G.I.; Bustamante, L.A.C.; Miranda, P.E.V. de

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the development of an Mg-Al-Ni-Nd alloy for hydrogen storage purposes. The hydrogen storage properties of the alloy were analyzed using pressure-composition isotherms and hydrogen desorption kinetic curves at different temperatures. The characterization of the microstructures, before and after hydrogenation, was performed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectrometry. Hydrogenation caused significant changes in the alloy microstructure. Two pressure plateaus were observed. The maximum hydrogen storage reversible capacity measured was 4 wt.% at 573 K

  7. Effects of apolipoproteins on the kinetics of cholesterol exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letizia, J.Y.; Phillips, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of apolipoproteins on the kinetics of cholesterol exchange have been investigated by monitoring the transfer of [ 14 C]cholesterol from donor phospholipid/cholesterol complexes containing human apolipoproteins A, B, or C. Negatively charged discoidal and vesicular particles containing purified apolipoproteins complexed with lipid and a trace of [ 14 C]cholesterol were incubated with a 10-fold excess of neutral, acceptor, small unilamellar vesicles. The donor and acceptor particles were separated by chromatogrphy of DEAE-Sepharose, and the rate of movement of labeled cholesterol was analyzed as a first-order exchange process. The kinetics of exchange of cholesterol from both vesicular and discoidal complexes that contain apoproteins are consistent with an aqueous diffusion mechanism, as has been established previously for PC/cholesterol SUV. Apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, reduced and carboxymethylated A-11, and B-100 present in SUV at the same lipid/protein (w/w) ratio all enhance the rate of cholesterol exchange to about the same degree. Cholesterol molecules exchange more rapidly from discoidal complexes. Generally, as the diameter of apoprotein/phospholipid/cholesterol discs decreases, t 1/2 for cholesterol exchange decreases. Since small bilayer discs have a relatively high ratio of boundary to face surface area, cholesterol molecules desorb more rapidly than from larger discs. The modulation of lipid packing by the apoprotein molecules present at the surface of lipoprotein particles affects the rate of cholesterol exchange from such particles

  8. Kinetics study of antimony adsorption on Si(1 1 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapena, L.; Mueller, P.; Quentel, G.; Guesmi, H.; Treglia, G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we use mass spectrometry (MS) and reflection high-energy electron (RHEED) to study the kinetics of adsorption of Sb on Si(1 1 1) surface and its relation to the corresponding surface structure. At high temperature (T>800 deg. C) all the impinging Sb 4 molecules completely dissociate at the silicon surface and a 2D gas of Sb monomers reversibly adsorbs on the (1x1) surface. At low temperature (T 4 molecules act as precursors and can be partially reflected or desorbed while a 2D stable layer of Sb monomers irreversibly adsorbs. The surface continuously shifts from a blurred (7x7) surface to a (1x1) structure near completion of the 2D layer. In the intermediate range (600 deg. C< T<800 deg. C) provided that the coverage is large enough (θ ∼ 2/3) the condensation of the 2D gas leads to a 2D (5√3 x 5√3) reconstruction. We show that introducing the formation of a condensed phase in a kinetics model allows us to reproduce our experimental data. Finally, we determine the adsorption geometry from ab initio calculations: Sb is adsorbed on top positions, somewhat passivating the Si surface dangling bonds

  9. Hollow fiber adsorbents for CO2 capture: Kinetic sorption performance

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.

    2011-07-01

    We describe a CO 2 capture platform based on hollow polymeric fibers with sorbent particles embedded in the porous fiber wall for post-combustion CO 2 capture. These fibers are intended for use in a rapid temperature swing adsorption (RTSA) process. The RTSA system utilizes the hollow fiber morphology by flowing cooling water on the bore-side of the fibers during sorption to prevent temperature rise associated with the sorption enthalpy. Steam or hot water is flowed through the bores during desorption to desorb CO 2 rapidly. To minimize material transfer between the bore and the fiber wall, a dense Neoprene ® lumen layer is cast on the bore-side of the fiber wall. In this paper, the key sorption step and associated kinetic resistances for the uncooled fibers are examined and evaluated for this portion of the RTSA process. Chopped fibers in a packed bed, as well as fibers assembled into a parallel flow module, have been tested in a simulated flue gas stream. Kinetic limitations in the hollow fiber modules are largely overcome by increasing the superficial gas velocity and the fiber packing in the module-indicating that film diffusion is the controlling mass transfer limitation in the fiber system. The un-cooled fiber modules lose apparent capacity as superficial velocities are increased, likely indicating non-isothermal operation, whereas the actively-cooled fibers in the packed bed maintain apparent capacity at all flowrates studied. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.; Pang, Genny A.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Ren, Wei; Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David Frank

    2013-01-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we

  11. Water’s dual nature and its continuously changing hydrogen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henchman, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    A model is proposed for liquid water that is a continuum between the ordered state with predominantly tetrahedral coordination, linear hydrogen bonds and activated dynamics and a disordered state with a continuous distribution of multiple coordinations, multiple types of hydrogen bond, and diffusive dynamics, similar to that of normal liquids. Central to water’s heterogeneous structure is the ability of hydrogen to donate to either one acceptor in a conventional linear hydrogen bond or to multiple acceptors as a furcated hydrogen. Linear hydrogen bonds are marked by slow, activated kinetics for hydrogen-bond switching to more crowded acceptors and sharp first peaks in the hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. Furcated hydrogens, equivalent to free, broken, dangling or distorted hydrogens, have barrierless, rapid kinetics and poorly defined first peaks in their hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. They involve the weakest donor in a local excess of donors, such that barrierless whole-molecule vibration rapidly swaps them between the linear and furcated forms. Despite the low number of furcated hydrogens and their transient existence, they are readily created in a single hydrogen-bond switch and free up the dynamics of numerous surrounding molecules, bringing about the disordered state. Hydrogens in the ordered state switch with activated dynamics to make the non-tetrahedral coordinations of the disordered state, which can also combine to make the ordered state. Consequently, the ordered and disordered states are both connected by diffusive dynamics and differentiated by activated dynamics, bringing about water’s continuous heterogeneity. (paper)

  12. Cascade Processes in Muonic Hydrogen Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faifman, M. P.; Men'Shikov, L. I.

    2001-01-01

    The QCMC scheme created earlier for cascade calculations in heavy hadronic atoms of hydrogen isotopes has been modified and applied to the study of cascade processes in the μp muonic hydrogen atoms. The distribution of μp atoms over kinetic energies has been obtained and the yields of K-series X-rays per one stopped muon have been calculated.Comparison with experimental data indicated directly that for muonic and pionic atoms new types of non-radiative transitions are essential, while they are negligible for heavy (kaonic, antiprotonic, etc.) atoms. These processes have been considered and their probabilities have been estimated.

  13. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  14. Si(001):B gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy: Boron surface segregation and its effect on film growth kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.; Glass, G.; Spila, T.; Taylor, N.; Park, S.Y.; Abelson, J.R.; Greene, J.E. [Department of Materials Science, Coordinated Science Laboratory, and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, 1101 West Springfield, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    1997-09-01

    B-doped Si(001) films, with concentrations C{sub B} up to 1.7{times}10{sup 22}cm{sup {minus}3}, were grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy from Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} and B{sub 2}H{sub 6} at T{sub s}=500{endash}800{degree}C. D{sub 2} temperature-programed desorption (TPD) spectra were then used to determine B coverages {theta}{sub B} as a function of C{sub B} and T{sub s}. In these measurements, as-deposited films were flash heated to desorb surface hydrogen, cooled, and exposed to atomic deuterium until saturation coverage. Strong B surface segregation was observed with surface-to-bulk B concentration ratios ranging up to 1200. TPD spectra exhibited {beta}{sub 2} and {beta}{sub 1} peaks associated with dideuteride and monodeuteride desorption as well as lower-temperature B-induced peaks {beta}{sub 2}{sup {asterisk}} and {beta}{sub 1}{sup {asterisk}}. Increasing {theta}{sub B} increased the area under {beta}{sub 2}{sup {asterisk}} and {beta}{sub 1}{sup {asterisk}} at the expense of {beta}{sub 2} and {beta}{sub 1} and decreased the total D coverage {theta}{sub D}. The TPD results were used to determine the B segregation enthalpy, {minus}0.53eV, and to explain and model the effects of high B coverages on Si(001) growth kinetics. Film deposition rates R increase by {ge}50{percent} with increasing C{sub B}{tilde {gt}}1{times}10{sup 19}cm{sup {minus}3} at T{sub s}{le}550{degree}C, due primarily to increased H desorption rates from B-backbonded Si adatoms, and decrease by corresponding amounts at T{sub s}{ge}600{degree}C due to decreased adsorption site densities. At T{sub s}{ge}700{degree}C, high B coverages also induce {l_brace}113{r_brace} facetting. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Hydrogen converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina developed a process of 99 Mo production from fission, based on irradiation of uranium aluminide targets with thermal neutrons in the RA-3 reactor of the Ezeiza Atomic Centre. These targets are afterwards dissolved in an alkaline solution, with the consequent liberation of hydrogen as the main gaseous residue. This work deals with the use of a first model of metallic converter and a later prototype of glass converter at laboratory scale, adjusted to the requirements and conditions of the specific redox process. Oxidized copper wires were used, which were reduced to elementary copper at 400 C degrees and then regenerated by oxidation with hot air. Details of the bed structure and the operation conditions are also provided. The equipment required for the assembling in cells is minimal and, taking into account the operation final temperature and the purge with nitrogen, the procedure is totally safe. Finally, the results are extrapolated for the design of a converter to be used in a hot cell. (author)

  16. Noncovalent Hydrogen Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Breslavskaya, N. N.

    2018-02-01

    Zero-point energies (ZPE) and isotope effects, induced by intermolecular, noncovalent vibrations, are computed and tested by experimental data. The ZPE differences of H- and D-complexes of water with hydrogen, methane, and water molecules are about 100-300 cal/mol; they result to isotope effects IE of 1.20-1.70. Semi-ionic bonds between metal ions and water ligands in M(H2O) 6 2+ complexes are much stronger; their ZPEs are about 12-14 kcal/mol per molecule and result to IE of 1.9-2.1 at 300 K. Protonated (deuterated) water and biwater exhibit the largest ZPE differences and isotope effects; the latter are 25-28 and 12-13 for water and biwater, respectively. Noncovalent IEs contribute markedly into the experimentally measured effects and explain many anomalous and even magic properties of the effects, such as the dependence of IE on the solvents and on the presence of the third substances, enormously large isotope effects at the mild conditions, the difference between IEs measured in the reactions of individual protiated and deuterated compounds and those measured in their mixture. Noncovalent IEs are not negligible and should be taken into account to make correct and substantiated conclusions on the reaction mechanisms. The kinetic equations are derived for the total isotope effects, which include noncovalent IEs as additive factors.

  17. Hydrogen storage via polyhydride complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M.; Zidan, R.A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The reversible dehydrogenation of NaAlH{sub 4} is catalyzed in toluene slurries of the NaAlH{sub 4} containing the pincer complex, IrH{sub 4} {l_brace}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}PBu{sup t}{sub 2}){sub 2}{r_brace}. The rates of the pincer complex catalyzed dehydrogenation are about five times greater those previously found for NaAlH{sub 4} that was doped with titanium through a wet chemistry method. Homogenization of NaAlH{sub 4} with 2 mole % Ti(OBu{sup n}){sub 4} under an atmosphere of argon produces a novel titanium containing material. TPD measurements show that the dehydrogenation of this material occurs about 30 C lower than that previously found for wet titanium doped NaAlH{sub 4}. In further contrast to wet doped NaAlH{sub 4}, the dehydrogenation kinetics and hydrogen capacity of the novel material are undiminished over several dehydriding/hydriding cycles. Rehydrogenation of the titanium doped material occurs readily at 170 C under 150 atm of hydrogen. TPD measurements show that about 80% of the original hydrogen content (4.2 wt%) can be restored under these conditions.

  18. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasypin, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  19. Numerical Simulation of Hydrogen Combustion: Global Reaction Model and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yun [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an (China); Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Liu, Yinhe, E-mail: yinheliu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an (China)

    2017-11-20

    Due to the complexity of modeling the combustion process in nuclear power plants, the global mechanisms are preferred for numerical simulation. To quickly perform the highly resolved simulations with limited processing resources of large-scale hydrogen combustion, a method based on thermal theory was developed to obtain kinetic parameters of global reaction mechanism of hydrogen–air combustion in a wide range. The calculated kinetic parameters at lower hydrogen concentration (C{sub hydrogen} < 20%) were validated against the results obtained from experimental measurements in a container and combustion test facility. In addition, the numerical data by the global mechanism (C{sub hydrogen} > 20%) were compared with the results by detailed mechanism. Good agreement between the model prediction and the experimental data was achieved, and the comparison between simulation results by the detailed mechanism and the global reaction mechanism show that the present calculated global mechanism has excellent predictable capabilities for a wide range of hydrogen–air mixtures.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Hydrogen Combustion: Global Reaction Model and Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yun; Liu, Yinhe

    2017-01-01

    Due to the complexity of modeling the combustion process in nuclear power plants, the global mechanisms are preferred for numerical simulation. To quickly perform the highly resolved simulations with limited processing resources of large-scale hydrogen combustion, a method based on thermal theory was developed to obtain kinetic parameters of global reaction mechanism of hydrogen–air combustion in a wide range. The calculated kinetic parameters at lower hydrogen concentration (C hydrogen < 20%) were validated against the results obtained from experimental measurements in a container and combustion test facility. In addition, the numerical data by the global mechanism (C hydrogen > 20%) were compared with the results by detailed mechanism. Good agreement between the model prediction and the experimental data was achieved, and the comparison between simulation results by the detailed mechanism and the global reaction mechanism show that the present calculated global mechanism has excellent predictable capabilities for a wide range of hydrogen–air mixtures.

  1. Comparison of a disposable sorptive sampler with thermal desorption in a gas chromatographic inlet, or in a dedicated thermal desorber, to conventional stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption for the determination of micropollutants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooding, Madelien; Rohwer, Egmont R; Naudé, Yvette

    2017-09-01

    The presence of micropollutants in the aquatic environment is a worldwide environmental concern. The diversity of micropollutants and the low concentration levels at which they may occur in the aquatic environment have greatly complicated the analysis and detection of these chemicals. Two sorptive extraction samplers and two thermal desorption methods for the detection of micropollutants in water were compared. A low-cost, disposable, in-house made sorptive extraction sampler was compared to SBSE using a commercial Twister sorptive sampler. Both samplers consisted of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as a sorptive medium to concentrate micropollutants. Direct thermal desorption of the disposable samplers in the inlet of a GC was compared to conventional thermal desorption using a commercial thermal desorber system (TDS). Comprehensive gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS) was used for compound separation and identification. Ten micropollutants, representing a range of heterogeneous compounds, were selected to evaluate the performance of the methods. The in-house constructed sampler, with its associated benefits of low-cost and disposability, gave results comparable to commercial SBSE. Direct thermal desorption of the disposable sampler in the inlet of a GC eliminated the need for expensive consumable cryogenics and total analysis time was greatly reduced as a lengthy desorption temperature programme was not required. Limits of detection for the methods ranged from 0.0010 ng L -1 to 0.19 ng L -1 . For most compounds, the mean (n = 3) recoveries ranged from 85% to 129% and the % relative standard deviation (% RSD) ranged from 1% to 58% with the majority of the analytes having a %RSD of less than 30%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Retention of Hydrogen Isotopes in Divertor Tiles Used in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirohata, Y.; Shibahara, T.; Tanabe, T.; Oya, Y.; Arai, T.; Gotoh, Y.; Masaki, K.; Yagyu, J.; Oyaidzu, M.; Okuno, K.; Nishikawa, M.; Miya, N.

    2005-01-01

    Retention characteristics of deuterium and hydrogen retained in graphite tiles placed in the divertor region of JT-60U were investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The deuterium retained in the near surface of all graphite tiles was mostly replaced by hydrogen due to exposure to hydrogen plasma at the final stage operations, resulting in main deuterium retention in the deeper region. The dominant species desorbed from the divertor tiles were H 2 , HD, D 2 and CH 4 . The smallest retention of hydrogen isotopes (H+D) was observed in the outer divertor tile which was eroded with maximum of 20 μm depth. The amount of H+D retained in the inner divertor tiles covered by the re-deposited layers increased with the thickness of the re-deposited layers. Hydrogen isotopes concentration ((H+D)/C) in the re-deposited layers was ∼0.02, which was much smaller than those observed in JET and other devices

  3. Effects of hydrogen adsorption on the properties of double wall BN and (BN){sub x}C{sub y} nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58059-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Azevedo, S., E-mail: sazevedo@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58059-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Kaschny, J.R. [Instituto Federal da Bahia – Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Avenida Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitória da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    In the present contribution, we apply first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory, to study the effects of hydrogen adsorption on the structural and electronic properties of boron nitride and hybrid carbon–boron nitride double wall nanotubes. The results demonstrate that the hydrogen decoration induces significant structural deformation and an appreciable reduction in the gap energy. When the number of hydrogen atoms introduced on the outer wall is increased, desorption of hydrogen pairs are observed. The calculations indicate that each adsorbed hydrogen atom induces a structural deformation with an energetic cost of about 68 meV/atom. It is also found that the introduction of hydrogen atoms can be applied as an efficient tool for tuning the electronic properties of such structures. - Graphical abstract: Localized density of states of a hydrogenated double wall boron nitride nanotube. Some hydrogen pairs are desorbed, forming H{sub 2} molecules. - Highlights: • Hydrogenation induces structural deformation and reduction in the gap energy. • Each H atom induces a deformation with an energetic cost of about 68 meV/atom. • In some cases, desorption of H pairs from the outer wall is observed.

  4. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying; Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment.

  5. Determination of trapping parameters and the chemical diffusion coefficient from hydrogen permeation experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jiří; Mori, G.; Prethaler, A.; Fischer, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 82, MAY (2014), s. 93-100 ISSN 0010-938X Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Steel * Electrochemical calculation * Modeling studies * Hydrogen permeation * Kinetic parameters Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 4.422, year: 2014

  6. Separation of hydrogen isotopes via single column pressure swing adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Y.W.; Hill, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Separation of hydrogen isotopes based on kinetic isotope effects was studied. The mixture separated was hydrogen containing a trace of tritium as HT and the hydride was vanadium monohydride. The separation was achieved using the single-column pressure swing process. Stage separation factors are larger and product cuts smaller than for a two-column pressure swing process operated in the same monohydride phase

  7. BEHAVIOR OF THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS AGAINST HYDROGEN ATTACK

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Fabio; Latorre, Guillermo; Uribe, Iván

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of nickel and chrome alloys applied as thermal spray coatings to be used as protection against embrittlement by hydrogen is studied. Coatings were applied on a carbon steel substrate, under conditions that allow obtain different crystalline structures and porosity levels, in order to determine the effect of these variables on the hydrogen permeation kinetics and as a protection means against embrittlement caused this element. In order to establish behaviors as barriers and protec...

  8. Kinetics of Cs adsorption on soils with different mineralogical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Atsushi; Funakawa, Shinya; Kosaki, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    137 Cs is one of the main radioisotopes released into the environment by nuclear powerstation accidents (e.g. Chernobyl) and nuclear weapons tests. Many studies have shown that Cs tends to remain at surface soils due to the high adsorption selectivity of clay minerals for this element. This behavior of the Cs + ion is, however, assumed to vary significantly depending on the mineralogical composition of the soil. The main objective of this study is to analyze the kinetics of Cs adsorption on soils with different mineralogical composition. Soil samples used in this study were Mollisols (Um) and Alfisols (Ua) from Ukraine, Ultisols (Tu) from Thailand and Spodosols (Js) from Japan. The dominant clay species of these soils are montmorillonite (Um, Ua), kaolinite and mica (Tu) and beidellite (Js). The rates of Cs adsorption and Ca or K desorption were measured using a continuous flow method. Soil samples that were previously saturated with Ca 2+ were leached with a 0.75 mmol/l Cs + solution at a constant rate of 2.0 ml/min. The leachate was collected every 10 minutes and the concentrations of Cs + , Ca 2+ and K + of each aliquot were measured by atomic adsorption spectrophotometry (Cs + , Ca 2+ ) and flame spectrophotometry (K + ). The datasets obtained were simulated using the first order kinetic model: y = a(1 - exp(-kt)), where a is the adsorption (desorption) maximum and k the rate constant. It is here assumed that Ca 2+ is desorbed from cation exchange sites and K + desorbed from the frayed edges of micaceous minerals. The values of a obtained for both Cs adsorption and Ca desorption was in the order Js>Um>Tu>Ua, whereas the values of k were in the order Tu>Ua>Um>Js. This result reflects the values of permanent negative charge of clays which are originated from the substitution of cations in the structure of 2:1 clay minerals. The value of a for K + desorption was, however, highest in Tu, suggesting that the values of Cs + -exchangeable K + correspond to the amount

  9. Activation of erbium films for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Snow, Clark S.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Hydriding of metals can be routinely performed at high temperature in a rich hydrogen atmosphere. Prior to the hydrogen loading process, a thermal activation procedure is required to promote facile hydrogen sorption into the metal. Despite the wide spread utilization of this activation procedure, little is known about the chemical and electronic changes that occur during activation and how this thermal pretreatment leads to increased rates of hydrogen uptake. This study utilized variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to interrogate the changes during in situ thermal annealing of erbium films, with results confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and low energy ion scattering. Activation can be identified by a large increase in photoemission between the valence band edge and the Fermi level and appears to occur over a two stage process. The first stage involves desorption of contaminants and recrystallization of the oxide, initially impeding hydrogen loading. Further heating overcomes the first stage and leads to degradation of the passive surface oxide leading to a bulk film more accessible for hydrogen loading.

  10. Kinetics of elementary atom and radical reactions: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Our research program is concerned with the kinetics of elementary gas phase reactions and energy transfer involving polyatomic molecules. We report here on three ongoing projects: The reaction of oxygen atoms with hydrogen molecules, the electronic relaxation of NH radicals, and the vibrational relaxation of highly excited SF 6 molecules. 10 refs., 5 figs

  11. Theory of molecular hydrogen sorption for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengbai

    2011-03-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) sorption has the advantage of fast kinetics and high reversibility. However, the binding strength is often too weak to be operative at near room temperatures. Research into such hydrogen sorption materials has branched into the study of pure van der Waals (vdW) physisorption and that of weak chemisorption (known to exist in the so-called Kubas complexes). In either case, however, theoretical tools to describe such weak interactions are underdeveloped with error bars that often exceed the strength of the interaction itself. We have used quantum-chemistry (QC) based approaches to benchmark the various available DFT methods for four classes of weak chemisorption systems [Sun et al., Phys. Rev. B 82, 073401 (2010)]. These involve complexes containing Li, Ca, Sc, and Ti with increased strength of H2 binding from predominantly vdW to mostly Kubas-like. The study reveals that most of the DFT functionals within the generalized gradient approximation underestimate the binding energy, oppose to overestimating it. The functionals that are easy to use yet yielding results reasonably close to those of accurate QC are the PBE and PW91. I will also discuss the effort of implementing vdW interaction into the currently available density functional methods [Sun, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 154102 (2008)]. The rationale is that while the true vdW is an electron-electron correlation, a DFT plus classical dispersion approach may be too simple and unnecessary within the DFT. A local pseudopotential approach has been developed to account for the core part of the polarizability of the elements. Applications to a number of benchmark systems yield good agreement with QC calculations. The application of this method and the QC methods to vdW hydrogen binding will also be discussed. Work supported by DOE/BES and DOE/EERE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence under RPI subcontracts No. J30546/J90336.

  12. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  13. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of glycerol pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, F.; Frassoldati, A.; Bartocci, P.; Cinti, G.; Quagliarini, F.; Bidini, G.; Ranzi, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Glycerol pyrolysis can produce about 44–48%v hydrogen at 750–800 °C. • A simplified 452 reactions kinetic model of glycerol pyrolysis has been developed. • The model has good agreement with experimental data. • Non condensable gas yields can reach 70%. - Abstract: Pyrolysis of glycerol, a by-product of the biodiesel industry, is an important potential source of hydrogen. The obtained high calorific value gas can be used either as a fuel for combined heat and power (CHP) generation or as a transportation fuel (for example hydrogen to be used in fuel cells). Optimal process conditions can improve glycerol pyrolysis by increasing gas yield and hydrogen concentration. A detailed kinetic mechanism of glycerol pyrolysis, which involves 137 species and more than 4500 reactions, was drastically simplified and reduced to a new skeletal kinetic scheme of 44 species, involved in 452 reactions. An experimental campaign with a batch pyrolysis reactor was properly designed to further validate the original and the skeletal mechanisms. The comparisons between model predictions and experimental data strongly suggest the presence of a catalytic process promoting steam reforming of methane. High pyrolysis temperatures (750–800 °C) improve process performances and non-condensable gas yields of 70%w can be achieved. Hydrogen mole fraction in pyrolysis gas is about 44–48%v. The skeletal mechanism developed can be easily used in Computational Fluid Dynamic software, reducing the simulation time.

  14. Hydrogen fuel. Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darkrim-Lamari, F.; Malbrunot, P.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very energetic fuel which can be used in combustion to generate heat and mechanical energy or which can be used to generate electricity and heat through an electrochemical reaction with oxygen. This article deals with the energy conversion, the availability and safety problems linked with the use of hydrogen, and with the socio-economical consequences of a generalized use of hydrogen: 1 - hydrogen energy conversion: hydrogen engines, aerospace applications, fuel cells (principle, different types, domains of application); 2 - hydrogen energy availability: transport and storage (gas pipelines, liquid hydrogen, adsorbed and absorbed hydrogen in solid materials), service stations; 3 - hazards and safety: flammability, explosibility, storage and transport safety, standards and regulations; 4 - hydrogen economy; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  15. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between [ 14 C]NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols

  16. Optimising hydrogen bonding in solid wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2009-01-01

    The chemical bonds of wood are both covalent bonds within the wood polymers and hydrogen bonds within and between the polymers. Both types of bonds are responsible for the coherence, strength and stiffness of the material. The hydrogen bonds are more easily modified by changes in load, moisture...... and temperature distorting the internal bonding state. A problem arises when studying hydrogen bonding in wood since matched wood specimens of the same species will have very different internal bonding states. Thus, possible changes in the bonding state due to some applied treatment such as conditioning...... maintaining 100 % moisture content of the wood. The hypothesis was that this would enable a fast stress relaxation as a result of reorganization of bonds, since moisture plasticizes the material and temperature promotes faster kinetics. Hereby, all past bond distortions caused by various moisture, temperature...

  17. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  18. Principles of chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    House, James E

    2007-01-01

    James House's revised Principles of Chemical Kinetics provides a clear and logical description of chemical kinetics in a manner unlike any other book of its kind. Clearly written with detailed derivations, the text allows students to move rapidly from theoretical concepts of rates of reaction to concrete applications. Unlike other texts, House presents a balanced treatment of kinetic reactions in gas, solution, and solid states. The entire text has been revised and includes many new sections and an additional chapter on applications of kinetics. The topics covered include quantitative rela

  19. Introduction to chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Soustelle, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This book is a progressive presentation of kinetics of the chemical reactions. It provides complete coverage of the domain of chemical kinetics, which is necessary for the various future users in the fields of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Chemistry and Combustion. It will help them to understand the most sophisticated knowledge of their future job area. Over 15 chapters, this book present the fundamentals of chemical kinetics, its relations with reaction mechanisms and kinetic properties. Two chapters are then devoted to experimental re

  20. Simulation of hydrogen and hydrogen-assisted propane ignition in Pt catalyzed microchannel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadri, Vikram; Kaisare, Niket S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology - Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2010-11-15

    This paper deals with self-ignition of catalytic microburners from ambient cold-start conditions. First, reaction kinetics for hydrogen combustion is validated with experimental results from the literature, followed by validation of a simplified pseudo-2D microburner model. The model is then used to study the self-ignition behavior of lean hydrogen/air mixtures in a Platinum-catalyzed microburner. Hydrogen combustion on Pt is a very fast reaction. During cold start ignition, hydrogen conversion reaches 100% within the first few seconds and the reactor dynamics are governed by the ''thermal inertia'' of the microburner wall structure. The self-ignition property of hydrogen can be used to provide the energy required for propane ignition. Two different modes of hydrogen-assisted propane ignition are considered: co-feed mode, where the microburner inlet consists of premixed hydrogen/propane/air mixtures; and sequential feed mode, where the inlet feed is switched from hydrogen/air to propane/air mixtures after the microburner reaches propane ignition temperature. We show that hydrogen-assisted ignition is equivalent to selectively preheating the inlet section of the microburner. The time to reach steady state is lower at higher equivalence ratio, lower wall thermal conductivity, and higher inlet velocity for both the ignition modes. The ignition times and propane emissions are compared. Although the sequential feed mode requires slightly higher amount of hydrogen, the propane emissions are at least an order of magnitude lower than the other ignition modes. (author)

  1. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available .J. Cartera,*, L.A. Cornishb aAdvanced Engineering & Testing Services, MATTEK, CSIR, Private Bag X28, Auckland Park 2006, South Africa bSchool of Process and Materials Engineering, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, P.O. WITS 2050, South Africa... are contrasted, and an unusual case study of hydrogen embrittlement of an alloy steel is presented. 7 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. Keywords: Hydrogen; Hydrogen-assisted cracking; Hydrogen damage; Hydrogen embrittlement 1. Introduction Hydrogen suC128...

  2. Comparative study of reversible hydrogen storage in alkali-doped fulleranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teprovich, Joseph A.; Knight, Douglas A.; Peters, Brent [Clean Energy Directorate – Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29801 (United States); Zidan, Ragaiy, E-mail: ragaiy.zidan@srnl.doe.gov [Clean Energy Directorate – Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29801 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: ► Catalytic effect of alkali metals of fullerane formation. ► Hydrogen storage properties of alkali metal hydrides and fullerene composites. ► Novel intercalation of Na and Li in the fullerene lattice. ► Reversible phase transformation of C{sub 60} from fcc to bcc upon de/rehydrogenation. ► Potential to enable to the formation of other carbon based hydrogen storage systems. -- Abstract: In this report we describe and compare the hydrogen storage properties of lithium and sodium doped fullerenes prepared via a solvent-assisted mixing process. For the preparation of these samples either NaH or LiH was utilized as the alkali metal source to make material based on either a Na{sub 6}C{sub 60} or Li{sub 6}C{sub 60}. Both of the alkali-doped materials can reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen at much milder conditions than the starting materials used to make them (decomposition temperatures of NaH > 420 °C, LiH > 670 °C, and fullerane > 500 °C). The hydrogen storage properties of the materials were compared by TGA, isothermal desorption, and XRD analysis. It was determined that the sodium-doped material can reversibly store 4.0 wt.% H{sub 2} while the lithium doped material can reversibly store 5.0 wt.% H{sub 2} through a chemisorption mechanism indicated by the formation and measurement of C–H bonds. XRD analysis of the material demonstrated that a reversible phase transition between fcc and bcc occurs depending on the temperature at which the hydrogenation is performed. In either system the active hydrogen storage material resembles a hydrogenated fullerene (fullerane)

  3. Comparative study of reversible hydrogen storage in alkali-doped fulleranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teprovich, Joseph A.; Knight, Douglas A.; Peters, Brent; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Catalytic effect of alkali metals of fullerane formation. ► Hydrogen storage properties of alkali metal hydrides and fullerene composites. ► Novel intercalation of Na and Li in the fullerene lattice. ► Reversible phase transformation of C 60 from fcc to bcc upon de/rehydrogenation. ► Potential to enable to the formation of other carbon based hydrogen storage systems. -- Abstract: In this report we describe and compare the hydrogen storage properties of lithium and sodium doped fullerenes prepared via a solvent-assisted mixing process. For the preparation of these samples either NaH or LiH was utilized as the alkali metal source to make material based on either a Na 6 C 60 or Li 6 C 60 . Both of the alkali-doped materials can reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen at much milder conditions than the starting materials used to make them (decomposition temperatures of NaH > 420 °C, LiH > 670 °C, and fullerane > 500 °C). The hydrogen storage properties of the materials were compared by TGA, isothermal desorption, and XRD analysis. It was determined that the sodium-doped material can reversibly store 4.0 wt.% H 2 while the lithium doped material can reversibly store 5.0 wt.% H 2 through a chemisorption mechanism indicated by the formation and measurement of C–H bonds. XRD analysis of the material demonstrated that a reversible phase transition between fcc and bcc occurs depending on the temperature at which the hydrogenation is performed. In either system the active hydrogen storage material resembles a hydrogenated fullerene (fullerane)

  4. Factors determining the activity of catalysts of various chemical types in the oxidation of hydrogen. I. Oxidation and isotope exchange of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgikh, L.Y.; Golodets, G.I.; Il'chenko, N.I.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of data on the kinetics of the reaction 2H 2 + O 2 = 2H 2 O isotope exchange H 2 + D 2 = 2HD under the conditions of oxidative catalysis, and the kinetic isotope effect, a mechanism is proposed for the oxidation of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide. At low temperatures the reaction proceeds according to a mechanism of alternating reduction-reoxidation of the surface with the participation of hydrogen adsorbed in molecular form; at increased temperature and low P 02 /P /SUB H2/ ratios, a significant contribution to the observed rate is made by a mechanism including dissociative chemisorption of hydrogen

  5. First passage times for multiple particles with reversible target-binding kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the first passage problem for multiple particles that diffuse towards a target, partially adsorb there, and then desorb after a finite exponentially distributed residence time. We search for the first time when m particles undergoing such reversible target-binding kinetics are found simultaneously on the target that may trigger an irreversible chemical reaction or a biophysical event. Even if the particles are independent, the finite residence time on the target yields an intricate temporal coupling between particles. We compute analytically the mean first passage time (MFPT) for two independent particles by mapping the original problem to higher-dimensional surface-mediated diffusion and solving the coupled partial differential equations. The respective effects of the adsorption and desorption rates on the MFPT are revealed and discussed.

  6. Performance of the periodic pulse technique--4. Periodic pulse reaction kinetics of oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, T.; Ii, M.; Murakami, Y.

    1980-07-01

    The periodic pulse method was used to study the reaction mechanism and kinetics of the oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde (IBA) by following the formation rates of methacrolein (MA), carbon monoxide and dioxide (CO/sub x/), and other products (P) as a function of pulse widths and reactant partial pressures at 350/sup 0/C over a 2:3 antimony oxide/molybdenum trioxide catalyst. The results were consistent with a mechanism according to which IBA reacts with oxygen retained by the catalyst to form MA, causing reduction of the catalyst. The IBA also adsorbed on the surface as an oxygenated species which either reacted with gas-phase oxygen to form CO/sub x/ or desorbed as an oxygenated P. The reduced catalyst surface was reoxidized by oxygen adsorption. Implications of catalyst tailoring for increased MA yields by improving the redox mechanism and inhibiting the surface reactions, are discussed.

  7. Two-phase model of hydrogen transport to optimize nanoparticle catalyst loading for hydrogen evolution reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemppainen, Erno; Halme, Janne; Hansen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    is the evolution and transport of gaseous H2, since HER leads to the continuous formation of H2 bubbles near the electrode. We present a numerical model that includes the transport of both gaseous and dissolved H2, as well as mass exchange between them, and combine it with a kinetic model of HER at platinum (Pt......) nanoparticle electrodes. We study the effect of the diffusion layer thickness and H2 dissolution rate constant on the importance of gaseous transport, and the effect of equilibrium hydrogen coverage and Pt loading on the kinetic and mass transport overpotentials. Gaseous transport becomes significant when...

  8. Kinetic equation solution by inverse kinetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, G.

    1983-01-01

    We propose a computer program (CAMU) which permits to solve the inverse kinetic equation. The CAMU code is written in HPL language for a HP 982 A microcomputer with a peripheral interface HP 9876 A ''thermal graphic printer''. The CAMU code solves the inverse kinetic equation by taking as data entry the output of the ionization chambers and integrating the equation with the help of the Simpson method. With this program we calculate the evolution of the reactivity in time for a given disturbance

  9. Studies of ethylene hydrogenation and of adsorbed C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/ on chromia and lanthana catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodakov, Y.S.; Makarov, P.A.; Delzer, G.; Minachev, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    Temperature-programed desorption of ethylene or hydrogen adsorbed at -78/sup 0/, -68/sup 0/, and +20/sup 0/C on chromic oxide, a 1:7 chromic oxide/alumina catalyst prepared by impregnation, alumina, and lanthanum oxide pretreated at 400/sup 0/-900/sup 0/C in vacuo showed that ethylene adsorbed on these oxides on three different sites from which it desorbed at -40/sup 0/ to +10/sup 0/C, at 50/sup 0/-100/sup 0/C, and at 350/sup 0/-400/sup 0/C; and that hydrogen adsorbed only on the latter two sites. One preadsorbed ethylene molecule was displaced at room temperature by 16 molecules of carbon monoxide, 79 molecules of carbon dioxide, or 135 molecules of water. Hydrogen was displaced at lower temperature. The nature of the surface sites and of the adsorbed species, and their reactivities are discussed.

  10. Decomposition kinetics of plutonium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, J.M.; Stakebake, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetic data for decomposition of PuH/sub 1/ /sub 95/ provides insight into a possible mechanism for the hydriding and dehydriding reactions of plutonium. The fact that the rate of the hydriding reaction, K/sub H/, is proportional to P/sup 1/2/ and the rate of the dehydriding process, K/sub D/, is inversely proportional to P/sup 1/2/ suggests that the forward and reverse reactions proceed by opposite paths of the same mechanism. The P/sup 1/2/ dependence of hydrogen solubility in metals is characteristic of the dissociative absorption of hydrogen; i.e., the reactive species is atomic hydrogen. It is reasonable to assume that the rates of the forward and reverse reactions are controlled by the surface concentration of atomic hydrogen, (H/sub s/), that K/sub H/ = c'(H/sub s/), and that K/sub D/ = c/(H/sub s/), where c' and c are proportionality constants. For this surface model, the pressure dependence of K/sub D/ is related to (H/sub s/) by the reaction (H/sub s/) reversible 1/2H/sub 2/(g) and by its equilibrium constant K/sub e/ = (H/sub 2/)/sup 1/2//(H/sub s/). In the pressure range of ideal gas behavior, (H/sub s/) = K/sub e//sup -1/(RT)/sup -1/2/ and the decomposition rate is given by K/sub D/ = cK/sub e/(RT)/sup -1/2/P/sup 1/2/. For an analogous treatment of the hydriding process with this model, it can be readily shown that K/sub H/ = c'K/sub e//sup -1/(RT)/sup -1/2/P/sup 1/2/. The inverse pressure dependence and direct temperature dependence of the decomposition rate are correctly predicted by this mechanism which is most consistent with the observed behavior of the Pu--H system.

  11. Determination of the hydrogen content of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soare, M.; Petriu, F.; Toma, V.

    1995-01-01

    A new method and apparatus are reported for determination of the total hydrogen content by measurements on as-manufactured fuel elements, heated at prescribed temperature values between 200 degrees C and 600 degrees C. The method is based on the catalytic oxidation of the organic compounds and transformation of the hydrogen in the equivalent water quantity which is analysed by a special infrared detector. Different types of measurements for determination of the hydrogen content from graphite coating, UO 2 pellets and filling gas are presented. Also, experimental observation regarding water release and graphite thermal decomposition kinetic are discussed. (author)

  12. Combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE) process for hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.; Stevens, W.H.; Butler, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes can be separated efficiently by a process which combines an electrolysis cell with a trickle bed column packed with a hydrophobic platinum catalyst. The column effects isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of electrolytic hydrogen and liquid water while the electrolysis cell contributes to isotope separation by virtue of the kinetic isotope effect inherent in the hydrogen evolution reaction. The main features of the CECE process for heavy water production are presented as well as a discussion of the inherent positive synergistic effects, and other advantages and disadvantages of the process. Several potential applications of the process in the nuclear power industry are discussed. 3 figures, 2 tables

  13. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program | Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program Through its Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies Program, NREL researches, develops, analyzes, and validates fuel cell and hydrogen production, delivery, and storage technologies for transportation

  14. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is mobile and can easily move through the material). Hydrogen diffuses ... The determination of the relationship of light-enhanced hydrogen motion to ... term is negligible, and using the thermodynamic relation given below f(c) = kBT .... device-applications problematic but the normal state can be recovered by a thermal an-.

  15. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  16. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  17. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  18. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  19. HYDROGEN KINETICS LIMITATION OF AN AUTOTROPHIC SULPHATE REDUCTION REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÉSAR SÁEZ-NAVARRETE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El uso de sustratos inorgánicos podría reducir los costos y simplificar la operación de sistemas de tratamiento de aguas que utilizan bacterias reductoras de sulfato. Sin embargo, el uso de H2 como sustrato energético y la bioproducción de H2S podrían provocar limitaciones cinéticas. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar las condiciones en las que la capacidad de transferencia de masa de un bioreactor de reducción de sulfato, limita su cinética de reducción. La cinética del reactor fue obtenida monitoreando la presión del sistema en condiciones de no limitación por sulfato. Se concluyó que el diseño del bioreactor debería basarse en sus propiedades de transferencia. La tasa de consumo de H2 alcanzó un máximo de 10-4 M/min, para una tasa de reducción de sulfato de 3.4 g·L-1·d-1. Para evitar limitación por H2 se requirió un kLa de 1.48 min-1 a 1.2·109 cells/L (1.23·10-9 L·min-1·cell-1, valor relevante para propósitos de escalamiento.

  20. Modeling of hydrogen Stark line shapes with kinetic theory methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, J.; Capes, H.; Stamm, R.

    2012-12-01

    The unified formalism for Stark line shapes is revisited and extended to non-binary interactions between an emitter and the surrounding perturbers. The accuracy of this theory is examined through comparisons with ab initio numerical simulations.

  1. Propene bulk polymerization kinetics: Role of prepolymerization and hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pater, J.T.M.; Weickert, G.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2003-01-01

    An experimental setup for the polymerization of liquid propylene was used to carry out main polymerizations with and without a prepolymerization step. Two types of prepolymerization are introduced: at a constant temperature and at rapidly increasing reactor temperatures. With the present catalyst

  2. Hydrogen induced crack growth in Grade-12 titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.M.; Lee, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    Internal hydrogen induced crack growth rates were measured in Grade-12 titanium which is a candidate material for high-level nuclear waste containers. As-received and hydrogen charged samples (5 ppM to 330 ppM hydrogen) were used for slow crack growth measurements at constant loads using a Krak Gauge. The testing temperature ranged from room temperature to 148 0 C. The crack growth kinetics under low to moderate loads are linear, but this linear rate is interrupted by discrete fast crack jump segments with parabolic or cubic type kinetics. These fast jump segments are thought to be associated with the passage of the crack front through the alpha-beta interface phase or with the initial loading sequence. By measuring striation spacings on the fracture surface, most crack growth rates observed are found to be in stage II. The striations are considered to be associated with hydride fracture. The crack path is either transgranular in the alpha phase or interfacial in the alpha phase adjacent to the beta phase. For transgranular growth, crack growth rates are constant and slower than those for interfacial growth which is associated with fast crack growth through a high hydrogen concentration region. Most stage II crack growth rates depend slightly on the stress intensity suggesting the contribution of plastic tearing process to stage II kinetics. The activation energies for crack growth are much lower than the activation energy of hydrogen diffusion through the alpha phase, implying that hydrogen is transported along dislocations, grain boundaries or interfaces. When the temperature is increased, the crack velocity first reaches a maximum and then decreases at higher temperatures. These temperature effects come from lower hydrogen concentration trapped at dislocations or from slower hydride nucleation kinetics, both at higher temperatures

  3. Recent Advances in the Use of Sodium Borohydride as a Solid State Hydrogen Store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Mao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of new practical hydrogen storage materials with high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen densities is necessary to implement fuel cell technology for both mobile and stationary applications. NaBH4, owing to its low cost and high hydrogen density (10.6 wt%, has received extensive attention as a promising hydrogen storage medium. However, its practical use is hampered by its high thermodynamic stability and slow hydrogen exchange kinetics. Recent developments have been made in promoting H2 release and tuning the thermodynamics of the thermal decomposition of solid NaBH4. These conceptual advances offer a positive outlook for using NaBH4-based materials as viable hydrogen storage carriers for mobile applications. This review summarizes contemporary progress in this field with a focus on the fundamental dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation pathways and properties and on material design strategies towards improved kinetics and thermodynamics such as catalytic doping, nano-engineering, additive destabilization and chemical modification.

  4. Nuclear electrolytic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnstaple, A.G.; Petrella, A.J.

    1982-05-01

    An extensive study of hydrogen supply has recently been carried out by Ontario Hydro which indicates that electrolytic hydrogen produced from nuclear electricity could offer the lowest cost option for any future large scale hydrogen supply in the Province of Ontario, Canada. This paper provides a synopsis of the Ontario Hydro study, a brief overview of the economic factors supporting the study conclusion and discussion of a number of issues concerning the supply of electrolytic hydrogen by electric power utilities

  5. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  6. Hydrogen-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzl, H.; Springer, T.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the alloys of metal crystals with hydrogen. The system niobium-hydrogen and its properties are especially dealt with: diffusion and heat of solution of hydrogen in the host crystal, phase diagram, coherent and incoherent phase separation, application of metal-hydrogen systems in technology. Furthermore, examples from research work in IFF (Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung) of the Nuclear Research Plant, Juelich, in the field of metal-H systems are given in summary form. (GSC) [de

  7. Hydrogen peroxide and caustic soda: Dancing with a dragon while bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter W. Hart; Carl Houtman; Kolby Hirth

    2013-01-01

    When hydrogen peroxide is mixed with caustic soda, an auto-accelerating reaction can lead to generation of significant amounts of heat and oxygen. On the basis of experiments using typical pulp mill process concentration and temperatures, a relatively simple kinetic model has been developed. Evaluation of these model results reveals that hydrogen peroxide-caustic soda...

  8. Reactions of oxygen and hydrogen with liquid sodium - a critical survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullmann, H.

    1982-01-01

    The fundamentals of solvation chemistry are presented with appropriate components formulated. Methods of investigation and kinetics of the reactions are described. The hydrogen equilibrium pressure and saturation solubilities are described. The chemical equilibrium between O and H in solution is presented with detailed tabulation of the saturation solutions of oxygen, hydrogen and hydroxide in liquid sodium. Agreements and differences with the literature are presented

  9. Modulated synthesis of Cr-MOF (MIL 101) for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Segakweng, T

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available as a fuel into fuel cell technologies is only possible when safe and effective hydrogen storage systems become available. Complete usage of hydrogen is only possible if proper and effective storage systems with fast kinetics becomes available. Porous...

  10. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. II. Hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anbar, M.; Farhataziz; Ross, A.B.

    1975-05-01

    Rates of reactions of hydrogen atoms (from radiolysis of water and other sources) with organic and inorganic molecules, ions, and transients in aqueous solution were tabulated. Directly measured rates obtained by kinetic spectroscopy or conductimetric methods, and relative rates determined by competition kinetics are included. (U.S.)

  11. Kinetics in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this chapter the authors first briefly review the kinetics of first- and second-order processes for continuous and pulsed irradiation, without taking the effects of nonhomogeneous formation of the species into consideration. They also discuss diffusion controlled reactions under conditions where interactions of more than two particles can be neglected, first the kinetics of the diffusion-controlled reaction of randomly generated species (homogeneous reaction) and then that of isolated pairs of reactants. The latter is often called geminate kinetics when dealing with pairs of oppositely charged species; they shall use this term for the kinetics of isolated pairs in general. In the last section they discuss briefly the kinetics of groups of more than two reactants

  12. Hydrogen interaction with radiation defects in p-type silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Feklisova, O V; Yakimov, E B; Weber, J

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen interaction with radiation defects in p-type silicon has been investigated by deep-level non-stationary spectroscopy. Hydrogen is introduced into the high-energy electron-irradiated crystals under chemical etching in acid solutions at room temperature followed by the reverse-bias annealing at 380 K. It is observed that passivation of the irradiation-induced defects is accompanied by formation of novel electrically active defects with hydrogen-related profiles. Effect of hydrogen on the electrical activity of the C sub s C sub i complexes is shown for the first time. Based on the spatial distribution and passivation kinetics, possible nature of the novel complexes is analyzed. The radii for hydrogen capture by vacancies, K-centers, C sub s C sub i centers and the novel complexes are determined

  13. Hydrogenation of passivated contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeth, William; Yuan, Hao-Chih; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Stradins, Pauls; Page, Matthew R.

    2018-03-06

    Methods of hydrogenation of passivated contacts using materials having hydrogen impurities are provided. An example method includes applying, to a passivated contact, a layer of a material, the material containing hydrogen impurities. The method further includes subsequently annealing the material and subsequently removing the material from the passivated contact.

  14. Non-kinetic capabilities: complementing the kinetic prevalence to targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Ducheine, P.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting is used in military doctrine to describe a military operational way, using (military) means to influence a target (or addressee) in order to achieve designated political and/or military goals. The four factors italicized are used to analyse non-kinetic targeting, complementing our knowledge and understanding of the kinetic prevalence. Paradoxically, non-kinetic targeting is not recognized as a separate concept: kinetic and non-kinetic are intertwined facets of targeting. Kinetic tar...

  15. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the

  16. Methyllithium-Doped Naphthyl-Containing Conjugated Microporous Polymer with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan; Sun, Lei; Li, Gang; Shang, Jin; Yang, Rui-Xia; Deng, Wei-Qiao

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen storage is a primary challenge for using hydrogen as a fuel. With ideal hydrogen storage kinetics, the weak binding strength of hydrogen to sorbents is the key barrier to obtain decent hydrogen storage performance. Here, we reported the rational synthesis of a methyllithium-doped naphthyl-containing conjugated microporous polymer with exceptional binding strength of hydrogen to the polymer guided by theoretical simulations. Meanwhile, the experimental results showed that isosteric heat can reach up to 8.4 kJ mol(-1) and the methyllithium-doped naphthyl-containing conjugated microporous polymer exhibited an enhanced hydrogen storage performance with 150 % enhancement compared with its counterpart naphthyl-containing conjugated microporous polymer. These results indicate that this strategy provides a direction for design and synthesis of new materials that meet the US Department of Energy (DOE) hydrogen storage target. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Interaction of hydrogen and oxygen with continuous or granular films of palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhalenko, I.I.; Prokopov, A.M.; Yagodovskii, V.D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors use desorption and conductometric methods in establishing the existence of three species of adsorbed hydrogen on continuous Pd films and two species on Pd films with a granular structure. Preoxidation of the surface of the continuous films does not affect the rate or kinetic order of hydrogen sorption; oxidation/reduction treatment changes these parameters, but the magnitude of Edes of hydrogen remains unchanged.

  18. Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzymes and Biomimetic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layfield, Joshua P.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-04-09

    Hydrogen transfer reactions play an important role throughout chemistry and biology. In general, hydrogen transfer reactions encompass proton and hydride transfer, which are associated with the transfer of a positively or negatively charged species, respectively, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which corresponds to the net transfer of one electron and one proton in the simplest case. Such PCET reactions can occur by either a sequential mechanism, in which the proton or electron transfers first, or a concerted mechanism, in which the electron and proton transfer in a single kinetic step with no stable intermediate. Furthermore, concerted PCET reactions can be subdivided into hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between the same donor and acceptor (i.e., the transfer of a predominantly neutral species), and electron-proton transfer (EPT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between different donors and acceptors, possibly even in different directions. In all of these types of hydrogen transfer reactions, hydrogen tunneling could potentially play a significant role. The biomimetic portion was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  19. Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzymes and Biomimetic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layfield, Joshua P.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-12-20

    Hydrogen transfer reactions play an important role throughout chemistry and biology. In general, hydrogen transfer reactions encompass proton and hydride transfer, which are associated with the transfer of a positively or negatively charged species, respectively, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), which corresponds to the net transfer of one electron and one proton in the simplest case. Such PCET reactions can occur by either a sequential mechanism, in which the proton or electron transfers first, or a concerted mechanism, in which the electron and proton transfer in a single kinetic step with no stable intermediate. Furthermore, concerted PCET reactions can be subdivided into hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between the same donor and acceptor (i.e., the transfer of a predominantly neutral species), and electron-proton transfer (EPT), which corresponds to the transfer of an electron and proton between different donors and acceptors, possibly even in different directions. In all of these types of hydrogen transfer reactions, hydrogen tunneling could potentially play a signficant role. The theoretical development portion of this Review was supported by the National Science Foundation under CHE-10-57875. The biological portion of this Review was funded by NIH Grant No. GM056207. The biomimetic portion was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electro-catalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  20. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael U. Niemann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices. Nanostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS2/MoS2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc. and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.