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Sample records for hydrogen content assessment

  1. Effect of composition on diffusible hydrogen content and hydrogen assisted cracking of steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, S.K.; Ramasubbu, V.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Parvathavarthini, N.

    2008-01-01

    Study of hydrogen assisted cracking and measurement of diffusible hydrogen content in different Cr-Mo steel welds showed that for identical conditions, susceptibility to cracking increased and diffusible hydrogen content decreased with increase in alloy content. Hydrogen permeation studies showed that hydrogen diffusivity decreases and solubility increases with increase in alloy content. Thus decrease in diffusible hydrogen content with increase in alloying is attributed to increase in apparent solubility and decrease in apparent diffusivity of hydrogen with increase in alloy content. Analysis of the results indicates that variation of diffusible hydrogen content and apparent diffusivity of hydrogen with alloy content can be represented as a function of alloy composition. (author)

  2. Changes in Hydrogen Content During Steelmaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrbek K.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Štore Steel produces steel grades for spring, forging and engineering industry applications. Steelmaking technology consists of scrap melting in Electric Arc Furnace (EAF, secondary metallurgy in Ladle Furnace (LF and continuous casting of billets (CC. Hydrogen content during steelmaking of various steel grades and steelmaking technologies was measured. Samples of steel melt from EAF, LF and CC were collected and investigated. Sampling from Electric Arc Furnace and Ladle Furnace was carried out using vacuum pin tubes. Regular measurements of hydrogen content in steel melt were made using Hydris device. Hydrogen content results measured in tundish by Hydris device were compared with results from pin tube samples. Based on the measurement results it was established that hydrogen content during steelmaking increases. The highest values were determined in tundish during casting. Factors that influence the hydrogen content in liquid steel the most were steelmaking technology and alloying elements.

  3. Hydrogen charging, hydrogen content analysis and metallographic examination of hydride in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.; Kishore, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Roychowdhury, S.; Srivastava, D.; Sinha, T.K.; De, P.K.; Banerjee, S.; Gopalan, B.; Kameswaran, R.; Sheelvantra, Smita S.

    2003-12-01

    Gaseous and electrolytic hydrogen charging techniques for introducing controlled amount of hydrogen in zirconium alloy is described. Zr-1wt%Nb fuel tube, zircaloy-2 pressure tube and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube samples were charged with up to 1000 ppm of hydrogen by weight using one of the aforementioned methods. These hydrogen charged Zr-alloy samples were analyzed for estimating the total hydrogen content using inert gas fusion technique. Influence of sample surface preparation on the estimated hydrogen content is also discussed. In zirconium alloys, hydrogen in excess of the terminal solid solubility precipitates out as brittle hydride phase, which acquire platelet shaped morphology due to its accommodation in the matrix and can make the host matrix brittle. The F N number, which represents susceptibility of Zr-alloy tubes to hydride embrittlement was measured from the metallographs. The volume fraction of the hydride phase, platelet size, distribution, interplatelet spacing and orientation were examined metallographically using samples sliced along the radial-axial and radial-circumferential plane of the tubes. It was observed that hydride platelet length increases with increase in hydrogen content. Considering the metallographs generated by Materials Science Division as standard, metallographs prepared by the IAEA round robin participants for different hydrogen concentration was compared. It is felt that hydride micrographs can be used to estimate not only that approximate hydrogen concentration of the sample but also its size, distribution and orientation which significantly affect the susceptibility to hydride embrittlement of these alloys. (author)

  4. Infrared-transmission spectra and hydrogen content of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuehi; Chen, Guanghua; Wu, Yueying; Yin, Shengyi; Gao, Zhuo; Wang, Qing; Song, Xuemei; Deng, Jinxiang

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, two kinds of methods of calculating the hydrogen content of a-Si:H thin film by means of the wagging mode and the stretching modes of infrared-transmission spectra, are investigated. The reason for the difference in these two calculation results is analyzed. If the contents of SiH2 and (SiH2) n are indicated in terms of a structure factor F=(/840+/880)//2000, it is shown that the calculation results obtained from the two different methods are almost equal when the refractive index n is approximately 3.4 or the fitting thickness is between 0.71 and 0.89 μm in the case of a small F. It is shown that the ways of fabrication of thin film can influences silicon-hydrogen bonding configuration of a-Si: H film, and different ways of fabrication can lead to different contents of SiH2 and (SiH2) n . The uniformity of the thin film with a big F is bad. In this case, there is great difference between the thickness measured by the SurfCom408A surface profile apparatus and the thickness obtained by fitting the fringes; and the hydrogen contents of a-Si:H films obtained by means of the wagging mode and the stretching modes are different, too. But the fabrication of the MWECR CVD assisted by CAT CVD can effectively restrain the formation of SiH2 and (SiH2) n .

  5. Determination of the hydrogen content of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soare, M.; Petriu, F.; Toma, V.

    1995-01-01

    A new method and apparatus are reported for determination of the total hydrogen content by measurements on as-manufactured fuel elements, heated at prescribed temperature values between 200 degrees C and 600 degrees C. The method is based on the catalytic oxidation of the organic compounds and transformation of the hydrogen in the equivalent water quantity which is analysed by a special infrared detector. Different types of measurements for determination of the hydrogen content from graphite coating, UO 2 pellets and filling gas are presented. Also, experimental observation regarding water release and graphite thermal decomposition kinetic are discussed. (author)

  6. Middle distillates hydrogen content via GC×GC-FID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozka, Petr; Mo, Huaping; Šimáček, Pavel; Kilaz, Gozdem

    2018-08-15

    Liquid transportation fuels in the middle distillate range contain thousands of hydrocarbons making the predictions and calculations of properties from composition a challenging process. We present a new approach of hydrogen content determination by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame ionization detector (GC×GC-FID) using a weighted average method. GC×GC-FID hydrogen determination precision was excellent (0.005 wt% repeatability). The method accuracy was evaluated by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, which is non-biased, measures the H signal directly and was independently validated by controls in the current study. The hydrogen content (in the range of 12.72-15.54 wt%) in 28 fuel samples were determined using GC×GC-FID. Results were within ± 2% of those obtained via NMR. Owing to the fact that NMR is accepted as an accurate technique for hydrogen content determination, the GC×GC method proposed in this study can be considered precise and accurate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental determination of hydrogen content of oil extract from jatropha seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunade, I.O.; Jonah, S.A.; Omede, M.O.

    2010-01-01

    The thermal neutron technique was used for the determination of hydrogen content of oil extract from Jatropha seeds. The experimental arrangement consists of a source holder, Am-Be neutron source embedded in paraffin wax and 3 He detector was used to measure reflection coefficient as a function of hydrogen content of various hydrocarbon materials used as calibration standards. The hydrogen content which is an important property of fuel oils was determined for jatropha oil and jatropha-synthetic diesel using their measured values of neutron reflection coefficients and calibration data. The result obtained showed that the hydrogen content of Jatropha oil exceeds that of the synthetic diesel, thus indicating its suitability as a fuel oil for powering diesel engines. The results obtained also indicated that hydrogen content of jatropha-synthetic diesel mixture increases as the volumetric concentration of jatropha oil in the mixture increases, indicating that jatropha oil can serve as a suitable additive to synthetic diesel oil.

  8. Dependence of hydrogen-induced lattice defects and hydrogen embrittlement of cold-drawn pearlitic steels on hydrogen trap state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshida, Tomoki; Takai, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the hydrogen state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility and hydrogen-induced lattice defects were evaluated for cold-drawn pearlitic steel that absorbed hydrogen in two trapping states. Firstly, tensile tests were carried out under various conditions to evaluate hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. The results showed that peak 2 hydrogen, desorbed at temperatures above 200 °C as determined by thermal desorption analysis (TDA), had no significant effect on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. In contrast, hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased in the presence of peak 1 hydrogen, desorbed from room temperature to 200 °C as determined by TDA, at temperatures higher than −30 °C, at lower strain rates and with higher hydrogen content. Next, the same effects on hydrogen-induced lattice defects were also evaluated by TDA using hydrogen as a probe. Peak 2 hydrogen showed no significant effect on either hydrogen-induced lattice defects or hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. It was found that hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed under the conditions where hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased. This relationship indicates that hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility was higher under the conditions where the formation of hydrogen-induced lattice defects tended to be enhanced. Since hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed by the interaction between hydrogen and strain were annihilated by annealing at a temperature of 200 °C, they were presumably vacancies or vacancy clusters. One of the common atomic-level changes that occur in cold-drawn pearlitic steel showing higher hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility is the formation of vacancies and vacancy clusters

  9. Hydrogen in oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper-Charging techniques, hydrogen contents and modelling of hydrogen diffusion and depth profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinsson, Aasa; Sandstroem, Rolf; Lilja, Christina

    2013-01-01

    In Sweden spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of by encapsulating in cast iron inserts protected by a copper shell. The copper can be exposed to hydrogen released during corrosion processes in the inserts. If the hydrogen is taken up by the copper, it could lead to hydrogen embrittlement. Specimens from oxygen-free copper have been hydrogen charged using two different methods. The purpose was to investigate how hydrogen could be introduced into copper in a controlled way. The thermal charging method resulted in a reduction of the initial hydrogen content. After electrochemical charging of cylindrical specimens, the measured hydrogen content was 2.6 wt. ppm which should compared with 0.6 wt. ppm before charging. The retained hydrogen after two weeks was reduced by nearly 40%. Recently the paper 'Hydrogen depth profile in phosphorus-doped, oxygen-free copper after cathodic charging' (Martinsson and Sandstrom, 2012) has been published. The paper describes experimental results for bulk specimens as well as presenting a model. Almost all the hydrogen is found to be located less than 100 μm from the surface. This model is used to interpret the experimental results on foils in the present report. Since the model is fully based on fundamental equations, it can be used to analyse what happens in new situations. In this report the effect of the charging intensity, the grain size, the critical nucleus size for hydrogen bubble formation as well as the charging time are analysed

  10. Hydrogen in oxygen-free, phosphorus-doped copper - Charging techniques, hydrogen contents and modelling of hydrogen diffusion and depth profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsson, Aasa [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Sandstroem, Rolf [Swerea KIMAB, Kista (Sweden); Div. of Materials Science and Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Lilja, Christina [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    In Sweden spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of by encapsulating in cast iron inserts protected by a copper shell. The copper can be exposed to hydrogen released during corrosion processes in the inserts. If the hydrogen is taken up by the copper, it could lead to hydrogen embrittlement. Specimens from oxygen-free copper have been hydrogen charged using two different methods. The purpose was to investigate how hydrogen could be introduced into copper in a controlled way. The thermal charging method resulted in a reduction of the initial hydrogen content. After electrochemical charging of cylindrical specimens, the measured hydrogen content was 2.6 wt. ppm which should compared with 0.6 wt. ppm before charging. The retained hydrogen after two weeks was reduced by nearly 40%. Recently the paper 'Hydrogen depth profile in phosphorus-doped, oxygen-free copper after cathodic charging' (Martinsson and Sandstrom, 2012) has been published. The paper describes experimental results for bulk specimens as well as presenting a model. Almost all the hydrogen is found to be located less than 100 {mu}m from the surface. This model is used to interpret the experimental results on foils in the present report. Since the model is fully based on fundamental equations, it can be used to analyse what happens in new situations. In this report the effect of the charging intensity, the grain size, the critical nucleus size for hydrogen bubble formation as well as the charging time are analysed.

  11. Improved correlations of hydrogen content versus combustion performance related properties of aviation turbine fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, J.M.; Sharma, R.L.; Sagu, M.L.; Tiwari, G.B. (Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun (India))

    1994-01-01

    In recent years the hydrogen content of Aviation Fuels has generated considerable interest. Various investigators have suggested correlation of hydrogen content with combustion related properties of aviation turbine fuel (ATF). A suitable threshold value of hydrogen content 13.8 wt% is being considered as a waiver of specifications such as specific energy, aniline gravity product, smoke point, aromatic content, naphthalenes and luminometer number. In the present paper relationship between the hydrogen content and combustion related properties has been examined and improved correlations of hydrogen content with several combustion related properties have been developed by incorporating a characterization factor in the equations. The supporting threshold value of a hydrogen content of 13.8wt% is verified with 25 data points for waiving of combustion properties such as specific energy, aniline gravity product, smoke point and aromatic content from aviation turbine fuel. 6 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Hydrogen content, interfacial exchange and hydrogen diffusion in high-temperature protonic conductors based on strontium and barium cerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, G.K.; Kurumchin, Eh.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    The hydrogen content and kinetics of the hydrogen exchange in the barium and strontium doped cerates are studied in the reduction atmosphere through the methods of isotope counterbalancing and isotope exchange. The measurements are carried out at 500-840 Deg C and hydrogen pressure of 2.7-16 gPa. It is established, that the hydrogen interfacial exchange proceeds at high velocities through the dissociative-type mechanisms. The effective activation energy of the hydrogen heteroexchange is determined. The coefficient of the hydrogen diffusion in BaCe 0.95 Nd 0.5 O 3-δ is calculated. The hydrogen content per formula unit constituted (0.48±0.05) in the SrCe 0.95 Y 0.05 O 3-δ and (0.60±0.05) in the BaCe 0.95 Nd 0.5 O 3-δ at 550 and 720 Deg C correspondingly and hydrogen pressure of 6.7 gPa [ru

  13. Determination of hydrogen content of Jatropha biodiesel oil using neutron reflection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunade, I. O.; Jonah, S. A.; Omede, M.

    2014-01-01

    Biofuel is an environmental-friendly alternative to fossil fuel and holds immense potential for the future energy needs of the country. Non-edible jatropha biodiesel oil has been identified as one of the suitable bio-fuel options. In this work, experimental measurements were performed to determine the total hydrogen content of jatropha oil and jatropha-synthetic diesel oil mixture. The work was carried out using a neutron reflection facility at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. Jatropha oil and jatropha-synthetic diesel mixture were subjected to experimental measurements for the purpose of determining bulk hydrogen content using neutron reflection facility that had been previously calibrated using various hydrocarbon materials of known hydrogen content. The hydrogen content of the sample were subsequently determined using their measured neutron reflection coefficient values and calibration data. In general, results obtained indicate high hydrogen content range of 10.68-12.16wt% for jatropha oil and the various jatropha-synthetic diesel mixtures. The implication of this is that jatropha oil or jatrophal-synthetic diesel mixture can be used as alternative fuel to mitigate high carbon monoxide emission.

  14. Assessment of hydrogen levels in Zircaloy-2 by non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, P.K.; John, J.T.; Banerjee, S.; Jayakumar, T.; Thavasimuthu, M.; Raj, B.

    1998-01-01

    A non-destructive assessment of Zircaloy-2 samples charged with hydrogen in the range of 50 to 1150 mg/kg has been made using ultrasonic and eddy current testing. It has been found that the ratio of the longitudinal to the shear wave velocity is a parameter which can be directly correlated with the hydrogen content up to a level of 100 to 200 mg/kg. This parameter together with the values of longitudinal and shear wave velocities can be utilized in a multi-parametric correlation approach for estimation of higher levels of the hydrogen content (up to 1150 mg/kg). The sensitivity at different ranges has been found to be acceptable. Ultrasonic attenuation measurements at higher frequencies and eddy current test parameter are also effective for estimation of hydrogen levels above 250 mg/kg in zirconium alloys. Microstructural characterization including TEM studies have been carried out for studying the influence of the type and the morphology of hydride precipitates on ultrasonic parameters. (orig.)

  15. Hydrogen energy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzano, F J; Braun, C [eds.

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to define the near term and long term prospects for the use of hydrogen as an energy delivery medium. Possible applications of hydrogen are defined along with the associated technologies required for implementation. A major focus in the near term is on industrial uses of hydrogen for special applications. The major source of hydrogen in the near term is expected to be from coal, with hydrogen from electric sources supplying a smaller fraction. A number of potential applications for hydrogen in the long term are identified and the level of demand estimated. The results of a cost benefit study for R and D work on coal gasification to hydrogen and electrolytic production of hydrogen are presented in order to aid in defining approximate levels of R and D funding. A considerable amount of data is presented on the cost of producing hydrogen from various energy resources. A key conclusion of the study is that in time hydrogen is likely to play a role in the energy system; however, hydrogen is not yet competitive for most applications when compared to the cost of energy from petroleum and natural gas.

  16. Effect of hydrogen and oxygen content on the embrittlement of Zr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griger, A.; Hozer, Z.; Matus, L.; Vasaros, L.; Horvath, M.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental study is carried out in the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute in order to clear up the role of oxidation and hydrogen uptake in the embrittlement process. Russian E110 type Zr1%Nb and Zircaloy-4 claddings are used as test materials. The differences between the properties of two alloys are examined. The sample preparation covered the following cases: oxidation in Ar+O 2 atmosphere; hydrogen uptake of as received and pre-oxidised samples (in Ar+O 2 atmosphere); oxidation in steam. The oxidation in Ar+O 2 and the subsequent hydrogen uptake procedure make possible the production of samples with well-characterized hydrogen and oxygen content. Corrosion treated ring samples of 8 mm height are examined in ring compression tests. The force-deformation curves are recorded and the crushing force and deformation are determined. The relative deformation is used for the characterisation of embrittlement level. The results of experiments provide detailed information about the effect of hydrogen and oxygen content on the embrittlement of zirconium alloys. The conclusions are: 1) hydrogen seems to play a more important role in the embrittlement of zirconium alloys than oxygen; 2) the Zircaloy-4 alloy becomes brittle at lower hydrogen content than the Zr1%Nb; 3) under steam oxidation conditions the Zr1%Nb alloy takes up much more hydrogen and becomes more brittle than the Zircaloy-4

  17. Hot vacuum outgassing to ensure low hydrogen content in MOX fuel pellets for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Nair, M.R.; Kumar, Arun

    1983-01-01

    Hot vacuum outgassing treatment to ensure low hydrogen content in Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) pellets for thermal reactors has been described. Hypostoichiometric sintered MOX pellets retain more hydrogen than UO 2 pellets. The hydrogen content further increases with the addition of admixed lubricant and pore formers. However, low hydrogen content in the MOX pellets can be ensured by a hot vacuum outgassing treatment at a temperature between 773K to 823K for 2 hrs. (author)

  18. Determination of hydrogen content by neutron techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J.R.; Granada, J.R.; Mayer, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    The commonly available techniques for the determination of hydrogen dissolved in solids are usually destructive from the point of view of the sample. A new, nondestructive method for this kind of measurements has been developed at our laboratory, with the requirement of improved sensitivity for massive samples. This scattering method is based on the use of epithermal neutrons, and has been implemented through the design and construction of a spectrometer dedicated to that task. In addition, the traditional transmission method has been employed to determine hydrogen content in metals, using the full sub thermal and thermal neutron energy ranges. A pulsed neutron source based on an electron LINAC is employed, together with time-of-flight techniques. In this work we will present some results illustrative of the sensitivity achieved by these neutron techniques in different systems and for a wide range of hydrogen concentrations. (author) [es

  19. Changes in Hydrogen Content During Steelmaking

    OpenAIRE

    Vrbek K.; Lamut J.; Marolt M.; Knap M.

    2015-01-01

    Štore Steel produces steel grades for spring, forging and engineering industry applications. Steelmaking technology consists of scrap melting in Electric Arc Furnace (EAF), secondary metallurgy in Ladle Furnace (LF) and continuous casting of billets (CC). Hydrogen content during steelmaking of various steel grades and steelmaking technologies was measured. Samples of steel melt from EAF, LF and CC were collected and investigated. Sampling from Electric Arc Furnace and Ladle Furnace was carrie...

  20. Determination of hydrogen content of petroleum products from Tema Oil Refinery using neutron backscatter technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salifu, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen content of hydrocarbon materials is very important in several areas of industrial process such as mining, vegetable oil extraction and crude oil exploration and refining. A fast and more universal technique based on thermal neutron reflection was employed to determine the total hydrogen contents of petroleum samples from Tema Oil Refinery (TOR) and Crude oil samples from Jubilee field and Nigeria. The experimental set-up consisted of a source-holder housing a 1Ci Am-Be neutron source and a He-3 neutron detector. Two geometrical arrangements were considered and their sensitivities were compared. The set-up was used to measure the excess neutron count in both geometrical considerations and their reflection parameters were calculated as a function of hydrogen content of the samples. Calibration lines were deduced using liquid hydrocarbons containing well-known hydrogen and carbon contents as standards. Two linear equations were generated from the calibration lines and were used to further determine the hydrogen content of thirteen (13) petroleum samples obtained from Quality Control Department of TOR. The total hydrogen contents were found to be in the range of 7.211(hw %) - 15.069 (hw %) for vertical geometry and 7.206 (hw %) - 14.948 (hw %) for horizontal geometry respectively. The results obtained agreed constructively with other results obtained using different methodologies by other studies. The percentage error of the hydrogen contents denoted by (% E) for the various petroleum samples were also obtained and noticed to be within an acceptable range. The neutron backscatter technique was observed as an alternative and more generalized method for quality assurance and standardization in the petroleum industries

  1. The study of microplasticity mechanism in Ti-50 wt.%Nb alloy with high hydrogen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovin, I.S.; Kollerov, M.U.; Schinaeva, E.V.

    1996-01-01

    The upper yield point (∼ 700 MPa) appears at the compression test curves (ε=0.024 sec -1 ) of b.c.c. Nb-50 wt.%Ti due to the increase of hydrogen content from 0 to 0.2 wt.% and more and leads to the non monotonous increase in compressive lower yield stress from 400 to 550 MPa. Taking into account close connection between macro- and microplasticity of metallic materials the low frequency (∼ 2 Hz) amplitude dependent internal friction (ADIF) spectrum (γ = 1. 60.10 -5 ) in hydrogenized Nb-50 wt.% Ti and Nb samples are studied. The ADIF investigation of the closed hysteresis loop ''loading-unloading'' shows the dependence of its width from the hydrogen content which evidences the fact of dislocation unpinning from hydrogen atmospheres in the 1/2 cycle of loading. The study of ADIF spectrum for samples with different hydrogen content before and after torsion deformation (γ ∼ 2%) shows the sharp increase of IF level at γ = 1. 10.10 -5 after ∼1 hour of natural ageing. At that time the ADIF curves change its shape from Γ-shape to U-shape. The amplitude range of the IF increase depends on the hydrogen content. It is the interaction of hydrogen atoms with dislocations that caused the above mentioned effect which has not been observed in hydrogen free samples. The time estimation for the formation of thermodynamically stable hydrogen atmospheres on dislocations shows that hydrogen atmospheres could not follow the dislocation during compressive tests and that leads to the upper yield point appearance. (orig.)

  2. Determination of Hydrogen and Carbon contents in crude oil and Petroleum fractions by NMR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadim, Mohammad A.; Wolny, R.A.; Al-Dhuwaihi, Abdullah S.; Al-Hajri, E.A.; Al-Ghamdi, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Proton and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopic methods were developed for determining hydrogen and carbon contents in petroleum products. These methods are applicable to a wide of petroleum streams. A new reference standard, bis (trimethylsilyl) methane, BTMSM, is introduced fro both proton and carbon-13 NMR for the first time, which offers several advantages over those customarily employed. These methods are important for the calculation of the mass balance and hydrogen consumption in pilot plant studies. Unlike the ASTM D-5291 combustion method, the NMR methods also allow for the measurement of hydrogen and carbon content in low boiling fractions and those containing hydrogen as low as 1%. The NMR methods can also determine aromatic and aliphatic hydrogens carbons in a given sample without additional experimentation. The precision and accuracy of the newly developed NMR methods are compared with those of currently employed ASTM D-5291 combustion method. Using the proton NMR method, hydrogen content was determined in fifteen model compounds and sixty-eight petroleum fractions. The NMR and ASTM methods show an agreement within +5%for 48 out of a total number of 68 oil fractions. Using carbon-13 NMR, the carbon content was determined for four representative compounds and three fractions of crude oil. Both carbon-13 NMR and ASTM methods give comparable carbon content in model compounds and crude oil fractions. (author)

  3. Confident methods for the evaluation of the hydrogen content in nanoporous carbon microfibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culebras, Mario; Madroñero, Antonio; Cantarero, Andres; Amo, José Maria; Domingo, Concepción; López, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    Nanoporous carbon microfibers were grown by chemical vapor deposition in the vapor-liquid solid mode using different fluid hydrocarbons as precursors in different proportions. The as-grown samples were further treated in argon and hydrogen atmospheres at different pressure conditions and annealed at several temperatures in order to deduce the best conditions for the incorporation and re-incorporation of hydrogen into the microfibers through the nanopores. Since there are some discrepancies in the results on the hydrogen content obtained under vacuum conditions, in this work, we have measured the hydrogen content in the microfibers using several analytical methods in ambient conditions: surface tension, mass density, and Raman measurements. A discussion on the validity of the results obtained through the correlation between them is the purpose of the present work.

  4. Influence of hydrogen content on impact toughness of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R.N., E-mail: rnsingh@barc.gov.in [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Viswanathan, U.K.; Kumar, Sunil; Satheesh, P.M.; Anantharaman, S. [Post Irradiation Examination Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chakravartty, J.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Stahle, P. [Division of Solid Mechanics, Lund University/LTH, SE22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > For the first time impact behaviour of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material used in Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) as a function of hydrogen content and temperature is being reported. > The critical hydrogen concentration to cause low energy fracture at 25 and 200 deg. C is suggested. > The impact behaviour is rationalized in terms of hydrogen content, test temperature, microstructural features and state of stress ahead of a crack. - Abstract: Influence of hydrogen content on the impact toughness of Zr-2.5% Nb alloy was examined by carrying out instrumented drop weight tests in the temperature range of 25-250 deg. C using curved Charpy specimens fabricated from unirradiated pressure tubes of Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR). Hydrogen content of the samples was between 10 and 170 ppm by weight (wppm). Sharp ductile-to-brittle-transition behaviour was demonstrated by hydrided materials. The temperature for the onset of transition increased with the increase in the hydrogen content of the specimens. The fracture surfaces of unhydrided specimen exhibited ductile fracture caused by micro void coalescence and tear ridges at lower temperatures and by fibrous fracture at intermediate and at higher temperatures. Except for the samples tested at the upper shelf energy levels, the fracture surfaces of all hydrided samples were suggestive of hydride assisted failure. In most cases the transverse cracks observed in the fracture path matched well with the hydride precipitate distribution and orientation.

  5. Liquid alternative diesel fuels with high hydrogen content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancsok, Jenoe; Varga, Zoltan; Eller, Zoltan; Poelczmann, Gyoergy [Pannonia Univ., Veszprem (Hungary). MOL Dept. of Hydrocarbon Processing; Kasza, Tamas [MOL Hungarian Oil and Gas Plc., Szazhalombatta (Hungary)

    2013-06-01

    Mobility is a keystone of the sustainable development. In the operation of the vehicles as the tools of mobility internal combustion engines, so thus Diesel engines will play a remarkable role in the next decades. Beside fossil fuels - used for power these engines - liquid alternative fuels have higher and higher importance, because of their known advantages. During the presentation the categorization possibilities based on the chronology of their development and application will be presented. The importance of fuels with high hydrogen content will be reviewed. Research and development activity in the field of such kind of fuels will be presented. During this developed catalytic systems and main performance properties of the product will be presented which were obtained in case of biogasoils produced by special hydrocracking of natural triglycerides and in case of necessity followed by isomerization; furthermore in case of synthetic biogasoils obtained by the isomerization hydrocracking of Fischer-Tropsch paraffins produced from biomass based synthesis gas. Excellent combustion properties (cetane number > 65-75), good cold flow properties and reduced harmful material emission due to the high hydrogen content (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2}) are highlighted. Finally production possibilities of linear and branched paraffins based on lignocelluloses are briefly reviewed. Summarizing it was concluded that liquid hydrocarbons with high isoparaffin content are the most suitable fuels regarding availability, economical and environmental aspects, namely the sustainable development. (orig.)

  6. Canadian hydrogen safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacIntyre, I.; Tchouvelev, A.V.; Hay, D.R.; Wong, J.; Grant, J.; Benard, P.

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian hydrogen safety program (CHSP) is a project initiative of the Codes and Standards Working Group of the Canadian transportation fuel cell alliance (CTFCA) that represents industry, academia, government, and regulators. The Program rationale, structure and contents contribute to acceptance of the products, services and systems of the Canadian Hydrogen Industry into the Canadian hydrogen stakeholder community. It facilitates trade through fair insurance policies and rates, effective and efficient regulatory approval procedures and accommodation of the interests of the general public. The Program integrates a consistent quantitative risk assessment methodology with experimental (destructive and non-destructive) failure rates and consequence-of-release data for key hydrogen components and systems into risk assessment of commercial application scenarios. Its current and past six projects include Intelligent Virtual Hydrogen Filling Station (IVHFS), Hydrogen clearance distances, comparative quantitative risk comparison of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) refuelling options; computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling validation, calibration and enhancement; enhancement of frequency and probability analysis, and Consequence analysis of key component failures of hydrogen systems; and fuel cell oxidant outlet hydrogen sensor project. The Program projects are tightly linked with the content of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 19 Hydrogen Safety. (author)

  7. Evaluation of the plasma hydrogen isotope content by residual gas analysis at JET and AUG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenik, A.; Alegre, D.; Brezinsek, S.; De Castro, A.; Kruezi, U.; Oberkofler, M.; Panjan, M.; Primc, G.; Reichbauer, T.; Resnik, M.; Rohde, V.; Seibt, M.; Schneider, P. A.; Wauters, T.; Zaplotnik, R.; ASDEX-Upgrade, the; EUROfusion MST1 Teams; contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    The isotope content of the plasma reflects on the dynamics of isotope changeover experiments, efficiency of wall conditioning and the performance of a fusion device in the active phase of operation. The assessment of the isotope ratio of hydrogen and methane molecules is used as a novel method of assessing the plasma isotope ratios at JET and ASDEX-Upgrade (AUG). The isotope ratios of both molecules in general shows similar trends as the isotope ratio detected by other diagnostics. At JET, the absolute values of RGA signals are in relatively good agreement with each other and with spectroscopy data, while at AUG the deviation from neutral particle analyser data are larger, and the results show a consistent spatial distribution of the isotope ratio. It is further shown that the isotope ratio of the hydrogen molecule can be used to study the degree of dissociation of the injected gas during changeover experiments.

  8. Hydrogen content and density in nanocrystalline carbon films of a predominant diamond character

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, A.; Heiman, A.; Akhvlediani, R.; Lakin, E.; Zolotoyabko, E.; Cyterman, C.

    2003-01-01

    Nanocrystalline carbon films possessing a prevailing diamond or graphite character, depending on substrate temperature, can be deposited from a methane hydrogen mixture by the direct current glow discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition method. While at a temperature of ∼880 deg. C, following the formation of a thin precursor graphitic film, diamond nucleation occurs and a nanodiamond film grows, at higher and lower deposition temperatures the films maintain their graphitic character. In this study the hydrogen content, density and nanocrystalline phase composition of films deposited at various temperatures are investigated. We aim to elucidate the role of hydrogen in nanocrystalline films with a predominant diamond character. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed a considerable increase of the hydrogen concentration in the films that accompanies the growth of nanodiamond. It correlates with near edge x-ray adsorption spectroscopy measurements, that showed an appearance of spectroscopic features associated with the diamond structure, and with a substantial increase of the film density detected by x-ray reflectivity. Electron energy loss spectroscopy showed that nanocrystalline diamond films can be deposited from a CH 4 /H 2 mixture with hydrogen concentration in the 80%-95% range. For a deposition temperature of 880 deg. C, the highest diamond character of the films was found for a hydrogen concentration of 91% of H 2 . The deposition temperature plays an important role in diamond formation, strongly influencing the content of adsorbed hydrogen with an optimum at 880 deg. C. It is suggested that diamond nucleation and growth of the nanodiamond phase is driven by densification of the deposited graphitic films which results in high local compressive stresses. Nanodiamond formation is accompanied by an increase of hydrogen concentration in the films. It is suggested that hydrogen retention is critical for stabilization of nanodiamond crystallites. At lower

  9. Investigate of analysis for hydrogen contents in carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Haruyuki; Hirose, Yukio; Sasaki, Toshihiko; Awazu, Kaoru; Naramoto, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very common contaminant in carbon films. It can strongly influences on mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the films. The analysis of hydrogen is therefore a crucial problem to prepare the films with the reproducible property. We were measured two kinds of methods. Ion beam techniques using nuclear reactions are established methods for the quantitative determination of hydrogen concentration. A spectrometer has been constructed for the determination of hydrogen concentrations by detecting 4.43 MeV γ-rays from the resonant nuclear reactions 1 H( 15 N, α γ) 12 C at the 6.385 MeV. And the other measurement of hydrogen is GDOES (Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy), with its high sputtering rates, had been used previously for depth profiling analysis of thin films. The depth profiling analysis was carried out at an argon atmosphere by applying an RF of 13.56 MHz. The sampling time interval was 0.1 sec. The detailed hydrogen analysis was made on BCN (Boron Carbonitride) and DLC (Diamond-like Carbon) thin films. The BCN films were prepared by ion beam assisted deposition, in which boron and carbon were deposited by electron beam heating of B 4 C solid and nitrogen was supplied by implantation simultaneously. The DLC films were prepared by HPPC (Hybrid-pulse plasma coating) system. It was a new coating system that we developed which consists fundamentally of plasma CVD (chemical vapor deposition) and ion-mixing. In this paper, we reported the comparison of analysis for hydrogen contents between RNRA and GDOES. (author)

  10. Investigate of analysis for hydrogen contents in carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Haruyuki; Hirose, Yukio; Sasaki, Toshihiko [Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Awazu, Kaoru [Industrial Research Institute of Ishikawa, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Naramoto, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    Hydrogen is a very common contaminant in carbon films. It can strongly influences on mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the films. The analysis of hydrogen is therefore a crucial problem to prepare the films with the reproducible property. We were measured two kinds of methods. Ion beam techniques using nuclear reactions are established methods for the quantitative determination of hydrogen concentration. A spectrometer has been constructed for the determination of hydrogen concentrations by detecting 4.43 MeV {gamma}-rays from the resonant nuclear reactions {sup 1}H({sup 15}N, {alpha} {gamma}){sup 12}C at the 6.385 MeV. And the other measurement of hydrogen is GDOES (Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy), with its high sputtering rates, had been used previously for depth profiling analysis of thin films. The depth profiling analysis was carried out at an argon atmosphere by applying an RF of 13.56 MHz. The sampling time interval was 0.1 sec. The detailed hydrogen analysis was made on BCN (Boron Carbonitride) and DLC (Diamond-like Carbon) thin films. The BCN films were prepared by ion beam assisted deposition, in which boron and carbon were deposited by electron beam heating of B{sub 4}C solid and nitrogen was supplied by implantation simultaneously. The DLC films were prepared by HPPC (Hybrid-pulse plasma coating) system. It was a new coating system that we developed which consists fundamentally of plasma CVD (chemical vapor deposition) and ion-mixing. In this paper, we reported the comparison of analysis for hydrogen contents between RNRA and GDOES. (author)

  11. Hydrogen content in Zircaloy-IV by neutron emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granada, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using thermal neutron transmission techniques to determine the initial hydrogen content in Zry-IV is discussed in this work. The usual conditions of very low H concentration (∼ 10-20 ppm in weight) in the alloy, require a high degree of accuracy in the relevant cross sections in order to obtain reliable values of that concentration from the measured transmission spectra. Total cross sections corresponding to the metallic alloy and to hydrogen in that matrix were evaluated using interaction models developed in this Laboratory, for neutrons covering the range from subthermal up to epithermal energies. The sensitivity of this method as a function of neutron energy is discussed, and an optimized and self consistent procedure for data analysis after a transmission experiment is proposed. (Author) [es

  12. Analysis of total hydrogen content in palm oil and palm kernel oil using thermal neutron moderation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaho, E.H.K.; Dagadu, C.P.K.; Maaku, B.T.; Anim-Sampong, S.; Kyere, A.W.K.; Jonah, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    A fast and non-destructive technique based on thermal neutron moderation has been used for determining the total hydrogen content in two types of red palm oil (dzomi and amidze) and palm kernel oil produced by traditional methods in Ghana. An equipment consisting of an 241 Am-Be neutron source and 3 He neutron detector was used in the investigation. The equipment was originally designed for detection of liquid levels in petrochemical and other process industries. Standards in the form of liquid hydrocarbons were used to obtain calibration lines for thermal neutron reflection parameter as a function of hydrogen content. Measured reflection parameters with respective hydrogen content with or without heat treatment of the three edible palm oils available on the market were compared with a brand cooking oil (frytol). The average total hydrogen content in the local oil samples prior to heating was measured to be 11.62 w% which compared well with acceptable value of 12 w% for palm oils in the sub-region. After heat treatment, the frytol oil (produced through bleaching process) had the least loss of hydrogen content of 0.26% in comparison with palm kernel oil of 0.44% followed by dzomi of 1.96% and by amidze of 3.22%. (author)

  13. Influence of the P content on the transport parameters of hydrogen in Fe alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peñalva, I., E-mail: igor.penalva@ehu.es [University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Department of Nuclear Engineering & Fluid Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering, Alda. Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Alberro, G.; Legarda, F. [University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Department of Nuclear Engineering & Fluid Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering, Alda. Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Ortiz, C.J.; Vila, R. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Gas permeation technique was used to study hydrogen diffusive transport parameters. • Four Fe alloys were analyzed to study the influence of the P content. • Increase in the P content leads to smaller values of permeability and diffusivity. • Trapping effects were observed at temperatures below 473 K for alloys containing P. - Abstract: In this work, the hydrogen transport parameters of permeability (ϕ), diffusivity (D) and Sieverts’ constant (K{sub S}) were experimentally measured in four Fe alloys supplied by the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA), by means of the gas evolution permeation technique. The samples had controlled chemical alloying element contents and microstructure. The experimental temperature range explored was from 423 K to 823 K and the high purity hydrogen loading pressures from 10{sup 3} Pa to 1.5·10{sup 5} Pa. The main objective of this work was to determine the influence of the P content of the alloy in the transport parameters of hydrogen. Two of the samples, pure Fe and FeC, contained negligible quantities of P (less than 5 ppm in weight), whereas the other two, FeP and FeCP, had the same metallurgical composition as their corresponding pair, with the only difference in the phosphorus content (89 ppm in weight and 88 ppm in weight, respectively). The experimental permeation results were analyzed using a non-linear least square fitting. The final resulting values of the aforementioned transport parameters were paired off in order to determine the effect of the P content: pure Fe versus FeP and FeC versus FeCP. We observed that the permeability obtained for all the samples follows an Arrhenius law in each case. In general terms, the increase of the P content in the alloy leads to smaller values of the permeability showing a decrease in the permeation activation energy. Regarding diffusivity and Sieverts’ constant, trapping effects have been observed for the alloys containing P. This phenomenon was

  14. Dependence of RF power on the content and configuration of hydrogen in amorphous hydrogenated silicon by reactive sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imura, T; Ushita, K; Mogi, K; Hiraki, A [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1981-06-01

    Infrared absorption spectra at stretching bands of Si-H were investigated in hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by reactive sputtering in the atmosphere of Ar and H/sub 2/ (10 mole%) at various input rf powers in the range from 0.8 to 3.8 W/cm/sup 2/. Hydrogen content mainly due to the configuration of Si=H/sub 2/ in the film increased with the decreasing rf power, as the deposition rate was decreased. On the other hand, the quantity of the monohydride (Si-H) configuration depended less on the power. Attachment of hydrogen molecules onto the fresh and reactive surface of silicon deposited successively was proposed for possible process of hydrogen incusion into amorphous silicon resulting in Si=H/sub 2/ configuration. The photoconductivity increased as the input power became higher, when the deposition rate also increased linearly with the power.

  15. Production of JET fuel containing molecules of high hydrogen content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasek Sz.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The harmful effects of aviation can only be reduced by using alternative fuels with excellent burning properties and a high hydrogen content in the constituent molecules. Due to increasing plastic consumption the amount of the plastic waste is also higher. Despite the fact that landfill plastic waste has been steadily reduced, the present scenario is not satisfactory. Therefore, the aim of this study is to produce JET fuel containing an alternative component made from straight-run kerosene and the waste polyethylene cracking fraction. We carried out our experiments on a commercial NiMo/Al2O3/P catalyst at the following process parameters: T=200-300°C, P=40 bar, LHSV=1.0-3.0 h-1, hydrogen/hydrocarbon ratio= 400 Nm3/m3. We investigated the effects of the feedstocks and the process parameters on the product yields, the hydrodesulfurization and hydrodearomatization efficiencies, and the main product properties. The liquid product yields varied between 99.7-99.8%. As a result of the hydrogenation the sulfur (1-1780 mg/kg and the aromatic contents (9.0-20.5% of the obtained products and the values of their smoke points (26.0-34.7 mm fulfilled the requirements of JET fuel standard. Additionally, the concentration of paraffins increased in the products and the burning properties were also improved. The freezing points of the products were higher than -47°C, therefore product blending is needed.

  16. Degradation of the ethyl glucuronide content in hair by hydrogen peroxide and a non-destructive assay for oxidative hair treatment using infra-red spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Dominic; Becker, Roland; Kohl, Anka; Hänisch, Jessica; Nehls, Irene

    2014-11-01

    The assessment of quantification results of the alcohol abuse marker ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in hair in comparison to the cut-off values for the drinking behavior may be complicated by cosmetic hair bleaching. Thus, the impact of increasing exposure to hydrogen peroxide on the EtG content of hair was investigated. Simultaneously, the change of absorbance in the range of 1000-1100 cm(-1) indicative for the oxidation of cystine was investigated non-destructively by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) using pulverized portions of the respective hair samples. Hair samples treated with hydrogen peroxide consistently displayed a significantly increased absorbance at 1040 cm(-1) associated with the formation of cysteic acid. The EtG content decreased significantly if the hair was treated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide as during cosmetic bleaching. It could be shown that ATR-FTIR is capable of detecting an exposure to hydrogen peroxide when still no brightening was visible and already before the EtG content deteriorated significantly. Thus, hair samples suspected of having been exposed to oxidative treatment may be checked non-destructively by a readily available technique. This assay is also possible retrospectively after EtG extraction and using archived samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Study on Methodology of Assessment for Hydrogen Explosion in Hydrogen Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Gun Hyo

    2007-02-01

    Due to the exhaustion of fossil fuel as energy sources and international situation insecurity for political factor, unstability of world energy market is rising, consequently, a substitute energy development have been required. Among substitute energy to be discussed, producing hydrogen from water by nuclear energy which does not release carbon is a very promising technology. Very high temperature gas cooled reactor is expected to be utilized since the procedure of producing hydrogen requires high temperature over 1000 .deg. C. Hydrogen production facility using very high temperature gas cooled reactor lies in situation of high temperature and corrosion which makes hydrogen release easily. In case of hydrogen release, there lies a danger of explosion. Moreover explosion not only has a bad influence upon facility itself but very high temperature gas cooled reactor which also result in unsafe situation that might cause serious damage. However, from point of thermal-hydraulics view, long distance makes low efficiency result. In this study, therefore, outlines of hydrogen production using nuclear energy is researched. Several methods for analyzing the effects of hydrogen explosion upon high temperature gas cooled reactor are reviewed. Reliability physics model which is appropriate for assessment is used. Using this model, leakage probability, rupture probability and structure failure probability of very high temperature gas cooled reactor is evaluated classified by detonation volume and distance. Also based on standard safety criteria which is a value of 1x10 -6 , the safety distance between very high temperature and hydrogen production facility is calculated. In the future, assessment for characteristic of very high temperature gas cooled reactor, capacity to resist pressure from outside hydrogen explosion and overpressure for large amount of detonation volume in detail is expected to identify more precise distance using reliability physics model in this paper. This

  18. FY 1974 report on the results of the Sunshine Project. Technology assessment of hydrogen energy technology; 1974 nendo suiso energy gijutsu no technology assessment seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-04-30

    This is aimed at studying the relation between the technology development of hydrogen energy and the society. In Chapter 1, a meaning of technology assessment was examined. When applying it to the hydrogen energy technology, the paper presented what content it has. In Chapter 2, the needs for hydrogen energy in society were made clear in comparison with the energy supply/demand structure in Japan and characteristics of hydrogen energy. In Chapter 3, the paper showed what kinds of technology are being developed to meet the needs in this society and arranged viewpoints for evaluating the effectiveness of the technology. In Chapter 4, the paper studied the positioning of hydrogen energy technology in the future society, and presented as examples more than one hydrogen energy/system plans which become the base to describe the impact of the technology on the society. If taking technology assessment as a part of the communication activities between the technology development and the society as did in this study, these system plans are something like the ring for people in each field to talk with. In Chapter 5, the study made from each aspect was arranged. (NEDO)

  19. Analysis of hydrogen content and distribution in hydrogen storage alloys using neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Hiroki; Hatakeyama, Keisuke; Satake, Yuichi; Esaka, Takao; Fujine, Shigenori; Yoneda, Kenji; Kanda, Keiji

    2000-01-01

    Small amounts of hydrogen in hydrogen storage alloys, such as Mg 2 Ni, were detected using neutron radiography (NRG). Hydrogen concentrations in a hydrogenated solid solution were determined by this technique. Furthermore, we were able to obtain NRG images for an initial stage of hydrogen absorption in the hydrogen storage alloys. NRG would be a new measurement method to clarify the behavior of hydrogen in hydrogen storage alloys. (author)

  20. Robust, Reliable Low Emission Gas Turbine Combustion of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, Margaret Stacy [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Im, Hong Geum [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-12-16

    The effects of high hydrogen content fuels were studied using experimental, computational and theoretical approaches to understand the effects of mixture and state conditions on the ignition behavior of the fuels. A rapid compression facility (RCF) was used to measure the ignition delay time of hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures. The data were combined with results of previous studies to develop ignition regime criteria. Analytical theory and direct numerical simulation were used to validate and interpret the RCF ignition data. Based on the integrated information the ignition regime criteria were extended to non-dimensional metrics which enable application of the results to practical gas turbine combustion systems.

  1. An assessment of the waterside corrosion and hydrogen pick-up in the zircaloy-2 pressure tubes of PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, D.N.

    1992-01-01

    In view of the deleterious effect of hydriding on the operating life of zircaloy-2 pressure tubes in PHWRs there is an urgent need for the assessment of the status of the pressure tubes with respect to corrosion and hydrogen pick-up in the operating PHWRs. A model has been developed for analysing the waterside corrosion and hydrogen pick-up in the zircaloy-2 pressure tubes under reactor operating conditions. This model predicts the axial profiles of oxide layer thickness and hydrogen pick-up in the pressure tubes as a function of the operating time of the reactor. The prediction of hydrogen pick-up by the model in the F-10 pressure tube of RAPS-I have been found to be in good agreement with the measured value of hydrogen content. This report gives a brief description of the model and its predictions on the present status of hydrogen pick-up in the pressure tubes of lead reactor RAPS-II. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Effect of high hydrogen content on metallurgical and mechanical properties of zirconium alloy claddings after heat-treatment at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turque, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Under hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident conditions, fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys can be exposed to steam at high temperature (HT, up 1200 C) before being cooled and then quenched in water. In some conditions, after burst occurrence the cladding can rapidly absorb a significant amount of hydrogen (secondary hydriding), up to 3000 wt.ppm locally, during steam exposition at HT. The study deals with the effect, poorly studied up to date, of high contents of hydrogen on the metallurgical and mechanical properties of two zirconium alloys, Zircaloy-4 and M5, during and after cooling from high temperatures, at which zirconium is in its β phase. A specific facility was developed to homogeneously charge in hydrogen up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm cladding tube samples of several centimeters in length. Phase transformations, chemical element partitioning and hydrogen precipitation during cooling from the β temperature domain of zirconium were studied by using several techniques, for the materials containing up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm of hydrogen in average: in-situ neutron diffraction upon cooling from 700 C, X-ray diffraction, μ-ERDA, EPMA and electron microscopy in particular. The results were compared to thermodynamic predictions. In order to study the effect of high hydrogen contents on the mechanical behavior of the (prior-)μ phase of zirconium, axial tensile tests were performed at various temperatures between 20 and 700 C upon cooling from the β temperature domain, on samples with mean hydrogen contents up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm. The results show that metallurgical and mechanical properties of the (prior-)β phase of zirconium alloys strongly depend on temperature and hydrogen content. (author) [fr

  3. Performance and emission comparison of a supercharged dual-fuel engine fueled by producer gases with varying hydrogen content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohon Roy, Murari [Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology (JSPS Research Fellow, Okayama University), Tsushima-Naka 3, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Okayama University, Tsushima-Naka 3, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Tomita, Eiji; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Harada, Yuji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Okayama University, Tsushima-Naka 3, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakane, Atsushi (Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., 6-4 Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo)

    2009-09-15

    This study investigated the effect of hydrogen content in producer gas on the performance and exhaust emissions of a supercharged producer gas-diesel dual-fuel engine. Two types of producer gases were used in this study, one with low hydrogen content (H{sub 2} = 13.7%) and the other with high hydrogen content (H{sub 2} = 20%). The engine was tested for use as a co-generation engine, so power output while maintaining a reasonable thermal efficiency was important. Experiments were carried out at a constant injection pressure and injection quantity for different fuel-air equivalence ratios and at various injection timings. The experimental strategy was to optimize the injection timing to maximize engine power at different fuel-air equivalence ratios without knocking and within the limit of the maximum cylinder pressure. Two-stage combustion was obtained; this is an indicator of maximum power output conditions and a precursor of knocking combustion. Better combustion, engine performance, and exhaust emissions (except NO{sub x}) were obtained with the high H{sub 2}-content producer gas than with the low H{sub 2}-content producer gas, especially under leaner conditions. Moreover, a broader window of fuel-air equivalence ratio was found with highest thermal efficiencies for the high H{sub 2}-content producer gas. (author)

  4. Economic assessment of a waste hydrogen utilization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, H.; Wang, L.; Zhou, W.; Wu, J.; Wang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    This article reports an economic assessment on a hydride hydrogen recovery, purification, storage, transportation and application project (HRPSTA) set for a system including a nitrogenous fertilizer plant and a float glass factory. In this project, a pretreatment unit and metal hydride containers are used to recover and purify the hydrogen from the purge gas of the ammonia fertilizer plant and to transport and use the hydrogen in the tin bath in the float glass factory. Detailed economic assessment, cost analysis and a cash flow statement are presented, and financial net present value (NPV), as well as intrinsic rate of return (IRR), is calculated. The results shows that this project, which is feasible technologically, is profitable economically. (Author)

  5. Analysis of total hydrogen content in palm oil and palm kernel oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fast and non-destructive technique based on thermal neutron moderation has been used for determining the total hydrogen content in two types of red palm oil (dzomi and amidze) and palm kernel oil produced by traditio-nal methods in Ghana. An equipment consisting of an 241Am-Be neutron source and 3He neutron ...

  6. Determination of the hydrogen content of oil samples from Nigeria using an Am-Be neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, S.A.; Elegba, S.B.; Zakari, I.I.

    1998-01-01

    A 5 Ci Am-Be neutron source-based facility, which utilises the principles of thermal neutron reflection technique in combination with foil activation method, has been used to determine the total hydrogen content of commercial oil samples from Nigeria. With an established detection limit of 0.25 H w% for oil matrix of volume 600-ml, the total hydrogen contents of the samples were found to be in the range of 11.11-14.22 H w%. The facility is economical and suitable for the determination of moisture in solid samples. A brief description of the ongoing projects and future plans concerning the CRP are enumerated. (author)

  7. Safety assessment of envisaged systems for automotive hydrogen supply and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landucci, Gabriele [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Chimica Industriale e Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Pisa, via Diotisalvi n.2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Tugnoli, Alessandro; Cozzani, Valerio [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Mineraria e delle Tecnologie Ambientali, Alma Mater Studiorum - Universita di Bologna, via Terracini n.28, 40131 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    A novel consequence-based approach was applied to the inherent safety assessment of the envisaged hydrogen production, distribution and utilization systems, in the perspective of the widespread hydrogen utilization as a vehicle fuel. Alternative scenarios were assessed for the hydrogen system chain from large scale production to final utilization. Hydrogen transportation and delivery was included in the analysis. The inherent safety fingerprint of each system was quantified by a set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). Rules for KPIs aggregation were considered for the overall assessment of the system chains. The final utilization stage resulted by large the more important for the overall expected safety performance of the system. Thus, comparison was carried out with technologies proposed for the use of other low emission fuels, as LPG and natural gas. The hazards of compressed hydrogen-fueled vehicles resulted comparable, while reference innovative hydrogen technologies evidenced a potentially higher safety performance. Thus, switching to the inherently safer technologies currently under development may play an important role in the safety enhancement of hydrogen vehicles, resulting in a relevant improvement of the overall safety performance of the entire hydrogen system. (author)

  8. Determination of contents of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate in solutions for alkaline leading of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radil, V.

    1988-01-01

    The new analytical method is based on the determination of the molar ratio carbonate - hydrogen carbonate using the measured concentration of hydrogen ions, the determination of the dissociation constant of carbonic acid for different values of ionic strength. The concentration of hydrogen ions was measured with a Metrohm 632 pH meter with the use of a combined glass electrode. The content of total carbonate carbon was determined coulometrically and the uranium content was determined by extraction with tributyl phosphate and by spectrometry of the complex of uranyl ions with Arsenazo III. Model solutions were used for the experiments which contained a high concentration of sulfate ions, thiosulfate ions, uranium and various proportions of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate. The composition of the individual samples of the extraction solutions are tabulated. The calibration was made of the glass combined electrode at different ionic strength, the values determined of dissociation constants of carbonic acid for different ionic strength. The mathematical procedure is described for the calculation of molar concentrations of carbonate and hudrogen carbonate and the results are presented of the analysis of model solutions. (E.S.). 5 tabs., 1 fig., 5 refs

  9. Influence of hydrogen content on fracture toughness of CWSR Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. N.; Bind, A. K.; Srinivasan, N. S.; Ståhle, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, influence of hydrogen and temperature on the fracture toughness parameters of unirradiated, cold worked and stress relieved (CWSR) Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube alloys used in Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor is reported. The fracture toughness tests were carried out using 17 mm width curved compact tension specimens machined from gaseously hydrogen charged tube-sections. Metallography of the samples revealed that hydrides were predominantly oriented along axial-circumferential plane of the tube. Fracture toughness tests were carried out in the temperature range of 30-300 °C as per ASTM standard E-1820-06, with the crack length measured using direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique. The fracture toughness parameters (JQ, JMax and dJ/da), were determined. The critical crack length (CCL) for catastrophic failure was determined using a numerical method. It was observed that for a given test temperature, the fracture toughness parameters representing crack initiation (JQ) and crack propagation (JMax, and dJ/da) is practically unaffected by hydrogen content. Also, for given hydrogen content, all the aforementioned fracture toughness parameters increased with temperature to a saturation value.

  10. The US Department of Energy hydrogen baseline survey: assessing knowledge and opinions about hydrogen technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christy Cooper; Tykey Truett; R L Schmoyer

    2006-01-01

    To design and maintain its education program, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program conducted a statistically-valid national survey to measure knowledge and opinions of hydrogen among key target audiences. The Hydrogen Baseline Knowledge Survey provides a reference for designing the DOE hydrogen education strategy and will be used in comparisons with future surveys to measure changes in knowledge and opinions over time. The survey sampled four U.S. populations: (1) public; (2) students; (3) state and local government officials; and (4) potential large-scale hydrogen end-users in three business categories. Questions measured technical understanding of hydrogen and opinions about hydrogen safety. Other questions assessed visions of the likelihood of future hydrogen applications and sources of energy information. Several important findings were discovered, including a striking lack of technical understanding across all survey groups, as well as a strong correlation between technical knowledge and opinions about safety: those who demonstrated an understanding of hydrogen technologies expressed the least fear of its safe use. (authors)

  11. Exergetic life cycle assessment of hydrogen production from renewables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.

    Life cycle assessment is extended to exergetic life cycle assessment and used to evaluate the exergy efficiency, economic effectiveness and environmental impact of producing hydrogen using wind and solar energy in place of fossil fuels. The product hydrogen is considered a fuel for fuel cell vehicles and a substitute for gasoline. Fossil fuel technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas and gasoline from crude oil are contrasted with options using renewable energy. Exergy efficiencies and greenhouse gas and air pollution emissions are evaluated for all process steps, including crude oil and natural gas pipeline transportation, crude oil distillation and natural gas reforming, wind and solar electricity generation, hydrogen production through water electrolysis, and gasoline and hydrogen distribution and utilization. The use of wind power to produce hydrogen via electrolysis, and its application in a fuel cell vehicle, exhibits the lowest fossil and mineral resource consumption rate. However, the economic attractiveness, as measured by a "capital investment effectiveness factor," of renewable technologies depends significantly on the ratio of costs for hydrogen and natural gas. At the present cost ratio of about 2 (per unit of lower heating value or exergy), capital investments are about five times lower to produce hydrogen via natural gas rather than wind energy. As a consequence, the cost of wind- and solar-based electricity and hydrogen is substantially higher than that of natural gas. The implementation of a hydrogen fuel cell instead of an internal combustion engine permits, theoretically, an increase in a vehicle's engine efficiency of about of two times. Depending on the ratio in engine efficiencies, the substitution of gasoline with "renewable" hydrogen leads to (a) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions of 12-23 times for hydrogen from wind and 5-8 times for hydrogen from solar energy, and (b) air pollution (AP) emissions reductions of 38

  12. Fracture resistance of the VNC-2USh steel with different content of diffusion-mobile hydrogen at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yablonskij, I.S.; Sankho, K.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are the investigation results for the diffusible hydrogen (DH) content effect on cracking resistance and mechanical properties of the VNC-2USh steel in the temperature range from -75-100 deg C. In this range σsub(B), σsub(0.2) and σ are not practically sensitive to the DH content change from 0.27 to 3 cm 3 /100g. At room temperature the increase of DH content in the above concentration range results in 45 % decrease of cracking resistance under static loading. At -75 deg C the cracking resistance does not depend on DH content. Within the temperature range from -40-75 deg C placed is a temperature boundary, separating the regions of predominant effects of hydrogen and low temperature embrittlement on repture strength of the VNC-2 steel at moderated rates of deformation

  13. Examining student heuristic usage in a hydrogen bonding assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kathryn; Kim, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the role of representational competence in student responses to an assessment of hydrogen bonding. The assessment couples the use of a multiple-select item ("Choose all that apply") with an open-ended item to allow for an examination of students' cognitive processes as they relate to the assignment of hydrogen bonding within a structural representation. Response patterns from the multiple-select item implicate heuristic usage as a contributing factor to students' incorrect responses. The use of heuristics is further supported by the students' corresponding responses to the open-ended assessment item. Taken together, these data suggest that poor representational competence may contribute to students' previously observed inability to correctly navigate the concept of hydrogen bonding. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):411-416, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production and fuel cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dincer, I.

    2007-01-01

    This paper details life cycle assessment (LCA) of hydrogen production and fuel cell system. LCA is a key tool in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies for design, analysis, development; manufacture, applications etc. Energy efficiencies and greenhouse gases and air pollution emissions have been evaluated in all process steps including crude oil and natural gas pipeline transportation, crude oil distillation, natural gas reprocessing, wind and solar electricity generation , hydrogen production through water electrolysis and gasoline and hydrogen distribution and utilization

  15. Effects of nitrogen and hydrogen in argon shielding gas on bead profile, delta-ferrite and nitrogen contents of the pulsed GTAW welds of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viyanit, Ekkarut [National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), Pathaumthani (Thailand). Failure Analysis and Surface Technology Lab; Hartung, Fritz; Lothongkum, Gobboon [Chulalongkom University, Bangkok (Thailand). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering,; Phakpeetinan, Panyasak; Chianpairot, Amnuysak

    2016-08-01

    The general effects of 1, 2, 3 and 4 vol.-% nitrogen and 1, 5 and 10 vol.-% hydrogen in argon shielding gas on weld bead profile (depth/width ratio: D/W) and the δ-ferrite content of AISI 316L pulsed GTAW welds were investigated. The limits for imperfections for the quality levels of welds were based on ISO 5817 B. The plates with a thickness of 6 mm were welded at the flat position and the bead on plate. Increasing hydrogen content in argon shielding gas increases the D/W ratio. Excessive hydrogen addition to argon shielding gas will result in incompletely filled groove and excessive penetration of weld. Increasing welding speed decreases the weld-metal volume and the D/W ratios. Nitrogen addition to argon shielding gas has no effect on the D/W ratio. The addition of a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen to argon shielding gas on the D/W ratio does not show any interaction between them. An effect on the D/W ratio can be exclusively observed as a function of hydrogen content. Increasing hydrogen content in argon shielding gas increases the δ-ferrite content of weld metal. Increasing either nitrogen content in shielding gas or welding speed decreases the δ-ferrite content of weld metal. The nitrogen addition increases the weld metal nitrogen content, however, the hydrogen addition leads to a decrease of weld metal nitrogen content.

  16. Content Maps: A Teaching and Assessment Tool for Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Phillip; Lehwald, Harry; Lee, Yun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Developing content knowledge in teachers presents a constant challenge for teacher educators. This article introduces a teaching and assessment tool called a "content map," which allows teacher educators, teachers, and coaches to conceptualize the scope, sequence, and relational characteristics of the content being taught. Content maps…

  17. The hydrogen and oxygen content of self-supporting carbon foils prepared by dc glow discharge in ethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, N.R.S.; Tolfree, D.W.L.; John, P.; Odeh, I.M.; Thomas, M.J.K.; Tricker, M.J.; Wilson, J.J.B.; England, J.B.A.; Newton, D.

    1980-01-01

    The hydrogen and oxygen content of self-supporting carbon films produced by dc glow discharge have been determined using a precise method involving the elastic scattering of 25 MeV α-particles. The number of carbon-hydrogen bonds has been determined for similar samples using infrared spectroscopy. The results are compared with those for samples made by the carbon arc process. Assuming that the glow discharge carbon contains graphitic regions surrounded by amorphous tetrahedrally bonded material to which hydrogen can attach, a simple estimate is made of the relative numbers of carbon atoms in the two forms. (orig.)

  18. Economic assessment of a waste hydrogen utilization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Zhou, H.; Zhou, W.; Wu, J.; Wang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the economic assessment on an hybrid hydrogen recovery, purification, storage, transportation and application project (HRPSTA) set for a system including a nitrogenous fertilizer plant and a float glass factory. A pretreatment unit and metal hydride containers are used to recover and purify the hydrogen from the purge gas of the ammonia fertilizer plant and to transport and use the hydrogen on the tin bath in the float glass factory. Cost analysis and cash flow statements are presented, and financial value and rate of return are calculated. The project is shown to be technologically and financially feasible. 1 fig., 4 tabs., 4 refs

  19. Effect of Harvesting Frequency, Variety and Leaf Maturity on Nutrient Composition, Hydrogen Cyanide Content and Cassava Foliage Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuc Thi Hue

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment studied the effect of harvesting frequencies and varieties on yield, chemical composition and hydrogen cyanide content in cassava foliage. Foliage from three cassava varieties, K94 (very bitter, K98-7 (medium bitter and a local (sweet, were harvested in three different cutting cycles, at 3, 6 and 9 months; 6 and 9 months and 9 months after planting, in a 2-yr experiment carried out in Hanoi, Vietnam. Increasing the harvesting frequency increased dry matter (DM and crude protein (CP production in cassava foliage. The K94 variety produced higher foliage yields than the other two varieties. Dry matter, neutral detergent fibre (NDF, acid detergent fibre (ADF and total tannin content increased with months to the first harvest, whereas CP content decreased. Hydrogen cyanide (HCN content was lower at the first harvest than at later harvests for all cutting cycles. At subsequent harvests the content of total tannins tended to decline, while HCN content increased (p<0.05. Chemical composition differed somewhat across varieties except for total tannins and ash. Dry matter, NDF, ADF and total tannins were higher in fully matured leaves, while CP and HCN were lower in developing leaves.

  20. Exergetic assessment of an integrated gasifier/boiler system for hydrogen production with different biomass types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinci, Y.; Hepbasli, A.; Dincer, I.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we utilize some experimental data taken from the literature, especially on the air blown gasification characteristics of six different biomass fuels, namely almond shell (ASF), walnut pruning (WPF), rice straw (RSF), whole tree wood chips (WWF), sludge (SLF) and non-recyclable waste paper (NPF) for hydrogen production from an integrated gasifier-boiler power system. Then, we undertake an exergy analysis of this integrated system and assess its performance through energy and exergy efficiencies. The exergy content values calculated for the biomass fuels range from 15.89 to 22.07 MJ/kg. The stack gas is examined at cyclone out, and the hydrogen concentrations determined change between 7 and 18 (%v/v) for NPF and ASF. Furthermore, the system considered is studied in terms of irreversibility and improvement potential rates. These rate values change from 6.82 to 43.11 kW for irreversibility and 6.01 to 41.24 kW for improvement potential, respectively. The exergy efficiencies of the system are calculated as 4.33 to 11.89%. Finally, we consider N and NH 3 contents of the six biomass fuels and their stack gas compositions. (author)

  1. Hydrogen storage performance of Ti-V-based BCC phase alloys with various Fe content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, X.B.; Feng, S.L.; Wu, Z.; Xia, B.J.; Xu, N.X.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Fe content on hydrogen storage characteristics of Ti-10Cr-18Mn-(32-x)V-xFe (x = 0, 2, 3, 4, 5) alloys has been investigated at 353 K. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the alloys present BCC and C14 two-phase structures for all of the Fe-containing alloys. With the increasing Fe content, the lattice parameters of the BCC phase decrease, which results in an increase of the hydrogen desorption plateau pressure of the alloys. Among the studied alloys, Ti-10Cr-18Mn-27V-5Fe alloy exhibits the smallest PCT plateau slope and a more suitable plateau pressure (0.1 MPa equ <1 MPa). The maximum and effective capacities of the alloy are 3.32 wt.% and 2.26 wt.%, respectively, which are higher than other reported Fe-containing BCC phase alloys. In addition, the V/Fe ratio in this alloy is close to that of (VFe) alloy, whose cost is much lower than that of pure V

  2. Fire Protection Engineering Design Brief Template. Hydrogen Refueling Station.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Muna, Alice Baca [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Groth, Katrina M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Building a hydrogen infrastructure system is critical to supporting the development of alternate- fuel vehicles. This report provides a methodology for implementing a performance-based design of an outdoor hydrogen refueling station that does not meet specific prescriptive requirements in NFPA 2, The Hydrogen Technologies Code . Performance-based designs are a code-compliant alternative to meeting prescriptive requirements. Compliance is demonstrated by comparing a prescriptive-based fueling station design with a performance-based design approach using Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) methods and hydrogen risk assessment tools. This template utilizes the Sandia-developed QRA tool, Hydrogen Risk Analysis Models (HyRAM), which combines reduced-order deterministic models that characterize hydrogen release and flame behavior with probabilistic risk models to quantify risk values. Each project is unique and this template is not intended to account for site-specific characteristics. Instead, example content and a methodology are provided for a representative hydrogen refueling site which can be built upon for new hydrogen applications.

  3. A comprehensive energy–exergy-based assessment and parametric study of a hydrogen production process using steam glycerol reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajjaji, Noureddine; Chahbani, Amna; Khila, Zouhour

    2014-01-01

    Various assessment tools are applied to comprehensively investigate a glycerol-to-hydrogen production system. These tools investigate the chemical reactions, design and simulate the entire hydrogen production process, study the energetic and exergetic performances and perform parametric analyses (using intuitive and design of experiment-based methods). Investigating the chemical reaction of steam glycerol reforming reveals that the optimal conditions, determined based on maximizing the hydrogen production while minimizing the methane and carbon monoxide contents and coke formation, can be achieved at a reforming temperature and a water-to-glycerol feed ratio (WGFR) of 950 K and 9, respectively. The thermal and exergetic efficiencies of the resulting process are 66.6% and 59.9%, respectively. These findings are lower than those cited in the literature and relative to other reformates (methane, ethanol and methanol). The parametric investigation indicates that the performance of the process (energetic and exergetic) could be ensured by using an appropriate and judiciously selected combination of the reactor temperature and WGFR. Based on the parametric energetic and exergetic investigation, WGFR = 6 and T = 1100 K appear to be the most accurate parameters for the entire glycerol-to-hydrogen process. For this recommend configuration, the thermal and exergetic efficiencies are 78.1% and 66.1%, respectively. - Highlights: • Energy and exergy analysis are used to assess glycerol-to-hydrogen process. • Recommended conditions for glycerol-to-hydrogen process are WGFR = 6 and T = 1100 K. • For recommend conditions, thermal and exergetic efficiencies are 78.1% and 66.1%. • Energy and exergy consideration should be included by engineers and scientists

  4. Influence of the C content on the permeation of hydrogen in Fe alloys with low contents of C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Peñalva

    2016-12-01

    The experimental permeation results were analyzed using a non-linear least square fitting. The final resulting values of the permeability were paired off in order to determine the effect of the C content: pure Fe versus FeC, FeP versus FePC and Fe10%Cr versus Fe10%CrC. According to the results, the influence of the metallurgical composition of C in Fe alloys on the permeability of hydrogen is discussed together with the synergistic effects caused by the presence of P and Cr.

  5. Nuclear hydrogen: An assessment of product flexibility and market viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botterud, Audun; Yildiz, Bilge; Conzelmann, Guenter; Petri, Mark C.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear energy has the potential to play an important role in the future energy system as a large-scale source of hydrogen without greenhouse gas emissions. Thus far, economic studies of nuclear hydrogen tend to focus on the levelized cost of hydrogen without accounting for the risks and uncertainties that potential investors would face. We present a financial model based on real options theory to assess the profitability of different nuclear hydrogen production technologies in evolving electricity and hydrogen markets. The model uses Monte Carlo simulations to represent uncertainty in future hydrogen and electricity prices. It computes the expected value and the distribution of discounted profits from nuclear hydrogen production plants. Moreover, the model quantifies the value of the option to switch between hydrogen and electricity production, depending on what is more profitable to sell. We use the model to analyze the market viability of four potential nuclear hydrogen technologies and conclude that flexibility in output product is likely to add significant economic value for an investor in nuclear hydrogen. This should be taken into account in the development phase of nuclear hydrogen technologies

  6. Conformational Assessment of Adnectin and Adnectin-Drug Conjugate by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Richard Y.-C.; O'Neil, Steven R.; Lipovšek, Daša; Chen, Guodong

    2018-05-01

    Higher-order structure (HOS) characterization of therapeutic protein-drug conjugates for comprehensive assessment of conjugation-induced protein conformational changes is an important consideration in the biopharmaceutical industry to ensure proper behavior of protein therapeutics. In this study, conformational dynamics of a small therapeutic protein, adnectin 1, together with its drug conjugate were characterized by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) with different spatial resolutions. Top-down HDX allows detailed assessment of the residue-level deuterium content in the payload conjugation region. HDX-MS dataset revealed the ability of peptide-based payload/linker to retain deuterium in HDX experiments. Combined results from intact, top-down, and bottom-up HDX indicated no significant conformational changes of adnectin 1 upon payload conjugation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon coatings may modulate gingival cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussano, F.; Genova, T.; Laurenti, M.; Munaron, L.; Pirri, C. F.; Rivolo, P.; Carossa, S.; Mandracci, P.

    2018-04-01

    Silicon-based materials present a high potential for dental implant applications, since silicon has been proven necessary for the correct bone formation in animals and humans. Notably, the addition of silicon is effective to enhance the bioactivity of hydroxyapatite and other biomaterials. The present work aims to expand the knowledge of the role exerted by hydrogen in the biological interaction of silicon-based materials, comparing two hydrogenated amorphous silicon coatings, with different hydrogen content, as means to enhance soft tissue cell adhesion. To accomplish this task, the films were produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on titanium substrates and their surface composition and hydrogen content were analyzed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) respectively. The surface energy and roughness were measured through optical contact angle analysis (OCA) and high-resolution mechanical profilometry respectively. Coated surfaces showed a slightly lower roughness, compared to bare titanium samples, regardless of the hydrogen content. The early cell responses of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts were tested on the above mentioned surface modifications, in terms of cell adhesion, viability and morphometrical assessment. Films with lower hydrogen content were endowed with a surface energy comparable to the titanium surfaces. Films with higher hydrogen incorporation displayed a lower surface oxidation and a considerably lower surface energy, compared to the less hydrogenated samples. As regards mean cell area and focal adhesion density, both a-Si coatings influenced fibroblasts, but had no significant effects on keratinocytes. On the contrary, hydrogen-rich films increased manifolds the adhesion and viability of keratinocytes, but not of fibroblasts, suggesting a selective biological effect on these cells.

  8. Influence of redox condition in iron, silicon and hydrogen contents of leached glass surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manara, A.; Lanza, F.; Della Mea, G.; Rossi, C.; Salvagno, G.

    1984-01-01

    Surface analysis has been conducted on samples leached in a Sochlet apparatus at 100 0 C in the presence and in the absence of air. The XPS technique was applied to analyze the content of iron and silicon while the nuclear reaction method was utilized to analyze the content of hydrogen. Samples leached in argon atmosphere have shown a smaller content of iron and silicon with respect to the samples leached in air atmosphere. The H concentration has shown the same behavior. The results are discussed in terms of possible formation of iron compounds in the different redox condition and of their different stabilities and in terms of their efficiency in reducing exchange between Na + and H + ions. 11 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  9. Estimation of Uncertainty in Risk Assessment of Hydrogen Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Krymsky, V.; Kozine, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen technologies such as hydrogen fuelled vehicles and refuelling stations are being tested in practice in a number of projects (e.g. HyFleet-Cute and Whistler project) giving valuable information on the reliability and maintenance requirements. In order to establish refuelling stations the ...... probability and the NUSAP concept to quantify uncertainties of new not fully qualified hydrogen technologies and implications to risk management.......Hydrogen technologies such as hydrogen fuelled vehicles and refuelling stations are being tested in practice in a number of projects (e.g. HyFleet-Cute and Whistler project) giving valuable information on the reliability and maintenance requirements. In order to establish refuelling stations...... the permitting authorities request qualitative and quantitative risk assessments (QRA) to show the safety and acceptability in terms of failure frequencies and respective consequences. For new technologies not all statistical data might be established or are available in good quality causing assumptions...

  10. Absorption of hydrogen by vanadium-palladium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artman, D.; Lynch, J.F.; Flanagan, T.B.

    1976-01-01

    Pressure composition isotherms (273-373 K) have been determined for the absorption of hydrogen by a series of six palladium alloys (f.c.c) in the composition range from 1 to 8 at.% vanadium. At a given hydrogen content, the equilibrium hydrogen pressure progressively increases with vanadium content. Thermodynamic parameters for the absorption of hydrogen are reported at infinite dilution of hydrogen and for the formation of the nonstoichiometric hydride from the hydrogen-saturated alloy. The relative, partial molar enthalpy of solution of hydrogen at infinite dilution increases slightly with vanadium content. The presence of vanadium, which absorbs hydrogen itself in its normal b.c.c. structure, greatly inhibits the ability of palladium to absorb hydrogen. For example, the isobaric solubility of hydrogen (1 atm, 298K) decreases from H/Pd=0.7 (palladium) to 0.024 (V(6%)-Pd). The lattice expansion due to the presence of interstitial hydrogen has been determined by X-ray diffraction. From these data it can be concluded that the formation of two non-stoichiometric hydride phases does not occur at vanadium contents greater that 5 at.% (298 K). Electrical resistance has been measured as a function of the hydrogen content of the alloys. The electrical resistance increases more markedly with hydrogen content for these alloys than for any of the palladium alloys previously examined. (Auth.)

  11. Influence of fillers on hydrogen penetration properties and blister fracture of rubber composites for O-ring exposed to high-pressure hydrogen gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamabe, Junichiro; Nishimura, Shin [Department of Mechanical Science Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Research Center for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage (HYDROGENIUS), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2009-02-15

    Ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM) and nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) composites having carbon black, silica, and no fillers were exposed to hydrogen gas at a maximum pressure of 10 MPa; then, blister tests and the measurement of hydrogen content were conducted. The hydrogen contents of the composites were proportional to the hydrogen pressure, i.e., the behavior of their hydrogen contents follows Henry's law. This implies that hydrogen penetrates into the composite as a hydrogen molecule. The addition of carbon black raised the hydrogen content of the composite, while the addition of silica did not. Based on observations, the blister damages of composites with silica were less pronounced, irrespective of the hydrogen pressures. This may be attributed to their lower hydrogen content and relatively better tensile properties than the others. (author)

  12. Exploiting Synergies in European Wind and Hydrogen Sectors: A Cost-benefit Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    SHAW SUZANNE; PETEVES ESTATHIOS

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines an assessment of the perspectives for exploiting synergies between European wind and hydrogen energy sectors, where wind energy conversion to hydrogen is used as a common strategy for reducing network management costs in high wind energy penetration situations, and for production of renewable hydrogen. The attractiveness of this approach, referred to here as a ¿¿wind-hydrogen strategy¿¿, is analysed using a costbenefit approach to evaluate the final impact...

  13. Assessment of hydrogen fuel cell applications using fuzzy multiple-criteria decision making method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Pao-Long; Hsu, Chiung-Wen; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This study uses the fuzzy MCDM method to assess hydrogen fuel cell applications. ► We evaluate seven different hydrogen fuel cell applications based on 14 criteria. ► Results show that fuel cell backup power systems should be chosen for development in Taiwan. -- Abstract: Assessment is an essential process in framing government policy. It is critical to select the appropriate targets to meet the needs of national development. This study aimed to develop an assessment model for evaluating hydrogen fuel cell applications and thus provide a screening tool for decision makers. This model operates by selecting evaluation criteria, determining criteria weights, and assessing the performance of hydrogen fuel cell applications for each criterion. The fuzzy multiple-criteria decision making method was used to select the criteria and the preferred hydrogen fuel cell products based on information collected from a group of experts. Survey questionnaires were distributed to collect opinions from experts in different fields. After the survey, the criteria weights and a ranking of alternatives were obtained. The study first defined the evaluation criteria in terms of the stakeholders, so that comprehensive influence criteria could be identified. These criteria were then classified as environmental, technological, economic, or social to indicate the purpose of each criterion in the assessment process. The selected criteria included 14 indicators, such as energy efficiency and CO 2 emissions, as well as seven hydrogen fuel cell applications, such as forklifts and backup power systems. The results show that fuel cell backup power systems rank the highest, followed by household fuel cell electric-heat composite systems. The model provides a screening tool for decision makers to select hydrogen-related applications.

  14. Assessment of Effective Factor of Hydrogen Diffusion Equation Using FE Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Oh, Chang Sik; Kim, Yun Jae

    2010-01-01

    The coupled model with hydrogen transport and elasto-plasticity behavior was introduced. In this paper, the effective factor of the hydrogen diffusion equation has been described. To assess the effective factor, finite element (FE) analyses including hydrogen transport and mechanical loading for boundary layer specimens with low-strength steel properties are carried out. The results of the FE analyses are compared with those from previous studies conducted by Taha and Sofronis (2001)

  15. Mecanical Properties Degradation by Hydrogen Embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, G; Meyer, G; Perez Ipina J

    2001-01-01

    The presence of hydrogen-rich media during nuclear plant operation motivates the study of the zirconium alloys degradation of their mechanical properties influenced by hydrogen content and temperature.In this work we study samples with a microstructure of equiaxial grains resulted from hot-rolled, and with different homogeneous hydrogen content obtained by electrochemical charge and a thermal treatment.The influence of hydrogen content and temperature was analyzed from the results of fracture-mechanical tests on CT (compact test) probes using the J-criteria

  16. [Life cycle assessment of the infrastructure for hydrogen sources of fuel cell vehicles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wen; Wang, Shujuan; Ni, Weidou; Chen, Changhe

    2003-05-01

    In order to promote the application of life cycle assessment and provide references for China to make the project of infrastructure for hydrogen sources of fuel cell vehicles in the near future, 10 feasible plans of infrastructure for hydrogen sources of fuel cell vehicles were designed according to the current technologies of producing, storing and transporting hydrogen. Then life cycle assessment was used as a tool to evaluate the environmental performances of the 10 plans. The standard indexes of classified environmental impacts of every plan were gotten and sensitivity analysis for several parameters were carried out. The results showed that the best plan was that hydrogen will be produced by natural gas steam reforming in central factory, then transported to refuelling stations through pipelines, and filled to fuel cell vehicles using hydrogen gas at last.

  17. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen energy pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aissani, Lynda; Bourgois, Jacques; Rousseaux, Patrick; Jabouille, Florent; Loget, Sebastien; Perier Camby, Laurent; Sessiecq, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    In the last decades transportation sector is a priority for environmental research. Indeed, it is the most impacting sector because it involves greenhouse emissions and fossil resources exhaustion. The Group of 'Ecole des Mines' (GEM), in France, carries out studies concerning clean and renewable energies for this sector with the 'H2-PAC' project. The GEM with four teams performs studies concerning energy systems for transportation sector and more particularly the hydrogen system. The four teams of the GEM work each one on a process of this system. More precisely, the team of Albi studies biomass gasification in order to produce synthesis gas. The team of Nantes studies purification of this gas to obtain pure hydrogen and hydrogen storage on activated carbon. The team of Paris studies fuel cell use and especially Polymer Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell. Finally, the team of St Etienne evaluates this system along its life cycle from an environmental point of view. This paper presents this environmental evaluation witch is realized according to Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology. (authors)

  18. Cea assessment of the sulphur-iodine cycle for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caries, Ph.; Vitart, X.; Yvon, P.

    2010-01-01

    The sulphur-iodine cycle is a promising process for hydrogen production using nuclear heat: - it is a purely thermochemical cycle, implying that hydrogen production will scale with volume rather than surface; - it only involves fluids, thus avoiding the often difficult handling of solids; - its heat requirements are well matched to the temperatures available from a Generation IV very/high temperature reactor. These characteristics seem very attractive for high efficiency and low cost massive hydrogen production. On the other hand, the efficiency of the cycle may suffer from the large over-stoichiometries of water and iodine and the very important heat exchanges it involves; furthermore, due to lack of adequate thermodynamic models, its efficiency is difficult to assess with confidence. Besides, the large quantities of chemicals that need to be handled, and the corrosiveness of these chemicals, are factors not to be overlooked in terms of investment and operation costs. In order to assess the actual potential of the sulphur-iodine cycle for massive hydrogen production at a competitive cost, CEA has been conducting an important programme on this cycle, ranging from thermodynamic measurements to hydrogen production cost evaluation, with flow sheet optimisation, component sizing and investment cost estimation as intermediate steps. The paper will present the method used, the status of both efficiency and production cost estimations, and discuss perspectives for improvement. (authors)

  19. Determination of water, hydrogen, and carbon content of Korean main farm produces for the calculation of H-3 and C-14 ingestion dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yang Geun; Lee, Gab Bock; Kim, Mi Ja; Eum, Hee Moon

    2003-01-01

    Water, hydrogen, and carbon content of grains, leafy vegetable, root vegetable, and fruits in Korea were determined to be used in the calculation of HTO, OBT, C-14 offsite ingestion dose. The individual items and the weighting factors of the 4 groups were based on the results of nationwide dietary intake survey in Korea. Items produced in an island or imported were excluded for the reason that they would not be affected directly by the nuclear power plants in the nation. On the same assumption, cooked and instant foods also were excluded. Items within 95% of the cumulative percentage of intake in each category were selected as the main farm produces, and then each intake percentage was taken as the weighting factor. Water, Hydrogen, and carbon content were determined using the data in Food Composition TABLE of Korea. H and C content were calculated from protein, fat, and carbohydrate content in the TABLE, and multiplied by each weighting factor to make the group-representative value. Grains, lefty and root vegetable, and fruits of Korea had 11.0%, 93.6%, 87.9%, 86.2% of water, 5.6%, 0.4%. 0.7%, 0.9% of hydrogen, and 39.6%, 2.5%, 5.2%, 6.0% of carbon, respectively. This is different from those in the ODCM from AECL data. Over ODCM, water content of grains and vegetable were 0.92-0.98 times ODCM, and fruits 1.03 times ODCM, which would result in the change of HTO ingestion dose as much. Hydrogen content of grains and vegetables are 1.02-2.33 times ODCM, but fruits 0.9 times ODCM. Carbon content of grains, leafy vegetables, and fruits are 0.7-0.98 times ODCM, but root vegetables 1.49 times ODCM. This would result in the change of ingestion dose as much

  20. Comparative study of two methods for determining the diffusible hydrogen content in welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celio de Abreu, L.; Modenesi, P.J.; Villani-Marques, P.

    1994-01-01

    This work presents a comparative study of the methods for measurement of the amount of diffusible hydrogen in welds: glycerin, mercury and gaseous chromatography. The effect of the variables collecting temperatures and times were analyzed. Basic electrodes type AWS E 9018-M were humidified and dried at different times and temperatures in order to obtain a large variation in the diffusible hydrogen contents. The results showed that the collecting time can be reduced when the collecting temperature is raised, the mercury and chromatography methods present similar results, higher than those obtained by the glycerin method, the use of liquid nitrogen in the preparation of the specimens for test is unessential. The chromatography method presents the lower dispersion and is the method that can have the collecting time more reduced by the raising of the collecting temperature. The use of equations for comparison between results obtained by the various methods encountered in the literature is also discussed. (Author) 16 refs

  1. Hydrogen embrittlement due to hydrogen-inclusion interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.Y.; Li, J.C.M.

    1976-01-01

    Plastic flow around inclusions creates elastic misfit which attracts hydrogen towards the regions of positive dilatation. Upon decohesion of the inclusion-matrix interface, the excess hydrogen escapes into the void and can produce sufficient pressure to cause void growth by plastic deformation. This mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement can be used to understand the increase of ductility with temperature, the decrease of ductility with hydrogen content, and the increase of ductility with the ultimate strength of the matrix. An examination of the effect of the shape of spheroid inclusion reveals that rods are more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement than disks. The size of the inclusion is unimportant while the volume fraction of inclusions plays the usual role

  2. Achievement report for fiscal 1976 on Sunshine Program. Technology assessment of hydrogen energy technologies III; 1976 nendo suiso energy gijutsu no technology assessment. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-03-31

    This report contains the ultimate results of the 3-year research endeavor on 'Technology assessment of hydrogen energy technologies.' The scientists engaged in the project express their impressions at the conclusion of the research, stating: 'In the development of hydrogen energy technologies, what is the most important at the present stage is to define the formation of the energy more clearly - in what shape or at what place - so that various activities in this connection will be organized.' They say also: 'Although the type of research effort of looking into technological possibilities is quite important naturally, yet such should been carried out with a sense of purpose which is definite and concrete.' Before what are stated above may be complied with, of course, systems for development have to be arranged allowing the scientists to act in the above-suggested way. This report consists of a general discussion part and an itemized discussion part. The former summarizes the intention, aim, premise, contents, findings, opinions, etc., concerning the research work; and the latter carries a gist of the 'Hydrogen energy system concept (draft)' which constitutes the foundation on which the above-mentioned details are discussed in the former. (NEDO)

  3. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive

  4. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 1 Report Technology Evaluation of Hydrogen Light Duty Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Rousseau, Aymeric

    2007-12-01

    This task analyzes the candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles for near-term use in the Southeastern U.S. The purpose of this work is to assess their potential in terms of efficiency and performance. This report compares conventional, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) with gasoline and hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) as well as fuel cell and fuel cell hybrids from a technology as well as fuel economy point of view. All the vehicles have been simulated using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT). First, some background information is provided on recent American automotive market trends and consequences. Moreover, available options are presented for introducing cleaner and more economical vehicles in the market in the future. In this study, analysis of various candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles is performed using PSAT and, thus, a brief description of PSAT features and capabilities are provided. Detailed information on the simulation analysis performed is also offered, including methodology assumptions, fuel economic results, and conclusions from the findings.

  5. Influence of temperature and hydrogen content on stress-induced radial hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desquines, J., E-mail: jean.desquines@irsn.fr; Drouan, D.; Billone, M.; Puls, M.P.; March, P.; Fourgeaud, S.; Getrey, C.; Elbaz, V.; Philippe, M.

    2014-10-15

    Radial hydride precipitation in stress relieved Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings is studied using a new thermal–mechanical test. Two maximum temperatures for radial hydride precipitation heat treatment are studied, 350 and 450 °C with hydrogen contents ranging between 50 and 600 wppm. The new test provides two main results of interest: the minimum hoop stress required to precipitate radial hydrides and a maximum stress above which, all hydrides precipitate in the radial direction. Based on these two extreme stress conditions, a model is derived to determine the stress level required to obtain a given fraction of radial hydrides after high temperature thermal–mechanical heat treatment. The proposed model is validated using metallographic observation data on pressurized tubes cooled down under constant pressure. Most of the samples with reoriented hydrides are further subjected to a ductility test. Using finite element modeling, the test results are analyzed in terms of crack nucleation within radial hydrides at the outer diameter and crack growth through the thickness of the tubular samples. The combination of test results shows that samples with hydrogen contents of about 100 wppm had the lowest ductility.

  6. Hydrogen Mixing Studies (HMS) assessment manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, K.L.; Wilson, T.L.; Travis, J.R.

    1993-06-01

    This report documents some calculations performed to assess the Hydrogen Mixing Studies (HMS) code. Results are presented first for some analytical test problems, including laminar flow and mass diffusion. The von Karman vortex street problem and the Sandia FLAME Facility and Heiss Dampf Reaktor (HDR) containment facility test problems are then discussed. For the analytical problems, the code gave results that agree exceptionally well with the analytical solutions. Calculations for the von Karman vortex street problem were performed at selected Reynolds numbers for several obstacle types. The computed flow patterns agree well with experimental observations-specifically the occurrence of a vortex street (double row of vortices) above a critical Reynolds number. Calculations for the von Karman vortex street problem were performed at selected Reynolds numbers for several obstacle types. The computed flow patterns agree well with experimental observations-specifically the occurrence of a vortex street (double row of vortices) above a critical Reynolds number. The last assessment problem involves modeling the experiment T31.5. The experiment was carried out in the HDR containment building, which is a large, multi-compartment facility (11 300 m 3 free volume in 72 compartments). In the experiment, a steam-water mixture was first injected into the containment to simulate a large-break blowdown of a pressure vessel, and then superheated steam was injected that was followed by a release of helium-hydrogen light gas. The calculated results (pressure, temperature, and gas concentrations) agree reasonably well with the experimental data

  7. Modification of hydrogen determinator for total hydrogen analysis in irradiated zircaloy cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soon Dal; Choi, Kwnag Soon; Kim, Jong Goo; Joe, Kih Soo; Kim, Won Ho

    1999-01-01

    A hydrogen determinator was modified and installed in the glove box to analyse total hydrogen content in irradiated zircaloy tube. The analysis method of hydrogen is Inert Gas Fusion(IGF)-Thermal Conductivity Detection(TCD). The hydrogen recoveries of no tin method using Ti and Zr matrix standards, respectively, were available within 3 μg of hydrogen. Also the smaller size of sample showed the better hydrogen recovery. It was found that the hydrogen standard of Ti matrix is available to hydrogen analysis in zircaloy sample. The mean radioactivity of irradiated zircaloy sample was 10 mR/hr and hydrogen concentration was 130 ppm

  8. Internal hydrogen embrittlement of gamma-stabilized uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, G.L.; Koger, J.W.; Bennett, R.K.; Williamson, A.L.; Hemperly, V.C.

    1976-01-01

    Relationships between the tensile ductility and fracture characteristics of as-quenched, gamma-stabilized uranium alloys (uranium--10 wt percent molybdenum, uranium--8.5 wt percent niobium, uranium--10 wt percent niobium, and uranium--7.5 wt percent niobium--2.5 wt percent zirconium), the hydrogen content of the tensile specimens, and the hydrogen gas pressure during the annealing at 850 0 C of the tensile test blanks prior to quenching were established. For these alloys, the tensile ductility decreases only slightly with increasing hydrogen content up to a critical hydrogen concentration above which the tensile ductility drops to nearly zero. The only alloy not displaying this sharp drop in tensile ductility was U--7.5 Nb--2.5 Zr, probably because sufficiently high hydrogen contents could not be achieved under our experimental arrangements. The critical hydrogen content for ductility loss increased with increasing hydrogen solubility in the alloy. Fracture surfaces produced by internal hydrogen embrittlement do not resemble those produced by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aqueous environments containing chloride ions. 8 figs

  9. Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide Content on the Preparation of Peroxotitanate Materials for the Treatment of Radioactive Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wein-Duo Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modification of peroxotitanate using hydrogen peroxide significantly improved the ion-exchange capacity of titanate materials as sorbents for metal ions contained in a radioactive waste simulant solution. The effects of hydrogen peroxide content (hydrogen peroxide/titanium isopropoxide molar ratios, hereafter expressed as H/T on the properties of as-prepared titanate synthesized at 130°C and at pH of 6-7, followed by freeze-drying, were investigated. The peroxotitanate materials thus obtained were characterized by XRD, BET, SEM, TEM, EDX, ICP, and Raman spectroscopy. At an H/T ratio of 2, peroxotitanate predominantly exhibited an amorphous structure, with a clearly observed tubular or fibrous structure. Furthermore, peroxotitanate modified at an H/T ratio of 2 exhibited the best ion-exchange capacity of 191 mg g−1 for metal ions contained in a radioactive waste simulant solution. Hence, these peroxotitanate materials are suitable for removing metal ions from wastewater, especially lanthanide ions (Ln3+ and Sr2+.

  10. Safety assessment for the IS process in a hydrogen production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Nam Chul

    2005-08-01

    A substitute energy development have been required due to the dry up of the fossil fuel and an environmental problem. Consequently, among substitute energy to be discussed, producing hydrogen from water which does not release carbon is a very promising technology. Also, Iodine-Sulfur(IS) thermochemical water decomposition is one of the promising process which is used to produce hydrogen efficiently using the high temperature gas-cooled reactor(HTGR) as an energy source that is possible to supply heat over 1000 .deg. C. In this study, to make a safety assessment of the hydrogen production using the IS process, an initiating events analysis and an accident scenario modeling considering the relief system were carried out. A method for initiating event identification used the Master Logic Diagram(MLD) that is logical and deductive. As a result, 9 initiating events that cause a leakage of the chemical material were identified. 6 accident scenario based on the initiating event are identified and quantified to the event trees. The frequency of the chemical material leakage produced by IS process is estimated relatively high to the value of 1.22x10 -4 /y. Therefore, it requires more effort on safety of the hydrogen production which can be considered as a part of the nuclear system and safety management research to increase social acceptability. Moreover, these methods will be helpful to the safety assessment of the hydrogen production system of the IS process in general

  11. Methodology for assessing the safety of Hydrogen Systems: HyRAM 1.1 technical reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, Katrina; Hecht, Ethan; Reynolds, John Thomas; Blaylock, Myra L.; Erin E. Carrier

    2017-03-01

    The HyRAM software toolkit provides a basis for conducting quantitative risk assessment and consequence modeling for hydrogen infrastructure and transportation systems. HyRAM is designed to facilitate the use of state-of-the-art science and engineering models to conduct robust, repeatable assessments of hydrogen safety, hazards, and risk. HyRAM is envisioned as a unifying platform combining validated, analytical models of hydrogen behavior, a stan- dardized, transparent QRA approach, and engineering models and generic data for hydrogen installations. HyRAM is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the U. S. De- partment of Energy to increase access to technical data about hydrogen safety and to enable the use of that data to support development and revision of national and international codes and standards. This document provides a description of the methodology and models contained in the HyRAM version 1.1. HyRAM 1.1 includes generic probabilities for hydrogen equipment fail- ures, probabilistic models for the impact of heat flux on humans and structures, and computa- tionally and experimentally validated analytical and first order models of hydrogen release and flame physics. HyRAM 1.1 integrates deterministic and probabilistic models for quantifying accident scenarios, predicting physical effects, and characterizing hydrogen hazards (thermal effects from jet fires, overpressure effects from deflagrations), and assessing impact on people and structures. HyRAM is a prototype software in active development and thus the models and data may change. This report will be updated at appropriate developmental intervals.

  12. A framework for assessing hydrogen management strategies involving multiple decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.D.; Suh, K.Y.; Park, G.C.; Jae, M.

    2000-01-01

    An accident management framework consisting of multiple and sequential decisions is developed and applied to a hydrogen control strategy for a reference plant. The compact influence diagrams including multiple decisions are constructed and evaluated with MAAP4 calculations. Each decision variable, represented by a node in the influence diagrams, has an uncertainty distribution. Using the values from the IPE (Individual Plant Examinations) report for the reference plant (UCN 3 and 4), the hydrogen control and accident management strategies are assessed. In this paper, a problem with two decisions is modeled for a simple illustration of the process involved. One decision is whether or not to actuate igniters at the time of core uncovery. Another decision is whether or not to turn on the containment sprays. We chose a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) sequence, which was one of the dominant accident sequences in the reference plant. The framework involves the modeling of the decision problem by using decision-making tools, data analysis, and the MAAP4 calculations. It is shown that the proposed framework with a new measure for assessing hydrogen control is flexible enough to be applied to various accident management strategies. (author)

  13. Discriminant content validity: a quantitative methodology for assessing content of theory-based measures, with illustrative applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Marie; Dixon, Diane; Hart, Jo; Glidewell, Liz; Schröder, Carin; Pollard, Beth

    2014-05-01

    In studies involving theoretical constructs, it is important that measures have good content validity and that there is not contamination of measures by content from other constructs. While reliability and construct validity are routinely reported, to date, there has not been a satisfactory, transparent, and systematic method of assessing and reporting content validity. In this paper, we describe a methodology of discriminant content validity (DCV) and illustrate its application in three studies. Discriminant content validity involves six steps: construct definition, item selection, judge identification, judgement format, single-sample test of content validity, and assessment of discriminant items. In three studies, these steps were applied to a measure of illness perceptions (IPQ-R) and control cognitions. The IPQ-R performed well with most items being purely related to their target construct, although timeline and consequences had small problems. By contrast, the study of control cognitions identified problems in measuring constructs independently. In the final study, direct estimation response formats for theory of planned behaviour constructs were found to have as good DCV as Likert format. The DCV method allowed quantitative assessment of each item and can therefore inform the content validity of the measures assessed. The methods can be applied to assess content validity before or after collecting data to select the appropriate items to measure theoretical constructs. Further, the data reported for each item in Appendix S1 can be used in item or measure selection. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? There are agreed methods of assessing and reporting construct validity of measures of theoretical constructs, but not their content validity. Content validity is rarely reported in a systematic and transparent manner. What does this study add? The paper proposes discriminant content validity (DCV), a systematic and transparent method

  14. A toolkit for integrated deterministic and probabilistic assessment for hydrogen infrastructure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, Katrina M.; Tchouvelev, Andrei V.

    2014-03-01

    There has been increasing interest in using Quantitative Risk Assessment [QRA] to help improve the safety of hydrogen infrastructure and applications. Hydrogen infrastructure for transportation (e.g. fueling fuel cell vehicles) or stationary (e.g. back-up power) applications is a relatively new area for application of QRA vs. traditional industrial production and use, and as a result there are few tools designed to enable QRA for this emerging sector. There are few existing QRA tools containing models that have been developed and validated for use in small-scale hydrogen applications. However, in the past several years, there has been significant progress in developing and validating deterministic physical and engineering models for hydrogen dispersion, ignition, and flame behavior. In parallel, there has been progress in developing defensible probabilistic models for the occurrence of events such as hydrogen release and ignition. While models and data are available, using this information is difficult due to a lack of readily available tools for integrating deterministic and probabilistic components into a single analysis framework. This paper discusses the first steps in building an integrated toolkit for performing QRA on hydrogen transportation technologies and suggests directions for extending the toolkit.

  15. Liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage: catalytic hydrogen generation under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-Long; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Yan, Jun-Min; Zhang, Xin-Bo; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-25

    There is a demand for a sufficient and sustainable energy supply. Hence, the search for applicable hydrogen storage materials is extremely important owing to the diversified merits of hydrogen energy. Lithium and sodium borohydride, ammonia borane, hydrazine, and formic acid have been extensively investigated as promising hydrogen storage materials based on their relatively high hydrogen content. Significant advances, such as hydrogen generation temperatures and reaction kinetics, have been made in the catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous lithium and sodium borohydride and ammonia borane as well as in the catalytic decomposition of hydrous hydrazine and formic acid. In this Minireview we briefly survey the research progresses in catalytic hydrogen generation from these liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  16. Assessment of the safety of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin: reverse mutation assay, acute and 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity in rats, and acute no-effect level for diarrhea in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yuko; Kishimoto, Yuka; Tagami, Hiroyuki; Kanahori, Sumiko

    2013-01-01

    A series of safety assessments were performed on hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin prepared by converting the reducing terminal glucose of resistant maltodextrin into sorbitol. The reverse mutation assay did not show mutagenicity. Acute and 90-day subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats showed no death was observed in any groups, including the group receiving the highest single dose of 10 g/kg body weight or the highest dose of 5 g/kg body weight per day for 90 days. Mucous or watery stools were observed in the hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin treatment group on the acute study, which were transient and were associated with the osmotic pressure caused by intake of the high concentrations. Subchronic study showed dose-dependent increases in the weights of cecum alone, cecal contents alone, and cecum with cecal contents as well as hypertrophy of the cecal mucosal epithelium, which are considered to be common physiological responses after intake of indigestible carbohydrates. These results indicated that the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin was 10 g/kg body weight or more on the acute oral toxicity study and 5.0 g/kg body weight/day or more on the 90-day subchronic repeated oral toxicity study in rats. Further study performed in healthy adult humans showed that the acute no-effect level of hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin for diarrhea was 0.8 g/kg body weight for men and more than 1.0 g/kg body weight for women. The results of the current safety assessment studies suggest that hydrogenated resistant maltodextrin is safe for human consumption.

  17. Hydrogenation and high temperature oxidation of Zirconium claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, T.; Perez-Feró, E.; Horváth, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years a new series of experiments started for supporting the new LOCA criteria, considering the proposals of US NRC. The effects which can cause the embrittlement of VVER fuel claddings were reviewed and evaluated in the framework of the project. The purpose of the work was to determine how the fuel cladding’s hydrogen uptake under normal operating conditions, effect the behavior of the cladding under LOCA conditions. As a first step a gas system equipment with gas valves and pressure gauge was built, in which the zirconium alloy can absorb hydrogen under controlled conditions. In this apparatus E110 (produced by electrolytic method, currently used at Paks NPP) and E110G (produced by a new technology) alloys were hydrogenated to predetermined hydrogen contents. According the results of ring compression tests the E110G alloys lose their ductility above 3200 ppm hydrogen content. This limit can be applied to determine the ductile-brittle transition of the nuclear fuel claddings. After the hydrogenation, high temperature oxidation experiments were carried out on the E110G and E110 samples at 1000 °C and 1200 °C. 16 pieces of E110G and 8 samples of E110 with 300 ppm and 600 ppm hydrogen content were tested. The oxidation of the specimens was performed in steam, under isothermal conditions. Based on the ring compression tests load-displacement curves were recorded. The main objective of the compression tests was to determine the ductile-brittle transition. These results were compared to the results of our previous experiments where the samples did not contain hydrogen. The original claddings showed more ductile behavior than the samples with hydrogen content. The higher hydrogen content resulted in a more brittle mechanical behavior. However no significant difference was observed in the oxidation kinetics of the same cladding types with different hydrogen content. The experiments showed that the normal operating hydrogen uptake of the fuel claddings

  18. Exploiting synergies in European wind and hydrogen sectors: A cost-benefit assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Suzanne; Peteves, Estathios

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines an assessment of the perspectives for exploiting synergies between European wind and hydrogen energy sectors, where wind energy conversion to hydrogen is used as a common strategy for reducing network management costs in high wind energy penetration situations, and for production of renewable hydrogen. The attractiveness of this approach, referred to here as a 'wind-hydrogen strategy', is analysed using a cost-benefit approach to evaluate the final impact at the level of the end-consumer when this strategy is implemented. The analysis is conducted for four scenarios, based on different levels of: wind energy penetration in the electricity network area, hydrogen energy price, and environmental taxation on fuels. The effect of technological learning on the outcome is also analysed for the period up to 2050. The results of the analysis indicate that the relative value of the wind energy in the electricity market compared to the hydrogen market is a deciding factor in the attractiveness of the strategy; here the wind energy penetration in the network is a key consideration. Finally, in order to exploit learning effects from linking European wind and hydrogen sectors, action would need to be taken in the short term. (author)

  19. Hydrogenation properties of Zr films under various conditions of hydrogen plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Yan Guo Qiang; Zhou Zhu Ying; Zhao Guo Qing; Hu Pei Gang; Luo Shun Zhong; Peng Shu Ming; Ding Wei; Long Xing Gui

    2002-01-01

    The hydrogenation properties of Zr samples with and without an Ni overlayer under various plasma conditions were investigated by means of non-Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection analysis. The theoretical maximum hydrogen capacity, 66.7 at%, could be achieved at a hydrogen absolute pressure of approx 2 Pa and a substrate temperature of approx 393K for a plasma irradiation of only 10 min; this was significantly greater than that for gas hydrogenation under the same hydrogen pressure and substrate temperature. It was also found that the C and O contamination on the sample surface strongly influences the hydrogenation, and that the maximum equilibrium hydrogen content drops dramatically with the increasing total contamination. In addition, the influence of the Ni overlayer on the plasma hydrogenation is discussed

  20. Atomic hydrogen reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massip de Turville, C.M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Methods are discussed of generating heat in an atomic hydrogen reactor which involve; the production of atomic hydrogen by an electrical discharge, the capture of nascent neutrons from atomic hydrogen in a number of surrounding steel alloy tubes having a high manganese content to produce 56 Mn, the irradiation of atomic hydrogen by the high energy antineutrinos from the beta decay of 56 Mn to yield nascent neutrons, and the removal of the heat generated by the capture of nascent neutrons by 55 Mn and the beta decay of 56 Mn. (U.K.)

  1. Biogas and Hydrogen Systems Market Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bush, Brian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Melaina, Marc [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This analysis provides an overview of the market for biogas-derived hydrogen and its use in transportation applications. It examines the current hydrogen production technologies from biogas, capacity and production, infrastructure, potential and demand, as well as key market areas. It also estimates the production cost of hydrogen from biogas and provides supply curves at a national level and at point source.

  2. Internal hydrogen-induced subcritical crack growth in austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J. H.; Altstetter, C. J.

    1991-11-01

    The effects of small amounts of dissolved hydrogen on crack propagation were determined for two austenitic stainless steel alloys, AISI 301 and 310S. In order to have a uniform distribution of hydrogen in the alloys, they were cathodically charged at high temperature in a molten salt electrolyte. Sustained load tests were performed on fatigue precracked specimens in air at 0 ‡C, 25 ‡C, and 50 ‡C with hydrogen contents up to 41 wt ppm. The electrical potential drop method with optical calibration was used to continuously monitor the crack position. Log crack velocity vs stress intensity curves had definite thresholds for subcritical crack growth (SCG), but stage II was not always clearly delineated. In the unstable austenitic steel, AISI 301, the threshold stress intensity decreased with increasing hydrogen content or increasing temperature, but beyond about 10 wt ppm, it became insensitive to hydrogen concentration. At higher concentrations, stage II became less distinct. In the stable stainless steel, subcritical crack growth was observed only for a specimen containing 41 wt ppm hydrogen. Fractographic features were correlated with stress intensity, hydrogen content, and temperature. The fracture mode changed with temperature and hydrogen content. For unstable austenitic steel, low temperature and high hydrogen content favored intergranular fracture while microvoid coalescence dominated at a low hydrogen content. The interpretation of these phenomena is based on the tendency for stress-induced phase transformation, the different hydrogen diffusivity and solubility in ferrite and austenite, and outgassing from the crack tip. After comparing the embrittlement due to internal hydrogen with that in external hydrogen, it is concluded that the critical hydrogen distribution for the onset of subcritical crack growth is reached at a location that is very near the crack tip.

  3. Behaviour of hydrogen in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Y.C.; Tang, C.H.; Chuang, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Polycrystalline niobium was charged electrolytically with hydrogen at room temperature. The behaviour of hydrogen in niobium has been investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, and ion microprobe analysis. It is shown that, when the hydrogen content in niobium is low, hydride tends to form at the grain boundary. As the hydrogen content is increased, precipitation of hydrides with domain structure takes place in the grain. The habit plane of the hydride formed in the vicinity of the grain boundary has been determined by Laue X-ray back reflection technique to be (130)c and (111)c. The structure of the hydride formed on the surface of niobium after 6 h hydrogen charging at room temperature (c.d. 0.2 A/cm 2 ) has been established to be identical to that of NbHsub(0.89). (orig.) [de

  4. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likozar, Blaz, E-mail: blaz.likozar@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Major, Zoltan, E-mail: zoltan.major@jku.at [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 x 10{sup 28} m{sup -3}), density (maximally 1.16 g cm{sup -3}), and tear strength (11.2 kN m{sup -1}), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  5. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likozar, Blaž; Major, Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 × 1028 m-3), density (maximally 1.16 g cm-3), and tear strength (11.2 kN m-1), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  6. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likozar, Blaz; Major, Zoltan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 x 10 28 m -3 ), density (maximally 1.16 g cm -3 ), and tear strength (11.2 kN m -1 ), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  7. An assessment of post-LOCA radiolytic generation of hydrogen in reactor containment of Indian PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, H.; Shah, G.C.; Dutta, S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: An event-wise assessment has been carried out for the 220 MWe Indian PHWRs of standardized design, to estimate the post-LOCA release of radiolytic hydrogen inside reactor containment, in absence of steam-zirconium reaction. The assessment is based on (i) the dissolved hydrogen concentration build-up in water corresponding to the decaying gamma dose profile and (ii) the rate of concentration dependent mass-transfer of hydrogen from water to gas-space. It is observed that the total radiolytic hydrogen released is about three times less than that obtained by the conventional method of calculation which assumes the radiolytic yield of hydrogen to be equal to the primary yield G(H 2 ) = 0.44 molecules per 100 eV. It is also seen that a major part (∼90 %) of the total release is due to the spillage of fission product irradiated suppression pool water flowing through the core, followed by moderator and suppression pool surface releases respectively

  8. Safety assessment of VHTR hydrogen production system against fire, explosion and acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been developing a nuclear hydrogen production system by using heat from the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). This system will handle a large amount of combustible gas and toxic gas. The risk from fire, explosion and acute toxic exposure caused by an accident involving chemical material release in a hydrogen production system is assessed. It is important to ensure the safety of the nuclear plant, and the risks for public health should be sufficiently small. This report provides the basic policy for the safety evaluation in cases of accident involving fire, explosion and toxic material release in a hydrogen production system. Preliminary safety analysis of a commercial-sized VHTR hydrogen production system, GTHTR300C, is performed. This analysis provides us with useful information on the separation distance between a nuclear plant and a hydrogen production system and a prospect that an accident in a hydrogen production system does not significantly increase the risks of the public. (author)

  9. Hydrogen analysis by elastic recoil spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirira, J.; Trocellier, P.

    1989-01-01

    An absolute, quantitative procedure was developed to determine the hydrogen content and to describe its concentration profile in the near-surface region of solids. The experimental technique used was the elastic recoil detection analysis of protons induced by 4 He beam bombardment in the energy range <=1.8 MeV. The hydrogen content was calculated using a new recoil cross section expression. The analyses were performed in silicon crystals implanted with hydrogen at 10 keV. The implantation dose was evaluated with an accuracy of 10% and the hydrogen depth profile with that of +-10 nm around 200 nm. (author) 10 refs.; 3 figs

  10. Qualitative and quantitative ultrasound assessment of gastric content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Margarida Barra Bisinotto

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: Pulmonary aspiration of the gastric contents is one of the most feared complications in anesthesia. Its prevention depends on preoperative fasting as well as identification of risky patients. A reliable diagnostic tool to assess gastric volume is currently lacking. The aim of this study performed on volunteers was to evaluate the feasibility of ultrasonography to identify qualitative and quantitative gastric content. Method: A standardized gastric scanning protocol was applied on 67 healthy volunteers to assess the gastric antrum in four different situations: fasting, after ingesting clear fluid, milk and a solid meal. A qualitative and quantitative assessment of the gastric content in the antrum was performed by a blinded sonographer. The antrum was considered either as empty, or containing clear or thick fluid, or solids. Total gastric volume was predicted based on a cross-sectional area of the antrum. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: For each type of gastric content, the sonographic characteristics of the antrum and its content were described and illustrated. Sonographic qualitative assessment allowed to distinguish between an empty stomach and one with different kinds of meal. The predicted gastric volume was significantly larger after the consumption of any food source compared to fasting. Conclusion: Bedside sonography can determine the nature of gastric content. It is also possible to estimate the difference between an empty gastric antrum and one that has some food in it. Such information may be useful to estimate the risk of aspiration, particularly in situations when prandial status is unknown or uncertain.

  11. Qualitative and quantitative ultrasound assessment of gastric content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisinotto, Flora Margarida Barra; Pansani, Patrícia Luísa; Silveira, Luciano Alves Matias da; Naves, Aline de Araújo; Peixoto, Ana Cristina Abdu; Lima, Hellen Moreira de; Martins, Laura Bisinotto

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary aspiration of the gastric contents is one of the most feared complications in anesthesia. Its prevention depends on preoperative fasting as well as identification of risky patients. A reliable diagnostic tool to assess gastric volume is currently lacking. The aim of this study performed on volunteers was to evaluate the feasibility of ultrasonography to identify qualitative and quantitative gastric content. A standardized gastric scanning protocol was applied on 67 healthy volunteers to assess the gastric antrum in four different situations: fasting, after ingesting clear fluid, milk and a solid meal. A qualitative and quantitative assessment of the gastric content in the antrum was performed by a blinded sonographer. The antrum was considered either as empty, or containing clear or thick fluid, or solids. Total gastric volume was predicted based on a cross-sectional area of the antrum. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. For each type of gastric content, the sonographic characteristics of the antrum and its content were described and illustrated. Sonographic qualitative assessment allowed to distinguish between an empty stomach and one with different kinds of meal. The predicted gastric volume was significantly larger after the consumption of any food source compared to fasting. Bedside sonography can determine the nature of gastric content. It is also possible to estimate the difference between an empty gastric antrum and one that has some food in it. Such information may be useful to estimate the risk of aspiration, particularly in situations when prandial status is unknown or uncertain.

  12. Effects of indium contents on photocatalytic performance of ZnIn_2S_4 for hydrogen evolution under visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kelin; Zhu, Rongshu; Tian, Fei; Cao, Gang; Ouyang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    A series of ZnIn_xS_4_+_y (x=1.6, 2.0, 2.3, 2.6, 2.9, 3.1) photocatalysts were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method and characterized by various analytical techniques, such as XRD, EDS, UV–vis DRS, SEM, TEM, BET and PL. The ZnIn_xS_4_+_y photocatalysts had a similar crystal structure. With the increase of indium content, the absorption edges of ZnIn_xS_4_+_y photocatalysts shifted to longer wavelength, their crystal sizes decreased firstly and then increased and the variation of the specific surface area and total pore volume was exactly opposite. Especially, when x=2.3, ZnIn_2_._3S_4_+_y catalyst had smallest crystal size, largest specific surface area and total pore volume. Additionally, the morphology of ZnIn_xS_4_+_y greatly depended on the contents of indium. The photocatalytic activity of ZnIn_xS_4_+_y was evaluated by photocatalytic hydrogen production from water under visible light. The ZnIn_2_._3S_4_+_y sample had the highest photocatalytic activity among these ZnIn_xS_4_+_y photocatalysts and its hydrogen production rate was 363 μmol/g h. - Graphical abstract: First, a series of catalysts were synthesized. And then those were characterized by various analytical techniques (such as SEM). finally, The photocatalytic activity of catalyst was evaluated by photocatalytic hydrogen production from water under visible light. - Highlights: • The photocatalytic property was studied upon visible-light irradiation. • ZnIn_xS_4_+_y photocatalysts show superior photocatalytic activity. • The catalyst of grain size, morphology and BET are related to indium content. • ZnIn_xS_4_+_y photocatalysts were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method.

  13. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  14. 43 CFR 46.310 - Contents of an environmental assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... implementation without the need for further analysis. Adaptive management includes a monitoring component... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contents of an environmental assessment... OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT OF 1969 Environmental Assessments § 46.310 Contents of an...

  15. Proposal of guideline for bonding to prevention of hydrogen embrittlement at Ta/Zr bond interface. Hydrogen embrittlement in SUS304ULC/Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi; Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence condition of hydrogen embrittlement cracking at Ta/Zr bond interface was investigated with respect to the hydrogen content and applied stress in order to propose a guideline for the explosive bonding procedure to prevention of hydrogen embrittlement. Hydrogen charging test was conducted for SUS304ULC/Ta/Zr explosive bonded joints applied the different flexural strains. A hydrogen embrittlement crack occurred in the Zr substrate at Ta/Zr bond interface after hydrogen charging, and it was initiated at shorter charging times when the augmented strain was increased. The occurrence condition of hydrogen embrittlement cracking at Ta/Zr bond interface was shifted to lower stress and hydrogen content with an increase in the amount of explosive during bonding. It was suggested that hydrogen embrittlement in Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint could be inhibited by reducing the initial hydrogen content in Ta substrate less than approx. 5 ppm. (author)

  16. Internal friction study of hydrides in zirconium at low hydrogen contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretti, H.A.; Corso, H.L.; Gonzalez, O.A.; Fernandez, L.; Ghilarducci, A.A.; Salva, H.R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Internal friction and shear modulus measurements were carried out on crystal bar zirconium in the as received and hydride conditions using an inverted forced pendulum. Hydriding was achieved in two ways: inside and out of the pendulum. The final hydrogen content determined by fusion analysis in the 'in situ' hydride sample was of 36 ppm. Another sample was hydride by the cathodic charge method with 25 ppm. The thermal solid solubility (TSS) phase boundary presents hysteresis between the precipitation (TSSP) and the dissolution (TSSD) temperatures for the zirconium hydrides. During the first thermal cycling the anelastic effects could be attributed to the δ, ε and metastable γ zirconium hydrides. After 'in situ' annealing at 490 K, these peaks completely disappear in the electrolytically charged sample, while in the 'in situ' hydride, the peaks remain with decreasing intensity. This effect can be understood in terms of the different surface conditions of the samples. (author)

  17. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  18. Thermodynamic investigation and environment impact assessment of hydrogen production from steam reforming of poultry tallow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajjaji, Noureddine

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic analysis and environmental impact assessment of H 2 production system. • Thermodynamic analysis identifies optimal conditions for H 2 production. • LCA is applied to evaluate the environmental impacts of H 2 production system. • Inventories data are derived from process simulation and from literature review. • Thermal energy process is the main contributor to the environmental impact. - Abstract: In this research, various assessment tools are applied to comprehensively investigate hydrogen production from steam reforming of poultry tallow (PT). These tools investigate the chemical reactions, design and simulate the entire hydrogen production process, study the energetic performance and perform an environment impact assessment using life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. The chemical reaction investigation identifies thermodynamically optimal operating conditions at which PT may be converted to hydrogen via the steam reforming process. The synthesis gas composition was determined by simulations to minimize the Gibbs free energy using the Aspen Plus™ 10.2 software. These optimal conditions are, subsequently, used in the design and simulation of the entire PT-to-hydrogen process. LCA is applied to evaluate the environmental impacts of PT-to-hydrogen system. The system boundaries include rendering and reforming along with the required transportation process. The reforming inventories data are derived from process simulation in Aspen Plus™, whereas the rendering data are adapted from a literature review. The life cycle inventories data of PT-to-hydrogen are computationally implemented into SimaPro 7.3. A set of seven relevant environmental impact categories are evaluated: global warming, abiotic depletion, acidification, eutrophication, ozone layer depletion, photochemical oxidant formation, and cumulative non-renewable fossil and nuclear energy demand. The results are subject to a systematic sensitivity analysis and compared

  19. An experimental study of high-hydrogen welding processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fydrych, Dariusz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigation results of determination of the diffusible hydrogen content in deposited metal obtained by means of two most often used methods-the glycerin method and the mercury method. Relation has been defined between results of those methods in the area characteristic of low-hydrogen as well as high-hydrogen welding processes. Relations available in the literature do not include the diffusible hydrogen content in deposited metal greater than 35 ml/100 g. Extending the scope of analysis of the diffusible hydrogen quantity to an 80 ml/100 g level considerably simplifies carrying out the steel weldability assessment with the use of high-hydrogen processes and with welding in water environment.Este trabajo presenta los resultados de una investigación sobre la determinación del contenido de hidrógeno difusible en el material aportado mediante dos métodos: el de la glicerina (el más utilizado y el del mercurio. El contenido de dicho hidrógeno se ha definido a partir de los resultados de esos métodos en una zona con bajo contenido en hidrógeno, así como procesos de soldadura con alto contenido en hidrógeno. No hay datos disponibles en la literatura para contenidos de hidrógeno difusible en metal depositado mayores de 35 ml/100 g. Ampliando el análisis de la cantidad de dicho hidrógeno hasta los 80 ml/100 g, se simplifica considerablemente la realización de ensayos de soldabilidad del acero en procesos de alto contenido en hidrógeno así como en la soldadura en medio acuoso.

  20. Fabrication of Metal Nanoparticle-Modified Screen Printed Carbon Electrodes for the Evaluation of Hydrogen Peroxide Content in Teeth Whitening Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Adriana; Abenojar, Eric C.; Vianna, Adam; Buenviaje, Czarina Y. A.; Yang, Jiahua; Pascual, Cherrie B.; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment in which students synthesize Ag, Au, and Pt nanoparticles (NPs) and use them to modify screen printed carbon electrodes for the electroanalysis of the hydrogen peroxide content in commercially available teeth whitening strips is described. This experiment is designed for two 3-h laboratory periods and can be adapted for…

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide Alleviates Aluminum Toxicity via Decreasing Apoplast and Symplast Al Contents in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Q. Zhu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S plays a vital role in Al3+ stress resistance in plants, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In the present study, pretreatment with 2 μM of the H2S donor NaHS significantly alleviated the inhibition of root elongation caused by Al toxicity in rice roots, which was accompanied by a decrease in Al contents in root tips under 50 μM Al3+ treatment. NaHS pretreatment decreased the negative charge in cell walls by reducing the activity of pectin methylesterase and decreasing the pectin and hemicellulose contents in rice roots. This treatment also masked Al-binding sites in the cell wall by upregulating the expression of OsSATR1 and OsSTAR2 in roots and reduced Al binding in the cell wall by stimulating the expression of the citrate acid exudation gene OsFRDL4 and increasing the secretion of citrate acid. In addition, NaHS pretreatment decreased the symplasmic Al content by downregulating the expression of OsNRAT1, and increasing the translocation of cytoplasmic Al to the vacuole via upregulating the expression of OsALS1. The increment of antioxidant enzyme [superoxide dismutase (SOD, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, catalase (CAT, and peroxidase (POD] activity with NaHS pretreatment significantly decreased the MDA and H2O2 content in rice roots, thereby reducing the damage of Al3+ toxicity on membrane integrity in rice. H2S exhibits crosstalk with nitric oxide (NO in response to Al toxicity, and through reducing NO content in root tips to alleviate Al toxicity. Together, this study establishes that H2S alleviates Al toxicity by decreasing the Al content in the apoplast and symplast of rice roots.

  2. Review of Design Data for Safety Assessment of Tokai Reprocessing Plant. Control of hydrogen gas produced by radiolysis of reprocessing solutions at Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, E.; Surugaya, N.; Takaya, A.; Nakamura, H.; Maki, A.; Yamanouchi, T.

    1999-10-01

    Radioactive materials in aqueous solution at a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant causes radiolytic generation of several gases including hydrogen. Hydrogen accumulating in equipment can be an explosion hazard. In such plants, though the consideration in the design has been fundamentally made in order to remove the ignition source from the equipment, the hydrogen concentration in the equipment should not exceed the explosion threshold. It is, therefore, desired to keep the hydrogen concentration lower than the explosion threshold by dilution with the air introduced into equipment, from the viewpoint which previously prevents the explosion. This report describes the calculation of hydrogen generation, evaluation of hydrogen concentration under abnormal operation and consideration of possible improvement at Tokai Reprocessing Plant. The amount of hydrogen generation was calculated for each equipment from available data on radiolysis induced by radioactive materials. Taking into consideration for abnormal condition that is single failure of air supply and loss of power supply, the investigation was made on the method for controlling so that the hydrogen concentration may not exceed the explosion threshold. Possible means which can control the concentration of hydrogen gas under the explosion threshold have been also investigated. As the result, it was found that hydrogen concentration of most equipment was kept under the explosion threshold. It was also shown that improvement of the facility was necessary on the equipment in which the concentration of the hydrogen may exceed the explosion threshold. Proposals based on the above results are also given in this report. The above content has been described in 'Examination of the hydrogen produced by the radiolysis' which is a part of 'Reviews of Design Data for Safety Assessment of Tokai Reprocessing Plant' (JNC TN8410 99-002) published in February 1999. This report incorporates the detail evaluation so that operation

  3. Hydrogen charging/discharging system with liquid organic compounds: a lacunar oxide catalyst to hydrogenate the unsaturated organic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalowiecki-Duhamel, L.; Carpentier, J.; Payen, E.; Heurtaux, F.

    2006-01-01

    Lacunar mixed oxides based on cerium nickel and aluminium or zirconium CeM 0.5 Ni x O y s (M = Zr or Al), able to store high quantities of hydrogen, have been analysed in the hydrogenation of toluene into methyl-cyclohexane (MCH). When these solids present very good toluene hydrogenation activity and selectivity towards MCH in presence of H 2 , in absence of gaseous hydrogen, the reactive hydrogen species stored in the solid can hydrogenate toluene into MCH. The hydrogenation activity under helium + toluene flow decreases as a function of time and becomes nil. The integration of the curve obtained allows to determine the extractable hydrogen content of the solid used, and a value of 1.2 wt % is obtained at 80 C on a CeAl 0.5 Ni 3 O y compound pre-treated in H 2 at 300 C. To optimise the system, different parameters have been analysed, such as the catalyst formulation, the metal content, the pre-reducing conditions as well as the reaction conditions under helium + toluene. (authors)

  4. CO2-free hydrogen as a substitute to fossil fuels: What are the targets? Prospective assessment of the hydrogen market attractiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansilla, C.; Avril, S.; Imbach, J.; Le Duigou, A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen is usually presented as a promising energy carrier that has a major role to play in low carbon mobility, through the use of fuel cells. However, such a market is not expected in the short term. In the meantime, hydrogen may also contribute to reduce carbon emissions in diverse sectors: oil refining, low carbon mobility through the industrial deployment of advanced bio-fuels, natural gas consumption, and methanol production. According to the targeted market, objective costs are rather different; and so is the reachable mitigated CO 2 amount. This paper assesses the dynamics of these markets' attractiveness, in order to provide target costs for CO 2 -free hydrogen production. The potential of the markets of hydrogen as a fuel and hydrogen for the biomass-to-liquid production is highlighted, as they could represent significant volumes by 2050, as well as interesting perspectives for CO 2 emission reduction. However the targets are very sensitive to the CO 2 price, thus highlighting the requirement for economic instruments in order to facilitate the penetration of such technologies. Hydrogen is then highlighted as a key player of the energy system in the years to come, as the connection of the energy and mobility sectors. (authors)

  5. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of the Drip Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F. Hua

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced cracking is characterized by the decreased ductility and fracture toughness of a material due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. Corrosion is the source of hydrogen generation. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, hydrogen-induced cracking may be a concern because the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this report is to analyze whether the drip shield will fail by hydrogen-induced cracking under repository conditions within 10,000 years after emplacement. Hydrogen-induced cracking is a scenario of premature failure of the drip shield. This report develops a realistic model to assess the form of hydrogen-induced cracking degradation of the drip shield under the hydrogen-induced cracking. The scope of this work covers the evaluation of hydrogen absorbed due to general corrosion and galvanic coupling to less noble metals (e.g., Stainless Steel Type 316 and carbon steels) under the repository conditions during the 10,000-year regulatory period after emplacement and whether the absorbed hydrogen content will exceed the critical hydrogen concentration value, above which the hydrogen-induced cracking is assumed to occur. This report also provides the basis for excluding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to hydrogen-induced cracking of the drip shield with particular emphasis on FEP 2.1.03.04.OB, hydride cracking of drip shields (DTN: M00407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). This report is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944])

  6. Simultaneous determination of the styrene unit content and assessment of molecular weight of triblock copolymers in adhesives by a size exclusion chromatography method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingfang; Wang, Yuerong; Luo, Pei; Zhang, Hongyang; Zhang, Min; Hu, Ping

    2017-10-01

    The content of styrene units in nonhydrogenated and hydrogenated styrene-butadiene-styrene and styrene-isoprene-styrene triblock copolymers significantly influences product performance. A size exclusion chromatography method was developed to determine the average styrene content of triblock copolymers blended with tackifier in adhesives. A complete separation of the triblock copolymer from the other additives was realized with size exclusion chromatography. The peak area ratio of the UV and refraction index signals of the copolymers at the same effective elution volume was correlated to the average styrene unit content using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with commercial copolymers as standards. The obtained calibration curves showed good linearity for both the hydrogenated and nonhydrogenated styrene-butadiene-styrene and styrene-isoprene-styrene triblock copolymers (r = 0.974 for styrene contents of 19.3-46.3% for nonhydrogenated ones and r = 0.970 for the styrene contents of 23-58.2% for hydrogenated ones). For copolymer blends, the developed method provided more accurate average styrene unit contents than nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy provided. These results were validated using two known copolymer blends consisting of either styrene-isoprene-styrene or hydrogenated styrene-butadiene-styrene and a hydrocarbon tackifying resin as well as an unknown adhesive with styrene-butadiene-styrene and an aromatic tackifying resin. The methodology can be readily applied to styrene-containing polymers in blends such as poly(acrylonitrile-butadiene styrene). © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Environmental and Health Benefits and Risks of a Global Hydrogen Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Rahn, T. A.; Kinnison, D. E.

    2003-12-01

    Rapid development in hydrogen fuel-cell technologies will create a strong impetus for a massive hydrogen supply and distribution infrastructure in the coming decades. Hydrogen provides an efficient energy carrier that promises to enhance urban and regional air quality that will benefit human health. It could also reduce risks of climate change if large-scale hydrogen production by renewable or nuclear energy sources becomes viable. While it is well known that the byproduct of energy produced from hydrogen is water vapor, it is not well known that the storage and transfer of hydrogen is inevitably accompanied by measurable leakage of hydrogen. Unintended consequences of hydrogen leakage include reduction in global oxidative capacity, changes in tropospheric ozone, and increase in stratospheric water that would exacerbate halogen induced ozone losses as well as impact the earth's radiation budget and climate. Stratospheric ozone depletion would increase exposure to harmful ultraviolet radiation and increased risk to melanoma. We construct plausible global hydrogen energy use and leak scenarios and assess their impacts using global 3-D simulations by the Model for Ozone And Related Trace species (MOZART). The hydrogen fluxes and photochemistry in our model successfully reproduce the contemporary hydrogen cycle as observed by a network of remote global stations. Our intent is to determine environmentally tolerable leak rates and also facilitate a gradual phasing in of a hydrogen economy over the next several decades as the elimination of the use of halocarbons gradually reduces halogen induced stratospheric ozone loss rates. We stress that the future evolution of microbial soil sink of hydrogen that determines its current lifetime (about 2 years) is the principal source of uncertainty in our assessment. We propose global monitoring of hydrogen and its deuterium content to define a baseline and track its budget to responsibly prepare for a global hydrogen economy.

  8. Effect of hydrogen addition on the microstructure of TC21 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Tangkui; Li Miaoquan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The aim of this paper is to study the effect of hydrogen content (0-0.887 wt.%H) on microstructure, phase composition, microhardness and β transus temperature of TC21 alloy. The results show that, with increasing hydrogen content, the β phase increases, the α/β interfaces of lamellar transformed β phase disappear, the lattice parameter of β phase increases and the β transus temperature decreases for the hydrogenated TC21 alloy. In comparison to the as-received TC21 alloy, the contrasts of primary α phase and transformed β phase under optical microscope in the TC21 alloy with high hydrogen content are reversed completely. Furthermore, the γ and δ hydrides are detected in the hydrogenated TC21 alloy. In addition, the variations of phase compositions for the hydrogenated TC21 alloy have influence on microhardness and β transus temperature. → In conclusion, this paper shows some significant rules about the influence of hydrogen on TC21 alloy. - Abstract: TC21 alloy was hydrogenated at 750 deg. C with different hydrogen contents ranging from 0 to 0.873 wt.%H, and its microstructural evolution and phase transformations were investigated by optical microscopy (OM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The microhardness and the β transus temperature for the hydrogenated TC21 alloy were determined by microhardness testing and metallographical approach, respectively. The results show that, hydrogen addition has a noticeable influence on microstructure, phase composition, microhardness and β transus temperature of TC21 alloy. With increasing hydrogen content, the β phase increases, the α/β interfaces of lamellar transformed β phase disappear, the lattice parameter of β phase increases and the β transus temperature decreases for the hydrogenated TC21 alloy. In comparison to the as-received TC21 alloy, the contrasts of primary α phase and transformed β phase under optical microscope in the hydrogenated TC21 alloy with high hydrogen

  9. Determination of hydrogen solubility in Fe-Mn-C melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lob, Alexander; Senk, Dieter [Institute of Ferrous Metallurgy (IEHK), RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Hallstedt, Bengt [Materials Chemistry (MCh), RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    High manganese steels are supposed to be sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement. This can be explained by increased hydrogen solubility in comparison to unalloyed steels. To minimise hydrogen pick up during melting operations, it is necessary to know accurately the hydrogen solubility as function of hydrogen partial pressure, temperature and Mn content. In this work in situ measurements of hydrogen content at 12, 18 and 23 wt.% Mn (and 0.6 wt.% C) using the Hydris {sup registered} system are compared to pin-tube measurements. Below about 7 ppm [H] both methods gave the same results and above 7 ppm [H] the in situ measurement showed slightly higher hydrogen contents because some hydrogen is lost during quenching with the pin-tube method. The measured solubilities were compared with thermodynamic calculations. Using dilute solution theory with data developed for alloyed Fe-based melts with up to 10 wt.% Mn gives reasonable results except that the hydrogen solubility is slightly underestimated for the presently investigated Mn contents. This could be compensated by using an interaction parameter of e{sup Mn}{sub H}=-0.004 instead of e{sup Mn}{sub H}=-0.0012. A Calphad type extrapolation from the binary Fe-H, Mn-H and Fe-Mn systems gave results very close to the experimental ones. This work is a contribution from the collaborative research centre SFB 761 ''Steel - ab initio''. (Copyright copyright 2011 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Heat, hydrogen peroxide, and UV resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores with increased core water content and with or without major DNA-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popham, D.L.; Sengupta, S.; Setlow, P.

    1995-01-01

    Spores of a Bacillus subtilis strain with an insertion mutation in the dacB gene, which codes for an enzyme involved in spore cortex biosynthesis, have a higher core water content than wild-type spores. Spores lacking the two major α/β-type small, acid-soluble proteins (SASP) (termed a α - β - spores) have the same core water content as do wild-type spores, but α - β - dacB spores had more core water than did dacB spores. The resistance of α - β - , α - β - dacB, dacB, and wild-type spores to dry and moist heat, hydrogen peroxide, and UV radiation has been determined, as has the role of DNA damage in spore killing by moist heat and hydrogen peroxide. These data (1) suggest that core water content has little if any role in spore UV resistance and are consistent with binding of α/β-type SASP to DNA being the major mechanism providing protection to spores from UV radiation; (2) suggest that binding of αβ-type SASP to DNA is the major mechanism unique to spores providing protection from dry heat; (3) suggest that spore resistance to moist heat and hydrogen peroxide is affected to a large degree by the core water content, as increased core water resulted in large decreases in spore resistance to these agents; and (4) indicate that since this decreased resistance (i.e., in dacB spores) is not associated with increased spore killing by DNA damage, spore DNA must normally be extremely well protected against such damage, presumably by the saturation of spore DNA by α/β-type SASP. 19 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Assessment of MHR-based hydrogen energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Matthew; Shenoy, Arkal; Schultz, Kenneth; Brown, Lloyd; Besenbruch, Gottfried; Handa, Norihiko; Das, Jadu

    2004-01-01

    Process heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor can be used to drive a set of chemical reactions, with the net result of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. For example, process heat at temperatures in the range 850degC to 950degC can drive the sulfur-iodine (SI) thermochemical process to produce hydrogen with high efficiency. The SI process produces highly pure hydrogen and oxygen, with formation, decomposition, regeneration, and recycle of the intermediate chemical reagents and low-temperature heat as the only waste product. Electricity can also be used directly to split water, using conventional, low-temperature electrolysis (LTE). Hydrogen can also be produced with hybrid processes that use both process heat and electricity to generate hydrogen. An example of a hybrid process is high-temperature electrolysis (HTE), in which process heat is used to generate steam, which is then supplied to an electrolyzer to generate hydrogen. This process is of interest because the efficiency of electrolysis increases with temperature. Because of its high-temperature capability, advanced of development relative to other high-temperature reactor concepts, and passive-safety features, the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) is well suited for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy. In this paper we investigate concepts for coupling the MHR to the SI process, LTE, and HTE. These concepts are referred to as the H2-MHR. (author)

  12. Assessment of hydrogen risk using advanced methodology for lumped parameter code-MELCOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duspiva, Jiri; Kujal, Bohumir

    2007-01-01

    The hydrogen risk is one of the most important containment integrity challenge during a severe accident progression at the VVER type reactors installed at the Czech NPPs. On the basis of recent comprehensive research results the general flame acceleration (FA) and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) criteria were formulated. The main objective of the new methodology developed in the NRI Rez was to prepare an analytical tool for the assessment of the hydrogen risk at the Czech NPPs in the course of a severe accident and also for the design of hydrogen removal system which should be able to prevent or at least minimize the threats of hydrogen detonation in containments. The major idea on which the development of models for the FA and DDT criteria was based is described in OECD state-of-art report (NEA, 2000). The module for the computation of FA criterion (often named σ-criterion) and DDT one (also named λ or Dorofeev criterion) was linked to the MELCOR 1.8.5 model of VVER-1000 containment. The most important feature of new model is that it makes possible to evaluate the both of the criteria for all compartments in the containment continuously during severe accident scenario progression. The containment model, which could be used for such a calculation, has to be very detailed owing to appropriate description of hydrogen distribution. New model was tested by calculation of hydrogen detonation risk in the VVER-1000 containment during severe accident scenario initiated by medium break LOCA. At present two more VVER-1000 severe accident scenarios have been analyzed. The mapping of a hydrogen detonation risk in individual compartments inside containment was performed. The results of analysis confirm that the risk of hydrogen detonation in the great majority of containment compartments during severe accidents is very high if the hydrogen removal system is not installed. (author)

  13. Hydrogen damage in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen damage has been studied in a wide variety of stainless steels. Both internal and external hydrogen damage were evaluated by ductility or J-integral under rising tensile loads and by fractography. Analysis of the data has emphasized the potential effects of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen damage. Strain-induced martensite was neither necessary nor sufficient for hydrogen damage in the alloys studied. Neither ductility loss nor fracture-mode change correlated generally with martensite formation. Alloy composition, particularly nickel and nitrogen contents, was the primary factor in resistance to hydrogen damage. Thermomechanical processing, however, could alter the degree of hydrogen damage in an alloy and was critical for optimizing resistance to hydrogen damage. 10 figures, 10 tables

  14. Thermoanalytical investigation of the hydrogen absorption behaviour of Sm2Fe17-xGax at high hydrogen pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handstein, A.; Kubis, M.; Gebel, B.; Mueller, K.-H.; Schultz, L.; Gutfleisch, O.; Harris, I.R.; Birmingham Univ.

    1998-01-01

    The complete disproportionation of Sm 2 Fe 17-x Ga x during annealing in hydrogen is hindered due to an increased stability of the compounds with a higher Ga content (x ≥ 1). Therefore the HD process as the first step of HDDR (hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination) has to be carried out at a high hydrogen pressure for x ≥ 1. The hydrogen absorption behaviour of Sm 2 Fe 17-x Ga x (x = 0, 0.5, 1 and 2) was investigated by means of hydrogen differential thermal analysis (HDTA) and high pressure differential scanning calorimetry (HPDSC) at hydrogen pressures up to 70 bar. A dependency of hydrogenation and disproportionation temperatures on hydrogen pressure and Ga content was found. The comparison with other substituents (M = Al and Si) instead of M = Ga showed an increased stability of Sm 2 Fe 17-x M x compounds against disproportionation by hydrogen in the sequence Al, Ga and Si. The Curie temperatures of the interstitially hydrogenated Th 2 Zn 17 -type materials increase with the hydrogen pressure. In order to produce coercive and thermally stable Sm 2 Fe 15 Ga 2 C y powder by means of the HDDR process, we recombined material disproportionated at different hydrogen pressures. Preliminary results of magnetic properties of this HDDR treated and gas-carburized Sm 2 Fe 15 Ga 2 C y are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Method for the determination of lignin content of a sample by flash pyrolysis in an atmosphere of hydrogen or helium and method therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy (Inventor); Kwack, Eug Y. (Inventor); Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The lignin content of wood, paper pulp or other material containing lignin (such as filter paper soaked in black liquor) is more readily determined by flash pyrolysis of the sample at approximately 550.degree. C. in a reducing atmosphere of hydrogen or in an inert atmosphere of helium followed by a rapid analysis of the product gas by a mass spectrometer. The heated pyrolysis unit as fabricated comprises a small platinum cup welded to an electrically-heated stainless steel ribbon with control means for programmed short duration (1.5 sec, approximately) heating and means for continuous flow of hydrogen or helium. The pyrolysis products enter an electron-ionization mode mass spectrometer for spectral evaluation. Lignin content is obtained from certain ratios of integrated ion currents of many mass spectral lines, the ratios being linearly related to the Kappa number of Klason lignin.

  16. Effects of hydrogen-charging on the properties of S235JR steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietkun-Greber, Izabela

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the test results of the S235JR steel susceptibility to damage under the influence of hydrogen. The test of mechanical properties was performed on the basis of a static stretch test of non-hydrogenated samples and after cathodic polarization. Electrochemical measurements for the assessment of corrosion resistance of non-hydrogenated and hydrogenated steels were carried out using open circuit potential measurement and registering of potentiodynamic polarization curves in a three-electrode measuring system. Hydrogenation was carried out for between 3 and 24 hours in a solution of 0.1 N sulfuric acid (VI) with the addition of 2 mg/dm 3 of arsenic oxide (III) at an electric current density of 10 mA/cm2. The hydrogen content in the steel before and after saturation with hydrogen was determined using the analyzer. Fracture samples after tensile test were observed using scanning electron microscope. The results of the research showed that as the hydrogen concentration in the examined steel increased (the lengthening of the saturation time), the deterioration of its mechanical and electrochemical properties occurred.

  17. Support of a pathway to a hydrogen future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, A.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which outline the content of the presentation. Subjects addressed include: hydrogen research program vision; electricity industry restructuring -- opportunities and challenges for hydrogen; transportation sector -- opportunities for hydrogen; near-term and mid-term opportunities for hydrogen; and hydrogen production technologies from water. It is concluded that the global climate change challenge is the potential driver for the development of hydrogen systems.

  18. Hydrogen, energy of the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleau, Th.

    2007-01-01

    A cheap, non-polluting energy with no greenhouse gas emissions and unlimited resources? This is towards this fantastic future that this book brings us, analyzing the complex but promising question of hydrogen. The scientific and technical aspects of production, transport, storage and distribution raised by hydrogen are thoroughly reviewed. Content: I) Energy, which solutions?: 1 - hydrogen, a future; 2 - hydrogen, a foreseeable solution?; II) Hydrogen, an energy vector: 3 - characteristics of hydrogen (physical data, quality and drawbacks); 4 - hydrogen production (from fossil fuels, from water, from biomass, bio-hydrogen generation); 5 - transport, storage and distribution of hydrogen; 6 - hydrogen cost (production, storage, transport and distribution costs); III) Fuel cells and ITER, utopias?: 7 - molecular hydrogen uses (thermal engines and fuel cells); 8 - hydrogen and fusion (hydrogen isotopes, thermonuclear reaction, ITER project, fusion and wastes); IV) Hydrogen acceptability: 9 - risk acceptability; 10 - standards and regulations; 11 - national, European and international policies about hydrogen; 12 - big demonstration projects in France and in the rest of the world; conclusion. (J.S.)

  19. On problems of hydrogen load of sponge palladium and determination of hydrogen content in it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittag, E.; Pleis, U.; Roemer, J.

    1977-01-01

    In the process of catalytic dehalogenation applied as a method for preparation of organic compounds labelled with tritium a special importance pertains to the determination of hydrogen (or tritium) bound on the catalyst. Hydrogen contained in palladium black may be determined quantitatively by oxidation with Pd ++ ions and successive potentiometric titration of the released H + ions. The method permits to obtain data on the quality of the catalyst and on the gas losses on the catalyst. Moreover, in connection with the radioactivity measurement, this method may be used for specific activity determination of the tritium gas

  20. Content Validation and Evaluation of an Endovascular Teamwork Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, L; Bicknell, C; Patel, K; Vyas, R; Van Herzeele, I; Sevdalis, N; Rudarakanchana, N

    2016-07-01

    To modify, content validate, and evaluate a teamwork assessment tool for use in endovascular surgery. A multistage, multimethod study was conducted. Stage 1 included expert review and modification of the existing Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery (OTAS) tool. Stage 2 included identification of additional exemplar behaviours contributing to effective teamwork and enhanced patient safety in endovascular surgery (using real-time observation, focus groups, and semistructured interviews of multidisciplinary teams). Stage 3 included content validation of exemplar behaviours using expert consensus according to established psychometric recommendations and evaluation of structure, content, feasibility, and usability of the Endovascular Observational Teamwork Assessment Tool (Endo-OTAS) by an expert multidisciplinary panel. Stage 4 included final team expert review of exemplars. OTAS core team behaviours were maintained (communication, coordination, cooperation, leadership team monitoring). Of the 114 OTAS behavioural exemplars, 19 were modified, four removed, and 39 additional endovascular-specific behaviours identified. Content validation of these 153 exemplar behaviours showed that 113/153 (73.9%) reached the predetermined Item-Content Validity Index rating for teamwork and/or patient safety. After expert team review, 140/153 (91.5%) exemplars were deemed to warrant inclusion in the tool. More than 90% of the expert panel agreed that Endo-OTAS is an appropriate teamwork assessment tool with observable behaviours. Some concerns were noted about the time required to conduct observations and provide performance feedback. Endo-OTAS is a novel teamwork assessment tool, with evidence for content validity and relevance to endovascular teams. Endo-OTAS enables systematic objective assessment of the quality of team performance during endovascular procedures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Feasibility study of hydrogen determination in blended gas mixture by an indigenously developed hydrogen determinator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaikwad, Revati; Sonar, V.R.; Pandey, R.K.; Karekar, C.D.; Raul, Seema; Mahanty, B.; Kelkar, A.; Bhatt, R.B.; Behere, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    It is required to determine accurately the percentage composition of hydrogen in the blended gas of N 2 and H 2 prior to deliver to the sintering furnace. A feasibility study has been carried out to determine the percentage composition of hydrogen in the blended gas by using an indigenously developed hydrogen determinator. The instrument uses gas chromatograph-thermal conductivity (GC-TCD) technique to determine hydrogen. The flow of carrier gas was kept at 100 mL min -1 during the analysis. A very close agreement between the determined value and the reported value of hydrogen content in the commercially available N 2 -H 2 mixed cylinder was found by using the indigenous hydrogen determinator. (author)

  2. Nondestructive hydrogen analysis of steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 by wide-angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong; Qian, Shuo; Garrison, Ben; Smith, Tyler; Kim, Peter

    2018-04-01

    A nondestructive neutron scattering method to precisely measure the hydrogen content in high-temperature steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding was developed. Zircaloy-4 cladding was used to produce hydrided specimens with hydrogen content up to ≈500 wppm. Following hydrogen charging, the hydrogen content of the hydrided specimens was measured using the vacuum hot extraction method, by which the samples with desired hydrogen concentrations were selected for the neutron study. The hydrided samples were then oxidized in steam up to ≈6.0 wt. % at 1100 °C. Optical microscopy shows that our hydriding procedure results in uniform distribution of circumferential hydrides across the wall thickness, and uniform oxide layers were formed on the sample surfaces by the steam oxidation. Small- and wide-angle neutron scattering were simultaneously performed to provide a quick (less than an hour per sample) measurement of the hydrogen content in various types of hydrided and oxidized Zircaloy-4. Our study demonstrates that the hydrogen in pre-oxidized Zircaloy-4 cladding can be measured very accurately by both small- and wide-angle neutron scattering. For steam-oxidized samples, the small-angle neutron scattering is contaminated with coherent scattering from additional structural features induced by the steam oxidation. However, the scattering intensity of the wide-angle neutron scattering increases proportionally with the hydrogen charged in the samples. The hydrogen content and wide-angle neutron scattering intensity are highly linearly correlated for the oxidized cladding samples examined in this work, and can be used to precisely determine the hydrogen content in steam-oxidized Zircaloy-4 samples. Hydrogen contents determined by neutron scattering of oxidation samples were also found to be consistent with the results of chemical analysis within acceptable margins for error.

  3. Sodium hydrazinidoborane: a chemical hydrogen-storage material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moury, Romain; Demirci, Umit B; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Chiriac, Rodica; van der Lee, Arie; Miele, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Herein, we present the successful synthesis and full characterization (by (11) B magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction) of sodium hydrazinidoborane (NaN2 H3 BH3 , with a hydrogen content of 8.85 wt %), a new material for chemical hydrogen storage. Using lab-prepared pure hydrazine borane (N2 H4 BH3 ) and commercial sodium hydride as precursors, sodium hydrazinidoborane was synthesized by ball-milling at low temperature (-30 °C) under an argon atmosphere. Its thermal stability was assessed by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that under heating sodium hydrazinidoborane starts to liberate hydrogen below 60 °C. Within the range of 60-150 °C, the overall mass loss is as high as 7.6 wt %. Relative to the parent N2 H4 BH3 , sodium hydrazinidoborane shows improved dehydrogenation properties, further confirmed by dehydrogenation experiments under prolonged heating at constant temperatures of 80, 90, 95, 100, and 110 °C. Hence, sodium hydrazinidoborane appears to be more suitable for chemical hydrogen storage than N2 H4 BH3 . Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Hydrogen embrittlement of titanium tested with fracture mechanics specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aho-Mantila, I.; Rahko, P.

    1990-11-01

    Titanium is one of the possible canister materials for spent nuclear fuel. The aim of this study is to determine whether the hydrogen embrittlement of titanium could be a possible deterioration mechanism of titanium canisters. This experimental study was preceded by a literature review and an experimental study on crack nucleation. Tests in this study were carried out with hydrogen charged fracture mechanics specimens. The studied hydrogen contents were as received, 100 ppm, 200 ppm, 500 ppm and 700 ppm and the types of the studied titanium were ASTM Grades 2 and 12. Test methods were slow tensile test (0.027 mm/h) and fatigue test (stress ratio 0.7 or 0.8 and frequency 5 Hz). According to the literature titanium may be embrittled by hydrogen at slow strain rates and cracking may occur under sustained load. In this study no evidence of hydrogen embrittlement was noticed in slow strain rate tension with bulk hydrogen contents up to 700 ppm. The fatigue tests of titanium Grades 2 and 12 containing 700 ppm hydrogen showed even slower crack growth compared to the as received condition. Very high hydrogen contents well in eccess of 700 ppm on the surface of titanium can, however, facilitate surface crack nucleation and crack growth, as shown in the previous study

  5. Antioxidant activities of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water assessed by ESR and 2,2′-bipyridyl methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shinya; Matsuoka, Daigo; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We prepared nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water (nano-H water) which contained hydrogen nano-bubbles of < 717-nm diameter for 54% of total bubbles. In the DMPO-spin trap electron spin resonance (ESR) method, the DMPO-OH:MnO ratio, being attributed to amounts of hydroxyl radicals (·OH), was 2.78 for pure water (dissolved hydrogen [DH] ≤ 0.01 ppm, oxidation-reduction potential [ORP] = + 324 mV), 2.73 for tap water (0.01 ppm, + 286 mV), 2.93 for commercially available hydrogen water (0.075 ppm, + 49 mV), and 2.66 for manufactured hydrogen water (0.788 ppm, − 614 mV), whereas the nano-H water (0.678 ppm, − 644 mV) exhibited 2.05, showing the superiority of nano-H water to other types of hydrogen water in terms of ·OH-scavenging activity. Then, the reduction activity of nano-H water was assessed spectrophotometrically by the 2,2′-bipyridyl method. Differential absorbance at 530 nm was in the order: 0.018 for pure water, 0.055 for tap water, 0.079 for nano-H water, 0.085 for commercially available hydrogen water, and 0.090 for manufactured hydrogen water, indicating a prominent reduction activity of hydrogen water and nano-H water against oxidation in ascorbate-coupled ferric ion–bipyridyl reaction. Thus, nano-H water has an improved antioxidant activity as compared to hydrogen water of similar DH-level, indicating the more marked importance of nano-bubbles rather than the concentration of hydrogen in terms of ·OH-scavenging. - Highlights: • We assessed the antioxidant activity of nano-bubble hydrogen-dissolved water (nano-H water). • Nano-H water exhibited superior ·OH-scavenging activity in DMPO-spin trap ESR. • A reduction ability of nano-H water was shown in 2,2′-bipyridyl reaction. • Nano-H water has an improved antioxidant activity as compared to hydrogen water of similar DH-level. • Results indicated the importance of nano-bubbles rather than the concentration of hydrogen

  6. Assessment of the GOTHIC code for prediction of hydrogen flame propagation in small scale experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin-Yong . E-mail jinyong1@fnctech.com; Lee, Jung-Jae; Park, Goon-Cherl . E-mail parkgc@snu.ac.kr

    2006-01-01

    With the rising concerns regarding the time and space dependent hydrogen behavior in severe accidents, the calculation for local hydrogen combustion in compartment has been attempted using CFD codes like GOTHIC. In particular, the space resolved hydrogen combustion analysis is essential to address certain safety issues such as the safety components survivability, and to determine proper positions for hydrogen control devices as e.q. recombiners or igniters. In the GOTHIC 6.1b code, there are many advanced features associated with the hydrogen burn models to enhance its calculation capability. In this study, we performed premixed hydrogen/air combustion experiments with an upright, rectangular shaped, combustion chamber of dimensions 1 m x 0.024 m x 1 m. The GOTHIC 6.1b code was used to simulate the hydrogen/air combustion experiments, and its prediction capability was assessed by comparing the experimental with multidimensional calculational results. Especially, the prediction capability of the GOTHIC 6.1b code for local hydrogen flame propagation phenomena was examined. For some cases, comparisons are also presented for lumped modeling of hydrogen combustion. By evaluating the effect of parametric simulations, we present some instructions for local hydrogen combustion analysis using the GOTHIC 6.1b code. From the analyses results, it is concluded that the modeling parameter of GOTHIC 6.1b code should be modified when applying the mechanistic burn model for hydrogen propagation analysis in small geometry

  7. Production of Hydrogen from Bio-ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrice Giroudiere; Christophe Boyer; Stephane His; Robert Sanger; Kishore Doshi; Jijun Xu

    2006-01-01

    IFP and HyRadix are collaborating in the development of a new hydrogen production system from liquid feedstock such as bio-ethanol. Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions along with high hydrogen yield are the key objectives. Market application of the system will be hydrogen refueling stations as well as medium scale hydrogen consumers including the electronics, metals processing, and oils hydrogenation industries. The conversion of bio-ethanol to hydrogen will be performed within a co-developed process including an auto-thermal reformer working under pressure. The technology will produce high-purity hydrogen with ultralow CO content. The catalytic auto-thermal reforming technology combines the exothermic and endothermic reaction and leads to a highly efficient heat integration. The development strategy to reach a high hydrogen yield target with the bio-ethanol hydrogen generator is presented. (authors)

  8. PERMEABILITY, SOLUBILITY, AND INTERACTION OF HYDROGEN IN POLYMERS- AN ASSESSMENT OF MATERIALS FOR HYDROGEN TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, M

    2008-02-05

    Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) piping has been identified as a leading candidate for use in a transport system for the Hydrogen Economy. Understanding the permeation and leakage of hydrogen through the candidate materials is vital to effective materials system selection or design and development of safe and efficient materials for this application. A survey of the literature showed that little data on hydrogen permeation are available and no mechanistically-based models to quantitatively predict permeation behavior have been developed. However, several qualitative trends in gaseous permeation have been identified and simple calculations have been performed to identify leakage rates for polymers of varying crystallinity. Additionally, no plausible mechanism was found for the degradation of polymeric materials in the presence of pure hydrogen. The absence of anticipated degradation is due to lack of interactions between hydrogen and FRP and very low solubility coefficients of hydrogen in polymeric materials. Recommendations are made to address research and testing needs to support successful materials development and use of FRP materials for hydrogen transport and distribution.

  9. Hydrogen Gas Inhalation Attenuates Seawater Instillation-Induced Acute Lung Injury via the Nrf2 Pathway in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Mengyuan; Zhang, Sheng; Wu, Lifeng; Huan, Le; Huang, Fenglou; Cui, Yunliang; Lin, Zhaofen

    2016-12-01

    Seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury involves oxidative stress and apoptosis. Although hydrogen gas inhalation is reportedly protective in multiple types of lung injury, the effect of hydrogen gas inhalation on seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of hydrogen gas on seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury and explored the mechanisms involved. Rabbits were randomly assigned to control, hydrogen (2 % hydrogen gas inhalation), seawater (3 mL/kg seawater instillation), and seawater + hydrogen (3 mL/kg seawater instillation + 2 % hydrogen gas inhalation) groups. Arterial partial oxygen pressure and lung wet/dry weight ratio were detected. Protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 levels were determined. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to monitor changes in lung specimens, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assayed. In addition, NF-E2-related factor (Nrf) 2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein expression were measured, and apoptosis was assessed by measuring caspase-3 expression and using terminal deoxy-nucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining. Hydrogen gas inhalation markedly improved lung endothelial permeability and decreased both MDA content and MPO activity in lung tissue; these changes were associated with decreases in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in BALF. Hydrogen gas also alleviated histopathological changes and cell apoptosis. Moreover, Nrf2 and HO-1 expressions were significantly activated and caspase-3 expression was inhibited. These results demonstrate that hydrogen gas inhalation attenuates seawater instillation-induced acute lung injury in rabbits and that the protective effects observed may be related to the activation of the Nrf2 pathway.

  10. The hydrogen economy- A debate on the merits

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info van Vuuren_2007.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5193 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name van Vuuren_2007.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 The Hydrogen Economy A Debate... cheapest alternative. • The Hydrogen Economy or its alternative will only really take off when cheap coal production begins to peak Slide 10 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Global Warming • The risk is real, but the debate...

  11. Europe - the first hydrogen economy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, D.

    1999-01-01

    An examination of the state of research relating to hydrogen production and utilization indicates that interest in hydrogen from major companies in Europe has increased by several orders of magnitude in recent years. Of the three major areas where a hydrogen economy could be expected to start, namely, Japan, the United States and Europe, the latter may have advantages in diversity of resources, attitudes towards environmental issues and specific fiscal and regulatory structures. Examples of ongoing research and development projects in Europe include Norway's hydrogen combustion turbine to run on hydrogen from decarbonised natural gas, a project in the Netherlands involving mixing hydrogen and methane in the natural gas grid and a variety of projects involving liquid hydrogen refuelling, hydrogen aircraft, hydrogen fuelling stations and fuel cell vehicle development. There are also ongoing projects in carbon sequestration and hydrogen production for power generation and vehicle use. The author's main contention is that the combination of natural surroundings, environmental problems and attitudes, and business and government frameworks strongly suggest that Europe may be the first to have a hydrogen-based economy. 8 refs

  12. Hydrogen Contractors Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, Tim [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering

    2006-05-16

    This volume highlights the scientific content of the 2006 Hydrogen Contractors Meeting sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (DMS&E) on behalf of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). Hydrogen Contractors Meeting held from May 16-19, 2006 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott Hotel Arlington, Virginia. This meeting is the second in a series of research theme-based Contractors Meetings sponsored by DMS&E held in conjunction with our counterparts in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the first with the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The focus of this year’s meeting is BES funded fundamental research underpinning advancement of hydrogen storage. The major goals of these research efforts are the development of a fundamental scientific base in terms of new concepts, theories and computational tools; new characterization capabilities; and new materials that could be used or mimicked in advancing capabilities for hydrogen storage.

  13. Liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets; Cibles a hydrogene et deuterium liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bougon, M; Marquet, M; Prugne, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    A description is given of 1) Atmospheric pressure target: liquid hydrogen, 400 mm thickness; thermal insulation: styrofoam; the hydrogen vapors are used to improve the target cooling; Mylar windows. 2) Vacuum target: 12 liter content: hydrogen or deuterium; liquid thickness 400 mm; thermal insulation is afforded by a vacuum vessel and a liquid nitrogen shield. Recovery and liquefaction of deuterium vapors are managed in the vacuum vessel which holds the target. The target emptying system is designed for operating in a few minutes. (author) [French] Description de: 1) Cible a pression atmospherique; hydrogene liquide, 400 mm d'epaisseur; l'isolement thermique: styrofoam; on utilise les vapeurs d'hydrogene pour ameliorer le refroidissement de la cible; hublots en Mylar. 2) Cible sous vide; contenance 12 litres; hydrogene ou deuterium; epaisseur du liquide 400 mm; l'isolement thermique est assure par une cuve a vide et un ecran d'azote liquide. Recuperation et liquefaction des vapeurs de deuterium sont effectuees dans la cuve a vide contenant la cible. Le systeme de vidange pour la cible est concu pour fonctionner en quelques minutes. (auteur)

  14. Hydrogen embrittlement property of a 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength tempered martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Akiyama, Eiji; Yuuji, Kimura; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Uno, Nobuyoshi, E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.j [Nippon Steel and Sumikin Metal Products Co, Ltd, SA Bldg., 17-12 Kiba 2-chome, Koto-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    The hydrogen embrittlement property of a prototype 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength steel (NIMS17) containing hydrogen traps was evaluated using a slow strain rate test (SSRT) after cathodic hydrogen precharging, cyclic corrosion test (CCT) and atmospheric exposure. The hydrogen content in a fractured specimen was measured after SSRT by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The relationship between fracture stress and hydrogen content for the hydrogen-precharged specimens showed that the fracture stress of NIMS17 steel was higher, at a given hydrogen content, than that of conventional AISI 4135 steels with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa. This suggests better resistance of NIMS17 steel to hydrogen embrittlement. However, hydrogen uptake to NIMS17 steel under CCT and atmospheric exposure decreased the fracture stress. This is because of the stronger hydrogen uptake to the steel containing hydrogen traps than to the AISI 4135 steels. Although NIMS17 steel has a higher strength level than AISI 4135 steel with a tensile strength of 1500 MPa, the decrease in fracture stress is similar between these steels.

  15. Hydrogen embrittlement property of a 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength tempered martensitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songjie Li, Eiji Akiyama, Kimura Yuuji, Kaneaki Tsuzaki, Nobuyoshi Uno and Boping Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen embrittlement property of a prototype 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength steel (NIMS17 containing hydrogen traps was evaluated using a slow strain rate test (SSRT after cathodic hydrogen precharging, cyclic corrosion test (CCT and atmospheric exposure. The hydrogen content in a fractured specimen was measured after SSRT by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS. The relationship between fracture stress and hydrogen content for the hydrogen-precharged specimens showed that the fracture stress of NIMS17 steel was higher, at a given hydrogen content, than that of conventional AISI 4135 steels with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa. This suggests better resistance of NIMS17 steel to hydrogen embrittlement. However, hydrogen uptake to NIMS17 steel under CCT and atmospheric exposure decreased the fracture stress. This is because of the stronger hydrogen uptake to the steel containing hydrogen traps than to the AISI 4135 steels. Although NIMS17 steel has a higher strength level than AISI 4135 steel with a tensile strength of 1500 MPa, the decrease in fracture stress is similar between these steels.

  16. Hydrogen embrittlement property of a 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength tempered martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Boping; Akiyama, Eiji; Yuuji, Kimura; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Uno, Nobuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen embrittlement property of a prototype 1700-MPa-class ultrahigh-strength steel (NIMS17) containing hydrogen traps was evaluated using a slow strain rate test (SSRT) after cathodic hydrogen precharging, cyclic corrosion test (CCT) and atmospheric exposure. The hydrogen content in a fractured specimen was measured after SSRT by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The relationship between fracture stress and hydrogen content for the hydrogen-precharged specimens showed that the fracture stress of NIMS17 steel was higher, at a given hydrogen content, than that of conventional AISI 4135 steels with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa. This suggests better resistance of NIMS17 steel to hydrogen embrittlement. However, hydrogen uptake to NIMS17 steel under CCT and atmospheric exposure decreased the fracture stress. This is because of the stronger hydrogen uptake to the steel containing hydrogen traps than to the AISI 4135 steels. Although NIMS17 steel has a higher strength level than AISI 4135 steel with a tensile strength of 1500 MPa, the decrease in fracture stress is similar between these steels.

  17. Effect of hydrogen on transformation characteristics and deformation behavior in a Ti-Ni shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshiya, Taiji; Ando, Hiroei; Den, Shoji; Katsuta, Hiroshi.

    1992-01-01

    Transformation characteristics and deformation behavior of hydrogenated Ti-50.5 at% Ni alloys, which were occluded in a low pressure range of hydrogen between 1.1 and 78.5 kPa, have been studied by electrical resistivity measurement, tensile test, X-ray diffraction analysis and microstructural observation. M S temperature of the Ti-Ni alloys decreased with an increase in hydrogen content. This corresponds to the stabilization of the parent phase during cooling, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction: The suppression effect of hydrogen takes place on the martensitic transformation. Critical stress for slip deformation of hydrogenated Ti-Ni alloys changed with hydrogen content and thus hydrogen had a major influence on deformation behavior of those alloys. With hydrogen contents above 0.032 mol%, hardening was distinguished from softening which was pronounced in the contents from 0 to 0.032 mol% H. Hydrides were formed in hydrogen contents over 1.9 mol%. The hydride formation results in the reorientation in variants of the R phase and increase in the lattice strains of the parent phase. (author)

  18. Decrease in Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of 10B21 Screws by Bake Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Jen Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of baking on the mechanical properties and fracture characteristics of low-carbon boron (10B21 steel screws were investigated. Fracture torque tests and hydrogen content analysis were performed on baked screws to evaluate hydrogen embrittlement (HE susceptibility. The diffusible hydrogen content within 10B21 steel dominated the fracture behavior of the screws. The fracture torque of 10B21 screws baked for a long duration was affected by released hydrogen. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS result showed that hydrogen content decreased with increasing baking duration, and thus the HE susceptibility of 10B21 screws improved. Diffusible hydrogen promoted crack propagation in high-stress region. The HE of 10B21 screws can be prevented by long-duration baking.

  19. Surface studies: corrosion, hydrogen content and charge transport in materials and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D.N.

    1999-01-01

    Presented here is a review of recent applications of the Melbourne nuclear microprobe applied to the study of surface phenomena in a variety of materials over the past two years. In addition to these applications, numerous improvements to the Melbourne system were initiated over the same period. These have been mainly directed at improvements in the spatial resolution through the installation of shielding to reduce stray magnetic fields and commissioning of a new event-by-event data acquisition system that can handle high count rates from up to four detectors with full dead time correction. In 1999 an ARC Research Infrastructure and Facilities Program grant has allowed us to perform a major upgrade of the Pelletron 5U accelerator. Major components of this upgrade include: a new ion source in the terminal, replacement of the column corona needles with resistors, replenishment of the SF6 gas supply and installation of a Danfysik analysing magnet power supply. In the near future we will also test some proposals to increase the ion source brightness based on reduction of the gas load on the column from the ion source. Many of the applications of the Melbourne nuclear microprobe over the past two years have employed the classic techniques of Ion Beam Analysis including PIXE and RBS. Pilot studies of involving the mapping of hydrogen in polysilicon solar cells has been done with the technique of elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). A number of different measurements such as depth distribution, stoichiometry, trace element distribution or hydrogen content were performed. Finally, we have also continued to study the visible light emitted from the specimen during ion irradiation. This can be collected to form images by ionoluminescense (IL). IL is an emerging technique for use with a nuclear microprobe that offers new insights into the presence of optically active defects in materials

  20. Bio-oil Stabilization by Hydrogenation over Reduced Metal Catalysts at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huamin; Lee, Suh-Jane; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2016-08-30

    Biomass fast pyrolysis integrated with bio-oil upgrading represents a very attractive approach for converting biomass to hydrocarbon transportation fuels. However, the thermal and chemical instability of bio-oils presents significant problems when they are being upgraded, and development of effective approaches for stabilizing bio-oils is critical to the success of the technology. Catalytic hydrogenation to remove reactive species in bio-oil has been considered as one of the most efficient ways to stabilize bio-oil. This paper provides a fundamental understanding of hydrogenation of actual bio-oils over a Ru/TiO2 catalyst under conditions relevant to practical bio-oil hydrotreating processes. Bio-oil feed stocks, bio-oils hydrogenated to different extents, and catalysts have been characterized to provide insights into the chemical and physical properties of these samples and to understand the correlation of the properties with the composition of the bio-oil and catalysts. The results indicated hydrogenation of various components of the bio-oil, including sugars, aldehydes, ketones, alkenes, aromatics, and carboxylic acids, over the Ru/TiO2 catalyst and 120 to 160oC. Hydrogenation of these species significantly changed the chemical and physical properties of the bio-oil and overall improved its thermal stability, especially by reducing the carbonyl content, which represented the content of the most reactive species (i.e., sugar, aldehydes, and ketones). The change of content of each component in response to increasing hydrogen additions suggests the following bio-oil hydrogenation reaction sequence: sugar conversion to sugar alcohols, followed by ketone and aldehyde conversion to alcohols, followed by alkene and aromatic hydrogenation, and then followed by carboxylic acid hydrogenation to alcohols. Hydrogenation of bio-oil samples with different sulfur contents or inorganic material contents suggested that sulfur poisoning of the reduced Ru metal catalysts was

  1. Low temperature heat capacity of lutetium and lutetium hydrogen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.K.

    1977-10-01

    The heat capacity of high purity electrotransport refined lutetium was measured between 1 and 20 0 K. Results for theta/sub D/ were in excellent agreement with theta values determined from elastic constant measurements. The heat capacity of a series of lutetium-hydrogen solid solution alloys was determined and results showed an increase in γ from 8.2 to about 11.3 mJ/g-atom-K 2 for hydrogen content increasing from zero to about one atomic percent. Above one percent hydrogen γ decreased with increasing hydrogen contents. The C/T data showed an increase with temperature decreasing below about 2.5 0 K for samples with 0.1 to 1.5 atomic percent hydrogen. This accounts for a large amount of scatter in theta/sub D/ versus hydrogen content in this range. The heat capacity of a bulk sample of lutetium dihydride was measured between 1 and 20 0 K and showed a large increase in theta/sub D/ and a large decrease in γ compared to pure lutetium

  2. The impact of hydrogen enrichment and bluff-body lip thickness on characteristics of blended propane/hydrogen bluff-body stabilized turbulent diffusion flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashir, Babak; Tabejamaat, Sadegh; Jalalatian, Nafiseh

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Characteristics of C 3 H 8 –H 2 bluff-body stabilized flames are investigated. • Decreasing the bluff-body lip thickness led into enhanced flame length. • CO mass fraction is increased with reducing hydrogen content in the fuel stream. • Augmenting hydrogen content increased the maximum temperature. • Jet-like zone in propane–hydrogen bluff-body stabilized flames is very unstable. - Abstract: At the beginning of this study, the well-known turbulent bluff-body stabilized diffusion flame of HM1 is simulated by a coupled flamelet/radiation approach. The HM1 flame comprises a CH 4 :H 2 [50:50 Vol.] jet flame at a Reynolds number of 15,800. The results showed reasonable agreement for the flow field and species. Afterwards, the abovementioned approach is employed to investigate the effects of hydrogen addition on bluff-body stabilized flames of propane–hydrogen. Adding hydrogen to the blended fuel of propane/hydrogen shifts the recirculation zone outwards the bluff-body and thus culminates in increased flame length. Besides this, the flame length is predicted to be enhanced with decreasing the lip thickness of the bluff-body configuration. The CO emission level is found to be decreased with hydrogen addition in near-burner and far field regions which might be attributed to the decrease of inflow carbon atoms. The local radiative heat power reveals higher values for fuel blends with decreased contents of hydrogen at the recirculation and jet-like zones. This might be attributed to the increased local heat release rate due to breaking further carbon bonds

  3. Accumulation of Content Validation Evidence for the Critical Thinking Self-Assessment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Girija Gopinathan; Hellsten, Laurie-Ann M; Stamler, Lynnette Leeseberg

    2017-04-01

    Critical thinking skills (CTS) are essential for nurses; assessing students' acquisition of these skills is a mandate of nursing curricula. This study aimed to develop a self-assessment instrument of critical thinking skills (Critical Thinking Self-Assessment Scale [CTSAS]) for students' self-monitoring. An initial pool of 196 items across 6 core cognitive skills and 16 subskills were generated using the American Philosophical Association definition of CTS. Experts' content review of the items and their ratings provided evidence of content relevance using the item-level content validity index (I-CVI) and Aiken's content validity coefficient (VIk). 115 items were retained (range of I-CVI values = .70 to .94 and range of VIk values = .69-.95; significant at pself-assessment purposes.

  4. Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard J. Fruehan; Siddhartha Misra

    2005-01-15

    In recent years there has been an increasing demand to reduce and control the amount of dissolved gases in steel. Hydrogen and nitrogen are two of the most important gases which when dissolved in liquid steel affect its properties significantly. Several steelmaking additions have been investigated in this research for their effect on the hydrogen and nitrogen content of steels. It has been established that calcium hydroxide (hydrated lime) acts as a source of hydrogen. Carburizers, such as metallurgical coke, were found to result in no hydrogen pickup when added to liquid steel. Addition of petroleum coke, on the other hand, increased the hydrogen content of liquid steel. Ferroalloy such as medium carbon ferromanganese when added to the liquid iron was found to increase its nitrogen content, the increase being proportional to the amount of ferroalloy added. Similarly, addition of pitch coke, which had a significant nitrogen impurity, increased the nitrogen content of liquid iron. A mathematical model was developed to quantify the absorption of nitrogen and hydrogen from the air bubbles entrained during tapping of liquid steel. During the bottom stirring of liquid metal in a ladle, the inert gas escaping from the top displaces the slag layer and often forms an open eye. The absorption of atmospheric nitrogen through the spout eye was estimated for different slag thickness and gas flow rate. The ultimate goal of this research was to develop a comprehensive set of equations which could predict the nitrogen and hydrogen pickup from their various sources. Estimates of hydrogen and nitrogen pickup during the steel transfer operations such as tapping and ladle stirring and the predicted pickup from steelmaking additions were integrated into empirical equations. The comprehensive model is designed to predict the gas pickup under varying operating conditions such as the metal oxygen and sulfur content, the total tapping or stirring time, the stirring gas flow rate and the

  5. An assessment of the risk of embrittlement of a steel container by hydrogen picked up on the ocean bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardie, D.

    1985-09-01

    A realistic assessment of the likelihood of embrittlement of a plain carbon steel container for nuclear waste has been made by estimating the hydrogen levels that might be expected to develop in the steel as a consequence of the slow corrosion of the container and the possible effect that such a hydrogen concentration would have on its mechanical behaviour. By consideration of various possible models for the generation of hydrogen and its subsequent uptake into the steel or dissemination in the environment, it is concluded that the most pessimistic assessment of the concentration of hydrogen that could build up in the container walls during 1000 years burial would not significantly affect the resistance to failure of even relatively high strength steels. (author)

  6. Studies of effects on determination of trace hydrogen in U-Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Lexi; Li Yingqiu; Liu Jun; Wu Lunqiang; Qi Lianzhu; Bian Min

    2002-01-01

    The affecting factors for determination of trace hydrogen in U-Nb alloy are studied. The status of samples affects greatly the measured hydrogen content, which has the higher value for scrap sample than cylinder sample. The hydrogen content in cylinder is closer to real value in U-Nb alloy. The hydrogen in U-Nb alloy is mainly from surface adsorption. The results of hydrogen determined by vacuum thermal evolved method, in which the relative standard uncertainty is less than 28%, are in agreement with those by inert-gas fusion method

  7. Liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougon, M.; Marquet, M.; Prugne, P.

    1961-01-01

    A description is given of 1) Atmospheric pressure target: liquid hydrogen, 400 mm thickness; thermal insulation: styrofoam; the hydrogen vapors are used to improve the target cooling; Mylar windows. 2) Vacuum target: 12 liter content: hydrogen or deuterium; liquid thickness 400 mm; thermal insulation is afforded by a vacuum vessel and a liquid nitrogen shield. Recovery and liquefaction of deuterium vapors are managed in the vacuum vessel which holds the target. The target emptying system is designed for operating in a few minutes. (author) [fr

  8. Computer simulation of hydrogen diffusion and hydride precipitation at Ta/Zr bond interface. Hydrogen embrittlement in SUS304ULC/Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi; Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2010-01-01

    The concentration of hydrogen and precipitation of zirconium hydrides in Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint were analysed by computer simulation. Numerical model of hydride precipitation under hydrogen diffusion was simplified by the alternate model coupled the macroscopic hydrogen diffusion with the microscopic hydride precipitation. Effects of the initial hydrogen content in Ta, working degree of Zr and post-bond heat treatment on the hydrogen diffusion and hydride precipitation were investigated. Hydrogen was rapidly diffused from Ta substrate into Zr after explosive bonding and temporarily concentrated at Ta/Zr bond interface. Zirconium hydrides were precipitated and grew at Ta/Zr bond interface, and the precipitation zone of hydrides was enlarged with the lapse of time. The precipitation of zirconium hydrides was promoted when the initial hydrogen content in Ta and working degree of Zr were increased. The concentration of hydrogen and precipitation of hydrides at the bond interface were reduced and diminished by post-bond heat treatment at 373 K. It was deduced that hydrogen embrittlement in Ta/Zr explosive bonded joint was caused by the precipitation of zirconium hydrides and concentration of hydrogen at Ta/Zr bond interface during the diffusion of hydrogen containing in Ta substrate. (author)

  9. Content Analysis of Assessment Data in Marketing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vowles, Nicole; Hutto, Alexandra; Miller, Peter Max M.

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes a sample of students' writing to assess their understanding of marketing concepts in the context of a Principles of Marketing course. Content analysis of pre- and post-essays was used to assess student knowledge of marketing concepts. The data was collected in Principles of Marketing classes. and highlight that many students…

  10. Effects of indium contents on photocatalytic performance of ZnIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} for hydrogen evolution under visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kelin [Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Water Resource Utilization and Environmental Pollution Control, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zhu, Rongshu, E-mail: rszhu@hitsz.edu.cn [Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Water Resource Utilization and Environmental Pollution Control, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Public Platform for Technological Service in Urban Waste Reuse and Energy Regeneration, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Tian, Fei [Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Water Resource Utilization and Environmental Pollution Control, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Cao, Gang, E-mail: caog@hotmail.com [Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Water Resource Utilization and Environmental Pollution Control, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Public Platform for Technological Service in Urban Waste Reuse and Energy Regeneration, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Ouyang, Feng [Harbin Institute of Technology Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Water Resource Utilization and Environmental Pollution Control, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Public Platform for Technological Service in Urban Waste Reuse and Energy Regeneration, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2015-12-15

    A series of ZnIn{sub x}S{sub 4+y} (x=1.6, 2.0, 2.3, 2.6, 2.9, 3.1) photocatalysts were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method and characterized by various analytical techniques, such as XRD, EDS, UV–vis DRS, SEM, TEM, BET and PL. The ZnIn{sub x}S{sub 4+y} photocatalysts had a similar crystal structure. With the increase of indium content, the absorption edges of ZnIn{sub x}S{sub 4+y} photocatalysts shifted to longer wavelength, their crystal sizes decreased firstly and then increased and the variation of the specific surface area and total pore volume was exactly opposite. Especially, when x=2.3, ZnIn{sub 2.3}S{sub 4+y} catalyst had smallest crystal size, largest specific surface area and total pore volume. Additionally, the morphology of ZnIn{sub x}S{sub 4+y} greatly depended on the contents of indium. The photocatalytic activity of ZnIn{sub x}S{sub 4+y} was evaluated by photocatalytic hydrogen production from water under visible light. The ZnIn{sub 2.3}S{sub 4+y} sample had the highest photocatalytic activity among these ZnIn{sub x}S{sub 4+y} photocatalysts and its hydrogen production rate was 363 μmol/g h. - Graphical abstract: First, a series of catalysts were synthesized. And then those were characterized by various analytical techniques (such as SEM). finally, The photocatalytic activity of catalyst was evaluated by photocatalytic hydrogen production from water under visible light. - Highlights: • The photocatalytic property was studied upon visible-light irradiation. • ZnIn{sub x}S{sub 4+y} photocatalysts show superior photocatalytic activity. • The catalyst of grain size, morphology and BET are related to indium content. • ZnIn{sub x}S{sub 4+y} photocatalysts were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method.

  11. Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam Reforming; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.

    2000-01-01

    A life cycle assessment of hydrogen production via natural gas steam reforming was performed to examine the net emissions of greenhouse gases as well as other major environmental consequences. LCA is a systematic analytical method that helps identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of a specific process or competing processes

  12. Preparation of platinum-decorated porous graphite nanofibers, and their hydrogen storage behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Joo; Lee, Young-Seak; Park, Soo-Jin

    2008-02-15

    In this work, the hydrogen storage behaviors of porous graphite nanofibers (GNFs) decorated by Pt nanoparticles were investigated. The Pt nanoparticles were introduced onto the GNF surfaces using a well-known chemical reduction method. We investigated the hydrogen storage capacity of the Pt-doped GNFs for the platinum content range of 1.3-7.5 mass%. The microstructure of the Pt/porous GNFs was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The hydrogen storage behaviors of the Pt/GNFs were studied using a PCT apparatus at 298 K and 10 MPa. It was found that amount of hydrogen stored increased with increasing Pt content to 3.4 mass%, and then decreased. This result indicates that the hydrogen storage capacity of porous carbons is based on both their metal content and dispersion rate.

  13. Hydrogen production from high-moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Adschiri, T.; Ekbom, T. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Most hydrogen is produced by steam reforming methane at elevated pressures. The goal of this research is to develop commercial processes for the catalytic steam reforming of biomass and other organic wastes at high pressures. This approach avoids the high cost of gas compression and takes advantage of the unique properties of water at high pressures. Prior to this year the authors reported the ability of carbon to catalyze the decomposition of biomass and related model compounds in supercritical water. The product gas consists of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and traces of higher hydrocarbons. During the past year the authors have: (a) developed a method to extend the catalyst life, (b) begun studies of the role of the shift reaction, (c) completed studies of carbon dioxide absorption from the product effluent by high pressure water, (d) measured the rate of carbon catalyst gasification in supercritical water, (e) discovered the pumpability of oil-biomass slurries, and (f) completed the design and begun fabrication of a flow reactor that will steam reform whole biomass feedstocks (i.e. sewage sludge) and produce a hydrogen rich synthesis gas at very high pressure (>22 MPa).

  14. Fiscal 1975 Sunshine Project research report. Technology assessment on hydrogen energy technology. Part 2; 1975 nendo suiso energy gijutsu no technology assessment seika hokokuksho. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-03-31

    This research assesses the impact of development of practical hydrogen energy technology on the economy, society and environment in Japan, and proposes some effective countermeasures, the required technical development target and a promising promotion system. The example of technology assessment assuming practical technology several tens years after is hardly found. Hydrogen energy technology is in the first stage among (1) initial planning stage, (2) technical research and development stage, (3) practical technology stage and (4) service operation stage. In the first fiscal year, as the first stage of determination of the communication route between society and technology, study was made on the concrete system image of practical technology. In this fiscal year, study was made entirely on preparation of the scenario for imaging the future economy and society concretely, modifying the planning of the hydrogen energy system. Through comparison of the scenario and system, the meaning and problem of the hydrogen energy technology were clarified. (NEDO)

  15. Hydrogen retorting of oil shales from Eastern Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E. (CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)); Synnott, J.; Boorman, R.S.; Salter, R.S.

    1984-04-01

    The liquid production potential of thirty oil shale samples from Eastern Canada was determined by Fischer assay retort and pyrochem retort. For all shales, the presence of hydrogen during pyrochem retorting resulted in a significant increase in oil yields compared to Fischer assay yields. Ten oil shale samples were selected for detailed evaluation in the pyrochem retort in the presence of nitrogen and hydrogen. Besides increasing yields, the presence of hydrogen lowered the specific gravity of liquid products and the content of sulphur but increased the content of nitrogen. This was attributed to the stabilization of precursors to nitrogen compounds which prevented their polymerization. (J.H.K.)

  16. Hydrogen safety risk assessment methodology applied to a fluidized bed membrane reactor for autothermal reforming of natural gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Psara, N.; Van Sint Annaland, M.; Gallucci, F.

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the development and implementation of a safety risk assessment methodology to highlight hazards potentially prevailing during autothermal reforming of natural gas for hydrogen production in a membrane reactor, as well as to reveal potential accidents related to hydrogen

  17. 42 CFR 90.4 - Contents of requests for health assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES ADMINISTRATIVE... assessment. (c) Each request for a health assessment should include, where possible: (1) Any other... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contents of requests for health assessments. 90.4...

  18. Hydrogen production by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under light driven sulfur deprived condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayaraghavan, Krishnan; Karthik, Rajendran [Biotechnology Research Division, Department of Biotechnology, Prathyusha Institute of Technology and Management, Aranvoyalkuppam, Thiruvallur District 602025, Tamil Nadu (India); Kamala Nalini, S.P. [Department of Biotechnology, Vel Group of Educational Institutions, Avadi, Alamadhi Road, Chennai 600062, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2009-10-15

    This article explores the possibility of demonstrating sustainable photohydrogen production using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii when grown in sulfur deprived photoautotrophic condition. The hydrogen evolving capability of the algal species was monitored based on alternating light and dark period. Investigation was carried out during the day time in order to exploit the solar energy for meeting the demand of the light period. The results showed that when the reactor was operated at varying photoperiod namely 2, 3 and 4 h of alternating light and dark period, the gas generation was found to be 32 {+-} 4, 63 {+-} 7 and 52 {+-} 5 mL/h, while the corresponding hydrogen content was 47, 86 and 87% respectively. Functional components of hydrogen generation reaction centers were also analyzed, which showed that the PS(I) reaction centers were involved in hydrogen production pathway, as the light absorption by PS(I) was prerequisite for hydrogen generation under sulfur deprived photoautotrophic condition. The findings showed a higher gas yield and hydrogen content under dark period, whereas under light period the gas content was below detectable level for hydrogen due to the reversible hydrogenase reaction. (author)

  19. Investigation of Hydrogen and Nitrogen Content in Compacted Graphite Iron Production

    OpenAIRE

    Siafakas, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research, part of a wider program called SPOFIC, is to investigate how the casting procedure affects the concentration of hydrogen and nitrogen gases in Compacted Graphite Iron used for the production of truck cylinder blocks. Hydris equipment was used for the Hydrogen measurements and the Optical Emission Spectroscopy and combustion analysis methods were used for the nitrogen measurements. The experiment was performed in one of the cooperating foundries. It was found that Hyd...

  20. Bridging the European Wind Energy Market and a Future Renewable Hydrogen-Inclusive Economy. A Dynamic Techno-economic Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, S.; Peteves, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    The study establishes the link between the growing wind market and the emerging hydrogen market of the European Union, in a so-called 'wind-hydrogen strategy'. It considers specifically the diversion of wind electricity, as a wind power control mechanism in high wind penetration situations, for the production of renewable electrolytic hydrogen - a potentially important component of a renewable hydrogen-inclusive economy. The analysis examines the long-term competitiveness of a wind-hydrogen strategy via cost-benefit assessment. It indicates the duration and extent to which (financial) support, if any, would need to be provided in support of such a strategy, and the influence over time of certain key factors on the outcome

  1. Wise Crowd Content Assessment and Educational Rubrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passonneau, Rebecca J.; Poddar, Ananya; Gite, Gaurav; Krivokapic, Alisa; Yang, Qian; Perin, Dolores

    2018-01-01

    Development of reliable rubrics for educational intervention studies that address reading and writing skills is labor-intensive, and could benefit from an automated approach. We compare a main ideas rubric used in a successful writing intervention study to a highly reliable wise-crowd content assessment method developed to evaluate…

  2. Thermoanalytical investigation of the hydrogen absorption behaviour of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}Ga{sub x} at high hydrogen pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handstein, A.; Kubis, M.; Gebel, B.; Mueller, K.-H.; Schultz, L. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany). Inst. fuer Metallische Werkstoffe; Gutfleisch, O.; Harris, I.R. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany). Inst. fuer Metallische Werkstoffe]|[Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Metallurgy and Materials

    1998-07-01

    The complete disproportionation of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}Ga{sub x} during annealing in hydrogen is hindered due to an increased stability of the compounds with a higher Ga content (x {>=} 1). Therefore the HD process as the first step of HDDR (hydrogenation-disproportionation-desorption-recombination) has to be carried out at a high hydrogen pressure for x {>=} 1. The hydrogen absorption behaviour of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}Ga{sub x} (x = 0, 0.5, 1 and 2) was investigated by means of hydrogen differential thermal analysis (HDTA) and high pressure differential scanning calorimetry (HPDSC) at hydrogen pressures up to 70 bar. A dependency of hydrogenation and disproportionation temperatures on hydrogen pressure and Ga content was found. The comparison with other substituents (M = Al and Si) instead of M = Ga showed an increased stability of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-x}M{sub x} compounds against disproportionation by hydrogen in the sequence Al, Ga and Si. The Curie temperatures of the interstitially hydrogenated Th{sub 2}Zn{sub 17}-type materials increase with the hydrogen pressure. In order to produce coercive and thermally stable Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Ga{sub 2}C{sub y} powder by means of the HDDR process, we recombined material disproportionated at different hydrogen pressures. Preliminary results of magnetic properties of this HDDR treated and gas-carburized Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Ga{sub 2}C{sub y} are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Device for removing hydrogen gas from the safety containment vessel of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiefel, M.

    1983-01-01

    The safe processing of all concentrations of gas mixtures should be possible with such a device using a thermal recombiner of compact construction. A recombiner consisting of a metal case and diverter sheets situated in it is heated by induction. The incoming pipe for the gas mixture enriched with hydrogen and the outgoing pipe for the gas mixture with low hydrogen content are connected together by a three way valve. The third connection to the safety valve takes the larger port of the gas mixture with low hydrogen content back to the safety containment vessel. Sufficient amount of the gas mixture with low hydrogen content is taken via the three way valve to the safety containment vessel to ensure that the hydrogen content of the gas mixture taken to the recombiner remains below the 4% by volume limit. (orig./PW)

  4. Assessment of primary impacts of a hydrogen economy in New Zealand using UniSyD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaver, Jonathan D.; Gillingham, Kenneth T.; Leaver, Luke H.T.

    2009-01-01

    Small economies such as New Zealand risk significant economic hardship without careful evaluation of alternatives to petroleum-based transportation due to the adverse effects of climate change and depleting international oil reserves. This paper uses an integrated multi-regional multi-fleet system dynamics model of New Zealand's energy economy to assess the primary impacts of alternative vehicle fleet technologies. Results suggest that hydrogen fuelled HICEs and FCVs may offer significantly greater economic savings than BEVs due to a much lower capital cost. Under our Base Case, 65% of the light fleet are HICEs and FCVs and 5% BEVs. Excluding hydrogen vehicles from the vehicle fleet can result in an average annual cost of US$562 per vehicle between 2015 and 2050. Co-production of hydrogen and electricity using coal gasification with carbon capture and storage is the dominant long term hydrogen production technology. (author)

  5. A Low-Stress, Elastic, and Improved Hardness Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films with fullerene-like microstructure was investigated with a different proportion of hydrogen supply in deposition. The results showed at hydrogen flow rate of 50 sccm, the deposited films showed a lower compressive stress (lower 48.6%, higher elastic recovery (higher 19.6%, near elastic recovery rate 90%, and higher hardness (higher 7.4% compared with the films deposited without hydrogen introduction. Structural analysis showed that the films with relatively high sp2 content and low bonded hydrogen content possessed high hardness, elastic recovery rate, and low compressive stress. It was attributed to the curved graphite microstructure, which can form three-dimensional covalently bonded network.

  6. An assessment of information communication technology content ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of information communication technology content, context and ... a- vis the upscaling of ICT in health care facilities in Nairobi and Machakos counties. ... high in all the facilities compared to levels of services operations computerised and ... for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality.

  7. Water in Earth's mantle: Hydrogen analysis of mantle olivine, pyroxenes and garnet using the SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Masanori; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Sueno, Shigeho

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen (or water) in the Earth's interior plays a key role in the evolution and dynamics of the planet. However, the abundance and the existence form of the hydrogen have scarcely been clear in practice. Hydrogen in the mantle was incorporated in the interior during the formation of the Earth. The incorporated hydrogen was hardly possible to concentrate locally inside the Earth considering its high mobility and high reactivity. The hydrogen, preferably, could be distributed homogeneously over the mantle and the core by the subsequent physical and chemical processes. Therefore, hydrogen in the mantle could be present in the form of trace hydrogen in nominally anhydrous mantle minerals. The hydrogen and the other trace elements in mantle olivines, orthopyroxenes, clinopyroxenes, and garnets were determined using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for elucidating (1) the exact hydrogen contents, (2) the correlation between the hydrogen and the other trace elements, (3) the dependence of the hydrogen contents on the depth, and (4) the dependence of the whole rock water contents on the depth.

  8. Hydrogen storage alternatives - a technological and economic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Joakim; Hjortsberg, Ove [Volvo Teknisk Utveckling AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    This study reviews state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage alternatives for vehicles. We will also discuss the prospects and estimated cost for industrial production. The study is based on published literature and interviews with active researchers. Among the alternatives commercially available today, we suggest using a moderate-pressure chamber for seasonal stationary energy storage; metal hydride vessels for small stationary units; a roof of high-pressure cylinders for buses, trucks and ferries; cryogenic high-pressure vessels or methanol reformers for cars and tractors; and cryogenic moderate-pressure vessels for aeroplanes. Initial fuel dispensing systems should be designed to offer hydrogen in pressurised form for good fuel economy, but also as cryogenic liquid for occasional needs of extended driving range and as methanol for reformer-equipped vehicles. It is probable that hydrogen can be stored efficiently in adsorbents for use in recyclable hydrogen fuel containers or rechargeable hydrogen vessels operating at ambient temperature and possibly ambient pressure by year 2004, and at reasonable or even low cost by 2010. The most promising alternatives involve various forms of activated graphite nanostructures. Recommendations for further research and standardisation activities are given.

  9. Assessing the process and content of strategy in different organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romme, A.G.L.; Kunst, P.; Schreuder, H.; Spangenberg, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper deals with a quantitative assessment of strategy content and strategy process characteristics. The framework used is based on the concept of strategic logics. The empirical study involves six organizations in The Netherlands. Both the content and the process dimension of strategy-making

  10. Determination of the carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen contents of alanine and their uncertainties using the certified reference material L-alanine (NMIJ CRM 6011-a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Nobuyasu; Sato, Ayako; Yamazaki, Taichi; Numata, Masahiko; Takatsu, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    The carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN) contents of alanine and their uncertainties were estimated using a CHN analyzer and the certified reference material (CRM) L-alanine. The CHN contents and their uncertainties, as measured using the single-point calibration method, were 40.36 ± 0.20% for C, 7.86 ± 0.13% for H, and 15.66 ± 0.09% for N; the results obtained using the bracket calibration method were also comparable. The method described in this study is reasonable, convenient, and meets the general requirement of having uncertainties ≤ 0.4%.

  11. Advantages of the use of hydrogen fuel as compared to kerosene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroneos, C.; Dompros, A.; Roumbas, G.; Moussiopoulos, N.

    2005-01-01

    A life cycle assessment (LCA) study has been carried out to investigate the environmental aspects of two types of aviation fuel, kerosene that is presently used and hydrogen. Hydrogen is selected as a future aircraft fuel because of the absence of CO 2 emissions from its use, its high energy content and its combustion kinetics. The life cycle of aviation fuel includes the production and the use of the aviation fuel in different types of aircraft. Hydrogen production by natural gas steam reforming and production upon renewable energy sources (RES) are examined. A very large number of environmental burdens result from the operation of the different fuel cycles. Air pollution is by far the biggest environmental problem that is resulting from hydrogen and kerosene production and use. This work has been mainly concentrated with this environmental impact category. It is shown that the production of hydrogen from RES has significantly lower environmental impact as compared to that of kerosene. However, the use of different RES carries different environmental impacts among them. The production of hydrogen resulting from the use of photovoltaics to capture solar energy carries the biggest environmental impact among the other RES, wind, hydropower, biomass and solar thermal

  12. Valid and Reliable Science Content Assessments for Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretter, Thomas R.; Brown, Sherri L.; Bush, William S.; Saderholm, Jon C.; Holmes, Vicki-Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Science teachers' content knowledge is an important influence on student learning, highlighting an ongoing need for programs, and assessments of those programs, designed to support teacher learning of science. Valid and reliable assessments of teacher science knowledge are needed for direct measurement of this crucial variable. This paper…

  13. Characteristics of hydrogen co-doped ZnO : Al thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S H; Lee, T S; Lee, K S; Cheong, B; Kim, W M; Kim, Y D

    2008-01-01

    ZnO films co-doped with H and Al (HAZO) were prepared by sputtering ZnO targets containing 1 wt% Al 2 O 3 on Corning glass at a substrate temperature of 150 deg. C with Ar and H 2 /Ar gas mixtures. The effects of hydrogen addition to Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films with low Al content on the electrical, the optical and the structural properties of the as-grown films as well as the vacuum- and air-annealed films were examined. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis showed that the hydrogen concentration increased with increasing H 2 in sputter gas. For the as-deposited films, the free carrier number increased with increasing H 2 . The Hall mobility increased at low hydrogen content, reaching a maximum before decreasing with a further increase of H 2 content in sputter gas. Annealing at 300 deg. C resulted in the removal of hydrogen, causing a decrease in the carrier concentration. It was shown that hydrogen might exist as single isolated interstitial hydrogen bound with oxygen, thereby acting like an anionic dopant. Also, it was shown that the addition of hydrogen to ZnO films doped with low metallic dopant concentration could yield transparent conducting films with very low absorption loss as well as with proper electrical properties, which is suitable for thin film solar cell applications

  14. Non-combustible nuclear radiation shields with high hydrogen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, W.C.; Peterson, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to compositions, methods of production, and uses of non-combustible nuclear radiation shields, with particular emphasis on those containing a high concentration of hydrogen atoms, especially effective for moderating neutron energy by elastic scatter, dispersed as a discontinuous phase in a continuous phase of a fire resistant matrix

  15. A technique for measuring hydrogen and water in inert gases and the hydrogen concentration in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.A.

    1978-04-01

    A method is described of measuring the hydrogen and water content of an inert gas. It is based upon the use of an electrochemical oxygen cell and has a high sensitivity at low hydrogen and water levels. The following possible applications of the method are described together with supporting experimental measurements: improving the sensitivity and range of the present PFR secondary circuit hydrogen detection instruments; the measurement of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in steels; the measurement of waterside corrosion rates of boiler steels; on-line monitoring of waterside boiler corrosion. Attention is given to the characteristics of diffusion barriers in relation to the first and last of these. (author)

  16. Precipitation hardening and hydrogen embrittlement of aluminum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen susceptibility of alloy AA7020 was evaluated by slow strain-rate tensile ... high pressures because of the embrittling effect of hydrogen. ... The higher the total Zn + Mg content,. ∗ .... dislocations, leading to a local softening of the slip plane, and thus to ... A Vickers hardness testing machine was used to measure the.

  17. Compact hydrogen production systems for solid polymer fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledjeff-Hey, K.; Formanski, V.; Kalk, Th.; Roes, J.

    Generally there are several ways to produce hydrogen gas from carbonaceous fuels like natural gas, oil or alcohols. Most of these processes are designed for large-scale industrial production and are not suitable for a compact hydrogen production system (CHYPS) in the power range of 1 kW. In order to supply solid polymer fuel cells (SPFC) with hydrogen, a compact fuel processor is required for mobile applications. The produced hydrogen-rich gas has to have a low level of harmful impurities; in particular the carbon monoxide content has to be lower than 20 ppmv. Integrating the reaction step, the gas purification and the heat supply leads to small-scale hydrogen production systems. The steam reforming of methanol is feasible at copper catalysts in a low temperature range of 200-350°C. The combination of a small-scale methanol reformer and a metal membrane as purification step forms a compact system producing high-purity hydrogen. The generation of a SPFC hydrogen fuel gas can also be performed by thermal or catalytic cracking of liquid hydrocarbons such as propane. At a temperature of 900°C the decomposition of propane into carbon and hydrogen takes place. A fuel processor based on this simple concept produces a gas stream with a hydrogen content of more than 90 vol.% and without CO and CO2.

  18. Device of measuring hydrogen in U-H-Zr fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Guo Qiaoru; Xu Xiuqing

    1992-01-01

    A device used for the determination of hydrogen content in U-H-Zr fuel pellet and its precision determination are introduced. The influence of different flow of carry gas, extracting temperature and collecting time on the determination of hydrogen content is researched separately. While the flow of carry gas is 85-100 mL/min and extracting temperature increasing to 1550 deg C, the best collecting time may be reduced to 18 min from 30 min, the determination of zirconium hydrogenate reference standard sample shows that the precision of six time determination is smaller than ±2%, determination error is 2%. The rate of recovery of hydrogen is 99.3%. The test shows that the device and its determination method are stable and operation is simple

  19. The Synergetic Effects of Hydrogen and Oxygen on the Strength and Ductility of Vanadium Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jiming(谌继明); Xu Ying(徐颖); Deng Ying(邓颖); Yang Ling(杨霖); Qiu Shaoyu(邱绍宇)

    2003-01-01

    A V4Ti alloy and several V4Cr4Ti alloys with different oxygen contents were studied on their tensile properties with the effect of hydrogen concentrations. The ductility of the alloys showed a successive decrease in a varied rate with an increased hydrogen concentration, while the ultimate tensile strength remained unchanged or even decreased for the high oxygen content alloy in spite of the occurrence of hardening in the low oxygen content alloy. Oxygen in the alloy causes grain boundary weakening, increasing the possibility of intergranular fractures and thus enhancing the hydrogen embrittlement. V4Ti showed a higher resistance to the hydrogen embrittlement as compared to the V4Cr4Ti alloys on a similar oxygen content level.

  20. The effect of internal hydrogen on surface slip localisation on polycrystalline AISI 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, Isabelle; Olive, Jean-Marc; Saintier, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the effect of internal hydrogen on the surface slip morphology of relatively high nickel content AISI 316L type austenitic stainless steel was carried out on high resolution data obtained by atomic force microscopy. Surface plastic strain localisation was studied for different hydrogen contents, two grain sizes, and two plastic strain levels. The height and spacing of approximately 8000 slip bands, observed on 12 specimens, are shown to follow log-normal distributions. Hydrogen increased the mean slip-band height and the mean slip-band spacing for the two macroscopic plastic strain levels considered, and for the two hydrogen concentrations in coarse-grained specimens. The hydrogen effect was also observed for fine-grained specimens, but only for the highest hydrogen concentration. In addition, the emerging dislocation velocity increased by a factor 3 for high hydrogen content.

  1. Determination of hydrogen content in mixed oxide fuels (U,Pu)02 by three different methods: occluded gas, carrier gas at 9000C (apparatus Dupont de Nemours) and carrier gas at 17000C (apparatus Ithac 2000 Adamel). Operation, performance comparison of the three methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepetit; Lebrun; Haour; Dellasta; Vannier.

    1989-01-01

    Test conditions and performance are described. Results obtained allow a comparison and give the important parameters sampling conditions, sample storage and transfer, radiolysis and pyrohydrolysis. After a few hundred analysis fuels can be divided in two types: hydrogen content between 0.1 and 1 ppm corresponding to water fixation at the pellet surface, homogeneous content, not or slightly porous and with a perfect metallographic structure. Hydrogen content over 1 ppm, heterogeneous content from one sample to one another because of porosity and metallographic structure with cracks and cavities [fr

  2. Content validity of methods to assess malnutrition in cancer patients: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sealy, Martine; Nijholt, Willemke; Stuiver, M.M.; van der Berg, M.M.; Ottery, Faith D.; van der Schans, Cees; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriët

    Content validity of methods to assess malnutrition in cancer patients: A systematic review Rationale: Inadequate operationalisation of the multidimensial concept of malnutrition may result in inadequate evaluation of nutritional status. In this review we aimed to assess content validity of methods

  3. Content validation of an interprofessional learning video peer assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Gillian; Jorm, Christine; Roberts, Chris; Gordon, Christopher J; Chen, Timothy F

    2017-12-16

    Large scale models of interprofessional learning (IPL) where outcomes are assessed are rare within health professional curricula. To date, there is sparse research describing robust assessment strategies to support such activities. We describe the development of an IPL assessment task based on peer rating of a student generated video evidencing collaborative interprofessional practice. We provide content validation evidence of an assessment rubric in the context of large scale IPL. Two established approaches to scale development in an educational setting were combined. A literature review was undertaken to develop a conceptual model of the relevant domains and issues pertaining to assessment of student generated videos within IPL. Starting with a prototype rubric developed from the literature, a series of staff and student workshops were undertaken to integrate expert opinion and user perspectives. Participants assessed five-minute videos produced in a prior pilot IPL activity. Outcomes from each workshop informed the next version of the rubric until agreement was reached on anchoring statements and criteria. At this point the rubric was declared fit to be used in the upcoming mandatory large scale IPL activity. The assessment rubric consisted of four domains: patient issues, interprofessional negotiation; interprofessional management plan in action; and effective use of video medium to engage audience. The first three domains reflected topic content relevant to the underlying construct of interprofessional collaborative practice. The fourth domain was consistent with the broader video assessment literature calling for greater emphasis on creativity in education. We have provided evidence for the content validity of a video-based peer assessment task portraying interprofessional collaborative practice in the context of large-scale IPL activities for healthcare professional students. Further research is needed to establish the reliability of such a scale.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide treatment of TCE contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, D.H.; Robinson, K.G.; Siegrist, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Solvent contaminated soils are ubiquitous in the industrial world and represent a significant environmental hazard due to their persistence and potentially negative impacts on human health and the environment. Environmental regulations favor treatment of soils with options which reduce the volume and toxicity of contaminants in place. One such treatment option is the in-situ application of hydrogen peroxide to soils contaminated with chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE). This study investigated hydrogen peroxide mass loading rates on removal of TCE from soils of varying organic matter content. Batch experiments conducted on contaminated loam samples using GC headspace analysis showed up to 80% TCE removal upon peroxide treatment. Column experiments conducted on sandy loam soils with high organic matter content showed only 25% TCE removal, even at hydrogen peroxide additions of 25 g peroxide per kg soil

  5. Hydrogen storage thermodynamics and kinetics of LaMg11Ni + x wt.% Ni (x = 100, 200) alloys synthesized by mechanical milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yanghuan; Jia, Zhichao; Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing; Yuan, Zeming; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Dongliang; Hou, Zhonghui

    2016-01-01

    LaMg 11 Ni + x wt.% Ni (x = 100, 200) composite hydrogen storage alloys with a nanocrystalline/amorphous structure were synthesized using ball milling technology. The effects of Ni content and milling time on hydrogen storage thermodynamics and dynamics of the alloys were investigated systematically. The hydrogen desorption properties were assessed using a Sieverts apparatus and differential scanning calorimetry. The thermodynamic parameters for the hydrogen absorption and desorption were calculated using the Van't Hoff equation. The hydrogen desorption activation energies of the hydrogenated alloys were also estimated by Arrhenius and Kissinger methods. Results indicate that the amount of Ni added has no effect on the thermodynamics of the alloys, but it significantly improves their absorption and desorption kinetics. Furthermore, the milling time has a great influence on the hydrogen storage properties. To be specific, the hydrogen absorption capacities reach the maximum values with the variation of milling time, and the hydrogen desorption activation energy obviously decreases with increasing milling time.

  6. An assessment of the government liquid hydrogen requirements for the 1995-2005 time frame including addendum, liquid hydrogen production and commercial demand in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Addison

    1990-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen will continue to be an integral element in virtually every major space program, and it has also become a significant merchant product for certain commercial markets. Liquid hydrogen is not a universally available commodity, and the number of supply sources historically have been limited to regions having concentrated consumption patterns. With the increased space program activity it becomes necessary to assess all future programs on a collective and unified basis. An initial attempt to identify projected requirements on a long range basis is presented.

  7. Hydrogen Production by Steam Reforming of Natural Gas Over Vanadium-Nickel-Alumina Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jaekyeong; Park, Seungwon; Song, Ji Hwan; Song, In Kyu

    2018-09-01

    A series of vanadium-nickel-alumina (xVNA) catalysts were prepared by a single-step sol-gel method with a variation of vanadium content (x, wt%) for use in the hydrogen production by steam reforming of natural gas. The effect of vanadium content on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of xVNA catalysts in the steam reforming of natural gas was investigated. It was found that natural gas conversion and hydrogen yield showed volcano-shaped trends with respect to vanadium content. It was also revealed that natural gas conversion and hydrogen yield increased with decreasing nickel crystallite size.

  8. Effects of hydrogen on the tensile strength characteristics of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, R.; Pelissier, J.; Pluchery, M.; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay

    1961-01-01

    This paper deals with the effects of hydrogen on stainless steel, that might possibly be used as a canning material in hydrogen-cooled reactors. Apparent ultimate-tensile strength is only 80 per cent of initial value for hydrogen content about 50 cc NTP/ 100 g, and reduction in area decreases from 80 to 55 per cent. A special two-stage replica technique has been developed which allows fracture surface of small tensile specimens (about 0.1 mm diam.) to be examined in an electron microscope. All the specimens showed evidence of ductile character throughout the range of hydrogen contents investigated, but the aspect of the fracture surfaces gradually changes with increasing amounts. (author) [fr

  9. Immediate assessment of in situ gas content using underground manometric desorbometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunaezewski, L.W.; Mahoney, M.R. [Lunagas Pty. Ltd., Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    An underground assessment of gas content (within 30 minutes) can be used as a complementary method for the immediate establishment of the magnitudes of in situ gas content at a distance of 5 to 6 metres ahead of a heading face. The indirect method of in situ gas content measurement, using a manometric desorbometer, can be used to establish the direct relationship between underground desorbometer readings and corresponding in situ gas content values for a selected coal seam. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Hydrogen storage: state-of-the-art and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzimas, E.; Filiou, C.; Peteves, S.D.; Veyret, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    The EU aims at establishing a sustainable energy supply, able to provide affordable and clean energy without increasing green house gas emissions. Hydrogen and fuel cells are seen by many as key energy system solutions for the 21. century, enabling clean and efficient production of power and heat from a broad range of primary energy sources. To be effective, there is a crucial need for well-coordinated research, development and deployment at European Level. The particular segment of hydrogen storage is one key element of the full hydrogen chain and it must meet a number of challenges before it is introduced into the global energy system. Regarding its energy characteristics, the gravimetric energy density of hydrogen is about three times higher than gasoline, but its energy content per volume is about a quarter. Therefore, the most significant problem for hydrogen (in particular for on-board vehicles) is to store sufficient -amounts of hydrogen. The volumetric energy density of hydrogen can be increased by compression or liquefaction which are both the most mature technologies. Still the energy required for both compression and liquefaction is one element to be properly assessed in considering the different pathways in particular for distribution. As far as on-board vehicle storage is concerned all possible options (compressed, liquid, metal hydrides and porous structures) have their own advantages and disadvantages with respect to weight, volume, energy efficiency, refuelling times, cost and safety aspects. To address these problems, long-term commitments to scientific excellence in research, coupled with co-ordination between the many different stakeholders, is required. In the current state-of-the-art in hydrogen storage, no single technology satisfies all of the criteria required by manufacturers and end-users, and a large number of obstacles have to be overcome. The current hydrogen storage technologies and their associated limitations/needs for improvement

  11. Effects of External Hydrogen on Hydrogen Transportation and Distribution Around the Fatigue Crack Tip in Type 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyang; Zhou, Chengshuang; Cai, Xiao; Zheng, Jinyang; Zhang, Lin

    2017-10-01

    The effects of external hydrogen on hydrogen transportation and distribution around the fatigue crack tip in type 304 stainless steel were investigated by using hydrogen microprint technique (HMT) and thermal desorption spectrometry. HMT results show that some silver particles induced by hydrogen release are located near the fatigue crack and more silver particles are concentrated around the crack tip, which indicates that hydrogen accumulates in the vicinity of the crack tip during the crack growth in hydrogen gas environment. Along with the crack propagation, strain-induced α' martensite forms around the crack tip and promotes hydrogen invasion into the matrix, which will cause the crack initiation and propagation at the austenite/ α' martensite interface. In addition, the hydrogen content in the vicinity of the crack tip is higher than that at the crack edge far away from the crack tip, which is related to the stress state and strain-induced α' martensite.

  12. Nuclear reaction analysis of hydrogen in amorphous silicon and silicon carbide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guivarc'h, A.; Le Contellec, M.; Richard, J.; Ligeon, E.; Fontenille, J.; Danielou, R.

    1980-01-01

    The 1 H( 11 B, α)αα nuclear reaction is used to determine the H content and the density of amorphous semiconductor Si 1 -sub(x)Csub(x)H 2 and SiHsub(z) thin films. Rutherford backscattering is used to determine the x values and infrared transmission to study the hydrogen bonds. We have observed a transfer or/and a release of hydrogen under bombardment by various ions and we show that this last effect must be taken into account for a correct determination of the hydrogen content. An attempt is made to correlate the hydrogen release with electronic and nuclear energy losses. (orig.)

  13. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H]2- ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H]2- ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  14. A framework and tool for assessing Indigenous content in Canadian social work curricula

    OpenAIRE

    Tamburro, Andrea Grayson

    2010-01-01

    Social Work faculties across Canada are mandated through policy and for historical, political, social, and moral reasons to include Indigenous content in their curriculum. While there is policy that mandates Indigenous content, there is no clear framework or tool to assist faculty members to examine how they can assess their curriculum to ensure it includes appropriate Indigenous content. This study has three objectives: 1) to articulate an Aboriginal Assessment Process for Social Work Curri...

  15. The potential role of electrolytic hydrogen in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.

    1982-03-01

    The potential role of electrolytic hydrogen in Canada is assessed for the period 1980 to 2025 for large-scale uses only. Present uses of hydrogen, and specifically electrolytic hydrogen, are discussed briefly and hydrogen production processes are summarized. Only hydrogen derived from natural gas, coal, or electrolysis of sater are considered. Cost estimates of electrolytic hydrogen are obtained from a parametric equation, comparing values for unipolar water elecctrklyser technologies with those for bipolar electrolysers. Both by-products of electrolytic hydrogen production, namely heavy water and oxygen, are evaluated. Electrolytic hydrogen, based on non-fossil primary energy sources, is also considered as ankther 'liquid fuel option' for Canada along with the alcohols. The market potential for hydrogen in general and electrolytic hydrogen is assessed. Results show that the market potential for electrolytic hydrogen is large by the year 2025

  16. Protective Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Alveolar Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Yun-Qian; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Mao, Yan-Fei; Sun, Xue-Jun; Liu, Yu-Jian; Jiang, Lai

    2017-05-19

    BACKGROUND Fibrotic change is one of the important reasons for the poor prognosis of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The present study investigated the effects of hydrogen-rich saline, a selective hydroxyl radical scavenger, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary fibrosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Male ICR mice were divided randomly into 5 groups: Control, LPS-treated plus vehicle treatment, and LPS-treated plus hydrogen-rich saline (2.5, 5, or 10 ml/kg) treatment. Twenty-eight days later, fibrosis was assessed by determination of collagen deposition, hydroxyproline, and type I collagen levels. Development of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was identified by examining protein expressions of E-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 content, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), malondialdehyde (MDA) content, catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were determined. RESULTS Mice exhibited increases in collagen deposition, hydroxyproline, type I collagen contents, and TGF-β1 production in lung tissues after LPS treatment. LPS-induced lung fibrosis was associated with increased expression of α-SMA, as well as decreased expression of E-cadherin. In addition, LPS treatment increased MDA levels but decreased T-AOC, CAT, and SOD activities in lung tissues, indicating that LPS induced pulmonary oxidative stress. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment at doses of 2.5, 5, or 10 ml/kg significantly attenuated LPS-induced pulmonary fibrosis. LPS-induced loss of E-cadherin in lung tissues was largely reversed, whereas the acquisition of α-SMA was dramatically decreased by hydrogen-rich saline treatment. In addition, hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated LPS-induced oxidative stress. CONCLUSIONS Hydrogen-rich saline may protect against LPS-induced EMT and pulmonary fibrosis through suppressing oxidative stress.

  17. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hua, T. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lasher, S. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, Kurtis [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, J. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the potential to meet DOE onboard storage targets, as well as independent reviews of system cost and energy analyses of the technology paired with delivery costs.

  18. Storage of hydrogen in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiswall, R.

    1981-01-01

    A review is dedicated to a problem of hydrogen storage as fuel of future, that can be used under various conditions, is easily obtained with the help of other types of energy and can be transformed into them. Data on reversible metal-hydrogen systems, where hydrogen can be obtained by the way of reaction of thermal decomposition are presented. Pressure-temperature-content diagrams, information on concrete Pd-H, TiFe-H, V-N systems are presented and analyzed from the point of view of thermodynamics. A table with thermodynamical characteristics of several hydrides is presented. The majority of known solid hydrides in relation to their use for hydrogen storage are characterized. The review includes information on real or supposed uses in concrete systems: in fuel cells, for levelling of loading of electric plants, in automobile engines, in hydride engines, for heat storage [ru

  19. Hydrogen production methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.

    1982-07-01

    Old, present and new proceses for producing hydrogen are assessed critically. The emphasis throughout is placed on those processes which could be commercially viable before the turn of the century for large-scale hydrogen manufacture. Electrolysis of water is the only industrial process not dependent on fossil resources for large-scale hydrogen production and is likely to remain so for the next two or three decades. While many new processes, including those utilizing sunlight directly or indirectly, are presently not considered to be commercially viable for large-scale hydrogen production, research and development effort is needed to enhance our understanding of the nature of these processes. Water vapour electrolysis is compared with thermochemical processes: the former has the potential for displacing all other processes for producing hydrogen and oxygen from water

  20. Hydrogen in CANDU fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejnoha, R.; Manzer, A.M.; Surette, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    Unirradiated and irradiated CANDU fuel cladding was tested to compare the role of stress-corrosion cracking and of hydrogen in the development of fuel defects. The results of the tests are compared with information on fuel performance in-reactor. The role of hydriding (deuteriding) from the coolant and from the fuel element inside is discussed, and the control of 'hydrogen gas' content in the element is confirmed as essential for defect-free fuel performance. Finally, implications for fuel element design are discussed. (author)

  1. Fatigue of vanadium--hydrogen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.S.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen contents near and above the room temperature solubility limit increase the high cycle fatigue life but decrease low cycle life of polycrystalline vanadium. Changes in endurance limit with hydrides may be a consequence of decreased cyclic strain hardening coefficient, n'. 132 ppM hydrogen in solution has only a slightly beneficial effect on stress controlled fatigue life and essentially no effect on low cycle fatigue life. Unalloyed vanadium exhibits profuse striations, while hydrides produce cleavage cracks in fatigued samples. 10 fig

  2. Measurements of the electrical resistance and the hydrogen depth distribution for Ni 60Nb 20Zr 20 amorphous alloy before and after hydrogen charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Sumiaki; Ohtsu, Naofumi; Nagata, Shinji; Yamaura, Shin-ichi; Uchinashi, Sakae; Kimura, Hisamichi; Shikama, Tatsuo; Inoue, Akihisa

    2005-02-01

    A Ni 60Nb 20Zr 20 amorphous alloy was prepared by the single-roller melt-spinning technique. The change in the electrical resistance of the alloy after electrochemical hydrogen charging in 6 N KOH solution was investigated. The change in the hydrogen depth distribution in the alloy was also investigated by elastic recoil detection. As a result, we found that the electrical resistance of the alloy increases with increasing the hydrogen content in the alloy and that a large number of hydrogen atoms are remained in the surface area of the hydrogen-charged alloy.

  3. Economic Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Participating in California Electricity Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichman, Joshua [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Townsend, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Melaina, Marc [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-19

    As the electric sector evolves and increasing amounts of variable renewable generation are installed on the system, there are greater needs for system flexibility and sufficient capacity, and greater concern for overgeneration from renewable sources not well matched in time with electric loads. Hydrogen systems have the potential to support the grid in each of these areas. However, limited information is available about the economic competitiveness of hydrogen system configurations. This paper quantifies the value for hydrogen energy storage and demand response systems to participate in select California wholesale electricity markets using 2012 data. For hydrogen systems and conventional storage systems (e.g., pumped hydro, batteries), the yearly revenues from energy, ancillary service, and capacity markets are compared to the yearly cost to establish economic competitiveness. Hydrogen systems can present a positive value proposition for current markets. Three main findings include: (1) For hydrogen systems participating in California electricity markets, producing and selling hydrogen was found to be much more valuable than producing and storing hydrogen to later produce electricity; therefore systems should focus on producing and selling hydrogen and opportunistically providing ancillary services and arbitrage. (2) Tighter integration with electricity markets generates greater revenues (i.e., systems that participate in multiple markets receive the highest revenue). (3) More storage capacity, in excess of what is required to provide diurnal shifting, does not increase competitiveness in current California wholesale energy markets. As more variable renewable generation is installed, the importance of long duration storage may become apparent in the energy price or through additional markets, but currently, there is not a sufficiently large price differential between days to generate enough revenue to offset the cost of additional storage. Future work will involve

  4. Incoherent neutron-scattering determination of hydrogen content : Theory and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perego, R.C.; Blaauw, M.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen concentrations of 0 up to 350?mg/kg in a titanium alloy have been determined at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) with neutron incoherent scattering (NIS) and with cold neutron prompt gamma activation analysis. The latter is a well-established technique, while the former

  5. Formation of free hydrogen during radiolysis in a bed of clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.; Lind, J.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of the amount of molecular hydrogen formed radiolytically in γ-irradiated sodium bentonite with varying water content have been carried out. Experiments have been carried out with 0.1 to 5 MPa Ar pressure and 2 to 5 MPa mechanical (mercury) pressure applied to the bentonite. The results clearly show that a water content and pressure-dependent equilibrium is obtained with hydrogen concentrations well below the hydrogen solubility in water. Titrations of slurries of 10 g irradiated and unirradiated bentonite in 100 g water with NaOH show a dose dependent increase in the surface acidity of the bentonite

  6. Hydrogen mobility from wind energy – A life cycle assessment focusing on the fuel supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, Jörg; Patyk, Andreas; Tanguy, Philippe; Retzke, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Environmental performance, focusing on production and provision of hydrogen. • Primary data collected from a 700 bar refueling station incl. alkaline electrolyser. • Construction of facilities dominates the primary energy demand and emissions. • Refueling station contributes to same extent to GHG emissions as electricity supply. • Remarkably high expenditures for provision of supplies. - Abstract: In the current debates on reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the mobility sector, hydrogen produced via water electrolysis from renewable electricity is commonly regarded to be a sustainable energy carrier with large potential for decarbonisation of the mobility sector. Directly produced at the refueling stations site, hydrogen greenhouse gas emissions are presently defined to be zero in e.g. the Directives of the European Union since emissions arising from the facilities construction are defined to be negligible. In order to check the validity of this assumption with respect to the latest technical developments in hydrogen supply, the present article aims to report the environmental performance of hydrogen being produced and compressed for mobility purposes. To this end, a state-of-the-art hydrogen refueling station (HRS) with an on-site alkaline electrolyser is assessed, which was built and operated in Berlin. Assuming electricity supply from wind energy generation, a life cycle assessment for the complete value chain was carried out where primary data for the build-up of electrolyser and HRS were obtained during decommissioning of the station. The results show that the construction of HRS and on-site electrolyser requires higher material and energy expenditures compared to previous investigations on similar but technically less advanced systems. These expenditures generate a significant footprint in the specific e.g. greenhouse gas emissions if the electrolyser is operated at a reduced load factor as it may be foreseen for grid stabilisation

  7. Design and reliability assessment of control systems for a nuclear-based hydrogen production plant with copper-chlorine thermochemical cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Dabbagh, Ahmad W. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario, L1H 7K4 (Canada); Lu, Lixuan [Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario, L1H 7K4 (Canada)

    2010-02-15

    The thermochemical Copper-Chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle is an emerging new method of nuclear-based hydrogen production. In the process, water is decomposed into hydrogen and oxygen through several physical and chemical processes. In this paper, a Distributed Control System (DCS) is designed for the thermochemical Cu-Cl cycle. The architecture and the communication networks of the DCS are discussed. Reliability of the DCS is assessed using fault trees. In the assessment, the impact of the malfunction of the actuators, sensors, controllers and communication networks on the overall system reliability is investigated. This provides key information for the selection of control system components, and determination of their inspection frequency and maintenance strategy. The hydrogen reactor unit, which is one of the major components in the thermochemical Cu-Cl cycle, is used to demonstrate the detailed design and analysis. (author)

  8. Hydrogen extraction from liquid lithium-lead alloy by gas-liquid contact method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Bo; Weng Kuiping; Hou Jianping; Yang Guangling; Zeng Jun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen extraction experiment from liquid lithium-lead alloy by gas-liquid contact method has been carried out in own liquid lithium-lead bubbler (LLLB). Experimental results show that, He is more suitable than Ar as carrier gas in the filler tower. The higher temperature the tower is, the greater hydrogen content the tower exports. Influence of carrier gas flow rate on the hydrogen content in the export is jagged, no obvious rule. Although the difference between experimental results and literature data, but it is feasible that hydrogen isotopes extraction experiment from liquid lithium-lead by gas-liquid contact method, and the higher extraction efficiency increases with the growth of the residence time of the alloy in tower. (authors)

  9. Nickel-hydrogen battery and hydrogen storage alloy electrode; Nikkeru suiso denchi oyobi suiso kyuzo gokin denkyoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, T. [Furukawa Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Furukawa, J. [The Furukawa Battery Co. Ltd., Yokohama (Japan)

    1996-03-22

    Hermetically sealed nickel-hydrogen battery has such problem that the inner pressure of the battery elevates when it is overcharged since the oxygen gas evolves from the positive electrode. This invention relates to the hermetically sealed nickel-hydrogen battery consisting of positive electrode composed mainly of nickel hydroxide and negative electrode composed mainly of hydrogen storage alloy. According to the invention, the negative electrode contains organic sulfur compound having carbon-sulfur bond. As a result, the elevation of battery inner pressure due to the hydrogen gas evolution, the decrease in discharge capacity due to the repetition of charge and discharge, and the lowering of voltage after charging can be suppressed. The adequate content of the organic sulfur compound is 0.05 - 1 part in weight to 100 part in weight of hydrogen storage alloy. As for the organic sulfur compound, n-butylthiol, ethylthioethane, phenyldithiobenzene, trimethylsulfonium bromide, thiobenzophenone, 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfenyl chloride, and ethylene sulphidic acid are employed. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Nanoenergetics and High Hydrogen Content Materials for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-28

    past twenty years. Ammonia borane has already been used with success to produce hydrogen for chemical lasers and fuel cells. The alternatives being...adduct solution in the presence of a titanium catalyst under an inert atmosphere. The resulting material was used to reduce complexes of gold, nickel...A. Varma, B. Legrand, C. Chauveau, and I. Gokalp, “Ignition and Combustion of Al Particles Clad by Ni”, Combust. Sci. Tech., Vol. 174, 2002, pp

  11. Content and Grade Trends in State Assessments and NAEP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Schafer

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Each state is required by the No Child Left Behind Act to report the percents of its students who have reached a score level called - proficient- or above for certain grades in the content areas of reading (or a similar construct and math. Using 2005 data from public web sites of states and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP, state-to-state differences in percents were analyzed, both unconditionally and conditionally on NAEP, for (1 trend across content areas (horizontal moderation, (2 trend across grade levels (vertical moderation, and (3 consistency with NAEP. While there was considerable variation from state to state, especially on an idealistic-realistic dimension, the results generally show that states are relatively consistent in trends across grades and contents.

  12. Fish stomach contents in benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TH. Tupinambás

    Full Text Available The choice of sampling gears to assess benthic macroinvertebrate communities depends on environmental characteristics, study objectives, and cost effectiveness. Because of the high foraging capacity and diverse habitats and behaviors of benthophagous fishes, their stomach contents may offer a useful sampling tool in studies of benthic macroinvertebrates, especially in large, deep, fast rivers that are difficult to sample with traditional sediment sampling gear. Our objective was to compare the benthic macroinvertebrate communities sampled from sediments with those sampled from fish stomachs. We collected benthic macroinvertebrates and fish from three different habitat types (backwater, beach, riffle in the wet season, drying season, and dry season along a single reach of the Grande River (Paraná River Basin, southeast Brazil. We sampled sediments through use of a Petersen dredge (total of 216 grabs and used gill nets to sample fish (total of 36 samples. We analyzed the stomach contents of three commonly occurring benthophagous fish species (Eigenmannia virescens, Iheringichthys labrosus, Leporinus amblyrhynchus. Chironomids dominated in both sampling methods. Macroinvertebrate taxonomic composition and abundances from fish stomachs differed from those from sediment samples, but less so from riffles than from backwater and beach habitats. Macroinvertebrate taxa from E. virescens stomachs were more strongly correlated with sediment samples from all three habitats than were those from the other two species. The species accumulation curves and higher mean dispersion values, compared with with sediment samples suggest that E. virescens is more efficient than sediment samples and the other fish studied at collecting benthic taxa. We conclude that by analyzing the stomach contents of benthophagous fishes it is possible to assess important characteristics of benthic communities (dispersion, taxonomic composition and diversity. This is especially true

  13. Deposition of a-SiC:H using organosilanes in an argon/hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, L.

    1993-01-01

    Selected organosilanes were examined as precursors for the deposition of amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide in an argon/hydrogen plasma. Effect of process variables on the quality of the films was established by means of FTIR, Auger spectroscopy, XPS, XRD, chemical analysis, and weight losses upon pyrolysis. For a given power level there is a limiting feeding rate of the precursor under which operation of the system is dominated by thermodynamics and leads to high quality silicon carbide films that are nearly stoichiometric and low in hydrogen. Beyond that limit, carbosilane polymer formation and excessive hydrogen incorporation takes place. The hydrogen content of the plasma affects the deposition rate and the hydrogen content of the film. In the thermodynamically dominated regime the nature of the precursor has no effect on the quality of the film, it affects only the relative utilization efficiency

  14. The study on binary Mg-Co hydrogen storage alloys with BCC phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yao; Tsushio, Yoshinori; Enoki, Hirotoshi; Akiba, Etsuo

    2005-01-01

    Novel Mg-Co binary alloys were successfully synthesized by mechanical alloying. These alloys were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron micrograph (TEM), pressure-composition-isotherms measurements (P-C-T) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Both XRD Rietveld analysis and TEM observation confirmed that these binary alloys contain BCC phase and that the BCC phase existed in the range from 37 to 80 at.% Co. The lattice parameter of the BCC phase increased with the increase of the Co content from 37 to 50 at.%. When the Co content reached 50 at.%, the lattice parameter reached a maximum value, and then turned to decrease gradually with further increase of the Co content. Most of Mg-Co BCC alloys absorbed hydrogen at 373 K under 6 MPa of hydrogen pressure. The Mg 60 Co 40 alloy showed the highest hydrogen absorption capacity, about 2.7 mass% hydrogen. However, all the Mg-Co alloys studied did not desorb hydrogen at 373 K. By means of DSC measurements and in situ XRD analysis, it was found that under 4 MPa hydrogen atmosphere, Mg 50 Co 50 alloy transformed from BCC solid solution to Mg 2 CoH 5 tetragonal hydride at 413 K

  15. Hydrogen embrittlement of ASTM A 203 D nuclear structural steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravartty, J.K.; Prasad, G.E.; Sinha, T.K.; Asundi, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of ASTM A 203 D nuclear structural steel has been studied by tension, bend and delayed-failure tests at room temperature. While the tension tests of hydrogen charged unnotched specimens reveal no change in ultimate strength and ductility, the effect of hydrogen is manifested in notched specimens (tensile and bend) as a decrease in ultimate strength (maximum load in bend test) and ductility; the effect increases with increasing hydrogen content. It is observed that for a given hydrogen concentration, the decrease in bend ductility is remarkably large compared to that in tensile ductility. Hydrogen charging does not cause any delayed-failure upto 200 h under an applied tensile stress, 0.85 times the notch tensile strength. However delayed failure occurs in hydrogen charged bend samples in less than 10 h under an applied bending load of about 0.80 times of the uncharged maximum load. Fractographs of hydrogen charged unnotched specimens show ductile dimple fracture, while those of notched tension and bend specimens under hydrogen-charged conditions show a mixture of ductile dimple and quasi-cleavage cracking. The proportion of quasi-cleavage cracking increases with increasing hydrogen content and this fracture mode is more predominant in bend specimens. The changes in tensile properties and fracture modes can reasonably be explained by existing theories of hydrogen embrittlement. An attempt is made to explain the significant difference in the embrittlement susceptibility of bend and tensile specimens in the light of difference in triaxiality and plastic zone size near the notch tip. (orig.)

  16. Hydrogen-Oxygen Reaction Assessment in the HANARO Cold Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Hark Rho; Lee, Kye Hong; Han, Young Soo; Kim, Young Ki; Kim, Seok Hoon; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2006-04-01

    Liquid hydrogen, filled in the moderator cell of the in-pool assembly (IPA), is selected as a moderator to moderate thermal neutrons into cold neutrons for the HANARO Cold Neutron Source. Since the IPA will be installed in the vertical CN hole of the reflector tank at HANARO, the vacuum chamber (VC), the pressure boundary against the reactor, should withstand the detonation pressure so as to avoid any physical damage on the reactor under the hydrogen-oxygen chemical reaction. Accordingly, not only will the vacuum chamber be designed to keep its integrity against the hydrogen accident, but also the hydrogen and vacuum system will be designed with the leak-tight concept and also designed to be surrounded by the inert gas blanket system to prevent any air intrusion into the system. Also, in order to confirm the design concept of the CNS as well as VC integrity against the hydrogen accident, the hydrogen-oxygen chemical reaction is evaluated in this report by several methodologies: AICC methodology, Equivalent TNT detonation methodology, Explosion test result, and Calculation of VC strain under the maximum reflected explosion load

  17. Hydrogen-Oxygen Reaction Assessment in the HANARO Cold Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Hark Rho; Lee, Kye Hong; Han, Young Soo; Kim, Young Ki; Kim, Seok Hoon; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2006-04-15

    Liquid hydrogen, filled in the moderator cell of the in-pool assembly (IPA), is selected as a moderator to moderate thermal neutrons into cold neutrons for the HANARO Cold Neutron Source. Since the IPA will be installed in the vertical CN hole of the reflector tank at HANARO, the vacuum chamber (VC), the pressure boundary against the reactor, should withstand the detonation pressure so as to avoid any physical damage on the reactor under the hydrogen-oxygen chemical reaction. Accordingly, not only will the vacuum chamber be designed to keep its integrity against the hydrogen accident, but also the hydrogen and vacuum system will be designed with the leak-tight concept and also designed to be surrounded by the inert gas blanket system to prevent any air intrusion into the system. Also, in order to confirm the design concept of the CNS as well as VC integrity against the hydrogen accident, the hydrogen-oxygen chemical reaction is evaluated in this report by several methodologies: AICC methodology, Equivalent TNT detonation methodology, Explosion test result, and Calculation of VC strain under the maximum reflected explosion load.

  18. Hyperoxygenated hydrogen-rich solution suppresses shock- and resuscitation-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Yangjie; Liu, Ting; Mei, Xiaopeng; Meng, Xiangzhong; Gou, Xingchun; Deng, Bin; Xu, Hao; Xu, Lixian

    2017-12-01

    It is not known whether simultaneous delivery of hydrogen and oxygen can reduce injury caused by hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HSR). This study investigated the therapeutic potential of hyperoxygenated hydrogen-rich solution (HHOS), a combined hydrogen/oxygen carrier, in a rat model of HSR-induced liver injury. Rats (n = 60) were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 6 per group at each time point). One group underwent sham operation, and the others were subjected to severe hemorrhagic shock and then treated with lactated Ringer's solution (LRS), hydrogen-rich solution, hyperoxygenated solution, or HHOS. At 2 and 6 h after resuscitation, blood samples (n = 6) were collected from the femoral artery and serum concentrations of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were measured. Rats were then sacrificed, and histopathological changes in the liver were evaluated by quantifying the percentage of apoptotic cells by caspase-3 immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling. Inflammation was assessed by assessing malondialdehyde content and tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin (IL)-6 expression. Compared to lactated Ringer's solution, hydrogen-rich solution, or hyperoxygenated solution groups, serum AST and alanine aminotransferase levels and IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and malondialdehyde expression in liver tissue were decreased by HHOS treatment. The number of caspase-3- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells was decreased (P < 0.05) by HHOS treatment, 2 and 6 h after resuscitation. HHOS has protective effects against liver injury in a rat model of HSR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, D.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.; Sglavo, V.; ENEA, Rome

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of the technical/economic feasibility of the use of hydrogen as an automotive fuel is made based on analyses of the following: the chemical- physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems - with water vapour injection, cryogenic injection, and the low or high pressure injection of hydrogen directly into the combustion chamber; the current commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. The paper concludes that, considering current costs for hydrogen fuel production, distribution and use, at present, the employment of hydrogen fuelled vehicles is feasible only in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives

  20. Electromigration of hydrogen in zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmeswaran, P.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Raghunathan, V.S.; Govinda Rajan, K.

    1989-01-01

    Electromigration is a purification technique for removing interstitial impurities from metals like Zr, Ti and Nb. It uses an electric field to induce migration of atoms from one end to other. This paper describes an attempt to purify zircaloy-2 of its hydrogen content by this technique. Resistivity measurement has been used to evaluate the change in impurity concentration that occurs during the process. Results indicate the movement of hydrogen atoms towards the cathode end. The value of the effective charge number, Z * , calculated from the results confirms hydrogen migration to the cathode aided by a positive wind force. (author). 6 refs., 5 figs

  1. Economical assessment of a wind-hydrogen energy system using WindHyGen registered software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguado, Monica; Ayerbe, Elixabete; Garde, Raquel; Rivas, David M.; Azcarate, Cristina; Blanco, Rosa; Mallor, Fermin

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of analyzing the economical feasibility of a wind-hydrogen energy storage and transformation system. Energy systems based on certain renewable sources as wind power, have the drawback of random input making them a non-reliable supplier of energy. Regulation of output energy requires the introduction of new equipment with the capacity to store it. We have chosen the hydrogen as an energy storage system due to its versatility. The advantage of these energy storage systems is that the energy can be used (sold) when the demand for energy rises, and needs (prices) therefore are higher. There are two disadvantages: (a) the cost of the new equipment and (b) energy loss due to inefficiencies in the transformation processes. In this research we develop a simulation model to aid in the economic assessment of this type of energy systems, which also integrates an optimization phase to simulate optimal management policies. Finally we analyze a wind-hydrogen farm in order to determine its economical viability compared to current wind farms. (author)

  2. Assessment of nitrogen content in buffalo manure and land application costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Faugno

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis livestock for mozzarella cheese production plays a fundamental role in the economy of southern Italy. European and Italian regulations consider nitrogen content in buffalo manure to be the same as that of cattle manure. This study aimed to assess whether this assumption is true. The first aim of the study was to assess nitrogen content in buffalo manure. Samples were taken from 35 farms to analyse nitrogen and phosphorous concentration in the manure. Analysis confirmed a lower nitrogen concentration (2% in buffalo manure. A secondary aim of the study was to evaluate whether manure application techniques that are apparently less suitable, e.g. splash plate spreader, could be feasible. The cost of different methods of land application of manure and their characteristics were evaluated on the basis of one operational cycle. Considering losses for volatilisation, and taking into account cost assessment, the immediate incorporation of buffalo manure (nitrogen content 2% is a suitable method of ammonia volatilisation. However, it is expensive and involves high fuel consumption in relation to the environmental benefit.

  3. Turbulent Flame Propagation Characteristics of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitzman, Jerry [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lieuwen, Timothy [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    This final report describes the results of an effort to better understand turbulent flame propagation, especially at conditions relevant to gas turbines employing fuels with syngas or hydrogen mixtures. Turbulent flame speeds were measured for a variety of hydrogen/carbon monoxide (H2/CO) and hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4) fuel mixtures with air as the oxidizer. The measurements include global consumption speeds (ST,GC) acquired in a turbulent jet flame at pressures of 1-10 atm and local displacement speeds (ST,LD) acquired in a low-swirl burner at atmospheric pressure. The results verify the importance of fuel composition in determining turbulent flame speeds. For example, different fuel-air mixtures having the same unstretched laminar flame speed (SL,0) but different fuel compositions resulted in significantly different ST,GC for the same turbulence levels (u'). This demonstrates the weakness of turbulent flame speed correlations based simply on u'/SL,0. The results were analyzed using a steady-steady leading points concept to explain the sensitivity of turbulent burning rates to fuel (and oxidizer) composition. Leading point theories suggest that the premixed turbulent flame speed is controlled by the flame front characteristics at the flame brush leading edge, or, in other words, by the flamelets that advance farthest into the unburned mixture (the so-called leading points). For negative Markstein length mixtures, this is assumed to be close to the maximum stretched laminar flame speed (SL,max) for the given fuel-oxidizer mixture. For the ST,GC measurements, the data at a given pressure were well-correlated with an SL,max scaling. However the variation with pressure was not captured, which may be due to non-quasi-steady effects that are not included in the current model. For the ST,LD data, the leading points model again faithfully captured the variation of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of fuel-compositions and turbulence intensities. These

  4. Thermo analytic investigation of hydrogen effusion behavior - sensor evaluation and calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ried, P.; Gaber, M.; Beyer, K.; Mueller, R.; Kipphardt, H.; Kannengiesser, T. [BAM, Federal Institute for Material Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    The well established carrier gas analysis (CGA) method was used to test different hydrogen detectors comprising a thermal conductivity detector (TCD) and a metal oxide semiconducting (MOx) sensor. The MOx sensor provides high hydrogen sensitivity and selectivity, whereas the TCD exhibits a much shorter response time and a linear hydrogen concentration dependency. Therefore, the TCD was used for quantitative hydrogen concentration measurements above 50 {mu}mol/mol. The respective calibration was made using N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} gas mixtures. Furthermore, the hydrogen content and degassing behaviour of titanium hydride (TiH{sub 2-x}) was studied. This material turned out to be a potential candidate for a solid sample calibration. Vacuum hot extraction (VHE) coupled with a mass spectrometer (MS) was then calibrated with TiH{sub 2-x} as transfer standard. The calibration was applied for the evaluation of the hydrogen content of austenitic steel samples (1.4301) and the comparison of CGA-TCD and VHE-MS. (Copyright copyright 2011 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Determination of hydrogen in uranium-niobium-zirconium alloy by inert-gas fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carden, W.F.

    1979-12-01

    An improved method has been developed using inert-gas fusion for determining the hydrogen content in uranium-niobium-zirconium (U-7.5Nb-2.5Zr) alloy. The method is applicable to concentrations of hydrogen ranging from 1 to 250 micrograms per gram and may be adjusted for analysis of greater hydrogen concentrations. Hydrogen is determined using a hydrogen determinator. The limit of error for a single determination at the 95%-confidence level (at the 3.7-μg/g-hydrogen level) is +-1.4 micrograms per gram hydrogen

  6. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader; J. S. Herring

    1999-09-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  7. Safety Issues with Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Herring, James Stephen

    1999-10-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify and evaluate safety issues associated with the use of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel in automobiles. Several forms of hydrogen have been considered: gas, liquid, slush, and hydrides. The safety issues have been discussed, beginning with properties of hydrogen and the phenomenology of hydrogen combustion. Safety-related operating experiences with hydrogen vehicles have been summarized to identify concerns that must be addressed in future design activities and to support probabilistic risk assessment. Also, applicable codes, standards, and regulations pertaining to hydrogen usage and refueling have been identified and are briefly discussed. This report serves as a safety foundation for any future hydrogen safety work, such as a safety analysis or a probabilistic risk assessment.

  8. Development and content validation of performance assessments for endoscopic third ventriculostomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breimer, Gerben E.; Haji, Faizal A.; Hoving, Eelco W; Drake, James M.

    This study aims to develop and establish the content validity of multiple expert rating instruments to assess performance in endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV), collectively called the Neuro-Endoscopic Ventriculostomy Assessment Tool (NEVAT). The important aspects of ETV were identified through

  9. Fatigue behavior of niobium--hydrogen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, D.W.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on room temperature fatigue behavior of niobium were investigated under both high frequency stress control and low frequency strain control conditions, in air. Hydrogen markedly improved the fatigue life in high frequency tests, while low frequency tests resulted in decreased fatigue life with increasing hydrogen content. Notches in hydrogen-charged alloys reduced high cycle life significantly but had little effect on low cycle tests. Fracture surfaces of annealed niobium mainly exhibited striations, with numerous cracks originating at troughs of striated bands in both stress and strain control tests. The fracture mode for alloys with hydrogen in solution was mixed, with striations interspersed with cleavage facets at high frequencies but generally cleavage steps at low frequencies. For the hydrided alloys, distinctive steps of mixed ductile-brittle appearance were revealed under high frequency conditions, but large cleavage facets only were observed for low frequency tests. The results are discussed in terms of the effects of hydrogen on the cyclic strain hardening rate, as well as on fatigue strength and ductility of niobium

  10. Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanism in Fatigue Behavior of Austenitic and Martensitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Brück

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the influence of hydrogen on the fatigue behavior of the high strength martensitic stainless steel X3CrNiMo13-4 and the metastable austenitic stainless steels X2Crni19-11 with various nickel contents was examined in the low and high cycle fatigue regime. The focus of the investigations were the changes in the mechanisms of short crack propagation. Experiments in laboratory air with uncharged and precharged specimen and uncharged specimen in pressurized hydrogen were carried out. The aim of the ongoing investigation was to determine and quantitatively describe the predominant processes of hydrogen embrittlement and their influence on the short fatigue crack morphology and crack growth rate. In addition, simulations were carried out on the short fatigue crack growth, in order to develop a detailed insight into the hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms relevant for cyclic loading conditions. It was found that a lower nickel content and a higher martensite content of the samples led to a higher susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. In addition, crack propagation and crack path could be simulated well with the simulation model.

  11. Contribution to the determination of total hydrogen in oxide nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartscher, W.; Kutter, H.

    1979-01-01

    Normally the total hydrogen content of a fast breeder mixed oxide fuel is calculated from the results of the determinations of free hydrogen and water. Thermodynamic considerations, coupled with kinetic results for room temperature and 1000 0 C and taken from the literature indicate, that the normal method for the determination of water by heating in a carrier gas stream and subsequent coulometric determination of the expelled water must give low results. A modification of this method involving the introduction of a copper oxide furnace into the system for the oxidation of hydrogen has been studied. The resulting method for the determination of total hydrogen gives about ten times higher values than those calculated from the normal water determination. These total hydrogen values and the oxygen to metal ratios which are obtained by gravimetric methods and not corrected for the water content, reflect more realistically the in-pile conditions in the fuel pin. (Auth.)

  12. Water and deuterium content of chondrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, Francois

    1978-01-01

    The main objective of this research thesis which deals with meteorite study, is to develop an experimental technique to measure the hydrogen isotopic rate in the case of very low quantities of hydrogen, notably in samples in which water content is hundred or thousand times less than in reported experiments, in order to study mechanisms of alteration of chondrites. The author reports an attempt to reconcile obtained results for isotopic rates as well as for water contents with those of the main existing models of chondrite formation. He proposes a detailed description of isotopic exchange mechanisms at low temperature, and shows that this mechanism is not in disagreement with literature published on chondrites

  13. Analysis of composite hydrogen storage cylinders subjected to localized flame impingements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, J.; Chen, J.; Sundararaman, S.; Chandrashekhara, K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Chernicoff, William [US Department of Transportation, Washington, DC 20509 (United States)

    2008-06-15

    A comprehensive non-linear finite element model is developed for predicting the behavior of composite hydrogen storage cylinders subjected to high pressure and localized flame impingements. The model is formulated in an axi-symmetric coordinate system and incorporates with various sub-models to describe the behavior of the composite cylinder under extreme thermo-mechanical loadings. A heat transfer sub-model is employed to predict the temperature evolution of the composite cylinder wall and accounts for heat transport due to decomposition and mass loss. A composite decomposition sub-model described by Arrhenius's law is implemented to predict the residual resin content of thermal damaged area. A sub-model for material degradation is implemented to account for the loss of mechanical properties. A progressive failure model is adopted to detect various types of mechanical failure. These sub-models are implemented in ABAQUS commercial finite element code using user subroutines. Numerical results are presented for thermal damage, residual properties and profile of resin content in the cylinder. The developed model provides a useful tool for safe design and structural assessment of high pressure composite hydrogen storage cylinders. (author)

  14. Methods of assessment of whole body 241Am content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltanova, S.; Malatova, I.; Klisak, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discuss an influence of different skull phantoms on efficiency of the measurement. Description of some methods of an assessment of the 241 Am content in the human skeleton from measurements performed over long bones of the human body is also offered. (authors)

  15. Hydrogen content in titanium and a titanium–zirconium alloy after acid etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Matthias J.; Walter, Martin S. [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1109, Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway); Institute of Medical and Polymer Engineering, Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstrasse 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lyngstadaas, S. Petter [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1109, Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway); Wintermantel, Erich [Institute of Medical and Polymer Engineering, Chair of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstrasse 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Haugen, Håvard J., E-mail: h.j.haugen@odont.uio.no [Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1109, Blindern, NO-0317 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-04-01

    Dental implant alloys made from titanium and zirconium are known for their high mechanical strength, fracture toughness and corrosion resistance in comparison with commercially pure titanium. The aim of the study was to investigate possible differences in the surface chemistry and/or surface topography of titanium and titanium–zirconium surfaces after sand blasting and acid etching. The two surfaces were compared by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and profilometry. The 1.9 times greater surface hydrogen concentration of titanium zirconium compared to titanium was found to be the major difference between the two materials. Zirconium appeared to enhance hydride formation on titanium alloys when etched in acid. Surface topography revealed significant differences on the micro and nanoscale. Surface roughness was increased significantly (p < 0.01) on the titanium–zirconium alloy. High-resolution images showed nanostructures only present on titanium zirconium. - Highlights: ► TiZr alloy showed increased hydrogen levels over Ti. ► The alloying element Zr appeared to catalyze hydrogen absorption in Ti. ► Surface roughness was significantly increased for the TiZr alloy over Ti. ► TiZr alloy revealed nanostructures not observed for Ti.

  16. Hydrogen control in the System 80+TM ALWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.E.; Jacob, M.C.; Carpentino, F.L.; Wachowiak, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an assessment of the features built into the System 80 +TM Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) design for controlling hydrogen concentration during a hypothetical severe accident. Although the significantly larger System 80 + containment volume serves to passively maintain the global average below detonable limits, the design incorporates a Hydrogen Mitigation System (HMS) to further reduce the local hydrogen concentration. The HMS consists of a large number of hydrogen ignitors distributed within the containment to selectively burn-off hydrogen at low concentrations. The criteria for the placement of these igniters are discussed along with an assessment of the effectiveness of the igniters to control the hydrogen concentrations. This assessment, which was performed using the generalized containment model of the MAAP 4 code, evaluated the potential for hydrogen build-up in the containment and calculated the best-estimate response of the igniters. (author)

  17. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, G.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.; Brighigna, M.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen fueled vehicles may just be the answer to the air pollution problem in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives. This paper examines the feasibility of hydrogen as an automotive fuel by analyzing the following aspects: the chemical-physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems; current production technologies and commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. With reference to recent trial results being obtained in the USA, an assessment is also made of the feasibility of the use of methane-hydrogen mixtures as automotive fuels. The paper concludes with a review of progress being made by ENEA (the Italian Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) in the development of fuel storage and electronic fuel injection systems for hydrogen powered vehicles

  18. Assessing the Life-Cycle Performance of Hydrogen Production via Biofuel Reforming in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Susmozas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, hydrogen is mainly produced through steam reforming of natural gas. However, this conventional process involves environmental and energy security concerns. This has led to the development of alternative technologies for (potentially green hydrogen production. In this work, the environmental and energy performance of biohydrogen produced in Europe via steam reforming of glycerol and bio-oil is evaluated from a life-cycle perspective, and contrasted with that of conventional hydrogen from steam methane reforming. Glycerol as a by-product from the production of rapeseed biodiesel and bio-oil from the fast pyrolysis of poplar biomass are considered. The processing plants are simulated in Aspen Plus® to provide inventory data for the life cycle assessment. The environmental impact potentials evaluated include abiotic depletion, global warming, ozone layer depletion, photochemical oxidant formation, land competition, acidification and eutrophication. Furthermore, the cumulative (total and non-renewable energy demand is calculated, as well as the corresponding renewability scores and life-cycle energy balances and efficiencies of the biohydrogen products. In addition to quantitative evidence of the (expected relevance of the feedstock and impact categories considered, results show that poplar-derived bio-oil could be a suitable feedstock for steam reforming, in contrast to first-generation bioglycerol.

  19. Risk analysis of complex hydrogen infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Marangon, Alessia; Carcassi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Developing a future sustainable refuelling station network is the next important step to establish hydrogen as a fuel for vehicles and related services. Such stations will most likely be integrated in existing refuelling stations and result in multi-fuel storages with a variety of fuels being...... to improve the quality of biomass based fuels. Therefore, hydrogen supply and distribution chains will likely not only serve to fulfil the demands of refuelling, but may also be important for the wider electrical power and fuel industries. Based on an integrated hydrogen supply and distribution network...... assessment methodologies, and how functional models could support coherent risk and sustainability (Risk Assessment, Life Cycle Assessment /Life Cycle Costing) assessments, in order to find optimal solutions for the development of the infrastructure on a regional or national level....

  20. Hydrogen: The Fuel that Drill Bits Cannot Reach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Alistair I.; Duffey, Romney B.

    2006-01-01

    As realization grows of the damaging cumulative effects of CO 2 on our biosphere, the prospect of substituting hydrogen for oil-based fuels attracts growing attention. Japan provides a leading example of remedial action with the expectation of five million fuel-cell-powered vehicles in operation by 2020. But where will the fuel for these and the rest of a 'Hydrogen Age' come from? The hydrogen market used to be straightforward: small-scale or high-purity markets were supplied relatively expensively by electrolysis; the other 95% was supplied much more cheaply by reforming hydrocarbons -- mostly using steam-methane reforming (SMR) and low-cost natural gas. The recent rise in the price of hydrocarbons -- natural gas as well as oil -- plus the need to sequester CO 2 has disrupted this scenario. It seems likely that this is a permanent shift driven by growing demand for limited low-cost sources of fluid hydrocarbons. So the traditional SMR route to hydrogen will be in competition with reforming of heavier hydrocarbons (particularly coal and residual oils) as well as with electrolysis based on electricity produced from low-CO 2 -emitting sources. By 2025, new high-temperature thermochemical or thermo-electrolytic sources based on high-temperature nuclear reactors could be in contention. This paper assesses the economics of all these potential sources of hydrogen and their price sensitivities. It also considers their environmental footprints. Is hydrogen from 'clean coal' or other lower value hydrocarbons cost-effective if it is also CO 2 -free? Is intermittent low-temperature electrolysis based on nuclear- and wind-produced electricity (NuWind C ) the best way or does the hydrogen future belong to thermochemistry or thermo-electrolytic sources? How can one produce hydrogen to upgrade Canada's vast oil sands resources without the detraction of a large CO 2 processing penalty? Fortunately for our planet, switching to hydrogen is no more than a technical challenge with a

  1. Hydrogen from biomass: state of the art and research challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, Thomas A; Elam, Carolyn C; Evans, Robert J

    2002-02-01

    appropriate feedstocks and deployment scenarios that match hydrogen to the local markets. Co-production opportunities are of particular interest for near-term deployment since multiple products improve the economics; however, co-product development is not covered in this report. Biomass has the potential to accelerate the realization of hydrogen as a major fuel of the future. Since biomass is renewable and consumes atmospheric CO2 during growth, it can have a small net CO2 impact compared to fossil fuels. However, hydrogen from biomass has major challenges. There are no completed technology demonstrations. The yield of hydrogen is low from biomass since the hydrogen content in biomass is low to being with (approximately 6% versus 25% for methane) and the energy content is low due to the 40% oxygen content of biomass. Since over half of the hydrogen from biomass comes from splitting water in the steam reforming reaction, the energy content of the feedstock is an inherent limitation of the process . The low yield of hydrogen on a weight basis is misleading since the energy conversion efficiency is high. However, the cost for growing, harvesting, and transporting biomass is high. Thus even with reasonable energy efficiencies, it is not presently economically competitive with natural gas steam reforming for stand-alone hydrogen without the advantage of high-value co-products. Additionally, as with all sources of hydrogen, production from biomass will require appropriate hydrogen storage and utilization systems to be developed and deployed. The report also looked at promising areas for further research and development. The major areas for R,D and D are: feedstock preparation and feeding; gasification gas conditioning; system integration; modular systems development; valuable co-product integration; and larger-scale demonstrations. These are in addition to the challenges for any hydrogen process in storage and utilization technologies.

  2. Effect of the hydrogen content and cooling velocity in the hydrides precipitation in α-zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.

    1983-01-01

    Zirconium specimens containing 50-300 ppm hydrogen have been cooled from the hydrogen solution treatment temperature at different rates by furnace cooling, air cooling and oil quenching. Optical and electron microscopical investigations have revealed grain boundary Δ - hydrides in slowly cooled specimens. At higher cooling rates γ and Δ hydrides have been found precipitated both intergranularly and intragranularly. Grain boundary Δ hydrides have been also observed in oil quenched specimens with 300 ppm hydrogen. Quenched specimens have revealed Widmanstatten and parallel plate type hydride morphologies. (Author) [pt

  3. CFD analysis for the hydrogen transport in the primary contention of a BWR using the codes OpenFOAM and Gas-Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez P, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    The accidents in Unit 2 of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in the United States (March 28 th , 1979), the one in Unit 4 of the NPP Chernobyl in Ukraine (April 26 th , 1986) and the explosions in some units of Fukushima NPP in Japan (March 11 th , 2011) boosted the investigations on severe accidents with core damage and, in particular, the threat to the ultimate barrier by an eventual explosion from uncontrolled Hydrogen combustion within the containment was considered of particular relevance. Research programs for analyzing Hydrogen behavior and control during this kind of accidents were early initiated by research and regulatory bodies. Assessment on Hydrogen behavior once it has been postulated to be released on the containment system can be divided into two phases, in the first one, transport and the concentrations of the gas mixtures and steam in each volume or area comprised between the structures of the containment are calculated, in the second one, the propagation of the detonation of the Hydrogen is calculated if there are the conditions to occur. Currently, there are computer programs that can be used in one, or both stages of computation, and they are based on one of the two solution methods in current use, one of them are integrated codes (e.g. MELCOR), which consists in assuming the containment as a network composed of hydraulic tanks or nodes on which the balance equations of mass and energy have to be solved, the network is connected by ducts or connections where the momentum balance equation arise. This methodology relies on the use of semi-empirical relationships and the criteria used to define a geometric pattern, are subjective. The second method, which is having relevance due to the large computing power of modern computers, is the numerical solution of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in complex geometries. This method of solution is known as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), and offers the advantage of using a

  4. What Do Clinicians Consider when Assessing Chronic Low Back Pain? A Content Analysis of Multidisciplinary Pain Centre Team Assessments of Functioning, Disability, and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagraith, Karl S; Strong, Jenny; Meredith, Pamela J; McPhail, Steven M

    2018-05-22

    Beyond expert suggestions as to the appropriate subject matter for chronic pain assessments, little is known about the actual content of multidisciplinary pain centre (MPC) clinical assessments. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Low Back Pain Core Set (ICF LBP-CS) provides a universal language to support the consistent description of LBP-related assessments across disciplines within multidisciplinary teams (MDT). This study sought to map the content of MPC clinical assessments to the ICF to: 1) identify and compare the content of clinical MDT assessments using a cross-disciplinary framework and, 2) examine the content validity of the LBP-CS. A qualitative examination of MPC team clinical assessments of CLBP was undertaken. MDT (pain medicine, psychiatry, nursing, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and psychology) assessments were audio-recorded and transcribed. Concepts were extracted from transcripts using a meaning condensation procedure and then linked to the ICF. Across seven MDT assessments, comprised of 42 discipline-specific assessments and 241,209 transcribed words, 8596 concepts were extracted. Contextual factors (i.e., the person and environment), except for physiotherapy, accounted for almost half of each discipline's assessments (range: 49% - 58%) Concepts spanned 113 second-level ICF categories, including 73/78 LBP-CS categories. Overall, the findings revealed novel insights into the content of MPC clinical assessments that can be used to improve healthcare delivery. ICF-based assessment profiles demonstrated unique contributions from each discipline to CLBP assessment. Finally, users of the LBP-CS can be confident that the tool exhibits sound content validity from the perceptive of MDT assessments of functioning, disability, and health.

  5. Effects of hydrogen on the tensile strength characteristics of stainless steels; Effets de l'hydrogene sur les caracteristiques de rupture par traction d'aciers inoxydables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, R; Pelissier, J; Pluchery, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    This paper deals with the effects of hydrogen on stainless steel, that might possibly be used as a canning material in hydrogen-cooled reactors. Apparent ultimate-tensile strength is only 80 per cent of initial value for hydrogen content about 50 cc NTP/ 100 g, and reduction in area decreases from 80 to 55 per cent. A special two-stage replica technique has been developed which allows fracture surface of small tensile specimens (about 0.1 mm diam.) to be examined in an electron microscope. All the specimens showed evidence of ductile character throughout the range of hydrogen contents investigated, but the aspect of the fracture surfaces gradually changes with increasing amounts. (author) [French] On etudie les effets de l'hydrogene sur des aciers inoxydables, qui sont des materiaux de gainage possibles pour des reacteurs utilisant l'hydrogene comme gaz de refroidissement. On montre que la charge apparente de rupture a la traction n'est plus que 80 pour cent de sa valeur initiale lorsque la teneur en hydrogene atteint 50 cc TPN/ 100 g, et que la striction passe dans ces conditions de 80 a 55 pour cent. L'examen microfractographique qui a ete effectue avec succes par une technique de double replique malgre la petitesse des echantillons (0,3 mm de diametre environ), revele que tout en gardant un caractere ductile, l'aspect des surfaces de rupture evolue notablement avec la teneur en hydrogene. (auteur)

  6. Investigation of the explosion hazards of hydrogen sulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, A.J.; Sulmistras, A.; Moen, I.O.; Thibault, P.A.

    1986-03-01

    The results of Phase I of an investigation directed towards quantifying the explosion hazards of hydrogen sulphide in air are described. The first phase is focussed on detonation in free hydrogen sulphide/air clouds. Detonation properties, including velocity and pressure, have been calculated and compared with experimental results. The observed detonation structure together with critical tube tests tests are used to assess the detonability of hydrogen sulphide/air mixtures relative to hydrogen and common hydrocarbon gases. Detailed chemical kinetic modelling of hydrogen sulphide combustion in air has been performed to correlate the detonation cell size data and to determine the influence of water vapour on the detonability of hydrogen sulphide in air. Calculations of the blast wave properties for detonation of a hydrogen sulphide/air cloud provide the data required to assess the blast effects of such explosions

  7. Hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking of high alloyed austenitic materials; Wasserstoffversproedung und wasserstoffinduzierte Spannungsrisskorrosion hochlegierter austenitischer Werkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mummert, K; Uhlemann, M; Engelmann, H J [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    The susceptiblity of high alloyed austenitic steels and nickel base alloys to hydrogen-induced cracking is particularly determined by 1. the distribution of hydrogen in the material, and 2. the microstructural deformation behaviour, which last process is determined by the effects of hydrogen with respect to the formation of dislocations and the stacking fault energy. The hydrogen has an influence on the process of slip localization in slip bands, which in turn affects the microstructural deformation behaviour. Slip localization increases with growing Ni contents of the alloys and clearly reduces the ductility of the Ni-base alloy. Although there is a local hydrogen source involved in stress corrosion cracking, emanating from the corrosion process at the cathode, crack growth is observed only in those cases when the hydrogen concentration in a small zone ahead of the crack tip reaches a critical value with respect to the stress conditions. Probability of onset of this process gets lower with growing Ni content of the alloy, due to increasing diffusion velocity of the hydrogen in the austenitic lattice. This is why particularly austenitic steels with low Ni contents are susceptible to transcrystalline stress corrosion cracking. In this case, the microstructural deformation process at the crack tip is also influenced by analogous processes, as could be observed in hydrogen-loaded specimens. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Empfindlichkeit von hochlegierten austentischen Staehlen und Nickelbasislegierungen gegen wasserstoffinduziertes Risswachstum wird im wesentlichen bestimmt durch 1. die Verteilung von Wasserstoff im Werkstoff und 2. das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten. Das mikrostrukturelle Deformationsverhalten ist wiederum durch den Einfluss von Wasserstoff auf die Versetzungsbildung und die Stapelfehlerenergie charakterisiert. Das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten wird durch wasserstoffbeeinflusste Gleitlokalisierung in Gleitbaendern bestimmt. Diese nimmt mit

  8. A neutronic method to determine low hydrogen concentrations in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennun, Leonardo; Santisteban, Javier; Diaz-Valdes, J.; Granada, J.R.; Mayer, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a method for the non-destructive determination of low hydrogen content in metals. The method is based on measurements of neutron inelastic scattering combined with cadmium filters. Determination is simple and the method would allow to construct a mobile device, to perform the analysis 'in situ'. We give a brief description of the usual methods to determine low hydrogen contents in solids, paying special attention to those methods supported by neutron techniques. We describe the proposed method, calculations to achieve a better sensitivity, and experimental results

  9. Hydrogen storage in complex hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupu, D.; Biris, A. R.; Misan, I.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell power technologies in mobile and stationary applications. A relevant role of the fuel cell powered vehicles on the market of the transportation systems will be achieved only if the research and development of on-board vehicular hydrogen storage are able to allow a driving range of at least 500 km. The on-board hydrogen storage systems are more challenging due to the space, weight and cost limitations. This range of autonomy between refueling requires materials able to store at least 6.5% weight hydrogen, available at moderate pressures, at the working temperature of the fuel cells and with acceptable cycling stability. The intensive research on the hydrogen storage in alloys and intermetallic of the LaNi 5 , FeTi or Laves phase type compounds, which started more than three decades ago did not resulted in materials of more than about 3% H storage capacities. The 7.5% H content of the Mg hydride is still of attracting interest but though the absorption has been achieved at lower temperatures by ball milling magnesium with various amounts of nickel, the desorption can not be attained at 1 bar H 2 below 280 deg. C and the kinetics of the process is too slow. In the last decade, the attention is focused on another class of compounds, the complex hydrides of aluminum with alkali metals (alanates), due to their high hydrogen content. It was found that doping with Ti-based catalysts improve the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation conditions of NaAlH 4 . Later on, it was shown that ball milling with solid state catalysts greatly improve the hydrogen desorption kinetics of NaAlH 4 , and this also helps to the rehydriding process. The hydrogen desorption from NaAlH 4 occurs in three steps, it shows a reversible storage capacity of 5.5% H and this led to further research work for a better knowledge of its application relating properties. In this work, ball milling experiments on Na

  10. Hydrogen diffusion and microstructure in undoped and boron-dope hydrogenated amorphous silicon: An IR and SIMS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) prepared by rf sputtering of a polycrystalline Si target at various rf powers 50 ≤ P ≤ 550 W (0.27--2.97 W/cm 2 ), target to substrate distance 1 ≤ d ≤ 2 double-prime, and varying hydrogen partial pressures. Doping was accomplished by introducing diborane (B 2 H 6 ) in the plasma. Hydrogen diffusion was studied from the depth profiles obtained from the SIMS on multilayered a-Si:H/a-Si:(H,D)/a-Si:H samples. The properties of the samples were characterized by IR absorption, optical gap measurements and ESR. IR yielded quantitative and qualitative information total hydrogen content and the nature of the hydrogen bonding, respectively. Hence the hydrogen microstructure of the samples could be varied in a systematic manner and monitored from the hydrogen vibrational modes. The ESR gave information on the number of paramagnetic defects per unit volume in the samples. The IR absorption of both as-deposited and annealed samples were closely monitored and the results clearly demonstrate a strong correlation between hydrogen diffusion and its microstructure. It is shown that microvoids in a-Si:H play a critical role in the process of diffusion by inducing deep hydrogen trapping sites that render them immobile. Consequently, as the microvoid density increases beyond a critical density hydrogen diffusion is totally quenched. The diffusion results are discussed both in the context of multiple trapping transport of hydrogen in an exponential distribution of trapping sites and the floating bond model

  11. Hydrogen evolution from aluminium in reactor containment spray solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, G.; Sundvall, S.-B.

    1982-01-01

    Three different aluminium alloys were exposed to conditions similar to BWR and PWR containment spray waters at 50, 100 and 150 0 C. BWR deionized water gives corrosion rates of at most 0.05 mm/year and hydrogen concentrations less than 0.1-1%. On the contrary PWR alkaline solutions give very high corrosion rates and hydrogen contents. (Auth.)

  12. Metal oxide-hydrogen secondary battery; Kinzoku sankabutsu-suiso niji denchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosobuchi, H.; Edoi, M.; Katsumata, T.

    1995-06-06

    Recently, the metal oxide - hydrogen secondary battery characterized by employing the hydrogen storage alloy as the hydrogen negative electrode draws attention. However, the secondary batteries equipped with the negative electrode composed of hydrogen storage alloy powder have such shortcoming that the charge-discharge cycle life is rather short and it changes widely from battery to battery, as the hydrogen storage alloy is disintegrated. This invention solves the problem. Employing the alloy having a composition expressed as LmNi(w)Co(X)Mn(y)Al(z) (Lm = rare earth elements including La) can suppress the disintegration of hydrogen storage alloy powder during the charge-discharge cycle. In addition, controlling the oxygen content in the hydrogen storage alloy powder to 500 - 1500ppm can reduce the oxidation corrosion of the hydrogen storage alloy, resulting in suppression of its deterioration. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Separation of gaseous hydrogen from a water-hydrogen mixture in a fuel cell power system operating in a weightless environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, William E. (Inventor); Suljak, George T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A fuel cell power system for use in a weightless environment, such as in space, includes a device for removing water from a water-hydrogen mixture condensed from the exhaust from the fuel cell power section of the system. Water is removed from the mixture in a centrifugal separator, and is fed into a holding, pressure operated water discharge valve via a Pitot tube. Entrained nondissolved hydrogen is removed from the Pitot tube by a bleed orifice in the Pitot tube before the water reaches the water discharge valve. Water discharged from the valve thus has a substantially reduced hydrogen content.

  14. Numerical and Experimental Study of Mixing Processes Associated with Hydrogen and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonell, Vincent; Hill, Scott; Akbari, Amin; McDonell, Vincent

    2011-09-30

    As simulation capability improves exponentially with increasingly more cost effective CPUs and hardware, it can be used ?routinely? for engineering applications. Many commercial products are available and they are marketed as increasingly powerful and easy to use. The question remains as to the overall accuracy of results obtained. To support the validation of the CFD, a hierarchical experiment was established in which the type of fuel injection (radial, axial) as well as level of swirl (non-swirling, swirling) could be systematically varied. The effort was limited to time efficient approaches (i.e., generally RANS approaches) although limited assessment of time resolved methods (i.e., unsteady RANS and LES) were considered. Careful measurements of the flowfield velocity and fuel concentration were made using both intrusive and non-intrusive methods. This database was then used as the basis for the assessment of the CFD approach. The numerical studies were carried out with a statistically based matrix. As a result, the effect of turbulence model, fuel type, axial plane, turbulent Schmidt number, and injection type could be studied using analysis of variance. The results for the non-swirling cases could be analyzed as planned, and demonstrate that turbulence model selection, turbulence Schmidt number, and the type of injection will strongly influence the agreement with measured values. Interestingly, the type of fuel used (either hydrogen or methane) has no influence on the accuracy of the simulations. For axial injection, the selection of proper turbulence Schmidt number is important, whereas for radial injection, the results are relatively insensitive to this parameter. In general, it was found that the nature of the flowfield influences the performance of the predictions. This result implies that it is difficult to establish a priori the ?best? simulation approach to use. However, the insights from the relative orientation of the jet and flow do offer some

  15. Effect of post weld heat treatments on the resistance to the hydrogen embrittlement of soft martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarabedian, Alfredo; Ovejero Garcia, Jose; Bilmes, P.; Llorente, C.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of external hydrogen on the tensile properties of an all weld sample of a soft martensitic stainless steel was studied. The material was tested in the as weld condition and after tempered conditions modifying the austenite content, and changing the quantity, type and distribution of precipitates. Hydrogen was introduced by cathodic charge or by immersion in an acid brine saturated whit 1 atm hydrogen sulphide, during the mechanical test. The as weld condition showed a good resistance in the hydrogen sulphide, were the tempered samples were embrittled. Under cathodic charge, all samples were susceptible to hydrogen damage. The embritting mechanisms were the same in both environments. When the austenite content, was below 10% the crack path is on the primary austenite grain boundary. At higher austenite content, the crack is transgranular. (author)

  16. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  17. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, Jay P.; Kramer, Robert; Pourpoint, Timothee L.; Ramachandran, P.V.; Varma, Arvind; Zheng, Yuan

    2011-01-01

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  18. Resource Assessment for Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production Potential from Fossil and Renewable Energy Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Penev, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heimiller, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This study examines the energy resources required to produce 4-10 million metric tonnes of domestic, low-carbon hydrogen in order to fuel approximately 20-50 million fuel cell electric vehicles. These projected energy resource requirements are compared to current consumption levels, projected 2040 business as usual consumptions levels, and projected 2040 consumption levels within a carbonconstrained future for the following energy resources: coal (assuming carbon capture and storage), natural gas, nuclear (uranium), biomass, wind (on- and offshore), and solar (photovoltaics and concentrating solar power). The analysis framework builds upon previous analysis results estimating hydrogen production potentials and drawing comparisons with economy-wide resource production projections

  19. Increasing hydrogen storage capacity using tetrahydrofuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Takeshi; Haag, Joanna C; Prasad, Pinnelli S R; Warntjes, Ashleigh A; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2009-10-21

    Hydrogen hydrates with tetrahydrofuran (THF) as a promoter molecule are investigated to probe critical unresolved observations regarding cage occupancy and storage capacity. We adopted a new preparation method, mixing solid powdered THF with ice and pressurizing with hydrogen at 70 MPa and 255 +/- 2 K (these formation conditions are insufficient to form pure hydrogen hydrates). All results from Raman microprobe spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and gas volumetric analysis show a strong dependence of hydrogen storage capacity on THF composition. Contrary to numerous recent reports that claim it is impossible to store H(2) in large cages with promoters, this work shows that, below a THF mole fraction of 0.01, H(2) molecules can occupy the large cages of the THF+H(2) structure II hydrate. As a result, by manipulating the promoter THF content, the hydrogen storage capacity was increased to approximately 3.4 wt % in the THF+H(2) hydrate system. This study shows the tuning effect may be used and developed for future science and practical applications.

  20. Effect of helium ion bombardment on hydrogen behaviour in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseva, M.I.; Stolyarova, V.G.; Gorbatov, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of helium ion bombardment on hydrogen behaviour in 12Kh18N10T stainless steel is investigated. Helium and hydrogen ion bombardment was conducted in the ILU-3 ion accelerator; the fluence and energy made up 10 16 -5x10 17 cm -2 , 30 keV and 10 16 -5x10 18 cm -2 , 10 keV respectively. The method of recoil nuclei was used for determination of helium and hydrogen content. Successive implantation of helium and hydrogen ions into 12Kh18N10T stainless steel results in hydrogen capture by defects formed by helium ions

  1. Bio-hydrogen Production Potential from Market Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanna Jaitalee

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This research studied bio-hydrogen production from vegetable waste from a fresh market in order to recover energy. A series of batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of initial volatile solids concentration on the bio-hydrogen production process. Lab bench scale anaerobic continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR were used to study the effect of substrate and sludge inoculation on hydrogen production. Three different concentrations of initial total volatile solids (TVS of organic waste were varied from 2%, 3% and 5% respectively. The pH was controlled at 5.5 for all batches in the experiment. The results showed that bio-hydrogen production depended on feed-substrate concentration. At initial TVS content of 3%, the highest hydrogen production was achieved at a level of 0.59 L-H2/L at pH 5.5. The maximum hydrogen yield was 15.3 ml H2/g TVS or 8.5 ml H2/g COD. The composition of H2 in the biogas ranged from 28.1-30.9% and no CH4 was detected in all batch tests.

  2. Hydrogen absorption in Zr(Alsub(x)Bsub(1-x))2 (B = Fe, Co) Laves phase compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, I.; Shaltiel, D.

    1978-01-01

    The hydrogen absorption capacity of the systems Zr(Alsub(x)Fesub(1-x)) 2 and Zr(Alsub(x)Cosub(1-x)) 2 (0 = 2 (A = V, Cr, Mn; B = Fe, Co; 0 =< x =< 1). The maximum hydrogen content in both systems is achieved for x approximately 2/12 at 40 atm and 80 K. Further increase of the Al content leads, however, to a steep decrease in the hydrogen capacity. This general behaviour is well described by a phenomenological model, recently proposed by the authors, thus supporting the importance of short-range neighbouring effects for the hydrogen absorption capacity. The influence of Al on the hydrogen sorption properties in different intermetallic compounds is discussed. (author)

  3. Modeling of combustion products composition of hydrogen-containing fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assad, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the usage of entropy maximum principal the algorithm and the program of chemical equilibrium calculation concerning hydrogen--containing fuels are devised. The program enables to estimate the composition of combustion products generated in the conditions similar to combustion conditions in heat engines. The program also enables to reveal the way hydrogen fraction in the conditional composition of the hydrocarbon-hydrogen-air mixture influences the harmful components content. It is proven that molecular hydrogen in the mixture is conductive to the decrease of CO, CO 2 and CH x concentration. NO outlet increases due to higher combustion temperature and N, O, OH concentrations in burnt gases. (authors)

  4. A possible explanation for the contradictory results of hydrogen effects on macroscopic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miresmaeili, Reza; Liu, Lijun; Kanayama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive research, there have been many controversies on whether hydrogen hardens or softens iron and steels. Conventional application of hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity (HELP) theory – including a decrease in the local flow stress in the presence of hydrogen – results in an expansion in the plastic zone ahead of a blunting crack tip rather than the localization of plastic deformation. Therefore, we propose a model to interpret the criterion for the application of local softening concept. According to our physical model, called pinning-softening model, the hydrogen-induced softening merely occurs in the large shear stress regions, e.g. in the vicinity of the crack tip. The remote areas from the stress raisers do not satisfy the critical condition of slip; as such, hydrogen-induced hardening occurs. Our model not only explains the contradictory results of hydrogen effects on the macroscopic deformation, but also gives more insight into the mechanistic understanding of hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon. Highlights: ► A model to interpret the criterion for the application of hydrogen-induced softening. ► Hydrogen-induced softening at the crack tip and hardening at the remote regions. ► Shear stresses and hydrogen contents-important factors on transition from hardening to softening. ► In BCC iron, as the hydrogen concentration increases, the local flow stress decreases. ► In 316L, depending on the hydrogen contents, we observe both softening and hardening.

  5. Solid Aluminum Borohydrides for Prospective Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovgaliuk, Iurii; Safin, Damir A; Tumanov, Nikolay A; Morelle, Fabrice; Moulai, Adel; Černý, Radovan; Łodziana, Zbigniew; Devillers, Michel; Filinchuk, Yaroslav

    2017-12-08

    Metal borohydrides are intensively researched as high-capacity hydrogen storage materials. Aluminum is a cheap, light, and abundant element and Al 3+ can serve as a template for reversible dehydrogenation. However, Al(BH 4 ) 3 , containing 16.9 wt % of hydrogen, has a low boiling point, is explosive on air and has poor storage stability. A new family of mixed-cation borohydrides M[Al(BH 4 ) 4 ], which are all solid under ambient conditions, show diverse thermal decomposition behaviors: Al(BH 4 ) 3 is released for M=Li + or Na + , whereas heavier derivatives evolve hydrogen and diborane. NH 4 [Al(BH 4 ) 4 ], containing both protic and hydridic hydrogen, has the lowest decomposition temperature of 35 °C and yields Al(BH 4 ) 3 ⋅NHBH and hydrogen. The decomposition temperatures, correlated with the cations' ionic potential, show that M[Al(BH 4 ) 4 ] species are in the most practical stability window. This family of solids, with convenient and versatile properties, puts aluminum borohydride chemistry in the mainstream of hydrogen storage research, for example, for the development of reactive hydride composites with increased hydrogen content. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Influence of hydrogen effusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride layers on the regeneration of boron-oxygen related defects in crystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilking, S.; Ebert, S.; Herguth, A.; Hahn, G.

    2013-01-01

    The degradation effect boron doped and oxygen-rich crystalline silicon materials suffer from under illumination can be neutralized in hydrogenated silicon by the application of a regeneration process consisting of a combination of slightly elevated temperature and carrier injection. In this paper, the influence of variations in short high temperature steps on the kinetics of the regeneration process is investigated. It is found that hotter and longer firing steps allowing an effective hydrogenation from a hydrogen-rich silicon nitride passivation layer result in an acceleration of the regeneration process. Additionally, a fast cool down from high temperature to around 550 °C seems to be crucial for a fast regeneration process. It is suggested that high cooling rates suppress hydrogen effusion from the silicon bulk in a temperature range where the hydrogenated passivation layer cannot release hydrogen in considerable amounts. Thus, the hydrogen content of the silicon bulk after the complete high temperature step can be increased resulting in a faster regeneration process. Hence, the data presented here back up the theory that the regeneration process might be a hydrogen passivation of boron-oxygen related defects

  7. Effect of hydrogen oxygen and nitrogen, on the tendency of welded joints of titanium alloys to moderate failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshkov, A.I.; Matyushin, B.A.

    1976-01-01

    The admissible limits have been defined of gaseous impurities content in the metal of welded joints of titanium alloys, with due accout for the phase composition and alloying system. The proposed procedure of testing disk specimens most adequately simulates the behavior of welded joints in full-scale strures. The tests lasting 2.5 to 3 years permit to consider the effect of temporal processes (hydrogen diffusion, relaxation of stresses, phase transformations, etc.) on the durability of a weld. The hydrogen content in the metal of welded joints of OT4 alloy should not exceed 0.008%, that of VT14 alloy should not exceed 0.008%, and that of VT20 alloy should not exceed 0.015% (at an oxygen content of no more than 0.15% and a nitrogen content of no more than 0.03%), the oxygen content being 0.25%, 0.2% and 0.2%, respectxvely (at a hydrogen content of no more than 0.008% and a nitrogen of no more than 0.03%), ;nd the nitrogen content being 0.1%, 0.06% and 0.08%, respectively (at hydrogen content of no more than 0.008% and an oxygen content of no more than 0.15%

  8. Risk and sustainability analysis of complex hydrogen infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Marangon, A.; Carcassi, M.

    2017-01-01

    -based fuels. Therefore, future hydrogen supply and distribution chains will have to address several objectives. Such a complexity is a challenge for risk assessment and risk management of these chains because of the increasing interactions. Improved methods are needed to assess the supply chain as a whole......Building a network of hydrogen refuelling stations is essential to develop the hydrogen economy within transport. Additional, hydrogen is regarded a likely key component to store and convert back excess electrical power to secure future energy supply and to improve the quality of biomass....... The method of “Functional modelling” is discussed in this paper. It will be shown how it could be a basis for other decision support methods for comprehensive risk and sustainability assessments....

  9. Effect of reversible hydrogen alloying and plastic deformation on microstructure development in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murzinova, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen leads to degradation in fracture-related mechanical properties of titanium alloys and is usually considered as a very dangerous element. Numerous studies of hydrogen interaction with titanium alloys showed that hydrogen may be considered not only as an impurity but also as temporary alloying element. This statement is based on the following. Hydrogen stabilizes high-temperature β-phase, leads to decrease in temperature of β→α transformation and extends (α + β )-phase field. The BCC β-phase exhibits lower strength and higher ductility in comparison with HCP α -phase. As a result, hydrogen improves hot workability of hard-to-deform titanium alloys. Hydrogen changes chemical composition of the phases, kinetics of phase transformations, and at low temperatures additional phase transformation (β→α + TiH 2 ) takes place, which is accompanied with noticeable change in volumes of phases. As a result, fine lamellar microstructure may be formed in hydrogenated titanium alloys after heat treatment. It was shown that controlled hydrogen alloying improves weldability and machinability of titanium alloys. After processing hydrogenated titanium preforms are subjected to vacuum annealing, and the hydrogen content decreases up to safe level. Hydrogen removal is accompanied with hydrides dissolution and β→α transformation that makes possible to control structure formation at this final step of treatment. Thus, reversible hydrogen alloying of titanium alloys allows to obtain novel microstructure with enhanced properties. The aim of the work was to study the effect of hydrogen on structure formation, namely: i) influence of hydrogen content on transformation of lamellar microstructure to globular one during deformation in (α+β)-phase field; ii) effect of dissolved hydrogen on dynamic recrystallization in single α- and β- phase regions; iii) influence of vacuum annealing temperature on microstructure development. The work was focused on the optimization of

  10. Development of tantalum–zirconium alloy for hydrogen purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sanjay, E-mail: sanjay.barc@gmail.com [Fusion Reactor Materials Section, MG, BARC, Mumbai 85 (India); IAMR, Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Singh, Anamika [GSASM Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Jain, Uttam; Dey, Gautam Kumar [Fusion Reactor Materials Section, MG, BARC, Mumbai 85 (India)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Terminal solid solubility of Ta increases with Zr addition. • Increase in lattice parameters of Ta due to Zr addition may be the possible reason. • Enhance H solubility could also be explained on the change in e-DOS of Ta–Zr alloys. • Ta–Zr alloys could be possible combination for hydrogen purification membrane. - Abstract: Terminal solid solubility of hydrogen in Ta–Zr alloys has been studied in connection with the development of tantalum based metallic membrane for hydrogen/tritium purification. The alloys were prepared by vacuum arc melting technique and subsequently cold rolled to 0.2 mm thickness. The terminal solid solubility of hydrogen in these cold rolled samples was investigated in a modified Sieverts apparatus. The terminal solid solubility of hydrogen was marginally increased with zirconium content. The change in the lattices parameter of tantalum upon zirconium addition and the higher affinity of zirconium for hydrogen as compared to tantalum could be the possible reasons.

  11. Scale for Assessment of Giftedness - teacher's version: evidence of validity content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana de Cassia Nakano

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of high abilities is of great importance in psychology, despite scarce studies in literature. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify, through content validity, the appropriateness of the items of the High Assessment Scale Skills - Teacher Version. The judges were six post-graduate students in the psychological assessment area who rated the 41 items of the instrument in six factors (academic intellectual ability, specific academic skills, leadership, creativity, artistic talent. The results demonstrated the suitability of the items, most of them with concordance rates above 80% (n = 29 and between 60 and 80% (n = 8. Only four items showed agreement at or below 50%, suggesting the need for reformulation. The analysis of the Kappa coefficients showed indices between 0.69 and 0.81. In general, the results indicated the suitability of the scale to the contents of the pretended model.

  12. Assessment of Quality and Content of Online Information About Hip Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Bridget; Patel, Hiren; Kamath, Atul F

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of information available to patients on the Internet when using popular search engines to search the term "hip arthroscopy." We analyzed the quality and content of information about hip arthroscopy (HA) on the first 50 websites returned by the search engines Google and Bing for the search term "hip arthroscopy." The sites were categorized by type, and quality and content were measured using the DISCERN score, along with an HA-specific content score. The HA-specific content score was used to assess each website for the presence or absence of 19 topics about HA determined to be important for a patient seeking information about the procedure. The Health on the Net Code (HONcode) status of each website was also noted. The mean DISCERN score for all websites analyzed was 39.5, considered "poor," while only 44.6% of sites were considered "fair" or "good." Governmental and nonprofit organization (NPO) websites had the highest average DISCERN score. The mean HA-specific content score was 8.6 (range, 2 to 16). The commercial website category had the highest average HA-specific content score, followed by the governmental and NPO category. Sites that bore the HONcode certification obtained significantly higher DISCERN scores than those without the certification (P = .0032) but did not obtain significantly higher HA-specific content scores. "Hip arthroscopy" is a fairly general term, and there is significant variability in the quality of HA information available online. The HONcode is useful to identify quality patient information websites; however, it is not commonly used in HA-specific websites and does not encompass all quality websites about HA. This study increases awareness of the quality of information on HA available online. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Characteristics of proteins synthesized by hydrogen-oxidizing microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volova, T G; Barashkov, V A

    2010-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the biological value of proteins synthesized by hydrogen-oxidizing microorganisms--the hydrogen bacteria Alcaligenes eutrophus Z1 and Ralstonia eutropha B5786 and the CO-resistant strain of carboxydobacterium Seliberia carboxydohydrogena Z1062. Based on a number of significant parameters characterizing the biological value of a product, the proteins of hydrogen-oxidizing microorganisms have been found to occupy an intermediate position between traditional animal and plant proteins. The high total protein in biomass of these microorganisms, their complete amino acid content, and availability to proteolytic enzymes allow for us to consider these microorganisms as potential protein producers.

  14. Mechanohydrogen processing as an element of hydrogen process of production of titanium alloy parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorova, Yu.B.; Il'in, A.A.; Levochkin, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The regularities of the effect of hydrogen on cutting machinability of titanium alloys are generalized. The main principles of mechanohydrogen treatment are founded. The effectiveness of titanium alloys machining with the use of reversible hydrogen alloying depends on hydrogen content, hydrogen pickup temperature and cutting modes. High-performance technological processes of manufacturing parts and constructions made of titanium alloys are proposed [ru

  15. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  16. Evaluation of hydrogen trapping mechanisms during performance of different hydrogen fugacity in a lean duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverstein, R., E-mail: barrav@post.bgu.ac.il [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Eliezer, D. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Glam, B.; Eliezer, S.; Moreno, D. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

    2015-11-05

    Hydrogen trapping behavior in a lean duplex stainless steel (LDS) is studied by means of thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The susceptibility of a metal to hydrogen embrittlement is directly related to the trap characteristics: source or sink (reversible or irreversible, respectively). Since trapping affects the metal's diffusivity, it has a major influence on the hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) phenomenon. It is known from previously published works that the susceptibility will depend on the competition between reversible and irreversible traps; meaning a direct relation to the hydrogen's initial state in the steel. In this research the trapping mechanism of LDS, exposed to different hydrogen charging environments, is analyzed by means of TDS. The TDS analysis was supported and confirmed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), hydrogen quantitative measurements and microstructural observations. It was found that gaseous charging (which produces lower hydrogen fugacity) creates ∼22% higher activation energy for hydrogen trapping compared with cathodic charging (which produces higher hydrogen fugacity). These results are due to the different effects on the hydrogen behavior in LDS which causes a major difference in the hydrogen contents and different hydrogen assisted phase transitions. The highest activation energy value in the cathodic charged sample was ascribed to the dominant phase transformation of γ → γ{sup ∗}, whereas in the gaseous charged sample it was ascribed to the dominant formation of intermetallic compound, sigma (σ). The relation between hydrogen distribution in LDS and hydrogen trapping mechanism is discussed in details. - Highlights: • The relation between hydrogen distribution and trapping in LDS is discussed. • Hydrogen's initial state in LDS causes different microstructural changes. • Gaseous charged LDS creates higher trapping energy compared to cathodic charged LDS. • The dominant phase transformation in

  17. Retinal image quality assessment based on image clarity and content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamid, Lamiaa; El-Rafei, Ahmed; El-Ramly, Salwa; Michelson, Georg; Hornegger, Joachim

    2016-09-01

    Retinal image quality assessment (RIQA) is an essential step in automated screening systems to avoid misdiagnosis caused by processing poor quality retinal images. A no-reference transform-based RIQA algorithm is introduced that assesses images based on five clarity and content quality issues: sharpness, illumination, homogeneity, field definition, and content. Transform-based RIQA algorithms have the advantage of considering retinal structures while being computationally inexpensive. Wavelet-based features are proposed to evaluate the sharpness and overall illumination of the images. A retinal saturation channel is designed and used along with wavelet-based features for homogeneity assessment. The presented sharpness and illumination features are utilized to assure adequate field definition, whereas color information is used to exclude nonretinal images. Several publicly available datasets of varying quality grades are utilized to evaluate the feature sets resulting in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve above 0.99 for each of the individual feature sets. The overall quality is assessed by a classifier that uses the collective features as an input vector. The classification results show superior performance of the algorithm in comparison to other methods from literature. Moreover, the algorithm addresses efficiently and comprehensively various quality issues and is suitable for automatic screening systems.

  18. Comparative environmental impact and efficiency assessment of selected hydrogen production methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozbilen, Ahmet, E-mail: Ahmet.Ozbilen@uoit.ca; Dincer, Ibrahim, E-mail: Ibrahim.Dincer@uoit.ca; Rosen, Marc A., E-mail: Marc.Rosen@uoit.ca

    2013-09-15

    The environmental impacts of various hydrogen production processes are evaluated and compared, considering several energy sources and using life cycle analysis. The results indicate that hydrogen produced by thermochemical water decomposition cycles are more environmentally benign options compared to conventional steam reforming of natural gas. The nuclear based four-step Cu–Cl cycle has the lowest global warming potential (0.559 kg CO{sub 2}-eq per kg hydrogen production), mainly because it requires the lowest quantity of energy of the considered processes. The acidification potential results show that biomass gasification has the highest impact on environment, while wind based electrolysis has the lowest. The relation is also investigated between efficiency and environmental impacts. -- Highlights: • Environmental performance of nuclear-based hydrogen production is investigated. • The GWP and AP results are compared with various hydrogen production processes. • Nuclear based 4-step Cu–Cl cycle is found to be an environmentally benign process. • Wind-based electrolysis has the lowest AP value.

  19. Benzene adsorption and hydrogenation on Pd-Ru alloy by pulse chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrokhotov, V.G.; Pavlova, L.F.; Gryaznov, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Pulse chromatography has been applied to investigate benzene adsorption and hydrogenation on the Walls of a capillary of the Pd-6% Ru alloy at different hydrogen contents in the alloy and various methods of hydrogen supply: as a mixture with benzene vapors or by diffusion through the walls of the capillary. It is stated that reversible adsorption of benzene vapors on the Pd-6% Ru alloy at 303 K under the conditions of the β-phase existence in the alloy-hydrogen system does not change whereas in the region of the α-phase existence it slightly increases with a growth of hydrogen pressure. Strongly adsorbed benzene occupies approximately 7% of the surface. Only strongly adsorbed benzene is hydrogenated on the α-phase of the alloy-hydrogen system. Hydrogen supply to the hydrogenation zone by diffusion throUgh the alloy results in supersaturation of the surface active in the reaction of benzene hydrogenation with a chemisorbed hydrogen form

  20. Experimental investigations of the hydrogen addition effects on diesel engine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirica, I.; Pana, C.; Negurescu, N.; Cernat, A.; Nutu, C.

    2016-08-01

    In the global content regarding the impact on the environmental of the gases emissions resulted from the fossil fuels combustion, an interest aspect discussed on the 21st Session of the Conference of the Parties from the 2015 Paris Climate Conference and the gradual diminution of the worldwide oil reserves contribute to the necessity of searching of alternative energy from durable and renewable resources. At the use of hydrogen as addition in air to diesel engine, the level of CO, HC and smoke from the exhaust gases will decrease due to the improvement of the combustion process. At low and medium partial loads and low hydrogen energetic ratios used the NOX emission level can decrease comparative to classic diesel engine. The hydrogen use as fuel for diesel engine leads to the improving of the energetic and emissions performance of the engine due to combustion improvement and reduction of carbon content. The paper presents, in a comparative way, results of the experimental researches carried on a truck compression ignition engine fuelled with diesel fuel and with hydrogen diesel fuel and hydrogen as addition in air at different engine operation regimes. The results obtained during experimental investigations show better energetic and pollution performance of the engine fuelled with hydrogen as addition in air comparative to classic engine. The influences of hydrogen addition on engine operation are shown.

  1. Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production and Consumption in an Isolated Territory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Guangling; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2018-01-01

    cylinder by road and ferry. The hydrogen is used to provide electricity and heat through fuel cell stacks as well as hydrogen fuel for fuel cell vehicles. In order to evaluate the environmental impacts related to the hydrogen production and utilisation, this work conducts an investigation of the entire...... life cycle of the described hydrogen production, transportation, and utilisation. All the processes related to the equipment manufacture, operation, maintenance, and disposal are considered in this study....

  2. Probabilistic consequence assessment of hydrogen sulphide releases from a heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baynes, C.J.

    1986-05-01

    This report provides a summary of work carried out on behalf of the Atomic Energy Control Board, concerned with the consequences of accidental releases to the atmosphere of hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) at a heavy water plant. In this study, assessments of consequences are made in terms of the probabilities of a range of possible outcomes, i.e., numbers of fatalities, given a certain release scenario. The report describes the major features of a computer model which was developed to calculate the consequences and their associated probabilities, and the major input data used in applying the model to a consequence assessment of the Bruce heavy water plant (HWP) in Ontario. The results of the sensitivity analyses of the model are summarized. Finally, the results of the consequence assessments of 43 accidental release scenarios at the Bruce HWP are summarized, together with a number of conclusions which were drawn from these results regarding the predicted consequences and the factors which influence them

  3. Changes of hydrogen peroxide and radical-scavenging activity of raspberry during osmotic, convective, and freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaković, Miroslav M; Stevanović, Snežana M; Gorjanović, Stanislava Ž; Jovanovic, Predrag M; Tešević, Vele V; Janković, Miodrag A; Sužnjević, Desanka Ž

    2011-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the influence of different drying treatments on antioxidant (AO) activity and phenolic content of raspberry (Rubus idaeus), cultivar Willamette. Whole raspberry fruits were dried convectively (air-drying), osmotically, and freeze-dried. Acetone-water extracts of fresh and dried raspberries were assessed for total phenolic content by standard Folin-Ciocalteau method. Two AO assays were applied, a recently developed direct current (DC) polarographic assay based on decrease of anodic oxidation current of hydrogen peroxide and widely used radical scavenge against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Strong correlation has been obtained between both AO assays and total phenolic content. In addition, some individual phenolic compounds present in raspberry have been assessed using DPPH and DC polarographic assay. Comparison and evaluation of drying methods has been based on preservation of AO activity and total phenolic content. Obtained results confirmed superiority of freeze-drying; convective drying caused slight changes while osmotic dehydration showed a significant decrease of phenolic compounds and AO activity. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Study of hydrogenation of Sm2Fe17-yGay by means of X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teresiak, A.; Uhlemann, M.; Kubis, M.; Gebel, B.; Mattern, N.; Mueller, K.-H.

    2000-01-01

    The hydrogenation process of Sm 2 Fe 17-y Ga y (y=0-2) was studied. X-ray investigations show a decreasing hydrogen solubility in the intermetallic alloy with increasing Ga-content from 4.0±0.3 atoms per formula unit for Sm 2 Fe 17 to 2.85±0.05 for Sm 2 Fe 15 Ga 2 . The larger Ga atoms reduce the size of the interstitial sites and thereby the maximum hydrogen concentration is decreased. The behaviour of the lattice parameters a and c with increasing Ga content points to a changed hydrogen distribution on the interstitial sites, becoming more statistical. In situ observations by means of high temperature X-ray diffraction show that the hydrogen absorption process is diffusion controlled. The hydrogen absorption starts at an annealing temperature of 120-140 C in all cases. The solubility of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperature. The hydrogen is completely desorbed above 350 C in all cases. The absorption/desorption process is reversible between room temperature and 400 C. Annealing at temperatures above 400 C leads to the decomposition of the Sm 2 Fe 17 phase, indicated by emerging of α-Fe. The formation of SmH x is established at 600 C. The decomposition temperature increases with increasing Ga-content. Up to 750 C, only Sm 2 Fe 17 is completely decomposed. (orig.)

  5. Carbon-free hydrogen production from low rank coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Muhammad; Oda, Takuya; Kashiwagi, Takao

    2018-02-01

    Novel carbon-free integrated system of hydrogen production and storage from low rank coal is proposed and evaluated. To measure the optimum energy efficiency, two different systems employing different chemical looping technologies are modeled. The first integrated system consists of coal drying, gasification, syngas chemical looping, and hydrogenation. On the other hand, the second system combines coal drying, coal direct chemical looping, and hydrogenation. In addition, in order to cover the consumed electricity and recover the energy, combined cycle is adopted as addition module for power generation. The objective of the study is to find the best system having the highest performance in terms of total energy efficiency, including hydrogen production efficiency and power generation efficiency. To achieve a thorough energy/heat circulation throughout each module and the whole integrated system, enhanced process integration technology is employed. It basically incorporates two core basic technologies: exergy recovery and process integration. Several operating parameters including target moisture content in drying module, operating pressure in chemical looping module, are observed in terms of their influence to energy efficiency. From process modeling and calculation, two integrated systems can realize high total energy efficiency, higher than 60%. However, the system employing coal direct chemical looping represents higher energy efficiency, including hydrogen production and power generation, which is about 83%. In addition, optimum target moisture content in drying and operating pressure in chemical looping also have been defined.

  6. The pipeline fracture behavior and pressure assessment under HIC (Hydrogen induced cracking) environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaohua, Dong [China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), Beijing (China); Lianwei, Wang [University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), Beijing (China)

    2009-07-01

    As Hydrogen's transmit and diffuse, after gestating for a while, the density of hydrogen around crack tip of pipeline will get to the critical density, and the pipeline material will descend, make critical stress factor, the reason of pipeline Hydrogen Induced Cracking is Hydrogen's transmit and diffuse. The stress factor of Hydrogen Induced Cracking under surroundings-condition of stress is the key that estimate material's rupture behavior. The paper study the relationship among hydrogen concentrate, crack tip stress, stain field, hydrogen diffusion and inner pressure for crack tip process zone, then determined the length of HIC (hydrogen induced cracking) process zone. Based on the theory of propagation which reason micro-crack making core, dislocation model is produced for fracture criteria of HIC, the influence between material and environments under the HIC is analyzed, step by step pipeline maximum load pressure and threshold of J-integrity ( J{sub ISCC} ) is calculated, which is very significant for pipeline safety operation. (author)

  7. Dispersion, mixing and intentional ignition of hydrogen in the Darlington reactor vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.S.; Knystautas, R.

    1989-03-01

    The present report reviews the Darlington Safety Report (DSR) which has been used as basis for decisions regarding intentional ignition in the Darlington reactor vault. The validity of the assumptions in the DSR regarding mixing of contents is assessed and possible hydrogen release scenarios, specific to the Darlington reactor vault, are examined. The combustion analysis in the DSR vent code calculations are reviewed in the light of existing state of the art information on high speed turbulent flames and transition to detonation. Limitations of the vent code, in this context, are identified and improvements recommended

  8. Development of Criteria for Flashback Propensity in Jet Flames for High Hydrogen Content and Natural Gas Type Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalantari, Alireza [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Sullivan-Lewis, Elliot [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); McDonell, Vincent [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-10-17

    Due to increasingly stringent air quality requirements stationary power gas turbines have moved to lean-premixed operation, which reduces pollutant emissions but can result in flashback. Curtailing flashback can be difficult with hydrocarbon fuels and becomes even more challenging when hydrogen is used as the fuel. In fact, flashback is a key operability issue associated with low emission combustion of high hydrogen content fuels. Flashback can cause serious damage to the premixer hardware. Hence, design tools to predict flashback propensity are of interest. Such a design tool has been developed based on the data gathered by experimental study to predict boundary layer flashback using non-dimensional parameters. The flashback propensity of a premixed jet flame has been studied experimentally. Boundary layer flashback has been investigated under turbulent flow conditions at elevated pressures and temperatures (i.e. 3 atm to 8 atm and 300 K to 500 K). The data presented in this study are for hydrogen fuel at various Reynolds numbers, which are representative of practical gas turbine premixer conditions and are significantly higher than results currently available in the literature. Three burner heads constructed of different materials (stainless steel, copper, and zirconia ceramic) were used to evaluate the effect of tip temperature, a parameter found previously to be an important factor in triggering flashback. This study characterizes flashback systematically by developing a comprehensive non-dimensional model which takes into account all effective parameters in boundary layer flashback propensity. The model was optimized for new data and captures the behavior of the new results well. Further, comparison of the model with the single existing study of high pressure jet flame flashback also indicates good agreement. The model developed using the high pressure test rig is able to predict flashback tendencies for a commercial gas turbine engine and can thus serve as a

  9. Neutronic studies on decoupled hydrogen moderator for a short-pulse spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Masahide; Watanabe, Noboru; Teshigawara, Makoto; Kai, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2005-01-01

    Neutronic studies of decoupled hydrogen moderators were performed by calculations taking into account para hydrogen content, decoupling energy, moderator dimensions/shapes and reflector material. Low-energy parts of calculated spectral intensities with different para hydrogen contents were analyzed by a modified Maxwell function to characterize neutron spectra. The result shows that a 100% para hydrogen moderator gives the highest pulse peak intensity together with the narrowest pulse width and the shortest decay times. Pulse broadening with a reflector was explained by time distributions of source neutrons entering into the moderator through a decoupler. Material dependence of time distribution was studied. A decoupling energy higher than 1 eV does not bring about a large improvement in pulse widths and decay times, even at a large penalty in the peak intensity. The optimal moderator thickness was also discussed for a rectangular parallelepipe-shaped and a canteen-shaped moderator

  10. Apparatus and method for determining the hydrogen content of a substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggour, M.A.; Banerjee, S.

    1984-01-01

    For monitoring the concentration of a hydrogenous component within a given sample or space eg steam quality within a steam conduit. A fast neutron source is positioned proximate the conduit. A moderating element equivalent to a thickness of at least 1 cm of water is situated intermediate the source and conduit for softening the neutron spectrum incident to the conduit. Two neutron detectors are positioned at opposite sides of the conduit, each being spaced an equal radial distance from the source. Means are provided for establishing from the rate of neutron detection and certain other physical properties of the sample data concerning the concentration or disposition of a hydrogenous component of the sample. The source, detectors, and conduit are surrounded by a neutron reflector of neutron moderating material. A screen may be placed around the source to remove most of thermal neutrons so that predominantly epithermal neutrons reach the conduit. To obtain the rate of thermal neutron detection signals from a detector shielded to render it sensitive only to fast and epithermal neutrons are subtracted from those from an unshielded detector. (author)

  11. Assessing the Genetics Content in the Next Generation Science Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lontok, Katherine S; Zhang, Hubert; Dougherty, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Science standards have a long history in the United States and currently form the backbone of efforts to improve primary and secondary education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Although there has been much political controversy over the influence of standards on teacher autonomy and student performance, little light has been shed on how well standards cover science content. We assessed the coverage of genetics content in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using a consensus list of American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) core concepts. We also compared the NGSS against state science standards. Our goals were to assess the potential of the new standards to support genetic literacy and to determine if they improve the coverage of genetics concepts relative to state standards. We found that expert reviewers cannot identify ASHG core concepts within the new standards with high reliability, suggesting that the scope of content addressed by the standards may be inconsistently interpreted. Given results that indicate that the disciplinary core ideas (DCIs) included in the NGSS documents produced by Achieve, Inc. clarify the content covered by the standards statements themselves, we recommend that the NGSS standards statements always be viewed alongside their supporting disciplinary core ideas. In addition, gaps exist in the coverage of essential genetics concepts, most worryingly concepts dealing with patterns of inheritance, both Mendelian and complex. Finally, state standards vary widely in their coverage of genetics concepts when compared with the NGSS. On average, however, the NGSS support genetic literacy better than extant state standards.

  12. Assessing the Genetics Content in the Next Generation Science Standards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Lontok

    Full Text Available Science standards have a long history in the United States and currently form the backbone of efforts to improve primary and secondary education in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM. Although there has been much political controversy over the influence of standards on teacher autonomy and student performance, little light has been shed on how well standards cover science content. We assessed the coverage of genetics content in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS using a consensus list of American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG core concepts. We also compared the NGSS against state science standards. Our goals were to assess the potential of the new standards to support genetic literacy and to determine if they improve the coverage of genetics concepts relative to state standards. We found that expert reviewers cannot identify ASHG core concepts within the new standards with high reliability, suggesting that the scope of content addressed by the standards may be inconsistently interpreted. Given results that indicate that the disciplinary core ideas (DCIs included in the NGSS documents produced by Achieve, Inc. clarify the content covered by the standards statements themselves, we recommend that the NGSS standards statements always be viewed alongside their supporting disciplinary core ideas. In addition, gaps exist in the coverage of essential genetics concepts, most worryingly concepts dealing with patterns of inheritance, both Mendelian and complex. Finally, state standards vary widely in their coverage of genetics concepts when compared with the NGSS. On average, however, the NGSS support genetic literacy better than extant state standards.

  13. Fuzzy Multi-actor Multi-criteria Decision Making for Sustainability Assessment of biomass-based technologies for hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Fedele, Andrea; Mason, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a sustainability assessment method to rank the prior sequence of biomass-based technologies for hydrogen production. A novel fuzzy Multi-actor Multi-criteria Decision Making method which allows multiple groups of decision-makers to use linguistic variables...

  14. Technology assessment on a hydrogen fueled aircraft system; 1980 nendo suiso nenryo kokuki system ni kansuru technology assissment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-03-01

    This paper describes technology assessment on a hydrogen fueled aircraft system. Indispensable as technological assignments are structuring different safety systems including prevention of leakage and ignition, not to speak of developing an airframe structure that considers cryogenic and brittle nature of liquefied hydrogen. Operation related industries would be subjected to increased burdens, such as purchase and servicing of new implements and materials, but the liquefied hydrogen industry will have a chance of growing largely with wide repercussions. In the environmental aspect, the aircraft will have less CO and SOx emission in exhaust gas and lower noise than the conventional jet aircraft. Technological problems to be solved in the development include the safety of fuel tanks, safety assurance measures, and liquefied hydrogen of the required amount to be supplied easily and at low cost. To meet these requirements, noticeable progress is demanded in hydrogen manufacturing technologies. What is also required is explosion-proof safety that does not have to require crews to take special considerations in take-off and landing, not to speak of during flight. This also applies to fuel feeding and servicing on the ground. Considerations must be given that rise in operation cost should not be excessive. (NEDO)

  15. Possibilities of hydrogen removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, G.; Koehling, A.; Nikodem, H.

    1982-12-01

    In the event of hypothetical severe accidents in light-water reactors, considerable amounts of hydrogen may be produced and released into the containment. Combustion of the hydrogen may jeopardize the integrity of the containment. The study reported here aimed to identify methods to mitigate the hydrogen problem. These methods should either prevent hydrogen combustion, or limit its effects. The following methods have been investigated: pre-inerting; chemical oxygen absorption; removal of oxygen by combustion; post-inerting with N 2 , CO 2 , or halon; aqueous foam; water fog; deliberate ignition; containment purging; and containment venting. The present state of the art in both nuclear and non-nuclear facilities, has been identified. The assessment of the methods was based on accident scenarios assuming significant release of hydrogen and the spectrum of requirements derived from these scenarios was used to determine the advantages and drawbacks of the various methods, assuming their application in a pressurized-water reactor of German design. (orig.) [de

  16. Possibilities of Production and Storage of Hydrogen in the Black Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmet Haklidir; Fusun Servin Tut; Sule Kapkin

    2006-01-01

    Black Sea, a highly-isolated inland sea, is the largest anoxic zone in the world. Since the hydrogen sulphide zone was discovered in early 19. century in the Black Sea, it has been adopted that there is no life in the depths of the Black Sea and there are only bacteria live in the hydrogen sulphide layer. High content of organic matter, with maximum processes of bacterial sulfate reduction is the major source of this hydrogen sulphide zone. Hydrogen sulphide is one of the most poisonous gases in the world but it has great economic value to obtain hydrogen via dissociated into hydrogen and sulphur. Thus the Black Sea is not only has a serious environmental contamination but also has potential source of hydrogen energy, if a decomposition process can be developed. In this study, the sources of hydrogen sulphide, environmental impact of hydrogen sulphide in the Black Sea, the available techniques of hydrogen production from hydrogen sulphide and the possibilities of hydrogen storage by the natural sources in the Black Sea have been investigated. (authors)

  17. Hydrogen effect on mechanical properties and flake formation in the 10KhSND steel rolled plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradova, R G; Zakharov, V A; Kuzin, A P; Gol' tsov, V A; Podgajskij, M S [Donetskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR); Donetskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Chernoj Metallurgii (Ukrainian SSR))

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on mechanical properties of the 10KhSND steel rolled plates during natural aging is studied. Optimum period of metal acceptance tests, which are advisable to conduct after 5-7 day natural aging of finished products, are found out. The technique is worked out and a safe hydrogen content to prevent flake formation in the 10KhSND steel is determined. It is shown that a safe hydrogen content is dependent on the experiment conditions (sample dimensions, conditions of cooling, and prehistory).

  18. Hydrogen effect on mechanical properties and flake formation in the 10KhSND steel rolled plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muradova, R.G.; Zakharov, V.A.; Kuzin, A.P.; Gol'tsov, V.A.; Podgajskij, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on mechanical properties of the 10KhSND steel rolled plates during natural aging is studied. Optimum period of metal acceptance tests, which are advisable to conduct after 5-7 day natural aging of finished products, are found out. The technique is worked out and a safe hydrogen content to prevent flake formation in the 10KhSND steel is determined. It is shown that a safe hydrogen content is dependent on the experiment conditions (sample dimensions, conditions of cooling, and prehistory)

  19. From text to codings: intercoder reliability assessment in qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Laila; Knierim, Birte; Barth, Jurgen; Liewald, Katharina; Duetz, Margreet; Abel, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    High intercoder reliability (ICR) is required in qualitative content analysis for assuring quality when more than one coder is involved in data analysis. The literature is short of standardized procedures for ICR procedures in qualitative content analysis. To illustrate how ICR assessment can be used to improve codings in qualitative content analysis. Key steps of the procedure are presented, drawing on data from a qualitative study on patients' perspectives on low back pain. First, a coding scheme was developed using a comprehensive inductive and deductive approach. Second, 10 transcripts were coded independently by two researchers, and ICR was calculated. A resulting kappa value of .67 can be regarded as satisfactory to solid. Moreover, varying agreement rates helped to identify problems in the coding scheme. Low agreement rates, for instance, indicated that respective codes were defined too broadly and would need clarification. In a third step, the results of the analysis were used to improve the coding scheme, leading to consistent and high-quality results. The quantitative approach of ICR assessment is a viable instrument for quality assurance in qualitative content analysis. Kappa values and close inspection of agreement rates help to estimate and increase quality of codings. This approach facilitates good practice in coding and enhances credibility of analysis, especially when large samples are interviewed, different coders are involved, and quantitative results are presented.

  20. Identification of Zn-vacancy-hydrogen complexes in ZnO single crystals: A challenge to positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, G.; Anwand, W.; Grambole, D.; Grenzer, J.; Skorupa, W.; Čížek, J.; Kuriplach, J.; Procházka, I.; Ling, C. C.; So, C. K.; Schulz, D.; Klimm, D.

    2009-03-01

    A systematic study of various, nominally undoped ZnO single crystals, either hydrothermally grown (HTG) or melt grown (MG), has been performed. The crystal quality has been assessed by x-ray diffraction, and a comprehensive estimation of the detailed impurity and hydrogen contents by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis, respectively, has been made also. High precision positron lifetime experiments show that a single positron lifetime is observed in all crystals investigated, which clusters at 180-182 ps and 165-167 ps for HTG and MG crystals, respectively. Furthermore, hydrogen is detected in all crystals in a bound state with a high concentration (at least 0.3at.% ), whereas the concentrations of other impurities are very small. From ab initio calculations it is suggested that the existence of Zn-vacancy-hydrogen complexes is the most natural explanation for the given experimental facts at present. Furthermore, the distribution of H at a metal/ZnO interface of a MG crystal, and the H content of a HTG crystal upon annealing and time afterward has been monitored, as this is most probably related to the properties of electrical contacts made at ZnO and the instability in p -type conductivity observed at ZnO nanorods in literature. All experimental findings and presented theoretical considerations support the conclusion that various types of Zn-vacancy-hydrogen complexes exist in ZnO and need to be taken into account in future studies, especially for HTG materials.

  1. Dual mechanical behaviour of hydrogen in stressed silicon nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpi, F.; Braccini, M.; Pasturel, A.; Devos, A.; Raymond, G.; Morin, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the present article, we report a study on the mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms and pores in silicon nitride (SiN) films. A simple three-phase model is proposed to relate the physical properties (stiffness, film stress, mass density, etc.) of hydrogenated nanoporous SiN thin films to the volume fractions of hydrogen and pores. This model is then applied to experimental data extracted from films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, where hydrogen content, stress, and mass densities range widely from 11% to 30%, −2.8 to 1.5 GPa, and 2.0 to 2.8 g/cm 3 , respectively. Starting from the conventional plotting of film's Young's modulus against film porosity, we first propose to correct the conventional calculation of porosity volume fraction with the hydrogen content, thus taking into account both hydrogen mass and concentration. The weight of this hydrogen-correction is found to evolve linearly with hydrogen concentration in tensile films (in accordance with a simple “mass correction” of the film density calculation), but a clear discontinuity is observed toward compressive stresses. Then, the effective volume occupied by hydrogen atoms is calculated taking account of the bond type (N-H or Si-H bonds), thus allowing a precise extraction of the hydrogen volume fraction. These calculations applied to tensile films show that both volume fractions of hydrogen and porosity are similar in magnitude and randomly distributed against Young's modulus. However, the expected linear dependence of the Young's modulus is clearly observed when both volume fractions are added. Finally, we show that the stiffer behaviour of compressive films cannot be only explained on the basis of this (hydrogen + porosity) volume fraction. Indeed this stiffness difference relies on a dual mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms against the film stress state: while they participate to the stiffness in compressive films, hydrogen atoms mainly

  2. Scientific Assessment in support of the Materials Roadmap enabling Low Carbon Energy Technologies: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerri, I.; Lefebvre-Joud, F.; Holtappels, Peter

    A group of experts from European research organisations and industry have assessed the state of the art and future needs for materials' R&D for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The work was performed as input to the European Commission's roadmapping exercise on materials for the European...

  3. Method of eliminating gaseous hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakura, Masaaki; Imaizumi, Hideki; Suemori, Nobuo; Aizawa, Takashi; Naito, Taisei.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent external diffusion of gaseous hydrogen isotopes such as tritium or the like upon occurrence of tritium leakage accident in a thermonuclear reactor by recovering to eliminate the isotopes rapidly and with safety. Method: Gases at the region of a reactor container where hydrogen isotopes might leak are sucked by a recycing pump, dehumidified in a dehumidifier and then recycled from a preheater through a catalytic oxidation reactor to a water absorption tower. In this structure, the dehumidifier is disposed at the upstream of the catalytic oxidation reactor to reduce the water content of the gases to be processed, whereby the eliminating efficiency for the gases to be processed can be maintained well even when the oxidation reactor is operated at a low temperature condition near the ambient temperature. This method is based on the fact that the oxidating reactivity of the catalyst can be improved significantly by eliminating the water content in the gases to be processed. (Yoshino, Y.)

  4. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  5. Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    In support of DOE/EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE), UNC conducted Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements that contributed spectroscopic information as well as quantitative analysis of adsorption processes. While NMR based Langmuir isotherms produce reliable H2 capacity measurements, the most astute contribution to the center is provided by information on dihydrogen adsorption on the scale of nanometers, including the molecular dynamics of hydrogen in micropores, and the diffusion of dihydrogen between macro and micro pores. A new method to assess the pore width using H2 as probe of the pore geometry was developed and is based on the variation of the observed chemical shift of adsorbed dihydrogen as function of H2 pressure. Adsorbents designed and synthesized by the Center were assessed for their H2 capacity, the binding energy of the adsorption site, their pore structure and their ability to release H2. Feedback to the materials groups was provided to improve the materials properties. To enable in situ NMR measurements as a function of H2 pressure and temperature, a unique, specialized NMR system was designed and built. Pressure can be varied between 10-4 and 107 Pa while the temperature can be controlled between 77K and room temperature. In addition to the 1H investigation of the H2 adsorption process, NMR was implemented to measure the atomic content of substituted elements, e.g. boron in boron substituted graphitic material as well as to determine the local environment and symmetry of these substituted nuclei. The primary findings by UNC are the following: (1) Boron substituted for carbon in graphitic material in the planar BC3 configuration enhances the binding energy for adsorbed hydrogen; (2) Arrested kinetics of H2 was observed below 130K in the same boron substituted carbon samples that combine enhanced binding energy with micropore structure; (3) Hydrogen storage material made from activated PEEK

  6. Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred

    2011-07-11

    In support of DOE/EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE), UNC conducted Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements that contributed spectroscopic information as well as quantitative analysis of adsorption processes. While NMR based Langmuir isotherms produce reliable H2 capacity measurements, the most astute contribution to the center is provided by information on dihydrogen adsorption on the scale of nanometers, including the molecular dynamics of hydrogen in micropores, and the diffusion of dihydrogen between macro and micro pores. A new method to assess the pore width using H2 as probe of the pore geometry was developed and is based on the variation of the observed chemical shift of adsorbed dihydrogen as function of H2 pressure. Adsorbents designed and synthesized by the Center were assessed for their H2 capacity, the binding energy of the adsorption site, their pore structure and their ability to release H2. Feedback to the materials groups was provided to improve the materials’ properties. To enable in situ NMR measurements as a function of H2 pressure and temperature, a unique, specialized NMR system was designed and built. Pressure can be varied between 10-4 and 107 Pa while the temperature can be controlled between 77K and room temperature. In addition to the 1H investigation of the H2 adsorption process, NMR was implemented to measure the atomic content of substituted elements, e.g. boron in boron substituted graphitic material as well as to determine the local environment and symmetry of these substituted nuclei. The primary findings by UNC are the following: • Boron substituted for carbon in graphitic material in the planar BC3 configuration enhances the binding energy for adsorbed hydrogen. • Arrested kinetics of H2 was observed below 130K in the same boron substituted carbon samples that combine enhanced binding energy with micropore structure. • Hydrogen storage material made from

  7. Solid solutions of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, T.T.

    1981-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and niobium-molybdenum alloys with varying atomic fraction of molybdenum from 0.15 to 0.75 was measured on the temperature range of 673 0 K to 1273 0 k for one atmosphere hydrogen pressure. The experimental technique involved the saturation of the solvent metal or alloy with hydrogen, followed by quenching and analysis of the solid solution. The results obtained of hydrogen solubility are consistent with the quasi-regular model for the dilute interstitial solid solutions. The partial molar enthalpy and partial molar entropy in excess of the dissolved hydrogen atoms were calculated from data of solubility versus reciprocal doping temperature. The variation of the relative partial molar enthalpy of hydrogen dissolved in niobium-molybdenum alloys, with the increase of molybdenum content of the alloy was analized. (Author) [pt

  8. High pressure oxidation of sponge-Zr in steam/hydrogen mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.S.

    1997-01-01

    A thermogravimetric apparatus for operation in 1 and 70 atm steam-hydrogen or steam-helium mixtures was used to investigate the oxidation kinetics of sponge-Zr containing 215 ppm Fe. Weight-gain rates, reflecting both oxygen and hydrogen uptake, were measured in the temperature range 350-400 C. The specimens consisted of thin sponge-Zr layers metallurgically bonded to a Zircaloy disk. The edges of the disk specimens were coated with a thin layer of pure gold to avoid the deleterious effect of corners. Following each experiment, the specimens were examined metallographically to reveal the morphology of the oxide and/or hydride formed. Two types of oxide, one black and uniform and the other white and nodular, were observed on sponge-Zr surfaces oxidized in steam environments at 70 atm. The oxidation rate when white-nodular oxide formed was a factor of two higher than that of black-uniform oxide at 400 C for steam contents above 1 mol%. The oxidation rate was independent of total pressure, the carrier gas (H 2 or He) and steam content above ∝1 mol%. The oxidation kinetics of sponge-Zr follows a linear law for maximum reaction times up to ∝6 days. The oxidation rate in steam-hydrogen mixtures at 70 atm total pressure decreases when the steam content approaches the steam-starved region (∝0.5 mol% steam at 400 C and ∝0.02 mol% steam at 350 C). Lower steam concentrations cause massive hydriding of the specimens. Even at steam concentrations above the critical value, direct hydrogen absorption from the gas was manifest by hydrogen pickup fractions greater than unity. (orig.)

  9. Can Learners Become Teachers? Evaluating the Merits of Student Generated Content and Peer Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Murray

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The aim of this project was to explore student perceptions of the value of both the creation of video content and exposure to other students’ work though peer assessment and inclusion of exemplars as unit material. Background: The research was in a first year information technology flipped-learning unit, where the assessment involved students developing video presentations that were peer assessed and exemplars incorporated into the unit as teaching material. Methodology: Data was gathered using a mixed methods approach using an online questionnaire followed by semi-structured interviews with a selection of questionnaire respondents. The interviews were designed to further explore issues identified from the analysis of the questionnaire data. Contribution: Informs on student perceptions of peer review and the integration of student generated content into University teaching. Findings: Most students enjoyed the video assessment (58% with many preferring it to a written or programming task (55-58%. In the subsequent peer assessment, many liked seeing the work of others (67% and found the approach engaging (63% yet some other perceptions were mixed or neutral. Recommendations for Practitioners: University IT students generally enjoyed and perceived peer assessment and found student generated content to be valuable. Recommendation for Researchers: Further investigation of peer review and student generated content in contexts where the student cohort represents a variety of cultures and age categories Impact on Society: Contributes to a body of knowledge regarding peer assessment and student generated educational materials. Future Research: Future work is needed to better understand this domain, in particular the role of learners’ individual differences in order to successfully integrate these approaches into modern learning environments.

  10. Hydrogen production from nano-porous Si powder formed by stain etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, S.; Alekseev, S.; Kuznetsov, G.; Skryshevsky, V. [Institute of High Technology of National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Volodymyrs' ka 64, Kyiv 01601 (Ukraine); Lysenko, V.; Barbier, D. [Lyon Institute of Nanotechnologies (INL), CNRS UMR-5270, University of Lyon, INSA de Lyon, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Venturello, A.; Geobaldo, F.; Garrone, E. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, 10129 Torino (Italy); Gulina, L.; Tolstoy, V. [St-Petersburg State University, Chemical Department (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15

    Hydrogen reservoirs based on porous silicon (PS) nanostructures are considered. Silicon-based hydrogen tanks are believed to be applicable for portable device energy supply and compatible with micro-sources of energy of new generation. Stain etching of silicon powder to produce PS is studied as a technology alternative to conventional electrochemical etching and application of the PS powder for hydrogen production is also described. Size selection of initial Si micro-particles constituting the powders was carried out by sedimentation technique. Hydrogen content in PS was investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. Extraction of hydrogen in water environment in presence of small amount of NH{sub 3} as catalyst was shown to have advantages such as safety and tunability, additional production of hydrogen from water dissociation, and a possibility to characterize PS as a hydrogen source material in terms of hydrogen effective shell and crystalline core conception. (author)

  11. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang; Liu, Wen Wu; Xiang, Hong Gang; Fan, Lie Ying; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Xin Yun; Cai, Jian Mei; Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin; Sun, Xue Jun; Wang, Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-κB activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-κB activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  12. The certification of hydrogen in titanium. CRM No. 318

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandendriessche, S.; Marchandise, H.; Vandecasteele, C.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the work done to certify the hydrogen content in a batch of 28 kg of commercial unalloyed titanium. The homogeneity of the three original sheets of metals was demonstrated. Samples were analysed by 10 laboratories using hydrogen extraction and thermal conductivity measurement and by 2 laboratories using a nuclear resonance reaction technique, but the accuracy of the latter was insufficient for a certification. On the basis of the measurements in 8 laboratories using extraction techniques, the hydrogen mass fraction in the titanium (CRM 318) is certified to be (12.2 +/- 0.8) ug/g

  13. A Content Validity Study of AIMIT (Assessing Interpersonal Motivation in Transcripts).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassone, Giovanni; Lo Reto, Floriana; Foggetti, Paola; Santomassimo, Chiara; D'Onofrio, Maria Rita; Ivaldi, Antonella; Liotti, Giovanni; Trincia, Valeria; Picardi, Angelo

    2016-07-01

    Multi-motivational theories of human relatedness state that different motivational systems with an evolutionary basis modulate interpersonal relationships. The reliable assessment of their dynamics may usefully inform the understanding of the therapeutic relationship. The coding system of the Assessing Interpersonal Motivation in Transcripts (AIMIT) allows to identify in the clinical the activity of five main interpersonal motivational systems (IMSs): attachment (care-seeking), caregiving, ranking, sexuality and peer cooperation. To assess whether the criteria currently used to score the AIMIT are consistently correlated with the conceptual formulation of the interpersonal multi-motivational theory, two different studies were designed. Study 1: Content validity as assessed by highly qualified independent raters. Study 2: Content validity as assessed by unqualified raters. Results of study 1 show that out of the total 60 AIMIT verbal criteria, 52 (86.7%) met the required minimum degree of correspondence. The average semantic correspondence scores between these items and the related IMSs were quite good (overall mean: 3.74, standard deviation: 0.61). In study 2, a group of 20 naïve raters had to identify each prevalent motivation (IMS) in a random sequence of 1000 utterances drawn from therapy sessions. Cohen's Kappa coefficient was calculated for each rater with reference to each IMS and then calculated the average Kappa for all raters for each IMS. All average Kappa values were satisfactory (>0.60) and ranged between 0.63 (ranking system) and 0.83 (sexuality system). Data confirmed the overall soundness of AIMIT's theoretical-applicative approach. Results are discussed, corroborating the hypothesis that the AIMIT possesses the required criteria for content validity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Assessing Interpersonal Motivations in psychotherapy transcripts as a useful tool to better understand links between motivational systems and intersubjectivity

  14. Solubility and diffusivity of hydrogen in enameling steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Gregorio, P.; Valentini, R.; Solina, A.; Gastaldo, F. (Centro Sviluppo Materiali, Rome (Italy) Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Ingegneria Chimica, Chimica Industriale e Scienza dei Materiali)

    1991-06-01

    In recent years, continuous casting has almost expelled conventional ingot casting from the steel-making process by its much higher productivity. However, enameling steel sheets doesn't give the steel sufficient resistance to fishscale, as that which is achieved by the inclusions in case of ingot capped steel. Fishscales are caused by hydrogen gas building up pressure at the interface between enamel and steel, resulting in the rupture of enamel. Object of this study, was not only to correlate fishscale susceptibility with metallurgical parameters, but to define the effect of reversible and irreversible traps on hydrogen solubility and diffusivity in enameling steel. Hydrogen permeation was studied, in low carbon enameling steel, with an electrochemical technique developed by Devanathan and co-workers. This method was used to calculate concentrations of irreversibly adsorbed hydrogen and evaluate hydrogen diffusion coefficients. The results on reversible traps correlated with micro-voids formations around the carbide precipitate, while the irreversible traps correlated with inclusions and precipitate content.

  15. Hydrogen study in melt inclusions trapped in quartz with nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, M.; Tirira, J.; Gosset, J.; Massiot, P.

    1990-01-01

    Elastic recoil spectrometry induced by 3 MeV helium-4 microbeam has been used to determine hydrogen distribution within melt inclusions trapped in quartz. These minerals were selected from different geological environments: Guadeloupe (West Indies), Pantelleria Island (South Sicily - Italy) and San Pietro (South Sardinia - Italy). Bulk hydrogen contents are calculated (H assumed to be in H 2 O form). The knowledge of hydrogen distribution assists both in a better understanding and in the establishment of volcanic dynamism hypotheses. Finally, fluid hydrogen rich inclusions are evidenced and H concentration profile is simulated and reported for the first time in glass inclusion

  16. Performance and emission characteristics of a turbocharged CNG engine fueled by hydrogen-enriched compressed natural gas with high hydrogen ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Fanhua; Wang, Mingyue; Jiang, Long; Chen, Renzhe; Deng, Jiao; Naeve, Nashay; Zhao, Shuli [State Key Laboratory of Automotive Safety and Energy Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-06-15

    This paper investigates the effect of high hydrogen volumetric ratio of 55% on performance and emission characteristics in a turbocharged lean burn natural gas engine. The experimental data was conducted under various operating conditions including different spark timing, excess air ratio (lambda), and manifold pressure. It is found that the addition of hydrogen at a high volumetric ratio could significantly extend the lean burn limit, improve the engine lean burn ability, decrease burn duration, and yield higher thermal efficiency. The CO, CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced and NO{sub x} emission could be kept an acceptable low level with high hydrogen content under lean burn conditions when ignition timing were optimized. (author)

  17. Adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen in Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, E.; Desquines, J.; Baietto, M.C.; Coret, M.; Wehling, F.; Blat-Yrieix, M.; Ambard, A.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen in zirconium alloys is considered in many nuclear safety issues. Below 500 Celsius degrees, rather limited knowledge is available on the combined hydrogen adsorption at the sample surface and diffusion in the metal. A modeling of hydrogen gaseous charging has been established starting with a set of relevant laws and parameters derived from open literature. Simulating the hydrogen charging process requires simultaneous analysis of gaseous surface adsorption, hydrogen solid-solution diffusion and precipitation, when exceeding the material solubility limit. The modeling has been extended to reproduce the solid-gas exchange. Gaseous charging experiments have been performed at 420 C. degrees on Stress Relieved Annealed (SRA) Zircaloy-4 cladding samples to validate the model. The sample hydrogen content has been systematically measured after charging and compared to the calculated value thus providing a validation of the adsorption modeling. Complementary tests have been carried out on Recrystallized Annealed (RXA) Zircaloy-4 rods to characterize the combined diffusion and adsorption process. The hydrogen concentration distribution has been characterized using an inverse technique based on destructive analyses of the samples. This additional set of data was relevant for the validation of the hydrogen combined adsorption/diffusion modeling up to 420 C. degrees. (authors)

  18. Quantitative determination of absorbed hydrogen in oxidised zircaloy by means of neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, M.; Lehmann, E.; Vontobel, P.; Steinbrueck, M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen absorbed in steam-oxidised zircaloy can be determined quantitatively by means of neutron radiography. Correlation parameters between the total cross section and hydrogen content as well as oxide layer thickness were determined quantitatively. At H/Zr atomic ratios lower than 1.0, linear correlations between the hydrogen content and total cross section exist. The total cross section of Zr is lower and the effect of the hydrogen is higher in radiography measurements with a cold neutron spectrum than with a thermal spectrum. A Be filter reduces the effects of lower wavelength and epithermal neutrons and extends the linear correlations to higher H/Zr atomic ratios. Due to the better possibilities of background corrections, the neutron image should be detected by a CCD camera for a proper quantitative analysis with a medium spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm. A higher spatial resolution, but larger uncertainties in the quantitative hydrogen determination are achieved by measurements with imaging plates. The effect of oxygen layers on the total cross section is much smaller than the effect of hydrogen. The total cross section measured depends linearly on the oxide layer thickness

  19. Content validity across methods of malnutrition assessment in patients with cancer is limited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sealy, Martine J.; Nijholt, Willemke; Stuiver, Martijn M.; van der Berg, Marit M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Schans, van der Cees P.; Ottery, Faith D.; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet

    Objective: To identify malnutrition assessment methods in cancer patients and assess their content validity based on internationally accepted definitions for malnutrition. Study Design and Setting: Systematic review of studies in cancer patients that operationalized malnutrition as a variable,

  20. Content validity across methods of malnutrition assessment in patients with cancer is limited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sealy, Martine; Nijholt, Willemke; Stuiver, M.M.; van der Berg, M.M.; Roodenburg, Jan; Ottery, Faith D.; van der Schans, Cees; Jager, Harriët

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify malnutrition assessment methods in cancer patients and assess their content validity based on internationally accepted definitions for malnutrition. Study Design and Setting Systematic review of studies in cancer patients that operationalized malnutrition as a variable,

  1. Optimising hydrogen bonding in solid wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2009-01-01

    The chemical bonds of wood are both covalent bonds within the wood polymers and hydrogen bonds within and between the polymers. Both types of bonds are responsible for the coherence, strength and stiffness of the material. The hydrogen bonds are more easily modified by changes in load, moisture...... and temperature distorting the internal bonding state. A problem arises when studying hydrogen bonding in wood since matched wood specimens of the same species will have very different internal bonding states. Thus, possible changes in the bonding state due to some applied treatment such as conditioning...... maintaining 100 % moisture content of the wood. The hypothesis was that this would enable a fast stress relaxation as a result of reorganization of bonds, since moisture plasticizes the material and temperature promotes faster kinetics. Hereby, all past bond distortions caused by various moisture, temperature...

  2. Hydrogen embrittlement of Zr-2.5Nb PT with temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Dong Joon; Ahn, Sang Bok; Kim, Young Suk

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of hydrogen embrittlement of Zr-2.5Nb CANDU pressure tube. The tests were performed at three hydrogen contents for transverse tensile and CCT specimens while the test temperatures were changed (RT to 300 .deg. C). The specimens were directly machined from the tube retaining original curvature using electric discharge machine. Both the transverse tensile and the fracture toughness tests showed the hydrogen embrittlement clearly at RT but this phenomenon was disappeared while the test temperature arrived over 250 .deg. C

  3. Influence of alloying on hydrogen-assisted cracking and diffusible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    moisture in the welding consumables which dissociate in the welding arc to form hydrogen and oxygen. The susceptibility of the weldment to HAC is assessed from the hydrogen diffused out from the weld after the welding is over. Hydrogen thus diffused out is referred to as diffusible hydrogen (HD) and is estimated from the ...

  4. Assessing the Utility of Hydrogen, Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes in Estimating Consumer Allochthony in Two Shallow Eutrophic Lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Syväranta

    Full Text Available Hydrogen stable isotopes (δ2H have recently been used to complement δ13C and δ15N in food web studies due to their potentially greater power to separate sources of organic matter in aquatic food webs. However, uncertainties remain regarding the use of δ2H, since little is known about the potential variation in the amount of exchangeable hydrogen (Hex among common sample materials or the patterns of δ2H when entire food webs are considered. We assessed differences in Hex among the typical sample materials in freshwater studies and used δ2H, δ13C and δ15N to compare their effectiveness in tracing allochthonous matter in food webs of two small temperate lakes. Our results showed higher average amounts of Hex in animal tissues (27% in fish and macroinvertebrates, 19% in zooplankton compared to most plant material (15% in terrestrial plants and 8% in seston/periphyton, with the exception of aquatic vascular plants (23%, referred to as macrophytes. The amount of Hex correlated strongly with sample lipid content (inferred from C:N ratios in fish and zooplankton samples. Overall, the three isotopes provided good separation of sources (seston, periphyton, macrophytes and allochthonous organic matter, particularly the δ2H followed by δ13C. Aquatic macrophytes revealed unexpectedly high δ2H values, having more elevated δ2H values than terrestrial organic matter with direct implications for estimating consumer allochthony. Organic matter from macrophytes significantly contributed to the food webs in both lakes highlighting the need to include macrophytes as a potential source when using stable isotopes to estimate trophic structures and contributions from allochthonous sources.

  5. State of the art and environmental benefits using methane-hydrogen blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faedo, D.

    2007-01-01

    Hythane is the patented mixture of 15% (by energy content) of hydrogen in CNG: in other proportions the blend is called HCNG. Hydrogen addition to CNG extends the lean burn limit of a natural gas engine, and has the potential to lower the nitrogen oxides emissions and to improve the engine thermal efficiency, with minor hardware changes necessary. This paper reports the benefits of hydrogen to CNG in S.I. engine, and a brief review of the results obtained in this field [it

  6. Efficient STEP (solar thermal electrochemical photo) production of hydrogen - an economic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, Stuart [Department of Chemistry, George Washington University, Ashburn, VA 20147 (United States); Solar Institute, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Chitayat, Olivia; Bergmann, Harry; Dick, Andrew; Ayub, Hina [Solar Institute, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Ghosh, Susanta [Department of Chemistry, George Washington University, Ashburn, VA 20147 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan (India)

    2010-10-15

    A consideration of the economic viability of hydrogen fuel production is important in the STEP (Solar Thermal Electrochemical Photo) production of hydrogen fuel. STEP is an innovative way to decrease costs and increase the efficiency of hydrogen fuel production, which is a synergistic process that can use concentrating photovoltaics (CPV) and solar thermal energy to drive a high temperature, low voltage, electrolysis (water-splitting), resulting in H{sub 2} at decreased energy and higher solar efficiency. This study provides evidence that the STEP system is an economically viable solution for the production of hydrogen. STEP occurs at both higher electrolysis and solar conversion efficiencies than conventional room temperature photovoltaic (PV) generation of hydrogen. This paper probes the economic viability of this process, by comparing four different systems: (1) 10% or (2) 14% flat plate PV driven aqueous alkaline electrolysis H{sub 2} production, (3) 25% CPV driven molten electrolysis H{sub 2} production, and (4) 35% CPV driven solid oxide electrolysis H{sub 2} production. The molten and solid oxide electrolysers are high temperature systems that can make use of light, normally discarded, for heating. This significantly increases system efficiency. Using levelized cost analysis, this study shows significant cost reduction using the STEP system. The total price per kg of hydrogen is shown to decrease from 5.74 to 4.96 to 3.01 to 2.61 with the four alternative systems. The advanced STEP plant requires less than one seventh of the land area of the 10% flat cell plant. To generate the 216 million kg H{sub 2}/year required by 1 million fuel cell vehicles, the 35% CPV driven solid oxide electrolysis requires a plant only 9.6 mi{sup 2} in area. While PV and electrolysis components dominate the cost of conventional PV generated hydrogen, they do not dominate the cost of the STEP-generated hydrogen. The lower cost of STEP hydrogen is driven by residual distribution and

  7. Morpho- Physiological Changes of Hempseed (Cannabis sativa L. Traits as Affected by Seed Priming with Folic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Karbalaye Golizadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of seed priming of hempseed with folic acid and hydrogen peroxide on some morphological and physiological traits a factorial greenhouse experiment based on randomized complete design with four replications was conducted at Islamic Azad University, Mahabad Branch. Treatments consisted of hydrogen peroxide at five levels (0, 7.5, 15, 22.5, 30 mm/liter as the first factor and the four leveld of folic acid (5, 10, 20, 27 mm/liter as the second factor.Seeds, to be primed, were immersed into solution of folic acid for 24 hours and hydrogen peroxide for 6 hours. The characteristics like chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll content, relative water content, plant height, root length, allometric coefficient, plant fresh and dry weights, were measured. Result of analysis of variance showed that the effects of folic acid and hydrogen peroxide on all characters were significant, but the interaction between the two treatments were only significant on relative water content and allometric coefficient. In this study, seed priming with 15 mm/liter of hydrogen peroxide and 5mm folic acid resulted in highest chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll contents, plant height, root length, fresh and dry weights. Increasing hydrogen peroxide level above 15mm/liter affected traits negatively. Combinated treatments of 15 mm/liter of hydrogen peroxide and 5 and 10 mm of folic acid resulted in highest relative water content and allometric coefficient, respectively. Based on the results obtained it can be concluded that priming seeds with 15 mm/liter of hydrogen peroxide and 5mm folic acid is recommended to produce proper morphological and physiological traits.

  8. Influence of thermo hydrogen treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-fei Ren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermo hydrogen treatment (THT of titanium is a process in which hydrogen is used as a temporary alloying element in titanium alloys. It is an attractive approach for controlling the microstructure and thereby improving the final mechanical properties. In the present study, the microstructure of the original (non-hydrogenated sample has only α phase and the grains is coarse with an average size of ~ 650 μm. While the grain size of thermo hydrogen treated Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy became finer and the mechanical properties were improved significantly. When the hydrogen content of the hydrogenated Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy is 0.321wt.%, β phase and δ titanium hydride appear. Also the average grain size decreases to 450 μm. When the hydrogen content is 0.515wt.%, the grain size decreases to 220 μm. The mechanical properties were tested after dehydrogenation, and the mechanical properties improved significantly compared to the unhydrogenated specimens. The tensile strength of the Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy improved by 17.7% when the hydrogen content increased to 0.920wt.%, at the same time the percentage reduction of area (Z increased by 33% and the impact toughness increased by 37%.

  9. Hydrogen storage behaviors of platinum-supported multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seul-Yi [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 253 Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    In this work, the hydrogen storage behaviors of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) loaded by crystalline platinum (Pt) particles were studied. The microstructure of the Pt/MWNTs was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The pore structure and total pore volumes of the Pt/MWNTs were analyzed by N{sub 2}/77 K adsorption isotherms. The hydrogen storage capacity of the Pt/MWNTs was evaluated at 298 K and 100 bar. From the experimental results, it was found that Pt particles were homogeneously distributed on the MWNT surfaces. The amount of hydrogen storage capacity increased in proportion to the Pt content, with Pt-5/MWNTs exhibiting the largest hydrogen storage capacity. The superior amount of hydrogen storage was linked to an increase in the number of active sites and the optimum-controlled micropore volume for hydrogen adsorption due to the well-dispersed Pt particles. Therefore, it can be concluded that Pt particles play an important role in hydrogen storage characteristics due to the hydrogen spillover effect. (author)

  10. Morphology, Microstructure, and Hydrogen Content of Carbon Nanostructures Obtained by PECVD at Various Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Acosta Gentoiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanostructures were obtained by acetylene injection into an argon plasma jet in the presence of hydrogen. The samples were synthesized in similar conditions, except that the substrate deposition temperatures TD were varied, ranging from 473 to 973 K. A strong dependence of morphology, structure, and graphitization upon TD was found. We obtained vertical aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs at low temperatures as 473 K, amorphous carbon nanoparticles (CNPs at temperatures from about 573 to 673 K, and carbon nanowalls (CNWs at high temperatures from 773 to 973 K. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used to substantiate the differences in these material types. It is known that hydrogen concentration modifies strongly the properties of the materials. Different concentrations of hydrogen-bonded carbon could be identified in amorphous CNP, VA-CNT, and CNW. Also, the H : C ratios along depth were determined for the obtained materials.

  11. Hydrogen absorbing alloy electrode for metal-hydride alkali storage battery and hydrogen absorbing particles for metal-hydride alkali storage battery; Kinzoku-suisokabutsu arukari chikudenchiyo no suiso kyuzo gokin denkyoku oyobi kinzoku-suisokabutsu arukari chikudenchiyo no suiso kyuzo gokin ryushi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niiyama, K.; Konno, Y.; Maeda, R.; Nogami, K.; Nishio, K.; Saito, T.

    1996-02-02

    For preventing degradation due to oxidation of hydrogen absorbing alloy to elongate the life of batteries, a proposal has been made to coat the surface of hydrogen absorbing alloy with electroless nickel plated film. When the surfaces of hydrogen absorbing alloy particles are coated with such electroless nickel plated films having low phosphoric acid content, however, absorption of the oxygen gas produced by overcharge delays to increase the pressure inside the battery because the plated film is unporous dense coat with high crystallinity. This invention relates to phosphoric acid containment in the ratios from 11 to 14wt% in the electroless nickel plated layer of the hydrogen absorbing alloy electrode for the metal-hydride alkali storage battery. Long time is required for the initial activation when the phosphoric acid content is less than 11wt% because the crystallinity of the plated film is too high and forms a dense unporous film. On the other hand, the plated film becomes brittle and tends to peel off from the hydrogen absorbing alloy if phosphoric acid content exceeds 14wt%. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Test plan for hydrogen getters project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mroz, G.; Weinrach, J.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen levels in many transuranic (TRU) waste drums are above the compliance threshold, therefore deeming the drums non-shippable to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hydrogen getters (alkynes and dialkynes) are known to react irreversibly with hydrogen in the presence of certain catalysts. The primary purpose of this investigation is to ascertain the effectiveness of a hydrogen getter in an environment that contains gaseous compounds commonly found in the headspace of drums containing TRU waste. It is not known whether the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly found in the headspace of TRU waste drums will inhibit (poison) the effectiveness of the hydrogen getter. The results of this study will be used to assess the feasibility of a hydrogen-getter system, which is capable of removing hydrogen from the payload containers or the Transuranic package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) inner containment vessel to increase the quantity of TRU waste that can be shipped to the WIPP

  13. The preparation and application of crude cellulase for cellulose-hydrogen production by anaerobic fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yi-Ping; Fan, Yao-Ting; Pan, Chun-Mei; Hou, Hong-Wei [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Fan, Shao-Qun [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Beijing Alcatel-Lucent R and D Center, Beijing, 100102 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Strategies were adopted to cost-efficiently produce cellulose-hydrogen by anaerobic fermentation in this paper. First, cellulase used for hydrolyzing cellulose was prepared by solid-state fermentation (SSF) on cheap biomass from Trichoderma viride. Several cultural conditions for cellulase production on cheap biomass such as moisture content, inoculum size and culture time were studied. And the components of solid-state medium were optimized using statistical methods to further improve cellulase capability. Second, the crude cellulase was applied to cellulose-hydrogen process directly. The maximal hydrogen yield of 122 ml/g-TVS was obtained at the substrate concentration of 20 g/L and cultured time of 53 h. The value was about 45-fold than that of raw corn stalk wastes. The hydrogen content in the biogas was 44-57%(v/v) and there was no significant methane gas observed. (author)

  14. The permeation of hydrogen in a steel at elevated temperature by an electrochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubakino, H.; Ando, A.; Yamakawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    An electrochemical permeation method has been widely used to study the transport characteristics of hydrogen in metals, i.e., the content, diffusivity and permeability. This electrochemical measurement technique has the following remarkable features: a good detection limit for the measurement of hydrogen content, a simpler measuring apparatus, suitability for successive measurement of the transport characteristics, and flexibility in variation of experimental conditions. However this method has been restricted to temperatures below 373 K because an aqueous solution has been used as an electrode. In this study, an electrochemical permeation method using molten salts at elevated temperatures (673-773 K) in the range of practical interest for hydrogen attack in steel is presented. The introduction of hydrogen by use of molten salts has been reported but it has been performed at 423473 K and at 553 K

  15. Hydrogen formation under gamma and heavy ions irradiation of geopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chupin, F.; Dannoux-Papin, A.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, J.B.; Ngono Ravache, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the behavior under irradiation of geo-polymer which is not yet well known and attempts to highlight the importance of water radiolysis. For their use as embedding matrices, stability under ionizing radiation as well as low hydrogen gas released must be demonstrated. Different formulations of geo-polymers have been irradiated either with γ-rays ( 60 Co sources) or 75 MeV 36 Ar ions beams and the production of hydrogen released has been quantified. This paper presents the results of gas analysis in order to identify important structural parameters that influence confined water radiolysis. Indeed, a correlation between pore size, water content on one side, and the hydrogen production radiolytic yield (G(H 2 )) on the other side, has been demonstrated. For the 75 MeV 36 Ar ions irradiation, the effect of porosity has not been well emphasized. For both, the results have revealed the water content influence. (authors)

  16. The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities, Costs, Barriers, and R&D Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use

    2004-08-31

    The announcement of a hydrogen fuel initiative in the President’s 2003 State of the Union speech substantially increased interest in the potential for hydrogen to play a major role in the nation’s long-term energy future. Prior to that event, DOE asked the National Research Council to examine key technical issues about the hydrogen economy to assist in the development of its hydrogen R&D program. Included in the assessment were the current state of technology; future cost estimates; CO2 emissions; distribution, storage, and end use considerations; and the DOE RD&D program. The report provides an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel in the nation’s future energy economy and describes a number of important challenges that must be overcome if it is to make a major energy contribution. Topics covered include the hydrogen end-use technologies, transportation, hydrogen production technologies, and transition issues for hydrogen in vehicles.

  17. Trans fatty acid content in Malaysian supermarket foods: a field-to-laboratory approach in assessing food risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karupaiah, Tilakavati; Tan, Hui Kuen; Ong, Wei Wen; Tan, Choon Heen; Sundram, Kalyana

    2014-01-01

    The extent of industrial trans fatty acids (TFA) in the food supply is unknown in Malaysia, whilst TFA disclosure on food labels is not mandatory by Malaysian food standards. Supermarket foods such as dairy products, fats and oils, meat products, snack foods, soups, and confectionery are commonly cited to be major contributors of TFA in the diet. A consumer survey (n = 622) was used to develop a food listing of these 'high risk' foods. TFA content of high-risk foods were analysed by gas chromatography. Food samples (n = 158) were analysed and their total TFA content were compared with Malaysian Food Standards. A wide variation in TFA content within food categories was indicated. Of the foods containing TFA, many food labels did not cite TFA content or the use of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO) as an ingredient. Hypothesised estimates of TFA intake from these supermarket foods in a sample day's menu providing 2000 kcal projected a minimum intake of 0.5 g and a maximum intake of 5.2 g TFA. This study found there was no voluntary disclosure of TFA content on food labels or identifying PHVO as an ingredient. It appears that health education targeting consumers to minimise TFA consumption is required supported by mandatory PHVO disclosure on the food label.

  18. Effect of foliar application of salicylic acid, hydrogen peroxide and a xyloglucan oligosaccharide on capsiate content and gene expression associatedwith capsinoids synthesis in Capsicum annuum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunun-Perez, A Y; Guevara-Figueroa, T; Jimenez-Garcia, S N; Feregrino-Perez, A A; Gautier, F; Guevara-Gonzalez, R G

    2017-06-01

    Capsinoids are non-pungent analogues of capsaicinoids in pepper (Capsicum spp). The absence of pungency, in addition to their biological activities similar to that of capsaicinoids such as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties, makes capsinoids an excellent option for increasing use in human and animal nutrition, as well as health and pharmaceutical industries. There are only few sources of pepper producing capsinoids, and one of them (accession 509-45-1), Capsicum annuum L., is a potential source for increasing capsinoids content using strategies as controlled elicitation during plant production in the greenhouse. In this research we evaluated the effect of weekly and one-day-before-harvest foliar applications of hydrogen peroxide, salicylic acid and a xyloglucan oligosaccharide on the concentration of capsiate in fruits of this pepper accession, as well as the gene expression of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (pal), putative aminotransferase (pamt), capsaicin synthase (at3) and β-keto acyl synthase (kas). Results showed that the two tested concentrations of H2O2 significantly increased capsiate content and gene expression associated with capsaicinoids (pamt, at3 and kas) and the phenylpropanoids (pal) pathways. Plant yield was not affected using this induction strategy. Our results indicated that the pre-harvest and weekly application of hydrogen peroxide and xyloglucan oligosaccharide improved production of capsiate in C. annuum L.

  19. Assessment of feasible strategies for seasonal underground hydrogen storage in a saline aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáinz-García, Alvaro; Abarca, Elena; Rubí, Violeta; Grandia, Fidel

    2017-04-01

    Renewable energies are unsteady, which results in temporary mismatches between demand and supply. The conversion of surplus energy to hydrogen and its storage in geological formations is one option to balance this energy gap. This study evaluates the feasibility of seasonal storage of hydrogen produced from wind power in Castilla-León region (northern Spain). A 3D multiphase numerical model is used to test different extraction well configurations during three annual injection-production cycles in a saline aquifer. Results demonstrate that underground hydrogen storage in saline aquifers can be operated with reasonable recovery ratios. A maximum hydrogen recovery ratio of 78%, which represents a global energy efficiency of 30%, has been estimated. Hydrogen upconing emerges as the major risk on saline aquifer storage. However, shallow extraction wells can minimize its effects. Steeply dipping geological structures are key for an efficient hydrogen storage.

  20. Evaluation tool for selection and optimisation of hydrogen demonstration projects. Application to a decentralized renewable hydrogen system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracht, M.; De Groot, A.; Gregoire Padro, C.E.; Schucan, T.H.; Skolnik, E.

    1998-06-01

    As part of the International Energy Agency Hydrogen Implementing Agreement, an evaluation tool to assist in the design, operation and optimisation of hydrogen demonstration facilities is under development. Using commercially available flowsheet simulation software (ASPEN- Plus) as the integrating platform, this tool is designed to provide system developers with a comprehensive data base or library of component models and an integrating platform through which these models may be linked. By combining several energy system components a conceptual design of a integrated hydrogen energy system can be made. As a part of the tool and connected to the library are design guidelines which can help finding the optimal configuration in the design process. The component categories considered include: production, storage, transport, distribution and end use. Many component models have already been included in the initial test platform. The use of the tool will be illustrated by presenting the results of a specific sample system that has been designed and assessed with use of the tool. The system considered is a decentralized renewable hydrogen system in which the hydrogen is produced by biomass gasification or pyrolysis, the produced hydrogen is transported through a pipeline or with a tank truck. The storage options that are considered are liquid hydrogen and compressed gas. The hydrogen is dispensed through a refueling station. Several options for integration are conceivable; i.e. storage of the hydrogen can take place centrally or district heat of a gasification unit can be used to generate electricity for liquefaction, etc. With use of the tool several configurations with different components and various integration options have been examined. Both the results of the modeling effort and an assessment of the evaluation tool will be presented. 5 refs

  1. Ballmilling of metal borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    of the renewable energy sources [2]. Borohydrides have received great attention as energy carrier due to their high gravimetric content of hydrogen, though unfortunately they are currently not applicable for industrial use due to high thermal stability and poor recycling. The purpose of the investigation...

  2. Technical Analysis of Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali T-Raissi

    2005-01-14

    The aim of this work was to assess issues of cost, and performance associated with the production and storage of hydrogen via following three feedstocks: sub-quality natural gas (SQNG), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and water. Three technology areas were considered: (1) Hydrogen production utilizing SQNG resources, (2) Hydrogen storage in ammonia and amine-borane complexes for fuel cell applications, and (3) Hydrogen from solar thermochemical cycles for splitting water. This report summarizes our findings with the following objectives: Technoeconomic analysis of the feasibility of the technology areas 1-3; Evaluation of the hydrogen production cost by technology areas 1; and Feasibility of ammonia and/or amine-borane complexes (technology areas 2) as a means of hydrogen storage on-board fuel cell powered vehicles. For each technology area, we reviewed the open literature with respect to the following criteria: process efficiency, cost, safety, and ease of implementation and impact of the latest materials innovations, if any. We employed various process analysis platforms including FactSage chemical equilibrium software and Aspen Technologies AspenPlus and HYSYS chemical process simulation programs for determining the performance of the prospective hydrogen production processes.

  3. Influence of hydrogen on metals behavior. 1 - Mechanical behavior of Ti 6 pc Al 6 pc V 2 pc Sn titanium alloy versus hydrogen: influence of heat treatment and of oxygen content; Influence de l'hydrogene sur le comportement des metaux. 1 - comportement mecanique de l'alliage de titane T A6 V6 E2 vis-a-vis de l'hydrogene: influence du traitement thermique et de la teneur en oxygene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaller, Bernard

    1972-06-26

    The mechanical behavior of Ti 6 pc Al 6 pc V Sn alloy during dynamic testing has been investigated versus hydrogen and oxygen content. The hydrogen susceptibility depends only slightly on its microstructure, acicular or equi-axed: it depends much more on conditions of hydrogen contamination and on the thermal history afterward. When the alloy has been stabilized by annealing in {alpha} - {beta} and provided hydrogen absorption does not induce phase transformations, hydrogen sensitivity is relatively low: brittleness occurs suddenly but at a high concentration threshold (2000 ppm H), which coincides with hydrogen saturation of {beta} phase. When the alloy includes unstabilized phases, its response to hydrogen changes whether it has been finally annealed or not, in the 300 - 500 C temperature area, prone to {omega} phase formation. In the absence of such an annealing, a reduction in ductility only occurs at high concentrations (> 1500 ppm H). In the other and, after annealing at 400 C, alloy hardening and a ductility decrease start even at the lowest hydrogen amounts: then hydrogen susceptibility is very high. Low oxygen concentration (up to 2000 ppm) do not sensibly affect the good hydrogen tolerance of this alloy. Beyond 2500 ppm, oxygen, while improving tensile strength, yet severely decreases ductility. [French] Le comportement mecanique de l'alliage TA6-V6-E2 lors d'un essai dynamique a ete etudie en fonction de la teneur en hydrogene et en oxygene. La sensibilite vis-a-vis de l'hydrogene ne depend que tres faiblement de sa structure migrographique, aciculaire ou equiaxe; elle depend bien plus des conditions de contamination par l'hydrogene et de son histoire thermique apres contamination. Lorsque l'alliage a ete stabilise par un recuit dans le domaine biphase, et a condition que l'absorption d'hydrogene n'entraine pas de modification structurale, la sensibilite vis-a-vis de l'hydrogene est relativement faible: la fragilite apparait brutalement mais pour un

  4. Hydrogen-bromine fuel cell advance component development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleston, Joann; Reed, James

    1988-01-01

    Advanced cell component development is performed by NASA Lewis to achieve improved performance and longer life for the hydrogen-bromine fuel cells system. The state-of-the-art hydrogen-bromine system utilizes the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) technology, similar to the SPE technology developed for the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell system. These studies are directed at exploring the potential for this system by assessing and evaluating various types of materials for cell parts and electrode materials for Bromine-hydrogen bromine environment and fabricating experimental membrane/electrode-catalysts by chemical deposition.

  5. Life Cycle Assessment Of Hydrogen Production From Natural Gas Reforming Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, M.

    2010-01-01

    Society has become concerned about the issues of natural resource depletion and environmental degradation. The environmental performance of products or processes has become a key issue, which is why ways to minimize the effects on the environment are investigated. The most effective tool for this purpose is called life cycle assessment (LCA). This concept considers the entire life cycle of product or process. The life cycle of a product begins with the extraction of raw materials from the earth to create the product and ends at the point when all materials are returned to the earth. LCA makes it possible to estimate the cumulative environmental impacts resulting from all stages in the product life cycle, often including impacts not considered in more traditional analyses. Therefore, LCA provides a comprehensive view of the environmental aspects of the product or process and a more accurate picture of the true environmental trade-offs in product selection. In the case of this study, life cycle assessments of hydrogen production via natural gas reforming process are investigated for environmental affect.

  6. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

  7. Effect of trapping and temperature on the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of alloy 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galliano, Florian; Andrieu, Eric; Blanc, Christine; Cloue, Jean-Marc; Connetable, Damien; Odemer, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.odemer@ensiacet.fr

    2014-08-12

    Ni-based alloy 718 is widely used to manufacture structural components in the aeronautic and nuclear industries. Numerous studies have shown that alloy 718 may be sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement. In the present study, the susceptibilities of three distinct metallurgical states of alloy 718 to hydrogen embrittlement were investigated to identify both the effect of hydrogen trapping on hydrogen embrittlement and the role of temperature in the hydrogen-trapping mechanism. Cathodic charging in a molten salt bath was used to saturate the different hydrogen traps of each metallurgical state. Tensile tests at different temperatures and different strain rates were carried out to study the effect of hydrogen on mechanical properties and failure modes, in combination with hydrogen content measurements. The results demonstrated that Ni-based superalloy 718 was strongly susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement between 25 °C and 300 °C, and highlighted the dominant roles played by the hydrogen solubility and the hydrogen trapping on mechanical behavior and fracture modes.

  8. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  9. The effect of amorphous silicon surface hydrogenation on morphology, wettability and its implication on the adsorption of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filali, Larbi, E-mail: larbifilali5@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Brahmi, Yamina; Sib, Jamal Dine [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Bouhekka, Ahmed [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Département de Physique, Université Hassiba Ben Bouali, 02000 Chlef (Algeria); Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation of the surfaces had the effect of reducing the roughness by way of shadow etching. • Roughness was the driving factor affecting the wettability of the hydrogenated surfaces. • Bovine Serum Albumin proteins favored the surfaces with highest hydrogen content. • Surface modification induced secondary structure change of adsorbed proteins. - Abstract: We study the effect of amorphous silicon (a-Si) surface hydrogenation on Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption. A set of (a-Si) films was prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS) and after deposition; they were treated in molecular hydrogen ambient at different pressures (1–3 Pa). Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used to study the hydrogenation effect and BSA adsorption. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate morphological changes caused by hydrogenation. The wettability of the films was measured using contact angle measurement, and in the case of the hydrogenated surfaces, it was found to be driven by surface roughness. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy and SE measurements show that proteins had the strongest affinity toward the surfaces with the highest hydrogen content and their secondary structure was affected by a significant decrease of the α-helix component (-27%) compared with the proteins adsorbed on the un-treated surface, which had a predominantly α-helix (45%) structure. The adsorbed protein layer was found to be densely packed with a large thickness (30.9 nm) on the hydrogen-rich surfaces. The most important result is that the surface hydrogen content was the dominant factor, compared to wettability and morphology, for protein adsorption.

  10. Developing a Questionnaire to Assess the Probability Content Knowledge of Prospective Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Torres, Emilse; Batanero, Carmen; Díaz, Carmen; Contreras, José Miguel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development of a questionnaire designed to assess the probability content knowledge of prospective primary school teachers. Three components of mathematical knowledge for teaching and three different meanings of probability (classical, frequentist and subjective) are considered. The questionnaire content is based on…

  11. Hydrogen adsorption on skeletal rhodium-tantalum electrodes-catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsinstevich, V.M.; Krejnina, N.M.

    1975-01-01

    Skeleton rhodium-tantalic catalyst electrodes with a tantalum mass percentage of 0 to 100 have been obtained by the methodology of Crupp and others. The hydrogen adsorption is studied through the method of removing the galvano-static and potentiodynamic curves of charging in sulfuric acid and potassium hydroxide. It has been discovered that the maximum adsorption ability relatively to the hydrogen can be observed in an alloy with a 5% tantalum contents. The energetic characteristics of the alloys are higher in alkali than in acid

  12. Improvements in the susceptibility to hydrogen attack and stress-relief cracking of 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanaka, T.; Sato, S.; Shimomura, J.; Aso, K.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of sulphur content at extremely low level on the susceptibility to hydrogen attack and stress-relief cracking in 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steels was studied. The reduction of sulphur content and/or the addition of REM (rare earth metal) or Ca in accordance with sulphur content remarkably improve the resistivity against hydrogen attack and stress-relief cracking. Micro-structural examination has showed that there exist Mn-REM-S-Al-O complex particles in the REM-added steels. It is concluded that the effect of REM on hydrogen attack and stress-relief cracking is to reduce ''the free sulphur'' in 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steels

  13. Simultaneous hydrogen utilization and in situ biogas upgrading in an anaerobic reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Johansson, Sara; Boe, Kanokwan

    2012-01-01

    . The methane production rate of the reactor with H2 addition was 22% higher, compared to the control reactor only fed with manure. The CO2 content in the produced biogas was only 15%, while it was 38% in the control reactor. However, the addition of hydrogen resulted in increase of pH (from 8.0 to 8.3) due......The possibility of converting hydrogen to methane and simultaneous upgrading of biogas was investigated in both batch tests and fully mixed biogas reactor, simultaneously fed with manure and hydrogen. Batch experiments showed that hydrogen could be converted to methane by hydrogenotrophic...

  14. Impact of hydrogen onboard storage technologies on the performance of hydrogen fuelled vehicles: A techno-economic well-to-wheel assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, M.P.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen onboard storage technologies form an important factor in the overall performance of hydrogen fuelled transportation, both energetically and economically. Particularly, advanced storage options such as metal hydrides and carbon nanotubes are often hinted favourable to conventional, liquid

  15. Hydrogen jet recombination under postulated LMFBR accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierman, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Certain conditions may be postulated in LMFBR risk assessments for which the potential of hydrogen release to the reactor containment building needs to be evaluated. The inherent self-ignition characteristics of hydrogen jets entering the air atmosphere of the reactor containment building should be understood for such analyses. If hydrogen jets were to self-ignite (recombine) at the source where they enter the reactor containment building, then undesirable hydrogen accumulation would not occur. Therefore, experiments have been conducted investigating the phenomena associated with the recombination of hydrogen jets under conditions similar to those postulated for LMFBR studies. The data presented define the conditions required for self-ignition of the hydrogen jets

  16. Gas Phase Fabrication of Pd-Ni Nanoparticle Arrays for Hydrogen Sensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pd-Ni nanoparticles have been fabricated by gas aggregation process. The formation of Pd-Ni nano-alloys was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. By depositing Pd-Ni nanoparticles on the interdigital electrodes, quantum conductance-based hydrogen sensors were fabricated. The Ni content in the nanoparticle showed an obvious effect on the hydrogen response behavior corresponding to the conductance change of the nanoparticle film. Three typical response regions with different conductance-hydrogen pressure correlations were observed. It was found that the α-β phase transition region of palladium hydride moves to significant higher hydrogen pressure with the addition of nickel element, which greatly enhance the hydrogen sensing performance of the nanoparticle film.

  17. Biological hydrogen production from probiotic wastewater as substrate by selectively enriched anaerobic mixed microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaramakrishna, D.; Sreekanth, D.; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad 500072, Andhra Pradesh (India); Anjaneyulu, Y. [TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Biohydrogen production from probiotic wastewater using mixed anaerobic consortia is reported in this paper. Batch tests are carried out in a 5.0 L batch reactor under constant mesophillic temperature (37 C). The maximum hydrogen yield 1.8 mol-hydrogen/mol-carbohydrate is obtained at an optimum pH of 5.5 and substrate concentration 5 g/L. The maximum hydrogen production rate is 168 ml/h. The hydrogen content in the biogas is more than 65% and no significant methane is observed throughout the study. In addition to hydrogen, acetate, propionate, butyrate and ethanol are found to be the main by-products in the metabolism of hydrogen fermentation. (author)

  18. Nuclear hydrogen production and its safe handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hongsuk; Paek, Seungwoo; Kim, Kwang-Rag; Ahn, Do-Hee; Lee, Minsoo; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2003-01-01

    An overview of the hydrogen related research presently undertaken at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. These encompass nuclear hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, and the safe handling of hydrogen, High temperature gas-cooled reactors can play a significant role, with respect to large-scale hydrogen production, if used as the provider of high temperature heat in fossil fuel conversion or thermochemical cycles. A variety of potential hydrogen production methods for high temperature gas-cooled reactors were analyzed. They are steam reforming of natural gas, thermochemical cycles, etc. The produced hydrogen should be stored safely. Titanium metal was tested primarily because its hydride has very low dissociation pressures at normal storage temperatures and a high capacity for hydrogen, it is easy to prepare and is non-reactive with air in the expected storage conditions. There could be a number of potential sources of hydrogen evolution risk in a nuclear hydrogen production facility. In order to reduce the deflagration detonation it is necessary to develop hydrogen control methods that are capable of dealing with the hydrogen release rate. A series of experiments were conducted to assess the catalytic recombination characteristics of hydrogen in an air stream using palladium catalysts. (author)

  19. Test Methodologies for Hydrogen Sensor Performance Assessment: Chamber vs. Flow Through Test Apparatus: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hartmann, Kevin S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schmidt, Kara [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cebolla, Rafeal O [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Weidner, Eveline [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Bonato, Christian [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands

    2017-11-06

    Certification of hydrogen sensors to standards often prescribes using large-volume test chambers [1, 2]. However, feedback from stakeholders such as sensor manufacturers and end-users indicate that chamber test methods are often viewed as too slow and expensive for routine assessment. Flow through test methods potentially are an efficient, cost-effective alternative for sensor performance assessment. A large number of sensors can be simultaneously tested, in series or in parallel, with an appropriate flow through test fixture. The recent development of sensors with response times of less than 1s mandates improvements in equipment and methodology to properly capture the performance of this new generation of fast sensors; flow methods are a viable approach for accurate response and recovery time determinations, but there are potential drawbacks. According to ISO 26142 [1], flow through test methods may not properly simulate ambient applications. In chamber test methods, gas transport to the sensor can be dominated by diffusion which is viewed by some users as mimicking deployment in rooms and other confined spaces. Alternatively, in flow through methods, forced flow transports the gas to the sensing element. The advective flow dynamics may induce changes in the sensor behaviour relative to the quasi-quiescent condition that may prevail in chamber test methods. One goal of the current activity in the JRC and NREL sensor laboratories [3, 4] is to develop a validated flow through apparatus and methods for hydrogen sensor performance testing. In addition to minimizing the impact on sensor behaviour induced by differences in flow dynamics, challenges associated with flow through methods include the ability to control environmental parameters (humidity, pressure and temperature) during the test and changes in the test gas composition induced by chemical reactions with upstream sensors. Guidelines on flow through test apparatus design and protocols for the evaluation of

  20. Technical Integration of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Young; Park, J. K.; Chang, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    These works focus on the development of attainment indices for nuclear hydrogen key technologies, the analysis of the hydrogen production process and the performance estimation for hydrogen production systems, and the assessment of the nuclear hydrogen production cost. For assessing the degree of attainments in comparison with the final goals of VHTR technologies in progress of researches, subdivided are the prerequisite items confirmed to the NHDD concepts. We developed and applied R and D quality management methodology to meet 'Development of Key Technologies for Nuclear Hydrogen' project. And we also distributed R and D QAM and R and D QAP to each teams and are in operation. The preconceptual flow diagrams of SI, HTSE, and HyS processes are introduced and their material and energy balances have been proposed. The hydrogen production thermal efficiencies of not only the SI process as a reference process but also the HTSE and HyS processes were also estimated. Technical feasibility assessments of SI, HTSE, and HyS processes have been carried out by using the pair-wise comparison and analytic hierarchy process, and it is revealed that the experts are considering the SI process as the most feasible process. The secondary helium pathway across the SI process is introduced. Dynamic simulation codes for the H2S04vaporizer, sulfuric acid and sulfur trioxide decomposers, and HI decomposer on the secondary helium pathway and for the primary and secondary sulfuric acid distillation columns, HIx solution distillation column, and preheater for HI vapor have been developed and integrated

  1. GENERALIZATION, FORMULATION AND HEAT CONTENTS OF SIMULATED MSW WITH HIGH MOISTURE CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. JOHARI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a generalization technique for the formulation of simulated municipal solid waste. This technique is used for the elimination of the inconsistency in the municipal solid waste (MSW characteristics due to its heterogeneous nature. The compositions of simulated municipal solid waste were formulated from four major municipal waste streams components in Malaysia namely paper, plastic, food and yard waste. The technique produced four simplified waste generalization categories with composition of paper (19%, plastic (25%, food (27% and green waste (29% respectively. Comparative study was conducted for proximate analysis for the determination of volatile matter, fixed carbon and ash content. Ultimate analysis was performed for carbon and hydrogen content. The heat content for simulated and actual municipal solid waste showed good agreement. The moisture content of the simulated municipal solid waste and actual municipal solid waste were established at 52.34% and 61.71% respectively. Overall results were considered to be representative of the actual compositions of municipal solid waste in Malaysia.

  2. Development of a tool dedicated to the evaluation of hydrogen term source for technological Wastes: assumptions, physical models, and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamouroux, C. [CEA Saclay, Nuclear Energy Division /DANS, Department of physico-chemistry, 91191 Gif sur yvette (France); Esnouf, S. [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M/Radiolysis Laboratory , 91191 Gif sur yvette (France); Cochin, F. [Areva NC,recycling BU, DIRP/RDP tour Areva, 92084 Paris La Defense (France)

    2013-07-01

    In radioactive waste packages hydrogen is generated, in one hand, from the radiolysis of wastes (mainly organic materials) and, in the other hand, from the radiolysis of water content in the cement matrix. In order to assess hydrogen generation 2 tools based on operational models have been developed. One is dedicated to the determination of the hydrogen source term issues from the radiolysis of the wastes: the STORAGE tool (Simulation Tool Of Emission Radiolysis Gas), the other deals with the hydrogen source term gas, produced by radiolysis of the cement matrices (the Damar tool). The approach used by the STORAGE tool for assessing the production rate of radiolysis gases is divided into five steps: 1) Specification of the data packages, in particular, inventories and radiological materials defined for a package medium; 2) Determination of radiochemical yields for the different constituents and the laws of behavior associated, this determination of radiochemical yields is made from the PRELOG database in which radiochemical yields in different irradiation conditions have been compiled; 3) Definition of hypothesis concerning the composition and the distribution of contamination inside the package to allow assessment of the power absorbed by the constituents; 4) Sum-up of all the contributions; And finally, 5) validation calculations by comparison with a reduced sampling of packages. Comparisons with measured values confirm the conservative character of the methodology and give confidence in the safety margins for safety analysis report.

  3. Hydrogen enriched gas production in a multi-stage downdraft gasification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, A.; Jarungthammachote, S.

    2009-01-01

    To achieve hydrogen enriched and low-tar producer gas, multi-stage air-blown and air-steam gasification were studied in this research. Results showed that the tar content from multi-stage air-blown and air-steam gasification was lower compared to the average value of that from downdraft gasification. It was also seen that an air-steam gasification process could potentially increase the hydrogen concentration in the producer gas in the expense of carbon monoxide; however, the summation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the producer gas was increased. (author)

  4. Hydrogen burn assessment with the CONTAIN code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Rij, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    The CONTAIN computer code was developed at Sandia National Laboratories, under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The code is intended for calculations of containment loads during severe accidents and for prediction of the radioactive source term in the event that the containment leaks or fails. A strong point of the CONTAIN code is the continuous interaction of the thermal-hydraulics phenomena, aerosol behavior and fission product behavior. The CONTAIN code can be used for Light Water Reactors as well as Liquid Metal Reactors. In order to evaluate the CONTAIN code on its merits, comparisons between the code and experiments must be made. In this paper, CONTAIN calculations for the hydrogen burn experiments, carried out at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), are presented and compared with the experimental data. In the Large-Scale Hydrogen Combustion Facility at the NTS, 21 tests have been carried out. These tests were sponsored by the NRC and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The tests, carried out by EG and G, were performed in a spherical vessel 16 m in diameter with a design pressure of 700 kPa, substantially higher than that of most commercial nuclear containment buildings

  5. Economic Efficiency Assessment of Autonomous Wind/Diesel/Hydrogen Systems in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Marchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The economic efficiency of harnessing wind energy in the autonomous power systems of Russia is analyzed. Wind turbines are shown to be competitive for many considered variants (groups of consumers, placement areas, and climatic and meteorological conditions. The authors study the possibility of storing energy in the form of hydrogen in the autonomous wind/diesel/hydrogen power systems that include wind turbines, diesel generator, electrolyzer, hydrogen tank, and fuel cells. The paper presents the zones of economic efficiency of the system (set of parameters that provide its competitiveness depending on load, fuel price, and long-term average annual wind speed. At low wind speed and low price of fuel, it is reasonable to use only diesel generator to supply power to consumers. When the fuel price and wind speed increase, first it becomes more economical to use a wind-diesel system and then wind turbines with a hydrogen system. In the latter case, according to the optimization results, diesel generator is excluded from the system.

  6. Assessment of hydrogen storage systems as a means of integrating electricity from renewable energies; Bewertung von Wasserstoffspeichersystemen zur Integration von Strom aus erneuerbaren Energien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelis, Julia; Genoese, Fabio; Wietschel, Martin [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Hydrogen storage is a possible option for an improved integration of renewable energies into the electricity supply system. Similarly to other technical storage options it is faced with the challenge of having to be economically viable. Compared with other storage media hydrogen has the virtue of being versatile. This has a significant impact on assessments of its profitability.

  7. Hydrogen storage - are we making progress?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, L.; Milliken, J.; Satyapal, S.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The efficient storage of hydrogen in compact, lightweight systems that allow greater than 300-mile range has been identified as one of the major technical challenges facing the practical commercialization of fuel cell power systems for light-duty vehicles. Following the hydrogen vision announced by President Bush in his 2003 State of the Union address, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Grand Challenge, soliciting ideas from universities, national laboratories, and industry. DOE's National Hydrogen Storage Project, an aggressive and innovative research program focused on materials R and D, will be launched in Fiscal Year 2005. An intensive effort is also underway in the private sector, both in the U.S. and abroad, to meet the challenging on-board hydrogen storage requirements. A historical perspective of hydrogen storage research and development will be provided and the current DOE technical targets for hydrogen storage systems will be discussed. The state-of-the-art in hydrogen storage will be summarized and recent progress assessed. Finally future research directions and areas of technical emphasis will be described. (author)

  8. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwarno Suwarno

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is reactive toward hydrogen forming metal hydride which has a potential application in      energy storage and conversion. Titanium hydride has been widely studied for hydrogen storage, thermal storage, and battery electrodes applications. A special interest is using titanium for hydrogen production in a hydrogen sorption-enhanced steam reforming of natural gas. In the present work, non-isothermal dehydrogenation kinetics of titanium hydride and kinetics of hydrogenation in gaseous flow at isothermal conditions were investigated. The hydrogen desorption was studied using temperature desorption spectroscopy (TDS while the hydrogen absorption and desorption in gaseous flow were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD. The present work showed that the path of dehydrogenation of the TiH2 is d®b®a hydride phase with possible overlapping steps occurred. The fast hydrogen desorption rate observed at the TDS main peak temperature were correlated with the fast transformation of the d-TiH1.41 to b-TiH0.59. In the gaseous flow, hydrogen absorption and desorption were related to the transformation of b-TiH0.59 Û d-TiH1.41 with 2 wt.% hydrogen reversible content. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 21st November 2016; Revised: 20th March 2017; Accepted: 9th April 2017; Available online: 27th October 2017; Published regularly: December 2017 How to Cite: Suwarno, S., Yartys, V.A. (2017. Kinetics of Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption in Titanium. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (3: 312-317  (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.3.810.312-317

  9. Technical Integration of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Young; Chang, J. H.; Park, J. K.

    2007-06-01

    These works focus on the development of attainment indices for nuclear hydrogen key technologies, the analysis of the hydrogen production process and the performance estimation for hydrogen production system, and the assessment of the nuclear hydrogen production economy. To estimate the attainments of the key technologies in progress with the performance goals of GIF, itemized are the attainment indices based on SRP published in VHTR R and D steering committee of Gen-IV. For assessing the degree of attainments in comparison with the final goals of VHTR technologies in progress of researches, subdivided are the prerequisite items conformed to the NHDD concepts established in a preconceptual design in 2005. The codes for analyzing the hydrogen production economy are developed for calculating the unit production cost of nuclear hydrogen. We developed basic R and D quality management methodology to meet design technology of VHTR's needs. By putting it in practice, we derived some problems and solutions. We distributed R and D QAP and Q and D QAM to each teams and these are in operation. Computer simulations are performed for estimating the thermal efficiency for the electrodialysis component likely to adapting as one of the hydrogen production system in Korea and EED-SI process known as the key components of the hydrogen production systems. Using the commercial codes, the process diagrams and the spread-sheets were produced for the Bunsen reaction process, Sulphuric Acid dissolution process and HI dissolution process, respectively, which are the key components composing of the SI process

  10. Polymers for hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Rachel Reina; Simmons, Kevin L.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2013-10-01

    This document addresses polymer materials for use in hydrogen service. Section 1 summarizes the applications of polymers in hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems and identifies polymers used in these applications. Section 2 reviews the properties of polymer materials exposed to hydrogen and/or high-pressure environments, using information obtained from published, peer-reviewed literature. The effect of high pressure on physical and mechanical properties of polymers is emphasized in this section along with a summary of hydrogen transport through polymers. Section 3 identifies areas in which fuller characterization is needed in order to assess material suitability for hydrogen service.

  11. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs., E-mail: tazsolt@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Cormos, C. C., E-mail: cormos@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Agachi, P. S. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 11 Arany Janos, Postal code: 400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO{sub 2} emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  12. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs.; Cormos, C. C.; Agachi, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO 2 emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint

  13. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs.; Cormos, C. C.; Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO2 emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  14. Hydrogen management in nuclear reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, Kannan

    2014-01-01

    The talk will present the systematic methodology evolved to assess the hydrogen management in nuclear reactor containment during a severe accident. The focus is on the methodology evolved as the full problem is yet to be solved completely. First, the method to quantify mixing of hydrogen is presented. It is demonstrated that buoyancy modified model is adequate to quantify the process satisfactorily. On noting that the hydrogen levels are higher than the safe limits, effort was directed towards mitigating the concentration. Passive Auto-catalytic Recombiners (PAR) were identified as the potential devices for mitigation. Efforts were then directed to model these and a satisfactory one-step reaction derived from a 12 reaction model was evolved. This model was satisfactory when compared with experimental results with hydrogen concentration below 4%. However, the same when extended to hydrogen concentration of 20%, predicts very high concentration thereby indicating the need for experiments at high hydrogen concentration. (author)

  15. Hydrogen in intermetallic phases: the system titanium--nickel--hydrogen. Wasserstoff in intermetallischen phasen am beispiel des systems titan-nickel-wasserftoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchner, H.; Gutjahr, M. A.; Beccu, K. D.; Saeufferer, H.

    1972-07-01

    The intermetallic phases Ti/sub 2/-Ni (E9/sub 3/-type) and TiNi (B2-type) are able to absorb great amounts of hydrogen interstitially. The E9/sub 3/-structure forms four isotypic hydrogen phases, the lattice parameters of which increase with increasing hydrogen contents (..delta..d/sub max/ = 5.3%). The stoichiometric formulas are: Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 0/./sub 5/; Ti/sub 2/NiH; Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 2/; Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 2/./sub 5/. The lattice parameter of the B2-structure increases from 3.01 A to 3.10 A (..delta..d = 3%), thus forming the stoichiometric TiNiH phase. The TiNiH structure possesses an eight-fold superlattice having a B2 type cell. The positions of hydrogen in the two intermetallic phases Ti/sub 2/Ni and TiNi are discussed from the geometrical point of view. Neutron diffraction diagrams verify these positions for only two hydrogen phases (Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 0/./sub 5/; Ti/sub 2/NiH). Because of extreme experimental difficulties, the exact hydrogen positions in the phases Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 2/; Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 2/./sub 5/; TiNiH are still unknown.

  16. Experimental results and analysis on hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorofeev, S.B.; Efimenko, A.A.; Kochurko, A.S.; Sidorov, V.P.; Bezmelnitsin, A.V.

    1994-01-01

    The Small-Scale Development Apparatus (SSDA) was constructed to provide a preliminary set of experimental data to characterize the effect of temperature on the ability of hydrogen-air-steam-mixtures to undergo detonations and, equally important, to support design of the larger-scale High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) by providing a test bed for solution of a number of high-temperature design and operational problems. The SSDA, the central element of which is 10-cm inside diameter, 6.1-m long tubular test vessel designed to permit detonation experiments at temperatures up to 700K, was employed to study self-sustained detonations in gaseous mixtures of hydrogen, air, and steam at temperature between 300K and 650K at a fixed pressure of 0.1 MPa. Detonation cell size measurements provide clear evidence that the effect of hydrogen-air gas mixture temperature, in the range 300K to 650K, is to decrease cell size and, hence, to increase the sensitivity of the mixture to undergo detonations. The effect of steam content, at any given temperature, is to increase the cell size and, thereby, to decrease the sensitivity of stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixtures. The one-dimensional ZND model does a very good job at predicting the overall trends in the cell size data over the range of hydrogen-air-steam mixture compositions and temperature studied in the experiments. Experiments were conducted to measure the rate of hydrogen oxidation in the absence of ignition sources at temperatures of 500K and 650K, for hydrogen-air mixtures of 15% and 50%, and for a mixture of equimolar hydrogen-air and 30% steam at 650K. The rate of hydrogen oxidation was found to be significant at 650K. Reduction of hydrogen concentration by chemical reaction from 50 to 44% hydrogen, and from 15 to 11% hydrogen, were observed on a time frame of minutes. The DeSoete rate equation predicts the 50% experiment very well, but greatly underestimates the reaction rate of the lean mixtures

  17. Development of assessment technology for hydrogen burn and fission product behavior in containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, J. T.; Ha, K. S.; Hong, S. W.; Song, Y. M.; Park, J. H.; Cho, Y. R.; Kang, H. S.

    2012-04-01

    Analysis tools for hydrogen burn was established to resolve the hydrogen issues in containment. To validate CFX commercial CFD(computational fluid dynamics) code, the hydrogen combustion experiments such as FLAME and ENACEFF for reactor containment were analyzed. And OpenFOAM hydrogen combustion code was developed and validated. Experiments for the flame propagation characteristics in IRWST and the run-up-distance for DDT(Deflagration to detonation transition) were performed and analytical model was evaluated to evaluation of the performance of hydrogen mitigation system, that is, PAR(Passive auto-catalistic re-combiner) To improvement of the fission product modelling in containment, separate analysis module for Iodine behavior and its application tool of K-IODIP (Korea IODIne Package) were developed. PHEBUS FPT-3 analysis was performed to validate MELCOR code. And also the characteristics of fission product behaviors in Future Reactors(GEN-IV) were compared

  18. A comparative assessment of the the nutritional contents of 'wara' a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The processing line of West African soft cheese varieties (processed with Calotropis procera (Sodom apple) and Cymbopogon citratus (lemon grass) leaf extracts was assessed for nutrient compositions (nitrogen, crude protein, fat, lactose, moisture content), pH, total aerobic plate count and trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, ...

  19. Using Delphi Methodology to Design Assessments of Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manizade, Agida Gabil; Mason, Marguerite M.

    2011-01-01

    Descriptions of methodologies that can be used to create items for assessing teachers' "professionally situated" knowledge are lacking in mathematics education research literature. In this study, researchers described and used the Delphi method to design an instrument to measure teachers' pedagogical content knowledge. The instrument focused on a…

  20. Assessment of factors influencing trace element content of mushrooms from European part of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, A.V.; Lyapunov, S.M.; Okina, O.I.; Frontas'eva, M.V.; Pavlov, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    The results on trace element content in 12 species of basidial mushrooms from the European part of Russia are presented. Difference in the elemental content of wild and cultivated mushrooms is demonstrated. Assessment of technogenic contamination impact on trace element content of champignons is given. It was revealed that in the described conditions the accumulation of Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in Boletus edulis is not observed. High content of the mentioned elements in these mushrooms is caused by high content of their mobile forms in soil. It was shown that the high concentration of mobile forms of metals in soil establishes in the process of natural many years' accumulation of organic matter followed by its decomposition

  1. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nano-materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Eyler; Michel Junker; Emanuelle Breysse Carraboeuf; Laurent Allidieres; David Guichardot; Fabien Roy; Isabelle Verdier; Edward Mc Rae; Moulay Rachid Babaa; Gilles Flamant; David Luxembourg; Daniel Laplaze; Patrick Achard; Sandrine Berthon-Fabry; David Langohr; Laurent Fulcheri

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a French project related to hydrogen storage in carbon nano-materials. This 3 years project, co-funded by the ADEME (French Agency for the Environment and the Energy Management), aimed to assess the hydrogen storage capacity of carbon nano-materials. Four different carbon materials were synthesized and characterized in the frame of present project: - Carbon Nano-tubes; - Carbon Nano-fibres; - Carbon Aerogel; - Carbon Black. All materials tested in the frame of this project present a hydrogen uptake of less than 1 wt% (-20 C to 20 C). A state of the art of hydrogen storage systems has been done in order to determine the research trends and the maturity of the different technologies. The choice and design of hydrogen storage systems regarding fuel cell specifications has also been studied. (authors)

  2. 18th world hydrogen energy conference 2010. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This CD-ROM contains lectures, power points slides and posters presented on the 18th World Hydrogen Energy Conference. The topics of the conference are: (A). Fuel Cell Basics: 1. Electrochemistry of PEM Fuell Cells; 2. PEM/HT-PEM Fuel Cells: Electrolytes, Stack Components; 3. Direct Fuel Cells; 4. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 5. Advanced Modelling (B). Existing and Emerging Markets: 1. Off-Grid Power Supply and Premium Power Generation; 2. Space and Aeronautic Applications; 3. APUs for LDV, Trucks, Ships and Airplanes; 4. Portable Applications and Light Traction. (C). Stationary Applications: 1. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 2. Fuell Cells for Buildings. (D). Transportation Applications: 1. Fuel-Cell Power Trains; 3. Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engines; 4. Systems Analysis and Well-to-Wheel Studies; 5. Demonstration Projects, Costs and Market Introduction; 6 Electrification in Transportation Systems. (E). Fuel Infrastructures: 1. Hydrogen Distribution Technologies; 2. Hydrogen Deployment; 3. Fuel Provision for Early Market Applications. (G). Hydrogen Production Technologies: 1a. Photobiological Hydrogen Production; 1b. Fermentative Hydrogen Production; 1c. The HYVOLUTION Project. (H). Thermochemical Cycles: 3a. Hydrogen from Renewable Electricity; 3b. High-Temperature Electrolysis; 3c Alcaline Electrolysis; 3d PEM Electrolysis; 4a Reforming and Gasification-Fossil Energy Carriers; 4b Reforming and Gasification-Biomass; 5. Hydrogen-Separation Membranes; 6. Hydrogen Systems Assessment;.7. Photocatalysis (I). Storages: 1. Physical Hydrogen Storage; 2a. Metal Hydrides; 2b. Complex Hydrides; 3. Adsorption Technologies; (J). Strategic Analyses: 1. Research + Development Target and Priorities; 2. Life-Cycle Assessment and Economic Impact; 3. Socio-Economic Studies; 4. Education and Public Awareness; 5. Market Introduction; 7. Regional Activities; 8. The Zero Regio Project. (K). Safety Issues: 1. Vehicle and Infrastructural Safety; 2. Regulations, Codes, Standards and Test

  3. 18th world hydrogen energy conference 2010. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains lectures, power points slides and posters presented on the 18th World Hydrogen Energy Conference. The topics of the conference are: (A). Fuel Cell Basics: 1. Electrochemistry of PEM Fuell Cells; 2. PEM/HT-PEM Fuel Cells: Electrolytes, Stack Components; 3. Direct Fuel Cells; 4. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 5. Advanced Modelling (B). Existing and Emerging Markets: 1. Off-Grid Power Supply and Premium Power Generation; 2. Space and Aeronautic Applications; 3. APUs for LDV, Trucks, Ships and Airplanes; 4. Portable Applications and Light Traction. (C). Stationary Applications: 1. High-Temperature Fuel Cells; 2. Fuell Cells for Buildings. (D). Transportation Applications: 1. Fuel-Cell Power Trains; 3. Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engines; 4. Systems Analysis and Well-to-Wheel Studies; 5. Demonstration Projects, Costs and Market Introduction; 6 Electrification in Transportation Systems. (E). Fuel Infrastructures: 1. Hydrogen Distribution Technologies; 2. Hydrogen Deployment; 3. Fuel Provision for Early Market Applications. (G). Hydrogen Production Technologies: 1a. Photobiological Hydrogen Production; 1b. Fermentative Hydrogen Production; 1c. The HYVOLUTION Project. (H). Thermochemical Cycles: 3a. Hydrogen from Renewable Electricity; 3b. High-Temperature Electrolysis; 3c Alcaline Electrolysis; 3d PEM Electrolysis; 4a Reforming and Gasification-Fossil Energy Carriers; 4b Reforming and Gasification-Biomass; 5. Hydrogen-Separation Membranes; 6. Hydrogen Systems Assessment;.7. Photocatalysis (I). Storages: 1. Physical Hydrogen Storage; 2a. Metal Hydrides; 2b. Complex Hydrides; 3. Adsorption Technologies; (J). Strategic Analyses: 1. Research + Development Target and Priorities; 2. Life-Cycle Assessment and Economic Impact; 3. Socio-Economic Studies; 4. Education and Public Awareness; 5. Market Introduction; 7. Regional Activities; 8. The Zero Regio Project. (K). Safety Issues: 1. Vehicle and Infrastructural Safety; 2. Regulations, Codes, Standards and Test

  4. Hydrogen storage behavior of ZrCo1-xNix alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jat, Ram Avtar; Parida, S.C.; Agarwal, Renu; Kulkarni, S.G.

    2012-01-01

    Intermetallic compound ZrCo is proposed as a candidate material for storage, supply and recovery of hydrogen isotopes in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Storage and Delivery System (SDS). However, it has been reported that upon repeated hydriding-dehydriding cycles, ZrCo undergoes disproportionation as per the reaction; 2ZrCo + H 2 ↔ ZrH 2 + ZrCO 2 . This results in reduction in hydrogen storage capacity of ZrCo, which is not a desirable property for SDS. Konishi et al. reported that the disproportionation reaction can be suppressed by decreasing the desorption temperature. It is anticipated that suitable ternary alloying of ZrCo can elevated the hydrogen equilibrium pressure and hence decrease the desorption temperature for supply of 100 kPa of hydrogen. In this study, we have investigated the effect of Ni content on the hydrogenation behavior of ZrCo 1-x Ni x alloys

  5. Hydrogen storage in thin film magnesium-scandium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niessen, R.A. H.; Notten, P.H. L.

    2005-01-01

    Thorough electrochemical materials research has been performed on thin films of novel magnesium-scandium hydrogen storage alloys. It was found that palladium-capped thin films of Mg x Sc (1-x) with different compositions (ranging from x=0.50 -0.90) show an increase in hydrogen storage capacity of more than 5-20% as compared to their bulk equivalents using even higher discharge rates. The maximum reversible hydrogen storage capacity at the optimal composition (Mg 80 Sc 20 ) amounts to 1795-bar mAh/g corresponding to a hydrogen content of 2.05 H/M or 6.7-bar wt.%, which is close to five times that of the commonly used hydride-forming materials in commercial NiMH batteries. Galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT) measurements show that the equilibrium pressure during discharge is lower than that of bulk powders by one order of magnitude (10 -7 -bar mbar versus 10 -6 -bar mbar, respectively)

  6. Feasibility of the hydrogen sulfide test for the assessment of drinking water quality in post-earthquake Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weppelmann, Thomas A; Alam, Meer T; Widmer, Jocelyn; Morrissey, David; Rashid, Mohammed H; De Rochars, Valery M Beau; Morris, J Glenn; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A

    2014-12-01

    In 2010, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti, severely damaging the drinking and wastewater infrastructure and leaving millions homeless. Compounding this problem, the introduction of Vibrio cholerae resulted in a massive cholera outbreak that infected over 700,000 people and threatened the safety of Haiti's drinking water. To mitigate this public health crisis, non-government organizations installed thousands of wells to provide communities with safe drinking water. However, despite increased access, Haiti currently lacks the monitoring capacity to assure the microbial safety of any of its water resources. For these reasons, this study was designed to assess the feasibility of using a simple, low-cost method to detect indicators of fecal contamination of drinking water that could be implemented at the community level. Water samples from 358 sources of drinking water in the Léogâne flood basin were screened with a commercially available hydrogen sulfide test and a standard membrane method for the enumeration of thermotolerant coliforms. When compared with the gold standard method, the hydrogen sulfide test had a sensitivity of 65 % and a specificity of 93 %. While the sensitivity of the assay increased at higher fecal coliform concentrations, it never exceeded 88 %, even with fecal coliform concentrations greater than 100 colony-forming units per 100 ml. While its simplicity makes the hydrogen sulfide test attractive for assessing water quality in low-resource settings, the low sensitivity raises concerns about its use as the sole indicator of the presence or absence of fecal coliforms in individual or community water sources.

  7. Hydrogen determination in magnesium, zirconium, sodium and lithium using installation, C2532

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malikova, E.D.; Velyukhanov, V.P.; Makhinova, L.O.; Kunin, L.L.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques of hydrogen determination in magnesium, lithium, sodium and zirconium using the S 2532 installation are developed. The method of oxidizing melting using lead borate has been used for hydrogen determination in lithium and sodium and the method of vacuum extraction - for hydrogen determination in zirconium and magnesium. Zr and Mg extraction has been carried out in steel reactor at the temperatures of 1000 and 650 deg C, the time of extraction being 30 and 10 minutes respectively. A quartz reactor, temperatures of oxidizing melting of 700-800 deg C, the time of analysis 10 and 20 minutes have been used for sodium and lithium. A possibility to determine volumetric content of hydrogen in magnesium at the existing surface contaminations with hydrogen-containing compounds is shown [ru

  8. Production of hydrogen through the carbonation-calcination reaction applied to CH4/CO2 mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barelli, L.; Bidini, G.; Corradetti, A.; Desideri, U.

    2007-01-01

    The production of hydrogen combined with carbon capture represents a possible option for reducing CO 2 emissions in atmosphere and anthropogenic greenhouse effect. Nowadays the worldwide hydrogen production is based mainly on natural gas reforming, but the attention of the scientific community is focused also on other gas mixtures with significant methane content. In particular mixtures constituted mainly by methane and carbon dioxide are extensively used in energy conversion applications, as they include land-fill gas, digester gas and natural gas. The present paper addresses the development of an innovative system for hydrogen production and CO 2 capture starting from these mixtures. The plant is based on steam methane reforming, coupled with the carbonation and calcination reactions for CO 2 absorption and desorption, respectively. A thermodynamic approach is proposed to investigate the plant performance in relation to the CH 4 content in the feeding gas. The results suggest that, in order to optimize the hydrogen purity and the efficiency, two different methodologies can be adopted involving both the system layout and operating parameters. In particular such methodologies are suitable for a methane content, respectively, higher and lower than 65%

  9. Hydrogenation of carbon to methane in reduced sponge iron, chromium, and ferrochromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, M A; Reeve, D A

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogenation of excess carbon to methane in reduced sponge iron, chromium and ferrochromium under isothermal and temperature-programmed conditions indicates that it is possible to control the residual carbon content of the metallized products which may be an advantage if further processing of the products is contemplated. Hydrogenation starts above 800/sup 0/C and a shrinking-core kinetic model fits the experimental data. The mean apparent activation energy for the hydrogenation of residual carbon to methane in sponge iron, chromium and ferrochromium is 21 kcal/mole.

  10. Modelling of discrete TDS-spectrum of hydrogen desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodchenkova, Natalia I.; Zaika, Yury V.

    2015-12-01

    High concentration of hydrogen in metal leads to hydrogen embrittlement. One of the methods to evaluate the hydrogen content is the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As the sample is heated under vacuumization, atomic hydrogen diffuses inside the bulk and is desorbed from the surface in the molecular form. The extraction curve (measured by a mass-spectrometric analyzer) is recorded. In experiments with monotonous external heating it is observed that background hydrogen fluxes from the extractor walls and fluxes from the sample cannot be reliably distinguished. Thus, the extraction curve is doubtful. Therefore, in this case experimenters use discrete TDS-spectrum: the sample is removed from the analytical part of the device for the specified time interval, and external temperature is then increased stepwise. The paper is devoted to the mathematical modelling and simulation of experimental studies. In the corresponding boundary-value problem with nonlinear dynamic boundary conditions physical- chemical processes in the bulk and on the surface are taken into account: heating of the sample, diffusion in the bulk, hydrogen capture by defects, penetration from the bulk to the surface and desorption. The model aimed to analyze the dynamics of hydrogen concentrations without preliminary artificial sample saturation. Numerical modelling allows to choose the point on the extraction curve that corresponds to the initial quantity of the surface hydrogen, to estimate the values of the activation energies of diffusion, desorption, parameters of reversible capture and hydride phase decomposition.

  11. Modelling of discrete TDS-spectrum of hydrogen desorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodchenkova, Natalia I; Zaika, Yury V

    2015-01-01

    High concentration of hydrogen in metal leads to hydrogen embrittlement. One of the methods to evaluate the hydrogen content is the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As the sample is heated under vacuumization, atomic hydrogen diffuses inside the bulk and is desorbed from the surface in the molecular form. The extraction curve (measured by a mass-spectrometric analyzer) is recorded. In experiments with monotonous external heating it is observed that background hydrogen fluxes from the extractor walls and fluxes from the sample cannot be reliably distinguished. Thus, the extraction curve is doubtful. Therefore, in this case experimenters use discrete TDS-spectrum: the sample is removed from the analytical part of the device for the specified time interval, and external temperature is then increased stepwise. The paper is devoted to the mathematical modelling and simulation of experimental studies. In the corresponding boundary-value problem with nonlinear dynamic boundary conditions physical- chemical processes in the bulk and on the surface are taken into account: heating of the sample, diffusion in the bulk, hydrogen capture by defects, penetration from the bulk to the surface and desorption. The model aimed to analyze the dynamics of hydrogen concentrations without preliminary artificial sample saturation. Numerical modelling allows to choose the point on the extraction curve that corresponds to the initial quantity of the surface hydrogen, to estimate the values of the activation energies of diffusion, desorption, parameters of reversible capture and hydride phase decomposition. (paper)

  12. Adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption of hydrogen with dispersed platinum and platinum-gold catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J.R.; Foger, K.; Breakspere, R.J.

    1979-05-01

    Adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption of hydrogen with dispersed platinum and platinum-gold catalysts was studied with 0.9-3Vertical Bar3< platinum on silica gel, aerosil, sodium and lanthanum Y zeolites, and ..gamma..-alumina, and on aerosil-supported gold-platinum alloys containing 2, 10, 24, 33, and 85Vertical Bar3< gold. Surface enrichment with gold in the alloy systems, as derived from hydrogen adsorption data and predicted from surface enrichment theory and electron microscopic measurements of particle size, were in good agreement, which indicated that equilibrium was achieved by the thermal treatment (oxygen at 573/sup 0/K, hydrogen at 620/sup 0/K, repeated cycles) used. Hydrogen spillover to gold was observed at the higher hydrogen pressures tested on the alloys with high gold content, and to the zeolite supports. The temperature-programed desorption profiles were independent of gold content, which indicated that gold acts only as diluent, and that isolated surface platinum atoms become populated with hydrogen atoms either by hydrogen atom spillover from platinum ensembles to gold and from the gold to the isolated platinum, and/or by adsorption of a molecule directly on the isolated platinum and chemisorption of one H atom at an adjacent gold atom. The distribution of surface platinum ensembles was evaluated by a computer simulation method.

  13. Using advanced oxidation treatment for biofilm inactivation by varying water vapor content in air plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryota, Suganuma; Koichi, Yasuoka

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are caused by environmental degradation in food factories and medical facilities. The inactivation of biofilms involves making them react with chemicals including chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, and ozone, although inactivation using chemicals has a potential problem because of the hazardous properties of the residual substance and hydrogen peroxide, which have slow reaction velocity. We successfully performed an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using air plasma. Hydrogen peroxide and ozone, which were used for the formation of OH radicals in our experiment, were generated by varying the amount of water vapor supplied to the plasma. By varying the content of the water included in the air, the main product was changed from air plasma. When we increased the water content in the air, hydrogen peroxide was produced, while ozone peroxide was produced when we decreased the water content in the air. By varying the amount of water vapor, we realized a 99.9% reduction in the amount of bacteria in the biofilm when we discharged humidified air only. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25630104.

  14. Aims and first assessments of the French hydrogen pathways project HyFrance3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Duigou, Alain [CEA/DEN/DANS/I-Tese, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Quemere, Marie-Marguerite [EDF R et D, Moret sur Loing (France). Dept. EPI; Marion, Pierre [IFP, Rueil Malmaison (FR)] (and others)

    2010-07-01

    The HyFrance Group was originally formed in France to support the European project HyWays, by providing (former projects HyFrance1 and HyFrance2) the French data and possible hydrogen pathways according to national specificities. HyFrance3 is a new project that focuses on the economic competitiveness of different steps of the hydrogen chain, from the production to end usage, at the time horizon of 2030 in France. The project is coordinated by CEA with the other partners being: ADEME (co-funding), AFH2, CNRS, IFP, Air Liquide, EdF, GdF Suez, TOTAL, ALPHEA. The project is divided into 4 sub-projects, that address present and future French hydrogen industrial markets for chemical and refinery uses, the analysis of the interplay between wind energy production and storage of hydrogen for different automotive requirements (refuelling stations, BtL plants, H2/NG mix), massive hydrogen storage to balance various offer and demand characteristics, and the supply network (pipeline option competitiveness vs. trucked in supply) to distribute hydrogen in a French region for automotive applications. Technical and economical issues, as well as GHG emissions, are addressed. (orig.)

  15. Tetrahydroborates: Development and Potential as Hydrogen Storage Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Puszkiel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of fossil fuels as an energy supply becomes increasingly problematic from the point of view of both environmental emissions and energy sustainability. As an alternative, hydrogen is widely regarded as a key element for a potential energy solution. However, different from fossil fuels such as oil, gas, and coal, the production of hydrogen requires energy. Alternative and intermittent renewable sources such as solar power, wind power, etc., present multiple advantages for the production of hydrogen. On one hand, the renewable sources contribute to a remarkable reduction of pollutants released to the air. On the other hand, they significantly enhance the sustainability of energy supply. In addition, the storage of energy in form of hydrogen has a huge potential to balance an effective and synergetic utilization of the renewable energy sources. In this regard, hydrogen storage technology presents a key roadblock towards the practical application of hydrogen as “energy carrier”. Among the methods available to store hydrogen, solid-state storage is the most attractive alternative both from the safety and the volumetric energy density points of view. Because of their appealing hydrogen content, complex hydrides and complex hydride-based systems have attracted considerable attention as potential energy vectors for mobile and stationary applications. In this review, the progresses made over the last century on the development in the synthesis and research on the decomposition reactions of homoleptic tetrahydroborates is summarized. Furthermore, theoretical and experimental investigations on the thermodynamic and kinetic tuning of tetrahydroborates for hydrogen storage purposes are herein reviewed.

  16. Methodology and consistency of slant and vertical assessments for ionospheric electron content models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pajares, Manuel; Roma-Dollase, David; Krankowski, Andrzej; García-Rigo, Alberto; Orús-Pérez, Raül

    2017-12-01

    A summary of the main concepts on global ionospheric map(s) [hereinafter GIM(s)] of vertical total electron content (VTEC), with special emphasis on their assessment, is presented in this paper. It is based on the experience accumulated during almost two decades of collaborative work in the context of the international global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) service (IGS) ionosphere working group. A representative comparison of the two main assessments of ionospheric electron content models (VTEC-altimeter and difference of Slant TEC, based on independent global positioning system data GPS, dSTEC-GPS) is performed. It is based on 26 GPS receivers worldwide distributed and mostly placed on islands, from the last quarter of 2010 to the end of 2016. The consistency between dSTEC-GPS and VTEC-altimeter assessments for one of the most accurate IGS GIMs (the tomographic-kriging GIM `UQRG' computed by UPC) is shown. Typical error RMS values of 2 TECU for VTEC-altimeter and 0.5 TECU for dSTEC-GPS assessments are found. And, as expected by following a simple random model, there is a significant correlation between both RMS and specially relative errors, mainly evident when large enough number of observations per pass is considered. The authors expect that this manuscript will be useful for new analysis contributor centres and in general for the scientific and technical community interested in simple and truly external ways of validating electron content models of the ionosphere.

  17. Assessing the effects of hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, Augusto Ricardo; de Leão Withers, Eduardo Henrique; Grando, Karlos Giovani; Ambrosio, Aldrieli Regina; Shimizu, Roberto Hideo; Melo, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Tooth bleaching is, today, one of the most widespread cosmetic treatments in dental practice,  so it is important to determine whether it can interfere with orthodontic bonding or not. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Forty-five upper bicuspids were divided into three groups (n = 15). In the control Group (C), the brackets were bonded without previous bleaching treatment. Group 1 (G1) was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent 24 h before bracket bonding. Group 2 was also bleached, and the brackets were bonded after 30 days. The shear bond strength of the brackets was measured using an EMIC machine, and the results were analyzed by ANOVA. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups (P > 0.05), with Group C showing a mean bond strength of 9.72 ± 2.63 MPa, G1 of 8.09 ± 2.63 MPa, and G2 of 11.15 ± 4.42 MPa. It was possible to conclude that 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent does not affect the shear strength of orthodontic brackets bonded 24 h and 30 days after bleaching.

  18. Draft test plan for hydrogen getters project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mroz, G.; Weinrach, J.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen levels in many transuranic (TRU) waste drums are above the compliance threshold, therefore deeming the drums non-shippable to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hydrogen getters (alkynes and dialkynes) are known to react irreversibly with hydrogen in the presence of certain catalysts. The primary purpose of this investigation is to ascertain the effectiveness of a hydrogen getter in an environment that contains gaseous compounds commonly found in the headspace of drums containing TRU waste. It is not known whether the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly found in the headspace of TRU waste drums will inhibit (poison) the effectiveness of the hydrogen getter. The results of this study will be used to assess the feasibility of a hydrogen-getter system, which is capable of removing hydrogen from the payload containers or the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) inner containment vessel to increase the quantity of TRU waste that can be shipped to the WIPP

  19. Fire risk assessment for hydrogen at EDG/battery room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, Moon Hak; Hong, Sung Yull; Choi, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hyun Jong; Park, Kyung Hyum [Korea electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jin Bae [KHNP, Wolsong (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    At the design stage of Nuclear Power Plant, the fire hazard analysis for the fire zone or compartment is implemented according to the fire protection requirement and the document is required for the licensing approval. On the basis of fire hazard analysis, the evaluation for the safe shutdown capability is preceded for each fire zone that contains safety-important systems and facilities. The primary philosophy for the fire safety is to secure fire defense-in-depth at Nuclear Power Plants that represents fire prevention, fire protection, and mitigation from fire damage. One of the concerning fire zones that need quantitative fire hazard analysis as well as qualitative fire evaluation at Nuclear Power Plants is the battery room at Emergency Diesel Generator (EDG) Room. For an example, Emergency Power Supply System called as EPS at Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant generates emergency power and supply the electric power to the safety-related systems and essential facilities during the loss of on-site and off-site AC power. For the start of emergency power generator, it needs DC power from the battery units inside the EPS room. For the emergency supply of DC power, the battery at EPS room should be recharged during the standby period to compensate the reduced chemical energy that was converted to the electric energy or depleted through the natural process. During the recharge process, especially at the time of charging current becoming greater than the nominal floating current or at the time of over-charging period, the hydrogen and the oxygen are generated from the positive plate and cathodic part respectively and escaped through the vent holes or crevices. In this context, the fire hazard assessment should be done for the EPS/battery room with quantitative approach and the fire safety evaluation for the explosion of hydrogen gas must be done under the specific fire protection program at Nuclear Power Plants.

  20. Fire risk assessment for hydrogen at EDG/battery room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Moon Hak; Hong, Sung Yull; Choi, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hyun Jong; Park, Kyung Hyum; Song, Jin Bae

    2004-01-01

    At the design stage of Nuclear Power Plant, the fire hazard analysis for the fire zone or compartment is implemented according to the fire protection requirement and the document is required for the licensing approval. On the basis of fire hazard analysis, the evaluation for the safe shutdown capability is preceded for each fire zone that contains safety-important systems and facilities. The primary philosophy for the fire safety is to secure fire defense-in-depth at Nuclear Power Plants that represents fire prevention, fire protection, and mitigation from fire damage. One of the concerning fire zones that need quantitative fire hazard analysis as well as qualitative fire evaluation at Nuclear Power Plants is the battery room at Emergency Diesel Generator (EDG) Room. For an example, Emergency Power Supply System called as EPS at Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant generates emergency power and supply the electric power to the safety-related systems and essential facilities during the loss of on-site and off-site AC power. For the start of emergency power generator, it needs DC power from the battery units inside the EPS room. For the emergency supply of DC power, the battery at EPS room should be recharged during the standby period to compensate the reduced chemical energy that was converted to the electric energy or depleted through the natural process. During the recharge process, especially at the time of charging current becoming greater than the nominal floating current or at the time of over-charging period, the hydrogen and the oxygen are generated from the positive plate and cathodic part respectively and escaped through the vent holes or crevices. In this context, the fire hazard assessment should be done for the EPS/battery room with quantitative approach and the fire safety evaluation for the explosion of hydrogen gas must be done under the specific fire protection program at Nuclear Power Plants

  1. Transition to a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus fleet for Canadian urban transit system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducharme, P.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The Canadian Transportation Fuel Cell Alliance (CTFCA), created by the Canadian Government as part of its 2000 Climate Change Action Plan, has commissioned MARCON-DDM's Hydrogen Intervention Team (HIT) to provide a roadmap for urban transit systems that wish to move to hydrogen fuel cell-powered bus fleets. HIT is currently in the process of gathering information from hydrogen technology providers, bus manufacturers, fuelling system providers and urban transit systems in Canada, the US and Europe. In September, HIT will be in a position to provide a preview of its report to the CTFCA, due for October 2004. The planned table of contents includes: TOMORROW'S FUEL CELL (FC) URBAN TRANSIT BUS - Powertrain, on-board fuel technologies - FC engine system manufacturers - Bus technical specifications, performances, operating characteristics - FC bus manufacturers TOMORROW'S FC TRANSIT PROPERTY - Added maintenance, facilities and fuelling infrastructure requirements - Supply chain implications - Environmental and safety issues - Alternative operational concepts PATHWAYS TO THE FUTURE - Choosing the future operational concept - 'Gap' assessment - how long from here to there? - Facilities and fleet adjustments, including fuelling infrastructure - Risk mitigation, code compliance measures TRANSITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS - Cost implications - Transition schedule (author)

  2. Rapid assessment of water pollution by airborne measurement of chlorophyll content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvesen, J. C.; Weaver, E. C.; Millard, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Present techniques of airborne chlorophyll measurement are discussed as an approach to water pollution assessment. The differential radiometer, the chlorophyll correlation radiometer, and an infrared radiometer for water temperature measurements are described as the key components of the equipment. Also covered are flight missions carried out to evaluate the capability of the chlorophyll correlation radiometer in measuring the chlorophyll content in water bodies with widely different levels of nutrients, such as fresh-water lakes of high and low eutrophic levels, marine waters of high and low productivity, and an estuary with a high sediment content. The feasibility and usefulness of these techniques are indicated.

  3. Content and Alignment of State Writing Standards and Assessments as Predictors of Student Writing Achievement: An Analysis of 2007 National Assessment of Educational Progress Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troia, Gary A.; Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Zhang, Mingcai; Wilson, Joshua; Stewart, Kelly A.; Mo, Ya; Hawkins, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    We examined the degree to which content of states' writing standards and assessments (using measures of content range, frequency, balance, and cognitive complexity) and their alignment were related to student writing achievement on the 2007 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), while controlling for student, school, and state…

  4. Radiation Shielding Materials Containing Hydrogen, Boron, and Nitrogen: Systematic Computational and Experimental Study. Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Sheila A.; Fay, Catharine C.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Earle, Kevin D.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kang, Jin Ho; Park, Cheol; McMullen, Amelia M.

    2012-01-01

    The key objectives of this study are to investigate, both computationally and experimentally, which forms, compositions, and layerings of hydrogen, boron, and nitrogen containing materials will offer the greatest shielding in the most structurally robust combination against galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), secondary neutrons, and solar energetic particles (SEP). The objectives and expected significance of this research are to develop a space radiation shielding materials system that has high efficacy for shielding radiation and that also has high strength for load bearing primary structures. Such a materials system does not yet exist. The boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) can theoretically be processed into structural BNNT and used for load bearing structures. Furthermore, the BNNT can be incorporated into high hydrogen polymers and the combination used as matrix reinforcement for structural composites. BNNT's molecular structure is attractive for hydrogen storage and hydrogenation. There are two methods or techniques for introducing hydrogen into BNNT: (1) hydrogen storage in BNNT, and (2) hydrogenation of BNNT (hydrogenated BNNT). In the hydrogen storage method, nanotubes are favored to store hydrogen over particles and sheets because they have much larger surface areas and higher hydrogen binding energy. The carbon nanotube (CNT) and BNNT have been studied as potentially outstanding hydrogen storage materials since 1997. Our study of hydrogen storage in BNNT - as a function of temperature, pressure, and hydrogen gas concentration - will be performed with a hydrogen storage chamber equipped with a hydrogen generator. The second method of introducing hydrogen into BNNT is hydrogenation of BNNT, where hydrogen is covalently bonded onto boron, nitrogen, or both. Hydrogenation of BN and BNNT has been studied theoretically. Hyper-hydrogenated BNNT has been theoretically predicted with hydrogen coverage up to 100% of the individual atoms. This is a higher hydrogen content

  5. (MnH9)2- salts with high hydrogen contents and unusual bonding: Density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Michèle; Gupta, Raju P.; Singh, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The compounds BaReH9 and K2ReH9 are the prototypical members of a family of hydrides described as salts of (ReH9)2- anions. The structures reflect highly unusual chemistry with short H-H distances and at the same time very high ninefold coordination of Re by hydrogen atoms. This is of interest because of the resulting high hydrogen-to-metal ratios, 4.5 in BaReH9 and 3 in K2ReH9 . Here we use density functional calculations to investigate possible new members of this family including both Re and Mn compounds. We find that although SrReH9 and CaReH9 have not been synthesized these are very likely to be stable compounds that may be prepared in a similar manner as the Ba analog. We also find that the manganese counterparts, including K2MnH9 , are also likely to be stable and have thermodynamic properties consistent with requirements for hydrogen storage.

  6. Is there room for hydrogen in energy transition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeker, Etienne

    2014-08-01

    As Germany decided to use hydrogen to store huge quantities of renewable energies, this report aims at assessing the opportunities associated with hydrogen in the context of energy transition. The author addresses the various techniques and technologies of hydrogen production, and proposes a prospective economic analysis of these processes: steam reforming, alkaline electrolysis, polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) electrolysis, and other processes still at R and D level. He gives an overview of existing and potential uses of hydrogen in industry, in energy storage (power-to-gas, power-to-power, methanation) and in mobility (hydrogen-mobility could be a response to hydrocarbon shortage, but the cost is still very high, and issues like hydrogen distribution must be addressed), and also evokes their emergence potential

  7. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  8. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  9. Roughness effects on the hydrogen signal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, W.; Bousquet, B.; Lasue, J.

    2017-01-01

    On Mars, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) as performed by the ChemCam instrument can be used to measure the hydrogen content of targets in situ, under a low pressure CO2 atmosphere. However, unexpected variations observed in the Martian dataset suggest an effect related to target...... to hydrogen, as other emission lines in the spectra are not affected. The increase of the signal could be related to an addition of hydrogen to the plasma due to interaction with the surrounding target surface, yet the exact physical process to explain such effect remains to be identified. More generally...

  10. Mechanical test of E110 cladding material oxidized in hydrogen rich steam atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windberg, P.; Perez-Fero, E.

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of the fuel cladding under accidental conditions has been studied at the AEKI for more than a decade. Earlier, the effect of oxygen and hydrogen content on the mechanical properties was studied separately. The present experiments can help to understand what kind of processes took place in the cleaning tank at Paks NPP (2003). The purpose of our experiments was to investigate high temperature oxidation of E110 cladding in steam + hydrogen mixture. A high temperature tube furnace was used for oxidation of the samples. The oxidation was carried out at three different temperatures (900 0 C, 1000 0 C, 1100 0 C). The hydrogen content in the steam was varied between 19-36 vol%. The oxygen content of the sample was defined as oxidation ratio. Two sizes (length: 2 and 8 mm) of cladding rings and 100 mm long E110 cladding tubes were oxidized. After the oxidation we made compression and tensile tests for rings, and ballooning experiments for 100 mm long tube. The most important conclusions were the following. Oxidation in H-rich steam atmosphere need longer time to get the same oxidation ratio compared to the steam oxidation without hydrogen. The shorter oxidation time results in a more compact oxide layer. The longer oxidation time leads to a cracked oxide layer. (author)

  11. Five Big, Big Five Issues : Rationale, Content, Structure, Status, and Crosscultural Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raad, Boele

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses the rationale, content, structure, status, and crosscultural assessment of the Big Five trait factors, focusing on topics of dispute and misunderstanding. Taxonomic restrictions of the original Big Five forerunner, the "Norman Five," are discussed, and criticisms regarding the

  12. Effect of the 718 alloy metallurgical status on hydrogen embrittlement; Effet de l'etat metallurgique de l'alliage 718 sur la fragilisation par l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvano, F.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, Ch.; Odemer, G.; Ter-Ovanessian, B.; Cocheteau, N.; Holstein, A.; Reboul, Ch. [Universite de Toulouse, CIRIMAT, UPS/CNRS/INPT, 31 - Toulouse (France); Clouez, J.M. [AREVA NP 69 - Lyon (France)

    2010-03-15

    The Inconel 718 is a nickel superalloy which is widely used in the nuclear industry, but is sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement induced by corrosion and stress corrosion cracking phenomena, and by the presence of dissolved hydrogen in pressurized water reactor environments. As this alloy is hardened by precipitation of different intermetallic phases, it appeared that the presence of these precipitates has a strong influence on the hydrogen embrittlement. The authors report the study of the nature and effect of the different traps (intermetallic phases, carbides or their interfaces) on the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of the 718 alloy, and more particularly on the observed failure modes. Experiments are performed on tensile samples in which hydrogen content can be measured. The type and grain size of the observed microstructures are given with respect with the thermal treatment, as well as the mechanical properties with or without hydrogen loading

  13. Information needs and instrumentation for hydrogen control and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gun Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Lee, Seung Dong; Lee, Jin Yong [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jae, Moo Sung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    In this study we examined instrument information, which is related to the severe accident management, guidance. We also examined the hydrogen control and management strategy. Hydrogen control occupies and important part in severe accident management and adequate hydrogen control strategy i needed to maintain the plant integrity. Reducing containment hydrogen during a severe accident will mitigate a potential containment failure mechanism. One of the hydrogen control strategies os intentional burning by the hydrogen igniter. Though intentional hydrogen burn strategy may cause pressure and temperature spikes, which are adverse effects, it si the fastest way of reducing the containment hydrogen concentration. From the Ulchin 3 and 4 plant information we developed a simple hydrogen ignition decision tree. And from the information of decision tree, hydrogen ignition decision can be determined in Containment Event Tree (CET). The end branch values in the CET are hydrogen concentrations, which will be used to assess the accident management measure.

  14. Information needs and instrumentation for hydrogen control and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gun Chul; Suh, Kune Y.; Lee, Seung Dong; Lee, Jin Yong; Jae, Moo Sung

    2000-03-01

    In this study we examined instrument information, which is related to the severe accident management, guidance. We also examined the hydrogen control and management strategy. Hydrogen control occupies and important part in severe accident management and adequate hydrogen control strategy i needed to maintain the plant integrity. Reducing containment hydrogen during a severe accident will mitigate a potential containment failure mechanism. One of the hydrogen control strategies os intentional burning by the hydrogen igniter. Though intentional hydrogen burn strategy may cause pressure and temperature spikes, which are adverse effects, it si the fastest way of reducing the containment hydrogen concentration. From the Ulchin 3 and 4 plant information we developed a simple hydrogen ignition decision tree. And from the information of decision tree, hydrogen ignition decision can be determined in Containment Event Tree (CET). The end branch values in the CET are hydrogen concentrations, which will be used to assess the accident management measure

  15. Errors in the calculation of sub-soil moisture probe by equivalent moisture content technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshmipathy, A.V.; Gangadharan, P.

    1982-01-01

    The size of the soil sample required to obtain the saturation response, with a neutron moisture probe is quite large and this poses practical problems of handling and mixing large amounts of samples for absolute laboratory calibration. Hydrogenous materials are used as a substitute for water in the equivalent moisture content technique, for calibration of soil moisture probes. In this it is assumed that only hydrogen of the bulk sample is responsible for the slowing down of fast neutrons and the slow neutron countrate is correlated to equivalent water content by considering the hydrogen density of sample. It is observed that the higher atomic number elements present in water equivalent media also affect the response of the soil moisture probe. Hence calculations, as well as experiments, were undertaken to know the order of error introduced by this technique. The thermal and slow neutron flux distribution around the BF 3 counter of a sub-soil moisture probe is calculated using three group diffusion theory. The response of the probe corresponding to different equivalent moisture content of hydrogenous media, is calculated taking into consideration the effective length of BF 3 counter. Soil with hydrogenous media such as polyethylene, sugar and water are considered for calculation, to verify the suitability of these materials as substitute for water during calibration of soil moisture probe. Experiments were conducted, to verify the theoretically calculated values. (author)

  16. Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

  17. Defect studies of ZnO single crystals electrochemically doped with hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čížek, J.; Žaludová, N.; Vlach, M.; Daniš, S.; Kuriplach, J.; Procházka, I.; Brauer, G.; Anwand, W.; Grambole, D.; Skorupa, W.; Gemma, R.; Kirchheim, R.; Pundt, A.

    2008-03-01

    Various defect studies of hydrothermally grown (0001) oriented ZnO crystals electrochemically doped with hydrogen are presented. The hydrogen content in the crystals is determined by nuclear reaction analysis and it is found that already 0.3at.% H exists in chemically bound form in the virgin ZnO crystals. A single positron lifetime of 182ps is detected in the virgin crystals and attributed to saturated positron trapping at Zn vacancies surrounded by hydrogen atoms. It is demonstrated that a very high amount of hydrogen (up to ˜30at.%) can be introduced into the crystals by electrochemical doping. More than half of this amount is chemically bound, i.e., incorporated into the ZnO crystal lattice. This drastic increase of the hydrogen concentration is of marginal impact on the measured positron lifetime, whereas a contribution of positrons annihilated by electrons belonging to O-H bonds formed in the hydrogen doped crystal is found in coincidence Doppler broadening spectra. The formation of hexagonal shape pyramids on the surface of the hydrogen doped crystals by optical microscopy is observed and discussed.

  18. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of oxygenated and unsaturated organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, James E.; Lam, Chun Ho; Saffron, Christopher M.; Miller, Dennis J.

    2018-04-24

    A process and related electrode composition are disclosed for the electrocatalytic hydrogenation and/or hydrodeoxygenation of organic substrates such as biomass-derived bio-oil components by the production of hydrogen atoms on a catalyst surface followed by the reaction of the hydrogen atoms with the organic reactants. Biomass fast pyrolysis-derived bio-oil is a liquid mixture containing hundreds of organic compounds with chemical functionalities that are corrosive to container materials and are prone to polymerization. A high surface area skeletal metal catalyst material such as Raney Nickel can be used as the cathode. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation and/or hydrodeoxygenation convert the organic substrates under mild conditions to reduce coke formation and catalyst deactivation. The process converts oxygen-containing functionalities and unsaturated bonds into chemically reduced forms with an increased hydrogen content. The process is operated at mild conditions, which enables it to be a good means for stabilizing bio-oil to a form that can be stored and transported using metal containers and pipes.

  19. Effect of the hydrogen concentration on the ductility of Zry-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domizzi, G.; Ovejero Garcia, J.

    1996-01-01

    After many years in service, zirconium alloys employed in nuclear reactors may reach high contents of hydride particles, exceeding the hydrogen solid solubility at the service temperature. The brittle character of zirconium hydride promotes the alloy embrittlement. In order to predict the critical hydrogen concentration which causes a ductile-brittle transition in a Zry-4 foil, 0.02mm thick, tensile test specimens were hydride by gaseous charging. To obtain uniform hydride distribution the specimens were electroplated with a film of copper prior to gaseous charge. In absence of oxide film, the foils retained its ductility up to high hydrogen concentration (950 Og/g). The critical hydrogen concentration was attained at 2900-3100 Og/g. (author). 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David L Block; Ali T-Raissi

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the activities and results from 36 hydrogen research projects being conducted over a four-year period by Florida universities for the U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The program entitled 'NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities' is managed by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). FSEC has 22 years of experience in conducting research in areas related to hydrogen technologies and fuel cells. The R and D activities under this program cover technology areas related to production, cryogenics, sensors, storage, separation processes, fuel cells, resource assessments and education. (authors)

  1. Designing Cognitively Diagnostic Assessment for Algebraic Content Knowledge and Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhidong

    2018-01-01

    This study explored a diagnostic assessment method that emphasized the cognitive process of algebra learning. The study utilized a design and a theory-driven model to examine the content knowledge. Using the theory driven model, the thinking skills of algebra learning was also examined. A Bayesian network model was applied to represent the theory…

  2. Fiscal 1975 Sunshine Project research report. General research on hydrogen energy subsystems and their peripheral technologies (Research on hydrogen combustion technology); 1975 nendo suiso nensho gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-03-01

    This research mainly aims at establishment of various conditions necessary for using hydrogen fuel. The research includes (1) properties of hydrogen-methane mixture gas, and the proposal to future R and D, (2) extraction of various problems in practical use of home or industrial combustors, and evaluation of existing technologies, (3) the environmental impact of hydrogen fuel and its reduction measures, and (4) estimation of energy structures in cities and placing of hydrogen fuel in 2000. Detailed study items are as follows. In (1), general and proper combustion characteristics of and combustion technology for hydrogen- methane mixture system. In (2), problems for every use of various gas equipment, application of various gas equipment to hydrogen, peripheral technologies, conversion from natural gas, problems of heating furnaces and hydrogen burners, combustion safety/control equipment for various combustors, water content recovery combustion system, hydrogen embrittlement, and sealing. In (3), NO{sub x} generation in hydrogen combustion and its reduction measures. In (4), problems in introduction of a hydrogen-electric power energy system to an assumed model city in 2000. (NEDO)

  3. Hydrogen behaviour in PWR containment evaluated with MAAP4.0.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilic-Zabric, T.; Basic, I.; Spiler, J.

    2004-01-01

    The possible impacts of the non-uniform hydrogen distribution and the consequent fast burning should be assessed in the light of newer research information on hydrogen management. The review should include the hydrogen source term, both for the in-vessel and ex-vessel period, and investigate the potential effects on the hydrogen management strategy. NPP Krsko will repeat MAAP 4.0.5 calculation for the most important Rx vessel failure sequences taken from Individual Plant Examination Project (with molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) and with no MCCI) including wet cavity strategy. Mass and energy gases releases of analyzed sequences will be used to assess the non-uniform hydrogen distribution and the consequent fast burning by GOTHIC 7.1 (3-D).(author)

  4. The scope for generating bio-oils with relatively low oxygen contents via hydropyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, J.D. [Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom). Dept. of Pure and Applied Chemistry; Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil). Dept. Fisica Aplicada; Luengo, C.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil). Dept. Fisica Aplicada; Snape, C.E. [Strathclyde Univ., Glasgow (United Kingdom). Dept. of Pure and Applied Chemistry

    1999-07-01

    The primary oils obtained in high yields from fast (fluidised-bed) pyrolysis of biomass generally have high oxygen contents (ca. 40% w/w). The scope for using pyrolysis under hydrogen pressure (hydropyrolysis), to give oils with much lower oxygen contents compared to normal pyrolysis has been investigated. Fixed-bed hydropyrolysis tests have been conducted on cellulose, sugar cane bagasse and eucalyptus wood using hydrogen pressures up to 10 MPa, with heating rates of 5 and 300{sup o}C min{sup -1}. A colloidal FeS catalyst was used in some tests (Fe loading of 5%, w/w) to increase overall conversions. Further, the attractive option of using a two-stage reactor in which the primary oil vapors are passed though a bed of hydrotreating catalyst is also described. Raising the hydrogen pressure from atmospheric to 10 MPa reduced the oxygen content of the primary oil by over 10% to below 20% w/w. The addition of a dispersed iron sulphide catalyst gave conversions close to 100% for all three biomass samples investigated at 10 MPa under conditions in the fixed-bed reactor where significant diffusional resistances existed and reduced the oxygen content of the bio-oil by a further 10%. Although NMR indicated that the oils became increasingly aromatic as more oxygen was removed, the increase in hydrogen pressure decreased the extent of overall aromatisation that occurs primarily due to the lower char yields obtained. In two-stage tests for cellulose, using a commercial sulphided Ni/Mo {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst at 400{sup o}C, increasing the hydrogen pressure from 2.5 to 10 MPa decreased the oxygen content of the oil by over 20% to 10% w/w. The H/C ratios were higher and O/C ratios smaller for the two-stage bio-oils compared to their single stage counterparts. However, the differences in the O/C ratios between the single and two-stage bio-oils increase with pressure. (author)

  5. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  6. Development of Criteria for Flameholding Tendencies within Premixer Passages for High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Elliot Sullivan- [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); McDonell, Vincent G. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Due to increasingly stringent air quality requirements stationary power gas turbines have moved to lean-premixed operation, which reduces pollutant emissions but can result in flashback. Flashback can cause serious damage to the premixer hardware. Curtailing flashback can be difficult with hydrocarbon fuels and becomes even more challenging when hydrogen is used as the fuel. The two main approaches for coping with flashback are either to design a combustor that is resistant to flashback, or to design a premixer that will not anchor a flame if flashback occurs. Even with a well-designed combustor flashback can occur under certain circumstances, thus it is necessary to determine how to avoid flameholding within the premixer passageways of a gas turbine. To this end, an experiment was designed that would determine the flameholding propensities at elevated pressures and temperatures of three different classes of geometric features commonly found in gas turbine premixers, with both natural gas and hydrogen fuel. Experiments to find the equivalence ratio at blow off were conducted within an optically accessible test apparatus with four flameholders: 0.25 and 0.50 inch diameter cylinders, a reverse facing step with a height of 0.25 inches, and a symmetric airfoil with a thickness of 0.25 inches and a chord length of one inch. Tests were carried out at temperatures between 300 K and 750 K, at pressures up to 9 atmospheres. Typical bulk velocities were between 40 and 100 m/s. The effect of airfoil’s angle of rotation was also investigated. Blow off for hydrogen flames was found to occur at much lower adiabatic flame temperatures than natural gas flames. Additionally it was observed that at high pressures and high turbulence intensities, reactant velocity does not have a noticeable effect on the point of blow off due in large part to corresponding increases in turbulent flame speed. Finally a semi empirical correlation was developed that predicts flame extinction for both

  7. Destructive hydrogenation of carbonaceous materials, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-02-15

    A process is described for the destructive hydrogenation continuously of solid and infusible carbonaceous substances, consisting of heating the charge to the same temperature as the added hydrogen, under a pressure essentially equal to that of the reaction, from the first to at least 300/sup 0/C, but not more than 440/sup 0/C, while passing the heated charge through a zone the contents of which are equal to about 20 per cent to 40 per cent of that of the reaction space, maintaining the charge for a certain time at the temperature without sensible change in the pressure, then reheating the charge to at least the temperature to prime the reaction and finally to introduce the charge into the reaction space.

  8. Hydrogenation upgrading of heavy oil residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krichko, A.A.; Maloletnev, A.S.; Mazneva, O.A.; Galkina, N.I. [Fossil Fuel Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). Hydrogenation and Gasification Dept.; Suvorov, U.P.; Khadjiev, S.N. [Inst. Oil and Chemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation). Hydrogenation of Heavy Residues Dept.

    1997-12-31

    At present time in the world there is no simple and effective technology at low pressure (<15-20 MPa) which could give the opportunity to use oil residues for distillate fractions production. In Russia a process for hydrogenation (up 6 MPa hydrogen pressure) of high boiling point (b.p. >520 C) oil products, including high S, V and Ni contents ones, into distillates, feedstock for catalytic cracking (b.p. 360-520 C) and metal concentrates. The main point of the new process is as follows: the water solution of catalytic additive, for which purpose water soluble metal salts of VI-VIII groups are used, is mixed with heavy oil residues, dispersed and then subjected to additional supercavitation in a special apparatus. (orig.)

  9. The Pediatrics Milestones Assessment Pilot: Development of Workplace-Based Assessment Content, Instruments, and Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Patricia J; Margolis, Melissa; Poynter, Sue E; Chaffinch, Christa; Tenney-Soeiro, Rebecca; Turner, Teri L; Waggoner-Fountain, Linda; Lockridge, Robin; Clyman, Stephen G; Schwartz, Alan

    2016-05-01

    To report on the development of content and user feedback regarding the assessment process and utility of the workplace-based assessment instruments of the Pediatrics Milestones Assessment Pilot (PMAP). One multisource feedback instrument and two structured clinical observation instruments were developed and refined by experts in pediatrics and assessment to provide evidence for nine competencies based on the Pediatrics Milestones (PMs) and chosen to inform residency program faculty decisions about learners' readiness to serve as pediatric interns in the inpatient setting. During the 2012-2013 PMAP study, 18 U.S. pediatric residency programs enrolled interns and subinterns. Faculty, residents, nurses, and other observers used the instruments to assess learner performance through direct observation during a one-month rotation. At the end of the rotation, data were aggregated for each learner, milestone levels were assigned using a milestone classification form, and feedback was provided to learners. Learners and site leads were surveyed and/or interviewed about their experience as participants. Across the sites, 2,338 instruments assessing 239 learners were completed by 630 unique observers. Regarding end-of-rotation feedback, 93% of learners (128/137) agreed the assessments and feedback "helped me understand how those with whom I work perceive my performance," and 85% (117/137) agreed they were "useful for constructing future goals or identifying a developmental path." Site leads identified several benefits and challenges to the assessment process. PM-based instruments used in workplace-based assessment provide a meaningful and acceptable approach to collecting evidence of learner competency development. Learners valued feedback provided by PM-based assessment.

  10. IEA Hydrogen Implementing Agreement's Second Generation R and D and the Hydrogen Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, N.; Garcia-Conde, A. G.; Riis, T. U.; Luzzi, A.; Valladares, M. R. de

    2005-07-01

    Since its creation by the International Energy Agency in the late 1970's, the IEA Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) has been at the forefront of collaborative international hydrogen research and development (R and D) (http://www.ieahia.org. ) The collective body of HIA hydrogen R and D will contribute to definition of the hydrogen economy. The five-year [2004-2009) mission of the IEA HIA is to advance the adoption of a Hydrogen Economy through strategic implementation of collaborative R and D and outreach programs that address key issues and barriers. The three goals for the Second Generation HIA are: Advancement of science and technology via pre-commercial collaborative RD and D programs; Assessment of market environment, including the non-energy sector; and Implementation of outreach program, aimed at community acceptance and support. The HIA launched its Second Generation of hydrogen R and D in the latter part of 2004. The HIA's anniversary report: In Pursuit of the Future: 25 Years of IEA Research towards the realization of Hydrogen Energy Systems (http://ieahia.org/pdfs/IEA_AnniversaryReport_HIA.pdf) chronicles its contributions to hydrogen R and D. As the hydrogen economy takes shape, the HIA is pleased to share highlights of its R and D history together with progress on planned activities and its six current annexes, listed below: Task 15 Photobiological Production of Hydrogen Task 16 Hydrogen from Carbon-Containing Materials Task 17 Solid and Liquid Storage Task 18 Integrated Systems Evaluation Task 19 Safety Task 20 Hydrogen from Waterphotolysis Planned successor annexes in storage and photobiological hydrogen production will also be discussed, along with a task on high temperature hydrogen production that is now in the definition phase. Over 250 experts from the sixteen member HIA countries and the European Union contribute to this portfolio of cutting edge hydrogen R and D and analysis activities. Several other countries are expected to

  11. Radon contents in groundwater and the uncertainty related to risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Masami [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    The United States has proposed 11 Bq/l (300 pCi/l) as the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) of radon. Japan has not set up the standards for drinking water. The problems about evaluation of effects of radon on organism and MCLs of radon in groundwater and drinking water in 12 countries were reported. The local area content the high concentrations of radon, but generally it`s low levels were observed in Nigeria, China and Mexico. The countries which content high concentration of radon were Greek, Slovakia, Bornholm Island and Scotland. There are high and low concentration area in US and Japan. I proposed an uncertainty scheme on risk assessment for the exposure by radon. (S.Y.)

  12. Hydrogen: Adding Value and Flexibility to the Nuclear Power Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Bhatt, V.; Friley, P.; Horak, W.; Reisman, A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess potential synergies between the hydrogen economy and nuclear energy options. Specifically: to provide a market analysis of advanced nuclear energy options for hydrogen production in growing hydrogen demand; to conduct an impact evaluation of nuclear-based hydrogen production on the economics of the energy system, environmental emissions, and energy supply security; and to identify competing technologies and challenges to nuclear options

  13. Study of hydrogenation of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-y}Ga{sub y} by means of X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresiak, A.; Uhlemann, M.; Kubis, M.; Gebel, B.; Mattern, N.; Mueller, K.-H. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany)

    2000-06-06

    The hydrogenation process of Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17-y}Ga{sub y}(y=0-2) was studied. X-ray investigations show a decreasing hydrogen solubility in the intermetallic alloy with increasing Ga-content from 4.0{+-}0.3 atoms per formula unit for Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} to 2.85{+-}0.05 for Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Ga{sub 2}. The larger Ga atoms reduce the size of the interstitial sites and thereby the maximum hydrogen concentration is decreased. The behaviour of the lattice parameters a and c with increasing Ga content points to a changed hydrogen distribution on the interstitial sites, becoming more statistical. In situ observations by means of high temperature X-ray diffraction show that the hydrogen absorption process is diffusion controlled. The hydrogen absorption starts at an annealing temperature of 120-140 C in all cases. The solubility of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperature. The hydrogen is completely desorbed above 350 C in all cases. The absorption/desorption process is reversible between room temperature and 400 C. Annealing at temperatures above 400 C leads to the decomposition of the Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} phase, indicated by emerging of {alpha}-Fe. The formation of SmH{sub x} is established at 600 C. The decomposition temperature increases with increasing Ga-content. Up to 750 C, only Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} is completely decomposed. (orig.)

  14. ASK Standards: Assessment, Skills, and Knowledge Content Standards for Student Affairs Practitioners and Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACPA College Student Educators International, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Assessment Skills and Knowledge (ASK) standards seek to articulate the areas of content knowledge, skill and dispositions that student affairs professionals need in order to perform as practitioner-scholars to assess the degree to which students are mastering the learning and development outcomes the professionals intend. Consistent with…

  15. Diffusion-controlled growth of hydrogen pores in aluminum-silicon castings: In situ observation and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, R.C.; Sridhar, S.; Zhang, W.; Lee, P.D.

    2000-01-24

    In situ observations were made of the nucleation and growth kinetics of hydrogen porosity during the directional solidification of aluminium-7 wt% silicon (Al7Si) with TiB{sub 2} grain refiner added, using an X-ray temperature gradient stage (XTGS). The effect of altering the solidification velocity on the growth rate and morphology of the porosity formed was characterized by tracking individual pores with digital analysis of the micro-focal video images. It was found that increasing the solidification velocity caused the pore radius to decrease and pore density to increase. Insight gained from the experimental results was used to develop a computational model of the evolution of hydrogen pores during solidification of aluminum-silicon cast alloys. The model solves for the diffusion-limited growth of the pores in spherical coordinates, using a deterministic solution of the grain nucleation and growth as a sub-model to calculate the parameters that depend upon the fraction solid. Sensitivity analysis was carried out to assess the effects of equiaxed grain density, pore density, initial hydrogen content and cooling rate. The model agrees with the experimental results within the resolution limits of the XTGS experiments performed.

  16. Measurement of dissolved hydrogen and hydrogen gas transfer in a hydrogen-producing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizas, I.; Bagley, D.M. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a simple method to measure dissolved hydrogen concentrations in the laboratory using standard equipment and a series of hydrogen gas transfer tests. The method was validated by measuring hydrogen gas transfer parameters for an anaerobic reactor system that was purged with 10 per cent carbon dioxide and 90 per cent nitrogen using a coarse bubble diffuser stone. Liquid samples from the reactor were injected into vials and hydrogen was allowed to partition between the liquid and gaseous phases. The concentration of dissolved hydrogen was determined by comparing the headspace injections onto a gas chromatograph and a standard curve. The detection limit was 1.0 x 10{sup -5} mol/L of dissolved hydrogen. The gas transfer rate for hydrogen in basal medium and anaerobic digester sludge was used to validate the method. Results were compared with gas transfer models. In addition to monitoring dissolved hydrogen in reactor systems, this method can help improve hydrogen production potential. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  17. The orientation dependence of the hydrogen distribution within Mo/V (110) and (001) multilayered artificial superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Hjörvarsson, B; Olafsson, S; Karlsson, E B; Birch, J; Sundgren, J E

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the hydrogen distribution within multilayered Mo/V (110) and (001) artificial superlattices. The hydrogen concentration, determined by the sup 1 H( sup 1 sup 5 N, alpha gamma) sup 1 sup 2 C nuclear resonance reaction, is found to decrease with decreasing layer thickness. The decrease is attributed to an interface region with reduced hydrogen content. The extension of this interface region is found to be two monolayers in Mo/V (110), compared to the previously reported three monolayers in Mo/V (001) superlattices. In the (110) oriented samples the relative amount of H in the interface region decreases with increasing average H content (H/V (atomicratio) approx. 0.3-0.5). This effect is shown to be related to the orientation of the hydrogen planes with respect to the boundaries implied by the Mo/V interfaces. The hydrogen induced volume change, obtained by conventional theta-2 theta x-ray diffraction (XRD) and reciprocal space mapping, is found to be smaller for the (110) samples than for t...

  18. Mechanism of obtaining carbon monoxide and hydrogen during brown coal radiolysis. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rustamov, V R; Kurbanov, M A; Dzantiev, B T; Kerimov, V K; Musaeva, P F

    1982-05-01

    This article analyzes effects of gamma radiation on the yield of products of coal gasification: hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Samples of brown coal from the Kansk-Achins basin were treated by gamma radiation with cobalt 60 radiation source. Analyses show that accumulation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in brown coal under influence of gamma radiation is characterized by a constant rate. Yields of carbon monoxide and hydrogen amount to 0.16 molecule/100 electro volt and 0.21 molecule/electro volt respectively. Reducing radiation dose from 2.5 to 0.7 millirad/h reduces yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Increasing temperature of vacuum brown coal pyrolysis from 200 to 600 C causes decrease of hydrogen yield. Hydrogen yield decrease during temperature increase is caused by a high content of aromatic nuclei in the samples used in the radiolysis. (5 refs.)

  19. Effect of foliar application of salicylic acid, hydrogen peroxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 2. Effect of foliar application of salicylic acid, hydrogen peroxide and a xyloglucan oligosaccharide on capsiate content and gene expression associatedwith capsinoids synthesis in Capsicum annuum L. AY ZUNUN-PÉREZ T GUEVARA-FIGUEROA SN ...

  20. Possibilities of hydrogen removal. Phase 2: Limitation of hydrogen effects in hypothetical severe accidents in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, G.; Koehling, A.; Nikodem, H.

    1984-01-01

    In the event of hypothetical severe accidents in light-water reactors, considerable amounts of hydrogen may be produced and released into the containment. Combustion of the hydrogen may jeopardize the integrity of the containment. The study reported here aimed to identify methods to mitigate the hydrogen problem. These methods should either prevent hydrogen combustion, or limit its effects. The following methods have been investigated: pre-inerting; chemical oxygen absorption; removal of oxygen by combustion; post-inerting with N 2 , CO 2 , or halon; aqueous foam; water fog; deliberate ignition; containment purging; and containment venting. The present state of the art in both nuclear and non-nuclear facilities, has been identified. The assessment of the methods was based on accident scenarios assuming significant release of hydrogen and the spectrum of requirements derived from these scenarios was used to determine the advantages and drawbacks of the various methods, assuming their application in a pressurized water reactor of German design. (orig./RW) [de

  1. A GIS-based assessment of coal-based hydrogen infrastructure deployment in the state of Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen infrastructure costs will vary by region as geographic characteristics and feedstocks differ. This paper proposes a method for optimizing regional hydrogen infrastructure deployment by combining detailed spatial data in a geographic information system (GIS) with a technoeconomic model of hydrogen infrastructure components. The method is applied to a case study in Ohio in which coal-based hydrogen infrastructure with carbon capture and storage (CCS) is modeled for two distribution modes at several steady-state hydrogen vehicle market penetration levels. The paper identifies the optimal infrastructure design at each market penetration as well as the costs, CO 2 emissions, and energy use associated with each infrastructure pathway. The results indicate that aggregating infrastructure at the regional-scale yields lower levelized costs of hydrogen than at the city-level at a given market penetration level, and centralized production with pipeline distribution is the favored pathway even at low market penetration. Based upon the hydrogen infrastructure designs evaluated in this paper, coal-based hydrogen production with CCS can significantly reduce transportation-related CO 2 emissions at a relatively low infrastructure cost and levelized fuel cost. (author)

  2. SAIDE: A Semi-Automated Interface for Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Maria T; Miller, Danny E; Fenton, Aron W; Artigues, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Deuterium/hydrogen exchange in combination with mass spectrometry (DH MS) is a sensitive technique for detection of changes in protein conformation and dynamics. Since temperature, pH and timing control are the key elements for reliable and efficient measurement of hydrogen/deuterium content in proteins and peptides, we have developed a small, semiautomatic interface for deuterium exchange that interfaces the HPLC pumps with a mass spectrometer. This interface is relatively inexpensive to build, and provides efficient temperature and timing control in all stages of enzyme digestion, HPLC separation and mass analysis of the resulting peptides. We have tested this system with a series of standard tryptic peptides reconstituted in a solvent containing increasing concentration of deuterium. Our results demonstrate the use of this interface results in minimal loss of deuterium due to back exchange during HPLC desalting and separation. For peptides reconstituted in a buffer containing 100% deuterium, and assuming that all amide linkages have exchanged hydrogen with deuterium, the maximum loss of deuterium content is only 17% of the label, indicating the loss of only one deuterium molecule per peptide.

  3. Disclosed dielectric and electromechanical properties of hydrogenated nitrile–butadiene dielectric elastomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dan; Tian, Ming; Dong, Yingchao; Liu, Haoliang; Yu, Yingchun; Zhang, Liqun

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study of the effects of acrylonitrile content, crosslink density and plasticization on the dielectric and electromechanical performances of hydrogenated nitrile–butadiene dielectric elastomer. It was found that by increasing the acrylonitrile content of hydrogenated nitrile–butadiene dielectric elastomer, the dielectric constant will be improved accompanied with a sharp decrease of electrical breakdown strength leading to a small actuated strain. At a fixed electric field, a high crosslink density increased the elastic modulus of dielectric elastomer, but it also enhanced the electrical breakdown strength leading to a high actuated strain. Adding a plasticizer into the dielectric elastomer decreased the dielectric constant and electrical breakdown strength slightly, but reduced the elastic modulus sharply, which was beneficial for obtaining a large strain at low electric field from the dielectric elastomer. The largest actuated strain of 22% at an electric field of 30 kV mm −1 without any prestrain was obtained. Moreover, the hydrogenated nitrile–butadiene dielectric actuator showed good history dependence. This proposed material has great potential to be an excellent dielectric elastomer. (paper)

  4. Hydrogen production from algal biomass - Advances, challenges and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Show, Kuan-Yeow; Yan, Yuegen; Ling, Ming; Ye, Guoxiang; Li, Ting; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2018-06-01

    Extensive effort is being made to explore renewable energy in replacing fossil fuels. Biohydrogen is a promising future fuel because of its clean and high energy content. A challenging issue in establishing hydrogen economy is sustainability. Biohydrogen has the potential for renewable biofuel, and could replace current hydrogen production through fossil fuel thermo-chemical processes. A promising source of biohydrogen is conversion from algal biomass, which is abundant, clean and renewable. Unlike other well-developed biofuels such as bioethanol and biodiesel, production of hydrogen from algal biomass is still in the early stage of development. There are a variety of technologies for algal hydrogen production, and some laboratory- and pilot-scale systems have demonstrated a good potential for full-scale implementation. This work presents an elucidation on development in biohydrogen encompassing biological pathways, bioreactor designs and operation and techno-economic evaluation. Challenges and prospects of biohydrogen production are also outlined. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrogen and methane production from condensed molasses fermentation soluble by a two-stage anaerobic process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chiu-Yue; Liang, You-Chyuan; Lay, Chyi-How [Feng Chia Univ., Taichung, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Environmental Engineering and Science; Chen, Chin-Chao [Chungchou Institute of Technology, Taiwan (China). Environmental Resources Lab.; Chang, Feng-Yuan [Feng Chia Univ., Taichung, Taiwan (China). Research Center for Energy and Resources

    2010-07-01

    The treatment of condensed molasses fermentation soluble (CMS) is a troublesome problem for glutamate manufacturing factory. However, CMS contains high carbohydrate and nutrient contents and is an attractive and commercially potential feedstock for bioenergy production. The aim of this paper is to produce hydrogen and methane by two-stage anaerobic fermentation process. The fermentative hydrogen production from CMS was conducted in a continuously-stirred tank bioreactor (working volume 4 L) which was operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h, organic loading rate (OLR) of 120 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, temperature of 35 C, pH 5.5 and sewage sludge as seed. The anaerobic methane production was conducted in an up-flow bioreactor (working volume 11 L) which was operated at a HRT of 24 -60 hrs, OLR of 4.0-10 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, temperature of 35 C, pH 7.0 with using anaerobic granule sludge from fructose manufacturing factory as the seed and the effluent from hydrogen production process as the substrate. These two reactors have been operated successfully for more than 400 days. The steady-state hydrogen content, hydrogen production rate and hydrogen production yield in the hydrogen fermentation system were 37%, 169 mmol-H{sub 2}/L-d and 93 mmol-H{sub 2}/g carbohydrate{sub removed}, respectively. In the methane fermentation system, the peak methane content and methane production rate were 66.5 and 86.8 mmol-CH{sub 4}/L-d with methane production yield of 189.3 mmol-CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub removed} at an OLR 10 kg/m{sup 3}-d. The energy production rate was used to elucidate the energy efficiency for this two-stage process. The total energy production rate of 133.3 kJ/L/d was obtained with 5.5 kJ/L/d from hydrogen fermentation and 127.8 kJ/L/d from methane fermentation. (orig.)

  6. Hydrogen Pathways: Updated Cost, Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, and Emissions for the Current Technology Status of Ten Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Distribution Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsden, T.; Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M.; Timbario, T. A.

    2013-03-01

    This report describes a life-cycle assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of 10 hydrogen production, delivery, dispensing, and use pathways that were evaluated for cost, energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This evaluation updates and expands on a previous assessment of seven pathways conducted in 2009. This study summarizes key results, parameters, and sensitivities to those parameters for the 10 hydrogen pathways, reporting on the levelized cost of hydrogen in 2007 U.S. dollars as well as life-cycle well-to-wheels energy use and GHG emissions associated with the pathways.

  7. Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Tolbert, Scott; Curran, Tyler; Swanson, Michael

    2012-04-30

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has continued the work of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) Program Year 6 Task 1.12 project to expose hydrogen separation membranes to coal-derived syngas. In this follow-on project, the EERC has exposed two membranes to coal-derived syngas produced in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU). Western Research Institute (WRI), with funding from the State of Wyoming Clean Coal Technology Program and the North Dakota Industrial Commission, contracted with the EERC to conduct testing of WRI’s coal-upgrading/gasification technology for subbituminous and lignite coals in the EERC’s TRDU. This gasifier fires nominally 200–500 lb/hour of fuel and is the pilot-scale version of the full-scale gasifier currently being constructed in Kemper County, Mississippi. A slipstream of the syngas was used to demonstrate warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation using membrane technology. Two membranes were exposed to coal-derived syngas, and the impact of coal-derived impurities was evaluated. This report summarizes the performance of WRI’s patent-pending coalupgrading/ gasification technology in the EERC’s TRDU and presents the results of the warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation tests. Overall, the WRI coal-upgrading/gasification technology was shown to produce a syngas significantly lower in CO2 content and significantly higher in CO content than syngas produced from the raw fuels. Warm-gas cleanup technologies were shown to be capable of reducing sulfur in the syngas to 1 ppm. Each of the membranes tested was able to produce at least 2 lb/day of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas.

  8. Renewable Hydrogen Potential from Biogas in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saur, G.; Milbrandt, A.

    2014-07-01

    This analysis updates and expands upon previous biogas studies to include total potential and net availability of methane in raw biogas with respect to competing demands and includes a resource assessment of four sources of biogas: (1) wastewater treatment plants, including domestic and a new assessment of industrial sources; (2) landfills; (3) animal manure; and (4) a new assessment of industrial, institutional, and commercial sources. The results of the biogas resource assessment are used to estimate the potential production of renewable hydrogen from biogas as well as the fuel cell electric vehicles that the produced hydrogen might support.

  9. Hydrogen Incorporation during Aluminium Anodisation on Silicon Wafer Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Pei Hsuan Doris; Strutzberg, Hartmuth; Wenham, Stuart; Lennon, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen can act to reduce recombination at silicon surfaces for solar cell devices and consequently the ability of dielectric layers to provide a source of hydrogen for this purpose is of interest. However, due to the ubiquitous nature of hydrogen and its mobility, direct measurements of hydrogen incorporation in dielectric layers are challenging. In this paper, we report the use of secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements to show that deuterium from an electrolyte can be incorporated in an anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) layer and be introduced into an underlying amorphous silicon layer during anodisation of aluminium on silicon wafers. After annealing at 400 °C, the concentration of deuterium in the AAO was reduced by a factor of two, as the deuterium was re-distributed to the interface between the amorphous silicon and AAO and to the amorphous silicon. The assumption that hydrogen, from an aqueous electrolyte, could be similarly incorporated in AAO, is supported by the observation that the hydrogen content in the underlying amorphous silicon was increased by a factor of ∼ 3 after anodisation. Evidence for hydrogen being introduced into crystalline silicon after aluminium anodisation was provided by electrochemical capacitance voltage measurements indicating boron electrical deactivation in the underlying crystalline silicon. If introduced hydrogen can electrically deactivate dopant atoms at the surface, then it is reasonable to assume that it could also deactivate recombination-active states at the crystalline silicon interface therefore enabling higher minority carrier lifetimes in the silicon wafer

  10. Hydrogen isotope storage behavior of Zr1-xTixCo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jat, Ram Avtar; Pati, Subhasis; Parida, S.C.; Agarwal, Renu; Mukerjee, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    Tritium storage properties similar to uranium make ZrCo as a suitable candidate material for storage, supply and recovery of hydrogen isotopes in various tritium facilities. Beside non-radioactive, nonpyrophoric at room temperature and higher storage capacity (H/f.u. up to 3, f.u. = ZrCo), it has been reported that upon repeated hydriding-dehydriding cycles, ZrCo undergoes dis-proportionation as per the reaction; ZrCo + H 2 ↔ ZrH 2 + ZrCo 2 . The present study is aimed to investigate the effect of Ti content on the hydrogen storage behavior of Zr 1-x Ti x Co alloys and the hydrogen isotope effect

  11. Hydrogen determination in chemically delithiated lithium ion battery cathodes by prompt gamma activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Emilio, II

    2007-12-01

    Lithium ion batteries, due to their relatively high energy density, are now widely used as the power source for portable electronics. Commercial lithium ion cells currently employ layered LiCoO2 as a cathode but only 50% of its theoretical capacity can be utilized. The factors that cause the limitation are not fully established in the literature. With this perspective, prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) has been employed to determine the hydrogen content in various oxide cathodes that have undergone chemical extraction of lithium (delithiation). The PGAA data is complemented by data obtained from atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), redox titration, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and mass spectroscopy to better understand the capacity limitations and failure mechanisms of lithium ion battery cathodes. As part of this work, the PGAA facility has been redesigned and reconstructed. The neutron and gamma-ray backgrounds have been reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Detection limits for elements have also been improved. Special attention was given to the experimental setup including potential sources of error and system calibration for the detection of hydrogen. Spectral interference with hydrogen arising from cobalt was identified and corrected for. Limits of detection as a function of cobalt mass present in a given sample are also discussed. The data indicates that while delithiated layered Li1- xCoO2, Li1-xNi 1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2, and Li1- xNi0.5Mn0.5O2 take significant amounts of hydrogen into the lattice during deep extraction, orthorhombic Li 1-xMnO2, spinel Li1- xMn2O4, and olivine Li1- xFePO4 do not. Layered LiCoO2, LiNi 0.5Mn0.5O2, and LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co 1/3O2 have been further analyzed to assess their relative chemical instabilities while undergoing stepped chemical delithiation. Each system takes increasing amounts of protons at lower lithium contents. The differences are attributed to the relative chemical instabilities of the various cathodes

  12. Handbook of advanced nuclear hydrogen safety. 1st edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Takegami, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Toru

    2017-03-01

    In the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear accident, safety measures against hydrogen in severe accident has been recognized as a serious technical problem in Japan. Therefore, efforts have begun to form a common knowledge base between nuclear engineers and experts on combustion and explosion, and to secure and improve future nuclear energy safety. As one of such activities, we have prepared the 'Handbook of Advanced Nuclear Hydrogen Safety'. A handbook committee consisting of Japanese experts in the fields of nuclear and combustion-explosion in universities, nuclear companies, electric companies and research institutes was established in 2012. The objective and consents of the handbook were determined, and the outline of the contents was decided. The concepts of the handbook are as follows: to show advanced nuclear hydrogen safety technologies that nuclear engineers should understand, to show hydrogen safety points to make combustion-explosion experts cooperate with nuclear engineers, to expand information on water radiolysis considering the situation from just after the Fukushima accidents and to the waste management necessary for decommissioning after the accident etc. Many experts have participated to manuscript preparation, which was the first step of forming a hydrogen community across the boundaries of fields. The hydrogen community is expected to grow along with its improvement to the knowledge base on nuclear hydrogen safety. (author)

  13. Detailed modeling of size distribution functions and hydrogen content in combustion-formed particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirignano, Mariano; D' Anna, Andrea [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy); Kent, John [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-06-15

    A kinetic modeling approach is proposed to delve into the nature and chemistry of combustion-produced particles. A sectional method is used for the first time on this purpose. It is based on modeling of gas-to-particle transitions by sections containing 125 lumped species with C numbers ranging from 24 to 4 x 10{sup 8} and H/C ratio ranging from 0 to 1. This allows not only the mass evolution of particles, but also their hydrogen content to be followed. The model is tested in an atmospheric pressure premixed flat flame of ethylene/oxygen with C/O = 0.8 and cold gas flow velocity of 4 cm/s. Comparison of modeled results with experimental data is satisfying in terms of species concentrations and H/C ratio of the particles. Analysis of model results in comparison with the experimental data has shown that it is possible to distinguish different precursors of particles moving from the exit of the burner into the post-oxidation region of the flame. At particle inception, i.e. just downstream from the flame front, gas-phase PAHs are responsible for particle nucleation and oligomers of aromatic hydrocarbons and small pericondensed hydrocarbons are predominantly present. Then the dehydrogenation process takes place and soot formation starts; in this zone large pericondensed and stacked structures are produced. Further up soot maturation generally linked with dehydrogenation is present, but still a few particles with higher H/C and with low coagulation efficiency are produced and remain present along the flame. The model, in accordance with experimental structural soot analysis, shows that in soot particles condensed structures typical of clusters of large pericondensed hydrocarbons are present whereas high-molecular mass condensed species mainly comprise oligomers of small aromatic compounds of clusters of small pericondensed hydrocarbons. (author)

  14. Hydrogen escape from Mars enhanced by deep convection in dust storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavens, Nicholas G.; Kleinböhl, Armin; Chaffin, Michael S.; Halekas, Jasper S.; Kass, David M.; Hayne, Paul O.; McCleese, Daniel J.; Piqueux, Sylvain; Shirley, James H.; Schofield, John T.

    2018-02-01

    Present-day water loss from Mars provides insight into Mars's past habitability1-3. Its main mechanism is thought to be Jeans escape of a steady hydrogen reservoir sourced from odd-oxygen reactions with near-surface water vapour2, 4,5. The observed escape rate, however, is strongly variable and correlates poorly with solar extreme-ultraviolet radiation flux6-8, which was predicted to modulate escape9. This variability has recently been attributed to hydrogen sourced from photolysed middle atmospheric water vapour10, whose vertical and seasonal distribution is only partly characterized and understood11-13. Here, we report multi-annual observational estimates of water content and dust and water transport to the middle atmosphere from Mars Climate Sounder data. We provide strong evidence that the transport of water vapour and ice to the middle atmosphere by deep convection in Martian dust storms can enhance hydrogen escape. Planet-encircling dust storms can raise the effective hygropause (where water content rapidly decreases to effectively zero) from 50 to 80 km above the areoid (the reference equipotential surface). Smaller dust storms contribute to an annual mode in water content at 40-50 km that may explain seasonal variability in escape. Our results imply that Martian atmospheric chemistry and evolution can be strongly affected by the meteorology of the lower and middle atmosphere of Mars.

  15. Economic analysis of a combined production of hydrogen-energy from empty fruit bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langè, Stefano; Pellegrini, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    This work relates to an economic analysis and a comparison between different process solutions for the production of hydrogen and the co-production of hydrogen and energy by means of a zero emission biomass integrated supercritical water gasification (SCWG) and combined cycle power plant. The case study will be located in Malaysia. Energy will be produced in agreement with the Small Renewable Energy Power Plant (SREP) Program, promoted by the Government of Malaysia. Hydrogen is obtained by supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of empty fruit bunches (EFB), a technology of interest for the processing of biomass with high moisture content. The economic analysis has been carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the process solutions and to compare their convenience. The feedstock is 35 Mg h −1 of empty fruit bunches (EFB), a biomass obtained in the Palm Oil Industry. The location of the site is Teluk Intak District in the State of Perak (Malaysia). The study is performed with Aspen Plus ® V7.2. The aim of this work is to investigate the economic convenience of supercritical water gasification technology applied to a potential industrial case study in order to state the possibilities and the trade-off for the production of hydrogen and the co-production of hydrogen and energy from biomass, using an innovative technology (SCWG) instead of a typical unit for syngas and energy production. The processes have been developed to reach zero emissions and zero wastes. CO 2 and solid residuals are recycled inside palm oil lifecycle. -- Highlights: • Supercritical water gasification of empty fruit bunches has been used for hydrogen production. • Malaysia Small Renewable Energy Power Plant Program is aiming to reduce by 40% its greenhouse gases emissions by 2020. • An economic analysis has been performed to assess the sustainability of hydrogen and energy production from palm oil biomass. • Carbon dioxide and solid residuals are recycled back into biomass

  16. The Hydrogen Pickup Behavior for Zirconium-based Alloys in Various Out-of-pile Corrosion Test Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aomi, M.; Etoh, Y.; Ishimoto, S.; Une, K. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development, Co., Ltd., 2163 Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki-ken, 311-1313 (Japan); Ito, K. [Global Nuclear Fuel Japan Co., Ltd., 3-1 Uchikawa 2-chome, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken, 239-0836 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    An acceleration of hydrogen absorption in zirconium alloy claddings at high burnups is one of the most important issues limiting the fuel performance from the viewpoint of cladding integrity. In this context, advanced cladding materials with higher corrosion resistant and lower hydrogen absorption properties have been widely searched in various organizations. In this study, four kinds of zirconium-based alloys, whose in-pile data had been acquired [1,2] were subjected to comprehensive out-of-pile corrosion tests with various temperature and atmosphere conditions in order to investigate the correlation between in-pile and out-of-pile corrosion and hydrogen pick-up behavior, i.e. Zry-2, GNF-Ziron (Zry-2-based alloy with {approx}0.25 wt % of Fe), Hi-FeNi Zircaloy (Zry-2-based alloy with {approx}0.25 wt % of Fe and {approx}0.1 wt% Ni), and VB (Zr-based alloy containing Sn, Cr, and {approx}0.5 wt % of Fe). All the alloys were annealed in RXA condition. The out-of-pile corrosion tests were carried out in three different conditions of 400 deg. C steam, 475 deg. C supercritical water, and 290 deg. C LiOH aqueous solution. In addition to these alloys, several Zry-2-based alloys with various iron contents were tested in 290 deg. C LiOH aqueous solution. Among the four corrosion conditions, the 290 deg. C LiOH aqueous solution test well screened the hydrogen pick-up behavior of the alloys. The hydrogen absorption decreased with higher iron contents in the alloys in both the out-of-pile and in-pile conditions. Especially, the distinct suppression of hydrogen absorption was observed for VB with the highest iron content. The similar dependence of iron content on the hydrogen pick-up fraction was also obtained for the Zry-2-based alloys with different iron contents, which were corroded in the 290 deg. C LiOH aqueous solution condition. As for the corrosion behavior in the 290 deg. C LiOH aqueous solution condition, the weight gains of Zry-2, GNF-Ziron and VB followed the 1

  17. A manual of recommended practices for hydrogen energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoagland, W.; Leach, S. [W. Hoagland and Associates, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Technologies for the production, distribution, and use of hydrogen are rapidly maturing and the number and size of demonstration programs designed to showcase emerging hydrogen energy systems is expanding. The success of these programs is key to hydrogen commercialization. Currently there is no comprehensive set of widely-accepted codes or standards covering the installation and operation of hydrogen energy systems. This lack of codes or standards is a major obstacle to future hydrogen demonstrations in obtaining the requisite licenses, permits, insurance, and public acceptance. In a project begun in late 1996 to address this problem, W. Hoagland and Associates has been developing a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Systems intended to serve as an interim document for the design and operation of hydrogen demonstration projects. It will also serve as a starting point for some of the needed standard-setting processes. The Manual will include design guidelines for hydrogen procedures, case studies of experience at existing hydrogen demonstration projects, a bibliography of information sources, and a compilation of suppliers of hydrogen equipment and hardware. Following extensive professional review, final publication will occur later in 1997. The primary goal is to develop a draft document in the shortest possible time frame. To accomplish this, the input and guidance of technology developers, industrial organizations, government R and D and regulatory organizations and others will be sought to define the organization and content of the draft Manual, gather and evaluate available information, develop a draft document, coordinate reviews and revisions, and develop recommendations for publication, distribution, and update of the final document. The workshop, Development of a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Energy Systems, conducted on March 11, 1997 in Alexandria, Virginia, was a first step.

  18. Biological fermentative hydrogen production from olive pulp at 35 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutrouli, E.C.; Gavala, H.N.; Skiadas, I.V.; Lyberatos, G. [Patras Univ., Patras (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2004-07-01

    In response to energy security and environmental concerns, there is renewed interest in the use of hydrogen gas as a renewable energy source. However, many processes for generating hydrogen are extremely energy intensive and costly. This study focused on biological production of hydrogen from wastewater or other biomass. Photosynthetic and fermentation processes were outlined, but the main focus of this paper was on continuous anaerobic fermentation of low cost substrates such as olive pulp at 35 degrees C. This process is linked to the acidogenic stage of anaerobic digestion where carbohydrates are the preferred carbon source. Volatile fatty acids and alcohols are produced simultaneously with the hydrogen gas. An added advantage is that the effluent from the fermentation process can be further used by methanogenesis due to its rich organic acids content. Batch experiments with olive pulp resulted in 2.5 mmole of hydrogen per gram of total carbohydrates. It was noted that more research is required to maximize hydrogen production in a continuous process. It was suggested that hydrogen production could be optimized through hydrolysis of the non-soluble carbohydrates. This could be accomplished through physicochemical or biological pretreatments. 7 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig.

  19. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  20. Key Challenges to the introduction of hydrogen - European stakeholder views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seymour, E. Hugo; Murray, Luke; Fernandes, Rei

    2008-01-01

    Recent hydrogen policy initiatives focus on fostering the market introduction of hydrogen technologies. These initiatives include hydrogen roadmapping projects. Stakeholder involvement in strategic planning is of key importance to the successful implementation of the strategy. Thus, the views of the stakeholder group involved in the European roadmapping project HyWays are pertinent to the introduction of hydrogen in Europe. A qualitative assessment using the Key Changes and Actor Mapping (KCAM) methodology showed that on average stakeholders expect hydrogen systems to begin to be introduced over the next 15 years. Hydrogen production is expected to be based initially on steam methane reforming of natural gas and onsite electrolysis using wind power, and any hydrogen transport is likely to be by truck. The major challenges envisaged are to do with carbon capture and storage, high-temperature hydrogen production technologies and hydrogen pipeline development. (author)