WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrogen complex formation

  1. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Michael D

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  2. Hexagonal wheel formation through the hydrogen-bonded assembly of cobalt Pacman complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeland, James W; White, Fraser J; Love, Jason B

    2011-04-14

    A cobalt aquo-hydroxo complex of a ditopic Schiff-base pyrrole-crown ether macrocycle has been prepared and forms a rigid Pacman-clefted structure that assembles through hydrogen-bonding into a hexagonal wheel motif in the solid state.

  3. Membrane complexes of Syntrophomonas wolfei involved in syntrophic butyrate degradation and hydrogen formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Regis Crable

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Syntrophic butyrate metabolism involves the thermodynamically unfavorable production of hydrogen and/or formate from the high potential electron donor, butyryl-CoA. Such redox reactions can occur only with energy input by a process called reverse electron transfer. Previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen production from butyrate requires the presence of a proton gradient, but the biochemical machinery involved has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the gene and enzyme systems involved in reverse electron transfer by Syntrophomonas wolfei were investigated using proteomic and gene expression approaches. S. wolfei was grown in coculture with Methanospirillum hungatei or Dehalococcoides mccartyi under conditions requiring reverse electron transfer and compared to both axenic S. wolfei cultures and cocultures grown in conditions that do not require reverse electron transfer. Blue native gel analysis of membranes solubilized from syntrophically grown cells revealed the presence of a membrane-bound hydrogenase, Hyd2, which exhibited hydrogenase activity during in gel assays. Bands containing a putative iron-sulfur (FeS oxidoreductase were detected in membranes of crotonate-grown and butyrate grown S. wolfei cells. The genes for the corresponding hydrogenase subunits, hyd2ABC, were differentially expressed at higher levels during syntrophic butyrate growth when compared to growth on crotonate. The expression of the FeS oxidoreductase gene increased when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei. Additional membrane-associated proteins detected included FoF1 ATP synthase subunits and several membrane transporters that may aid syntrophic growth. Furthermore, syntrophic butyrate metabolism can proceed exclusively by interspecies hydrogen transfer, as demonstrated by growth with D. mccartyi, which is unable to use formate. These results argue for the importance of Hyd2 and FeS oxidoreductase in reverse electron transfer during syntrophic

  4. Fundamental and overtone vibrational spectroscopy, enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation and equilibrium constant determination of the methanol-dimethylamine complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lin; Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2013-07-07

    We have measured gas phase vibrational spectra of the bimolecular complex formed between methanol (MeOH) and dimethylamine (DMA) up to about 9800 cm(-1). In addition to the strong fundamental OH-stretching transition we have also detected the weak second overtone NH-stretching transition. The spectra of the complex are obtained by spectral subtraction of the monomer spectra from spectra recorded for the mixture. For comparison, we also measured the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the bimolecular complex between MeOH and trimethylamine (TMA). The enthalpies of hydrogen bond formation (ΔH) for the MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA complexes have been determined by measurements of the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the temperature range from 298 to 358 K. The enthalpy of formation is found to be -35.8 ± 3.9 and -38.2 ± 3.3 kJ mol(-1) for MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA, respectively, in the 298 to 358 K region. The equilibrium constant (Kp) for the formation of the MeOH-DMA complex has been determined from the measured and calculated transition intensities of the OH-stretching fundamental transition and the NH-stretching second overtone transition. The transition intensities were calculated using an anharmonic oscillator local mode model with dipole moment and potential energy curves calculated using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods. The equilibrium constant for formation of the MeOH-DMA complex was determined to be 0.2 ± 0.1 atm(-1), corresponding to a ΔG value of about 4.0 kJ mol(-1).

  5. Polyhydride complexes for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application in hydrogen storage. Efforts have focused on developing complexes with improved available hydrogen weight percentages. We have explored the possibility that complexes containing aromatic hydrocarbon ligands could store hydrogen at both the metal center and in the ligands. We have synthesized novel indenyl hydride complexes and explored their reactivity with hydrogen. The reversible hydrogenation of [IrH{sub 3}(PPh{sub 3})({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 10}H{sub 7})]{sup +} has been achieved. While attempting to prepare {eta}{sup 6}-tetrahydronaphthalene complexes, we discovered that certain polyhydride complexes catalyze both the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of tetrahydronaphthalene.

  6. Catalytic Hydrodehalogenation of Some Organic Halides by Hydrogen Transfer from Lithium Formate in the Presence of Ruthenium and Rhodium Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Marčec, Radovan

    1990-01-01

    Organic halides react with lithium formate in the presence of ruthenium and rhodium phosphine complexes as homogeneous catalysts in refluxing dioxane producing the corresponding deha- logenated compounds in moderate yields.

  7. Amine-free reversible hydrogen storage in formate salts catalyzed by ruthenium pincer complex without pH control or solvent change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothandaraman, Jotheeswari; Czaun, Miklos; Goeppert, Alain; Haiges, Ralf; Jones, John-Paul; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya; Olah, George A

    2015-04-24

    Due to the intermittent nature of most renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind, energy storage is increasingly required. Since electricity is difficult to store, hydrogen obtained by electrochemical water splitting has been proposed as an energy carrier. However, the handling and transportation of hydrogen in large quantities is in itself a challenge. We therefore present here a method for hydrogen storage based on a CO2 (HCO3 (-) )/H2 and formate equilibrium. This amine-free and efficient reversible system (>90 % yield in both directions) is catalyzed by well-defined and commercially available Ru pincer complexes. The formate dehydrogenation was triggered by simple pressure swing without requiring external pH control or the change of either the solvent or the catalyst. Up to six hydrogenation-dehydrogenation cycles were performed and the catalyst performance remained steady with high selectivity (CO free H2 /CO2 mixture was produced). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  9. Vibrational mode-selected differential scattering of NH3+ methanol (d1, d3, d4): Control of product branching by hydrogen-bonded complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hungshin; Qian, Jun; Green, Richard J.; Anderson, Scott L.

    1998-02-01

    We report a study of vibrational mode effects and differential scattering in reaction of NH3+ with CD3OD, CD3OH, and CH3OD over the collision energy range from 0.1 to 5 eV. At low collision energies, abstraction of both methyl and hydroxyl D atoms is observed with roughly equal probability, even though methyl D-abstraction should be favored on both energetic and statistical grounds. Branching between the two abstraction reactions is controlled by two different hydrogen-bonded complexes. Formation of these complexes is enhanced by NH3+ umbrella bending, unaffected by the NH3+ symmetric stretch, and inhibited by collision energy. Endoergic proton transfer is mediated at low energies by a third hydrogen-bonded complex, formation of which is enhanced by both umbrella bending and the symmetric stretch. Charge transfer (CT) has a significant cross section only when the NH3+ umbrella bend excitation exceeds the endoergicity. Collision energy and symmetric stretching appear to have no effect on CT. At high collision energies all reactions become direct, with near spectator stripping dynamics. In this energy range product branching appears to be controlled by collision geometry and there are no significant vibrational effects.

  10. Hydrogen storage via polyhydride complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application to hydrogen storage. Complexes have been found which catalyze the reversible hydrogenation of unsaturated hydrocarbons. This catalytic reaction could be the basis for a low temperature, hydrogen storage system with a available hydrogen density greater than 7 weight percent. The P-C-P pincer complexes, RhH{sub 2}(C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}PBu{sup t}{sub 2}){sub 2}) and IrH{sub 2}(C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}PBu{sup t}{sub 2}){sub 2}) have unprecedented, long term stability at elevated temperatures. The novel iridium complex catalyzes the transfer dehydrogenation of cycloctane to cyclooctene at the rate of 716 turnovers/h which is 2 orders of magnitude greater than that found for previously reported catalytic systems which do not require the sacrificial hydrogenation of a large excess of hydrogen acceptor.

  11. Muonium/muonic hydrogen formation in atomic hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The muonium/muonic hydrogen atom formation in µ±–H collisions is in- vestigated, using a two-state approximation in a time dependent formalism. It is found that muonium cross-section results are similar to the cross-section results obtained for positronium formation in e+–H collision. Muonic hydrogen atom ...

  12. Recombination-induced formation of hydrogen-defect complexes in 4H and 6H-SiC: electrical and optical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshka, Y.; Los, A.; Mazzola, M.S.; Sankin, I

    2003-12-31

    The phenomenon of recombination-induced passivation of defects with hydrogen was investigated in SiC polytypes. Excitation of the hydrogenated samples with above-band gap light at low temperatures resulted in formation of different non-metastable hydrogen-related luminescence centres. Electrical measurements revealed strong recombination-induced passivation of electrical activity of aluminium and boron acceptors in p-type SiC epilayers, which in some cases resulted in inversion of the conductivity type. Athermal migration of hydrogen is considered as a possible mechanism for the observed phenomena.

  13. Hydrogen storage via polyhydride complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.M.; Zidan, R.A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The reversible dehydrogenation of NaAlH{sub 4} is catalyzed in toluene slurries of the NaAlH{sub 4} containing the pincer complex, IrH{sub 4} {l_brace}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}PBu{sup t}{sub 2}){sub 2}{r_brace}. The rates of the pincer complex catalyzed dehydrogenation are about five times greater those previously found for NaAlH{sub 4} that was doped with titanium through a wet chemistry method. Homogenization of NaAlH{sub 4} with 2 mole % Ti(OBu{sup n}){sub 4} under an atmosphere of argon produces a novel titanium containing material. TPD measurements show that the dehydrogenation of this material occurs about 30 C lower than that previously found for wet titanium doped NaAlH{sub 4}. In further contrast to wet doped NaAlH{sub 4}, the dehydrogenation kinetics and hydrogen capacity of the novel material are undiminished over several dehydriding/hydriding cycles. Rehydrogenation of the titanium doped material occurs readily at 170 C under 150 atm of hydrogen. TPD measurements show that about 80% of the original hydrogen content (4.2 wt%) can be restored under these conditions.

  14. Formation of hydrogen-bonded complexes of 3,3',5,5'-tetrabromo-2,2'-biphenol with MTBD and triethylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Grzegorz; Brzezinski, Bogumil

    2002-10-01

    The complexes of 3,3',5,5'-tetrabromo-2,2'-biphenol (TBBPh) with 7-methyl-1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene (MTBD) and triethylamine (TEA) were studied by FTIR spectroscopy. In chloroform and in acetonitrile a proton transfer from TBBPh to N-bases (MTBD, TEA) occurs. In chloroform solution the protonated N-base molecules are hydrogen-bonded to the deprotonated TBBPh molecules, whereas in acetonitrile the complexes dissociate. The intra- as well as intermolecular hydrogen bonds within the chains show large proton polarizability.

  15. Metal ammine complexes for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Johannessen, Tue

    2005-01-01

    The hopes of using hydrogen as an energy carrier are severely dampened by the fact that there is still no safe, high-density method available for storing hydrogen. We investigate the possibility of using metal ammine complexes as a solid form of hydrogen storage. Using Mg(NH3)(6)Cl-2 as the example...

  16. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sesha S [Tampa, FL; Niemann, Michael U [Venice, FL; Goswami, D Yogi [Tampa, FL; Stefanakos, Elias K [Tampa, FL

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  17. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV BOGDANOVIĆ

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex metal hydrides such as sodium aluminohydride (NaAlH4 and sodium borohydride (NaBH4 are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides. The most important point for a wide application of these materials is the reversibility under moderate technical conditions. At present, only NaAlH4 has favourable thermodynamic properties and can be employed as a thermally reversible means of hydrogen storage. By contrast, NaBH4 is a typical non- -reversible complex metal hydride; it reacts with water to produce hydrogen.

  18. Hydrogen storage and evolution catalysed by metal hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-07

    The storage and evolution of hydrogen are catalysed by appropriate metal hydride complexes. Hydrogenation of carbon dioxide by hydrogen is catalysed by a [C,N] cyclometalated organoiridium complex, [Ir(III)(Cp*)(4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl-κN(2))benzoic acid-κC(3))(OH(2))](2)SO(4) [Ir-OH(2)](2)SO(4), under atmospheric pressure of H(2) and CO(2) in weakly basic water (pH 7.5) at room temperature. The reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from formate, is also catalysed by [Ir-OH(2)](+) in acidic water (pH 2.8) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between hydrogen and formic acid in water at ambient temperature and pressure has been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst in both directions depending on pH. The Ir complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses regioselective hydrogenation of the oxidised form of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to produce the 1,4-reduced form (NADH) under atmospheric pressure of H(2) at room temperature in weakly basic water. In weakly acidic water, the complex [Ir-OH(2)](+) also catalyses the reverse reaction, i.e., hydrogen evolution from NADH to produce NAD(+) at room temperature. Thus, interconversion between NADH (and H(+)) and NAD(+) (and H(2)) has also been achieved by using [Ir-OH(2)](+) as an efficient catalyst and by changing pH. The iridium hydride complex formed by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) by H(2) and NADH is responsible for the hydrogen evolution. Photoirradiation (λ > 330 nm) of an aqueous solution of the Ir-hydride complex produced by the reduction of [Ir-OH(2)](+) with alcohols resulted in the quantitative conversion to a unique [C,C] cyclometalated Ir-hydride complex, which can catalyse hydrogen evolution from alcohols in a basic aqueous solution (pH 11.9). The catalytic mechanisms of the hydrogen storage and evolution are discussed by focusing on the reactivity of Ir-hydride complexes.

  19. Radiolysis of confined water: molecular hydrogen formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotureau, P.; Renault, J.P.; Mialocq, J.C. [CEA/Saclay, DSM/DRECAM/SCM/URA 331 CNRS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Lebeau, B.; Patarin, J. [Laboratoire de Materiaux a Porosite Controlee, UMR CNRS 7016, ENSCMu-UHA, 3, Rue Alfred Werner, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France)

    2005-07-11

    The formation of molecular hydrogen in the radiolysis of water confined in nanoscale pores of well-characterised porous silica glasses and mesoporous molecular sieves (MCM-41) is examined. The comparison of dihydrogen formation by irradiation of both materials, dry and hydrated, shows that a large part of the H{sub 2} comes from the surface of the material. The radiolytic yields, G(H{sub 2})=(3{+-}0.5) x 10{sup -7} mol J{sup -1}, calculated using the total energy deposited in the material and the water, are only slightly affected by the degree of hydration of the material and by the pore size. These yields are also not modified by the presence of hydroxyl radical scavengers. This observation proves that the back reaction between H{sub 2} and HO{sup .} is inoperative in such confined environments. Furthermore, the large amount of H{sub 2} produced in the presence of different concentrated scavengers of the hydrated electron and its precursor suggests that these two species are far from being the only species responsible for the H{sub 2} formation. Our results show that the radiolytic phenomena that occur in water confined in nanoporous silica are dramatically different to those in bulk water, suggesting the need to investigate further the chemical reactivity in this type of environment. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Radiolysis of confined water: molecular hydrogen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotureau, P; Renault, J P; Lebeau, B; Patarin, J; Mialocq, J-C

    2005-07-11

    The formation of molecular hydrogen in the radiolysis of water confined in nanoscale pores of well-characterised porous silica glasses and mesoporous molecular sieves (MCM-41) is examined. The comparison of dihydrogen formation by irradiation of both materials, dry and hydrated, shows that a large part of the H2 comes from the surface of the material. The radiolytic yields, G(H2)=(3+/-0.5)x10(-7) mol J(-1), calculated using the total energy deposited in the material and the water, are only slightly affected by the degree of hydration of the material and by the pore size. These yields are also not modified by the presence of hydroxyl radical scavengers. This observation proves that the back reaction between H2 and HO(.) is inoperative in such confined environments. Furthermore, the large amount of H2 produced in the presence of different concentrated scavengers of the hydrated electron and its precursor suggests that these two species are far from being the only species responsible for the H2 formation. Our results show that the radiolytic phenomena that occur in water confined in nanoporous silica are dramatically different to those in bulk water, suggesting the need to investigate further the chemical reactivity in this type of environment.

  1. The Influence of Small Monovalent Cations on Neighbouring Hydrogen Bonds of Aquo-Protein Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarik, Kritsana P.; Rode, Bernd M.

    1981-12-01

    The influence of small monovalent metal ions on hydrogen bonds of aquo-protein complexes is studied on Li+/HCONH2-OH2 as an example. Using results obtained from ab initio calculations with minimal GLO basis sets, the remarkable changes in the hydrogen bond energy and charge distribution, due to metal ion complex formation, are discussed. The metal ion seems to enhance strongly the donor-acceptor interaction of the O ... H-N-C=0 hydrogen-bonded system.

  2. A novel liquid organic hydrogen carrier system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Fogler, Eran; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Iron, Mark A; Milstein, David

    2015-04-17

    Hydrogen is an efficient green fuel, but its low energy density when stored under high pressure or cryogenically, and safety issues, presents significant disadvantages; hence finding efficient and safe hydrogen carriers is a major challenge. Of special interest are liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs), which can be readily loaded and unloaded with considerable amounts of hydrogen. However, disadvantages include high hydrogen pressure requirements, high reaction temperatures for both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation steps, which require different catalysts, and high LOHC cost. Here we present a readily reversible LOHC system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation, using an inexpensive, safe and abundant organic compound with high potential capacity to store and release hydrogen, applying the same catalyst for loading and unloading hydrogen under relatively mild conditions. Mechanistic insight of the catalytic reaction is provided. We believe that these findings may lead to the development of an inexpensive, safe and clean liquid hydrogen carrier system.

  3. AAA-DDD triple hydrogen bond complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blight, Barry A; Camara-Campos, Amaya; Djurdjevic, Smilja; Kaller, Martin; Leigh, David A; McMillan, Fiona M; McNab, Hamish; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2009-10-07

    Experiment and theory both suggest that the AAA-DDD pattern of hydrogen bond acceptors (A) and donors (D) is the arrangement of three contiguous hydrogen bonding centers that results in the strongest association between two species. Murray and Zimmerman prepared the first example of such a system (complex 3*2) and determined the lower limit of its association constant (K(a)) in CDCl(3) to be 10(5) M(-1) by (1)H NMR spectroscopy (Murray, T. J. and Zimmerman, S. C. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1992, 114, 4010-4011). The first cationic AAA-DDD pair (3*4(+)) was described by Bell and Anslyn (Bell, D. A. and Anslyn, E. A. Tetrahedron 1995, 51, 7161-7172), with a K(a) > 5 x 10(5) M(-1) in CH(2)Cl(2) as determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. We were recently able to quantify the strength of a neutral AAA-DDD arrangement using a more chemically stable AAA-DDD system, 6*2, which has an association constant of 2 x 10(7) M(-1) in CH(2)Cl(2) (Djurdjevic, S., Leigh, D. A., McNab, H., Parsons, S., Teobaldi, G. and Zerbetto, F. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 476-477). Here we report on further AA(A) and DDD partners, together with the first precise measurement of the association constant of a cationic AAA-DDD species. Complex 6*10(+)[B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)C(6)H(3))(4)(-)] has a K(a) = 3 x 10(10) M(-1) at RT in CH(2)Cl(2), by far the most strongly bound triple hydrogen bonded system measured to date. The X-ray crystal structure of 6*10(+) with a BPh(4)(-) counteranion shows a planar array of three short (NH...N distances 1.95-2.15 A), parallel (but staggered rather than strictly linear; N-H...N angles 165.4-168.8 degrees), primary hydrogen bonds. These are apparently reinforced, as theory predicts, by close electrostatic interactions (NH-*-N distances 2.78-3.29 A) between each proton and the acceptor atoms of the adjacent primary hydrogen bonds.

  4. Insights into the spontaneity of hydrogen bond formation between formic acid and phthalimide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júnior, Rogério V A; Moura, Gustavo L C; Lima, Nathalia B D

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated a group of phthalimide derivatives, which comprise a convenient test set for the study of the multiple factors involved in the energetics of hydrogen bond formation. Accordingly, we carried out quantum chemical calculations on the hydrogen bonded complexes formed between a sample of phthalimide derivatives with formic acid with the intent of identifying the most important electronic and structural factors related to how their strength and spontaneity vary across the series. The geometries of all species considered were fully optimized at DFT B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), RM1, RM1-DH2, and RM1-D3H4 level, followed by frequency calculations to determine their Gibbs free energies of hydrogen bond formation using Gaussian 2009 and MOPAC 2012. Our results indicate that the phthalimide derivatives that form hydrogen bond complexes most favorably, have in their structures only one C=O group and at least one NH group. On the other hand, the phthalimide derivatives predicted to form hydrogen bonds least favorably, possess in their structures two carbonyl groups, C=O, and no NH group. The ability to donate electrons and simultaneously receive one acidic hydrogen is the most important property related to the spontaneity of hydrogen bond formation. We further chose two cyclic compounds, phthalimide and isoindolin-1-one, in which to study the main changes in molecular, structural and spectroscopic properties as related to the formation of hydrogen bonds. Thus, the greatest ability of the isoindolin-1-one compound in forming hydrogen bonds is evidenced by the larger effect on the structural, vibrational, and chemical shifts properties associated with the O-H group. In summary, the electron-donating ability of the hydrogen bond acceptor emerged as the most important property differentiating the spontaneity of hydrogen bond formation in this group of complexes.

  5. Infrared spectra of OCS-hydrogen complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2002-01-01

    Five distinct species of OCS-hydrogen van der Waals complexes (OCS-orthoH2,-paraH2,-paraD2,-orthoD2, and -HD) have been observed by infrared spectroscopy in the region of the OCS ν1 vibration (≈2062 cm-1) in a pulsed supersonic jet expansion using a tunable diode laser probe. The spectra are those of prolate asymmetric rotors, with observed a-type transitions (ΔK=0), but no b-type transitions (ΔK=±1). The fitted rotational parameters are consistent with structures having intermolecular separations in the range of 3.6-3.8 Å and angles of about 70° between the OCS axis and the hydrogen center of mass. The band origins are slightly red-shifted (-0.05 to -0.20 cm-1) relative to that of the free OCS molecule. The results are of interest due to recent observations of the same complexes trapped in ultracold helium droplets; there is a remarkably close correspondence of the vibrational band origins of the free and trapped species.

  6. Hydrogen or formate: Alternative key players in methanogenic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schink, Bernhard; Montag, Dominik; Keller, Anja; Müller, Nicolai

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen and formate are important electron carriers in methanogenic degradation in anoxic environments such as sediments, sewage sludge digestors and biogas reactors. Especially in the terminal steps of methanogenesis, they determine the energy budgets of secondary (syntrophically) fermenting bacteria and their methanogenic partners. The literature provides considerable data on hydrogen pool sizes in such habitats, but little data exist for formate concentrations due to technical difficulties in formate determination at low concentration. Recent evidence from biochemical and molecular biological studies indicates that several secondary fermenters can use both hydrogen and formate for electron release, and may do so even simultaneously. Numerous strictly anaerobic bacteria contain enzymes which equilibrate hydrogen and formate pools to energetically equal values, and recent measurements in sewage digestors and biogas reactors indicate that - beyond occasional fluctuations - the pool sizes of hydrogen and formate are indeed energetically nearly equivalent. Nonetheless, a thermophilic archaeon from a submarine hydrothermal vent, Thermococcus onnurineus, can obtain ATP from the conversion of formate to hydrogen plus bicarbonate at 80°C, indicating that at least in this extreme environment the pools of formate and hydrogen are likely to be sufficiently different to support such an unusual type of energy conservation. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. THE PARADIGM OF PROTON DONOR STRUCTURE ON HYDROGEN BOND FORMATION: C2H2···6(HF) COMPLEX

    OpenAIRE

    Silva,Denize S.; Oliveira,Boaz G.

    2016-01-01

    The DFT, QTAIM, NBO and ChelpG methods were used in a theoretical study of structural parameters, vibration stretch modes and absorption intensities, electronic properties, molecular orbital analyses and molecular topography of the heptamer C2H2···6(HF) complex. One of the great aims concerns to the studying of the proton donor structure, which is considered as two 3(HF) cyclic moieties. The structures of the HF trimer interact with acetylene in an opened configuration because the energies of...

  8. Hydrogen bonding in oxalic acid and its complexes: A database ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The basic result of carboxylic group that the oxygen atom of the –OH never seems to be a hydrogen bond acceptor is violated in the cases, namely urea oxalic acid and bis urea oxalic acid complexes, where the hydroxyl oxygen atom is an acceptor of a weak N–H... O hydrogen bond. The parameters of this hydrogen bond, ...

  9. Biological hydrogen formation by thermophilic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielen, A.A.M.

    2014-01-01

      Hydrogen gas (H2) is an important chemical commodity. It is used in many industrial processes and is applicable as a fuel. However, present production processes are predominantly based on non-renewable resources. In a biological H2 (bioH2) production process,

  10. How hydroxylation affects hydrogen adsorption and formation on nanosilicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Bacchus-Montabonel, Marie-Christine; Bromley, Stefan T.

    2017-06-01

    Silicate dust constitutes one of the primary solid components of the Universe and is thought to be an essential enabler for complex chemistry in a number of astronomical environments. Hydroxylated silicate nanoclusters (MgO)x(SiO2)y(H2O)z, where strongly absorbed water molecules are dissociated on the silicate surface, are likely to be persistent in diffuse clouds. Such precursor species are thus also primary candidates as seeds for the formation and growth of icy dust grains in dense molecular clouds. Using density functional calculations we investigate the reactivity of hydroxylated pyroxene nanoclusters (Mg4Si4O12)(H2O)N (N = 1-4) towards hydrogen physisorption, chemisorption and H2 formation. Our results show that increased hydroxylation leads to a significant reduction in the energy range for the physisorption and chemisorption of single H atoms, when compared to bare silicate grains and bare bulk silicate surfaces. Subsequent chemisorption of a second H atom is, however, little affected by hydroxylation. The H2 reaction barrier for the recombination of two chemisorbed H atoms tends to follow a linear correlation with respect to the 2Hchem binding energy, suggestive of a general Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relation for H2 formation on silicate grains, independent of dust grain size, composition and degree of hydroxylation.

  11. Biological hydrogen formation by thermophilic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bielen, A.A.M.

    2014-01-01

      Hydrogen gas (H2) is an important chemical commodity. It is used in many industrial processes and is applicable as a fuel. However, present production processes are predominantly based on non-renewable resources. In a biological H2 (bioH2) production process, known as dark-fermentation, fermentative microorganisms are able to generate H2 from renewable resources like carbohydrate-rich plant material or industrial waste streams. Because of their favourable biomass degrading capabilities...

  12. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage - New perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Morten B.; Jepsen, Lars H.; Lee, Young-Su

    2014-01-01

    , as discussed in this review, but a range of new lightweight hydrogen-containing materials has been discovered with fascinating properties. State-of-the-art and future perspectives for hydrogen-containing solids will be discussed, with a focus on metal borohydrides, which reveal significant structural...

  13. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  14. Catalytic hydrogenation using complexes of base metals with tridentate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Susan K.; Zhang, Guoqi; Vasudevan, Kalyan V.

    2017-02-14

    Complexes of cobalt and nickel with tridentate ligand PNHP.sup.R are effective for hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds. Cobalt complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Co(CH.sub.2SiMe.sub.3)]BAr.sup.F.sub.4 (PNHP.sup.Cy=bis[2-(dicyclohexylphosphino)ethyl]amine, BAr.sup.F.sub.4=B(3,5-(CF.sub.3).sub.2C.sub.6H.sub.3).sub.4)) was prepared and used with hydrogen for hydrogenation of alkenes, aldehydes, ketones, and imines under mild conditions (25-60.degree. C., 1-4 atm H.sub.2). Nickel complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Ni(H)]BPh.sub.4 was used for hydrogenation of styrene and 1-octene under mild conditions. (PNP.sup.Cy)Ni(H) was used for hydrogenating alkenes.

  15. Cooperative Hydrogen Bonding in Amyloid Formation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsemekhman, Kiril L.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Eisenberg, Dvaid; Baker, David

    2007-04-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's and prion diseases, are each associated with unbranched protein fibrils. Each fibril is made of a particular protein, yet they share common properties. One such property is nucleation-dependent fibril growth. Monomers of amyloid-forming proteins can remain in dissolved form for long periods, before rapidly assembly into fibrils. The lag before growth has been attributed to slow kinetics of formation of a nucleus, on which other molecules can deposit to form the fibril. We have explored the energetics of fibril formation, based on the known molecular structure of a fibril-forming peptide from the yeast prion, Sup35, using both classical and quantum (density functional theory) methods. We find that the energetics of fibril formation for the first three layers are cooperative using both methods. This cooperativity is consistent with the observation that formation of amyloid fibrils involves slow nucleation and faster growth.

  16. Physical origin of hydrogen-adsorption-induced metallization of the SiC surface: n-type doping via formation of hydrogen bridge bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hao; Wu, Jian; Gu, Bing-Lin; Liu, Feng; Duan, Wenhui

    2005-11-04

    We perform first-principles calculations to explore the physical origin of hydrogen-induced semiconductor surface metallization observed in beta-SiC(001)-3 x 2 surface. We show that the surface metallization arises from a novel mechanism of n-type doping of surface band via formation of hydrogen bridge bonds (i.e., Si-H-Si complex). The hydrogen strengthens the weak Si-Si dimers in the subsurface by forming hydrogen bridge bonds, and donates electron to the surface conduction band.

  17. Risk analysis of complex hydrogen infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Marangon, Alessia; Carcassi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    delivered, stored and distributed, as e.g. biomass based methane, ethanol, gasoline, diesel as well as the traditional crude oil based products. Hydrogen is also in play as intermediate energy storage to secure the power supply based on large shares of fluctuating energy sources and as an intermediate...

  18. Spray formation with complex fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lustig, S; Rosen, M, E-mail: mrosen@fi.uba.ar [Grupo de Medios Porosos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, LIA (Laboratoire International Associe).Argentina (Argentina)

    2011-05-01

    Droplet formation through Faraday excitation has been tested in the low driving frequency limit. Kerosene was used to model liquid fuel with the addition of PIB in different proportions. All fluids were characterized in detail. The mechanisms of ejection were investigated to identify the relative influence of viscosity and surface tension. It was also possible to characterize the type of instability leading to the emission drop process.

  19. Formation of ground and excited hydrogen atoms in proton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-17

    Oct 17, 2016 ... Abstract. The inelastic scattering of proton with a potassium atom is treated for the first time as a three- channel problem within the framework of the improved coupled static approximation by assuming that the ground. (1s state) and the excited (2s state) hydrogen formation channels are open for seven ...

  20. Hydrogen bonds in ethylene glycol, monoethanolamine, and ethylenediamine complexes with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krest'yaninov, M. A.; Titova, A. G.; Zaichikov, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    The structures of ethylene glycol, aminoethanol, and ethylenediamine complexes with water and the formation of hydrogen bonds of different types are optimized using the B3LYP hybrid functional and the aug-CC-pVTZ basis. The parameters of the hydrogen bonds, their energies of interaction, and their oscillation frequencies are calculated, and NBO and QTAIM analyses are performed. The order of hydrogen bonds according to strength is obtained: O-HW···N > O-HW···O > O-H···OW.

  1. Resonant Scattering of Muonic Hydrogen Atoms and Dynamics of the Muonic Molecular Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, M. C., E-mail: Makoto.Fujiwara@cern.ch [University of British Columbia (Canada); Adamczak, A. [Institute Nuclear Physics (Poland); Bailey, J. M. [Chester Technology (United Kingdom); Beer, G. A. [University of Victoria (Canada); Beveridge, J. L. [TRIUMF (Canada); Faifman, M. P. [Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Huber, T. M. [Gustavus Adolphus College (United States); Kammel, P. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Kim, S. K. [Jeonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Knowles, P. E. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Kunselman, A. R. [University of Wyoming (United States); Markushin, V. E. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Marshal, G. M. [TRIUMF (Canada); Mason, G. R. [University of Victoria (Canada); Mulhauser, F. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Olin, A. [TRIUMF (Canada); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Porcelli, T. A. [University of Northern British Columbia (Canada); Wozniak, J. [Institute Physics and Nuclear Techniques (Poland); Zmeskal, J. [Austrian Academy of Sciences (Austria)

    2001-12-15

    Resonant scattering of muonic hydrogen atoms via back decay of the molecular complex, a key process in the understanding of epithermal muonic molecular formation, is analyzed. The limitations of the effective rate approximation are discussed and the importance of the explicit treatment of the back decay is stressed. An expression of the energy distribution for the back-decayed atoms is given.

  2. Molecular and ionic hydrogen bond formation in fluorous solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Kristi L; Weber, Stephen G

    2009-01-08

    There are only a few studies of noncovalent association in fluorous solvents and even fewer that are quantitative. A full understanding, particularly of stoichiometry and binding strength of noncovalent interactions in fluorous solvents could be very useful in improved molecular-receptor-based extractions, advancements in sensor technologies, crystal engineering, and supramolecular chemistry. This work investigates hydrogen bonding between heterocyclic bases and a perfluoropolyether with a terminal carboxylic acid group (Krytox 157FSH (1)), chiefly in FC-72 (a mixture of perfluorohexanes). In particular, we were interested in whether or not proton transfer occurs, and if so, under what conditions in H-bonded complexes. Continuous variations experiments show that in FC-72 weaker bases (pyrazine, pyrimidine, and quinazoline) form 1:1 complexes with 1, whereas stronger bases (quinoline, pyridine, and isoquinoline) form 1:3 complexes. Ultraviolet and infrared spectral signatures reveal that the 1:1 complexes are molecular (B.HA) whereas the 1:3 complexes are ionic (BH+.A-HAHA). Infrared spectra of 1:3 ionic complexes are discussed in detail. Literature and experimental data on complexes between N-heterocyclic bases and carboxylic acids in a range of solvents are compiled to compare solvent effects on proton transfer. Polar solvents support ionic hydrogen bonds at a 1:1 mol ratio. In nonpolar organic solvents, ionic hydrogen bonds are only observed in complexes with 1:2 (base/acid) stoichiometries. In fluorous solvents, a larger excess of acid, 1:3, is necessary to facilitate proton transfer in hydrogen bonds between carboxylic acids and the bases studied.

  3. Thermochemistry of Alane Complexes for Hydrogen Storage: A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the relative stabilities of alane (AlH3) complexes with electron donors is essential for identifying hydrogen storage materials for vehicular applications that can be regenerated by off-board methods; however, almost no thermodynamic data are available to make this assessment. To fill this gap, we employed the G4(MP2) method to determine heats of formation, entropies, and Gibbs free energies of formation for 38 alane complexes with NH3−nRn (R = Me, Et; n = 0−3), pyridine, pyrazine, triethylenediamine (TEDA), quinuclidine, OH2−nRn (R = Me, Et; n = 0−2), dioxane, and tetrahydrofuran (THF). Monomer, bis, and selected dimer complex geometries were considered. Using these data, we computed the thermodynamics of the key formation and dehydrogenation reactions that would occur during hydrogen delivery and alane regeneration, from which trends in complex stability were identified. These predictions were tested by synthesizing six amine−alane complexes involving trimethylamine, triethylamine, dimethylethylamine, TEDA, quinuclidine, and hexamine and obtaining upper limits of ΔG° for their formation from metallic aluminum. Combining these computational and experimental results, we establish a criterion for complex stability relevant to hydrogen storage that can be used to assess potential ligands prior to attempting synthesis of the alane complex. On the basis of this, we conclude that only a subset of the tertiary amine complexes considered and none of the ether complexes can be successfully formed by direct reaction with aluminum and regenerated in an alane-based hydrogen storage system. PMID:22962624

  4. Measurement of the Formation Rate of Muonic Hydrogen Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V A; Carey, R M; Case, T A; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K R; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rate \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ characterizes the formation of pp\\mu\\ molecules in collisions of muonic p\\mu\\ atoms with hydrogen. In measurements of the basic weak muon capture reaction on the proton to determine the pseudoscalar coupling g_P, capture occurs from both atomic and molecular states. Thus knowledge of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ is required for a correct interpretation of these experiments. Purpose: Recently the MuCap experiment has measured the capture rate \\Lambda_S from the singlet p\\mu\\ atom, employing a low density active target to suppress pp\\mu\\ formation (PRL 110, 12504 (2013)). Nevertheless, given the unprecedented precision of this experiment, the existing experimental knowledge in \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ had to be improved. Method: The MuCap experiment derived the weak capture rate from the muon disappearance rate in ultra-pure hydrogen. By doping the hydrogen with 20 ppm of argon, a competing process to pp\\mu\\ formation was introduced, which allowed the extraction of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ from the observed t...

  5. Donor-hydrogen complexes in crystalline silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Z.N.; Niesen, L; Haas, C; Denteneer, P.J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental results are presented on the study of Sb-H complexes in crystalline silicon, employing Sb-119 --> Sn-119 source Mossbauer spectroscopy and a low-energy H implantation technique. In addition to a visible component, we observe a large decrease of the Mossbauer intensity associated with

  6. Chaetomium thermophilum formate dehydrogenase has high activity in the reduction of hydrogen carbonate (HCO3 -) to formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Aşkın Sevinç; Valjakka, Jarkko; Ruupunen, Jouni; Yildirim, Deniz; Turner, Nicholas J; Turunen, Ossi; Binay, Barış

    2017-01-01

    While formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) have been used for cofactor recycling in chemoenzymatic synthesis, the ability of FDH to reduce CO2 could also be utilized in the conversion of CO2 to useful products via formate (HCOO-). In this study, we investigated the reduction of CO2 in the form of hydrogen carbonate (HCO3-) to formate by FDHs from Candida methylica (CmFDH) and Chaetomium thermophilum (CtFDH) in a NADH-dependent reaction. The catalytic performance with HCO3- as a substrate was evaluated by measuring the kinetic rates and conducting productivity assays. CtFDH showed a higher efficiency in converting HCO3- to formate than CmFDH, whereas CmFDH was better in the oxidation of formate. The pH optimum of the reduction was at pH 7-8. However, the high concentrations of HCO3- reduced the reaction rate. CtFDH was modeled in the presence of HCO3- showing that it fits to the active site. The active site setting for hydride transfer in CO2 reduction was modeled. The hydride donated by NADH would form a favorable contact to the carbon atom of HCO3-, resulting in a surplus of electrons within the molecule. This would cause the complex formed by hydrogen carbonate and the hydride to break into formate and hydroxide ions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Hydrogenation and cleavage of dinitrogen to ammonia with a zirconium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Jaime A; Lobkovsky, Emil; Chirik, Paul J

    2004-02-05

    Molecular nitrogen is relatively inert owing to the strength of its triple bond, nonpolarity and high ionization potential. As a result, the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia under mild conditions has remained a challenge to chemists for more than a century. Although the Haber-Bosch process produces over 100 million tons of ammonia annually for the chemical industry and agriculture, it requires high temperature and pressure, in addition to a catalyst, to induce the combination of hydrogen (H2) and nitrogen (N2). Coordination of molecular nitrogen to transition metal complexes can activate and even rupture the strong N-N bond under mild conditions, with protonation yielding ammonia in stoichiometric and even catalytic yields. But the assembly of N-H bonds directly from H2 and N2 remains challenging: adding H2 to a metal-N2 complex results in the formation of N2 and metal-hydrogen bonds or, in the case of one zirconium complex, in formation of one N-H bond and a bridging hydride. Here we extend our work on zirconium complexes containing cyclopentadienyl ligands and show that adjustment of the ligands allows direct observation of N-H bond formation from N2 and H2. Subsequent warming of the complex cleaves the N-N bond at 45 degrees C, and continued hydrogenation at 85 degrees C results in complete fixation to ammonia.

  8. Ferromagnetism in ZnO:Co originating from a hydrogenated Co-O-Co complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Anh; Zhang, Y B; Assadi, M H N; Yu, A B; Li, S

    2013-03-20

    The effects of hydrogen interstitials and oxygen vacancies on the overall ferromagnetic behaviour of Co doped ZnO (ZnO:Co) have been closely examined using different density functional calculations. The results demonstrate the importance of correcting the bandgap problem of the ZnO host as well as the lack of correlation in Co's 3d states which can severely affect the coupling of H and Co's impurity bands. Our results show that in hydrogenated ZnO:Co, hydrogen interstitial can also stabilize the ferromagnetic interaction at low Co concentrations, but this requires the formation of the in-plane O-H-Co-O-Co complex. In this structure, the hydrogen interstitial forms an anionic complex with the neighbouring oxygen, which polarizes the surrounding oxygen to mediate the ferromagnetism through the superexchange mechanism. An oxygen vacancy by itself would not cause ferromagnetism in ZnO:Co. On the other hand, in the presence of hydrogen interstitials, oxygen vacancies can significantly enhance the magnetic coupling between H and Co-O-Co as a shallow donor if it is far away from the in-plane O-H-Co-O-Co complex. However, the total energy results show that this is much more favoured when the oxygen vacancy is near the in-plane O-H-Co-O-Co complex, which can inhibit the ferromagnetic interaction between Co ions.

  9. π Hydrogen bonded complexes of Acetic acid and Trifluoroacetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Matrix isolation infrared spectra of O-H···π Hydrogen bonded complexes of Acetic acid and Trifluoroacetic acid with Benzene. PUJARINI BANERJEE, INDRANI BHATTACHARYA and TAPAS CHAKRABORTY. ∗. Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata 700 032, India.

  10. Zein/caseinate/pectin complex nanoparticles: Formation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao; Wang, Taoran; Hu, Qiaobin; Luo, Yangchao

    2017-11-01

    In this study, pectin was used as coating material to form zein/caseinate/pectin complex nanoparticles through pH adjustment and heating treatment for potential oral delivery applications. The preparation conditions were studied by applying heating treatment at different pHs, either the isoelectric point of zein (pH 6.2) or caseinate (pH 4.6), or consecutively at both pHs. The particulate characteristics, including particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential were monitored for complex nanoparticles formed under different preparation conditions. The complex nanoparticles generally exhibited particle size smaller than 200nm with narrow distribution, spherical shape, and strong negative charge. Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds were involved in the formation of complex nanoparticles, in addition to electrostatic interactions. Fresh colloidal dispersion and freeze-dried powders varied in their morphology, depending on their preparation conditions. Our results suggested that heating pH and sequence significantly affected the morphology of complex nanoparticles, and pectin coating exerted stabilization effect under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. The present study provides insight into the formation of protein/polysaccharide complex nanoparticles under different preparation conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A model of hydrogen bond formation in phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, D A; McNeil, S; Quinn, B; Zuckermann, M J

    1998-01-19

    We have modelled hydrogen bond formation in phospholipid bilayers formed, in excess water, from lipids with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) headgroups. The hydrogen bonds are formed between the NH3+ group and either of the PO2- or the (sn2 chain) C=O groups. We used a model that represented the conformational states accessible to a PE headgroup by 17 states and modelled lipid dipole-dipole interactions using a non-local electrostatics theory to include the effects of hydrogen bonding in the aqueous medium. We used Monte-Carlo simulation to calculate equilibrium thermodynamic properties of bilayers in the fluid (T = 340 K) or gel (T = 300 K) phases of the bilayer. We defined Eh to be the difference in free energy between a hydrogen bond formed between a pair of lipid groups, and the energy of hydrogen bonds formed between water and those two groups, and we required its average value, [Eh], to be approximately -0.3kcal/mol (approximately -0.2 X 10(-13) erg) as reported by T.-B. Shin, R. Leventis, J.R. Silvius, Biochemistry 30 (1991) 7491. We found: (i) Eh = -0.9 X 10(-13) erg gave [Eh] = -0.21 X 10(-13) erg (gel phase) and [Eh] = -0.19 X 10(-13) erg (fluid phase). (ii) The relative number of C=O groups on the sn2 chain calculated to take part in interlipid hydrogen bonding in the fluid phase compared to the gel is 1.06 which compares well with the experimental ratio of approximately 1.25 (R.N.A.H. Lewis, R.N. McElhaney, Biophys. J. 64 (1993) 1081). The ratio of such groups taking part in interlipid hydrogen bonding compared to water hydrogen bonding in each phase was calculated to lie between 0.16 and 0.17. (iii) We calculated the distribution of positions of the headgroup moieties, P, O, CH2(alpha), CH2(beta) and N, and found that, in both phases, the O lay furthest from the hydrocarbon chain layer (average approximately 5.3A) with the PO2 and NH3 groups lying at approximately 5A. This results in the P-N dipole lying nearly parallel to the bilayer plane in both phases

  12. Bridged transition-metal complexes and uses thereof for hydrogen separation, storage and hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilga, Michael A.; Hallen, Richard T.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a class of organometallic complexes which reversibly react with hydrogen to form dihydrides and processes by which these compounds can be utilized. The class includes bimetallic complexes in which two cyclopentadienyl rings are bridged together and also separately .pi.-bonded to two transition metal atoms. The transition metals are believed to bond with the hydrogen in forming the dihydride. Transition metals such as Fe, Mn or Co may be employed in the complexes although Cr constitutes the preferred metal. A multiple number of ancilliary ligands such as CO are bonded to the metal atoms in the complexes. Alkyl groups and the like may be substituted on the cyclopentadienyl rings. These organometallic compounds may be used in absorption/desorption systems and in facilitated transport membrane systems for storing and separating out H.sub.2 from mixed gas streams such as the produce gas from coal gasification processes.

  13. Metallic nanostructure formation limited by the surface hydrogen on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Kathryn A; Teplyakov, Andrew V

    2010-08-03

    Constant miniaturization of electronic devices and interfaces needed to make them functional requires an understanding of the initial stages of metal growth at the molecular level. The use of metal-organic precursors for metal deposition allows for some control of the deposition process, but the ligands of these precursor molecules often pose substantial contamination problems. One of the ways to alleviate the contamination problem with common copper deposition precursors, such as copper(I) (hexafluoroacetylacetonato) vinyltrimethylsilane, Cu(hfac)VTMS, is a gas-phase reduction with molecular hydrogen. Here we present an alternative method to copper film and nanostructure growth using the well-defined silicon surface. Nearly ideal hydrogen termination of silicon single-crystalline substrates achievable by modern surface modification methods provides a limited supply of a reducing agent at the surface during the initial stages of metal deposition. Spectroscopic evidence shows that the Cu(hfac) fragment is present upon room-temperature adsorption and reacts with H-terminated Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces to deposit metallic copper. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to follow the initial stages of copper nucleation and the formation of copper nanoparticles, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) confirms the presence of hfac fragments on the surfaces of nanoparticles. As the surface hydrogen is consumed, copper nanoparticles are formed; however, this growth stops as the accessible hydrogen is reacted away at room temperature. This reaction sets a reference for using other solid substrates that can act as reducing agents in nanoparticle growth and metal deposition.

  14. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy [Aiken, SC; Ritter, James A [Lexington, SC; Ebner, Armin D [Lexington, SC; Wang, Jun [Columbia, SC; Holland, Charles E [Cayce, SC

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  15. Electrostatics determine vibrational frequency shifts in hydrogen bonded complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Arghya; Mondal, Sohidul Islam; Sen, Saumik; Ghosh, Debashree; Patwari, G Naresh

    2014-12-14

    The red-shifts in the acetylenic C-H stretching vibration of C-H∙∙∙X (X = O, N) hydrogen-bonded complexes increase with an increase in the basicity of the Lewis base. Analysis of various components of stabilization energy suggests that the observed red-shifts are correlated with the electrostatic component of the stabilization energy, while the dispersion modulates the stabilization energy.

  16. Risk and sustainability analysis of complex hydrogen infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Marangon, A.; Carcassi, M.

    2017-01-01

    -based fuels. Therefore, future hydrogen supply and distribution chains will have to address several objectives. Such a complexity is a challenge for risk assessment and risk management of these chains because of the increasing interactions. Improved methods are needed to assess the supply chain as a whole....... The method of “Functional modelling” is discussed in this paper. It will be shown how it could be a basis for other decision support methods for comprehensive risk and sustainability assessments....

  17. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  18. Hydrogen bonded complexes of acetylene and boric acid: A matrix isolation infrared and ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, K.; Ramanathan, N.; Kar, Bishnu Prasad; Viswanathan, K. S.

    2011-04-01

    The infrared spectra of the hydrogen bonded complexes of acetylene-boric acid have been investigated in solid nitrogen matrix. We have observed the 1:1 acetylene-boric acid complex in the nitrogen matrix. Formation of the complex was evidenced from the shifts in the vibrational frequencies corresponding to the modes involving the acetylene and boric acid submolecules in the complex. The structure of the complexes and the energies were computed at HF, B3LYP and MP2 levels of theory using 6-31++G ** basis sets. Only one minimum was obtained, which corresponded to a complex with both O sbnd H⋯π and C sbnd H⋯O interactions. In this complex boric acid acts as a proton donor to the acetylene π-cloud and proton acceptor to the acidic hydrogen in acetylene. The computed vibrational frequencies of acetylene-boric acid complexes at B3LYP/6-31++G ** level corroborated well with the experimental frequencies. Calculations were also performed for the higher 2:1 and 3:1 acetylene-boric acid complexes.

  19. Hydrogen-bonded encapsulation complexes in protic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Toru; Rebek, Julius

    2004-11-03

    We describe here the behavior of the hydrogen-bonded capsule 1.1 and its complexes in protic solvents. The kinetics and thermodynamics of the encapsulation process were determined through conventional (1)H NMR methods. The enthalpies and entropies of encapsulation are both positive, indicating a process that liberates solvent molecules. The rates of dissociation-association of the capsule were comparable to the rates for the in-out exchange of large guests, which suggests that guest exchange occurs by complete dissociation of the capsule in protic solvents. The stability of the hydrogen-bonded capsule 1.1 toward protic solvents depends strongly on the guests, with the best guest being dimethylstilbene 8. The results establish guidelines for the properties of capsules that could be accessed in water.

  20. Dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation by a trinuclear titanium polyhydride complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Takanori; Hu, Shaowei; Luo, Gen; Kang, Xiaohui; Luo, Yi; Hou, Zhaomin

    2013-06-28

    Both the Haber-Bosch and biological ammonia syntheses are thought to rely on the cooperation of multiple metals in breaking the strong N≡N triple bond and forming an N-H bond. This has spurred investigations of the reactivity of molecular multimetallic hydrides with dinitrogen. We report here the reaction of a trinuclear titanium polyhydride complex with dinitrogen, which induces dinitrogen cleavage and partial hydrogenation at ambient temperature and pressure. By (1)H and (15)N nuclear magnetic resonance, x-ray crystallographic, and computational studies of some key reaction steps and products, we have determined that the dinitrogen (N2) reduction proceeds sequentially through scission of a N2 molecule bonded to three Ti atoms in a μ-η(1):η(2):η(2)-end-on-side-on fashion to give a μ2-N/μ3-N dinitrido species, followed by intramolecular hydrogen migration from Ti to the μ2-N nitrido unit.

  1. Hydrogen Evolution Catalyzed by Cobalt Diimine-Dioxime Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Mimicking photosynthesis and producing solar fuels is an appealing way to store the huge amount of renewable energy from the sun in a durable and sustainable way. Hydrogen production through water splitting has been set as a first-ranking target for artificial photosynthesis. Pursuing that goal requires the development of efficient and stable catalytic systems, only based on earth abundant elements, for the reduction of protons from water to molecular hydrogen. Cobalt complexes based on glyoxime ligands, called cobaloximes, emerged ten years ago as a first generation of such catalysts. They are now widely utilized for the construction of photocatalytic systems for hydrogen evolution. In this Account, we describe our contribution to the development of a second generation of catalysts, cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes. While displaying similar catalytic activities as cobaloximes, these catalysts prove more stable against hydrolysis under strongly acidic conditions thanks to the tetradentate nature of the diimine-dioxime ligand. Importantly, H2 evolution proceeds via proton-coupled electron transfer steps involving the oxime bridge as a protonation site, reproducing the mechanism at play in the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. This feature allows H2 to be evolved at modest overpotentials, i.e. close to the thermodynamic equilibrium over a wide range of acid-base conditions in non-aqueous solutions. Derivatization of the diimine-dioxime ligand at the hydrocarbon chain linking the two imine functions enables the covalent grafting of the complex onto electrode surfaces in a more convenient manner than for the parent bis-bidentate cobaloximes. Accordingly we attached diimine-dioxime cobalt catalysts onto carbon nanotubes and demonstrated the catalytic activity of the resulting molecular-based electrode for hydrogen evolution from aqueous acetate buffer. The stability of immobilized catalysts was found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of catalysts

  2. Hydrogen evolution catalyzed by cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent

    2015-05-19

    Mimicking photosynthesis and producing solar fuels is an appealing way to store the huge amount of renewable energy from the sun in a durable and sustainable way. Hydrogen production through water splitting has been set as a first-ranking target for artificial photosynthesis. Pursuing that goal requires the development of efficient and stable catalytic systems, only based on earth abundant elements, for the reduction of protons from water to molecular hydrogen. Cobalt complexes based on glyoxime ligands, called cobaloximes, emerged 10 years ago as a first generation of such catalysts. They are now widely utilized for the construction of photocatalytic systems for hydrogen evolution. In this Account, we describe our contribution to the development of a second generation of catalysts, cobalt diimine-dioxime complexes. While displaying similar catalytic activities as cobaloximes, these catalysts prove more stable against hydrolysis under strongly acidic conditions thanks to the tetradentate nature of the diimine-dioxime ligand. Importantly, H2 evolution proceeds via proton-coupled electron transfer steps involving the oxime bridge as a protonation site, reproducing the mechanism at play in the active sites of hydrogenase enzymes. This feature allows H2 to be evolved at modest overpotentials, that is, close to the thermodynamic equilibrium over a wide range of acid-base conditions in nonaqueous solutions. Derivatization of the diimine-dioxime ligand at the hydrocarbon chain linking the two imine functions enables the covalent grafting of the complex onto electrode surfaces in a more convenient manner than for the parent bis-bidentate cobaloximes. Accordingly, we attached diimine-dioxime cobalt catalysts onto carbon nanotubes and demonstrated the catalytic activity of the resulting molecular-based electrode for hydrogen evolution from aqueous acetate buffer. The stability of immobilized catalysts was found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of catalysts in the

  3. Tuberous sclerosis complex proteins control axon formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Jin; Di Nardo, Alessia; Kramvis, Ioannis; Meikle, Lynsey; Kwiatkowski, David J; Sahin, Mustafa; He, Xi

    2008-09-15

    Axon formation is fundamental for brain development and function. TSC1 and TSC2 are two genes, mutations in which cause tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a disease characterized by tumor predisposition and neurological abnormalities including epilepsy, mental retardation, and autism. Here we show that Tsc1 and Tsc2 have critical functions in mammalian axon formation and growth. Overexpression of Tsc1/Tsc2 suppresses axon formation, whereas a lack of Tsc1 or Tsc2 function induces ectopic axons in vitro and in the mouse brain. Tsc2 is phosphorylated and inhibited in the axon but not dendrites. Inactivation of Tsc1/Tsc2 promotes axonal growth, at least in part, via up-regulation of neuronal polarity SAD kinase, which is also elevated in cortical tubers of a TSC patient. Our results reveal key roles of TSC1/TSC2 in neuronal polarity, suggest a common pathway regulating polarization/growth in neurons and cell size in other tissues, and have implications for the understanding of the pathogenesis of TSC and associated neurological disorders and for axonal regeneration.

  4. Computational mechanistic study of the hydrogenation of carbonate to methanol catalyzed by the Ru(II)PNN complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixia; Wen, Mingwei; Wang, Zhi-Xiang

    2012-05-21

    Density functional theory computations have been carried out to study the mechanism of hydrogenation-based transformation of dimethyl carbonate to methanol, catalyzed by Ru(II)PNN catalyst. The energetic results show that the catalytic transformation includes three sequential stages consistently involving the catalyst: (stage I) transformation of dimethyl carbonate (3) to methyl formate (5) and methanol; (stage II) transformation of methyl formate 5 to formaldehyde and methanol; (stage III) hydrogenation of formaldehyde to methanol. Stages I and II proceed similarly and follow three steps: hydrogen activation, formation of a hemiacetal intermediate via stepwise hydrogen transfer to dimethyl carbonate in stage I or methyl fomate in stage II, and subsequent decomposition of the hemiacetal intermediate to afford methanol. Hydrogenation via carbonyl insertion into the Ru-H bond is less favorable than the stepwise hydrogen-transfer mechanism. Decomposition of hemiacetal takes places by first breaking the hemiacetal O-H bond to give an alkoxide complex, followed by deprotonation of the benzylic arm ligand to the adjacent methoxy group. Comparing the hydrogenation steps in the three stages, hydrogenation in stage I is most difficult, that in stage II is less difficult, and that in stage III is easiest in terms of both kinetics and thermodynamics. This can be ascribed to the stronger electrophilicity of the carbonyl group in methyl formate or formaldehyde than that in dimethyl carbonate and fewer steric effects between the catalyst and methyl formate or formaldehyde than that between the catalyst and dimethyl carbonate. Thermodynamically, both stages I and II are uphill, but stage III is downhill significantly, which is the driving force for the catalytic transformation. The study indicates that the methanol product could facilitate the hydrogen activation involved in the transformation, implying that transformation could be accelerated by initially adding methanol.

  5. Discrimination of hydrogen-bonded complexes with axial chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2002-10-01

    The chiral self-discrimination of twelve molecules showing axial chirality has been studied. They included peroxides, hydrazines, carboxylic acids, amides, and allenes. The homo and heterochiral dimers of the selected compounds, that present two hydrogen bonds, have been studied by means of density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31+G**) and ab initio (MP2/6-31+G** and MP2/6-311++G**) methods. The energetic differences found for the complexes of each compound have been rationalized based on their electron density maps and the natural bond orbital analysis. In some cases, intermolecular oxygen-oxygen interactions have been found and interpreted as additional stabilizing contacts.

  6. A novel liquid organic hydrogen carrier system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Peng; Fogler, Eran; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Iron, Mark A.; Milstein, David

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is an efficient green fuel, but its low energy density when stored under high pressure or cryogenically, and safety issues, presents significant disadvantages; hence finding efficient and safe hydrogen carriers is a major challenge. Of special interest are liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs), which can be readily loaded and unloaded with considerable amounts of hydrogen. However, disadvantages include high hydrogen pressure requirements, high reaction temperatures for both hydro...

  7. The Influence of the Position of the Double Bond and Ring Size on the Stability of Hydrogen Bonded Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shumin; Tang, Shanshan; Tsona, Narcisse T; Du, Lin

    2017-09-12

    To study the influence of the position of the double bond and ring size on the stability of hydrogen bonded complexes, the 1:1 complexes formed between 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) and three heterocyclic compounds including 2,3-dihydrofuran (2,3-DHF), 2,5-dihydrofuran (2,5-DHF) and 3,4-dihydropyran (3,4-DHP) were investigated systematically. The formation of hydrogen bonded TFE-2,3-DHF, TFE-2,5-DHF and TFE-3,4-DHP complexes were identified by gas phase FTIR spectroscopy at room temperature, and the OH-stretching fundamental transition of TFE was red shifted upon complexation. The competition between the O atom and π-electrons bonding sites within the complexes was studied, and the O-H···π type hydrogen bond was found to be less stable than the O-H···O in all three cases. The observed red shifts of the OH-stretching fundamental transitions in the complexes were attributed to the formation of O-H···O hydrogen bond. Equilibrium constants of the complexation reactions were determined from measured and calculated OH-stretching fundamental intensities. Both theoretical calculations and experimental results reveal that the hydrogen bond strengths in the complexes follow the sequence: TFE-2,5-DHF > TFE-2,3-DHF ≈ TFE-3,4-DHP, thus the position of the double bond exerts significantly larger influence than ring size on the stability of the selected hydrogen bonded complexes.

  8. Blister formation in Mo/Si multilayered structures induced by hydrogen ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Bos, R. A.J.M.; Lee, C. J.; Benschop, J. P.H.; Bijkerk, F.

    2017-01-01

    We report on blister formation in nanometer thick Mo/Si multilayer structures due to exposure to hydrogen ion fluxes. The influence of hydrogen flux and ion energy for blister formation have been measured and compared to a blister model. The blister number density increases significantly around 100

  9. Superhalogens as Building Blocks of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Ambrish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Superhalogens are species whose electron affinity (EA) or vertical detachment energy (VDE) exceed to those of halogen. These species typically consist of a central electropositive atom with electronegative ligands. The EA or VDE of species can be further increased by using superhalogen as ligands, which are termed as hyperhalogen. Having established BH4- as a superhalogen, we have studied BH4-x(BH4)x- (x = 1 to 4) hyperhalogen anions and their Li-complexes, LiBH4-x(BH4)x using density functional theory. The VDE of these anions is larger than that of BH4-, which increases with the increase in the number of peripheral BH4 moieties (x). The hydrogen storage capacity of LiBH4-x(BH4)x complexes is higher but binding energy is smaller than that of LiBH4, a typical complex hydride. The linear correlation between dehydrogenation energy of LiBH4-x(BH4)x complexes and VDE of BH4-x(BH4)x- anions is established. These complexes are found to be thermodynamically stable against dissociation into LiBH4 and borane. This stud...

  10. Similar strength of the NH⋯O and NH⋯S hydrogen bonds in binary complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Cecilie Lindholm; Jensen, Christine S.; Mackeprang, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    . The topological analyses reveal that several hydrogen bond interactions are present in the complexes. The calculated binding energies, geometric parameters, observed redshifts, and topological analyses suggest that oxygen and sulfur are hydrogen bond acceptors of similar strength. (Graph Presented)....

  11. Development of novel catalysts for the photocatalytic hydrogen formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilz, Thomas David

    2011-11-16

    For future conversion of sunlight into chemical energy, intramolecular systems for artifical photosynthesis were developed in several stages. This comprised the fabrication of novel ligands and the resulting charge transfer chromophores (Ru(bpy)3-type) and/or catalytically active complexes (Pt, Pd). These were combined into heteronuclear diades consisting of covalently bonded functional subunits. In particular, the chromophores and catalysis centers were bridged so that their individual properties were retained while their individual functions were combined into a supramolecular photocatalyst. This makes it possible to reduce protons to hydrogen on these catalysts when exposed to light. As bridging units, oligodentate ligands were produced and used that can coordinate the active metal centers via bipyridines and N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC). A number of such heterobimetal complexes, their initial compounds and appropriate reference compounds were produced, characterized, and compared. Apart from structural, photophysical and electrochemical analyses, also successful catalysis experiment were carried out with the manufactured photocatalysts for light-induced hydrogen production from water. Further representative control experiments and dynamic light scattering analyses were carried out in order to gain deeper understanding of the processes going on during catalysis. By comparing the properties of the fabricated catalysts with selected reference compounds, information was obtained on the structure-property relationships of the systems. (orig.) [German] Fuer die zukuenftige Umwandlung von Sonnenlicht in chemische Energie wurden schrittweise intramolekular arbeitende Systeme fuer eine artifizielle Photosynthese aufgebaut. Dabei wurde eine Anzahl von neuen Liganden und den resultierenden Charge-Transfer-Chromophoren (Ru(bpy)3-artig) bzw. katalyseaktiven Komplexen (Pt, Pd) hergestellt. Diese wurden zu heteronuklearen Diaden zusammengefuegt, welche aus kovalent

  12. Formation of Glycerol through Hydrogenation of CO Ice under Prestellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseev, G.; Chuang, K.-J.; Ioppolo, S.; Qasim, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2017-06-01

    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, i.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic-ray-induced UV photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via nonenergetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the “CO freeze-out stage” in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol—HOCH2CH(OH)CH2OH—a three-carbon-bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical-radical and radical-molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde—HOCH2CH(OH)CHO—is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.

  13. Formation of Glycerol through Hydrogenation of CO Ice under Prestellar Core Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedoseev, G.; Chuang, K.-J.; Qasim, D.; Linnartz, H. [Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ioppolo, S. [School of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Dishoeck, E. F. van, E-mail: gfedo@oact.inaf.it [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2017-06-10

    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, i.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic-ray-induced UV photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via nonenergetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the “CO freeze-out stage” in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol—HOCH{sub 2}CH(OH)CH{sub 2}OH—a three-carbon-bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical–radical and radical–molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde—HOCH{sub 2}CH(OH)CHO—is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.

  14. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  15. Bane of Hydrogen-Bond Formation on the Photoinduced Charge-Transfer Process in Donor–Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2017-03-14

    Controlling the ultrafast dynamical process of photoinduced charge transfer at donor acceptor interfaces remains a major challenge for physical chemistry and solar cell communities. The process is complicated by the involvement of other complex dynamical processes, including hydrogen bond formation, energy transfer, and solvation dynamics occurring on similar time scales. In this study, we explore the remarkable impact of hydrogen-bond formation on the interfacial charge transfer between a negatively charged electron donating anionic porphyrin and a positively charged electron accepting pi-conjugated polymer, as a model system in solvents with different polarities and capabilities for hydiogen bonding using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Unlike the conventional understanding of the key role of hydrogen bonding in promoting the charge-transfer process, our steadystate and time-resolved results reveal that the intervening hydrogen-bonding environment and, consequently, the probable longer spacing between the donor and acceptor molecules significantly hinders the charge-transfer process between them. These results show that site-specific hydrogen bonding and geometric considerations between donor and acceptor can be exploited to control both the charge-transfer dynamics and its efficiency not only at donor acceptor interfaces but also in complex biological systems.

  16. Theoretical study of the possibility of glycin with thiotriazoline complexes formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Kucherenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain strokes are widely spread all over the world and are among the most dangerous for the population. Often it leads to death, complete or partial loss of ability to work. The correction of imbalance of Excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems by activation of natural inhibitory processes is a promising direction of primary neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia. Particular attention is drawn to the natural inhibitory neurotransmitter – glycine and its role in the mechanisms of acute cerebral ischemia. There are data on the ability of the thiotriazoline antioxidant to potentiate the therapeutic effect of neurometabolic cerebroprotectors. Therefore, the creation of new combined preparation based on glycine with thiotriazoline is important today. Objective: to study the structure, and estimate the energy of formation and geometric characteristics of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds for complexes which are formed with glycine, 3-methyl-1,2,4-triazolyl-5-thioacetate (MTTA and morpholine. Method of calculation. The initial approximation to the structure of the complexes was obtained with the help of molecular docking procedure using the AutoDock Vina program. The resulting three-component complexes were preliminarily optimized by the semiempirical PM7 method, taking into account the outward influences, which was simulated by the COSMO method. The calculations were carried out using the MOPAC2012 program. The complexes were optimized using the density functional method with the empirical dispersion correction B97-D3/SVP+COSMO (Water using geometric correction for the incompleteness of the gCP basic set. A more accurate calculation of the solvation energy was carried out by SMD method. Calculations by the density functional method were carried out using the ORCA 3.0.3 program. The energy of formation of complexes in solution was calculated as the difference between the free Gibbs energies of the solvated complex and its individual solvated

  17. Infrared intensities and charge mobility in hydrogen bonded complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galimberti, Daria; Milani, Alberto; Castiglioni, Chiara [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta,” Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    The analytical model for the study of charge mobility in the molecules presented by Galimberti et al.[J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164115 (2013)] is applied to hydrogen bonded planar dimers. Atomic charges and charge fluxes are obtained from density functional theory computed atomic polar tensors and related first derivatives, thus providing an interpretation of the IR intensity enhancement of the X–H stretching band observed upon aggregation. Our results show that both principal and non-principal charge fluxes have an important role for the rationalization of the spectral behavior; moreover, they demonstrate that the modulation of the charge distribution during vibrational motions of the –XH⋯Y– fragment is not localized exclusively on the atoms directly involved in hydrogen bonding. With these premises we made some correlations between IR intensities, interaction energies, and charge fluxes. The model was tested on small dimers and subsequently to the bigger one cytosine-guanine. Thus, the model can be applied to complex systems.

  18. Entropy and complexity analysis of hydrogenic Rydberg atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Rosa, S. [Instituto Carlos I de Fisica Teorica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, 18071-Granada (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012-Sevilla (Spain); Toranzo, I. V.; Dehesa, J. S. [Instituto Carlos I de Fisica Teorica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, 18071-Granada (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, 18071-Granada (Spain); Sanchez-Moreno, P. [Instituto Carlos I de Fisica Teorica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, 18071-Granada (Spain); Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Universidad de Granada, 18071-Granada (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    The internal disorder of hydrogenic Rydberg atoms as contained in their position and momentum probability densities is examined by means of the following information-theoretic spreading quantities: the radial and logarithmic expectation values, the Shannon entropy, and the Fisher information. As well, the complexity measures of Cramer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon, and Lopez Ruiz-Mancini-Calvet types are investigated in both reciprocal spaces. The leading term of these quantities is rigorously calculated by use of the asymptotic properties of the concomitant entropic functionals of the Laguerre and Gegenbauer orthogonal polynomials which control the wavefunctions of the Rydberg states in both position and momentum spaces. The associated generalized Heisenberg-like, logarithmic and entropic uncertainty relations are also given. Finally, application to linear (l= 0), circular (l=n- 1), and quasicircular (l=n- 2) states is explicitly done.

  19. Chemical bonding of hydrogen molecules to transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubas, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The complex W(CO){sub 3}(PR{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}) (CO = carbonyl; PR{sub 3} = organophosphine) was prepared and was found to be a stable crystalline solid under ambient conditions from which the hydrogen can be reversibly removed in vacuum or under an inert atmosphere. The weakly bonded H{sub 2} exchanges easily with D{sub 2}. This complex represents the first stable compound containing intermolecular interaction of a sigma-bond (H-H) with a metal. The primary interaction is reported to be donation of electron density from the H{sub 2} bonding electron pair to a vacant metal d-orbital. A series of complexes of molybdenum of the type Mo(CO)(H{sub 2})(R{sub 2}PCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}PR{sub 2}){sub 2} were prepared by varying the organophosphine substitutent to demonstrate that it is possible to bond either dihydrogen or dihydride by adjusting the electron-donating properties of the co-ligands. Results of infrared and NMR spectroscopic studies are reported. 20 refs., 5 fig.

  20. Importance of hydrogen bonds to stabilities of copper water complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukrat, Kanjarat; Parasuk, Vudhichai

    2007-10-01

    An investigation of structures and stabilization energies of copper-water complexes is presented. Possible cluster geometries of [Cu(H 2O) n] 2+ for n = 1-8 were optimized using HF/6-31G(d,p), and energies were determined at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) levels of theory. In addition, for n = 6, 7, and 8 geometry optimizations at MP2/6-311g(d,p) have been carried out. The basis set effect on stabilization energies was also considered by performing MP2 with 6-31++G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311G(2df,p) single point energy calculations. Only five- and six-fold coordination complexes were obtained with square pyramid (spy) and octahedral (oct) copper coordination as their most stable structures. The hydrogen bonds which form between water molecules in the first and second solvation shell play an important role for the stabilities of the complexes.

  1. Thermodynamics for complex formation between palladium(ii) and oxalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilný, Radomír; Lubal, Přemysl; Elding, Lars I

    2014-08-28

    Complex formation between [Pd(H2O)4](2+) and oxalate (ox = C2O4(2-)) has been studied spectrophoto-metrically in aqueous solution at variable temperature, ionic strength and pH. Thermodynamic parameters at 298.2 K and 1.00 mol dm(-3) HClO4 ionic medium for the complex formation [Pd(H2O)4](2+) + H2ox ⇄ [Pd(H2O)2(ox)] + 2H3O(+) with equilibrium constant K1,H (in mol dm(-3)) are log10K1,H = 3.38 ± 0.08, ΔH = -33 ± 3 kJ mol(-1), and ΔS = -48 ± 11 J K(-1) mol(-1), as determined from spectrophotometric equilibrium titrations at 15.0, 20.0, 25.0 and 31.0 °C. Thermodynamic overall stability constants β (in (mol dm(-3))(-n), n = 1,2) for [Pd(H2O)2(ox)] and [Pd(ox)2](2-) at zero ionic strength and 298.2 K, defined as the equilibrium constants for the reaction Pd(2+) + nox(2-) ⇄ [Pd(ox)n](2-2n) (water molecules omitted) are log10β = 9.04 ± 0.06 and log10β = 13.1 ± 0.3, respectively, calculated by use of Specific Ion Interaction Theory from spectrophotometric titrations with initial hydrogen ion concentrations of 1.00, 0.100 and 0.0100 mol dm(-3) and ionic strengths of 1.00, 2.00 or 3.00 mol dm(-3). The values derived together with literature data give estimated overall stability constants for Pd(ii) compounds such as [Pd(en)(ox)] and cis-[Pd(NH3)2Cl2], some of them analogs to Pt(ii) complexes used in cancer treatment. The palladium oxalato complexes are significantly more stable than palladium(ii) complexes with monodentate O-bonding ligands. A comparison between several different palladium complexes shows that different parameters contribute to the stability variations observed. These are discussed together with the so-called chelate effect.

  2. Formate stability and carbonate hydrogenation on strained Cu overlayers on Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii; Andersson, Klas Jerker; Nerlov, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    Formate (HCOO) synthesis, decomposition and the hydrogenation of carbonate (CO3) on Cu overlayers deposited on a Pt(111) single crystal are investigated to examine the reactivity of a Cu surface under tensile strain with defects present. Formate is synthesized from a 0.5 bar mixture of 70% CO2 an...... of formate on the surface, or any other hydrogenation product, could not be established during or after H2 exposure by PM-IRRAS, EELS or TPD. Even so, the results suggest that carbonate and its hydrogenation may constitute a relevant pathway to methanol production....

  3. Highly efficient hydrogen storage system based on ammonium bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium over palladium nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji; Yang, Lisha; Lu, Mi; Lin, Hongfei

    2015-03-01

    A highly efficient, reversible hydrogen storage-evolution process has been developed based on the ammonium bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium over the same carbon-supported palladium nanocatalyst. This heterogeneously catalyzed hydrogen storage system is comparable to the counterpart homogeneous systems and has shown fast reaction kinetics of both the hydrogenation of ammonium bicarbonate and the dehydrogenation of ammonium formate under mild operating conditions. By adjusting temperature and pressure, the extent of hydrogen storage and evolution can be well controlled in the same catalytic system. Moreover, the hydrogen storage system based on aqueous-phase ammonium formate is advantageous owing to its high volumetric energy density. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The effect of large amplitude motions on the vibrational intensities in hydrogen bonded complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Hänninen, Vesa; Halonen, Lauri

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a model to calculate accurately the intensity of the hydrogen bonded XH-stretching vibrational transition in hydrogen bonded complexes. In the Local Mode Perturbation Theory (LMPT) model, the unperturbed system is described by a local mode (LM) model, which is perturbed...... by the intermolecular modes of the hydrogen bonded system that couple with the intramolecular vibrations of the donor unit through the potential energy surface. We have applied the model to three complexes containing water as the donor unit and different acceptor units, providing a series of increasing complex binding...... of the fundamental hydrogen bonded OH-stretching transition relative to the simpler LM model....

  5. Experimental measurement and theory of substituent effects in π-hydrogen bonding: complexes of substituted phenols with benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Valia; Ilieva, Sonia; Galabov, Boris; Schaefer, Henry F

    2014-08-01

    IR spectroscopic experiments and theoretical DFT computations reveal the effects of aromatic substituents on π-hydrogen bonding between monosubstituted phenol derivatives and benzene. Simultaneous formation of two π-hydrogen bonds (red-shifting O-H···π and blue-shifting ortho-C-H···π) contribute to the stability of these complexes. The interaction of the acidic phenol O-H proton-donating group with the benzene π-system dominates the complex formation. The experimental shifts of O-H stretching frequencies for the different phenol complexes vary in the range 45-74 cm(-1). Strong effects on hydrogen-bonding energies and frequency shifts of electron-withdrawing aromatic substituents and very weak influence of electron-donating groups have been established. Experimental quantities and theoretical parameters are employed in rationalizing the properties of these complexes. The acidities of the proton-donating phenols describe quantitatively the hydrogen-bonding process. The results obtained provide clear evidence that, when the structural variations are in the proton-donating species, the substituent effects on π-hydrogen bonding follow classic mechanisms, comprising both resonance and direct through-space influences. The performance of three alternative DFT functionals (B3LYP, B97-D, and PBE0 combined with the 6-311++G(2df,2p) basis set) in predicting the O-H frequency shifts upon complexation is examined. For comparison, O-H frequency shifts for several complexes were also determined at MP2/6-31++G(d,p).

  6. Accurate thermodynamic properties of gas phase hydrogen bonded complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anne S; Maroun, Zeina; Mackeprang, Kasper; Frandsen, Benjamin N; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2016-08-24

    We have measured the infrared spectra of ethanol·dimethylamine and methanol·dimethylamine complexes in the 299-374 K temperature range, and have determined the enthalpy of complex formation (ΔH) to be -31.1 ± 2 and -29.5 ± 2 kJ mol(-1), respectively. The corresponding values of the Gibbs free energy (ΔG) are determined from the experimental integrated absorbance and a calculated oscillator strength of the OH-stretching vibrational transition to be 4.1 ± 0.3 and 3.9 ± 0.3 kJ mol(-1) at 302 and 300 K, respectively. The entropy, ΔS is determined from the values of ΔH and ΔG to be -117 ± 7 and -111 ± 10 J (mol K)(-1) for the ethanol·dimethylamine and methanol·dimethylamine complexes, respectively. The determined ΔH, ΔG and ΔS values of the two complexes are similar, as expected by the similarity to their donor molecules ethanol and methanol. Values of ΔH, ΔG and ΔS in chemical reactions are often obtained from quantum chemical calculations. However, these calculated values have limited accuracy and large variations are found using different methods. The accuracy of the present ΔH, ΔG and ΔS values is such that the benchmarking of theoretical methods is possible.

  7. Interconversion between formate and hydrogen carbonate by tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase-catalyzed mediated bioelectrocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kento Sakai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have focused on the catalytic properties of tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase (FoDH1 from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 to construct a bioelectrochemical interconversion system between formate (HCOO− and hydrogen carbonate (HCO3−. FoDH1 catalyzes both of the HCOO oxidation and the HCO3− reduction with several artificial dyes. The bi-molecular reaction rate constants between FoDH1 and the artificial electron acceptors and NAD+ (as the natural electron acceptor show the property called a linear free energy relationship (LFER, indicating that FoDH1 would have no specificity to NAD+. Similar LFER is also observed for the catalytic reduction of HCO3−. The reversible reaction between HCOO− and HCO3− through FoDH1 has been realized on cyclic voltammetry by using methyl viologen (MV as a mediator and by adjusting pH from the thermodynamic viewpoint. Potentiometric measurements have revealed that the three redox couples, MV2+/MV·−+, HCOO−/HCO3−, FoDH1 (ox/red, reach an equilibrium in the bulk solution when the two-way bioelectrocatalysis proceeds in the presence of FoDH1 and MV. The steady-state voltammograms with two-way bioelectrocatalytic properties are interpreted on a simple model by considering the solution equilibrium.

  8. The elusive ≡C-H···O complex in the hydrogen bonded systems of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Hydrogen-bonded complexes of phenylacetylene (PhAc) with methanol (MeOH) and diethylether. (DEE) were studied using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. This study specifically searched for the ≡C-. H···O hydrogen bonded complex in these systems, which manifest a n-σ* interaction and which is a local.

  9. The elusive≡ CH··· O complex in the hydrogen bonded systems of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen-bonded complexes of phenylacetylene (PhAc) with methanol (MeOH) and diethylether (DEE) were studied using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. This study specifically searched for the ≡CH · · ·O hydrogen bonded complex in these systems, which manifest a n-σ* interaction and which is a local minimum ...

  10. Track formation in a liquid hydrogen ultrasonic bubble chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, R C A; Jarman, P D

    1973-01-01

    Track sensitivity to minimum ionising particles has been demonstrated in liquid hydrogen using only an intense ultrasonic field. Carefully designed transducer systems are shown to be capable of producing pressure amplitudes >2.8 atm in a standing wave system in liquid hydrogen. The growth of bubbles to visible size (0.1 mm) in less than 0.2 ms, and their collapse in less than 15 ms, indicates that rapid cycling rates of 50-100 pulses per second may be feasible with this technique. (11 refs).

  11. Ligand effects on the hydrogenation of biomass-inspired substrates with bifunctional Ru, Ir, and Rh complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Eveline; Jongbloed, Linda S; Tromp, Dorette S; Lutz, Martin; de Bruin, Bas; Elsevier, Cornelis J

    2013-09-01

    We herein report on the application and structural investigation of a new set of complexes that contain bidentate N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and primary amine moieties of the type [M(arene)Cl(L)] [M=Ru, Ir, or Rh; arene=p-cymene or pentamethylcyclopentadienyl; L=1-(2-aminophenyl)-3-(n-alkyl)imidazol-2-ylidine]. These complexes were tested and compared in the hydrogenation of acetophenone with hydrogen. Structural variations in the chelate ring size of the heteroditopic ligand revealed that smaller chelate ring sizes in combination with ring conjugation in the ligand are beneficial for the activity of this type of catalyst, favoring an inner-sphere coordination pathway. Additionally, increasing the steric bulk of the alkyl substituent on the NHC aided the reaction, showing almost no induction period and formation of a more active catalyst for the n-butyl complex relative to complexes with smaller Me and Et substituents. As is common in hydrogenation reactions, the activity of the complexes decreases in the order Ru>Ir>Rh. The application of [Ru(p-cym)Cl(L)]PF6 , which outperforms its reported analogues, has been successfully extended to the hydrogenation of more challenging biomass-inspired substrates. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Formation of Hydrogen-Ion in Isomolar Solution of Hydrochloric and Hydrobromic Acids and Their Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Kovaleva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the presence of a large amount of factual material on thermodynamic parameters of complexation of agents in different solvents, including mixed ones, obtained knowledge is specific in nature. In order to identify more general patterns, studies are relevant that would allow to interpret the obtained data taking into account the interaction between chemical forms in solutions. This paper presents a general approach to studying weak ionic interactions in solutions that allows to simultaneously determine the constants of these interactions and the parameters characterizing the influence of changes in the ionic environment on these constants by the example of chlorides and bromides of alkali metals. The obtained constants for hydrosulfate-ion formation and the imperfection parameters can be a reference material for more accurate calculation of the concentration of hydrogen ions in sulfuric acid solutions. The developed approach and patterns identified in the work can be used to study the balanced states for formation of low and medium stable complexes.

  13. Efficient transfer hydrogenation reaction Catalyzed by a dearomatized PN 3P ruthenium pincer complex under base-free Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    He, Lipeng

    2012-03-01

    A dearomatized complex [RuH(PN 3P)(CO)] (PN 3PN, N′-bis(di-tert-butylphosphino)-2,6-diaminopyridine) (3) was prepared by reaction of the aromatic complex [RuH(Cl)(PN 3P)(CO)] (2) with t-BuOK in THF. Further treatment of 3 with formic acid led to the formation of a rearomatized complex (4). These new complexes were fully characterized and the molecular structure of complex 4 was further confirmed by X-ray crystallography. In complex 4, a distorted square-pyramidal geometry around the ruthenium center was observed, with the CO ligand trans to the pyridinic nitrogen atom and the hydride located in the apical position. The dearomatized complex 3 displays efficient catalytic activity for hydrogen transfer of ketones in isopropanol. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Complex Metal Hydrides for hydrogen storage and solid-state ion conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payandeh GharibDoust, SeyedHosein

    and electricity in batteries. However, both hydrogen and electricity must be stored in a very dense way to be useful, e.g. for mobile applications. Complex metal hydrides have high hydrogen density and have been studied during the past twenty years in hydrogen storage systems. Moreover, they have shown high ionic...... conductivities which promote their application as solid electrolytes in batteries. This dissertation presents the synthesis and characterization of a variety of complex metal hydrides and explores their hydrogen storage properties and ionic conductivity. Five halide free rare earth borohydrides RE(BH4)3, (RE...

  15. Non-LTE hydrogen-line formation in moving prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, P.; Rompolt, B.

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of hydrogen-line brightness variations, depending on the prominence-velocity changes were investigated. By solving the NON-Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) problem for hydrogen researchers determine quantitatively the effect of Doppler brightening and/or Doppler dimming (DBE, DDE) in the lines of Lyman and Balmer series. It is demonstrated that in low-density prominence plasmas, DBE in H alpha and H beta lines can reach a factor of three for velocities around 160 km/sec, while the L alpha line exhibits typical DDE. L beta brightness variations follow from a combined DBE in the H alpha and DDE in L alpha and L beta itself, providing that all relevant multilevel interlocking processes are taken into account.

  16. Foam formation in a biotechnological process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, W.E.; Marcelis, C.L.M.; Keizer, de A.; Janssen, A.J.H.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Foam formation in aqueous suspensions of biologically produced sulfur is studied in a foam generator at 30°C, with the objective of describing trends and phenomena that govern foam formation in a biotechnological hydrogen sulfide removal process. Air is bubbled through a suspension and the

  17. Mechanisms of hydrogen bond formation between ionic liquids and cellulose and the influence of water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabideau, Brooks D; Ismail, Ahmed E

    2015-02-28

    We study the dynamics of the formation of multiple hydrogen bonds between ionic liquid anions and cellulose using molecular dynamics simulations. We examine fifteen different ionic liquids composed of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations ([Cnmim], n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) paired with either chloride, acetate or dimethylphosphate. We map the transitions of anions hydrogen bonded to cellulose into different bonding states. We find that increased tail length in the ionic liquids has only a very minor effect on these transitions, tending to slow the dynamics of the transitions and increasing the hydrogen bond lifetimes. Each anion can form up to four hydrogen bonds with cellulose. We find that this hydrogen bond "redundancy" leads to multiply bonded anions having lifetimes three to four times that of singly bound anions. Such redundant hydrogen bonds account for roughly half of all anion-cellulose hydrogen bonds. Additional simulations for [C2mim]Cl, [C2mim]Ac and [C2mim]DMP were performed at different water concentrations between 70 mol% and 90 mol%. It was found that water crowds the hydrogen bond-accepting sites of the anions, preventing interactions with cellulose. The more water that is present in the system, the more crowded these sites become. Thus, if a hydrogen bond between an anion and cellulose breaks, the likelihood that it will be replaced by a nearby water molecule increases as well. We show that the formation of these "redundant" hydrogen bonding states is greatly affected by the presence of water, leading to steep drops in hydrogen bonding between the anions and cellulose.

  18. Osmium pyme complexes for fast hydrogenation and asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratta, Walter; Ballico, Maurizio; Del Zotto, Alessandro; Siega, Katia; Magnolia, Santo; Rigo, Pierluigi

    2008-01-01

    The osmium compound trans,cis-[OsCl2(PPh3)2(Pyme)] (1) (Pyme=1-(pyridin-2-yl)methanamine), obtained from [OsCl2(PPh3)3] and Pyme, thermally isomerizes to cis,cis-[OsCl2(PPh3)(2)(Pyme)] (2) in mesitylene at 150 degrees C. Reaction of [OsCl2(PPh3)3] with Ph2P(CH2)(4)PPh2 (dppb) and Pyme in mesitylene (150 degrees C, 4 h) leads to a mixture of trans-[OsCl2(dppb)(Pyme)] (3) and cis-[OsCl2(dppb)(Pyme)] (4) in about an 1:3 molar ratio. The complex trans-[OsCl2(dppb)(Pyet)] (5) (Pyet=2-(pyridin-2-yl)ethanamine) is formed by reaction of [OsCl2(PPh3)3] with dppb and Pyet in toluene at reflux. Compounds 1, 2, 5 and the mixture of isomers 3/4 efficiently catalyze the transfer hydrogenation (TH) of different ketones in refluxing 2-propanol and in the presence of NaOiPr (2.0 mol %). Interestingly, 3/4 has been proven to reduce different ketones (even bulky) by means of TH with a remarkably high turnover frequency (TOF up to 5.7 x 10(5) h(-1)) and at very low loading (0.05-0.001 mol %). The system 3/4 also efficiently catalyzes the hydrogenation of many ketones (H2, 5.0 atm) in ethanol with KOtBu (2.0 mol %) at 70 degrees C (TOF up to 1.5 x 10(4) h(-1)). The in-situ-generated catalysts prepared by the reaction of [OsCl2(PPh3)3] with Josiphos diphosphanes and (+/-)-1-alkyl-substituted Pyme ligands, promote the enantioselective TH of different ketones with 91-96 % ee (ee=enantiomeric excess) and with a TOF of up to 1.9 x 10(4) h(-1) at 60 degrees C.

  19. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND DELIVERY INFRASTRUCTURE AS A COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolley, George S

    2010-06-29

    An agent-based model of the transition to a hydrogen transportation economy explores influences on adoption of hydrogen vehicles and fueling infrastructure. Attention is given to whether significant penetration occurs and, if so, to the length of time required for it to occur. Estimates are provided of sensitivity to numerical values of model parameters and to effects of alternative market and policy scenarios. The model is applied to the Los Angeles metropolitan area In the benchmark simulation, the prices of hydrogen and non-hydrogen vehicles are comparable. Due to fuel efficiency, hydrogen vehicles have a fuel savings advantage of 9.8 cents per mile over non-hydrogen vehicles. Hydrogen vehicles account for 60% of new vehicle sales in 20 years from the initial entry of hydrogen vehicles into show rooms, going on to 86% in 40 years and reaching still higher values after that. If the fuel savings is 20.7 cents per mile for a hydrogen vehicle, penetration reaches 86% of new car sales by the 20th year. If the fuel savings is 0.5 cents per mile, market penetration reaches only 10% by the 20th year. To turn to vehicle price difference, if a hydrogen vehicle costs $2,000 less than a non-hydrogen vehicle, new car sales penetration reaches 92% by the 20th year. If a hydrogen vehicle costs $6,500 more than a non-hydrogen vehicle, market penetration is only 6% by the 20th year. Results from other sensitivity runs are presented. Policies that could affect hydrogen vehicle adoption are investigated. A tax credit for the purchase of a hydrogen vehicle of $2,500 tax credit results in 88% penetration by the 20th year, as compared with 60% in the benchmark case. If the tax credit is $6,000, penetration is 99% by the 20th year. Under a more modest approach, the tax credit would be available only for the first 10 years. Hydrogen sales penetration then reach 69% of sales by the 20th year with the $2,500 credit and 79% with the $6,000 credit. A carbon tax of $38 per metric ton is not

  20. Formation of amorphous hydrogenated carbon from compression of benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Mimura, Koichi

    2017-10-01

    Infrared spectra of benzene were measured at pressures up to 25.3 GPa at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell. With decompression from pressures above 18.7 GPa, a new peak of C-H vibration mode appeared at a lower frequency than that of benzene. This indicates that an irreversible chemical change occurred at a pressure that was lower than that reported in previous studies. The IR spectra of the recovered sample after compression up to 20.3 GPa are comparable with those of the amorphous hydrogenated carbon reported in the previous study that was formed by compression of benzene up to approximately 30 GPa.

  1. A quantum-chemical validation about the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions in intermolecular heterocyclic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Galdino Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a detailed theoretical study in order to understand the charge density topology of the C2H4O···C2H2 and C2H4S···C2H2 heterocyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes. Through the calculations derived from Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM, it was observed the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions. Such analysis was performed through the determination of optimized geometries at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory, by which is that QTAIM topological operators were computed, such as the electronic density ρ(r, Laplacian Ñ2ρ(r, and ellipticity ε. The examination of the hydrogen bonds has been performed through the measurement of ρ(r, Ñ2ρ(r and ε between (O···H—C and (S···H—C, whereas the secondary interaction between axial hydrogen atoms Hα and carbon of acetylene. In this insight, it was verified the existence of secondary interaction only in C2H4S···C2H2 complex because its structure is propitious to form multiple interactions.

  2. Methane Formation by Flame-Generated Hydrogen Atoms in the Flame Ionization Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1996-01-01

    The precombustion degradation of organic compounds in the flame ionization detector has been studied (1) by heating the additives in hydrogen in a quartz capillary and analyzing the reaction products by GC and (2) by following the degradation of the additives in a hydrogen flame, by means of a thin......, and conceivably all hydrocarbons are quantitatively converted into methane at temperatures below 600 C, that is, before the proper combustion has started. The splitting of the C-C bonds is preceded by hydrogenation of double and triple bonds and aromatic rings. The reactions, no doubt, are caused by hydrogen...... atoms, which are formed in the burning hydrogen and which diffuse into the inner core of the flame. The quantitative formation of methane appears to explain the "equal per carbon" rule for the detector response of hydrocarbons, since all carbons are "exchanged" for methane molecules....

  3. Performance of a full-scale hydrogen-storage tank based on complex hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Terry A; Jorgensen, Scott W; Dedrick, Daniel E

    2011-01-01

    Designing and building a full scale hydrogen storage system revealed several engineering challenges and also demonstrated the capabilities of complex hydrides. Three kg of hydrogen was stored in a four module system using modified sodium alanate as the storage media. Extensive testing of this system demonstrated the ability to follow aggressive hydrogen demand schedules that simulate actual driving. Extensive use of detailed models greatly improved the design and eventual performance of the storage system; the test data permitted further refinement of the models.

  4. "Additive" cooperativity of hydrogen bonds in complexes of catechol with proton acceptors in the gas phase: FTIR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A; Klimovitskii, Alexander E; Abaidullina, Dilyara I; Madzhidov, Timur I; Solomonov, Boris N

    2012-06-01

    Experimental study of hydrogen bond cooperativity in hetero-complexes in the gas phase was carried out by IR-spectroscopy method. Stretching vibration frequencies of O-H groups in phenol and catechol molecules as well as of their complexes with nitriles and ethers were determined in the gas phase using a specially designed cell. O-H groups experimental frequency shifts in the complexes of catechol induced by the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds are significantly higher than in the complexes of phenol due to the hydrogen bond cooperativity. It was shown that the cooperativity factors of hydrogen bonds in the complexes of catechol with nitriles and ethers in the gas phase are approximately the same. Quantum chemical calculations of the studied systems have been performed using density functional theory (DFT) methods. It was shown, that theoretically obtained cooperativity factors of hydrogen bonds in the complexes of catechol with proton acceptors are in good agreement with experimental values. Cooperative effects lead to a strengthening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the complexes of catechol on about 30%, despite the significant difference in the proton acceptor ability of the bases. The analysis within quantum theory of atoms in molecules was carried out for the explanation of this fact. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The types of metanalysis and the formation of complex affixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Алексеевна Пацюкова

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Two opposite types (regressive and progressive of metanalysis are described in this article. The connection of each type and the formation of complex affixes (prefixes and suffixes is considered.

  6. Kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and its protein complex by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Antina, E. V.

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study of oxidation reactions of bilirubin and its complex with albumin was carried out in aqueous solutions under the action of hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen at different pH values. Free radical oxidation of the pigment in both free and bound forms at pH 7.4 was shown not to lead to the formation of biliverdin, but to be associated with the decomposition of the tetrapyrrole chromophore into monopyrrolic products. The effective and true rate constants of the reactions under study were determined. It was assumed that one possible mechanism of the oxidation reaction is associated with the interaction of peroxyl radicals and protons of the NH groups of bilirubin molecules at the limiting stage with the formation of a highly reactive radical intermediate. The binding of bilirubin with albumin was found to result in a considerable reduction in the rate of the oxidation reaction associated with the kinetic manifestation of the protein protection effect. It was found that the autoxidation of bilirubin by molecular oxygen with the formation of biliverdin at the intermediate stage can be observed with an increase in the pH of solutions.

  7. Liesegang patterns: Complex formation of precipitate in an electric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Formation of 1D Liesegang patterns was studied numerically in precipitation and reversible complex formation of precipitate scenarios in an electric field. The Ostwald's supersaturation model reported by Büki, Kárpáti-Smidróczki and Zrínyi (BKZ model) was extended further. In the presence of an electric field the position of ...

  8. H2XP:OH2 Complexes: Hydrogen vs. Pnicogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibon Alkorta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A search of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD was carried out for phosphine-water and arsine-water complexes in which water is either the proton donor in hydrogen-bonded complexes, or the electron-pair donor in pnicogen-bonded complexes. The range of experimental P-O distances in the phosphine complexes is consistent with the results of ab initio MP2/aug’-cc-pVTZ calculations carried out on complexes H2XP:OH2, for X = NC, F, Cl, CN, OH, CCH, H, and CH3. Only hydrogen-bonded complexes are found on the H2(CH3P:HOH and H3P:HOH potential surfaces, while only pnicogen-bonded complexes exist on H2(NCP:OH2, H2FP:OH2, H2(CNP:OH2, and H2(OHP:OH2 surfaces. Both hydrogen-bonded and pnicogen-bonded complexes are found on the H2ClP:OH2 and H2(CCHP:OH2 surfaces, with the pnicogen-bonded complexes more stable than the corresponding hydrogen-bonded complexes. The more electronegative substituents prefer to form pnicogen-bonded complexes, while the more electropositive substituents form hydrogen-bonded complexes. The H2XP:OH2 complexes are characterized in terms of their structures, binding energies, charge-transfer energies, and spin-spin coupling constants 2hJ(O-P, 1hJ(H-P, and 1J(O-H across hydrogen bonds, and 1pJ(P-O across pnicogen bonds.

  9. Hydrogen bonded complexes of cyanuric acid with pyridine and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    C3N3H3O3:C5H5N], 1, and guanidinium carbonate [C3H2N3][C(NH2)3], 2, have been prepared at room temperature and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Structure of 1 shows pyridine molecules substituting the inter-tape hydrogen ...

  10. Investigation of formation constant of complex of a new synthesized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complex formation between a newly synthesized tripodal ligand and the cation Cu2+ in water and surfactant media was studied spectrophotometrically using rank annihilation factor analysis (RAFA). According to molar ratio data the stoichiometry of complexation between the ligand and the cation Cu2+ was 1:1.

  11. Catalytic Hydrogen Production by Ruthenium Complexes from the Conversion of Primary Amines to Nitriles: Potential Application as a Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Espinosa, David; Marzá-Beltrán, Aida; Mata, Jose A

    2016-12-05

    The potential application of the primary amine/nitrile pair as a liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) has been evaluated. Ruthenium complexes of formula [(p-cym)Ru(NHC)Cl2 ] (NHC=N-heterocyclic carbene) catalyze the acceptorless dehydrogenation of primary amines to nitriles with the formation of molecular hydrogen. Notably, the reaction proceeds without any external additive, under air, and under mild reaction conditions. The catalytic properties of a ruthenium complex supported on the surface of graphene have been explored for reutilization purposes. The ruthenium-supported catalyst is active for at least 10 runs without any apparent loss of activity. The results obtained in terms of catalytic activity, stability, and recyclability are encouraging for the potential application of the amine/nitrile pair as a LOHC. The main challenge in the dehydrogenation of benzylamines is the selectivity control, such as avoiding the formation of imine byproducts due to transamination reactions. Herein, selectivity has been achieved by using long-chain primary amines such as dodecylamine. Mechanistic studies have been performed to rationalize the key factors involved in the activity and selectivity of the catalysts in the dehydrogenation of amines. The experimental results suggest that the catalyst resting state contains a coordinated amine. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Adsorption of gold on hydrogen terminated Si(0 0 1): Formation of chain structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Bikash C., E-mail: bikashc.gupta@visva-bharati.ac.in [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Konar, Shyamal; Bose, Rudra P. [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2009-10-30

    Possible formation of stable Au atomic wire on the hydrogen terminated Si(0 0 1): 3x1 surface is investigated under the density functional formalism. The hydrogen terminated Si(0 0 1): 3x1 surface is patterned in two different ways by removing selective hydrogen atoms from the surface. The adsorption of Au on such surfaces is studied at different sub-monolayer coverages. At 4/9 monolayer (ML) coverage, zigzag continuous Au chains are found to be stable on the patterned hydrogen terminated Si(0 0 1): 3x1 surface. The reason for the stability of the wire structures at 4/9 ML coverage is explained. It is to be noted that beyond 4/9 ML coverage, the additional Au atoms may introduce clusters on the surface. The continuous atomic gold chains on the substrate may be useful for the fabrication of atomic scale devices.

  13. Use of Heterogenized Metal Complexes in Hydrogenation Reactions: Comparison of Hydrogenation and CTH Reactions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bata, P.; Zsigmond, A.; Gyémánt, M.; Czeglédi, A.; Klusoň, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 12 (2015), s. 9281-9294 ISSN 0922-6168. [Pannonian Symposium on Catalysis /12./. Castle Trest, 16.09.2014-20.09.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : catalytic transfer hydrogenation * iron-phthalocyanine catalyst * chemoselectivity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.833, year: 2015

  14. Observations on the Role of Hydrogen in Facet Formation in Near-alpha Titanium (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    void formation and subsequent crack extension. Another possibility is that which was suggested by Troiano [57] where hydrogen diffuses to regions of...AIME, NY, 1976, p 367-381. [56] J.D. Boyd: Trans. ASM, 62, 1969, p. 977-88. [57] A.R. Troiano : Trans. ASM, 1960, vol. 52., pp. 54-80. [58

  15. Formation of non-excited and excited hydrogen in proton–lithium inelastic scattering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elkilany, S.A; Al-Dhawi, A.A

    The collisions of a proton with a lithium atom are treated for the first time as a three-channel problem under the assumption that the elastic and hydrogen formation in non-excited, H(1s), and excited, H(2s), channels are open...

  16. Complexes between hypohalous acids and phosphine derivatives. Pnicogen bond versus halogen bond versus hydrogen bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingzhong; Zhu, Hongjie; Zhuo, Hongying; Yang, Xin; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo

    2014-11-11

    The complexes of HOBr:PH2Y (Y=H, F, Cl, Br, CH3, NH2, OH, and NO2), HOCl:PH2F, and HOI:PH2F have been investigated with ab initio calculations at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Four types of structures (1, 2, 3a, and 3b) were observed for these complexes. 1 is stabilized by an O⋯P pnicogen bond, 2 by a P⋯X halogen bond, 3a by a H⋯P hydrogen bond and a P⋯X pnicogen bond, and 3b by H⋯P and H⋯Br hydrogen bonds. Their relative stability is related to the halogen X of HOX and the substituent Y of PH2Y. These structures can compete with interaction energy of -10.22∼-29.40 kJ/mol. The HO stretch vibration shows a small red shift in 1, a small irregular shift in 2, but a prominent red shift in 3a and 3b. The XO stretch vibration exhibits a smaller red shift in 1, a larger red shift in 2, but an insignificant blue shift in 3a and 3b. The PY stretch vibration displays a red shift in 1 but a blue shift in 2, 3a, and 3b. The formation mechanism, stability, and properties of these structures have been analyzed with molecular electrostatic potentials, orbital interactions, and non-covalent interaction index. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Density functional study of hydrogen bond formation between methanol and organic molecules containing Cl, F, NH2, OH, and COOH functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, Stefan K; St Petkov, Petko; Rangelov, Miroslav A; Vayssilov, Georgi N

    2011-12-08

    Various hydrogen-bonded complexes of methanol with different proton accepting and proton donating molecules containing Cl, F, NH(2), OH, OR, and COOH functional groups have been modeled using DFT with hybrid B3LYP and M05-2X functionals. The latter functional was found to provide more accurate estimates of the structural and thermodynamic parameters of the complexes of halides, amines, and alcohols. The characteristics of these complexes are influenced not only by the principle hydrogen bond of the methanol OH with the proton acceptor heteroatom, but also by additional hydrogen bonds of a C-H moiety with methanol oxygen as a proton acceptor. The contribution of the former hydrogen bond in the total binding enthalpy increases in the order chlorides hydrogen bond increases in the reverse order. A general correlation was found between the binding enthalpy of the complex and the electrostatic potential at the hydrogen center participating in the formation of the hydrogen bond. The calculated binding enthalpies of different complexes were used to clarify which functional groups can potentially form a hydrogen bond to the 2'-OH hydroxyl group in ribose, which is strong enough to block it from participation in the intramolecular catalytic activation of the peptide bond synthesis. Such blocking could result in inhibition of the protein biosynthesis in the living cell if the corresponding group is delivered as a part of a drug molecule in the vicinity of the active site in the ribosome. According to our results, such activity can be accomplished by secondary or tertiary amines, alkoxy groups, deprotonated carboxyl groups, and aliphatic fluorides, but not by the other modeled functional groups.

  18. Tailoring Thermodynamics and Kinetics for Hydrogen Storage in Complex Hydrides towards Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state hydrogen storage using various materials is expected to provide the ultimate solution for safe and efficient on-board storage. Complex hydrides have attracted increasing attention over the past two decades due to their high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. In this account, we review studies from our lab on tailoring the thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides, including metal alanates, borohydrides and amides. By changing the material composition and structure, developing feasible preparation methods, doping high-performance catalysts, optimizing multifunctional additives, creating nanostructures and understanding the interaction mechanisms with hydrogen, the operating temperatures for hydrogen storage in metal amides, alanates and borohydrides are remarkably reduced. This temperature reduction is associated with enhanced reaction kinetics and improved reversibility. The examples discussed in this review are expected to provide new inspiration for the development of complex hydrides with high hydrogen capacity and appropriate thermodynamics and kinetics for hydrogen storage. © 2015 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. THE WILKINSON COMPLEX AS A HETEROGENEOUS CATALYST IN THE PARTIAL HYDROGENATION OF 1-HEPTYNE. REGENERATION OF THE COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Cagnola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Wilkinson complex was tested as a catalyst in the partial hydrogenation of 1-heptyne, a medium chain alkyne, at a temperature of T = 303 K and hydrogen pressure PH2 = 150 kPa. The tests were performed in homogeneous system as well as heterogeneous system, supporting the complex on i γ-Al2O3 and ii a commercial carbonaceous material, RX3. Characterization by means of XPS and FTIR revealed that the anchored complex did not lose its chemical identity, being the catalytically active species. The Wilkinson complex on RX3 showed better conversions and selectivities, higher than the Lindlar catalyst, used as a reference. Additionally, it was proposed a method to recover Rh as a metal from the remaining solutions, and from it regenerate the complex to be reused from it.

  20. Effect of Hydrogen on Vacancy Formation in Sputtered Cu Films Studied by Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Atsushi; Kihara, Teruo; Kubo, Daichi; Mizuno, Masataka; Araki, Hideki; Onishi, Takashi; Shirai, Yasuharu

    2013-04-01

    As a part of the LSI interconnect fabrication process, a post-deposition high-pressure annealing process is proposed for embedding copper into trench structures. The embedding property of sputtered Cu films has been recognized to be improved by adding hydrogen to the sputtering argon gas. In this study, to elucidate the effect of hydrogen on vacancy formation in sputtered Cu films, normal argon-sputtered and argon-hydrogen-sputtered Cu films were evaluated by positron annihilation spectroscopy. As a result, monovacancies with a concentration of more than 10-4 were observed in the argon-hydrogen-sputtered Cu films, whereas only one positron lifetime component corresponding to the grain boundary was detected in the normal argon-sputtered Cu films. This result means monovacancies are stabilized by adding hydrogen to sputtering gas. In the annealing process, the stabilized monovacancies began clustering at around 300 °C, which indicates the dissociation of monovacancy-hydrogen bonds. The introduced monovacancies may promote creep deformation during high-pressure annealing.

  1. Chemometric characterization of the hydrogen bonding complexes of secondary amides and aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Branislav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports the results of the study of hydrogen bonding complexes between secondary amides and various aromatic hydrocarbons. The possibility of using chemometric methods was investigated in order to characterize N-H•••π hydrogen bonded complexes. Hierarchical clustering and Principal Component Analysis (PCA have been applied on infrared spectroscopic and Taft parameters of 43 N-substituted amide complexes with different aromatic hydrocarbons. Results obtained in this report are in good agreement with conclusions of other spectroscopic and thermodynamic analysis.

  2. Curcumin complexation with cyclodextrins by the autoclave process: Method development and characterization of complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagbani, Turki Al; Nazzal, Sami

    2017-03-30

    One approach to enhance curcumin (CUR) aqueous solubility is to use cyclodextrins (CDs) to form inclusion complexes where CUR is encapsulated as a guest molecule within the internal cavity of the water-soluble CD. Several methods have been reported for the complexation of CUR with CDs. Limited information, however, is available on the use of the autoclave process (AU) in complex formation. The aims of this work were therefore to (1) investigate and evaluate the AU cycle as a complex formation method to enhance CUR solubility; (2) compare the efficacy of the AU process with the freeze-drying (FD) and evaporation (EV) processes in complex formation; and (3) confirm CUR stability by characterizing CUR:CD complexes by NMR, Raman spectroscopy, DSC, and XRD. Significant differences were found in the saturation solubility of CUR from its complexes with CD when prepared by the three complexation methods. The AU yielded a complex with expected chemical and physical fingerprints for a CUR:CD inclusion complex that maintained the chemical integrity and stability of CUR and provided the highest solubility of CUR in water. Physical and chemical characterizations of the AU complexes confirmed the encapsulated of CUR inside the CD cavity and the transformation of the crystalline CUR:CD inclusion complex to an amorphous form. It was concluded that the autoclave process with its short processing time could be used as an alternate and efficient methods for drug:CD complexation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Single-molecule force-conductance spectroscopy of hydrogen-bonded complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; De Vico, Luca; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2017-01-01

    to inform about molecular recognition events at the single-molecule limit. For this, we consider the force-conductance characteristics of a prototypical class of hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes sandwiched between gold electrodes. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton...... receptor that can form up to six simultaneous hydrogen bonds. The simulations combine classical molecular dynamics of the mechanical deformation of the junction with non-equilibrium Green’s function computations of the electronic transport. As shown, in these complexes hydrogen bonds mediate transport...... either by directly participating as a possible transport pathway or by stabilizing molecular conformations with enhanced conductance properties. Further, we observe that force-conductance correlations can be very sensitive to small changes in the chemical structure of the complexes and provide detailed...

  4. Influence of second sphere hydrogen bonding interaction on a manganese(II)-aquo complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghachtouli, Sanae; Guillot, Régis; Dorlet, Pierre; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, Elodie; Aukauloo, Ally

    2012-02-14

    We have developed a pentadentate N(4)O ligand scaffold with a benzimidazole group placed in a rigid fashion to develop hydrogen bonding interaction with the ligand in the sixth position. The mononuclear Mn(II) complex with a water molecule was isolated and characterized. We discuss the role of the outer sphere ligand in stabilising a Mn(II)-aquo complex.

  5. Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen, Thermal and Electrochemical Energy Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Kasper T.; Sheppard, Drew; Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.

    2017-01-01

    how complex metal hydrides may act in an integrated setup with a fuel cell. This review focuses on the unique properties of light element complex metal hydrides mainly based on boron, nitrogen and aluminum, e.g., metal borohydrides and metal alanates. Our hope is that this review can provide new...

  6. High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

    2007-07-27

    This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

  7. Complex Formations between Surfactants and Polyelectrolytes of the Same Charge on a Water Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafi, Amirhossein; Hu, Dan; Chou, Keng C

    2017-08-15

    The mechanism of complex formation between surfactants and polyelectrolytes with the same charge on the water surface was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and phase-sensitive sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. Although complex formation between highly charged surfactants and polyelectrolytes of the same charge is generally expected to be prohibited by the electrostatic repulsive force, our study shows that it is possible to form thermodynamically stable complexes when excess ions are present in the solution. We found that anionic partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) could interact with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on a water surface in the presence of salts. With excess Na+ ions in the solution, the charge screening effect allows HPAM to weakly interact with SDS via hydrogen bonds. In the presence of divalent Ca2+ ions, the surfactant and the polymer are strongly coupled by forming Ca2+ ion bridges and hydrogen bonds. Our calculation shows that the presence of Ca2+ ions creates a steep binding energy of ∼30 kJ/mol near the water surface. These results were qualitatively verified using phase-sensitive sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

  8. FORMATION OF CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES USING ACETYLENE, ARGON-ACETYLENE AND ARGON-HYDROGEN-ACETYLENE PLASMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinauskas, Liutauras; Grigonis, Alfonsas; Valincius, Vitas

    2013-01-01

    The amorphous carbon films were deposited on silicon-metal substrates by plasma jet chemical vapor deposition (PJCVD) and plasma enchanted CVD (PECVD). PJCVD carbon films have been prepared at atmospheric pressure in argon-acetylene and argon-hydrogen-acetylene plasma mixtures. The films deposited in Ar-C2H2 plasma are attributed to graphite-like carbon films. The formation of the nanocrystalline graphite was obtained in Ar-H2-C2H2 plasma. Addition of the hydrogen gas lead to the ...

  9. Elimination of C-6-hydrogen during the formation of ecdysteroids from cholesterol in Locusta migratoria ovaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Y.; Hiramoto, M.; Kakinuma, K.; Ikekawa, N. (Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan))

    1989-03-01

    Being administered to Locusta migratoria adult females, (6-{sup 3}H, 4-{sup 14}C)cholesterol was incorporated into ecdysone and 2-deoxyecdysone. The ratio of {sup 3}H/{sup 14}C of the two ecdysteroids isolated from newly laid eggs revealed that C-6-hydrogen of cholesterol was eliminated during the conversion to ecdysteroids in the ovaries of the insects. Thus, a hypothetical mechanism involving migration of the C-6-hydrogen to the C-5 position in the formation of A/B cis junction turned out to be less likely.

  10. The formation and study of titanium, zirconium, and hafnium complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bobby; Sarin, Sam; Smith, Laverne; Wilson, Melanie

    1989-01-01

    Research involves the preparation and characterization of a series of Ti, Zr, Hf, TiO, and HfO complexes using the poly(pyrazole) borates as ligands. The study will provide increased understanding of the decomposition of these coordination compounds which may lead to the production of molecular oxygen on the Moon from lunar materials such as ilmenite and rutile. The model compounds are investigated under reducing conditions of molecular hydrogen by use of a high temperature/pressure stainless steel autoclave reactor and by thermogravimetric analysis.

  11. Double hydrogen bond interaction in 7-azaindole complexes with protic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraee, Sara; Souri, Maryam

    2016-11-01

    The double hydrogen bond interaction between 7-azaindole (7AI) and protic solvents including methanol (MeOH), formamide (FM), formic acid (FA), pyridone (PY) and 7AI has been investigated as a proper model of mutations generated by tautomeric shifts in hydrogen-bonded bases of DNA. The results confirm electrostatic nature for all considered hydrogen bonds except for NH hydrogen bond in 7AI-FA. The largest interaction and polarization energies are obtained for 7AI-FA by means of energy decomposition analyses (EDA). The EDA results show an inverse competitive correlation between polarization and electrostatic components of attraction energy to determine the nature of hydrogen bond. The red-shifted hydrogen bonds are identified for all complexes as a result of hyperconjugation, except for 7AI-MeOH, which its blue-shift effect is attributed to the rehybridization dominating of CH bond. Investigation of aromaticity indices for 7AI complexes represents an increase in aromaticity of pentagonal ring and a decrease in hexagonal ring. Finally, the double hydrogen bond between 7AI and FA is identified as dominant interaction to achieve the tautomerization of 7AI in all applied approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An AAA-DDD triply hydrogen-bonded complex easily accessible for supramolecular polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi-Fei; Chen, Wen-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Bo; Yuan, Ying-Xue; Wu, Na-Na; Song, Xiang-Zhi; Yang, Lan

    2014-12-15

    For a complementary hydrogen-bonded complex, when every hydrogen-bond acceptor is on one side and every hydrogen-bond donor is on the other, all secondary interactions are attractive and the complex is highly stable. AAA-DDD (A=acceptor, D=donor) is considered to be the most stable among triply hydrogen-bonded sequences. The easily synthesized and further derivatized AAA-DDD system is very desirable for hydrogen-bonded functional materials. In this case, AAA and DDD, starting from 4-methoxybenzaldehyde, were synthesized with the Hantzsch pyridine synthesis and Friedländer annulation reaction. The association constant determined by fluorescence titration in chloroform at room temperature is 2.09×10(7)  M(-1) . The AAA and DDD components are not coplanar, but form a V shape in the solid state. Supramolecular polymers based on AAA-DDD triply hydrogen bonded have also been developed. This work may make AAA-DDD triply hydrogen-bonded sequences easily accessible for stimuli-responsive materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Hydrogen Isotopes in Amino Acids and Soils Offer New Potential to Study Complex Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, M. L.; Newsome, S. D.; Williams, E. K.; Bradley, C. J.; Griffin, P.; Nakamoto, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen isotopes have been analyzed extensively in the earth and biogeosciences to trace water through various environmental systems. The majority of the measurements have been made on water in rocks and minerals (inorganic) or non-exchangeable H in lipids (organic), important biomarkers that represent a small fraction of the organic molecules synthesized by living organisms. Our lab has been investigating hydrogen isotopes in amino acids and complex soil organic matter, which have traditionally been thought to be too complex to interpret owing to complications from potentially exchangeable hydrogen. For the amino acids, we show how hydrogen in amino acids originates from two sources, food and water, and demonstrate that hydrogen isotopes can be routed directly between organisms. Amino acid hydrogen isotopes may unravel cycling in extremophiles in order to discover novel biochemical pathways central to the organism. For soil organic matter, recent approaches to understanding the origin of soil organic matter are pointing towards root exudates along with microbial biomass as the source, rather than aboveground leaf litter. Having an isotope tracer in very complex, potentially exchangeable organic matter can be handled with careful experimentation. Although no new instrumentation is being used per se, extension of classes of organic matter to isotope measurements has potential to open up new doors for understanding organic matter cycling on earth and in planetary materials.

  14. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact.

  15. Complex Formation Between Iron(III) and Isonicotinohydroxamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Nigerian Journal of Basic and Applied Science (2009), 17(2): 181-188. ISSN 0794-5698. Complex Formation Between Iron(III) and ... CONHOH– groups have been extensively studied as a consequence of their biological importance ..... Cruckshank R. (1965) Medical Microbiology. Eds Church and Livingston U.K. pp 75-85.

  16. Complex Formation Between Iron(III) and Isonicotinohydroxamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Complex Formation Between Iron(III) and Isonicotinohydroxamic Acid and Its Microbial. Studies. *. 1. A.O. Aliyu and. 2. J.N. Nwabueze. *Department of Chemistry, Nigerian Defence Academy, PMB 2109, Kaduna. Department of Chemistry, University of Abuja, PMB 117, FCT,Abuja, Nigeria. [*Correspondence Address: ...

  17. Infrared study on hydrogen chloride complexed with allene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Michele; Broquier, Michel; Brenner, Valerie

    2010-04-28

    The first rotationally resolved observation of the infrared (IR) spectrum of the molecular complex C(3)H(4)-HCl in gas phase is reported. New IR spectra have been recorded at high resolution by means of a slit jet. Rotational constants and vibrational frequencies have been obtained from these spectra. These data are presented and compared with high level ab initio calculations (CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ). The results obtained in this study are compared with those on acetylene and ethene-HCl complexes. We observe a broadening of the lines interpreted as a decrease of the lifetime of the excited vibrational state with the size of the partner of complexation and also a correlation between the vibrational shift of the H-Cl stretching mode and the proton affinity of the acceptor molecule.

  18. Infrared study on hydrogen chloride complexed with allene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Michele; Broquier, Michel; Brenner, Valerie

    2010-04-01

    The first rotationally resolved observation of the infrared (IR) spectrum of the molecular complex C3H4-HCl in gas phase is reported. New IR spectra have been recorded at high resolution by means of a slit jet. Rotational constants and vibrational frequencies have been obtained from these spectra. These data are presented and compared with high level ab initio calculations (CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ). The results obtained in this study are compared with those on acetylene and ethene-HCl complexes. We observe a broadening of the lines interpreted as a decrease of the lifetime of the excited vibrational state with the size of the partner of complexation and also a correlation between the vibrational shift of the H-Cl stretching mode and the proton affinity of the acceptor molecule.

  19. Terminal tungsten pnictide complex formation through pnictaethynolate decarbonylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joost, Maximilian; Transue, Wesley J; Cummins, Christopher C

    2017-09-26

    Tungsten(iv) tetrakis(2,6-diisopropylphenoxide) (1) has been demonstrated to be a competent platform for decarbonylative formation of anionic terminal pnictide complexes upon treatment with pnictaethynolate anions: cyanate, 2-phosphaethynolate, and 2-arsaethynolate. These transformations constitute the first examples of terminal phosphide and arsenide complex formation at a transition metal center from OCP- and OCAs-, respectively. The phosphide and arsenide complexes are also the first to be isolated in a tetragonal, all-oxygen ligand environment. The scalar NMR coupling constants between tungsten-183 and nitrogen-15 or phosphorus-31 have been measured and contextualized using natural bond orbital (NBO) methods in terms of s orbital character in the σ bonding orbital and pnictide lone pair.

  20. Studying inhibition of calcium oxalate stone formation: an in vitro approach for screening hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vaitheeswari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases and is of high prevalence. The present study proposes to evaluate the antilithiatic property of hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites like thiosulfate & sulfate in an in vitro model.Materials and Methods:The antilithiatic activity of sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaSH, sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3 and sodium sulfate (Na2SO4 on the kinetics of calcium oxalate crystal formation was investigated both in physiological buffer and in urine from normal and recurrent stone forming volunteers. The stones were characterized by optical and spectroscopic techniques.Results:The stones were characterized to be monoclinic, prismatic and bipyramidal habit which is of calcium monohydrate and dihydrate nature. The FTIR displayed fingerprint corresponding to calcium oxalate in the control while in NaSH treated, S=O vibrations were visible in the spectrum. The order of percentage inhibition was NaSH>Na2S2O3>Na2SO4.Conclusion:Our study indicates that sodium hydrogen sulfide and its metabolite thiosulfate are inhibitors of calcium oxalate stone agglomeration which makes them unstable both in physiological buffer and in urine. This effect is attributed to pH changes and complexing of calcium by S2O32-and SO42- moiety produced by the test compounds.

  1. Nitrogen Adsorption and Hydrogenation on a MoFe6S9 Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Hammer, Bjørk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1999-01-01

    The enzyme nitrogenase catalyzes the biological nitrogen fixation where N-2 is reduced to NH3. Density functional calculations are presented of the bonding and hydrogenation of N-2 on a MoFe6S9 complex constructed to model aspects of the active site of nitrogenase. N-2 is found to bind end on to ...... on to one of the Fe atoms. A complete energy diagram for the addition of hydrogen to the MoFe6S9 complex with and without N-2 is given, and a mechanism for ammonia synthesis is proposed on this basis....

  2. Solid State NMR Characterization of Complex Metal Hydrides systems for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son-Jong Hwang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid state NMR is widely applied in studies of solid state chemistries for hydrogen storage reactions. Use of 11B MAS NMR in studies of metal borohydrides (BH4 is mainly focused, revisiting the issue of dodecaborane formation and observation of 11B{1H} Nuclear Overhauser Effect.

  3. Comment on "Entropy and complexity analysis of hydrogenic Rydberg atoms" [J. Math. Phys. 54, 052109 (2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Li Guang; Zan, Li Rong

    2017-10-01

    In a recent paper [S. López-Rosa et al., J. Math. Phys. 54, 052109 (2013)], the authors made detailed investigations on the information-theoretic quantities for hydrogenic atoms in Rydberg states. Asymptotic forms of different types of complexity measures (Crámer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon, and LMC types) in both position and momentum spaces were obtained for hydrogenic states (n,l,m) with fixed l and increasingly large n. However, the expressions for the Crámer-Rao complexity are incorrect due to the wrong definition of variance. The correct form of this complexity in position space is presented exactly in this work. In momentum space, two different definitions of variance are provided and corresponding Crámer-Rao complexities are discussed separately. In either case, the momentum complexity increases much faster than that in position space when increasing principal quantum number n.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical formation by methylene blue in the presence of ascorbic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buettner, G.R.; Doherty, T.P.; Bannister, T.D.

    1984-09-01

    Using ESR we have demonstrated the formation of the ascorbate free radical from sodium ascorbate, methylene blue and light. In oxygen uptake experiments we have observed the production of hydrogen peroxide while spin trapping experiments have revealed the iron catalyzed production of the hydroxyl free radical in this system. The presence of this highly reactive radical suggests that it could be the radical that initiates free radical damage in this photodynamic system. 39 refs.

  5. Hydrogen bonding in oxalic acid and its complexes: A database ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    terized by ZO–H. . . O = 146◦, O. . . O = 2.702 Å and H. . . O = 1.886 Å. The O–H bond is not directed at the carbonyl O atom; rather it straddles the carbonyl and hydroxyl O atoms (figure 8) as seen in the oxalic acid:amide complexes described above. β-Oxalic acid crystallizes in space group P21/c with two centrosymmetric.

  6. Competitive Adsorption-Assisted Formation of One-Dimensional Cobalt Nanochains with High CO Hydrogenation Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xin [State; Ren, Zhibo [State; Institute; Zhu, Xiaolin [State; Zhang, Qinwei [State; Mei, Donghai [Institute; Chen, Biaohua [State

    2017-10-31

    In the present work, cobalt nanochains have been successfully synthesized by a novel co assisted self-assembling formation strategy. A dramatic morphology transformation from cobalt nanoparticles to nanochains are observed when co molecules were introduced into the synthetic system. DFT calculations further confirm that competitive co-adsorbed co and oleylamine over the cobalt nanoparticles facilitates the formation of cobalt nanochains, which show higher co hydrogenation performance. The present work provides a new strategic and promising method for controllable synthesis of catalyst nanomaterials with the preferred surface structure and morphology.

  7. Hydrogen production in single chamber microbial electrolysis cells with different complex substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montpart, Nuria; Rago, Laura; Baeza, Juan A; Guisasola, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The use of synthetic wastewater containing carbon sources of different complexity (glycerol, milk and starch) was evaluated in single chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) for hydrogen production. The growth of an anodic syntrophic consortium between fermentative and anode respiring bacteria was operationally enhanced and increased the opportunities of these complex substrates to be treated with this technology. During inoculation, current intensities achieved in single chamber microbial fuel cells were 50, 62.5, and 9 A m⁻³ for glycerol, milk and starch respectively. Both current intensities and coulombic efficiencies were higher than other values reported in previous works. The simultaneous degradation of the three complex substrates favored power production and COD removal. After three months in MEC operation, hydrogen production was only sustained with milk as a single substrate and with the simultaneous degradation of the three substrates. The later had the best results in terms of current intensity (150 A m⁻³), hydrogen production (0.94 m³ m⁻³ d⁻¹) and cathodic gas recovery (91%) at an applied voltage of 0.8 V. Glycerol and starch as substrates in MEC could not avoid the complete proliferation of hydrogen scavengers, even under low hydrogen retention time conditions induced by continuous nitrogen sparging.

  8. The respiratory molybdo-selenoprotein formate dehydrogenases of Escherichia coli have hydrogen: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trchounian Armen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli synthesizes three membrane-bound molybdenum- and selenocysteine-containing formate dehydrogenases, as well as up to four membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Two of the formate dehydrogenases (Fdh-N and Fdh-O and two of the hydrogenases (Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 have their respective catalytic subunits located in the periplasm and these enzymes have been shown previously to oxidize formate and hydrogen, respectively, and thus function in energy metabolism. Mutants unable to synthesize the [NiFe]-hydrogenases retain a H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity. The aim of this study was to identify the enzyme or enzymes responsible for this activity. Results Here we report the identification of a new H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase enzyme activity in E. coli that is independent of the [NiFe]-hydrogenases. This enzyme activity was originally identified after non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualization of hydrogen-oxidizing activity by specific staining. Analysis of a crude extract derived from a variety of E. coli mutants unable to synthesize any [NiFe]-hydrogenase-associated enzyme activity revealed that the mutants retained this specific hydrogen-oxidizing activity. Enrichment of this enzyme activity from solubilised membrane fractions of the hydrogenase-negative mutant FTD147 by ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and size-exclusion chromatographies followed by mass spectrometric analysis identified the enzymes Fdh-N and Fdh-O. Analysis of defined mutants devoid of selenocysteine biosynthetic capacity or carrying deletions in the genes encoding the catalytic subunits of Fdh-N and Fdh-O demonstrated that both enzymes catalyze hydrogen activation. Fdh-N and Fdh-O can also transfer the electrons derived from oxidation of hydrogen to other redox dyes. Conclusions The related respiratory molybdo-selenoproteins Fdh-N and Fdh-O of Escherichia coli have hydrogen-oxidizing activity. These findings

  9. A composite of complex and chemical hydrides yields the first Al-based amidoborane with improved hydrogen storage properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovgaliuk, Iurii; Jepsen, Lars H; Safin, Damir A; Łodziana, Zbigniew; Dyadkin, Vadim; Jensen, Torben R; Devillers, Michel; Filinchuk, Yaroslav

    2015-10-05

    The first Al-based amidoborane Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ] was obtained through a mechanochemical treatment of the NaAlH4 -4 AB (AB=NH3 BH3 ) composite releasing 4.5 wt % of pure hydrogen. The same amidoborane was also produced upon heating the composite at 70 °C. The crystal structure of Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ], elucidated from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and confirmed by DFT calculations, contains the previously unknown tetrahedral ion [Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ](-) , with every NH2 BH3 (-) ligand coordinated to aluminum through nitrogen atoms. Combination of complex and chemical hydrides in the same compound was possible due to both the lower stability of the AlH bonds compared to the BH ones in borohydride, and due to the strong Lewis acidity of Al(3+) . According to the thermogravimetric analysis-differential scanning calorimetry-mass spectrometry (TGA-DSC-MS) studies, Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ] releases in two steps 9 wt % of pure hydrogen. As a result of this decomposition, which was also supported by volumetric studies, the formation of NaBH4 and amorphous product(s) of the surmised composition AlN4 B3 H(0-3.6) were observed. Furthermore, volumetric experiments have also shown that the final residue can reversibly absorb about 27 % of the released hydrogen at 250 °C and p(H2 )=150 bar. Hydrogen re-absorption does not regenerate neither Na[Al(NH2 BH3 )4 ] nor starting materials, NaAlH4 and AB, but rather occurs within amorphous product(s). Detailed studies of the latter one(s) can open an avenue for a new family of reversible hydrogen storage materials. Finally, the NaAlH4 -4 AB composite might become a starting point towards a new series of aluminum-based tetraamidoboranes with improved hydrogen storage properties such as hydrogen storage density, hydrogen purity, and reversibility. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Bromate Formation Characteristics of UV Irradiation, Hydrogen Peroxide Addition, Ozonation, and Their Combination Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Kishimoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bromate formation characteristics of six-physicochemical oxidation processes, UV irradiation, single addition of hydrogen peroxide, ozonation, UV irradiation with hydrogen peroxide addition (UV/H2O2, ozonation with hydrogen peroxide addition (O3/H2O2, and ozonation with UV irradiation (O3/UV were investigated using 1.88 μM of potassium bromide solution with or without 6.4 μM of 4-chlorobenzoic acid. Bromate was not detected during UV irradiation, single addition of H2O2, and UV/H2O2, whereas ozone-based treatments produced . Hydroxyl radicals played more important role in bromate formation than molecular ozone. Acidification and addition of radical scavengers such as 4-chlorobenzoic acid were effective in inhibiting bromate formation during the ozone-based treatments because of inhibition of hydroxyl radical generation and consumption of hydroxyl radicals, respectively. The H2O2 addition was unable to decompose 4-chlorobenzoic acid, though O3/UV and O3/H2O2 showed the rapid degradation, and UV irradiation and UV/H2O2 showed the slow degradation. Consequently, if the concentration of organic contaminants is low, the UV irradiation and/or UV/H2O2 are applicable to organic contaminants removal without bromate formation. However, if the concentration of organic contaminants is high, O3/H2O2 and O3/UV should be discussed as advanced oxidation processes because of their high organic removal efficiency and low bromate formation potential at the optimum condition.

  11. Gel phase formation in dilute triblock copolyelectrolyte complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Andreev, Marat; Levi, Adam E.; Goldfeld, David J.; Mao, Jun; Heller, William T.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Tirrell, Matthew V.

    2017-02-23

    Assembly of oppositely charged triblock copolyelectrolytes into phase-separated gels at low polymer concentrations (<1% by mass) has been observed in scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. Here we show that in contrast to uncharged, amphiphilic block copolymers that form discrete micelles at low concentrations and enter a phase of strongly interacting micelles in a gradual manner with increasing concentration, the formation of a dilute phase of individual micelles is prevented in polyelectrolyte complexation-driven assembly of triblock copolyelectrolytes. Gel phases form and phase separate almost instantaneously on solvation of the copolymers. Furthermore, molecular models of self-assembly demonstrate the presence of oligo-chain aggregates in early stages of copolyelectrolyte assembly, at experimentally unobservable polymer concentrations. Our discoveries contribute to the fundamental understanding of the structure and pathways of complexation-driven assemblies, and raise intriguing prospects for gel formation at extraordinarily low concentrations, with applications in tissue engineering, agriculture, water purification and theranostics.

  12. SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC STUDIES OF SANGUINARINE-Β-CYCLODEXTRIN COMPLEX FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veaceslav Boldescu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pH and the presence of hydrophilic polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone on the formation of sanguinarine-β-cyclodextrin (SANG-β-CD inclusion complex. Spectrophotometric studies of the SANG-β-CD systems in the presence and without 0.1 % PVP at the pH 5.0 did not show any evidence of the complex formation. However, the same systems showed several obvious evidences at the pH 8.0: the hyperchromic and the hypochromic effects and the presence of the isosbestic point in the region of 200 – 210 nm. The association constants calculated by three linear methods: Benesi-Hildebrand, Scott and Scatchard, were two times higher for the systems with addition of 0.1% PVP than for the systems without it.

  13. Gel phase formation in dilute triblock copolyelectrolyte complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Andreev, Marat; Levi, Adam E.; Goldfeld, David J.; Mao, Jun; Heller, William T.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Tirrell, Matthew V.

    2017-02-01

    Assembly of oppositely charged triblock copolyelectrolytes into phase-separated gels at low polymer concentrations (block copolymers that form discrete micelles at low concentrations and enter a phase of strongly interacting micelles in a gradual manner with increasing concentration, the formation of a dilute phase of individual micelles is prevented in polyelectrolyte complexation-driven assembly of triblock copolyelectrolytes. Gel phases form and phase separate almost instantaneously on solvation of the copolymers. Furthermore, molecular models of self-assembly demonstrate the presence of oligo-chain aggregates in early stages of copolyelectrolyte assembly, at experimentally unobservable polymer concentrations. Our discoveries contribute to the fundamental understanding of the structure and pathways of complexation-driven assemblies, and raise intriguing prospects for gel formation at extraordinarily low concentrations, with applications in tissue engineering, agriculture, water purification and theranostics.

  14. Substituent effects in double-helical hydrogen-bonded AAA-DDD complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Mudraboyina, Bhanu P; Wisner, James A

    2012-01-27

    Two series of DDD and AAA hydrogen-bond arrays were synthesized that form triply-hydrogen-bonded double-helical complexes when combined in CDCl(3) solution. Derivatization of the DDD arrays with electron-withdrawing groups increases the complex association constants by up to a factor of 30 in those arrays examined. Derivatization of the AAA arrays with electron donating substituents reveals a similar magnitude effect on the complex stabilities. The effect of substitution on both types of arrays are modeled quite satisfactorily (R(2) > 0.96 in all cases) as free energy relationships with respect to the sums of their Hammett substituent constants. In all, the complex stabilities can be manipulated over more than three orders of magnitude (>20 kJ mol(-1)) using this type of modification. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A statistical analysis of strong and weak hydrogen bonds in the minor groove of DNA was carried out for a set of 70 drug–DNA complexes. The terms `strong' and `weak' pertain to the inherent strengths and weakness of the donor and acceptor fragments rather than to any energy considerations. The dataset was extracted ...

  16. Efficient Energy Transfer in Supramolecular, Hydrogen-Bonded Polypyridylruthenium-Osmium Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rau, Sven; Schäfer, Bernhard; Schebesta, Sebastian; Grüßing, André; Poppitz, Wolfgang; Walther, Dirk; Duati, Marco; Browne, Wesley R.; Vos, Johannes G.

    Hydrogen bond association between ruthenium bibenzimidazole and carboxylated polypyridylosmium complexes results in stable supramolecular aggregates. The determined stability constant of logK approximate to 6 +/- 0.3 allows efficient energy transfer from the ruthenium to the osmium moiety. (C)

  17. One-Parameter Fisher–Rényi Complexity: Notion and Hydrogenic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene V. Toranzo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the one-parameter Fisher–Rényi measure of complexity for general d-dimensional probability distributions is introduced and its main analytic properties are discussed. Then, this quantity is determined for the hydrogenic systems in terms of the quantum numbers of the quantum states and the nuclear charge.

  18. Hydrogenation of esters catalyzed by ruthenium PN3-Pincer complexes containing an aminophosphine arm

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2014-08-11

    Hydrogenation of esters under mild conditions was achieved using air-stable ruthenium PN3-pincer complexes containing an aminophosphine arm. High efficiency was achieved even in the presence of water. DFT studies suggest a bimolecular proton shuttle mechanism which allows H2 to be activated by the relatively stable catalyst with a reasonably low transition state barrier. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  19. Formation of oxygen complexes in controlled atmosphere at surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 29; Issue 5. Formation of oxygen complexes in controlled atmosphere at surface of doped glassy carbon. Aleksandra A Perić-Grujić Tatjana M Vasiljević Olivera M Nešković Miomir V Veljković Zoran V Laušević Mila D Laušević. Ceramics and Glasses Volume 29 Issue ...

  20. Liesegang patterns: Complex formation of precipitate in an electric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    formed precipitate Co(OH)2(s) dissolves due to complex formation in excess ammo- nia. Zrınyi et al [26], Sultan and Panjarian [17] and Hilal and Sultan [27] observed and studied experimentally similar patterns in NaOH/Cr(NO3)3, while Das et al. [28] performed it in KI/HgCl2 system. The aim of this paper is to continue ...

  1. Competition of hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds in complexes of hypohalous acids with nitrogenated bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Blanco, Fernando; Solimannejad, Mohammad; Elguero, Jose

    2008-10-30

    A theoretical study of the complexes formed by hypohalous acids (HOX, X = F, Cl, Br, I, and At) with three nitrogenated bases (NH 3, N 2, and NCH) has been carried out by means of ab initio methods, up to MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ computational method. In general, two minima complexes are found, one with an OH...N hydrogen bond and the other one with a X...N halogen bond. While the first one is more stable for the smallest halogen derivatives, the two complexes present similar stabilities for the iodine case and the halogen-bonded structure is the most stable one for the hypoastatous acid complexes.

  2. Ruthenium(II) pincer complexes with oxazoline arms for efficient transfer hydrogenation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2012-08-01

    Well-defined P NN CN pincer ruthenium complexes bearing both strong phosphine and weak oxazoline donors were developed. These easily accessible complexes exhibit significantly better catalytic activity in transfer hydrogenation of ketones compared to their PN 3P analogs. These reactions proceed under mild and base-free conditions via protonation- deprotonation of the \\'NH\\' group in the aromatization-dearomatization process. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Correlations between community structure and link formation in complex networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Links in complex networks commonly represent specific ties between pairs of nodes, such as protein-protein interactions in biological networks or friendships in social networks. However, understanding the mechanism of link formation in complex networks is a long standing challenge for network analysis and data mining. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Links in complex networks have a tendency to cluster locally and form so-called communities. This widely existed phenomenon reflects some underlying mechanism of link formation. To study the correlations between community structure and link formation, we present a general computational framework including a theory for network partitioning and link probability estimation. Our approach enables us to accurately identify missing links in partially observed networks in an efficient way. The links having high connection likelihoods in the communities reveal that links are formed preferentially to create cliques and accordingly promote the clustering level of the communities. The experimental results verify that such a mechanism can be well captured by our approach. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provide a new insight into understanding how links are created in the communities. The computational framework opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications, such as community detection and missing link prediction.

  4. Correlations between community structure and link formation in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; He, Jia-Lin; Kapoor, Komal; Srivastava, Jaideep

    2013-01-01

    Links in complex networks commonly represent specific ties between pairs of nodes, such as protein-protein interactions in biological networks or friendships in social networks. However, understanding the mechanism of link formation in complex networks is a long standing challenge for network analysis and data mining. Links in complex networks have a tendency to cluster locally and form so-called communities. This widely existed phenomenon reflects some underlying mechanism of link formation. To study the correlations between community structure and link formation, we present a general computational framework including a theory for network partitioning and link probability estimation. Our approach enables us to accurately identify missing links in partially observed networks in an efficient way. The links having high connection likelihoods in the communities reveal that links are formed preferentially to create cliques and accordingly promote the clustering level of the communities. The experimental results verify that such a mechanism can be well captured by our approach. Our findings provide a new insight into understanding how links are created in the communities. The computational framework opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications, such as community detection and missing link prediction.

  5. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, S; Heitzig, J; Kornek, U; Schöll, E; Kurths, J

    2015-08-25

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation ("coalitions") on an acquaintance network. We include both the network's influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  6. Structural Basis of Clostridium perfringens Toxin Complex Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams,J.; Gregg, K.; Bayer, E.; Boraston, A.; Smith, S.

    2008-01-01

    The virulent properties of the common human and livestock pathogen Clostridium perfringens are attributable to a formidable battery of toxins. Among these are a number of large and highly modular carbohydrate-active enzymes, including the {mu}-toxin and sialidases, whose catalytic properties are consistent with degradation of the mucosal layer of the human gut, glycosaminoglycans, and other cellular glycans found throughout the body. The conservation of noncatalytic ancillary modules among these enzymes suggests they make significant contributions to the overall functionality of the toxins. Here, we describe the structural basis of an ultra-tight interaction (Ka = 1.44 x 1011 M-1) between the X82 and dockerin modules, which are found throughout numerous C. perfringens carbohydrate-active enzymes. Extensive hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals contacts between the X82 and dockerin modules give rise to the observed high affinity. The {mu}-toxin dockerin module in this complex is positioned {approx}180 relative to the orientation of the dockerin modules on the cohesin module surface within cellulolytic complexes. These observations represent a unique property of these clostridial toxins whereby they can associate into large, noncovalent multitoxin complexes that allow potentiation of the activities of the individual toxins by combining complementary toxin specificities.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical formation in anaerobic broth media exposed to atmospheric oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, J; Nyberg, G; Wrethén, J

    1978-08-01

    Fourteen different broth media were autoclaved under anaerobic conditions and then exposed to atmospheric oxygen. The hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical formation as well as the bactericidal effect of the media were studied. The rate of killing of Peptostreptococcus anaerobius VPI 4330-1 was high in media that rapidly autoxidized and accumulated hydrogen peroxide. In actinomyces broth (BBL), 50% of the cells were killed within 2 min, and in Brewer thioglycolate medium (Difco), 50% were killed within 11 min, whereas more than 50% of the cells survived for more than 2 h in Clausen medium (Oxoid), fluid thioglycolate medium (BBL), and thioglycolate medium without dextrose or indicator (Difco). Only media that contained phosphate and glucose had a tendency to accumulate hydrogen peroxide. A solution of phosphate and glucose autoxidized when it had been heated to 120 degrees C for at least 5 min and when the pH of the solution was higher than 6.5. Transitional metal ions catalyzed the autoxidation, but they were not necessary for the reaction to occur. Of the other substances heated in phosphate buffer, only alpha-hydroxycarbonyl compounds autoxidized with accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. Superoxide dismutase decreased the autoxidation rate of most of the broth media. This indicated that superoxide radicals were generated in these media.

  8. Muon molecular formation and transfer rate in solid hydrogen-deuterium mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Mulhauser, F. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility; Fujiwara, M.C. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria); Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Martoff, C.J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Wozniak, J. [Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Technology

    1996-10-01

    In an experiment at TRIUMF to study muon-catalyzed fusion and associated atomic and molecular effects, negative muons were stopped in a solid protium hydrogen layer containing a small amount of deuterium. Most of the resulting {mu}H atoms disappeared by formation of HH{mu} molecules or by muon transfer to a deuteron. The {mu}D can drift almost freely through the hydrogen layer due to the Ramsauer-Townsend effect and may even leave the layer. If a thin neon layer is frozen atop the hydrogen, the exiting muonic atoms will very rapidly release their muon to a neon atom. The analysis of the time structure of the neon X-rays is used to determine the rates of the slower processes involved in the evolution of the {mu}H. This analysis has been performed with the help of Monte Carlo calculations, which simulate the kinetics of both {mu}H and {mu}D atoms in the hydrogen mixtures. (orig.). 23 refs.

  9. Properties of hydrogen and hydrogen-vacancy complexes in the rutile phase of titanium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippone, F.; Mattioli, G.; Alippi, P.; Amore Bonapasta, A.

    2009-12-01

    The interaction of atomic H with host atoms and oxygen vacancies (VO) in the rutile phase of the TiO2 metal oxide has been investigated by using density-functional theory-local spin density (DFT-LSD) and DFT-LSD+U theoretical methods. The achieved results show that H in rutile presents quite different and peculiar properties with respect to other semiconductors and metal oxides. It behaves indeed neither as an amphoteric impurity, as it does in Si and GaAs, nor as a shallow donor, as it has been proposed in ZnO. Moreover, H in rutile represents a failure of a theoretical model proposing a universal alignment of the H-induced electronic level in the energy gaps of semiconductors, which predicts a shallow donor behavior of H in ZnO and TiO2 . Present results show indeed that H behaves as a deep donor in rutile and always forms an OH+ complex, independent of the position of the Fermi energy. This very unusual behavior of H can be accounted for by a peculiar property of TiO2 regarding its capability of localizing extra electrons at Ti+3 sites. The electron lost by H can be accommodated indeed by a Ti+4 atom which evolves in a Ti+3 defect. This accounts for the deep behavior of H and implies that the electronic level it induces in the TiO2 energy gap has, actually, a Ti+3 character quite similar to that characterizing an O vacancy (VO) , thus distinguishing H in rutile from H in other semiconductors. Finally, H can form stable H-VO complexes where it takes the place of the missing O atom by forming a bond with a prevailing ionic character, at variance with a multicenter bond model proposed for the same complexes in ZnO.

  10. Nanoparticle-protein complexes mimicking corona formation in ocular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Son, Jin Gyeong; Dan, Ki Soon; Song, Sang Hoon; Lee, Tae Geol; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2016-12-01

    Nanoparticles adsorb biomolecules to form corona upon entering the biological environment. In this study, tissue-specific corona formation is provided as a way of controlling protein interaction with nanoparticles in vivo. In the vitreous, the composition of the corona was determined by the electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the associated proteins, regardless of the material (gold and silica) or size (20- and 100-nm diameter) of the nanoparticles. To control protein adsorption, we pre-incubate 20-nm gold nanoparticles with 5 selectively enriched proteins from the corona, formed in the vitreous, to produce nanoparticle-protein complexes. Compared to bare nanoparticles, nanoparticle-protein complexes demonstrate improved binding to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the vitreous. Furthermore, nanoparticle-protein complexes retain in vitro anti-angiogenic properties of bare nanoparticles. In particular, priming the nanoparticles (gold and silica) with tissue-specific corona proteins allows nanoparticle-protein complexes to exert better in vivo therapeutic effects by higher binding to VEGF than bare nanoparticles. These results suggest that controlled corona formation that mimics in vivo processes may be useful in the therapeutic use of nanomaterials in local environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multicavity formations and complexity modulation in a hyperchaotic discrete system

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shaobo; Banerjee, Santo

    2018-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel and unified approach for controlling the directions and number of cavities of a two dimensional Sine ICMIC modulation map (2D-SIMM). Two controllers are added to the system for arranging the cavity fluctuations and translating the cavities respectively. Both the controllers can effectively redesign the dynamics of reproducing cavities in different directions with grid representations. The dynamics of the proposed controlled model are investigated with bifurcation, Lyapunov and FuzzyEn algorithms under various cavity formations in different directions. A relationship is established for the complexity of the phase space with the directional control and various arrangements of the sinusoidal cavities. The proposed model is overall hyperchaotic with the high complexity in the whole parameter plane. The proposed scheme is effective for a dynamical model to reproduce the self phase structure in various arrangements for the optimization and modulation of complexity.

  12. Study on the mechanism of copper-ammonia complex decomposition in struvite formation process and enhanced ammonia and copper removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cong; Chai, Liyuan; Tang, Chongjian; Min, Xiaobo; Song, Yuxia; Duan, Chengshan; Yu, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Heavy metals and ammonia are difficult to remove from wastewater, as they easily combine into refractory complexes. The struvite formation method (SFM) was applied for the complex decomposition and simultaneous removal of heavy metal and ammonia. The results indicated that ammonia deprivation by SFM was the key factor leading to the decomposition of the copper-ammonia complex ion. Ammonia was separated from solution as crystalline struvite, and the copper mainly co-precipitated as copper hydroxide together with struvite. Hydrogen bonding and electrostatic attraction were considered to be the main surface interactions between struvite and copper hydroxide. Hydrogen bonding was concluded to be the key factor leading to the co-precipitation. In addition, incorporation of copper ions into the struvite crystal also occurred during the treatment process. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Differential cross sections for positronium formation in positron-hydrogen scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamali, M.Z.M. [Centre for Foundation Studies in Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)], E-mail: mzmk2000@yahoo.com; Ratnavelu, Kuru [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2008-02-15

    Positron scattering by hydrogen atom is an interesting system to test theoretical methods due to its simplicity. Recently, theoretical calculations have reported differential cross sections (DCS) for positronium (Ps) formation for this system. The present work utilises the coupled-channel optical method (CCOM) that allows simultaneous treatment of the target channels and the Ps channels in the close-coupling method and the incorporation of the continuum effects via an optical potential to provide a comparative view of the DCS for Ps(1s) formation and Ps(2s) formation at energies ranging from 20 to 100 eV. A large 12-states and 15-states CCOM calculations have been undertaken and the results compared with other available data.

  14. Interaction of hydrogen with ZnO nanopowders--evidence of hydroxyl group formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kester W J; Field, Matthew R; Ou, Jian Zhen; Latham, Kay; Spencer, Michelle J S; Yarovsky, Irene; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2012-01-13

    There have been many investigations to reveal the nature of the hydrogen gas and ZnO nanopowder interaction at elevated temperatures, while at present no conclusive description of such an interaction has been confidently reported. In this work, we demonstrate that a hydroxyl group is formed during this interaction, depending on size and relative crystallinity of nanopowders. Our in situ Raman spectroscopy investigations show that the interaction directly affects the intensity of the Raman signal at 483 cm(-1), relative to the peak at 519 cm(-1). Ex situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectroscopy also show extra peaks at 44° and 1618 cm(-1), respectively, after hydrogenation. These peaks were all identified as surface hydroxyl groups, which can be related to the formation of water on the ZnO nanopowder surfaces.

  15. An experimental and numerical study of nitrogen oxide formation mechanisms in ammonia-hydrogen-air flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen

    The demand for sustainable alternative fuels is ever-increasing in the power generation, transportation, and energy sectors due to the inherent non-sustainable characteristics and political constraints of current energy resources. A number of alternative fuels derived from cellulosic biomass, algae, or waste are being considered, along with the conversion of electricity to non-carbon fuels such as hydrogen or ammonia (NH3). The latter is receiving attention recently because it is a non-carbon fuel that is readily produced in large quantities, stored and transported with current infrastructure, and is often a byproduct of biomass or waste conversion processes. However, pure or anhydrous ammonia combustion is severely challenging due to its high auto-ignition temperature (650 °C), low reactivity, and tendency to promote NOx formation. As such, the present study focuses on two major aspects of the ammonia combustion. The first is an applied investigation of the potential to achieve pure NH3 combustion with low levels of emissions in flames of practical interest. In this study, a swirl-stabilized flame typically used in fuel-oil home-heating systems is optimized for NH3 combustion, and measurements of NO and NH3 are collected for a wide range of operating conditions. The second major focus of this work is on fundamental investigation of NO x formation mechanisms in flames with high levels of NH3 in H2. For laminar premixed and diffusion jet flames, experimental measurements of flame speeds, exhaust-gas sampling, and in-situ NO measurements (NO PLIF) are compared with numerically predicted flames using complex chemical kinetics within CHEMKIN and reacting CFD codes i.e., UNICORN. From the preliminary testing of the NOx formation mechanisms, (1) Tian (2) Konnov and (3) GRI-Mech3.0 in laminar premixed H2/NH 3 flames, the Tian and Konnov mechanisms are found to capture the reduction in measured flame speeds with increasing NH3 in the fuel mixture, both qualitatively and

  16. Processes of the formation of large unconfined clouds following a massive spillage of liquid hydrogen on the ground

    OpenAIRE

    Proust, Christophe; Lacome, Jean-Marc; Jamois, Didier; Perrette, Lionel

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Because of hydrogen low volumetric energy content under its gaseous form, transport and storage of liquid hydrogen will certainly play a major role in any future hydrogen economy. One of the obstacles to the expected development use of hydrogen is the poor state of knowledge on explosion risks in the event of an extensive spillage. INERIS set up a large-scale experiment to study the mechanisms of the formation of the gas cloud resulting from such a spillage and the ass...

  17. Enhancement of Hydrogen Storage Behavior of Complex Hydrides via Bimetallic Nanocatalysts Doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash C. Sharma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pristine complex quaternary hydride (LiBH4/2LiNH2 and its destabilized counterpart (LiBH4/2LiNH2/nanoMgH2 have recently shown promising reversible hydrogen storage capacity under moderate operating conditions. The destabilization of complex hydride via nanocrystalline MgH2 apparently lowers the thermodynamic heat values and thus enhances the reversible hydrogen storage behavior at moderate temperatures. However, the kinetics of these materials is rather low and needs to be improved for on-board vehicular applications. Nanocatalyst additives such as nano Ni, nano Fe, nano Co, nano Mn and nano Cu at low concentrations on the complex hydride host structures have demonstrated a reduction in the decomposition temperature and overall increase in the hydrogen desorption reaction rates. Bi-metallic nanocatalysts such as the combination of nano Fe and nano Ni have shown further pronounced kinetics enhancement in comparison to their individual counterparts. Additionally, the vital advantage of using bi-metallic nanocatalysts is to enable the synergistic effects and characteristics of the two transitional nanometal species on the host hydride matrix for the optimized hydrogen storage behavior.

  18. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-08

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Decreasing the Viscosity in CO2 Capture by Amino-Functionalized Ionic Liquids through the Formation of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiao Y; Fan, Xi; Shi, Gui L; Li, Hao R; Wang, Cong M

    2016-03-17

    A strategy for decreasing the viscosity variation in the process of CO2 capture by amino-functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) through the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bond was reported. Different with the dramatic increase in viscosity during CO2 uptake by traditional amino-functionalized ILs, slight increase or even decrease in viscosity was achieved through introducing a N or O atom as hydrogen acceptor into amino-functionalized anion, which could stabilize the active hydrogen of produced carbamic acid. Quantum chemical calculations and spectroscopic investigations demonstrated that the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bond between introduced hydrogen acceptor and carbamic acid was the key to avoid the dramatic increase in viscosity during the capture of CO2 by these amino-functionalized ILs.

  20. Complex of titanocene with tolan as a catalyst for the homogeneous hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shur, V.B.; Burlakov, V.V.; Vol' pin, M.E.

    1986-09-01

    The complex of titanocene with tolan (Cp/sub 2/Ti(C/sub 2/Ph/sub 2/)) (I) synthesized by the reaction of Cp/sub 2/TiCl/sub 2/ with magnesium and tolan in THF was found to be an effective catalyst for the homogeneous hydrogenation of olefins and acetylenes at 20 C atmospheric hydrogen pressure. The reaction was carried out with a substrate. Under the conditions of the experiment, tolan as well as cis- and trans-stilbenes are hydrogenated virtually quantitatively in a few minutes to dibenzyl. Similarly, styrene is converted to ethylbenzene, 3-hexyne is converted to hexane, 1-heptene is converted to heptane, cyclohexene is converted to cyclohexane, and trans, trans-1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiene is converted to 1,4-diphenylbutane. The authors' attempts to synthesize (Cp/sub 2/Ti(C/sub 2/Ph/sub 2/)) with tolan were unsucessful.

  1. Hydrogenation catalysts based on complexes of palladium(II) and polyvinylpyridines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zharmagambetova, A.K.; Mukhamedzhanova, S.G.; Bekturov, E.A.; Saltykov, Yu.P.

    1992-05-20

    Recently methods for producing a new type of catalyst, grafted complexes have been developed. Polymers containing functional groups have been used quite successfully as a substrate in such catalysts. The refinement of the preparative method for metallopolymeric complexes (MPC) is of some importance. By varying the conditions of interaction between the polymers and the metal compounds the catalytic properties of MPC can be improved significantly. In this study the authors have looked at the effect of the preparative conditions for complexes of palladium(II) with poly-2-vinylpyridine (Pd-P2VP) on their catalytic activity in the hydrogenation of 2-propen-1-ol. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Evaluating hydrogen bond interactions in enzymes containing Mn(III)-histidine complexation using manganese-imidazole complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendiran, M; Caudle, T; Kirk, Martin L; Setyawati, Ika; Kampf, Jeff W; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2003-02-01

    It is often difficult to control hydrogen bond interactions in small molecule compounds that model metalloenzyme active sites. The imidazole-containing ligands 4,5-dicarboxyimidazole (H(3)DCBI) and 4,5-dicarboxy- N-methylimidazole (H(2)MeDCBI) allow examination of the effects of internal hydrogen bonding between carboxylate and imidazole nitrogen atoms. A new series of mononuclear manganese imidazole complexes have been prepared using these ligands: Mn(III)(salpn)(H(2)DCBI)(DMF) (1), Mn(III)(salpn)(HMeDCBI) (2), Mn(III)(dtsalpn)(HMeDCBI) (3), [Mn(IV)(dtsalpn)(HMeDCBI)]PF(6) (4), Mn(III)(salpn)(H(2)DCBI) (5), Mn(III)(dtsalpn)(H(2)DCBI) (6), and Mn(IV)(dtsalpn)(H(2)DCBI)PF(6) (8). Complexes 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 have been prepared by direct reaction of salpn [salpn=(salicylideneaminato)-1,3-diaminopropane)] or dtsalpn [dtsalpn=(3,5-di- t-butylsalicylideneaminato)-1,3-diaminopropane)] and H(3)DCBI and H(2)MeDCBI with Mn(III) acetate, while complexes 4 and 8 were made by bulk electrolysis of complex 3 or 6 in dichloromethane. Complexes 1, 2, and 6 were characterized by X-ray diffraction. The impact of hydrogen bonding interactions of the complexes has been demonstrated by X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, and EPR spectroscopy. In all complexes the central metal ion is present in a six-coordinate geometry. Magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the spin and oxidation states of the complexes. The cyclic voltammograms of 3 and 6 in dichloromethane reveal single, reversible redox waves with E(1/2)=600 mV and 690 mV, respectively. The X-band EPR spectrum of 4 shows a broad signal around g=4.4, and the corresponding complex 8 possesses a broad signal at slightly lower field ( g=5.5) than 4. These studies demonstrate that even small changes in the effective charge of the imidazole ligand can have a profound impact on the structure, spectroscopy, and magnetism of manganese(IV) complexes. We use these observations to present a model that may explain the origin of the g=4

  3. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI(+)] prion - an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein - and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome.

  4. Multi-Level Formation of Complex Software Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a multi-level formation model for complex software systems. The previous works extract the software systems to software networks for further studies, but usually investigate the software networks at the class level. In contrast to these works, our treatment of software systems as multi-level networks is more realistic. In particular, the software networks are organized by three levels of granularity, which represents the modularity and hierarchy in the formation process of real-world software systems. More importantly, simulations based on this model have generated more realistic structural properties of software networks, such as power-law, clustering and modularization. On the basis of this model, how the structure of software systems effects software design principles is then explored, and it could be helpful for understanding software evolution and software engineering practices.

  5. Hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of interstellar PAHs: Spectral characteristics and H2 formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, H.; Candian, A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. We have modelled the abundance distribution and IR emission of the first 3 members of the coronene family in the north-west photodissociation region of the well-studied reflection nebulae NGC 7023. Aims: Our aim was 3-fold: i) analyze the distribution of abundances; (ii) examine the spectral footprints from the hydrogenation state of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); and (iii) assess the role of PAHs in the formation of H2 in photodissociation regions. Methods: To model the physical conditions inside the cloud, we used the Meudon PDR Code, and we gave this as input to our kinetic model. We used specific molecular properties for each PAH, based on the latest data available at the present time. We considered the loss of an H atom or an H2 molecule as multiphoton processes, and we worked under the premise that PAHs with extra H atoms can form H2 through an Eley-Rideal abstraction mechanism. Results: In terms of abundances, we can distinguish clear differences with PAH size. The smallest PAH, coronene (C24H12), is found to be easily destroyed down to the complete loss of all of its H atoms. The largest species circumcircumcoronene (C96H24), is found in its normal hydrogenated state. The intermediate size molecule, circumcoronene (C54H18), shows an intermediate behaviour with respect to the other two, where partial dehydrogenation is observed inside the cloud. Regarding spectral variations, we find that the emission spectra in NGC 7023 are dominated by the variation in the ionization of the dominant hydrogenation state of each species at each point inside the cloud. It is difficult to "catch" the effect of dehydrogenation in the emitted PAH spectra since, for any conditions, only PAHs within a narrow size range will be susceptible to dehydrogenation, being quickly stripped off of all H atoms (and may isomerize to cages or fullerenes). The 3 μm region is the most sensitive one towards the hydrogenation level of PAHs. Conclusions: Based on our results, we

  6. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Polyhedral Borane Anions and Aluminum-Ammonia-Borane Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Safronov, Alexander V.; Lee, Han Beak; Wu, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    mediated hydrogenation process leading to reversibility. The Al-AB complexes have comparable hydrogen capacity with other M-AB and have potential to meet DOE’s 2010 and 2015 targets for system wt%.

  7. Vibrational transitions in hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes – A local mode perturbation theory approach to transition frequencies and intensities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjærgaard, Henrik Grum

    2017-01-01

    The local mode perturbation theory (LMPT) model was developed to improve the description of hydrogen bonded XH-stretching transitions, where X is typically O or N. We present a modified version of the LMPT model to extend its application from hydrated bimolecular complexes to hydrogen bonded...... bimolecular complexes with donors such as alcohols, amines and acids. We have applied the modified model to a series of complexes of different hydrogen bond type and complex energy. We found that the differences between local mode (LM) and LMPT calculated fundamental XH-stretching transition wavenumbers...

  8. Carbon-tuned bonding method significantly enhanced the hydrogen storage of BN-Li complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qing-ming; Zhao, Lina; Luo, You-hua; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Li-xia; Zhao, Yuliang

    2011-11-01

    Through first-principles calculations, we found doping carbon atoms onto BN monolayers (BNC) could significantly strengthen the Li bond on this material. Unlike the weak bond strength between Li atoms and the pristine BN layer, it is observed that Li atoms are strongly hybridized and donate their electrons to the doped substrate, which is responsible for the enhanced binding energy. Li adsorbed on the BNC layer can serve as a high-capacity hydrogen storage medium, without forming clusters, which can be recycled at room temperature. Eight polarized H(2) molecules are attached to two Li atoms with an optimal binding energy of 0.16-0.28 eV/H(2), which results from the electrostatic interaction of the polarized charge of hydrogen molecules with the electric field induced by positive Li atoms. This practical carbon-tuned BN-Li complex can work as a very high-capacity hydrogen storage medium with a gravimetric density of hydrogen of 12.2 wt%, which is much higher than the gravimetric goal of 5.5 wt % hydrogen set by the U.S. Department of Energy for 2015.

  9. Microwave spectroscopy of 2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridine⋯water complex: Molecular structure and hydrogen bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Zheng, Yang; Gou, Qian; Feng, Gang; Xia, Zhining

    2018-01-01

    In order to explore the -CF3 substitution effect on the complexation of pyridine, we investigated the 2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridine⋯water complex by using pulsed jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy complemented with quantum chemical calculations. Experimental assignment and ab initio calculations confirmed that the observed complex is stabilized through N⋯H-O and O⋯H-C hydrogen bonds forming a five-membered ring structure. The bonding distance in N⋯H-O is determined to be 2.027(2) Å, whilst that in O⋯H-C interaction is 2.728(2) Å. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules analysis indicates that the interaction energy of N⋯H-O hydrogen bond is ˜22 kJ mol-1 and that for O⋯H-C hydrogen bond is ˜5 kJ mol-1. The water molecule lies almost in the plane of the aromatic ring in the complex. The -CF3 substitution to pyridine quenches the tunneling splitting path of the internal motion of water molecule.

  10. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  11. Influence of the formation- and passivation rate of boron-oxygen defects for mitigating carrier-induced degradation in silicon within a hydrogen-based model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallam, Brett, E-mail: brett.hallam@unsw.edu.au; Abbott, Malcolm; Nampalli, Nitin; Hamer, Phill; Wenham, Stuart [School of Photovoltaics and Renewable Energy Engineering, Level 1 Tyree Energy Technologies Building, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-02-14

    A three-state model is used to explore the influence of defect formation- and passivation rates of carrier-induced degradation related to boron-oxygen complexes in boron-doped p-type silicon solar cells within a hydrogen-based model. The model highlights that the inability to effectively mitigate carrier-induced degradation at elevated temperatures in previous studies is due to the limited availability of defects for hydrogen passivation, rather than being limited by the defect passivation rate. An acceleration of the defect formation rate is also observed to increase both the effectiveness and speed of carrier-induced degradation mitigation, whereas increases in the passivation rate do not lead to a substantial acceleration of the hydrogen passivation process. For high-throughput mitigation of such carrier-induced degradation on finished solar cell devices, two key factors were found to be required, high-injection conditions (such as by using high intensity illumination) to enable an acceleration of defect formation whilst simultaneously enabling a rapid passivation of the formed defects, and a high temperature to accelerate both defect formation and defect passivation whilst still ensuring an effective mitigation of carrier-induced degradation.

  12. Renewable hydrogen: carbon formation on Ni and Ru catalysts during ethanol steam-reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rass-Hansen, Jeppe; Christensen, Christina Hviid; Sehested, J.

    2007-01-01

    addition was a rapid deactivation of the catalyst due to an enhanced gum carbon formation on the Ni crystals. Contrary to this, the effect of K addition was a prolonged resistance against carbon formation and therefore against deactivation. The Ru catalyst operates better than all the Ni catalysts...... for the production of hydrogen is investigated, along with quantitative and qualitative determinations of carbon formation on the catalysts by TPO and TEM experiments. A Ru/ MgAl2O4 catalyst, a Ni/MgAl2O4 catalyst as well as Ag-and K-promoted Ni/ MgAl2O4 catalysts were studied. The operating temperature was between...... 673 and 873 K, and a 25 vol% ethanol -water mixture was employed. Deactivation of the catalysts by carbon formation is the main obstacle for industrial use of this process. Carbon formation was found to be highly affected by the operating temperature and the choice of catalyst. The effect of Ag...

  13. Termolecular proton transfer reactions assisted by ionic hydrogen bond formation: Reactions of aromatic cations with polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, G. M.; Meot-Ner, M.; Pithawalla, Y. B.; El-Shall, M. S.

    1996-05-01

    We present a new method that applies resonant-two-photon ionization to generate reactant ions selectively in the source of a high-pressure mass spectrometer (R2PI-HPMS) for kinetic and equilibrium studies. Applications to reactions that would be obscured otherwise in a complex system are illustrated in mixtures of benzene with polar solvent molecules (S). We observe a novel type of proton transfer reactions from C6H6+• to two S molecules where S=CH3CN, CH3OH, C2H5OH and CH3COOC2H5, and from C6H5CH3+• to two S molecules where S=CH3OH and C2H5OH to form protonated solvent S2H+ dimers. The reactions are driven by the strong hydrogen bonds in the S2H+ dimers and therefore require the formation of the hydrogen bond concertedly with proton transfer, to make the process energetically feasible. The adducts (C6H6+•)S are observed with blocked solvent molecules where the subsequent switching reaction to yield S2H+ is slow, but not with alcohol reactants that can form hydrogen-bonded chains that facilitate fast subsequent proton extraction. Correspondingly, kinetic simulations suggest that the mechanism proceeds through (C6H6+•)S+S→S2H++C6H5• and C6H6+•+2S→S2H++C6H5• reactions, respectively. The rate coefficients of these reactions are in the range 10-13-10-12 cm3 s-1 for the reaction through a bimolecular switching channel and in the range 10-26-10-28 cm6 s-1 for reaction through a direct termolecular proton extraction mechanism. The relation to energetics and reactant structure is examined.

  14. Halogen Bonding VS Hydrogen Bonding in CHF_2I Complexes with NH_3 and N(CH_3)_3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medcraft, Chris; Geboes, Yannick; Legon, Anthony; Walker, Nick

    2016-06-01

    Ammonia and trimethylamine (TMA) were used to probe preference of hydrogen over halogen bonding in molecular complexes containing CHF_2I via chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. The halogen bonded complex of TMA is ≈ 2 kJ/mol more energetically favourable (extrapolation to CCSD(T)/CBS level) than the hydrogen bonded complex. The reverse is true for the ammonia complex where the hydrogen bonded complex is ≈ 3kJ/mol more favourable. Although the spectra of both complexes were perturbed by large amplitude motions around the intermolecular bond effective fits of the lower rotational energy levels appear to confirm that TMA prefers to bind to the iodine whilst ammonia prefers the hydrogen.

  15. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in protein-ligand complexes of kinases: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Sunil K

    2008-05-01

    Strong and weak hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand are analyzed in a group of 233 X-ray crystal structures of the kinase family. These kinases are from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. The dataset comprises of 44 sub-families, out of which 35 are of human origin and the rest belong to other organisms. Interaction analysis was carried out in the active sites, defined here as a sphere of 10 A radius around the ligand. A majority of the interactions are observed between the main chain of the protein and the ligand atoms. As a donor, the ligand frequently interacts with amino acid residues like Leu, Glu and His. As an acceptor, the ligand interacts often with Gly, and Leu. Strong hydrogen bonds N-H...O, O-H...O, N-H...N and weak bonds C-H...O, C-H...N are common between the protein and ligand. The hydrogen bond donor capacity of Gly in N-H...O and C-H...O interactions is noteworthy. Similarly, the acceptor capacity of main chain Glu is ubiquitous in several kinase sub-families. Hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand form characteristic hydrogen bond patterns (supramolecular synthons). These synthon patterns are unique to each sub-family. The synthon locations are conserved across sub-families due to a higher percentage of conserved sequences in the active sites. The nature of active site water molecules was studied through a novel classification scheme, based on the extent of exposure of water molecules. Water which is least exposed usually participates in hydrogen bond formation with the ligand. These findings will help structural biologists, crystallographers and medicinal chemists to design better kinase inhibitors.

  16. Ab initio lattice dynamics of complex structures:Computational design of novel materials for hydrogen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Voss, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, density functional theory is applied in a study of thermodynamic properties of so-called complex metal hydrides, which are promising materials for hydrogen storage applications. Since the unit cells of these crystals can be relatively large with many symmetrically inequivalent atomic coordinates, we have developed a new numerical optimization scheme, which allows for a fast convergence of the coordinate relaxation. Moreover, a method for the efficient calculation of phonon fre...

  17. Modeling the Effect of Finite-Rate Hydrogen Diffusion on Porosity Formation in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kent D.; Lin, Zhiping; Beckermann, Christoph

    2007-08-01

    A volume-averaged model for finite-rate diffusion of hydrogen in the melt is developed to predict pore formation during the solidification of aluminum alloys. The calculation of the micro-/macro-scale gas species transport in the melt is coupled with a model for the feeding flow and pressure field. The rate of pore growth is shown to be proportional to the local level of gas supersaturation in the melt, as well as various microstructural parameters. Parametric studies of one-dimensional solidification under an imposed temperature gradient and cooling rate illustrate that the model captures important phenomena observed in porosity formation in aluminum alloys. The transition from gas to shrinkage dominated porosity and the effects of different solubilities of hydrogen in the eutectic solid, capillary pressures at pore nucleation, and pore number densities are investigated in detail. Comparisons between predicted porosity percentages and previous experimental measurements show good correspondence, although some uncertainties remain regarding the extent of impingement of solid on the pores.

  18. pH-Regulated Reversible Transition Between Polyion Complexes (PIC) and Hydrogen-Bonding Complexes (HBC) with Tunable Aggregation-Induced Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Sidan; Liu, Guhuan; Wang, Xiaorui; Wu, Tao; Yang, Jinxian; Ye, Xiaodong; Zhang, Guoying; Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2016-02-17

    The mimicking of biological supramolecular interactions and their mutual transitions to fabricate intelligent artificial systems has been of increasing interest. Herein, we report the fabrication of supramolecular micellar nanoparticles consisting of quaternized poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PEO-b-PQDMA) and tetrakis(4-carboxylmethoxyphenyl)ethene (TPE-4COOH), which was capable of reversible transition between polyion complexes (PIC) and hydrogen bonding complexes (HBC) with tunable aggregation-induced emission (AIE) mediated by solution pH. At pH 8, TPE-4COOH chromophores can be directly dissolved in aqueous milieu without evident fluorescence emission. However, upon mixing with PEO-b-PQDMA, polyion complexes were formed by taking advantage of electrostatic interaction between carboxylate anions and quaternary ammonium cations and the most compact PIC micelles were achieved at the isoelectric point (i.e., [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] = 1), as confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement. Simultaneously, fluorescence spectroscopy revealed an evident emission turn-on and the maximum fluorescence intensity was observed near the isoelectric point due to the restriction of intramolecular rotation of TPE moieties within the PIC cores. The kinetic study supported a micelle fusion/fission mechanism on the formation of PIC micelles at varying charge ratios, exhibiting a quick time constant (τ1) relating to the formation of quasi-equilibrium micelles and a slow time constant (τ2) corresponding to the formation of final equilibrium micelles. Upon deceasing the pH of PIC micelles from 8 to 2 at the [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] molar ratio of 1, TPE-4COOH chromophores became gradually protonated and hydrophobic. The size of micellar nanoparticles underwent a remarkable decrease, whereas the fluorescence intensity exhibited a further increase by approximately 7.35-fold, presumably because of the formation of HBC micelles comprising cationic PQDMA

  19. Hybrid functional calculations of potential hydrogen storage material: Complex dimagnesium iron hydride

    KAUST Repository

    Ul Haq, Bakhtiar

    2014-06-01

    By employing the state of art first principles approaches, comprehensive investigations of a very promising hydrogen storage material, Mg 2FeH6 hydride, is presented. To expose its hydrogen storage capabilities, detailed structural, elastic, electronic, optical and dielectric aspects have been deeply analysed. The electronic band structure calculations demonstrate that Mg2FeH6 is semiconducting material. The obtained results of the optical bandgap (4.19 eV) also indicate that it is a transparent material for ultraviolet light, thus demonstrating its potential for optoelectronics application. The calculated elastic properties reveal that Mg2FeH6 is highly stiff and stable hydride. Finally, the calculated hydrogen (H2) storage capacity (5.47 wt.%) within a reasonable formation energy of -78 kJ mol-1, at room temperature, can be easily achievable, thus making Mg2FeH6 as potential material for practical H2 storage applications. Copyright © 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  1. Communication: A hydrogen-bonded difluorocarbene complex: Ab initio and matrix isolation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosulin, Ilya S.; Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.; Tyurin, Daniil A.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2017-10-01

    Structure and spectroscopic features of the CF2⋯HF complexes were studied by ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) level and matrix isolation FTIR spectroscopy. The calculations predict three stable structures. The most energetically favorable structure corresponds to hydrogen bonding of HF to the lone pair of the C atom (the interaction energy of 3.58 kcal/mol), whereas two less stable structures are the H⋯F bonded complexes (the interaction energies of 0.30 and 0.24 kcal/mol). The former species was unambiguously characterized by the absorptions in the FTIR spectra observed after X-ray irradiation of fluoroform in a xenon matrix at 5 K. The corresponding features appear at 3471 (H-F stretching), 1270 (C-F symmetric stretching, shoulder), 1175 (antisymmetric C-F stretching), and 630 (libration) cm-1, in agreement with the computational predictions. To our knowledge, it is the first hydrogen-bonded complex of dihalocarbene. Possible weaker manifestations of the H⋯F bonded complexes were also found in the C-F stretching region; however, their assignment is tentative. The H⋯C bonded complex is protected from reaction yielding a fluoroform molecule by a remarkably high energy barrier (23.85 kcal/mol), so it may be involved in various chemical reactions.

  2. Substituent effects on noncovalent bonds: complexes of ionized benzene derivatives with hydrogen cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attah, Isaac K; Hamid, Ahmed M; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; El-Shall, M S; Aziz, Saadullah G; Alyoubi, Abdulrahman O

    2013-10-17

    Here, we report the first experimental and computational study of the noncovalent binding energies and structures of ionized benzenes containing electron-withdrawing substituents solvated by one to four HCN molecules. Measured by ion mobility mass spectrometric equilibrium studies, the bond dissociation enthalpies of the first HCN molecule to the fluorobenzene (C6H5F(•+)), 1,4-difluorobenzene (C6H4F2(•+)), and benzonitrile (C6H5CN(•+)) ions (11.2, 11.2, and 9.2 kcal/mol, respectively) are similar to those of HCN with the benzene (C6H6(•+)) and phenyacetylene (C6H5CCH(•+)) radical cations (9.2 and 10.5 kcal/mol, respectively). DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level show that HCN can form in-plane hydrogen bonds to ring hydrogens, or bind electrostatically to positively charged carbon centers in the ring. The electron-withdrawing substituents increase the bond energy by increasing the partial positive charge on the ring hydrogens that form CH(δ+)---NCH bonds, and by creating a π hole, as evidenced by positive charge centers on the fluorinated ring carbons for electrostatically bonded isomers. In the complexes of benzonitrile(•+), similar to benzene(•+), hydrogen bonded planar isomers have the lowest energy. In the complexes of (fluorinated benzene)(•+), the lowest energy isomers are electrostatically bonded where HCN is perpendicular to the ring and its dipole points to a positively charged ring carbon. However, in all cases the planar hydrogen-bonded and vertical electrostatic isomers have similar binding energies within 1 kcal/mol, although HCN interacts with different sites of the ionized benzenes in these isomers, suggesting that the observed cluster populations are mixtures of the planar and vertical isomers. Further HCN molecules can bind directly to unoccupied ring CH hydrogens or bind to the first-shell HCN molecules to form linear HCN---HCN--- hydrogen bonded chains. The binding energies decrease stepwise to about 6-7 kcal/mol by

  3. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest ...

  4. Spectroscopic Investigation of the Formation and Disruption of Hydrogen Bonds in Pharmaceutical Semicrystalline Dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duong, Tu; Reekmans, Gunter; Venkatesham, Akkaladevi; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Adriaensens, Peter; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2017-05-01

    . Screening of crystallization inhibitors of semicrystalline polymers discovers numerous candidates that exhibit the same behavior as IMC, demonstrating a general pattern of polymer crystallization inhibition rather than a particular case. Furthermore, the crystallization inhibition effect of drugs on PEG is independent of the carrier molecular weight. These mechanistic findings on the formation and disruption of hydrogen bonds in semicrystalline dispersions can be extended to amorphous dispersions and are of significant importance for preparation of solid dispersions with consistent and reproducible physicochemical properties.

  5. N₂reduction and hydrogenation to ammonia by a molecular iron-potassium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Meghan M; Bill, Eckhard; Brennessel, William W; Holland, Patrick L

    2011-11-11

    The most common catalyst in the Haber-Bosch process for the hydrogenation of dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia (NH(3)) is an iron surface promoted with potassium cations (K(+)), but soluble iron complexes have neither reduced the N-N bond of N(2) to nitride (N(3-)) nor produced large amounts of NH(3) from N(2). We report a molecular iron complex that reacts with N(2) and a potassium reductant to give a complex with two nitrides, which are bound to iron and potassium cations. The product has a Fe(3)N(2) core, implying that three iron atoms cooperate to break the N-N triple bond through a six-electron reduction. The nitride complex reacts with acid and with H(2) to give substantial yields of N(2)-derived ammonia. These reactions, although not yet catalytic, give structural and spectroscopic insight into N(2) cleavage and N-H bond-forming reactions of iron.

  6. N2 Reduction and Hydrogenation to Ammonia by a Molecular Iron-Potassium Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Meghan M.; Bill, Eckhard; Brennessel, William W.; Holland, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    The most common catalyst in the Haber-Bosch process for the hydrogenation of dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia is an iron surface promoted with K+, but soluble iron complexes have neither reduced the N-N bond of N2 to nitride nor produced large amounts of NH3 from N2. We report a molecular iron complex that reacts with N2 and a potassium reductant to give a complex with two nitrides, which are bound to iron and potassium cations. The product has a Fe3N2 core, implying that three iron atoms cooperate to break the N-N triple bond through a six-electron reduction. The nitride complex reacts with acid and with H2 to give substantial yields of N2-derived ammonia. These reactions, though not yet catalytic, give structural and spectroscopic insight into N2 cleavage and N-H bond-forming reactions of iron. PMID:22076372

  7. Adhesion complex formation after small keratectomy wounds in the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, E L; Kurpakus, M A; Sambol, B; Jones, J C

    1992-02-01

    The adhesion complex of the corneal epithelium consists of the hemidesmosome and its associated structures, such as anchoring filaments, lamina densa of the basement membrane, and anchoring fibrils. It contributes to the adhesion of the corneal epithelium to Bowman's layer. To understand the adhesion complex better, an electron microscopic and immunofluorescence analysis was done of the reformation of the adhesion complex in small (1 mm) keratectomy wounds in the guinea pig cornea. In these wounds, the epithelium, hemidesmosomes, basal lamina, anchoring fibrils, and anterior stroma were removed. The wound bed was epithelialized completely by 24 hr after wounding. Immunofluorescence analyses involved the use of antibodies against plaque components of the hemidesmosome, an antibody against laminin, and an antibody against the collagen VII component of anchoring fibrils. At 18 hr after wounding, there was no morphologic evidence of hemidesmosomes at the epithelial-stromal interface. At 24 hr, hemidesmosomes were observed, with or without subjacent lamina densa. Furthermore, plaque components were detected by immunofluorescence in those cells in contact with the wound bed. In contrast, no type VII collagen was detected. On day 7, collagen VII, laminin, and bullous pemphigoid autoantibody markers colocalized along the wound bed as determined by immunofluorescence. However, at the ultrastructural level, even though the lamina densa of the basal lamina was observed primarily where hemidesmosomes were present, it remained incomplete. In this study, the precise temporal sequence in which components are incorporated into the assembling adhesion complex was described during wound healing. Furthermore, the possibility that the hemidesmosomal plaque nucleates the formation of the underlying basal lamina was discussed.

  8. Spontaneous formation of aqueous droplets in complex coacervate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Samim; Prabhu, Vivek

    Complex coacervation occurs when a solution of two oppositely charged polymers undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation under suitable conditions. The coacervate forms the highly viscoelastic polymer-rich phase that exhibits very low interfacial tension with the polymer-poor supernatant. This presentation will describe the spontaneous formation of micron-sized aqueous droplets in the polymer-rich coacervate domain as the temperature of the system is increased above a critical value. The spherical droplets, initiated at the liquid-liquid interface, propagates into the bulk coacervate domain. Moreover, the average size of the droplets increases monotonically with increase in temperature. This results in an optically turbid appearance of the coacervate. We evaluate the role of liquid-liquid interface and polymer structure inside the coacervate phase during such transition using rheological techniques and small-angle neutron scattering. These observations provide a foundation to understand coacervate properties at conditions useful to encapsulation, delivery media, and wet adhesives.

  9. Dynamical complexity in the perception-based network formation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Moon, Eunyoung

    2016-12-01

    Many link formation mechanisms for the evolution of social networks have been successful to reproduce various empirical findings in social networks. However, they have largely ignored the fact that individuals make decisions on whether to create links to other individuals based on cost and benefit of linking, and the fact that individuals may use perception of the network in their decision making. In this paper, we study the evolution of social networks in terms of perception-based strategic link formation. Here each individual has her own perception of the actual network, and uses it to decide whether to create a link to another individual. An individual with the least perception accuracy can benefit from updating her perception using that of the most accurate individual via a new link. This benefit is compared to the cost of linking in decision making. Once a new link is created, it affects the accuracies of other individuals' perceptions, leading to a further evolution of the actual network. As for initial actual networks, we consider both homogeneous and heterogeneous cases. The homogeneous initial actual network is modeled by Erdős-Rényi (ER) random networks, while we take a star network for the heterogeneous case. In any cases, individual perceptions of the actual network are modeled by ER random networks with controllable linking probability. Then the stable link density of the actual network is found to show discontinuous transitions or jumps according to the cost of linking. As the number of jumps is the consequence of the dynamical complexity, we discuss the effect of initial conditions on the number of jumps to find that the dynamical complexity strongly depends on how much individuals initially overestimate or underestimate the link density of the actual network. For the heterogeneous case, the role of the highly connected individual as an information spreader is also discussed.

  10. Aging Effects on the Hydrogen Storage Characteristics of Li-Mg-B-N-H Complex Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sesha; Vickers, Eric; Mulharan, James; Darkazalli, Gazi; Goswami, Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias; FLPoly-CERC Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The aging effects on the hydrogen storage characteristics and chemical formulations of the complex hydrides are discussed in this study. The aging effects due to atmospheric events such as oxygen and moisture coverage and self-decomposition are currently under investigation. The candidate material chosen for this study is Lithium/Magnesium based complex hydride LiBH4/LiNH2/MgH2. These materials were prepared using high energy ball milling under Ar/H2 atmosphere with different milling durations. The chemical, structural and microstructural characteristics of the synthesized and aged materials were compared and investigated using TGA/DSC, FTIR, XRD, BET and SEM analytical tools. Hydrogen storage properties such as hydrogen sorption kinetics, cycle life and pressure-composition isotherm (PCI) was examined via high pressure, high temperature Sievert's type apparatus. This current study will shed light to compare and contrast the above mentioned characteristics for the aged samples practically at the same experimental conditions. Furthermore, we have investigated the relationship between the aging effects with respect to the crystallite sizes of the candidate compounds and their nano-dopant variants. We acknowledge the grant from Florida Energy Systems Consortium and support from Florida Polytechnic University.

  11. MECHANISM OF FINANCIAL SAFETY FORMATION OF ENTERPRISES OF AGROINDUSTRIAL COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Khomenko

    2016-11-01

    answer their aims. As a result, depending on the worked out strategy of financial safety, it is possible to draw basic directions of guaranteeing his financial safety activity of enterprises of agro-industrial complex. Organizational-economic principles of forming of mechanism of financial safety of agricultural enterprises must be built on the basis of realization of its expressly certain strategy. It, in same queue, must go out from present of their production potential. This strategy is the basic internal reference-point of forming of financial safety of agricultural enterprise that sets the parameters of all her development. Practical implications. On financial safety of enterprises of agro-industrial complex testifies the conducted analysis of scientific researches, that without regard to the wide list of existing in economic literature researches on the mechanism of forming of enterprises’ financial safety, among scientific circles until now there is not a general idea. It requires forming of new knowledge’s in relation to forming of mechanism of enterprise financial safety, where not only the certain state of subject but also dynamic constituent of development must come forward as a priority lever, what is considered in this article. Value/originality. Creation of valuable mechanism of forming of financial safety of agro-industrial enterprises foresees formulation of criteria and principles of providing of financial safety of every enterprise, determinations of priority national interests in a financial sphere, realization of the permanent watching of factors, which cause a threat financial safety, and also acceptance of measures in relation to their warning and overcoming. The formed mechanism of financial safety of the agricultural formations is pre-condition of prevention of financial threats and negative financial phenomena in production activity of the agricultural formations, defence of their financial losses, and in future stabilizing of activity of the

  12. Hydrogen generation from formic acid catalyzed by a metal complex under amine-free and aqueous conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2018-01-04

    The present invention provides a class of catalyst compounds that can safely and effectively release hydrogen gas from a chemical substrate without producing either noxious byproducts or byproducts that will deactivate the catalyst. The present invention provides catalysts used to produce hydrogen that has a satisfactory and sufficient lifespan (measured by turnover number (TON)), that has stability in the presence of moisture, air, acid, or impurities, promote a rapid reaction rate, and remain stable under the reaction conditions required for an effective hydrogen production system. Described herein are compounds for use as catalysts, as well as methods for producing hydrogen from formic acid and/or a formate using the disclosed catalysts. The methods include contacting formic acid and/or a formate with a catalyst as described herein, as well as methods of producing formic acid and/or a formate using the disclosed catalyst and methods for generating electricity using the catalysts described herein.

  13. Responsive complex capsules prepared with polymerization of dopamine, hydrogen-bonding assembly, and catechol dismutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiaxing; Su, Chao; Zhang, Xuejian; Li, Jiefu; Zhang, Wen-Bin; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian; Yang, Shuguang

    2017-10-07

    Complex capsules were fabricated by combining the polymerization of dopamine with hydrogen-bonding layer-by-layer assembly (LbL) of dopamine-modified poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-dopa) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVPON). PDA(PAA-dopa/PVPON)n shell was cross-linked by dismutation reaction among catechol groups of polydopamine (PDA) and PAA-dopa. During LbL assembly, PAA-dopa and PVPON diffuse in the robust PDA pre-layer, and hence the complex capsules become soft and flexible. With the change of environmental pH value, the hydrogen bonds in PDA(PAA-dopa/PVPON)n capsules would dissociate or reconstruct, and thus the complex capsules exhibit pH-responsive swelling-shrinking behavior. With only one assembled bilayer, PDA(PAA-dopa/PVPON)1 capsules show a volume swelling ratio of 1.34 from pH 2.0 to pH 8.5. In addition, the complex capsules display controlled loading and release of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as pH value changed, which can be considered as a potential candidate for drug delivery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Vibrational transitions in hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes - A local mode perturbation theory approach to transition frequencies and intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2017-04-01

    The local mode perturbation theory (LMPT) model was developed to improve the description of hydrogen bonded XH-stretching transitions, where X is typically O or N. We present a modified version of the LMPT model to extend its application from hydrated bimolecular complexes to hydrogen bonded bimolecular complexes with donors such as alcohols, amines and acids. We have applied the modified model to a series of complexes of different hydrogen bond type and complex energy. We found that the differences between local mode (LM) and LMPT calculated fundamental XH-stretching transition wavenumbers and oscillator strengths were correlated with the strength of the hydrogen bond. Overall, we have found that the LMPT model in most cases predicts transition wavenumbers within 20 cm-1 of the experimental values.

  15. Li4FeH6: Iron-containing complex hydride with high gravimetric hydrogen density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Saitoh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Li4FeH6, which has the highest gravimetric hydrogen density of iron-containing complex hydrides reported so far, is synthesized by hydrogenation of a powder mixture of iron and LiH above 6.1 GPa at 900 °C. In situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that while kinetics require high temperature and thus high pressure for the synthesis, Li4FeH6 is expected to be thermodynamically stable slightly below room temperature at ambient pressure; further synthetic studies to suppress the kinetic effects may enable us to synthesize Li4FeH6 at moderate pressures. Li4FeH6 can be recovered at ambient conditions where Li4FeH6 is metastable.

  16. Flavin-Protein Complexes: Aromatic Stacking Assisted by a Hydrogen Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdane, Djemel; Bou-Nader, Charles; Cornu, David; Hui-Bon-Hoa, Gaston; Fontecave, Marc

    2015-07-21

    Enzyme-catalyzed reactions often rely on a noncovalently bound cofactor whose reactivity is tuned by its immediate environment. Flavin cofactors, the most versatile catalyst encountered in biology, are often maintained within the protein throughout numbers of complex ionic and aromatic interactions. Here, we have investigated the role of π-π stacking and hydrogen bond interactions between a tyrosine and the isoalloxazine moiety of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in an FAD-dependent RNA methyltransferase. Combining several static and time-resolved spectroscopies as well as biochemical approaches, we showed that aromatic stacking is assisted by a hydrogen bond between the phenol group and the amide of an adjacent active site loop. A mechanism of recognition and binding of the redox cofactor is proposed.

  17. Complex formation dynamics in a single-molecule electronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Huimin; Li, Wengang; Chen, Jiewei; He, Gen; Li, Longhua; Olson, Mark A; Sue, Andrew C-H; Stoddart, J Fraser; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-11-01

    Single-molecule electronic devices offer unique opportunities to investigate the properties of individual molecules that are not accessible in conventional ensemble experiments. However, these investigations remain challenging because they require (i) highly precise device fabrication to incorporate single molecules and (ii) sufficient time resolution to be able to make fast molecular dynamic measurements. We demonstrate a graphene-molecule single-molecule junction that is capable of probing the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of a host-guest complex. By covalently integrating a conjugated molecular wire with a pendent crown ether into graphene point contacts, we can transduce the physical [2]pseudorotaxane (de)formation processes between the electron-rich crown ether and a dicationic guest into real-time electrical signals. The conductance of the single-molecule junction reveals two-level fluctuations that are highly dependent on temperature and solvent environments, affording a nondestructive means of quantitatively determining the binding and rate constants, as well as the activation energies, for host-guest complexes. The thermodynamic processes reveal the host-guest binding to be enthalpy-driven and are consistent with conventional 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments. This electronic device opens up a new route to developing single-molecule dynamics investigations with microsecond resolution for a broad range of chemical and biochemical applications.

  18. The Smart Residential Complex Effect on Personality Formation of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Kasra Mirpadyab

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between human beings and the environment has been a question of all times; however, the Industrial Revolution has begun to change its way. It can be seen that the human beings were a part of their environment in the past, but now with the advancement of knowledge and technology, the man can dominate in their environment. But today, the man’s needs should be well known about the interaction with the natural environment and with respect to the position of the residential complexes in the modern society, these buildings are designed to create the psychological comfort and the formation of the personality. The authors of this paper believe the mentioned event will be happening in the future generation of the buildings. These buildings will be equipped with smart automation system for all their activities. This research conducted by grounded theories about the explanation of the smart residential complexes equipped with the BMS, which can be effective for shaping the managerial character of the children in their future.

  19. A complex postnatal mental health intervention: Australian translational formative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Heather J; Wynter, Karen H; Burns, Joanna K; Fisher, Jane R W

    2017-08-01

    Reducing the burden of postnatal maternal mental health problems is an international public health priority. We developed What Were We Thinking (WWWT), a psychoeducation programme for primary postnatal health care that addresses known but neglected risks. We then demonstrated evidence of its effects in a before-and-after controlled study in preventing maternal postnatal mental health problems among women without a psychiatric history participating in the intervention compared to usual care (AOR 0.43; 95% CI 0.21, 0.89) when conducted by specialist nurses. Testing its effectiveness when implemented in routine primary care requires changes at practitioner, organizational and health system levels. This paper describes a programme of translational formative evaluation to inform the protocol for a cluster RCT. Following the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) Guidance for evaluating complex interventions, we conducted a translational formative evaluation using mixed methods. Collection and analysis of postnatal health service documents, semi-structured interviews, group discussions and an online survey were used to investigate service provision, consumers' needs and expectations, clinicians' attitudes and clinical practice, and the implications for health service delivery. Participants were expectant parents, health care providers, health service managers and government policy makers. Results documented current clinical practice, staff training needs, necessary service modifications to standardize advice to parents and include fathers, key priorities and drivers of government health policy, and informed a model of costs and expected health and social outcomes. Implementation of WWWT into routine postnatal care requires adjustments to clinical practice. Staff training, modifications to service opening hours and economic implications for the health system also need to be considered. The MRC Guidance for developing and evaluating complex interventions is a useful framework

  20. Mechanism of H{sub 2}{sup -} formation in solid hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Tachikawa, Hiroto [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Kumagai, Jun; Kumada, Takayuki; Miyazaki, Tetsuo

    1998-02-01

    The singlet and the triplet ESR lines with the common g-factor of 2.0023 and the hyperfine coupling constant of 20.3 mT observed after {gamma}-irradiation of crystalline para hydrogen at 4.2 K agreed with the expected ESR spectra of the radical anions of the para and the ortho hydrogen molecules, respectively. A novel model has been proposed for explaining the formation and stabilization of H{sub 2}{sup -} in crystalline H{sub 2}. The model assumes H{sub 2}{sup -} to be located at the center of a cavity which has previously been occupied by a trapped electron. The excess electron of H{sub 2}{sup -} is forced to be attached on one H{sub 2} in the cavity due to strong repulsive interactions between the excess electron and H{sub 2} molecules surrounding the cavity. A quantum-mechanical calculation shows that an electron trapped in the vacancy of crystalline H{sub 2} automatically converts to H{sub 2}{sup -} by drawing one of the surrounding H{sub 2} molecules into the center of the vacancy. (author)

  1. Direct catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to formate over a Schiff-base-mediated gold nanocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinggang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Li, Lin; Miao, Shu; Li, Yong; Li, Yanqin; Wang, Xinkui; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2017-11-10

    Catalytic transformation of CO2 to formate is generally realized through bicarbonate hydrogenation in an alkaline environment, while it suffers from a thermodynamic sink due to the considerable thermodynamic stability of the bicarbonate intermediate. Here, we devise a route for the direct catalytic conversion of CO2 over a Schiff-base-modified gold nanocatalyst that is comparable to the fastest known nanocatalysts, with a turnover number (TON) of up to 14,470 over 12 h at 90 °C. Theoretical calculations and spectral analysis results demonstrate that the activation of CO2 can be achieved through a weakly bonded carbamate zwitterion intermediate derived from a simple Lewis base adduct of CO2. However, this can only occur with a hydrogen lacking Lewis base center in a polar solvent. This finding offers a promising avenue for the direct activation of CO2 and is likely to have considerable implications in the fields of CO2 conversion and gold catalytic chemistry.

  2. Hydrogen-bonded complexes of acetylene and acetonitrile: A matrix isolation infrared and computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopi, R.; Ramanathan, N.; Sundararajan, K.

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen-bonded complexes of acetylene (C2H2) and acetonitrile (CH3CN) have been investigated using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and ab initio computations. The complexes were trapped in both solid argon and N2 matrices. The structure of the complexes and the energies were computed at the B3LYP and MP2 levels of theory using a 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and also at B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level. Our computations indicated one minimum corresponding to the 1:1 C2H2sbnd CH3CN complex, with Csbnd H⋯N interaction, where C2H2 is the proton donor. Experimentally, we observed the 1:1 C2H2sbnd CH3CN complex in Ar and N2 matrices, which was evidenced by the shifts in the vibrational wavenumbers of the modes involving the C2H2 and CH3CN sub-molecules. Computations were also performed to study the higher complexes of C2H2 and CH3CN. One minimum was found for the 1:2 C2H2sbnd CH3CN complex and two minima for the 2:1 C2H2sbnd CH3CN complexes, at all levels of theory. Experimentally we observed features corresponding to the 1:2 C2H2sbnd CH3CN complexes in an Ar and N2 matrices. The computed vibrational wavenumbers of C2H2sbnd CH3CN complexes at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level correlate well with the experimental wavenumbers. Atoms in Molecules (AIM) analysis was performed to understand the nature of interaction in the complexes. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis was performed to understand the effect of charge-transfer hyperconjugative interactions towards the stability of different C2H2sbnd CH3CN complexes.

  3. Evaluation of one-dimensional potential energy surfaces for prediction of spectroscopic properties of hydrogen bonds in linear bonded complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouypazadeh, Hamidreza; Farrokhpour, Hossein; Solimannejad, Mohammad

    2017-05-01

    This work evaluated the reliability of the one-dimensional potential energy surface for calculating the spectroscopic properties (rovibrational constants and rotational line energies) of hydrogen bonds in linear bonded complexes by comparing theoretical results with the corresponding experimental results. For this purpose, two hydrogen bonded complexes were selected: the HCN···HCN homodimer and the HCN···HF heterodimer. The one-dimensional potential energy surfaces related to the hydrogen bonds in these complexes were calculated using different computational methods and basis sets. The calculated potential curve of each complex was fitted to an analytical one-dimensional potential function to obtain the potential parameters. The obtained analytical potential function of each complex was used in a two-particle Schrödinger equation to obtain the rovibrational energy levels of the hydrogen bond. Using the calculated rovibrational levels, the rovibrational spectra and constants of each complex were calculated and compared with experimental data available from the literature. Compared with experimental data, the calculated one-dimensional potential energy surface at the QCISD/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory was found to predict the spectroscopic properties of hydrogen bonds better than the potential curves obtained using other computational methods, especially for the HCN···HCN homodimer complex. Generally, the results obtained for the HCN···HCN homodimer complex were closer to experimental data than those obtained for the HCN···HF heterodimer complex. The investigation performed in this work showed that the one-dimensional potential curve related to the hydrogen bond between two linear molecules can be used to predict the spectroscopic constants of hydrogen bonds. Graphical abstract Potential energy curves of HCN···HCN and HCN···HF complexes calculated at the different computational levels.

  4. Cooperativity between the dihydrogen bond and the NHC hydrogen bond in LiH-(HCN)n Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing-Zhong; Hu, Ting; An, Xiu-Lin; Gong, Bao-An; Cheng, Jian-Bo

    2008-09-15

    The cooperativity between the dihydrogen bond and the NHC hydrogen bond in LiH-(HCN)(n) (n=2 and 3) complexes is investigated at the MP2 level of theory. The bond lengths, dipole moments, and energies are analyzed. It is demonstrated that synergetic effects are present in the complexes. The cooperativity contribution of the dihydrogen bond is smaller than that of the NHC hydrogen bond. The three-body energy in systems involving different types of hydrogen bonds is larger than that in the same hydrogen-bonded systems. NBO analyses indicate that orbital interaction, charge transfer, and bond polarization are mainly responsible for the cooperativity between the two types of hydrogen bonds.

  5. Hydrogen storage in C3Ti complex using quantum chemical methods and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalamse, Vijayanand; Wadnerkar, Nitin; Chaudhari, Ajay

    2012-06-01

    The hydrogen storage capacity of C(3)Ti and C(3)Ti(+) complex was studied using second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) and density functional theory (DFT) methods with different exchange and correlation functionals. Four and five H(2) molecules can be adsorbed on C(3)Ti and C(3)Ti(+) complex respectively at all the levels of theory used. This corresponds to the gravimetric H(2) uptake capacity of 8.77 and 10.73 wt % for the former and the latter respectively. The nature of interactions between different molecules in H(2) adsorbed complexes is also studied using many-body analysis approach. In the case of C(3)Ti(4H(2)) complex, total five-body interactions is negligible whereas for C(3)Ti(+)(5H(2)) relaxation energy is negligible. All the many-body energies have significant contribution to the binding energy of a respective complex. Atom-centered density matrix propagation molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using different methods to confirm whether H(2) molecules remain adsorbed on C(3)Ti and C(3)Ti(+) complex at room temperature. Adsorption Gibbs free energies show that four and five H(2) molecule adsorption on C(3)Ti and C(3)Ti(+) at room temperature is energetically favorable and unfavorable respectively using MP2 as well as DFT methods used here. H(2) adsorption is thermodynamically favorable over a wide range of temperature on the C(3)Ti than C(3)Ti(+)complex.

  6. Comparison of Degrees of Potential-Energy-Surface Anharmonicity for Complexes and Clusters with Hydrogen Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskaya, E. N.; Doroshenko, I. Yu.; Pogorelov, V. E.; Vaskivskyi, Ye. V.; Pitsevich, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Previously calculated multidimensional potential-energy surfaces of the MeOH monomer and dimer, water dimer, malonaldehyde, formic acid dimer, free pyridine-N-oxide/trichloroacetic acid complex, and protonated water dimer were analyzed. The corresponding harmonic potential-energy surfaces near the global minima were constructed for series of clusters and complexes with hydrogen bonds of different strengths based on the behavior of the calculated multidimensional potential-energy surfaces. This enabled the introduction of an obvious anharmonicity parameter for the calculated potential-energy surfaces. The anharmonicity parameter was analyzed as functions of the size of the analyzed area near the energy minimum, the number of points over which energies were compared, and the dimensionality of the solved vibrational problem. Anharmonicity parameters for potential-energy surfaces in complexes with strong, medium, and weak H-bonds were calculated under identical conditions. The obtained anharmonicity parameters were compared with the corresponding diagonal anharmonicity constants for stretching vibrations of the bridging protons and the lengths of the hydrogen bridges.

  7. Microbanded manganese formations; protoliths in the Franciscan Complex, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, J. Stephen; Flohr, Marta J.

    1990-01-01

    The Buckeye manganese deposit, 93 km southeast of San Francisco in the California Coast Ranges, preserves a geologic history that provides clues to the origin of numerous lenses of manganese carbonate, oxides, and silicates that occur with interbedded radiolarian chert and metashale of the Franciscan Complex. Compositionally and mineralogically laminated Mn-rich protoliths were deformed and dismembered, in a manner that mimics in smaller scale the deformation of the host complex, and then were incipiently metamorphosed at blueschistfacies conditions. Eight phases occur as almost monomineralic protoliths and mixtures: rhodochrosite, caryopilite, chlorite, gageite, taneyamalite, braunite, hausmannite, and laminated chert (quartz). Braunite, gageite, and some chlorite and caryopilite layers were deposited as gel-like materials; rhodochrosite, most caryopilite, and at least some hausmannite layers as lutites; and the chert as turbidites of radiolarian sand. Some gel-like materials are now preserved as transparent, sensibly isotropic relics of materials that fractured or shattered when deformed, creating curved surfaces. In contrast, the micrites flowed between the fragments of gel-like materials. The orebody and most of its constituent minerals have unusually Mn-rich compositions that are described by the system MnO-SiO2-O2-CO2-H2O. High values of Mn/Fe and U/Th, and low concentrations of Co, Cu, and Ni, distinguish the Buckeye deposit from many high-temperature hydrothermal deposits and hydrogenous or diagenetic manganese and ferromanganese nodules and pavements. This chemical signature suggests that ore deposition was related to fluids from the sediment column and seawater. Tungsten is associated exclusively with gageite, in concentrations as high as 80 parts per million. The source of the manganese is unknown; because basalts do not occur near the deposit, it was probably manganese leached from the sediment column by reducing solutions. Low concentrations of calcium

  8. Formation of Hydrogen Sulfide in Wine: Interactions between Copper and Sulfur Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlize Z. Bekker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The combined synergistic effects of copper (Cu2+ and sulfur dioxide (SO2 on the formation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S in Verdelho and Shiraz wine samples post-bottling was studied over a 12-month period. The combined treatment of Cu2+ and SO2 significantly increased H2S formation in Verdelho wines samples that were not previously treated with either Cu2+ or SO2. The formation of H2S produced through Cu2+ mediated reactions was likely either: (a directly through the interaction of SO2 with either Cu2+ or H2S; or (b indirectly through the interaction of SO2 with other wine matrix compounds. To gain better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the significant increases in H2S concentration in the Verdelho samples, the interaction between Cu2+ and SO2 was studied in a model wine matrix with and without the presence of a representative thiol quenching compound (4-methylbenzoquinone, 4MBQ. In these model studies, the importance of naturally occurring wine compounds and wine additives, such as quinones, SO2, and metal ions, in modulating the formation of H2S post-bottling was demonstrated. When present in equimolar concentrations a 1:1 ratio of H2S- and SO2-catechol adducts were produced. At wine relevant concentrations, however, only SO2-adducts were produced, reinforcing that the competition reactions of sulfur nucleophiles, such as H2S and SO2, with wine matrix compounds play a critical role in modulating final H2S concentrations in wines.

  9. Hydrogen Gas Is Involved in Auxin-Induced Lateral Root Formation by Modulating Nitric Oxide Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyu Cao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism of molecular hydrogen (H2 in bacteria and algae has been widely studied, and it has attracted increasing attention in the context of animals and plants. However, the role of endogenous H2 in lateral root (LR formation is still unclear. Here, our results showed that H2-induced lateral root formation is a universal event. Naphthalene-1-acetic acid (NAA; the auxin analog was able to trigger endogenous H2 production in tomato seedlings, and a contrasting response was observed in the presence of N-1-naphthyphthalamic acid (NPA, an auxin transport inhibitor. NPA-triggered the inhibition of H2 production and thereafter lateral root development was rescued by exogenously applied H2. Detection of endogenous nitric oxide (NO by the specific probe 4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR analyses revealed that the NO level was increased in both NAA- and H2-treated tomato seedlings. Furthermore, NO production and thereafter LR formation induced by auxin and H2 were prevented by 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO; a specific scavenger of NO and the inhibitor of nitrate reductase (NR; an important NO synthetic enzyme. Molecular evidence confirmed that some representative NO-targeted cell cycle regulatory genes were also induced by H2, but was impaired by the removal of endogenous NO. Genetic evidence suggested that in the presence of H2, Arabidopsis mutants nia2 (in particular and nia1 (two nitrate reductases (NR-defective mutants exhibited defects in lateral root length. Together, these results demonstrated that auxin-induced H2 production was associated with lateral root formation, at least partially via a NR-dependent NO synthesis.

  10. Cooperative catalysis: electron-rich Fe-H complexes and DMAP, a successful "joint venture" for ultrafast hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Susanne; Hettmanczyk, Lara; Klein, Johannes E M N; Plietker, Bernd

    2014-08-01

    A series of defined iron-hydrogen complexes was prepared in a straightforward one-pot approach. The structure and electronic properties of such complexes were investigated by means of quantum-chemical analysis. These new complexes were then applied in the dehydrogenative silylation of methanol. The complex (dppp)(CO)(NO)FeH showed a remarkable activity with a TOF of more than 600 000 h(-1) of pure hydrogen gas within seconds. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. FeS Corrosion Products Formation and Hydrogen Uptake in a Sour Environment for Quenched & Tempered Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elien Wallaert

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface corrosion product formation is one of the important factors affecting the corrosion rate and hydrogen uptake in a H2S environment. However, it is still unclear how the base material composition will affect the corrosion products that are generated, and consequently their impact on the corrosion rate. In this paper, corrosion product formation and the impact of the Mo content of the base material on the composition of the corrosion products and hydrogen absorption in a sour environment was investigated. The corrosion layer was composed of a double layered mackinawite (FeS1−x structure, which was enriched with molybdenum and chromium. The layers were formed via two different mechanisms, i.e., the inner layer was created via a general oxide film formation corrosion mechanism, whereas the upper layer was formed by a precipitation mechanism. The presence of this double corrosion layer had a large influence on the amount of diffusible hydrogen in the materials. This amount decreased as a function of contact time with the H2S saturated solution, while the corrosion rate of the materials shows no significant reduction. Therefore, the corrosion products are assumed to act as a physical barrier against hydrogen uptake. Mo addition caused a decrease in the maximal amount of diffusible hydrogen.

  12. Mechanistic elucidation of the stepwise formation of a tetranuclear manganese pinned butterfly cluster via N-N bond cleavage, hydrogen atom transfer, and cluster rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clifton R; Gau, Michael R; Baglia, Regina A; McWilliams, Sean F; Zdilla, Michael J

    2014-12-31

    A mechanistic pathway for the formation of the structurally characterized manganese-amide-hydrazide pinned butterfly complex, Mn4(μ3-PhN-NPh-κ(3)N,N')2(μ-PhN-NPh-κ(2)-N,N')(μ-NHPh)2L4 (L = THF, py), is proposed and supported by the use of labeling studies, kinetic measurements, kinetic competition experiments, kinetic isotope effects, and hydrogen atom transfer reagent substitution, and via the isolation and characterization of intermediates using X-ray diffraction and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The data support a formation mechanism whereby bis[bis(trimethylsilyl)amido]manganese(II) (Mn(NR2)2, where R = SiMe3) reacts with N,N'-diphenylhydrazine (PhNHNHPh) via initial proton transfer, followed by reductive N-N bond cleavage to form a long-lived Mn(IV) imido multinuclear complex. Coordinating solvents activate this cluster for abstraction of hydrogen atoms from an additional equivalent of PhNHNHPh resulting in a Mn(II)phenylamido dimer, Mn2(μ-NHPh)2(NR2)2L2. This dimeric complex further assembles in fast steps with two additional equivalents of PhNHNHPh replacing the terminal silylamido ligands with η(1)-hydrazine ligands to give a dimeric Mn2(μ-NHPh)2(PhN-NHPh)2L4 intermediate, and finally, the addition of two additional equivalents of Mn(NR2)2 and PhNHNHPh gives the pinned butterfly cluster.

  13. Hydrogen bonding induced polymorphism in the scandium(III) complex with ε-caprolactam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virovets, Alexander V.; Peresypkina, Eugenia V. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Univ. (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, Elizaveta V.; Cherkasova, Tatjana G. [Kuzbass State Technical Univ., Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-01

    Two polymorphs of [Sc(cpl){sub 6}][Cr(NCS){sub 6}] (cpl=ε- C{sub 6}H{sub 11}NO), trigonal and monoclinic, form purple elongated narrow plates and brownish-purple prisms and are formed concomitantly irrespectively of the crystallization conditions. In the trigonal polymorph both cation and anion possess C{sub 3i} site symmetry while in the monoclinic form cation and anion lie on inversion centre and 2-fold axis respectively. The nature of the polymorphism traces back to a redistribution of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds that causes different conformation of the complex cations, different hydrogen bonding and different molecular packings. The [Sc(cpl){sub 6}]{sup 3+} cations in the structure of the trigonal polymorph form intermolecular N(H)..S, and in the monoclinic form both N(H)..S inter- and N(H)..O intramolecular hydrogen bonds with NCS groups of [Cr(NCS){sub 6}]{sup 3-} and cpl ligands. This aggregation leads to chains, where the cations and the anions alternate, in the trigonal modification and to layers, in which each ion is surrounded by four counterions, in the monoclinic form. Both polymorphs possess thermochromic properties, and a reversible color change from light purple to dark green takes place at 470-475 K.

  14. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  15. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  16. Effect of Gaseous Impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and Aging Properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Dhanesh [Primary Contact; Lamb, Joshua; Chien, Wen-Ming; Talekar, Anjali; and Pal, Narendra

    2011-03-28

    This program was dedicated to understanding the effect of impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and aging properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage. At the start of the program we found reversibility between Li2NH+LiH LiH+LiNH2 (yielding ~5.8 wt.%H capacity). Then we tested the effect of impurity in H2 gas by pressure cycling at 255°C; first with industrial gas containing ppm levels of O2 and H2O as major impurities. Both these impurities had a significant impact on the reversibility and decreased the capacity by 2.65 wt.%H. Further increase in number of cycles from 500 to 1100 showed only a 0.2 wt%H more weight loss, showing some capacity is still maintained after a significant number of cycles. The loss of capacity is attributed to the formation of ~55 wt% LiH and ~30% Li2O, as major contaminant phases, along with the hydride Li2NH phase; suggesting loss of nitrogen during cycling. The effect of 100 ppm H2O in H2 also showed a decrease of ~2.5 wt.%H (after 560 cycles), and 100ppm O2 in H2; a loss of ~4.1 wt.%. Methane impurity (100 ppm, 100cycles), showed a very small capacity loss of 0.9 wt.%H under similar conditions. However, when Li3N was pressure cycled with 100ppmN2-H2 there were beneficial effects were observed (255oC); the reversible capacity increased to 8.4wt.%H after 853 cycles. Furthermore, with 20 mol.%N2-H2 capacity increased to ~10 wt.%H after 516 cycles. We attribute this enhancement to the reaction of nitrogen with liquid lithium during cycling as the Gibbs free energy of formation of Li3N (Go = -98.7 kJ/mol) is more negative than that of LiH (Go = -50.3 kJ/mol). We propose that the mitigation of hydrogen capacity losses is due to the destabilization of the LiH phase that tends to accumulate during cycling. Also more Li2NH phase was found in the cycled product. Mixed Alanates (3LiNH2:Li3AlH6) showed that 7 wt% hydrogen desorbed under dynamic vacuum. Equilibrium experiments (maximum 12 bar H2) showed up to 4wt% hydrogen reversibly

  17. Chemical equilibrium of hydrogen and aqueous solutions of 1 : 1 bicarbonate and formate salts with a common cation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, D.C.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1997-01-01

    The chemical equilibrium of hydrogen and aqueous solutions of 1:1 bicarbonate and formate salts with a common cation has been investigated in an intensively stirred batch reactor: MHCO3(aq) + H2(aq) ↔ MOOCH(aq) + H2O(l) This was accomplished for the sodium (M = Na), potassium (M = K) and ammonium (M

  18. Challenges in the Greener Production of Formates/Formic Acid, Methanol, and DME by Heterogeneously Catalyzed CO2 Hydrogenation Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Álvarez, Andrea; Bansode, Atul; Urakawa, Atsushi; Bavykina, A.V.; Wezendonk, T.A.; Makkee, M.; Gascon Sabate, J.; Kapteijn, F.

    2017-01-01

    The recent advances in the development of heterogeneous catalysts and processes for the direct hydrogenation of CO2 to formate/formic acid, methanol, and dimethyl ether are thoroughly reviewed, with special emphasis on thermodynamics and catalyst design considerations. After introducing the main

  19. Hydrogen-atom abstraction reactions by manganese(V)- and manganese(IV)-oxo porphyrin complexes in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, Chellaiah; Lee, Yong-Min; Lee, Jung Yoon; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2009-11-02

    High-valent manganese(IV or V)-oxo porphyrins are considered as reactive intermediates in the oxidation of organic substrates by manganese porphyrin catalysts. We have generated Mn(V)- and Mn(IV)-oxo porphyrins in basic aqueous solution and investigated their reactivities in C-H bond activation of hydrocarbons. We now report that Mn(V)- and Mn(IV)-oxo porphyrins are capable of activating C-H bonds of alkylaromatics, with the reactivity order of Mn(V)-oxo>Mn(IV)-oxo; the reactivity of a Mn(V)-oxo complex is 150 times greater than that of a Mn(IV)-oxo complex in the oxidation of xanthene. The C-H bond activation of alkylaromatics by the Mn(V)- and Mn(IV)-oxo porphyrins is proposed to occur through a hydrogen-atom abstraction, based on the observations of a good linear correlation between the reaction rates and the C-H bond dissociation energy (BDE) of substrates and high kinetic isotope effect (KIE) values in the oxidation of xanthene and dihydroanthracene (DHA). We have demonstrated that the disproportionation of Mn(IV)-oxo porphyrins to Mn(V)-oxo and Mn(III) porphyrins is not a feasible pathway in basic aqueous solution and that Mn(IV)-oxo porphyrins are able to abstract hydrogen atoms from alkylaromatics. The C-H bond activation of alkylaromatics by Mn(V)- and Mn(IV)-oxo species proceeds through a one-electron process, in which a Mn(IV)-oxo porphyrin is formed as a product in the C-H bond activation by a Mn(V)-oxo porphyrin, followed by a further reaction of the Mn(IV)-oxo porphyrin with substrates that results in the formation of a Mn(III) porphyrin complex. This result is in contrast to the oxidation of sulfides by the Mn(V)-oxo porphyrin, in which the oxidation of thioanisole by the Mn(V)-oxo complex produces the starting Mn(III) porphyrin and thioanisole oxide. This result indicates that the oxidation of sulfides by the Mn(V)-oxo species occurs by means of a two-electron oxidation process. In contrast, a Mn(IV)-oxo porphyrin complex is not capable of oxidizing

  20. Hydrogenation of CO 2 in Water Using a Bis(diphosphine) Ni–H Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, Samantha A. [Catalysis; Kendall, Alexander J. [Department; Tyler, David R. [Department; Linehan, John C. [Catalysis; Appel, Aaron M. [Catalysis

    2017-03-17

    The water soluble Ni bis(diphosphine) complex [NiL2](BF4)2 (L = 1,2- bis(di(methoxypropyl)phosphino)ethane) and the corresponding hydride, [HNiL2]BF4, were synthesized and characterized. For HNiL2+, the hydricity was determined to be 23.2(3) kcal/mol in aqueous solution. Based on the hydricity of formate of 24.1 kcal/mol, the transfer of a hydride from HNiL2 + to CO2 to produce formate is favorable by 1 kcal/mol. Starting from either NiL2 2+ or HNiL2 + in water, catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 was observed with NaHCO3 (0.8 M) as the only additive. A maximum turnover frequency of 3.6(8) h–1 was observed at 80 °C and 51 atm of a 1:1 mixture of CO2 and H2.

  1. Dimeric Self-assembling via Hydrogen Bonding and Emissive Behavior of a New Copper (I Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juciely M. dos Reis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the synthesis, structural characterization and emissive behavior of a new copper (I complex based on 1-thiocarbamoyl-5-(4-methoxiphenyl-3-phenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole ligand. A dimeric self-assembling via hydrogen bonding was determined by analyzing the short contacts present in the solid-state structure by means of X-ray crystallography. The spectroscopic properties were determined using UV-Vis and fluorescence experiments and an interesting behavior as bluish luminescence was assigned mainly to the mixed (MLCT + IL electronic transitions of the Cu(Id10 ® (S=C–Nligand type. The complete characterization of the new copper (I complex also included elemental analyses and IR spectroscopy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i1.952

  2. A first-principles study of carbon-related energy levels in GaN. II. Complexes formed by carbon and hydrogen, silicon or oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Masahiko; Bellotti, Enrico

    2017-05-01

    This work presents an in-depth investigation of the properties of complexes composed of hydrogen, silicon, or oxygen with carbon, which are the major unintentional impurities in undoped GaN. This manuscript is a complement to our previous work on carbon-carbon and carbon-vacancy complexes. We have employed a first-principles method using Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functionals within the framework of generalized Kohn-Sham density functional theory. Two H-C, four Si-C, and five O-C complexes in different charge states have been considered. After full geometry relaxations, formation energies, binding energies, and both thermal and optical transition levels were obtained. The calculated energy levels have been systematically compared with the experimentally observed carbon related trap levels. Furthermore, we computed vibrational frequencies for selected defect complexes and defect concentrations were estimated in the low, mid, and high carbon doping scenarios considering two different cases where electrically active defects: (a) only carbon and vacancies and (b) not only carbon and vacancies but also hydrogen, silicon, and oxygen. We confirmed that CN is a dominant acceptor in GaN. In addition to it, a substantial amount of SiGa-CN complex exists in a neutral form. This complex is a likely candidate for the unknown form of carbon observed in undoped n-type GaN.

  3. Chirality of weakly bound complexes: The potential energy surfaces for the hydrogen-peroxide−noble-gas interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roncaratti, L. F., E-mail: lz@fis.unb.br; Leal, L. A.; Silva, G. M. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Pirani, F. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Aquilanti, V. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210 Salvador (Brazil); Gargano, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910 Brasília (Brazil); Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Florida, Quantum Theory Project, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-10-07

    We consider the analytical representation of the potential energy surfaces of relevance for the intermolecular dynamics of weakly bound complexes of chiral molecules. In this paper we study the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}−Ng (Ng=He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) systems providing the radial and the angular dependence of the potential energy surface on the relative position of the Ng atom. We accomplish this by introducing an analytical representation which is able to fit the ab initio energies of these complexes in a wide range of geometries. Our analysis sheds light on the role that the enantiomeric forms and the symmetry of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule play on the resulting barriers and equilibrium geometries. The proposed theoretical framework is useful to study the dynamics of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molecule, or other systems involving O–O and S–S bonds, interacting by non-covalent forces with atoms or molecules and to understand how the relative orientation of the O–H bonds changes along collisional events that may lead to a hydrogen bond formation or even to selectivity in chemical reactions.

  4. Complex formation of Eu(III) with polyacrylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, T.; Tochiyama, O.; Tanaka, K.; Niibori, Y. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering

    2000-07-01

    For the quantitative description of the interaction of metal ions with humic substances, it is necessary to clarify the effects of both polyelectrolyte and heterogeneous nature of humic substances. To estimate the polyelectrolyte effect separately, polyacrylic acid (MW = 90 000) has been selected as a representative of well-defined, homogeneous polymeric weak acids, and its interaction with Eu(III) has been investigated by a solvent extraction method using {sup 152}Eu ({proportional_to} 10{sup -8} M) with TTA and TBP in xylene. By defining the apparent complex formation constant as {beta}{sub {alpha}} = [ML]/([M][R]), where [M] = [Eu{sup 3+}], [ML] is the concentration of Eu(III) associated with polyacrylic acid and [R] = C{sub R}{alpha} (C{sub R} is a total concentration of proton exchanging sites and {alpha} is a degree of dissociation determined by potentiometric titration), the apparent constants have been obtained at several pcH and ionic strength (0.1 M and 1.0 M NaClO{sub 4}). The constants increased with pcH and decreased with an increase of ionic strength, that is, the values of log {beta}{sub {alpha}} varied from 6.0 (at pcH = 4.7) to 7.6 (pcH = 5.5) at 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} and from 4.8 (pcH = 4.4) to 6.5 (pcH = 5.4) at 1.0 M. The plots of log {beta}{sub {alpha}} versus log {alpha} revealed almost linear relationship both at 0.1 and 1.0 M NaClO{sub 4}. (orig.)

  5. Retrograde lawsonite formation in the Franciscan subduction complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S.; Mulcahy, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Lawsonite [CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2·H2O] is an index mineral of low-temperature subduction zones, contains a significant amount of water, and is an important host of rare-earth and trace elements in mafic protoliths. For these reasons, numerous studies have investigated the consequences of lawsonite breakdown during prograde subduction. In the Franciscan subduction complex, however, lawsonite in mafic blueschist largely formed along a retrograde path from pre-existing eclogite. In order to asses the conditions and significance of retrograde lawsonite formation we examined the petrology and geochemistry of lawsonite-bearing assemblages in Franciscan mafic rocks. All of the samples have the common assemblage: lawsonite, glaucophane, and sphene. Quartz is generally absent. Muscovite, chlorite, and relict epidote and rutile are variably present. Different index minerals calcite, aragonite, albite, and jadeitic pyroxene are present within lawsonite assemblages. Garnet occurs in equilibrium with lawsonite, as a relict mineral in lawsonite and the matrix, or is completely absent. Major element compositions vary from typical basalts and are strongly correlated with one another. Chondrite normalized REE compositions are variably LREE depleted or enriched, MREE are flat to enriched, and HREE are generally flat. Trace elements normalized to NMORB show variably enriched and depleted LILE. The petrology suggests lawsonite, glaucophane, and sphene formed from multiple retrograde reactions involving garnet, clinopyroxene, epidote, and rutile, together with significant hydration. Important index minerals imply lawsonite formed over a wide range of pressures within the subduction zone. The major, REE, and trace element compositions suggest lawsonite assemblages were derived from different protoliths or experienced variable amounts of metasomatism and interaction with crustally derived material and serpentinite.

  6. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol−1 catalyst h−1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells. PMID:22953041

  7. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-08-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol-1 catalyst h-1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells.

  8. Efficient hydrogen liberation from formic acid catalyzed by a well-defined iron pincer complex under mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Thomas; Butschke, Burkhard; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Milstein, David

    2013-06-17

    Hydrogen liberation: An attractive approach to reversible hydrogen storage applications is based on the decomposition of formic acid. The efficient and selective hydrogen liberation from formic acid is catalyzed by an iron pincer complex in the presence of trialkylamine. Turnover frequencies up to 836 h⁻¹ and turnover numbers up to 100,000 were achieved at 40 °C. A mechanism including well-defined intermediates is suggested on the basis of experimental and computational data. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The relationship between discharge capacity of LaNi{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys and formation enthalpy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Xiaobo; Wei Xuedong; Dong Hui [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Liu Yongning, E-mail: ynliu@mail.xjtu.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2010-02-04

    The formation enthalpy of LaNi{sub 5} type hydrogen storage alloys has been calculated using a semi-empirical formula that takes into account the electronegativities, the atomic size, and the electron concentration of each constituent element in the alloys. Through our calculations, it was found that the formation enthalpy of the alloys is directly related to the discharge capacities of the alloys. When the absolute value of formation enthalpy decreases, the discharge capacity increases. The result provides a valuable reference for alloy design.

  10. Dinuclear Tetrapyrazolyl Palladium Complexes Exhibiting Facile Tandem Transfer Hydrogenation/Suzuki Coupling Reaction of Fluoroarylketone

    KAUST Repository

    Dehury, Niranjan

    2016-07-18

    Herein, we report an unprecedented example of dinuclear pyrazolyl-based Pd complexes exhibiting facile tandem catalysis for fluoroarylketone: Tetrapyrazolyl di-palladium complexes with varying Pd-Pd distances efficiently catalyze the tandem reaction involving transfer hydrogenation of fluoroarylketone to the corresponding alcohol and Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling reaction of the resulting fluoroarylalcohol under moderate reaction conditions, to biaryl alcohol. The complex with the shortest Pd-Pd distance exhibits the highest tandem activity among its di-metallic analogues, and exceeds in terms of activity and selectivity the analogous mononuclear compound. The kinetics of the reaction indicates clearly that reductive transformation of haloarylketone into haloaryalcohol is the rate determining step in the tandem reaction. Interestingly while fluoroarylketone undergoes the multistep tandem catalysis, the chloro- and bromo-arylketones undergo only a single step C-C coupling reaction resulting in biarylketone as the final product. Unlike the pyrazole based Pd compounds, the precursor PdCl2 and the phosphine based relevant complexes (PPh3)2PdCl2 and (PPh3)4Pd are found to be unable to exhibit the tandem catalysis.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide formation during radiolysis of aerated aqueous solutions of organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illés, Erzsébet; Tegze, Anna; Kovács, Krisztina; Sági, Gyuri; Papp, Zoltán; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2017-05-01

    A large number of aromatic molecules were irradiated in 10-4 mol dm-3 concentration air-saturated aqueous solutions; the hydrogen peroxide production was followed. H2O2 formed with an initial yield of 2.5-3.5×10-7 mol J-1, the concentration had a maximum (∼3×10-4 mol dm-3) due to the competition between the formation and decay. The H2O2 concentration increased with the dose rate in purified water samples, here the •OH+•OH reaction dominated in H2O2 production. In the presence of aromatic compounds the H2O2 concentration decreased with the increasing dose rate: the main source of H2O2 was the termination reaction of the O2•-/HO2• pair. This pair formed in the eaq-+ O2 and H•+O2 reactions and also in elimination from organic peroxy radicals. The dose rate dependence was attributed to the changes in the ratios of the different formation ways of H2O2. The main H2O2 consuming process was suggested to be the eaq-+H2O2 reaction. In the present study the Cu(II)/phenanthroline H2O2 test was used for concentration determination. The test was found to be applicable in wide concentration range, but it provided false results when the solutions contained phenol type compounds. To overcome such interferences the removal of these compounds by liquid-liquid extraction was suggested.

  12. Intramolecular competition between n-pair and π-pair hydrogen bonding: Microwave spectrum and internal dynamics of the pyridine–acetylene hydrogen-bonded complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Rebecca B.; Dewberry, Christopher T.; Leopold, Kenneth R., E-mail: A.C.Legon@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: david.tew@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: kleopold@umn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant St., SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Coulston, Emma; Cole, George C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD (United Kingdom); Legon, Anthony C., E-mail: A.C.Legon@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: david.tew@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: kleopold@umn.edu; Tew, David P., E-mail: A.C.Legon@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: david.tew@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: kleopold@umn.edu [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock’s Close, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-14

    a-type rotational spectra of the hydrogen-bonded complex formed from pyridine and acetylene are reported. Rotational and {sup 14}N hyperfine constants indicate that the complex is planar with an acetylenic hydrogen directed toward the nitrogen. However, unlike the complexes of pyridine with HCl and HBr, the acetylene moiety in HCCH—NC{sub 5}H{sub 5} does not lie along the symmetry axis of the nitrogen lone pair, but rather, forms an average angle of 46° with the C{sub 2} axis of the pyridine. The a-type spectra of HCCH—NC{sub 5}H{sub 5} and DCCD—NC{sub 5}H{sub 5} are doubled, suggesting the existence of a low lying pair of tunneling states. This doubling persists in the spectra of HCCD—NC{sub 5}H{sub 5}, DCCH—NC{sub 5}H{sub 5}, indicating that the underlying motion does not involve interchange of the two hydrogens of the acetylene. Single {sup 13}C substitution in either the ortho- or meta-position of the pyridine eliminates the doubling and gives rise to separate sets of spectra that are well predicted by a bent geometry with the {sup 13}C on either the same side (“inner”) or the opposite side (“outer”) as the acetylene. High level ab initio calculations are presented which indicate a binding energy of 1.2 kcal/mol and a potential energy barrier of 44 cm{sup −1} in the C{sub 2v} configuration. Taken together, these results reveal a complex with a bent hydrogen bond and large amplitude rocking of the acetylene moiety. It is likely that the bent equilibrium structure arises from a competition between a weak hydrogen bond to the nitrogen (an n-pair hydrogen bond) and a secondary interaction between the ortho-hydrogens of the pyridine and the π electron density of the acetylene.

  13. The formation of molecular hydrogen from water ice in the lunar regolith by energetic charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Wilson, J. K.

    2013-06-01

    On 9 October 2009, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission impacted a spent Centaur rocket into the permanently shadowed region (PSR) within Cabeus crater and detected water vapor and ice, as well as other volatiles, in the ejecta plume. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), a far ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), observed this plume as FUV emissions from the fluorescence of sunlight by molecular hydrogen (H2) and other constituents. Energetic charged particles, such as galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs), can dissociate the molecules in water ice to form H2. We examine how much H2can be formed by these types of particle radiation interacting with water ice sequestered in the regolith within PSRs, and we assess whether it can account for the H2 observed by LAMP. To estimate H2formation, we use the GCR and SEP radiation dose rates measured by the LRO Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER). The exposure time of the ice is calculated by considering meteoritic gardening and the penetration depth of the energetic particles. We find that GCRs and SEPs could convert at least 1-7% of the original water molecules into H2. Therefore, given the amount of water detected by LCROSS, such particle radiation‒induced dissociation of water ice could likely account for a significant percentage (10-100%) of the H2measured by LAMP.

  14. Role of Hydrogen Bonding in the Formation of Adenine Chains on Cu(110 Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanxia Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the adsorption properties of DNA bases on metal surfaces is fundamental for the rational control of surface functionalization leading to the realisation of biocompatible devices for biosensing applications, such as monitoring of particular parameters within bio-organic environments and drug delivery. In this study, the effects of deposition rate and substrate temperature on the adsorption behavior of adenine on Cu(110 surfaces have been investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and density functional theory (DFT modeling, with a focus on the characterization of the morphology of the adsorbed layers. STM results revealed the formation of one-dimensional linear chains and ladder-like chains parallel to the [110] direction, when dosing at a low deposition rate at room temperature, followed by annealing to 490 K. Two mirror related, well-ordered chiral domains oriented at ±55° with respect to the [110] direction are formed upon deposition on a substrate kept at 490 K. The molecular structures observed via STM are rationalized and qualitatively described on the basis of the DFT modeling. The observation of a variety of ad-layer structures influenced by deposition rate and substrate temperature indicates that dynamic processes and hydrogen bonding play an important role in the self-assembly of adenine on the Cu(110 surface.

  15. The formation of glycine and other complex organic molecules in exploding ice mantles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, J M C; Williams, D A; Viti, S; Cecchi-Pestellini, C; Duley, W W

    2014-01-01

    Complex Organic Molecules (COMs), such as propylene (CH3CHCH2) and the isomers of C2H4O2 are detected in cold molecular clouds (such as TMC-1) with high fractional abundances (Marcelino et al., Astrophys. J., 2007, 665, L127). The formation mechanism for these species is the subject of intense speculation, as is the possibility of the formation of simple amino acids such as glycine (NH2CH2COOH). At typical dark cloud densities, normal interstellar gas-phase chemistries are inefficient, whilst surface chemistry is at best ill defined and does not easily reproduce the abundance ratios observed in the gas phase. Whatever mechanism(s) is/are operating, it/they must be both efficient at converting a significant fraction of the available carbon budget into COMs, and capable of efficiently returning the COMs to the gas phase. In our previous studies we proposed a complementary, alternative mechanism, in which medium- and large-sized molecules are formed by three-body gas kinetic reactions in the warm high density gas phase. This environment exists, for a very short period of time, after the total sublimation of grain ice mantles in transient co-desorption events. In order to drive the process, rapid and efficient mantle sublimation is required and we have proposed that ice mantle 'explosions' can be driven by the catastrophic recombination of trapped hydrogen atoms, and other radicals, in the ice. Repeated cycles of freeze-out and explosion can thus lead to a cumulative molecular enrichment of the interstellar medium. Using existing studies we based our chemical network on simple radical addition, subject to enthalpy and valency restrictions. In this work we have extended the chemistry to include the formation pathways of glycine and other large molecular species that are detected in molecular clouds. We find that the mechanism is capable of explaining the observed molecular abundances and complexity in these sources. We find that the proposed mechanism is easily capable

  16. Spectral analysis and DFT computations of the hydrogen bonded complex between 2,6-diaminopyridine with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol in different solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmary, Khairia M.; Soliman, Saied M.; Habeeb, Moustafa M.; Al-Obidan, Areej H.

    2017-09-01

    New hydrogen bonded complex between 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP), proton donor with the proton acceptor 2,6-diaminopyridine (DAP) has been synthesized and characterized in solution and solid state by different spectroscopic techniques. Electronic spectra were used to identify the novel proton transfer complex through appearance of new absorption bands in acetonitrile (CH3CN), methanol (CH3OH) and mixture composed from 1:1 methanol and acetonitrile (AN-Me). The complex stoichiometry was determined to be 1:1 by job's method and photometric titrations. The formation constant was determined by applying minimum-maximum absorbances method where it reached high values confirming the complex high stability. A spectroscopic method for determining DAP was presented and validated statistically. The solid complex was characterized by elemental analysis, infrared and 1H NMR studies where the hydrogen bonded reaction occurs between the phenolic OH with the pyridine ring nitrogen as well as one amino group of DNP. The density functional theory DFT (B3LYP) method has been used to energy optimization of the reactants and complex in the ground state using two basis sets 6-31G(d) and 6-31 G+(d,p). The first one led to energy optimized structure through bifurcated hydrogen bond between OH of DCNP with the ring nitrogen and one amino group of DAP with optimization energy -1998.7 Hartree. The second one gave an optimized structure thought hydrogen bonding between OH and one amino group with lowered optimization energy -2018.1 Hartree. Hence, the experimental results will be simulated with the most stable one at DFT/B3LYB 6-31G+ (d,p). The most reactive electrophilic and nucleophilic sites of DCNP and DAP were predicted using the molecular electrostatic potential. The theoretical electronic spectra in the gas phase and the investigated solvents were calculated at TD-DFT/B3LYP 6-31G+ (d,p) and compared with measured electronic spectra where a satisfactory results have been obtained

  17. Coexistence facilitates interspecific biofilm formation in complex microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Røder, Henriette Lyng; Russel, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    , the underlying role of fundamental ecological factors, specifically coexistence and phylogenetic history, in biofilm formation remains unclear. This study examines how social interactions affect biofilm formation in multi-species co-cultures from five diverse environments. We found prevalence of increased...... biofilm formation among co-cultured bacteria that have coexisted in their original environment. Conversely, when randomly co-culturing bacteria across these five consortia, we found less biofilm induction and a prevalence of biofilm reduction. Reduction in biofilm formation was even more predominant when...... correlated with an increase in planktonic cell numbers, thus implying a behavioral response rather than mere growth competition. Our findings suggest that an increase in biofilm formation is a common adaptive response to long-term coexistence....

  18. Synthesis and radiosensitization properties of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md.; Mohamed, Faizal; Heng, Cheong Kai; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohamad, Hur Munawar Kabir [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Cancer cells which are large in size are resistant towards radiation therapy due to the presence of large amount of anti-oxidative enzymes and hypoxic cancer cells. Thus radiosensitizer agents have been developed to enhance the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy by increasing the sensitivity of these cancer cells towards radiation. This study is conducted to investigate the radiosensitization properties of radiosensitizer complex containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate. Combination with sodium hyaluronate may decrease reactivity of hydrogen peroxide but maintain the oxygen concentration needed for radiosensitizing effect. HepG2 cancer cells are cultured as the mean of test subject. Cancer cell samples which are targeted and not targeted with these radiosensitizers are irradiated with 2Gy single fractionated dose. Results obtained shows that the cancer cells which are not targeted with radiosensitizers has a cell viability of 98.80±0.37% after a time interval of 48 hours and has even repopulated over 100% after a 72 hour time interval. This shows that the cancer cells are resistant towards radiation. However, when the cancer cells are targeted with radiosensitizers prior to irradiation, there is a reduction of cell viability by 25.50±10.81% and 10.30±5.10% at time intervals of 48 and 72 hours respectively. This indicates that through the use of these radiosensitizers, cancer cells are more sensitive towards radiation.

  19. Synthesis and radiosensitization properties of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md.; Mohamed, Faizal; Heng, Cheong Kai; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohamad, Hur Munawar Kabir

    2014-09-01

    Cancer cells which are large in size are resistant towards radiation therapy due to the presence of large amount of anti-oxidative enzymes and hypoxic cancer cells. Thus radiosensitizer agents have been developed to enhance the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy by increasing the sensitivity of these cancer cells towards radiation. This study is conducted to investigate the radiosensitization properties of radiosensitizer complex containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate. Combination with sodium hyaluronate may decrease reactivity of hydrogen peroxide but maintain the oxygen concentration needed for radiosensitizing effect. HepG2 cancer cells are cultured as the mean of test subject. Cancer cell samples which are targeted and not targeted with these radiosensitizers are irradiated with 2Gy single fractionated dose. Results obtained shows that the cancer cells which are not targeted with radiosensitizers has a cell viability of 98.80±0.37% after a time interval of 48 hours and has even repopulated over 100% after a 72 hour time interval. This shows that the cancer cells are resistant towards radiation. However, when the cancer cells are targeted with radiosensitizers prior to irradiation, there is a reduction of cell viability by 25.50±10.81% and 10.30±5.10% at time intervals of 48 and 72 hours respectively. This indicates that through the use of these radiosensitizers, cancer cells are more sensitive towards radiation.

  20. Selective synthesis and characterization of single-site HY zeolite-supported rhodium complexes and their use as catalysts for ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khivantsev, Konstantin

    Single-site Rh(CO)2, Rh(C2H4)2 and Rh(NO)2 complexes anchored on various dealuminated HY zeolites can be used as precursors for the selective surface mediated synthesis of well-defined site-isolated Rh(CO)(H)x complexes. DFT calculations and D 2 isotope exchange experiments provide strong evidence for the formation of a family of site isolated mononuclear rhodium carbonyl hydride complexes (including the first examples of RhH complexes with undissociated H2 ligands): Rh(CO)(H2), Rh(CO)(H)2, and Rh(CO)(H). The fraction of each individual complex formed varies significantly with the Si/Al ratio of the zeolite and the nature of the precursor used. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(CO)2 complexes are very active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. There is strong evidence for the cooperation mechanism between mononuclear rhodium complexes and Bronsted acid sites of the zeolite support in C-C bond formation process, as well as ethane formation. Finally, it is shown that the dimerization pathway selectivity can be progressively tuned (and completely switched off) by modifying the number of Bronsted acid sites on the zeolite surface. HY zeolite-supported mononuclear Rh(NO)2 complexes can be selectively formed upon exposure of Rh(CO)2/HY to the gas phase NO/He. They are structurally similar to Rh(CO)2/HY with Rh(I) retaining square planar geometry and nitrosyl ligands adopting a linear configuration. Rh(NO)2/HY30 is active in ethylene hydrogenation and ethylene dimerization under ambient conditions. This is the first unprecedented example of a supported transition-metal nitrosyl complex capable of performing a catalytic reaction. Moreover, this is the first example of a site-isolated Rh complex with ligands other than ethylene or carbonyl, which can catalyze both ethylene hydrogenation and dimerization. Unlike its dicarbonyl counterpart, dinitrosyl rhodium complex has a uniquely different reactivity towards ethylene and hydrogen

  1. The hydrogen bond strength of the phenol-phenolate anionic complex: a computational and photoelectron spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytendyk, Allyson M; Graham, Jacob D; Collins, Kim D; Bowen, Kit H; Wu, Chia-Hua; Wu, Judy I

    2015-10-14

    The phenol-phenolate anionic complex was studied in vacuo by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy using 193 nm photons and by density functional theory (DFT) computations at the ωB97XD/6-311+G(2d,p) level. We characterize the phenol-phenolate anionic complex as a proton-coupled phenolate pair, i.e., as a low-barrier hydrogen bond system. Since the phenol-phenolate anionic complex was studied in the gas phase, its measured hydrogen bond strength is its maximal ionic hydrogen bond strength. The D(PhO(-)···HOPh) interaction energy (26-30 kcal mol(-1)), i.e., the hydrogen bond strength in the PhO(-)···HOPh complex, is quite substantial. Block-localized wavefunction (BLW) computations reveal that hydrogen bonded phenol rings exhibit increased ring π-electron delocalization energies compared to the free phenol monomer. This additional stabilization may explain the stronger than expected proton donating ability of phenol.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of amide-borohydrides: New complex light hydrides for potential hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chater, Philip A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Anderson, Paul A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: p.a.anderson@bham.ac.uk; Prendergast, James W. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Walton, Allan; Mann, Vicky S.J.; Book, David [Department of Metallurgy and Materials, School of Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); David, William I.F. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Johnson, Simon R.; Edwards, Peter P. [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-31

    The reactions xLiNH{sub 2} + (1 - x)LiBH{sub 4} and xNaNH{sub 2} + (1 - x)NaBH{sub 4} have been investigated and new phases identified. The lithium amide-borohydride system is dominated by a body centred cubic compound of formula Li{sub 4}BH{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}. In the sodium system, a new hydride of approximate composition Na{sub 2}BH{sub 4}NH{sub 2} has been identified with a primitive cubic structure and lattice parameter a {approx} 4.7 A. The desorption of gases from the two amide-borohydrides on heating followed a similar pattern with the relative proportions of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} released depending critically on the experimental set-up: in the IGA, ammonia release occurred in two steps - beginning at 60 and 260 deg. C for Li{sub 4}BH{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3} - the second of which was accompanied by hydrogen release; in the TPD system the main desorption product was hydrogen-again at 260 deg. C for Li{sub 4}BH{sub 4}(NH{sub 2}){sub 3} accompanied by around 5% ammonia. We hypothesize that the BH{sub 4}{sup -} anion can play a similar role to LiH in the LiNH{sub 2} + LiH system, where ammonia release is suppressed in favour of hydrogen. The reaction xLiNH{sub 2} + (1 - x)LiAlH{sub 4} did not result in the production of any new phases but TPD experiments show that hydrogen is released from the mixture 2LiNH{sub 2} + LiAlH{sub 4}, over a wide temperature range. We conclude that mixed complex hydrides may provide a means of tuning the dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation reactions to make viable storage systems.

  3. Stability of Complex Biomolecular Structures: Vander Waals, Hydrogen Bond Cooperativity, and Nuclear Quantum Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Mariana; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Biomolecules are complex systems stabilized by a delicate balance of weak interactions, making it important to assess all energetic contributions in an accurate manner. However, it is a priori unclear which contributions make more of an impact. Here, we examine stacked polyglutamine (polyQ) strands, a peptide repeat often found in amyloid aggregates. We investigate the role of hydrogen bond (HB) cooperativity, van der Waals (vdW) dispersion interactions, and quantum contributions to free energies, including anharmonicities through density functional theory and ab initio path integral simulations. Of these various factors, we find that the largest impact on structural stabilization comes from vdW interactions. HB cooperativity is the second largest contribution as the size of the stacked chain grows. Competing nuclear quantum effects make the net quantum contribution small but very sensitive to anharmonicities, vdW, and the number of HBs. Our results suggest that a reliable treatment of these systems can only ...

  4. The Microwave Spectrum and Molecular Structure of the Hydrogen-Bonded Aniline-Methanol Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeckel; Stahl

    1999-12-01

    The rotational spectrum of aniline-methanol was investigated in the frequency region 3-19 GHz using a pulsed molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Sixty-three measured a- and b-type transitions show a fine structure due to internal rotation of the methyl group. The resulting A and E lines are additionally split into hyperfine components arising from quadrupole coupling of the (14)N nucleus. The torsional motion of the methyl group is hindered by an effective barrier V(3) of nearly 215 cm(-1), which is almost one-half of the methanol barrier height. The structure of the complex was calculated assuming a common symmetry plane for the monomers. These form a linear N vertical ellipsis H-O hydrogen bond. Its distance was found to be 3.03 Å, which is identical with that of aniline-water. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Hydrogen storage in metal hydrides and complex hydrides; Wasserstoffspeicherung in Metall- und komplexen Hydriden - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bielmann, M.; Zuettel, A.

    2007-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE), reports on work done in 2007 at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology EMPA on the storage of hydrogen in metal hydrides and complex hydrides. In particular, the use of tetrahydroborates is noted. The potential of this class of materials is stressed. The structures at room-temperature were examined using neutron and X-ray diffraction methods. Thermodynamic methods helped determine the thermodynamic stability of the materials. Also, a complete energy diagram for the materials was developed. The use of silicon oxide to reduce activation energy and its catalytic effects are discussed. The challenges placed by desorption mechanisms are noted. The authors note that reversibility is basically proven.

  6. Emergence of hydrogen bonds from molecular dynamics simulation of substituted N-phenylthiourea-catechol oxidase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Lae

    2017-01-01

    A series of N-phenylthiourea derivatives was built starting from the X-ray structure in the molecular mechanics framework and the interaction profile in the complex with the catechol oxidase was traced using molecular dynamics simulation. The results showed that the geometry and interactions between ligand and receptor were highly related to the position of the substituted side chains of phenyl moiety. At the end of molecular dynamics run, a concentrated multicenter hydrogen bond was created between the substituted ligand and receptor. The conformation of the ligand itself were also restricted in the receptor pocket. Furthermore, the simulation time of 50 ns were found to be long enough to explore the relevant conformational space and the stationary behavior of the molecular dynamic could be observed.

  7. Luminescent lanthanide complexes with 4-acetamidobenzoate: Synthesis, supramolecular assembly via hydrogen bonds, crystal structures and photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xia; Fan, Jun; Wang, Zhi Hong; Zheng, Sheng Run; Tan, Jing Bo; Zhang, Wei Guang

    2011-07-01

    Four new luminescent complexes, namely, [Eu(aba) 2(NO 3)(C 2H 5OH) 2] ( 1), [Eu(aba) 3(H 2O) 2]·0.5 (4, 4'-bpy)·2H 2O ( 2), [Eu 2(aba) 4(2, 2'-bpy) 2(NO 3) 2]·4H 2O ( 3) and [Tb 2(aba) 4(phen) 2(NO 3) 2]·2C 2H 5OH ( 4) were obtained by treating Ln(NO 3) 3·6H 2O and 4-acetamidobenzoic acid (Haba) with different coligands (4, 4'-bpy=4, 4'-bipyridine, 2, 2'-bpy=2, 2'-bipyridine, and phen=1, 10-phenanthroline). They exhibit 1D chains ( 1- 2) and dimeric structures ( 3- 4), respectively. This structural variation is mainly attributed to the change of coligands and various coordination modes of aba molecules. Moreover, the coordination units are further connected via hydrogen bonds to form 2D even 3D supramolecular networks. These complexes show characteristic emissions in the visible region at room temperature. In addition, thermal behaviors of four complexes have been investigated under air atmosphere. The relationship between the structures and physical properties has been discussed.

  8. Mechanism of Formation and Stabilization of Nanoparticles Produced by Heating Electrostatic Complexes of WPI-Dextran Conjugate and Chondroitin Sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xiuling; Yu, Jingyang; Karangwa, Eric; Xia, Shuqin; Zhang, Xiaoming; Jia, Chengsheng

    2016-07-13

    Protein conformational changes were demonstrated in biopolymer nanoparticles, and molecular forces were studied to elucidate the formation and stabilization mechanism of biopolymer nanoparticles. The biopolymer nanoparticles were prepared by heating electrostatic complexes of whey protein isolate (WPI)-dextran conjugate (WD) and chondroitin sulfate (ChS) above the denaturation temperature and near the isoelectric point of WPI. The internal characteristics of biopolymer nanoparticles were analyzed by several spectroscopic techniques. Results showed that grafted dextran significantly (p electrostatic interaction with WD changed the fluorescence intensity of WD regardless of heat treatment. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopies confirmed that glycosylation and ionic polysaccharide did not significantly cause protein conformational changes in WD and ChS (WDC) during heat treatment. In addition, hydrophobic bonds were the major molecular force for the formation and stabilization of biopolymer nanoparticles. However, hydrogen bonds slightly influenced their formation and stabilization. Ionic bonds only promoted the formation of biopolymer nanoparticles, while disulfide bonds partly contributed to their stability. This work will be beneficial to understand protein conformational changes and molecular forces in biopolymer nanoparticles, and to prepare the stable biopolymer nanoparticles from heating electrostatic complexes of native or glycosylated protein and polysaccharide.

  9. Starch-lipid inclusion complexes for aerogel formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently we reported that aqueous slurries of starch can be excess steam jet-cooked and blended with aqueous solutions of fatty acid salts to produce inclusion complexes between amylose and the fatty acid salt. These complexes can be simply prepared on large scale using commercially available steam ...

  10. Formation of hydrogen bonds precedes the rate-limiting formation of persistent structure in the folding of ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, K; Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J

    2000-01-01

    A burst phase in the early folding of the four-helix two-state folder protein acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) has been detected using quenched-flow in combination with site-specific NMR-detected hydrogen exchange. Several of the burst phase structures coincide with a structure consisting o...

  11. The effect of temperature and time on the formation of amylose- lysophosphatidylcholine inclusion complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadiabhari, Salomeh; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Oudhuis, A. A. C. M. (Lizette); Hamer, Rob J.; Loos, Katja

    The formation of amylose inclusion complexes could help to decrease the susceptibility of starch granules against amylase digestion. We studied the formation of amylose-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) inclusion complexes at temperatures at and below the gelatinization temperature of starch, using DSC,

  12. Meiotic cohesin complexes are essential for the formation of the axial element in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Llano, Elena; Herrán, Yurema; García-Tuñón, Ignacio; Gutiérrez-Caballero, Cristina; de Álava, Enrique; Barbero, José Luis; Schimenti, John; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel; Pendás, Alberto M.

    2012-01-01

    Cohesin is a conserved multisubunit protein complex that participates in chromosome segregation, DNA damage repair, chromatin regulation, and synaptonemal complex (SC) formation. Yeast, but not mice, depleted of the cohesin subunit Rec8 are defective in the formation of the axial elements (AEs) of

  13. Blister formation on 13Cr2MoNbVB ferritic-martensitic steel exposed to hydrogen plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, A. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Kopanets, I. E.; Karpov, S. A.; Vasilenko, R. L.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of pre-irradiation specimen deformation level on surface blister formation and sub-surface cracking of dual-phase 13Cr2MoNbVB ferritic-martensitic steel was studied using glow discharge hydrogen plasma with ion energy of 1 keV to fluences of 2 × 1025 H/m2. Protium was used for most studies, but deuterium was used for measuring the depth dependence of hydrogen diffusion. Formation of blisters was observed in the temperature range 230-340 K. It was found that pre-irradiation deformation caused changes in the threshold fluences of blister formation and also in blister size distribution. Subsurface cracks located on grain boundaries far beyond the implantation zone were formed concurrently with blisters, arising from hydrogen diffusion and trapping at defects. It was observed that cracks as long as 1 mm in length were formed in 95% deformed steel at depths up to 500 μm from surface.

  14. Impacts of glycolate and formate radiolysis and thermolysis on hydrogen generation rate calculations for the Savannah River Site tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-14

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) personnel requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluate available data and determine its applicability to defining the impact of planned glycolate anion additions to Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) on Tank Farm flammability (primarily with regard to H2 production). Flammability evaluations of formate anion, which is already present in SRS waste, were also needed. This report describes the impacts of glycolate and formate radiolysis and thermolysis on Hydrogen Generation Rate (HGR) calculations for the SRS Tank Farm.

  15. ALPHA-HYDROGEN, BETA-HYDROGEN AND DELTA-HYDROGEN ABSTRACTION IN THE THERMOLYSIS OF PARAMAGNETIC VANADIUM(III) DIALKYL COMPLEXES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HESSEN, B; BUIJINK, JKF; MEETSMA, A; TEUBEN, JH; HELGESSON, G; HAKANSSON, M; JAGNER, S; SPEK, AL

    Electron deficient paramagnetic vanadium(III) dialkyls CpV(CH2CMe2R)2(PMe3) (14 electron, R = Me (2), Ph (3)) and CpV[CH(SiMe3)2]2 (12 electron, 4) have been synthesized. At ambient temperature 2 decomposes through a-hydrogen abstraction to produce, in the presence of dmpe

  16. Cα-H carries information of a hydrogen bond involving the geminal hydroxyl group: a case study with a hydrogen-bonded complex of 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and tertiary amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Uttam; Sen, Sudeshna; Maiti, Nakul Chandra

    2014-02-13

    Experimental measurement of the contribution of H-bonding to intermolecular and intramolecular interactions that provide specificity to biological complex formation is an important aspect of macromolecular chemistry and structural biology. However, there are very few viable methods available to determine the energetic contribution of an individual hydrogen bond to binding and catalysis in biological systems. Therefore, the methods that use secondary deuterium isotope effects analyzed by NMR or equilibrium or kinetic isotope effect measurements are attractive ways to gain information on the H-bonding properties of an alcohol system, particularly in a biological environment. Here, we explore the anharmonic contribution to the C-H group when the O-H group of 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFP) forms an intermolecular H-bond with the amines by quantum mechanical calculations and by experimentally measuring the H/D effect by NMR. Within the framework of density functional theory, ab initio calculations were carried out for HFP in its two different conformational states and their H-bonded complexes with tertiary amines to determine the (13)C chemical shielding, change in their vibrational equilibrium distances, and the deuterium isotope effect on (13)C2 (secondary carbon) of HFP upon formation of complexes with tertiary amines. When C2-OH was involved in hydrogen bond formation (O-H as hydrogen donor), it weakened the geminal C2-H bond; it was reflected in the NMR chemical shift, coupling constant, and the equilibrium distances of the C-H bond. The first derivative of nuclear shielding at C2 in HFP was -48.94 and -50.73 ppm Å(-1) for anti and gauche conformations, respectively. In the complex, the values were -50.28 and -50.76 ppm Å(-1), respectively. The C-H stretching frequency was lower than the free monomer, indicating enhanced anharmonicity in the C-H bond in the complex form. In chloroform, HFP formed a complex with the amine; δC2 was 69.107 ppm for HFP

  17. The Formation of the Self. Nietzsche and Complexity | Cilliers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between the formation of the self and the worldly horizon within which this self achieves its meaning. Our inquiry takes place from two perspectives: the first derived from the Nietzschean analysis of how one becomes what one is; the other from current developments in ...

  18. Quality Enhancement by Inclusion Complex Formation of Simvastatin Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emőke Rédai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Simvastatin is an inhibitor of hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. To enhance its bioavailability by inclusion complexation, as host molecule randommethyl-β-cyclodextrin had been used. After evaluating the complexes we chose the kneading product in 1:2 molar ratio for incorporation of 10 mg simvastatin tablets. Materials and methods: We prepared homogenous mixtures of the inclusion complex and some excipients. The tablets were prepared by direct compression. The tablets were evaluated in regard to: weight uniformity, thickness, diameter, hardness, friability, disintegration and dissolution profile. Results: Weights are in the range of 196-208 mg, diameter 6.83-6.86 mm, height 3.86-4.01 mm, hardness 78.3-113.1 N, friability 0.75- 1.19 %, disintegration above 15 minutes. The dissolved amounts of simvastatin from the tablets are higher compared to the dissolution of pure simvastatin, but lower than the dissolution of the complex itself. Excipients, like disintegrants and lubricants greatly influence the dissolution properties of the tablets. Conclusions: According to our results, tablets containing inclusion complex of simvastatin exhibit better solubility, according to the dissolved amount of simvastatin, than pure drug alone. Proper physical parameters of the tablets are obtained by application of 5 % Primellose

  19. The influence of large-amplitude librational motion on the hydrogen bond energy for alcohol–water complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas; Heimdal, J.; Larsen, René Wugt

    2015-01-01

    The far-infrared absorption spectra have been recorded for hydrogen-bonded complexes of water with methanol and t-butanol embedded in cryogenic neon matrices at 2.8 K. The partial isotopic substitution of individual subunits enabled by a dual inlet deposition procedure provides for the first time...

  20. Microscopic models for proton transfer in water and strongly hydrogen-bonded complexes with a single-well proton potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism and formalism for proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds introduced recently [1], is applied to a proton transfer in liquid water. "Structural diffusion" of hydroxonium ions is regarded as totally adiabatic process, with synchronous hindered translation...

  1. Anion-assisted trans-cis isomerization of palladium(II) phosphine complexes containing acetanilide functionalities through hydrogen bonding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Xia; Tang, Hau-San; Ko, Chi-Chiu; Wong, Jenny Ka-Yan; Zhu, Nianyong; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2005-03-28

    The anion-assisted shift of trans-cis isomerization equilibrium of a palladium(II) complex containing acetanilide functionalities brought about by allosteric hydrogen bonding interactions has been established by UV/Vis, 1H NMR, 31P NMR and ESI-MS studies.

  2. Hydrogenation of imines catalysed by ruthenium(II) complexes based on lutidine-derived CNC pincer ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Juárez, Martín; Vaquero, Mónica; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Salazar, Verónica; Suárez, Andrés

    2013-01-14

    The preparation of new Ru(II) complexes incorporating fac-coordinated lutidine-derived CNC ligands is reported. These derivatives are selectively deprotonated by (t)BuOK at one of the methylene arms of the pincer, leading to catalytically active species in the hydrogenation of imines.

  3. Complexity of gold nanoparticle formation disclosed by dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Sørensen, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Although chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from gold salt (HAuCl4) are among the most studied nanomaterials, understanding the formation mechanisms is a challenge mainly due to limited dynamics information. A range of in situ methods with down to millisecond (ms) time resolution...... from redox potential, pH, conductivity, and turbidity of the solution enables distinct observation of reduction and nucleation/growth of AuNPs phases. The dynamics of the electrochemical potential shows that reduction of gold salt (HAuCl 4 and its hydrolyzed forms) occurs via intermediate [AuCl 2......]- to form Au atoms during the early stage of the synthesis process. pH- and conductivity-dynamics point further clearly to formation of coating layers on AuNPs and adsorbate exchange between MES and starch. © 2013 American Chemical Society....

  4. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation by the interaction of hydrogen chloride with humid air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions in which hydrochloric acid aerosol is predicted by the interaction of hydrogen chloride gas with the water vapor in humid air are analyzed. The liquid gas phase equilibrium for the HCL-H2O system is expressed in terms of relative humidity and hydrogen chloride concentration as parts per million, units commonly used in pollution studies. Presented are the concentration (wt %) of HC1 in the aerosol and the concentration of aerosol (ppm) predicted.

  5. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  6. Formation of complex anodic films on porous alumina matrices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The kinetics of growth of complex anodic alumina films was investigated. These films were formed by filling porous oxide films (matrices) having deep pores. The porous films (matrices) were obtained voltastatically in (COOH)2 aqueous solution under various voltages. The filling was done by re-anodization in an electrolyte ...

  7. Co-formation of hydroperoxides and ultra-fine particles during the reactions of ozone with a complex VOC mixture under simulated indoor conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Z.H.; Weschler, Charles J.; Han, IK

    2005-01-01

    In this study we examined the co-formation of hydrogen peroxide and other hydroperoxides (collectively presented as H2O2*) as well as submicron particles, including ultra-fine particles (UFP), resulting from the reactions of ozone (O-3) with a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs...... in the O-3/23 VOCs system. The present study confirmed the findings of a previous study carried out in a real-world office and generated new findings regarding co-formation of UFP. Through a comparative analysis of H2O2* yields under different reaction conditions, this study demonstrates that VOCs co...

  8. Deoxy-liquefaction of switchgrass in supercritical water with calcium formate as an in-situ hydrogen donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsurn, Hema; Gupta, Ram B

    2013-09-01

    Switchgrass was liquefied in supercritical water (SCW) using Ca(HCOO)2 as an in-situ source of hydrogen to enhance deoxygenation and the quality of the biocrude obtained. In SCW, Ca(HCOO)2 produces hydrogen via decomposition and hydrolysis reactions, and simultaneously switchgrass hydrolyzes to form oxygenated hydrocarbon compounds. Because of the close proximity of the newly-formed hydrogen and active hydrocarbons, hydrodeoxygenation occurred whereby some of the oxygenated compounds were upgraded by the removal of oxygen in the form of water. The analysis of the so-formed biocrude revealed the presence of benzene, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and alkyl phenolics. The benzene formation is attributed to the hydrogenation of phenols but also due to the Diels-Alder alkene addition, followed by dehydrogenation. The addition of Ca(HCOO)2 doubled the yield of biocrude (10 wt%) and increased the heating value from 28 to 34 kJ/g. Formic acid amount increased in the aqueous biocrude due to the enhanced decomposition of xylose and glucose. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Structural Basis for TSC-1 TSC-2 Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    organs, including brain, skin, kidney, heart, and liver (1-2). This syndrome often manifests in early age with infantile seizures and patients may have...tuberin: working together for tumour suppression. Int. J. Cancer 118: 1-5 2. Astrinidis A, Henske EP. (2005). Tuberous sclerosis complex: linking growth...be regulated by changes in pH. Importantly, the BARD1 BRCT structure provides insights into the mechanisms by which the cancer - associated missense

  10. Formation of natamycin:cyclodextrin inclusion complexes and their characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, John L; Marcy, Joseph E

    2003-11-19

    Natamycin is a broad spectrum antimycotic with very low water solubility, which is used to extend the shelf life of shredded cheese products. beta-Cyclodextrin (beta-CD), hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HP beta-CD), and gamma-cyclodextrin (gamma-CD) were found to form inclusion complexes with natamycin in aqueous solution. The increase in solubility of natamycin with added beta-CD was observed to be linear (type A(L) phase solubility diagram). The 1:1 stability constant of natamycin:beta-CD complex was estimated from its phase solubility diagram to be 1010 M(-1). The phase solubility diagrams of both gamma-CD and HP beta-CD exhibited negative deviation from linearity (type A(N) diagram) and, therefore, did not allow the estimation of binding constants. The water solubility of natamycin was increased 16-fold, 73-fold, and 152-fold with beta-CD, gamma-CD, and HP beta-CD, respectively. The natamycin:CD inclusion complexes resulted in in vitro antifungal activity nearly equivalent to that of natamycin in its free state.

  11. Base Flipping in Open Complex Formation at Bacterial Promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Karpen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the process of transcription initiation, the bacterial RNA polymerase binds double-stranded (ds promoter DNA and subsequently effects strand separation of 12 to 14 base pairs (bp, including the start site of transcription, to form the so-called “open complex” (also referred to as RPo. This complex is competent to initiate RNA synthesis. Here we will review the role of σ70 and its homologs in the strand separation process, and evidence that strand separation is initiated at the −11A (the A of the non-template strand that is 11 bp upstream from the transcription start site of the promoter. By using the fluorescent adenine analog, 2-aminopurine, it was demonstrated that the −11A on the non-template strand flips out of the DNA helix and into a hydrophobic pocket where it stacks with tyrosine 430 of σ70. Open complexes are remarkably stable, even though in vivo, and under most experimental conditions in vitro, dsDNA is much more stable than its strand-separated form. Subsequent structural studies of other researchers have confirmed that in the open complex the −11A has flipped into a hydrophobic pocket of σ70. It was also revealed that RPo was stabilized by three additional bases of the non-template strand being flipped out of the helix and into hydrophobic pockets, further preventing re-annealing of the two complementary DNA strands.

  12. Hydrogen Production and Storage on a Formic Acid/Bicarbonate Platform using Water-Soluble N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes of Late Transition Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantke, Dominik; Pardatscher, Lorenz; Drees, Markus; Cokoja, Mirza; Herrmann, Wolfgang A; Kühn, Fritz E

    2016-10-06

    The synthesis and characterization of two water-soluble bis-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes of rhodium and iridium is presented. Both compounds are active in H2 generation from formic acid and in hydrogenation of bicarbonate to formate. The rhodium derivative is most active in both reactions, reaching a TOF of 39 000 h(-1) and a TON of 449 000 for H2 production. The catalytic hydrogenation reactions were carried out in an autoclave system and analyzed using the integrated peak areas in the (1) H NMR spectra. Decomposition of formic acid was investigated using a Fisher-Porter bottle equipped with a pressure transducer. Long-term stability for hydrogen evolution was tested by surveillance of the gas flow rate. The procedure does not require any additives like amines or inert gas conditions. Density functional theory calculations in agreement with experimental results suggest a bicarbonate reduction mechanism involving a second catalyst molecule, which provides an external hydride acting as reducing agent. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Induced Circular Dichroism in Phosphine Gold(I) Aryl Acetylide Urea Complexes through Hydrogen-Bonded Chiral Co-Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubarle-Offner, Julien; Moussa, Jamal; Amouri, Hani; Jouvelet, Benjamin; Bouteiller, Laurent; Raynal, Matthieu

    2016-03-14

    Phosphine gold(I) aryl acetylide complexes equipped with a central bis(urea) moiety form 1D hydrogen-bonded polymeric assemblies in solution that do not display any optical activity. Chiral co-assemblies are formed by simple addition of an enantiopure (metal-free) complementary monomer. Although exhibiting an intrinsically achiral linear geometry, the gold(I) aryl acetylide fragment is located in the chiral environment displayed by the hydrogen-bonded co-assemblies, as demonstrated by induced circular dichroism (ICD). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Engineering and Coordination of Regulatory Networks and Intracellular Complexes to Maximize Hydrogen Production by Phototrophic Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James C. Liao

    2012-05-22

    This project is a collaboration with F. R. Tabita of Ohio State. Our major goal is to understand the factors and regulatory mechanisms that influence hydrogen production. The organisms to be utilized in this study, phototrophic microorganisms, in particular nonsulfur purple (NSP) bacteria, catalyze many significant processes including the assimilation of carbon dioxide into organic carbon, nitrogen fixation, sulfur oxidation, aromatic acid degradation, and hydrogen oxidation/evolution. Our part of the project was to develop a modeling technique to investigate the metabolic network in connection to hydrogen production and regulation. Organisms must balance the pathways that generate and consume reducing power in order to maintain redox homeostasis to achieve growth. Maintaining this homeostasis in the nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacteria is a complex feat with many avenues that can lead to balance, as these organisms possess versatile metabolic capabilities including anoxygenic photosynthesis, aerobic or anaerobic respiration, and fermentation. Growth is achieved by using H{sub 2} as an electron donor and CO{sub 2} as a carbon source during photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic growth, where CO{sub 2} is fixed via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle. Photoheterotrophic growth can also occur when alternative organic carbon compounds are utilized as both the carbon source and electron donor. Regardless of the growth mode, excess reducing equivalents generated as a result of oxidative processes, must be transferred to terminal electron acceptors, thus insuring that redox homeostasis is maintained in the cell. Possible terminal acceptors include O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, organic carbon, or various oxyanions. Cells possess regulatory mechanisms to balance the activity of the pathways which supply energy, such as photosynthesis, and those that consume energy, such as CO{sub 2} assimilation or N{sub 2} fixation. The major route for CO{sub 2} assimilation is the CBB

  15. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Harbor Hospital Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Yong [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Yedidi, Ravikiran S. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dewdney, Tamaria G. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Reiter, Samuel J. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Brunzelle, Joseph S. [Northwestern Univ. Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Kovari, Iulia A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Kovari, Ladislau C. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-12-19

    Success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. Additionally, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  16. An ab initio study of the properties of some lithium-bonded complexes - Comparison with their hydrogen-bonded analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Thomas A.

    2013-07-01

    Ab initio calculations have been carried out on a series of complexes formed between lithium fluoride, chloride and bromide on the one hand, and ammonia, water, phosphine and hydrogen sulfide on the other. The calculations were performed using the Gaussian-09 program, at the second order level of Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and with Dunning's augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-zeta basis set. The properties studied were the molecular structures, interaction energies and vibrational spectra. The results have been compared with those for an analogous set of complexes formed between the three acids hydrogen fluoride, chloride and bromide, and the same four Lewis bases. Common features between the properties of both sets of complexes have been highlighted, and the differences rationalized.

  17. The thermodynamic stability of hydrogen bonded and cation bridged complexes of humic acid models—A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Adelia J. A.; Tunega, Daniel; Pašalić, Hasan; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H.; Lischka, Hans

    2008-06-01

    Hydrogen bonded and cation bridged complexation of poly(acrylic acid) oligomers, representing a model compound for humic acids, with acetic acid and the herbicide (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (MCPA) have been studied by means of density functional theory. Solvation effects were computed by means of a combination of microsolvation (explicit insertion of water molecules) and global solvation (polarizable continuum approach). The stability of hydrogen bonded complexes in solution is characterized by a strong competition between solute and solvent molecules. The cation bridged complexes of the negatively charged (deprotonated) ligands were found to be strongly favored explaining the capability of humic acids to fixate anionic species from soil solutions and the ability to form cross-linking structures within the humic acid macromolecules.

  18. The thermodynamic stability of hydrogen bonded and cation bridged complexes of humic acid models-A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, Adelia J.A. [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Soil Research, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Peter-Jordan-Strasse 82, A1190 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: adelia.aquino@univie.ac.at; Tunega, Daniel [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Soil Research, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Peter-Jordan-Strasse 82, A1190 Vienna (Austria); Pasalic, Hasan [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Haberhauer, Georg [ARC Seibersdorf Research, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Gerzabek, Martin H. [Institute of Soil Research, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Peter-Jordan-Strasse 82, A1190 Vienna (Austria); Lischka, Hans [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2008-06-16

    Hydrogen bonded and cation bridged complexation of poly(acrylic acid) oligomers, representing a model compound for humic acids, with acetic acid and the herbicide (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (MCPA) have been studied by means of density functional theory. Solvation effects were computed by means of a combination of microsolvation (explicit insertion of water molecules) and global solvation (polarizable continuum approach). The stability of hydrogen bonded complexes in solution is characterized by a strong competition between solute and solvent molecules. The cation bridged complexes of the negatively charged (deprotonated) ligands were found to be strongly favored explaining the capability of humic acids to fixate anionic species from soil solutions and the ability to form cross-linking structures within the humic acid macromolecules.

  19. Challenges in the Greener Production of Formates/Formic Acid, Methanol, and DME by Heterogeneously Catalyzed CO2 Hydrogenation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The recent advances in the development of heterogeneous catalysts and processes for the direct hydrogenation of CO2 to formate/formic acid, methanol, and dimethyl ether are thoroughly reviewed, with special emphasis on thermodynamics and catalyst design considerations. After introducing the main motivation for the development of such processes, we first summarize the most important aspects of CO2 capture and green routes to produce H2. Once the scene in terms of feedstocks is introduced, we carefully summarize the state of the art in the development of heterogeneous catalysts for these important hydrogenation reactions. Finally, in an attempt to give an order of magnitude regarding CO2 valorization, we critically assess economical aspects of the production of methanol and DME and outline future research and development directions. PMID:28656757

  20. Challenges in the Greener Production of Formates/Formic Acid, Methanol, and DME by Heterogeneously Catalyzed CO2 Hydrogenation Processes

    KAUST Repository

    Álvarez, Andrea

    2017-06-28

    The recent advances in the development of heterogeneous catalysts and processes for the direct hydrogenation of CO2 to formate/formic acid, methanol, and dimethyl ether are thoroughly reviewed, with special emphasis on thermodynamics and catalyst design considerations. After introducing the main motivation for the development of such processes, we first summarize the most important aspects of CO2 capture and green routes to produce H2. Once the scene in terms of feedstocks is introduced, we carefully summarize the state of the art in the development of heterogeneous catalysts for these important hydrogenation reactions. Finally, in an attempt to give an order of magnitude regarding CO2 valorization, we critically assess economical aspects of the production of methanol and DME and outline future research and development directions.

  1. An Ab Initio MP2 Study of HCN-HX Hydrogen Bonded Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo Regiane C.M.U.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available An ab initio MP2/6-311++G** study has been performed to obtain geometries, binding energies and vibrational properties of HCN-HX H-bonded complexes with X = F, Cl, NC, CN and CCH. These MP2/6-311++G** results have revealed that: (i the calculated H-bond lengths are in very good agreement with the experimental ones; (ii the H-bond strength is associated with the intermolecular charge transfer and follows the order: HCN-HNC ~ HCN-HF > HCN-HCl ~ HCN-HCN > HCN-HCCH; (iii BSSE correction introduces an average reduction of 2.4 kJ/mol on the MP2/6-311++G** binding energies, i.e. 11% of the uncorrected binding energy; (iv the calculated zero-point energies reduce the stability of these complexes and show a good agreement with the available experimental values; (v the H-X stretching frequency is shifted downward upon H-bond formation. This displacement is associated with the H-bond length; (vi The more pronounced effect on the infrared intensities occurs with the H-X stretching intensity. It is much enhanced after complexation due to the charge-flux term; (vii the calculated intermolecular stretching frequencies are in very good agreement with the experimental ones; and, finally, (viii the results obtained for the HCN-HX complexes follow the same profile as those found for the acetylene-HX series but, in the latter case, the effects on the properties of the free molecules due to complexation are less pronounced than those in HCN-HX.

  2. The complex interplay between semantics and grammar in impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreves, Wyley B; Hart, William; Adams, John M; Guadagno, Rosanna E; Eno, Cassie A

    2014-09-01

    We sought to bridge findings showing that (a) describing a person's behavior with the perfective verb aspect (did), compared to the imperfective aspect (was doing), increases processing of semantic knowledge unrelated to the target's action such as stereotypes and (b) an increased recognition of stereotypical thoughts often promotes a judgment correction for the stereotypes. We hypothesized an interplay between grammar (verb conjugation) and semantic information (gender) in impression-formation. Participants read a resume, attributed to a male or female, for a traditionally masculine job. When the resume was written in the imperfective, people rated a male (vs. female) more positively. When the resume was in the perfective, this pattern reversed. Only these latter effects of gender were influenced by cognitive load. Further, people more quickly indicated the applicant's gender in the perfective condition, suggesting an enhanced focus on gender during processing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Can quantum-mechanical calculations yield reasonable estimates of hydrogen-bonding acceptor strength? The case of hydrogen-bonded complexes of methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koné, Mawa; Illien, Bertrand; Laurence, Christian; Graton, Jérôme

    2011-12-01

    The thermodynamics and some vibrational properties of hydrogen-bonded complexes of methanol with 23 hydrogen-bond acceptors (HBAs) have been determined in CCl(4) by FTIR spectrometry. The experimental sample contains carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, fluorine, and chlorine organic bases and covers an energetic range of 13 kJ mol(-1) in the basicity scale (-ΔG), 22 kJ mol(-1) in the affinity scale (-ΔH), and 400 cm(-1) in the spectroscopic scale (Δν((OH))) (from benzene to trimethylphosphane oxide and amines). The experimental results in CCl(4) are compared to those computed in the gas phase at various levels of theory. Ninety five percent of the variance of the red shift and 89% of the variance of the intensification of the OH stretching upon hydrogen bonding are explained by gas-phase B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) calculations. However, this level does not satisfactorily explain the thermodynamic properties. Only 68% of the variance of the methanol affinity (-ΔH) is taken into account. MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) affinity calculations raise the explanation to 77% for all HBAs and to 93% when three outliers (Me(2)SO, Me(3)PO, and tetrahydrothiophene) are excluded. Discrepancies are analyzed in terms of experimental errors, calculation approximations, and solvation. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. The β-cyclodextrin/benzene complex and its hydrogen bonds – a theoretical study using molecular dynamics, quantum mechanics and COSMO-RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jutta Erika Helga Köhler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Four highly ordered hydrogen-bonded models of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD and its inclusion complex with benzene were investigated by three different theoretical methods: classical quantum mechanics (QM on AM1 and on the BP/TZVP-DISP3 level of approximation, and thirdly by classical molecular dynamics simulations (MD at different temperatures (120 K and 273 to 300 K. The hydrogen bonds at the larger O2/O3 rim of empty β-CDs prefer the right-hand orientation, e.g., O3-H…O2-H in the same glucose unit and bifurcated towards …O4 and O3 of the next glucose unit on the right side. On AM1 level the complex energy was −2.75 kcal mol−1 when the benzene molecule was located parallel inside the β-CD cavity and −2.46 kcal mol−1 when it was positioned vertically. The AM1 HOMO/LUMO gap of the empty β-CD with about 12 eV is lowered to about 10 eV in the complex, in agreement with data from the literature. AM1 IR spectra displayed a splitting of the O–H frequencies of cyclodextrin upon complex formation. At the BP/TZVP-DISP3 level the parallel and vertical positions from the starting structures converged to a structure where benzene assumes a more oblique position (−20.16 kcal mol−1 and −20.22 kcal mol−1, resp. as was reported in the literature. The character of the COSMO-RS σ-surface of β-CD was much more hydrophobic on its O6 rim than on its O2/O3 side when all hydrogen bonds were arranged in a concerted mode.This static QM picture of the β-CD/benzene complex at 0 K was extended by MD simulations. At 120 K benzene was mobile but always stayed inside the cavity of β-CD. The trajectories at 273, 280, 290 and 300 K certainly no longer displayed the highly ordered hydrogen bonds of β-CD and benzene occupied many different positions inside the cavity, before it left the β-CD finally at its O2/O3 side.

  5. Formation of Au and tetrapyridyl porphyrin complexes in superfluid helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Cheng; Latimer, Elspeth; Spence, Daniel; Al Hindawi, Aula M A A; Bullen, Shem; Boatwright, Adrian; Ellis, Andrew M; Yang, Shengfu

    2015-07-14

    Binary clusters containing a large organic molecule and metal atoms have been formed by the co-addition of 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (H2TPyP) molecules and gold atoms to superfluid helium nanodroplets, and the resulting complexes were then investigated by electron impact mass spectrometry. In addition to the parent ion H2TPyP yields fragments mainly from pyrrole, pyridine and methylpyridine ions because of the stability of their ring structures. When Au is co-added to the droplets the mass spectra are dominated by H2TPyP fragment ions with one or more Au atoms attached. We also show that by switching the order in which Au and H2TPyP are added to the helium droplets, different types of H2TPyP-Au complexes are clearly evident from the mass spectra. This study suggests a new route for the control over the growth of metal-organic compounds inside superfluid helium nanodroplets.

  6. Study of complex equilibria in niobium(V) and vanadium(V) systems with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol, tartrate and hydrogen peroxide using RP-HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oszwaldowski, S.; Jarosz, M. [Politechnika Warszawska, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-12-01

    Complex equilibria in multiligand niobium(V) systems with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridilazo)-5-diethyl aminophenol (5-Br-PADAP), tartrate and hydrogen peroxide and vanadium(V) with 5-Br-PADP and tartrate were evaluated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) using C{sub 18} column and VIS detection at 590 nm. In Nb(V)-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-tartrate-(5-Br{sub P}ADAP) system formation of multiligand niobium complex, non-reactive towards 5-Br-PADAP, was postulated. For V(V) system distribution of metal ion between V(V)-(5-Br-PADAP) binary and V(V)-tartrate-(5-Br-PADAP) ternary complexes were evaluated. On this base it was proved, that coloured ternary vanadium complex is only an intermediate stage in the formation of stable V(V)-tartrate binary complex. (author). 14 refs, 7 figs.

  7. Carbon–heteroatom bond formation catalysed by organometallic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    At one time the synthetic chemist’s last resort, reactions catalysed by transition metals are now the preferred method for synthesizing many types of organic molecule. A recent success in this type of catalysis is the discovery of reactions that form bonds between carbon and heteroatoms (such as nitrogen, oxygen, sulphur, silicon and boron) via complexes of transition metals with amides, alkoxides, thiolates, silyl groups or boryl groups. The development of these catalytic processes has been supported by the discovery of new elementary reactions that occur at metal–heteroatom bonds and by the identification of factors that control these reactions. Together, these findings have led to new synthetic processes that are in daily use and have formed a foundation for the development of processes that are likely to be central to synthetic chemistry in the future. PMID:18800130

  8. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  9. Density functional theory study of the reaction mechanism for competitive carbon-hydrogen and carbon-halogen bond activations catalyzed by transition metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinzheng; Hall, Michael B

    2009-03-12

    Carbon-hydrogen and carbon-halogen bond activations between halobenzenes and metal centers were studied by density functional theory with the nonempirical meta-GGA Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria functional and an all-electron correlation-consistent polarized valence double-zeta basis set. Our calculations demonstrate that the hydrogen on the metal center and halogen in halobenzene could exchange directly through a kite-shaped transition state. Transition states with this structure were previously predicted to have high energy barriers (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 279), and this prediction misled others in proposing a mechanism for their recent experimental study (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 3303). Furthermore, other halo-carbon activation pathways were found in the detailed mechanism for the competitive reactions between cationic titanium hydride complex [Cp*((t)Bu(3)P=N)TiH](+) and chlorobenzene under different pressure of H(2). These pathways include the ortho-C-H and Ti-H bond activations for the formation and release of H(2) and the indirect C-Cl bond activation via beta-halogen elimination for the movement of the C(6)H(4) ring and the formation of a C-N bond in the observed final product. A new stable isomer of the observed product with a similar total energy and an unexpected bridging between the Cp* ring and the metal center by a phenyl ring is also predicted.

  10. Controlled assembly of artificial protein-protein complexes via DNA duplex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płoskoń, Eliza; Wagner, Sara C; Ellington, Andrew D; Jewett, Michael C; O'Reilly, Rachel; Booth, Paula J

    2015-03-18

    DNA-protein conjugates have found a wide range of applications. This study demonstrates the formation of defined, non-native protein-protein complexes via the site specific labeling of two proteins of interest with complementary strands of single-stranded DNA in vitro. This study demonstrates that the affinity of two DNA-protein conjugates for one another may be tuned by the use of variable lengths of DNA allowing reversible control of complex formation.

  11. OTDM-to-WDM Conversion of Complex Modulation Formats by Time-Domain Optical Fourier Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palushani, Evarist; Richter, T.; Ludwig, R.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the utilization of the optical Fourier transform technique for serial-to-parallel conversion of 64×10-GBd OTDM data tributaries with complex modulation formats into 50-GHz DWDM grid without loss of phase and amplitude information.......We demonstrate the utilization of the optical Fourier transform technique for serial-to-parallel conversion of 64×10-GBd OTDM data tributaries with complex modulation formats into 50-GHz DWDM grid without loss of phase and amplitude information....

  12. Molecular dynamics of formation of TD lesioned DNA complexed with repair enzyme - onset of the enzymatic repair process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, Miroslav [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    To describe the first step of the enzymatic repair process (formation of complex enzyme-DNA), in which the thymine dimer (TD) part is removed from DNA, the 500 picosecond (ps) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of TD lesioned DNA and part of repair enzyme cell (inclusive of catalytic center - Arg-22, Glu-23, Arg-26 and Thr-2) was performed. TD is UV originated lesion in DNA and T4 Endonuclease V is TD specific repair enzyme. Both molecules were located in the same simulation cell and their relative movement was examined. During the simulation the research was focused on the role of electrostatic energy in formation of complex enzyme-DNA. It is found, that during the first 100 ps of MD, the part of enzyme approaches the DNA surface at the TD lesion, interacts extensively by electrostatic and van der Walls interactions with TD part of DNA and forms complex that lasts stabile for 500 ps of MD. In the beginning of MD, the positive electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TD ({approx} +10 kcal/mol) drives enzyme towards the DNA molecule. Water-mediated hydrogen bonds between enzyme and DNA help to keep complex stabile. As a reference, the MD simulation of the identical system with native DNA molecule (two native thymines (TT) instead of TD) was performed. In this system the negative electrostatic interaction energy between part of enzyme and TT ({approx} -11 kcal/mol), in contrary to the positive one in the system with TD, doesn't drive enzyme towards DNA and complex is not formed. (author)

  13. Single crystalline tantalum oxychloride microcubes: controllable synthesis, formation mechanism and enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen production activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Hao; Xu, Leilei; Mou, Fangzhi; Guan, Jianguo

    2015-08-11

    Single crystalline microcubes of a new tantalum compound, tantalum oxychloride (TaO2.18Cl0.64), have been fabricated hydrothermally in a concentrated aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid and acetic acid. They contain a superstructure and exhibit remarkably enhanced photocatalytic activities for hydrogen production due to the improved light harvest and facilitated charge transport.

  14. Neutral hydrogen in nearby elliptical and lenticular galaxies : the continuing formation of early-type galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morganti, R.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Oosterloo, T. A.; McDermid, R. M.; Krajnovic, D.; Cappellari, M.; Kenn, F.; Weijmans, A.; Sarzi, M.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations of neutral hydrogen in 12 nearby elliptical and lenticular galaxies. The selected objects come from a representative sample of nearby galaxies earlier studied at optical wavelengths with the integral-field spectrograph

  15. Formation of water-soluble soybean polysaccharides from spent flakes by hydrogen peroxide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wichmann, Jesper; Tran, Tam H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel chemical process for the generation of water-soluble polysaccharides from soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry. This process entails treatment of spent flake with hydrogen peroxide at an elevated temperature, resulting in the release of more than...

  16. Observations of Facet Formation in Near-a Titanium and Comments on the Role of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    possibility is that which was suggested by Troiano ,[57] where hydrogen diffuses to regions of high triaxial stress and lattice defects, which promotes...I.M. Bernstein, eds., Trans AIME, New York, NY, 1976, pp. 367–81. 56. J.D. Boyd: Trans. ASM, 1969, vol. 62, pp. 977–88. 57. A.R. Troiano : Trans. ASM

  17. Computational model for carbon diffusion and methane formation in a ferritic steel during hydrogen attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schl”gl, S.M.; van der Giessen, E.; Schlögl, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen attack is a material degradation process which involves partial dissolution of the microstructure in favor of the growth of methane-filled cavities. The various physical-chemical processes involved are strongly coupled. We present a numerical microstructural model for two of these

  18. Pregalactic black hole formation with an atomic hydrogen equation of state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, Marco; Silk, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The polytropic equation of state of an atomic hydrogen gas is examined for primordial halos with baryonic masses of M-h similar to 10(7)-10(9) M-circle dot. For roughly isothermal collapse around 10(4) K, we find that line trapping of Ly alpha (H I and He II) photons causes the polytropic exponent

  19. Identification of Zn-vacancy-hydrogen complexes in ZnO single crystals: A challenge to positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, G.; Anwand, W.; Grambole, D.; Grenzer, J.; Skorupa, W.; Čížek, J.; Kuriplach, J.; Procházka, I.; Ling, C. C.; So, C. K.; Schulz, D.; Klimm, D.

    2009-03-01

    A systematic study of various, nominally undoped ZnO single crystals, either hydrothermally grown (HTG) or melt grown (MG), has been performed. The crystal quality has been assessed by x-ray diffraction, and a comprehensive estimation of the detailed impurity and hydrogen contents by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis, respectively, has been made also. High precision positron lifetime experiments show that a single positron lifetime is observed in all crystals investigated, which clusters at 180-182 ps and 165-167 ps for HTG and MG crystals, respectively. Furthermore, hydrogen is detected in all crystals in a bound state with a high concentration (at least 0.3at.% ), whereas the concentrations of other impurities are very small. From ab initio calculations it is suggested that the existence of Zn-vacancy-hydrogen complexes is the most natural explanation for the given experimental facts at present. Furthermore, the distribution of H at a metal/ZnO interface of a MG crystal, and the H content of a HTG crystal upon annealing and time afterward has been monitored, as this is most probably related to the properties of electrical contacts made at ZnO and the instability in p -type conductivity observed at ZnO nanorods in literature. All experimental findings and presented theoretical considerations support the conclusion that various types of Zn-vacancy-hydrogen complexes exist in ZnO and need to be taken into account in future studies, especially for HTG materials.

  20. Photochemical Hydrogen Doping Induced Embedded Two-Dimensional Metallic Channel Formation in InGaZnO at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong-Ho; Lee, Young-Ahn; Kim, Jinseo; Park, Jucheol; Ahn, Seungbae; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Kim, Jeong Won; Choi, Duck-Kyun; Seo, Hyungtak

    2015-10-27

    The photochemical tunability of the charge-transport mechanism in metal-oxide semiconductors is of great interest since it may offer a facile but effective semiconductor-to-metal transition, which results from photochemically modified electronic structures for various oxide-based device applications. This might provide a feasible hydrogen (H)-radical doping to realize the effectively H-doped metal oxides, which has not been achieved by thermal and ion-implantation technique in a reliable and controllable way. In this study, we report a photochemical conversion of InGaZnO (IGZO) semiconductor to a transparent conductor via hydrogen doping to the local nanocrystallites formed at the IGZO/glass interface at room temperature. In contrast to thermal or ionic hydrogen doping, ultraviolet exposure of the IGZO surface promotes a photochemical reaction with H radical incorporation to surface metal-OH layer formation and bulk H-doping which acts as a tunable and stable highly doped n-type doping channel and turns IGZO to a transparent conductor. This results in the total conversion of carrier conduction property to the level of metallic conduction with sheet resistance of ∼16 Ω/□, room temperature Hall mobility of 11.8 cm(2) V(-1) sec(-1), the carrier concentration at ∼10(20) cm(-3) without any loss of optical transparency. We demonstrated successful applications of photochemically highly n-doped metal oxide via optical dose control to transparent conductor with excellent chemical and optical doping stability.

  1. Kinetics of Oxidation of Cobalt(III Complexes of a Acids by Hydrogen Peroxide in the Presence of Surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide oxidation of pentaamminecobalt(III complexes of α-hydroxy acids at 35°C in micellar medium has been attempted. In this reaction the rate of oxidation shows first order kinetics each in [cobalt(III] and [H2O2]. Hydrogen peroxide induced electron transfer in [(NH35 CoIII-L]2+ complexes of α-hydroxy acids readily yields 100% of cobalt(II with nearly 100% of C-C bond cleavage products suggesting that it behaves mainly as one equivalent oxidant in micellar medium. With unbound ligand also it behaves only as C-C cleavage agent rather than C-H cleavage agent. With increasing micellar concentration an increase in the rate is observed.

  2. Structural characterization of Am(III) formate complexes. Combining EXAFS spectroscopy with DFT and thermodynamical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossberg, Andre [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures; Froehlich, D.R. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisch-Chemisches Inst.

    2017-06-01

    We used iterative transformation factor analysis (ITFA) in order to isolate the EXAFS spectral contributions of the complexing ligand from a Am(III)/formate pH-series. Thermodynamic calculations were used as constraint for ITFA and for density functional theory (DFT) calculations to identify the coordination mode within the formed complexes.

  3. Dynamics of Nanoparticle-Protein Corona Complex Formation: Analytical Results from Population Balance Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi Sahneh, Faryad; Scoglio, Caterina; Riviere, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation involves absorption of protein molecules onto nanoparticle surfaces in a physiological environment. Understanding the corona formation process is crucial in predicting nanoparticle behavior in biological systems, including applications of nanotoxicology and development of nano drug delivery platforms. Method This paper extends the modeling work in to derive a mathematical model describing the dynamics of nanoparticle corona complex formation from population balance equations. We apply nonlinear dynamics techniques to derive analytical results for the composition of nanoparticle-protein corona complex, and validate our results through numerical simulations. Results The model presented in this paper exhibits two phases of corona complex dynamics. In the first phase, proteins rapidly bind to the free surface of nanoparticles, leading to a metastable composition. During the second phase, continuous association and dissociation of protein molecules with nanoparticles slowly changes the composition of the corona complex. Given sufficient time, composition of the corona complex reaches an equilibrium state of stable composition. We find analytical approximate formulae for metastable and stable compositions of corona complex. Our formulae are very well-structured to clearly identify important parameters determining corona composition. Conclusion The dynamics of biocorona formation constitute vital aspect of interactions between nanoparticles and living organisms. Our results further understanding of these dynamics through quantitation of experimental conditions, modeling results for in vitro systems to better predict behavior for in vivo systems. One potential application would involve a single cell culture medium related to a complex protein medium, such as blood or tissue fluid. PMID:23741371

  4. Dynamics of nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation: analytical results from population balance equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi Sahneh, Faryad; Scoglio, Caterina; Riviere, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation involves absorption of protein molecules onto nanoparticle surfaces in a physiological environment. Understanding the corona formation process is crucial in predicting nanoparticle behavior in biological systems, including applications of nanotoxicology and development of nano drug delivery platforms. This paper extends the modeling work in to derive a mathematical model describing the dynamics of nanoparticle corona complex formation from population balance equations. We apply nonlinear dynamics techniques to derive analytical results for the composition of nanoparticle-protein corona complex, and validate our results through numerical simulations. The model presented in this paper exhibits two phases of corona complex dynamics. In the first phase, proteins rapidly bind to the free surface of nanoparticles, leading to a metastable composition. During the second phase, continuous association and dissociation of protein molecules with nanoparticles slowly changes the composition of the corona complex. Given sufficient time, composition of the corona complex reaches an equilibrium state of stable composition. We find analytical approximate formulae for metastable and stable compositions of corona complex. Our formulae are very well-structured to clearly identify important parameters determining corona composition. The dynamics of biocorona formation constitute vital aspect of interactions between nanoparticles and living organisms. Our results further understanding of these dynamics through quantitation of experimental conditions, modeling results for in vitro systems to better predict behavior for in vivo systems. One potential application would involve a single cell culture medium related to a complex protein medium, such as blood or tissue fluid.

  5. Theoretical study of electronic excitation, ion-pair formation, and mutual neutralization in cesium-hydrogen collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Lepetit, Bruno; Gadéa, Florent Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Inelastic cross sections for the excitation, deexcitation, ion-pair formation, and mutual neutralization processes in cesium-hydrogen collisions Cs (6 s ,6 p ,5 d ,7 s )+H and Cs ++H- are calculated by means of the recently proposed branching-probability-current method and the recently calculated accurate ab initio adiabatic potential energies. Scattering calculations are performed in the low-energy range from 0.01 eV to 1 keV. It is shown that among the endothermic processes, the highest values of the partial cross sections correspond to the ion-pair formation processes with the maximum values up to 23 Å2 . Among the exothermic processes in the low-energy range, the largest partial cross section corresponds to the mutual neutralization process into the Cs (5 d )+H final state.

  6. Hydrogen migration in formation of NH(A{sup 3}Π) radicals via superexcited states in photodissociation of isoxazole molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubek, Mariusz, E-mail: mazub@mif.pg.gda.pl; Wasowicz, Tomasz J. [Department of Physics of Electronic Phenomena, Gdańsk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Dąbkowska, Iwona [Department of Chemistry, University of Gdańsk, 80-952 Gdańsk (Poland); Kivimäki, Antti [CNR-IOM, Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Gas Phase beamline@Elettra, Basovizza Area Science Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Coreno, Marcello [Gas Phase beamline@Elettra, Basovizza Area Science Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy); CNR-IMIP, Monterotondo, 00016 Roma (Italy)

    2014-08-14

    Formation of the excited NH(A{sup 3}Π) free radicals in the photodissociation of isoxazole (C{sub 3}H{sub 3}NO) molecules has been studied over the 14-22 eV energy range using photon-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The NH(A{sup 3}Π) is produced through excitation of the isoxazole molecules into higher-lying superexcited states. Observation of the NH radical, which is not a structural unit of the isoxazole molecule, corroborates the hydrogen atom (or proton) migration within the molecule prior to dissociation. The vertical excitation energies of the superexcited states were determined and the dissociation mechanisms of isoxazole are discussed. The density functional and ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been performed to study the mechanism of the NH formation.

  7. Blister formation and hydrogen retention in aluminium and beryllium: A modeling and experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Quirós

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were performed in a low pressure-high density plasma reactor in order to study the impact of hydrogen retention in aluminium under plasma conditions. Microscopy scans of the surface were performed before and after 1h plasma exposure (fluence 6.1 ×1023ions/m2 where it is seen that blisters start to nucleate at the grain boundaries. Investigation on blister growth kinetics was performed for fluences ranging between 6 ×1023 and 3.7 ×1024ions/m2. The evolution of the characteristic size of the projected area was also analyzed. Finally, a macroscopic rate equations (MRE code was used to simulate hydrogen retention and diffusion in Al and bubble growth in the bulk was simulated using experimental results. This model was also used to simulate these phenomena in Be and compare its behavior with respect to Al.

  8. Density functional theory study on the formation of reactive benzoquinone imines by hydrogen abstraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Rasmus; Rydberg, Patrik; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2015-01-01

    Many drug compounds are oxidized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes to form reactive metabolites. This study presents density functional theory calculations of the CYP-mediated metabolism of acetaminophen and a series of related compounds that can form reactive metabolites by hydrogen abstraction. ...... as an in silico method in the design of new compounds with improved metabolic stability.......Many drug compounds are oxidized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes to form reactive metabolites. This study presents density functional theory calculations of the CYP-mediated metabolism of acetaminophen and a series of related compounds that can form reactive metabolites by hydrogen abstraction...... the porphyrin model to determine the activation energies. We have used this correlation on monosubstituted phenols to rationalize the effect of the various substituents in the drug compounds. In addition to facilitating a chemical interpretation, the approach is sufficiently fast and reliable to be used...

  9. Contribution of Pentose Catabolism to Molecular Hydrogen Formation by Targeted Disruption of Arabinose Isomerase (araA) in the Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga maritima

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Derrick; Singh, Raghuveer; Rudrappa, Deepak; Mateo, Jackie; Kramer, Levi; Freese, Laura

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thermotoga maritima ferments a broad range of sugars to form acetate, carbon dioxide, traces of lactate, and near theoretic yields of molecular hydrogen (H2). In this organism, the catabolism of pentose sugars such as arabinose depends on the interaction of the pentose phosphate pathway with the Embden-Myerhoff and Entner-Doudoroff pathways. Although the values for H2 yield have been determined using pentose-supplemented complex medium and predicted by metabolic pathway reconstruction, the actual effect of pathway elimination on hydrogen production has not been reported due to the lack of a genetic method for the creation of targeted mutations. Here, a spontaneous and genetically stable pyrE deletion mutant was isolated and used as a recipient to refine transformation methods for its repair by homologous recombination. To verify the occurrence of recombination and to assess the frequency of crossover events flanking the deleted region, a synthetic pyrE allele, encoding synonymous nucleotide substitutions, was used. Targeted inactivation of araA (encoding arabinose isomerase) in the pyrE mutant was accomplished using a divergent, codon-optimized Thermosipho africanus pyrE allele fused to the T. maritima groES promoter as a genetic marker. Mutants lacking araA were unable to catabolize arabinose in a defined medium. The araA mutation was then repaired using targeted recombination. Levels of synthesis of H2 using arabinose-supplemented complex medium by wild-type and araA mutant cell lines were compared. The difference between strains provided a direct measurement of H2 production that was dependent on arabinose consumption. Development of a targeted recombination system for genetic manipulation of T. maritima provides a new strategy to explore H2 formation and life at an extremely high temperature in the bacterial domain. IMPORTANCE We describe here the development of a genetic system for manipulation of Thermotoga maritima. T. maritima is a

  10. Thermodynamics of formation reaction and hydrometallurgical application of metal-ammonia complexes in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, V. E.; Pashkov, G. L.; Stupko, T. V.

    1992-09-01

    Critically selected activity coefficients of individual ions stepwise stability constants, and enthalpy and entropy changes during formation of metal-ammonia complexes in aqueous salt solutions are summarised and analysed. Special attention is paid to the specifics of ammonia complexation in solutions with high ammonia concentrations (>=1 mol dm-3), which are of interest in hydrometallurgy. Certain problems and prospects for use of metal-ammonia complexation in hydrometallurgy are discussed. The bibliography includes 154 references.

  11. Mixed ligand complex formation of Fe III with boric acid and typical N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fe(L) 2 3 + , Fe(L)2(H2BO4) and Fe2(L)4(BO4)+ complexes are also indicated with 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline. Complex formation equilibria and stability constants of the complexes at 25 ± 0 × 1° C in aqueous solution at a fixed ionic strength, = 0.1 mol -3 (NaNO3) have been determined by potentiometric ...

  12. The effect of pH on thiosulfate formation in a biotechnological process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, van den P.L.F.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2008-01-01

    In a biotechnological process for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) removal from gas streams, operating at natronophilic conditions, formation of thiosulfate (S2O32¿) is unfavorable, as it leads to a reduced sulfur production. Thiosulfate formation was studied in gas-lift bioreactors, using natronophilic

  13. Formation of hydrogen-bonded chains through inter- and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds by a strong base of guanidine-like character and 2,2‧-biphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinski, B.; Wojciechowski, G.; Bartl, F.; Zundel, G.

    2000-11-01

    2,2‧-Biphenol mixtures with 7-methyl-1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene (MTBD) were studied by FTIR spectroscopy. In chloroform, a proton transfer from 2,2‧-biphenol to MTBD occurs. In this solution the protonated MTBD molecules are hydrogen-bonded to the 2,2‧-biphenol-2,2‧-biphenolate chains. In acetonitrile, after the proton transfer, the complexes dissociate and hence protonated MTBD molecules and hydrogen-bonded 2,2‧-biphenol-2,2‧-biphenolate chains are present. The hydrogen bonds and the hydrogen-bonded chains show large proton polarizability. In the systems intra- as well as inter-molecular hydrogen bonds are formed.

  14. Strong stacking between FH--N hydrogen-bonded foldamers and fullerenes: formation of supramolecular nano networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuang; Zhu, Yuan-Yuan; Yi, Hui-Ping; Li, Chang-Zhi; Jiang, Xi-Kui; Li, Zhan-Ting; Yu, Yi-Hua

    2007-01-01

    The stacking interactions between FH--N hydrogen-bonded foldamers 1-3, bis-foldamer 4, and tris-foldamer 5 and C(60) and C(70) are described. Compound 4 contains two folded units, which are connected by an isophthalamide linker, whereas 5 has a C(3)-symmetrical discotic structure, in which three folded units are connected by a benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide unit. UV/Vis, fluorescence, and NMR experiments have revealed that the foldamers or folded units strongly stack with fullerenes in chloroform. The (apparent) association constants of the respective complexes have been determined by a fluorescence titration method. The strong association is tentatively attributed to intermolecular cooperative fluorophenylpi and solvophobic interactions. A similar but weaker interaction has also been observed between an MeOH--N hydrogen-bonded foldamer and fullerenes. AFM studies have revealed that the surfaces of 3 and 4 show fibrous networks, while the surface of 5 shows particles. In sharp contrast, mixtures of 3 and 4 with C(60) have been shown to generate thinner separated fibrils, whereas a mixture of 5 and C(60) produces honeycomb-like nano networks, for which a columnar cooperative stacking pattern is proposed. The results demonstrate the usefulness of FH--N hydrogen-bonded folded structures in the construction of nanoscaled materials.

  15. Ionic exchange in p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene-mediated formation of metal-ligand complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Vitor; Basílio, Nuno; García-Río, Luis

    2014-05-01

    The effect of alkali and transition metal cations in the formation of host-guest complexes with the water-soluble p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene (SC4) was studied using 2-chloropyridine and Na(+) and Cu(2+) as model guest and model cations, respectively. The results obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR experiments provide evidence for the formation of 1:1:1 ternary complexes for both cations with Cu(2+) showing positive cooperativity and Na(+) negative cooperativity. The formation of ternary complexes comprising transition metal cations has been scarcely explored but present high potential for devising catalytic systems/models or for enhancing the stability and selectivity of SC4 complexes. Because transition metal cations are usually present in solution together with other SC4 countercations (e.g., Na(+)), a general binding model that considers the dynamic formation of all possible complexes (including ionic exchange between ternary complexes) is presented. This model allows the optimization of the conditions required to selectively form target complexes.

  16. Structure, stability, dynamics, high-field relaxivity and ternary-complex formation of a new tris(aquo) gadolinium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonat, Aline; Fries, Pascal H; Pécaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2007-01-01

    The tripodal hexadentate picolinate ligand dpaa3- (H3dpaa=N,N'-bis[(6-carboxypyridin-2-yl)methyl]glycine) has been synthesised. It can form 1:1 and 1:2 lanthanide/ligand complexes. The crystal structure of the bis(aquo) lutetium complex [Lu(dpaa)(H2O)2] has been determined by X-ray diffraction studies. The number of water molecules was determined by luminescence lifetime studies of the terbium and europium complexes. The tris(aquo) terbium complex shows a fairly high luminescence quantum yield (22 %). The [Gd(dpaa)(H2O)3] complex displays a high water solubility and an increased stability (pGd=12.3) with respect to the analogous bis(aquo) complex [Gd(tpaa)(H2O)2] (pGd=11.2). Potentiometric and relaxometric studies show the formation of a soluble GdIII hydroxo complex at high pH values. A unique aquohydroxo gadolinium complex has been isolated and its crystal structure determined. This complex crystallises as a 1D polymeric chain consisting of square-shaped tetrameric units. In heavy water, the [Gd(dpaa)-(D2O)3] complex shows a quite high HOD proton relaxivity at high field (11.93 s(-1) mM(-1) at 200 MHz and 298 K) because of the three inner-sphere water molecules. The formation of ternary complexes with physiological anions has been monitored by relaxometric studies, which indicate that even under conditions favourable to the formation of adducts with oxyanions, the mean relaxivity remains higher than those of most of the currently used commercial contrast agents except for the citrate. However, the measured relaxivity (r1=7.9 s(-1) mM(-1)) in a solution containing equimolar concentrations of [Gd(dpaa)(D2O)3] and citrate is still high. The interaction with albumin has been investigated by relaxometric and luminescence studies. Finally, a new versatile method to unravel the geometric and dynamic molecular factors that explain the high-field relaxivities has been developed. This approach uses a small, uncharged non-coordinating probe solute, the outer

  17. A Protein Data Bank survey reveals shortening of intermolecular hydrogen bonds in ligand-protein complexes when a halogenated ligand is an H-bond donor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Poznański

    Full Text Available Halogen bonding in ligand-protein complexes is currently widely exploited, e.g. in drug design or supramolecular chemistry. But little attention has been directed to other effects that may result from replacement of a hydrogen by a strongly electronegative halogen. Analysis of almost 30000 hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand demonstrates that the length of a hydrogen bond depends on the type of donor-acceptor pair. Interestingly, lengths of hydrogen bonds between a protein and a halogenated ligand are visibly shorter than those estimated for the same family of proteins in complexes with non-halogenated ligands. Taking into account the effect of halogenation on hydrogen bonding is thus important when evaluating structural and/or energetic parameters of ligand-protein complexes. All these observations are consistent with the concept that halogenation increases the acidity of the proximal amino/imino/hydroxyl groups and thus makes them better, i.e. stronger, H-bond donors.

  18. A Protein Data Bank Survey Reveals Shortening of Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds in Ligand-Protein Complexes When a Halogenated Ligand Is an H-Bond Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznański, Jarosław; Poznańska, Anna; Shugar, David

    2014-01-01

    Halogen bonding in ligand-protein complexes is currently widely exploited, e.g. in drug design or supramolecular chemistry. But little attention has been directed to other effects that may result from replacement of a hydrogen by a strongly electronegative halogen. Analysis of almost 30000 hydrogen bonds between protein and ligand demonstrates that the length of a hydrogen bond depends on the type of donor-acceptor pair. Interestingly, lengths of hydrogen bonds between a protein and a halogenated ligand are visibly shorter than those estimated for the same family of proteins in complexes with non-halogenated ligands. Taking into account the effect of halogenation on hydrogen bonding is thus important when evaluating structural and/or energetic parameters of ligand-protein complexes. All these observations are consistent with the concept that halogenation increases the acidity of the proximal amino/imino/hydroxyl groups and thus makes them better, i.e. stronger, H-bond donors. PMID:24933273

  19. Active hydrogenation Rh nanocatalysts protected by new self-assembled supramolecular complexes of cyclodextrins and surfactants in water

    OpenAIRE

    Thanh Chau, Nguyet,; Menuel, Stéphane; Colombel-Rouen, Sophie; Guerrero, Miguel; Monflier, Eric; Philippot, Karine; Denicourt-Nowicki, Audrey; Roucoux, Alain

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The stability of inclusion complexes between randomly methylated β-cyclodextrin (RaMeCD) or its leucine-grafted analogue (RaMeCDLeu) with two hydroxylated ammonium surfactants was investigated. The binding isotherms and complexation constants were measured using the Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) technique. These host-guest inclusion complexes were used as protective agents during the formation of rhodium(0) nanoparticles by chemical reduction of rhodium trichl...

  20. Hydrogen peroxide formation in a surrogate lung fluid by transition metals and quinones present in particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Jessica G; McFall, Alexander S; Richards-Henderson, Nicole K; Anastasio, Cort

    2014-06-17

    Inhaled ambient particulate matter (PM) causes adverse health effects, possibly by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), in the lung lining fluid. There are conflicting reports in the literature as to which chemical components of PM can chemically generate HOOH in lung fluid mimics. It is also unclear which redox-active species are most important for HOOH formation at concentrations relevant to ambient PM. To address this, we use a cell-free, surrogate lung fluid (SLF) to quantify the initial rate of HOOH formation from 10 transition metals and 4 quinones commonly identified in PM. Copper, 1,2-naphthoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone, and phenanthrenequinone all form HOOH in a SLF, but only copper and 1,2-naphthoquinone are likely important at ambient concentrations. Iron suppresses HOOH formation in laboratory solutions, but has a smaller effect in ambient PM extracts, possibly because organic ligands in the particles reduce the reactivity of iron. Overall, copper produces the majority of HOOH chemically generated from typical ambient PM while 1,2-naphthoquinone generally makes a small contribution. However, measured rates of HOOH formation in ambient particle extracts are lower than rates calculated from soluble copper by an average (±1σ) of 44 ± 22%; this underestimate is likely due to either HOOH destruction by Fe or a reduction in Cu reactivity due to organic ligands from the PM.

  1. Preparation and immobilization of diNOsarcobalt(III complex in zeolite y for the catalyzed production of hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Carriazo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A complex cation, diNOsarcobalt(III, [Co(diNOsar]3+, (diNOsar = 1,8-dinitro-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo-[6.6.6]eicosane, was synthesized and immobilized in the cavities of a Y zeolite by the reaction of precursor species in the pores of the zeolite. The encapsulated material was compared to the compound diNOsarcobalt(III chloride, [Co(diNOsar]Cl3. Both diNOsarcobalt(III chloride and the zeolite-encapsulated complex, [Co(diNOsar]3+/zeolite, were obtained in high yield and characterized by ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction demonstrated the incorporation of the complex cation into the pores of the zeolite. The catalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from oxygenated water confirmed the successful synthesis of the complex diNOsarcobalt(III immobilized in the zeolite.

  2. Electrochemical detection of oligopeptides through the precolumn formation of biuret complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, H Y; Weber, S G

    1991-04-12

    The relatively slow kinetics of formation of the electroactive Cu(II)-peptide complexes from larger (greater than 6 amino acids) peptides requires relatively high temperature and long reaction times for a postcolumn reactor. The precolumn incubation of bradykinin, Tyr8-bradykinin and insulin A chain with biuret reagent for 20 min at 60 degrees C leads to the formation of biuret complexes which can be subjected to chromatography in acidic or basic eluents. These complexes are detected electrochemically with a sensitivity similar to the Cu(II)-(ala)3 complex (1 nC/pmol at 1.0 ml/min). The influence of the column-packing material on the electrochemical detector response of the Cu-peptide complexes has also been studied.

  3. Complex 3D Vortex Lattice Formation by Phase-Engineered Multiple Beam Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the computational results on the formation of diverse complex 3D vortex lattices by a designed superposition of multiple plane waves. Special combinations of multiples of three noncoplanar plane waves with a designed relative phase shift between one another are perturbed by a nonsingular beam to generate various complex 3D vortex lattice structures. The formation of complex gyrating lattice structures carrying designed vortices by means of relatively phase-engineered plane waves is also computationally investigated. The generated structures are configured with both periodic as well as transversely quasicrystallographic basis, while these whirling complex lattices possess a long-range order of designed symmetry in a given plane. Various computational analytical tools are used to verify the presence of engineered geometry of vortices in these complex 3D vortex lattices.

  4. Water electrolysis with a conducting carbon cloth: subthreshold hydrogen generation and superthreshold carbon quantum dot formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Mandakini; Deshpande, Aparna; Kelkar, Sarika; Ogale, Satishchandra

    2014-03-01

    A conducting carbon cloth, which has an interesting turbostratic microstructure and functional groups that are distinctly different from other ordered forms of carbon, such as graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes, was synthesized by a simple one-step pyrolysis of cellulose fabric. This turbostratic disorder and surface chemical functionalities had interesting consequences for water splitting and hydrogen generation when such a cloth was used as an electrode in the alkaline electrolysis process. Importantly, this work also gives a new twist to carbon-assisted electrolysis. During electrolysis, the active sites in the carbon cloth allow slow oxidation of its surface to transform the surface groups from COH to COOH and so forth at a voltage as low as 0.2 V in a two-electrode system, along with platinum as the cathode, instead of 1.23 V (plus overpotential), which is required for platinum, steel, or even graphite anodes. The quantity of subthreshold hydrogen evolved was 24 mL cm(-2)  h(-1) at 1 V. Interestingly, at a superthreshold potential (>1.23 V+overpotential), another remarkable phenomenon was found. At such voltages, along with the high rate and quantity of hydrogen evolution, rapid exfoliation of the tiny nanoscale (5-7 nm) units of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are found in copious amounts due to an enhanced oxidation rate. These CQDs show bright-blue fluorescence under UV light. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Bioengineering and Coordination of Regulatory Networks and Intracellular Complexes to Maximize Hydrogen Production by Phototrophic Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabita, F. Robert [The Ohio State University

    2013-07-30

    In this study, the Principal Investigator, F.R. Tabita has teemed up with J. C. Liao from UCLA. This project's main goal is to manipulate regulatory networks in phototrophic bacteria to affect and maximize the production of large amounts of hydrogen gas under conditions where wild-type organisms are constrained by inherent regulatory mechanisms from allowing this to occur. Unrestrained production of hydrogen has been achieved and this will allow for the potential utilization of waste materials as a feed stock to support hydrogen production. By further understanding the means by which regulatory networks interact, this study will seek to maximize the ability of currently available “unrestrained” organisms to produce hydrogen. The organisms to be utilized in this study, phototrophic microorganisms, in particular nonsulfur purple (NSP) bacteria, catalyze many significant processes including the assimilation of carbon dioxide into organic carbon, nitrogen fixation, sulfur oxidation, aromatic acid degradation, and hydrogen oxidation/evolution. Moreover, due to their great metabolic versatility, such organisms highly regulate these processes in the cell and since virtually all such capabilities are dispensable, excellent experimental systems to study aspects of molecular control and biochemistry/physiology are available.

  6. The 2-Oxoacid Dehydrogenase Complexes in Mitochondria Can Produce Superoxide/Hydrogen Peroxide at Much Higher Rates Than Complex I*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Casey L.; Goncalves, Renata L. S.; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Yadava, Nagendra; Bunik, Victoria I.; Brand, Martin D.

    2014-01-01

    Several flavin-dependent enzymes of the mitochondrial matrix utilize NAD+ or NADH at about the same operating redox potential as the NADH/NAD+ pool and comprise the NADH/NAD+ isopotential enzyme group. Complex I (specifically the flavin, site IF) is often regarded as the major source of matrix superoxide/H2O2 production at this redox potential. However, the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH), branched-chain 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH), and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complexes are also capable of considerable superoxide/H2O2 production. To differentiate the superoxide/H2O2-producing capacities of these different mitochondrial sites in situ, we compared the observed rates of H2O2 production over a range of different NAD(P)H reduction levels in isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria under conditions that favored superoxide/H2O2 production from complex I, the OGDH complex, the BCKDH complex, or the PDH complex. The rates from all four complexes increased at higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratios, although the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes produced superoxide/H2O2 at high rates only when oxidizing their specific 2-oxoacid substrates and not in the reverse reaction from NADH. At optimal conditions for each system, superoxide/H2O2 was produced by the OGDH complex at about twice the rate from the PDH complex, four times the rate from the BCKDH complex, and eight times the rate from site IF of complex I. Depending on the substrates present, the dominant sites of superoxide/H2O2 production at the level of NADH may be the OGDH and PDH complexes, but these activities may often be misattributed to complex I. PMID:24515115

  7. Complex Formation of Human Proelastases with Procarboxypeptidases A1 and A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, András; Pilsak, Claudia; Bence, Melinda; Witt, Heiko; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2016-08-19

    The pancreas secretes digestive proenzymes typically in their monomeric form. A notable exception is the ternary complex formed by proproteinase E, chymotrypsinogen C, and procarboxypeptidase A (proCPA) in cattle and other ruminants. In the human and pig pancreas binary complexes of proCPA with proelastases were found. To characterize complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens in a systematic manner, we performed binding experiments using recombinant proelastases CELA2A, CELA3A, and CELA3B; chymotrypsinogens CTRB1, CTRB2, CTRC, and CTRL1; and procarboxypeptidases CPA1, CPA2, and CPB1. We found that proCELA3B bound not only to proCPA1 (KD 43 nm) but even more tightly to proCPA2 (KD 18 nm), whereas proCELA2A bound weakly to proCPA1 only (KD 152 nm). Surprisingly, proCELA3A, which shares 92% identity with proCELA3B, did not form stable complexes due to the evolutionary replacement of Ala(241) with Gly. The polymorphic nature of position 241 in both CELA3A (∼4% Ala(241) alleles) and CELA3B (∼2% Gly(241) alleles) points to individual variations in complex formation. The functional effect of complex formation was delayed procarboxypeptidase activation due to increased affinity of the inhibitory activation peptide, whereas proelastase activation was unchanged. We conclude that complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens is limited to a subset of proelastases and procarboxypeptidases. Complex formation stabilizes the inhibitory activation peptide of procarboxypeptidases and thereby increases zymogen stability and controls activation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Complex Formation of Human Proelastases with Procarboxypeptidases A1 and A2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, András; Pilsak, Claudia; Bence, Melinda; Witt, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The pancreas secretes digestive proenzymes typically in their monomeric form. A notable exception is the ternary complex formed by proproteinase E, chymotrypsinogen C, and procarboxypeptidase A (proCPA) in cattle and other ruminants. In the human and pig pancreas binary complexes of proCPA with proelastases were found. To characterize complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens in a systematic manner, we performed binding experiments using recombinant proelastases CELA2A, CELA3A, and CELA3B; chymotrypsinogens CTRB1, CTRB2, CTRC, and CTRL1; and procarboxypeptidases CPA1, CPA2, and CPB1. We found that proCELA3B bound not only to proCPA1 (KD 43 nm) but even more tightly to proCPA2 (KD 18 nm), whereas proCELA2A bound weakly to proCPA1 only (KD 152 nm). Surprisingly, proCELA3A, which shares 92% identity with proCELA3B, did not form stable complexes due to the evolutionary replacement of Ala241 with Gly. The polymorphic nature of position 241 in both CELA3A (∼4% Ala241 alleles) and CELA3B (∼2% Gly241 alleles) points to individual variations in complex formation. The functional effect of complex formation was delayed procarboxypeptidase activation due to increased affinity of the inhibitory activation peptide, whereas proelastase activation was unchanged. We conclude that complex formation among human pancreatic protease zymogens is limited to a subset of proelastases and procarboxypeptidases. Complex formation stabilizes the inhibitory activation peptide of procarboxypeptidases and thereby increases zymogen stability and controls activation. PMID:27358403

  9. Cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen in a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takamasa; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tanabe, Yoshiaki; Yuki, Masahiro; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-20

    The N≡N bond of molecular dinitrogen bridging two molybdenum atoms in the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl molybdenum complexes that bear ferrocenyldiphosphine as an auxiliary ligand is homolytically cleaved under visible light irradiation at room temperature to afford two molar molybdenum nitride complexes. Conversely, the bridging molecular dinitrogen is reformed by the oxidation of the molybdenum nitride complex at room temperature. This result provides a successful example of the cleavage and formation of molecular dinitrogen induced by a pair of two different external stimuli using a single system assisted by molybdenum complexes bearing ferrocenyldiphosphine under ambient conditions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Complex formation, promiscuity and multi-functionality: protein interactions in disease-resistance pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasu, Ken; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2003-06-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that plant disease-resistance (R) proteins assemble in hetero-multimeric protein complexes in the absence of pathogens. Such complexes might enable the indirect recognition of pathogen effector molecules during attempted pathogen invasion. RAR1 and SGT1 are required for the function of most known R proteins. They interact with each other and with diverse protein complexes, which might explain their multi-functionality. The promiscuous behavior of RAR1 and SGT1 might be crucial for the formation and activation of R protein-containing recognition complexes as well as for regulating downstream signaling processes.

  11. Practical Aspects and Mechanism of Asymmetric Hydrogenation with Chiral Half-Sandwich Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Kačer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This review is oriented toward the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH of imines regarding mostly fundamental, yet important topics from the practical point of view. Development of analytical methods for the monitoring of ATH (i.e., kinetics and stereoselectivity belongs to those topics, as well as studies on the influence of reaction conditions and structural variations on the reaction performance. The second part is devoted to the reaction mechanism with the emphasis on imine ATH and catalyst behaviour under acidic conditions. The review also addresses the asymmetric hydrogenation (AH of ketones and imines using molecular hydrogen and the application of ATH in pharmaceutical projects. The contributions of our group to each area are included.

  12. Letter Report: Stable Hydrogen and Oxygen Isotope Analysis of B-Complex Perched Water Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moran, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nims, Megan K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saunders, Danielle L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-13

    Fine-grained sediments associated with the Cold Creek Unit at Hanford have caused the formation of a perched water aquifer in the deep vadose zone at the B Complex area, which includes waste sites in the 200-DV-1 Operable Unit and the single-shell tank farms in Waste Management Area B-BX-BY. High levels of contaminants, such as uranium, technetium-99, and nitrate, make this aquifer a continuing source of contamination for the groundwater located a few meters below the perched zone. Analysis of deuterium (2H) and 18-oxygen (18O) of nine perched water samples from three different wells was performed. Samples represent time points from hydraulic tests performed on the perched aquifer using the three wells. The isotope analyses showed that the perched water had δ2H and δ18O ratios consistent with the regional meteoric water line, indicating that local precipitation events at the Hanford site likely account for recharge of the perched water aquifer. Data from the isotope analysis can be used along with pumping and recovery data to help understand the perched water dynamics related to aquifer size and hydraulic control of the aquifer in the future.

  13. The effect of large amplitude motions on the transition frequency redshift in hydrogen bonded complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjærgaard, Henrik Grum; Salmi, Teemu

    2014-01-01

    We describe the vibrational transitions of the donor unit in water dimer with an approach that is based on a three-dimensional local mode model. We perform a perturbative treatment of the intermolecular vibrational modes to improve the transition wavenumber of the hydrogen bonded OH......-stretching transition. The model accurately predicts the transition wavenumbers of the vibrations in water dimer compared to experimental values and provides a physical picture that explains the redshift of the hydrogen bonded OH-oscillator. We find that it is unnecessary to include all six intermolecular modes...

  14. Complexometric determination: Part I - EDTA and complex formation with the Cu2+ ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Compounds forming very stable complexes - chelates, have a wide field of application in analytical chemistry. The most famous group of these compounds are complexons. Complexons represent organic polyaminocarbonic acids as for example ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA and its salts. The EDTA molecule has six coordinative sites. It is a hexadentate ligands i.e. it has two binding nitrogen atoms and four oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups and it forms complexes with almost all metal ions. EDTA as a tetraprotonic acid, H4Y disociates through four steps, yielding the ions HsY-, H2Y2-, HY3- and Y4-. Which of the EDTA forms will be encountered in a solution, depends on the pH. Due to the poor solubility of EDTA in pure water, as well as in most organic solvents, the disodium salt of EDTA Na2H2Y-2H2O, under the commercial name complexon III, is utilized for analytical determinations. In water, EDTA forms soluble, stabile chelate complexes with all cations, at the molar ratio 1:1, regardless of the charge of the metal ion. In contrast to other equilibria, which are mainly defined by Le Chatellier's principle, equilibria related to metal-EDTA complex formation are also dependent on the influence of the secondary equilibria of EDTA complex formation. Complexing reactions, which are equilibrium reactions, are simultaneously influenced by the following factors: solution pH and the presence of complexing agents which may also form a stabile complex with metal ions. The secondary reaction influence may be viewed and monitored through conditional stability constants. In the first part of the paper, the reaction of the formation of the Cu2+-ion complex with EDTA is analyzed beginning from the main reaction through various influences of secondary reactions on the complex Cu2+-EDTA: pH effect, complexation effect and hydrolysis effect. The equations are given for conditional stability constants, which include equilibrium reactions under actual conditions.

  15. Effects of chemical and enzymatic modifications on starch-linoleic acid complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arijaje, Emily Oluwaseun; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2017-02-15

    This study investigated the complexation yield and physicochemical properties of soluble and insoluble starch complexes with linoleic acid when a β-amylase treatment was applied to acetylated and debranched potato starch. The degree of acetylation was generally higher in the soluble complexes than in the insoluble ones. The insoluble complexes from the acetylated starch displayed the V-type pattern, whereas, the soluble complexes displayed a mixture of either the A-/V-type or the B-/V-type pattern. Acetylation decreased onset and peak melting temperatures for the insoluble complexes, whereas no melting endotherm was observed in the soluble complexes. Acetylation substantially increased the amount of complexed linoleic acid in the insoluble complexes, but had little positive effect on the formation of the soluble complexes. The β-amylase treatment significantly increased the complexed linoleic content in both soluble and insoluble complexes for the low acetylated starch, but not for the high acetylated starch. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Complex Formation of Selected Radionuclides with Ligands Commonly Found in Ground Water: Low Molecular Organic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bror Skytte; Jensen, H.

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to the analysis of potentiometric data on complex formation between cations and polybasic amphoteric acids is described. The method is used for the characterisation of complex formation between Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, La 3+, and Eu3+ with a α-hydroxy acids, tartaric acid and citric ac......, and with the α-amino acids, aspartic acid and L-cysteine. The cations have been chosen as typical components of reactor waste, and the acids because they are often found as products of microbial activity in pits or wherever organic material decays...

  17. Complex Formation of Selected Radionuclides with Ligands Commonly Found in Ground Water: Low Molecular Organic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bror Skytte; Jensen, H.

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to the analysis of potentiometric data on complex formation between cations and polybasic amphoteric acids is described. The method is used for the characterisation of complex formation between Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, La 3+, and Eu3+ with a α-hydroxy acids, tartaric acid and citric acid......, and with the α-amino acids, aspartic acid and L-cysteine. The cations have been chosen as typical components of reactor waste, and the acids because they are often found as products of microbial activity in pits or wherever organic material decays...

  18. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    The analysis was performed with an in-house software, hydrogen bond analysis tool (HBAT). In addition to strong ..... drug design. However, the purpose of using docking in the present context is different. Molecular docking was carried out to estimate the best drug–DNA geometries in cases where the crystal structures of ...

  19. Efficient hydrogen peroxide decomposition to oxygen and water catalysed by a ruthenium pincer complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    are necessary, further enhancing the potential scope of this system. By the use of the homogeneous catalyst Ru(H)2(PNPiPr)CO, it is possible to obtain turnover frequencies reaching 180,000 h−1 and turnover numbers more than 14,000 in a neutral hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution at 25 °C. Overall, findings...

  20. Crystal structure of peroxiredoxin from Aeropyrum pernix K1 complexed with its substrate, hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Kado, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Takafumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin (Prx) reduces hydrogen peroxide and alkyl peroxides to water and corresponding alcohols, respectively. The reaction is dependent on a peroxidatic cysteine, whose sulphur atom nucleophilically attacks one of the oxygen atoms of the peroxide substrate. In spite of the many structural studies that have been carried out on this reaction, the tertiary structure of the hydrogen peroxide-bound form of Prx has not been elucidated. In this paper, we report the crystal structure of Prx from Aeropyrum pernix K1 in the peroxide-bound form. The conformation of the polypeptide chain is the same as that in the reduced apo-form. The hydrogen peroxide molecule is in close contact with the peroxidatic Cys50 and the neighbouring Thr47 and Arg126 side chain atoms, as well as with the main chain nitrogen atoms of Val49 and Cys50. Bound peroxide was also observed in the mutant C50S, in which the peroxidatic cysteine was replaced by serine. Therefore, the sulphur atom of the peroxidatic cysteine is not essential for peroxide binding, although it enhances the binding affinity. Hydrogen peroxide binds to the protein so that it fills the active site pocket. This study provides insight into the early stage of the Prx reaction.

  1. Effect of oxygen impurity on the efficiency of the formation of complexes with H-bond and aggregation of color centers in lithium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebogin, S. A.; Bryukvina, L. I.; Ivanov, N. A.; Glazunov, D. S.

    2017-06-01

    The effect of impurities on the efficiency of the formation of color centers and hydrogen-bonded molecular complexes upon exposure to various radiations in lithium fluoride crystals grown in air is studied. The results of experiments for measuring optical properties, IR vibrational spectra, luminescence, and thermally stimulated luminescence are presented. The fact that the band in the range of 1800-2300 cm-1 corresponds to stretching vibrations of a complex with strong hydrogen bond is proved based on the Fermi-resonance perturbation in the region of 2080 cm-1, shaped as the Evans hole and bands A, B, and C. It is shown that the composition of these complexes includes an OH- ion and an HF molecule. The crucial role of O2‒ V a + oxygen dipoles in the aggregation efficiency and gradient distribution of color centers and radiation resistance of hydroxyl ions is revealed. It is shown that products of radiation decomposition of OH- ions stimulate, while decay of O2‒ V a + dipoles suppress, the formation of positively charged color centers.

  2. Formation and annihilation of E4 centers in ZnO: Influence of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupfer, A.; Bhoodoo, C.; Vines, L.; Svensson, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrothermally grown n-type ZnO bulk samples have been implanted with protons and deuterium ions to fluences in the range of 8 × 1010 to 8 × 1011 cm-2. The implantations were performed at the temperature of 285 K, and the samples were then analyzed in-situ by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) using a setup connected to the implanter beam line. The concentration of the so-called E4 center, having an apparent energy level at ˜0.57 eV below the conduction edge, is found to increase linearly with the ion fluence and the generation rate is proportional to the elastic energy deposition, as expected for a primary defect. Isothermal annealing of the E4 center at temperatures between 290 and 315 K reveals first-order kinetics with the activation energy of ˜0.6 eV. The annealing rate is strongly enhanced with increasing hydrogen fluence, and a model invoking migration of interstitial hydrogen and subsequent reaction with E4 exhibits close agreement with the experimental data. The rate of electron capture by E4 during the DLTS filling pulse depends on temperature, and it displays a thermal barrier of ˜0.15 eV. Most of these experimental results for E4 conform to the theoretically predicted properties of the oxygen vacancy (VO) and a tentative assignment of E4 to VO is made, corroborating previous suggestions in the literature. In particular, the 0.57 eV level is ascribed to the double donor state of VO.

  3. Formation and annihilation of E4 centers in ZnO: Influence of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer, A.; Bhoodoo, C.; Vines, L.; Svensson, B. G. [Physics Department/Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048, Blindern, Oslo N-0316 (Norway)

    2016-05-14

    Hydrothermally grown n-type ZnO bulk samples have been implanted with protons and deuterium ions to fluences in the range of 8 × 10{sup 10} to 8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. The implantations were performed at the temperature of 285 K, and the samples were then analyzed in-situ by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) using a setup connected to the implanter beam line. The concentration of the so-called E4 center, having an apparent energy level at ∼0.57 eV below the conduction edge, is found to increase linearly with the ion fluence and the generation rate is proportional to the elastic energy deposition, as expected for a primary defect. Isothermal annealing of the E4 center at temperatures between 290 and 315 K reveals first-order kinetics with the activation energy of ∼0.6 eV. The annealing rate is strongly enhanced with increasing hydrogen fluence, and a model invoking migration of interstitial hydrogen and subsequent reaction with E4 exhibits close agreement with the experimental data. The rate of electron capture by E4 during the DLTS filling pulse depends on temperature, and it displays a thermal barrier of ∼0.15 eV. Most of these experimental results for E4 conform to the theoretically predicted properties of the oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}) and a tentative assignment of E4 to V{sub O} is made, corroborating previous suggestions in the literature. In particular, the 0.57 eV level is ascribed to the double donor state of V{sub O}.

  4. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-01

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  5. A theoretical study of hydrogen complexes of the XH-pi type between propyne and HF, HCL or HCN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Alessandra M; da Silva, Washington L V; Lopes, Kelson C; Ventura, Elizete; Araújo, Regiane C M U; do Monte, Silmar A; da Silva, João Bosco P; Ramos, Mozart N

    2006-05-15

    The present manuscript reports a systematic investigation of the basis set dependence of some properties of hydrogen-bonded (pi type) complexes formed by propyne and a HX molecule, where X=F, Cl and CN. The calculations have been performed at Hartree-Fock, MP2 and B3LYP levels. Geometries, H-bond energies and vibrational have been considered. The more pronounced effects on the structural parameters of the isolated molecules, as a result of complexation, are verified on RCtriple bondC and HX bond lengths. As compared to double-zeta (6-31G**), triple-zeta (6-311G**) basis set leads to an increase of RCtriple bondC bond distance, at all three computational levels. In the case where diffuse functions are added to both hydrogen and 'heavy' atoms, the effect is more pronounced. The propyne-HX structural parameters are quite similar to the corresponding parameters of acetylene-HX complexes, at all levels. The largest difference is obtained for hydrogen bond distance, RH, with a smaller value for propyne-HX complex, indicating a stronger bond. Concerning the electronic properties, the results yield the following ordering for H-bond energies, DeltaE: propynecdots, three dots, centeredHF>propynecdots, three dots, centeredHCl>propynecdots, three dots, centeredHCN. It is also important to point out that the inclusion of BSSE and zero-point energies (ZPE) corrections cause significant changes on DeltaE. The smaller effect of ZPE is obtained for propynecdots, three dots, centeredHCN at HF/6-311++G** level, while the greatest difference is obtained at MP2/6-31G** level for propynecdots, three dots, centeredHF system. Concerning the IR vibrational it was obtained that larger shift can be associated with stronger hydrogen bonds. The more pronounced effect on the normal modes of the isolated molecule after the complexation is obtained for HX stretching frequency, which is shifted downward.

  6. Effects of high-dose hydrogen implantation on defect formation and dopant diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaqoob, Faisal [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States); Huang, Mengbing, E-mail: mhuang@sunypoly.edu [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    This work reports on the effects of a deep high-dose hydrogen ion implant on damage accumulation, defect retention, and silver diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals. Single-crystal ZnO samples were implanted with Ag ions in a region ∼150 nm within the surface, and some of these samples were additionally implanted with hydrogen ions to a dose of 2 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}, close to the depth ∼250 nm. Rutherford backscattering/ion channeling measurements show that crystal damage caused by Ag ion implantation and the amount of defects retained in the near surface region following post-implantation annealing were found to diminish in the case with the H implantation. On the other hand, the additional H ion implantation resulted in a reduction of substitutional Ag atoms upon post-implantation annealing. Furthermore, the presence of H also modified the diffusion properties of Ag atoms in ZnO. We discuss these findings in the context of the effects of nano-cavities on formation and annihilation of point defects as well as on impurity diffusion and trapping in ZnO crystals.

  7. Dynamics of nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation: analytical results from population balance equations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faryad Darabi Sahneh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation involves absorption of protein molecules onto nanoparticle surfaces in a physiological environment. Understanding the corona formation process is crucial in predicting nanoparticle behavior in biological systems, including applications of nanotoxicology and development of nano drug delivery platforms. METHOD: This paper extends the modeling work in to derive a mathematical model describing the dynamics of nanoparticle corona complex formation from population balance equations. We apply nonlinear dynamics techniques to derive analytical results for the composition of nanoparticle-protein corona complex, and validate our results through numerical simulations. RESULTS: The model presented in this paper exhibits two phases of corona complex dynamics. In the first phase, proteins rapidly bind to the free surface of nanoparticles, leading to a metastable composition. During the second phase, continuous association and dissociation of protein molecules with nanoparticles slowly changes the composition of the corona complex. Given sufficient time, composition of the corona complex reaches an equilibrium state of stable composition. We find analytical approximate formulae for metastable and stable compositions of corona complex. Our formulae are very well-structured to clearly identify important parameters determining corona composition. CONCLUSION: The dynamics of biocorona formation constitute vital aspect of interactions between nanoparticles and living organisms. Our results further understanding of these dynamics through quantitation of experimental conditions, modeling results for in vitro systems to better predict behavior for in vivo systems. One potential application would involve a single cell culture medium related to a complex protein medium, such as blood or tissue fluid.

  8. Predicted effects of mineral neutralization and bisulfate formation on hydrogen ion concentration for dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Todd A; Wyman, Charles E

    2004-01-01

    Dilute acid and water-only hemicellulose hydrolysis are being examined as part of a multiinstitutional cooperative effort to evaluate the performance of leading cellulosic biomass pretreatment technologies on a common basis. Cellulosic biomass, such as agricultural residues and forest wastes, can have a significant mineral content. It has been shown that these minerals neutralize some of the acid during dilute acid pretreatment, reducing its effectiveness, and the higher solids loadings desired to minimize costs will require increased acid use to compensate. However, for sulfuric acid in particular, an equilibrium shift to formation of bisulfate during neutralization can further reduce hydrogen ion concentrations and compound the effect of neutralization. Because the equilibrium shift has a more pronounced effect at lower acid concentrations, additional acid is needed to compensate. Coupled with the effect of temperature on acid dissociation, these effects increase acid requirements to achieve a particular reaction rate unless minerals are removed prior to hydrolysis.

  9. Formation of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in rat skeletal muscle cells during contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silveira, Leonardo R.; Pereira-Da-Silva, Lucia; Juel, Carsten

    2003-01-01

    We examined intra- and extracellular H(2)O(2) and NO formation during contractions in primary rat skeletal muscle cell culture. The fluorescent probes DCFH-DA/DCFH (2,7-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate/2,7-dichlorofluorescein) and DAF-2-DA/DAF-2 (4,5-diaminofluorescein-diacetate/4,5-diaminofluoresce...

  10. Enantioselective formation of a dynamic hydrogen-bonded assembly based on the chiral memory concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ish-i Tsutomu, T.I.; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Timmerman, P.; Reinhoudt, David; Shinkai, Seiji

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we report the enantioselective formation of a dynamic noncovalent double rosette assembly 1a3·(CYA)6 composed of three 2-pyridylcalix[4]arene dimelamines (1a) and six butylcyanuric acid molecules (BuCYA). The six 2-pyridyl functionalities of the assembly interact stereoselectively

  11. Cation-induced formation of a macro-glucan synthase complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmer, D.; Solomon, M.; Andrawis, A.; Amor, Y. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel))

    1990-05-01

    Incubation of Chaps or digitonin-solubilized membrane proteins from cotton fiber with Ca{sup 2+} in combination with Mg{sup 2+}, leads to formation of a complex which can be sedimented within 15 min at 15,000 g. The complex is enriched >10-fold in callose synthase activity and possesses a characteristic pattern of enriched polypeptides when analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Although cation dependent, formation of the complex is not dependent upon the presence of the callose synthase substrate, UDP-glc, indicating that complex formation is not due to entrapment of the enzyme by association with glucan product. The enriched polypeptides include: >200, 50, and 46 kD, all of which have been shown by direct photo-labeling to interact with {sup 92}P-UDP-glc in a Ca{sup 2+} or beta-glucoside dependent reaction are considered likely subunits of callose synthase; a 60-62 kD doublet which is recognized by our MAb 2-1 which can form an immune complex with callose synthase; 74 and 34 kD polypeptides which also interact with UDP-glc, but do not associate with callose synthase in the presence of EDTA. A similar phenomenon is also observed with solubilized membrane proteins from mung beans. Possible functions of each of the enriched polypeptides, the catalytic properties, and ultra-structure of this macro-glucan synthase complex are currently under investigation.

  12. On the Formation of Interstellar Water Ice: Constraints from a Search for Hydrogen Peroxide Ice in Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. G.; Charnely, S. B.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Wright, C. M.; Maldoni, M. M.; Robinson, G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), for the production of water (H2O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H2O2 ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H2O2 should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H2O2/H2O ice films between 2.5 and 200 micron, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H2O2 ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H2O2 ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H2O2 ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 micron. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H2O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H2O2 ice. In the absence of definite H2O2 features, the H2O2 abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 micron found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 micron H2O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H2O2, as a percentage of H2O, of 9% +/- 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

  13. Merging Iron Catalysis and Biocatalysis-Iron Carbonyl Complexes as Efficient Hydrogen Autotransfer Catalysts in Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions

    KAUST Repository

    El-Sepelgy, Osama

    2016-09-29

    A dual catalytic iron/lipase system has been developed and applied in the dynamic kinetic resolution of benzylic and aliphatic secondary alcohols. A detailed study of the Knölker-type iron complexes demonstrated the hydrogen autotransfer of alcohols to proceed under mild reaction conditions and allowed the combination with the enzymatic resolution. Different racemic alcohols were efficiently converted to chiral acetates in good yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  14. Subtle differences in the hydrogen bonding of alcohol to divalent oxygen and sulfur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Lin; Tang, Shanshan; Hansen, Anne Schou

    2017-01-01

    complexes are more stable and form stronger hydrogen bonds compared to complexes with MeOH and EtOH, which are comparable, and only for the stronger hydrogen bond donor (TFE) are the small differences in acceptor molecules highlighted. The equilibrium constant for complex formation was determined from...

  15. Trans-complex formation by proteolipid channels in the terminal phase of membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, C; Bayer, M J; Bühler, S

    2001-01-01

    -complex formation occurs downstream from trans-SNARE pairing, and depends on both the Rab-GTPase Ypt7 and calmodulin. The maintenance of existing complexes and completion of fusion are independent of trans-SNARE pairs. Reconstituted proteolipids form sealed channels, which can expand to form aqueous pores in a Ca2......+/calmodulin-dependent fashion. V0 trans-complexes may therefore form a continuous, proteolipid-lined channel at the fusion site. We propose that radial expansion of such a protein pore may be a mechanism for intracellular membrane fusion....

  16. Ground state isomerism in betacarboline hydrogen bond complexes: The charge transfer nature of its large Stokes shifted emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Coronilla, Antonio; Balón, Manuel; Muñoz, María A.; Hidalgo, José; Carmona, Carmen

    2008-07-01

    The hydrogen bonding and excited state proton transfer reactions between betacarboline, 9 H-pyrido[3,4- b]indole, BC, and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoropropan-2-ol, HFIP, have been studied in the aprotic solvents cyclohexane and toluene by absorption, steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements. On the basis of these results and those of previous works (Refs. [A. Sánchez-Coronilla, C. Carmona, M.A. Muñoz, M. Balón, Chem. Phys., 327 (2006) 70] and [A. Sánchez-Coronilla, M. Balón, M.A. Muñoz, C. Carmona, Chem. Phys. 344 (2008) 72]) two main fundamental conclusions can be drawn on the photophysical behaviour of BC. Thus, it is shown, for the first time, that the non-cyclic double hydrogen bond complexes formed through both nitrogen atoms of BC, DHB, can suffer, in their ground state, an isomerisation process. These adducts acquire a quinoid structure in cyclohexane, but maintain a dipolar zwitterionic structure in toluene. Moreover, it is concluded that the observed large Stokes shifted emission, around 520 nm, is not due, as it has been so far generally accepted, to the emission of a BC zwitterionic phototautomer, but to the intramolecular charge transfer, ICT, excited state emissions of the DHB hydrogen bond adducts.

  17. PKCa and HMGB1 antagonistically control hydrogen peroxide-induced poly-ADP-ribose formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson Anneli; Bluwstein Andrej; Kumar Nitin; Teloni Federico; Traenkle Jens; Baudis Michael; Altmeyer Matthias; Hottiger Michael O

    2016-01-01

    Harmful oxidation of proteins lipids and nucleic acids is observed when reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced excessively and/or the antioxidant capacity is reduced causing 'oxidative stress'. Nuclear poly ADP ribose (PAR) formation is thought to be induced in response to oxidative DNA damage and to promote cell death under sustained oxidative stress conditions. However what exactly triggers PAR induction in response to oxidative stress is incompletely understood. Using reverse phase pro...

  18. Say again? How complexity and format of air traffic control instructions affect pilot recall

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This study compared the recall of ATC information presented in cither grouped or sequential format : in a part-task simulation. It also tested the effect of complexity of ATC clearances on recall, that is, : how many pieces of information a single tr...

  19. Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ multispecies complexes formation on the Khortitsa Island (Zaporizhzhya province)

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorchenko, D.; Brygadyrenko, V.

    2008-01-01

    Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ complexes formation under conditions of the Khortitsa National Reserve (Zaporizhzhya province) are studied. The dispersion of taxonomic groups of different levels (families and species) in litter mesofauna is swayed by the inter- and intrasystem factors; the largest influence has the power of litter and its humidity. The rate of ecological factors’ influence at different taxonomic levels may diverge.

  20. Copper(II) complex as a precursor for formation of cyano-bridged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chemsci

    Copper(II) complex as a precursor for formation of cyano-bridged pentanuclear Fe. III. -Cu. II bimetallic assembly: Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and antibacterial ... Single-crystal X-ray analysis indicated that 2 crystallized in the monoclinic system with ..... maximum absorption band at 431nm was assigned to.

  1. Thermodynamic characteristics of the formation of complexes of nickel(II) with L-homoserine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridchin, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    The formation of complexes of nickel(II) with L-homoserine at 298.15 K and ionic strengths I = 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 (KNO3) are investigated by potentiometry and calorimetry. Standard characteristics of studied equilibria (log K°, Δr G°, Δr H°, and Δr S°) are determined.

  2. Copper (II) complex as a precursor for formation of cyano-bridged ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Copper(II) complex as a precursor for formation of cyano-bridged pentanuclear FeIII-CuII bimetallic assembly: Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and ... ATCC 27853 strains were studied and compared with standard drugs, which showed moderate antibacterial activity compared with Penicillin and Gentamicin.

  3. The Vtc proteins in vacuole fusion: coupling NSF activity to V(0) trans-complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Oliver; Bayer, Martin J; Peters, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    The fusion of cellular membranes comprises several steps; membrane attachment requires priming of SNAREs and tethering factors by Sec18p/NSF (N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor) and LMA1. This leads to trans-SNARE pairing, i.e. formation of SNARE complexes between apposed membranes. The yeast...

  4. Mixed-ligand complex formation equilibria of Cu with biguanide in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    metric EDTA titration methods.23 Equilibrium study for the determination of proton-ligand and metal- ligand complex formation constants involved pH- metric titrations of series of solutions, each of initial volume 0⋅025 dm–3, containing known amounts. (0⋅001–0⋅002 mol dm–3) of the ligands, biguanide and/or glycine in ...

  5. Proton transfer and complex formation of angiotensin I ions with gaseous molecules at various temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonose, Shinji, E-mail: nonose@yokohama-cu.ac.jp; Yamashita, Kazuki; Sudo, Ayako; Kawashima, Minami

    2013-09-23

    Highlights: • Proton transfer from angiotensin I ions (z = 2, 3) to gaseous molecules was studied. • Temperature dependence of absolute reaction rate constants was measured. • Remarkable changes were obtained for distribution of product ions and reaction rate constants. • Proton transfer reaction was enhanced and reduced by complex formation. • Conformation changes are induced by complex formation and or by thermal collision with He. - Abstract: Proton transfer reactions of angiotensin I ions for +2 charge state, [M + 2H]{sup 2+}, to primary, secondary and aromatic amines were examined in the gas phase. Absolute reaction rate constants for proton transfer were determined from intensities of parent and product ions in the mass spectra. Temperature dependence of the reaction rate constants was measured. Remarkable change was observed for distribution of product ions and reaction rate constants. Proton transfer reaction was enhanced or reduced by complex formation of [M + 2H]{sup 2+} with gaseous molecules. The results relate to conformation changes of [M + 2H]{sup 2+} with change of temperature, which are induced by complex formation and or by thermal collision with He. Proton transfer reactions of angiotensin I ions for +3 charge state, [M + 3H]{sup 3+}, were also studied. The reaction rates did not depend on temperature so definitely.

  6. On the complex formation approach in modeling predator prey relations, mating, and sexual disease transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst R. Thieme

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Complex formation is used as a unified approach to derive representations and approximations of the functional response in predator prey relations, mating, and sexual disease transmission. Applications are given to the impact of a generalist predator on a prey population and the spread of a sexually transmitted disease in a multi-group heterosexual population.

  7. Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation and Hydrogen Production in the Ketonization of Aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Lina M; Renz, Michael; Corma, Avelino

    2016-09-08

    Aldehydes possess relatively high chemical energy, which is the driving force for disproportionation reactions such as Cannizzaro and Tishchenko reactions. Generally, this energy is wasted if aldehydes are transformed into carboxylic acids with a sacrificial oxidant. Here, we describe a cascade reaction in which the surplus energy of the transformation is liberated as molecular hydrogen for the oxidation of heptanal to heptanoic acid by water, and the carboxylic acid is transformed into potentially industrially relevant symmetrical ketones by ketonic decarboxylation. The cascade reaction is catalyzed by monoclinic zirconium oxide (m-ZrO2 ). The reaction mechanism has been studied through cross-coupling experiments between different aldehydes and acids, and the final symmetrical ketones are formed by a reaction pathway that involves the previously formed carboxylic acids. Isotopic studies indicate that the carboxylic acid can be formed by a hydride shift from the adsorbed aldehyde on the metal oxide surface in the absence of noble metals. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Sunlight-Driven Hydrogen Formation by Membrane-Supported Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nathan S. [California Institute of Technology

    2014-03-26

    This report describes the significant advances in the development of the polymer-supported photoelectrochemical water-splitting system that was proposed under DOE grant number DE-FG02-05ER15754. We developed Si microwire-array photoelectrodes, demonstrated control over the material and light-absorption properties of the microwire-array photoelectrodes, developed inexpensive processes for synthesizing the arrays, and doped the arrays p-type for use as photocathodes. We also developed techniques for depositing metal-nanoparticle catalysts of the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) on the wire arrays, investigated the stability and catalytic performance of the nanoparticles, and demonstrated that Ni-Mo alloys are promising earth-abundant catalysts of the HER. We also developed methods that allow reuse of the single-crystalline Si substrates used for microwire growth and methods of embedding the microwire photocathodes in plastic to enable large-scale processing and deployment of the technology. Furthermore we developed techniques for controlling the structure of WO3 films, and demonstrated that structural control can improve the quantum yield of photoanodes. Thus, by the conclusion of this project, we demonstrated significant advances in the development of all components of a sunlight-driven membrane-supported photoelectrochemical water-splitting system. This final report provides descriptions of some of the scientific accomplishments that were achieved under the support of this project and also provides references to the peer-reviewed publications that resulted from this effort.

  9. Formation of highly toxic hydrogen cyanide upon ruby laser irradiation of the tattoo pigment phthalocyanine blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Laux, Peter; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Since laser treatment of tattoos is the favored method for the removing of no longer wanted permanent skin paintings, analytical, biokinetics and toxicological data on the fragmentation pattern of commonly used pigments are urgently required for health safety reasons. Applying dynamic headspace—gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (DHS—GC/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC—ToF-MS), we identified 1,2-benzene dicarbonitrile, benzonitrile, benzene, and the poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN) as main fragmentation products emerging dose-dependently upon ruby laser irradiation of the popular blue pigment copper phthalocyanine in suspension. Skin cell viability was found to be significantly compromised at cyanide levels of ≥1 mM liberated during ruby laser irradiation of >1.5 mg/ml phthalocyanine blue. Further, for the first time we introduce pyrolysis-GC/MS as method suitable to simulate pigment fragmentation that may occur spontaneously or during laser removal of organic pigments in the living skin of tattooed people. According to the literature such regular tattoos hold up to 9 mg pigment/cm2 skin.

  10. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R., E-mail: elena.koresheva@gmail.com; Krokhin, O. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Osipov, I. E. [Power Efficiency Centre, Inter RAO UES (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  11. Complex formation of Np(V) with fulvic acid at tracer metal concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, K. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Sasaki, T. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2013-03-01

    Apparent formation constants of pentavalent Np with fulvic acid (FA) were determined in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4}, at 25 C using a solvent extraction technique with thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) and phenanthroline (phen) in an isoamyl alcohol solution. The metal concentration was set constant to a tracer level of 10{sup -15} M Np(V), relevant for the far field safety assessment of a nuclear waste disposal site. The impact of several solution conditions, namely pH, ionic strength, the initial fulvic acid concentration and the presence of Ca{sup 2+}, on the complex formation were studied. Similar to the sodium system, the divalent calcium ion effectively prevents complexation of the neptunyl ion with fulvic acid. Furthermore, the derived apparent formation constants were comparatively discussed with literature values obtained at very similar solution conditions. (orig.)

  12. Terabit bandwidth-adaptive transmission using low-complexity format-transparent digital signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuge, Qunbi; Morsy-Osman, Mohamed; Chagnon, Mathieu; Xu, Xian; Qiu, Meng; Plant, David V

    2014-02-10

    In this paper, we propose a low-complexity format-transparent digital signal processing (DSP) scheme for next generation flexible and energy-efficient transceiver. It employs QPSK symbols as the training and pilot symbols for the initialization and tracking stage of the receiver-side DSP, respectively, for various modulation formats. The performance is numerically and experimentally evaluated in a dual polarization (DP) 11 Gbaud 64QAM system. Employing the proposed DSP scheme, we conduct a system-level study of Tb/s bandwidth-adaptive superchannel transmissions with flexible modulation formats including QPSK, 8QAM and 16QAM. The spectrum bandwidth allocation is realized in the digital domain instead of turning on/off sub-channels, which improves the performance of higher order QAM. Various transmission distances ranging from 240 km to 6240 km are demonstrated with a colorless detection for hardware complexity reduction.

  13. High-Frequency Promoter Firing Links THO Complex Function to Heavy Chromatin Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouaikel, John; Causse, Sébastien Z; Rougemaille, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    The THO complex is involved in transcription, genome stability, and messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) formation, but its precise molecular function remains enigmatic. Under heat shock conditions, THO mutants accumulate large protein-DNA complexes that alter the chromatin density of target genes...... (heavy chromatin), defining a specific biochemical facet of THO function and a powerful tool of analysis. Here, we show that heavy chromatin distribution is dictated by gene boundaries and that the gene promoter is necessary and sufficient to convey THO sensitivity in these conditions. Single......-molecule fluorescence insitu hybridization measurements show that heavy chromatin formation correlates with an unusually high firing pace of the promoter with more than 20 transcription events per minute. Heavy chromatin formation closely follows the modulation of promoter firing and strongly correlates with polymerase...

  14. Photolysis of (cyclopentadienyl)- and (Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)tricarbonylhydridometal complexes of tungsten and molybdenum in dihydrogen-containing matrices: evidence of adducts of molecular hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweany, R.L.

    1986-10-29

    When HMCp(CO)/sub 3/ and HMPc'(CO)/sub 3/ (M = Mo and W; Cp = eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/H/sub 5/; and Cp' = eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/) are photolyzed with a low-pressure mercury lamp in dihydrogen-containing matrices, new bands appear in the carbonyl region of the infrared spectrum which are assignable to simple adducts of molecular hydrogen. These bands have been assigned to cisoid and transoid isomers of HM(H/sub 2/)Cp(CO)/sub 2/ and HM(H/sub 2/)Cp'(CO)/sub 2/. The molybdenum complexes can be shown to form from HMoCp(CO)/sub 2/ or HMoCp'(CO)/sub 2/ with radiation of ..gamma.. > 400 nm. The dihydrogen complex is destroyed by using radiation of ..gamma.. < 400 nm. The principal product of this latter process is HMoCp(CO)/sub 2/ or MoCp'(CO)/sub 2/. Thus, all the steps leading to the formation of the adducts from the parent HMoCp(CO)/sub 2/ are reversible. The tungsten dihydrogen adducts form from HWCp(CO)/sub 3/ in an analogous fashion via the intermediacy of HWCp(CO)/sub 2/. However, the two isomers of HW(H/sub 2/)Cp(CO)/sub 2/ do not form HWCp(CO)/sub 2/ upon subsequent photolysis. Rather, a new species is formed which gives spectral data consistent with H/sub 3/WCpCO, in which the hydrogen is oxidatively added.

  15. Recrystallized Impact Glasses of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex, Sudbury Structure, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, B. O.; Weiser, T.; Brockmeyer, P.

    1996-01-01

    The origin of the Sudbury Structure and of the associated heterolithic breccias of the Onaping Formation and the Sudbury Igneous Complex have been controversial. While an impact origin of the structure has gained wide acceptance over the last 15 years, the origin of the recrystallized Onaping Formation glasses and of the igneous complex is still being debated. Recently the interpretation of the breccias of the Onaping Formation as suevitic fall-back impact breccias has been challenged. The igneous complex is interpreted either as a differentiated impact melt sheet or as a combination of an upper impact melt represented by the granophyre, and a lower, impact-triggered magmatic body consisting of the norite-sublayer formations. The Onaping Formation contains glasses as fluidal and nonfluidal fragments of various shapes and sizes. They are recrystallized, and our research indicates that they are petrographically heterogeneous and span a wide range of chemical compositions. These characteristics are not known from glasses of volcanic deposits. This suggests an origin by shock vitrification, an interpretation consistent with their association with numerous and varied country rock clasts that exhibit microscopic shock metamorphic features. The recrystallized glass fragments represent individual solid-state and liquid-state vitrified rocks or relatively small melt pods. The basal member lies beneath the Gray and Black members of the Onaping Formation and, where not metamorphic, has an igneous matrix. Igneous-textured melt bodies occur in the upper two members and above the Basal Member. A comparison of the chemical compositions of recrystallized glasses and of the matrices of the Basal Member and the melt bodies with the components and the bulk composition of the igneous complex is inconclusive as to the origin of the igneous complex. Basal Member matrix and Melt Bodies, on average, are chemically similar to the granophyre of the Sudbury Igneous Complex, suggesting that

  16. Formation of hydrogen-bonded chains through inter- and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds by 5,5'-dinitro-2,2'-biphenol with a strong base of guanidine-like character and triethylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, Grzegorz; Brzezinski, Bogumil

    2002-04-01

    The complexes of 5,5'-dinitro-2,2'-biphenol (DNBPh) with 7-methyl-1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene (MTBD) and triethylamine (TEA) were studied by FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. In chloroform and in acetonitrile a proton transfer from DNBPh to N-bases (MTBD, TEA) occurs. In chloroform solution the protonated N-base molecules are hydrogen-bonded to the deprotonated DNBPh molecules whereas in acetonitrile the complexes dissociate and hence protonated N-base molecules and hydrogen-bonded chains formed between DNBPh and 5,5'-dinitro-2,2'-biphenolate are present. The intra- as well as inter-molecular hydrogen bonds within the chains show large proton polarizability.

  17. Energy conservation by oxidation of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen via a sodium ion current in a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae Kyu; Mayer, Florian; Kang, Sung Gyun; Müller, Volker

    2014-08-05

    Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 is known to grow by the anaerobic oxidation of formate to CO2 and H2, a reaction that operates near thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we demonstrate that this reaction is coupled to ATP synthesis by a transmembrane ion current. Formate oxidation leads to H(+) translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane that then drives Na(+) translocation. The ion-translocating electron transfer system is rather simple, consisting of only a formate dehydrogenase module, a membrane-bound hydrogenase module, and a multisubunit Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module. The electrochemical Na(+) gradient established then drives ATP synthesis. These data give a mechanistic explanation for chemiosmotic energy conservation coupled to formate oxidation to CO2 and H2. Because it is discussed that the membrane-bound hydrogenase with the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter module are ancestors of complex I of mitochondrial and bacterial electron transport these data also shed light on the evolution of ion transport in complex I-like electron transport chains.

  18. Complexes of dextran sulfate and anthocyanins from Vaccinium myrtillus: Formation and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimaviciute, Rima; Navikaite, Vesta; Jakstas, Valdas; Ivanauskas, Liudas

    2015-09-20

    To improve the stability and antioxidant activity of anthocyanins (ATC), complexes of dextran sulfate (DESU) and ATC extracted from Vaccinium myrtillus were formed during electrostatic interaction between sulfo groups of DESU and cationic moieties of ATC. At the optimal weight ratio DESU/ATC=0.4 g/g, the amount of ATC introduced into a complex depended on the total concentration of the reagents. About 1.7 g of ATC per g of DESU could be incorporated into a complex. The formation of DESU/ATC complexes was confirmed by HPLC and FT-IR spectroscopy. According to HPLC analysis, the amount of individual ATC incorporated into a complex varied from 73.7% in the case of malvidin-3-O-glucoside to 90.8% in the case of delphinidin-3-arabinoside. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stability of furosemide polymorphs and the effects of complex formation with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnero, Claudia; Chattah, Ana Karina; Longhi, Marcela

    2016-11-05

    The effect of the formation of supramolecular binary complexes with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin on the chemical and physical stability of the polymorphs I and II of furosemide was evaluated in solid state. The solid samples were placed under accelerated storage conditions and exposed to daylight into a stability chamber for a 6-month. Chemical stability was monitored by high performance liquid chromatography, while the physical stability was studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the physical appearance of the samples were evaluated. The studies showed a significant stabilizing effect of β-cyclodextrin on furosemide form II. Our results suggest that the complex formation is a useful tool for improving the stability of furosemide polymorphs. These new complexes are promising candidates that can be used in the pharmaceutical industry for the preparation of alternative matrices that improve physicochemical properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Controlling the Formation of Ionic-Liquid-based Aqueous Biphasic Systems by Changing the Hydrogen Bonding Ability of Polyethylene Glycol End Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jorge F. B.; Kurnia, Kiki A.; Freire, Mara G.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Rogers, Robin D.

    2017-01-01

    The formation of aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) when mixing aqueous solutions of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and an ionic liquid (IL) can be controlled by modification of the hydrogen bond ability of the polymer’s end groups. It is shown that the miscibility/immiscibility on these systems stems from both the solvation of the ether groups in the oxygen chain and the ability of the PEG terminal groups to preferably hydrogen bond with water or the salt anion. The reduction of even one hydrogen bond in PEG can noticeably affect the phase behavior, especially in those regions of the phase diagram where all the ethylene oxide (EO) units of the polymeric chain are completely solvated. In this region, removing or weakening the hydrogen bond donating ability of PEG results in greater immiscibility, i.e., in a higher ability to form ABS, as a result of the much weaker interactions between the IL anion and the PEG end groups. PMID:25943332

  1. Lethal synergism between organic and inorganic wood preservatives via formation of an unusual lipophilic ternary complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo; Li, Yan; Fan, Rui-Mei; Chao, Xi-Juan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu, Ben-Zhan, E-mail: bzhu@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    We have shown previously that exposing bacteria to wood preservatives pentachlorophenol (PCP) and copper-containing compounds together causes synergistic toxicity. However, it is not clear whether these findings also hold true in mammalian cells; and if so, what is the underlying molecular mechanism? Here we show that PCP and a model copper complex bis-(1,10-phenanthroline) cupric (Cu(OP){sub 2}), could also induce synergistic cytotoxicity in human liver cells. By the single crystal X-ray diffraction and atomic absorption spectroscopy assay, the synergism was found to be mainly due to the formation of a lipophilic ternary complex with unusual structural and composition characteristics and subsequent enhanced cellular copper uptake, which markedly promoted cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing pro-apoptotic protein expression, releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria and activating caspase-3, and -9. Analogous results were observed with other polychlorinated phenols (PCPs) and Cu(OP){sub 2}. Synergistic cytotoxicity could be induced by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} via formation of an unusual lipophilic complex in HepG2 cells. The formation of ternary complexes with similar lipophilic character could be of relevance as a general mechanism of toxicity, which should be taken into consideration especially when evaluating the toxicity of environmental pollutants found at currently-considered non- or sub-toxic concentrations. -- Highlights: ► The combination of PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces synergistic cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. ► The synergism is mainly due to forming a lipophilic ternary complex between them. ► The formation of lipophilic ternary complex enhances cellular copper uptake. ► PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} stimulates the cellular ROS production. ► The ROS promoted by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  2. Measurement of muon transfer from proton to triton and {ital pp}{mu} molecular formation in solid hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulhauser, F.; Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (CANADA); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology, Chester (England); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. [University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8W 2Y2 (CANADA); Fujiwara, M.C. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A6 (CANADA); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota 56082 (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National University, Jeonju City 560-756, South (Korea); Kunselman, A.R. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States); Markushin, V.E. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow 123182 (Russia); Martoff, C.J. [Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-05-01

    An alternate approach was used to study the reactions of muonic atoms and molecules in solid layers of hydrogen isotopes. Muons stopped in a protium layer with a small admixture of tritium producing {mu}{ital p} atoms. Muon transfer from a proton to a triton generated {mu}{ital t} atoms, which were emitted into a deuterium layer. Subsequent epithermal {ital dt}{mu} molecular formation followed by {ital dt} fusion gave a prompt signal for the {mu}{ital t} emission. Fusion time spectra at various tritium concentrations were measured by detecting neutrons and {alpha} particles and the {mu}{ital p} disappearance rates were determined. The rates of {mu}{ital p}{r_arrow}{mu}{ital t} transfer and {ital pp}{mu} formation were measured to be {lambda}{sub {ital pt}}=[5.86{plus_minus}(0.10){sub {ital stat}}{plus_minus}(0.15){sub {ital syst}}({sub {minus}0}{sup +0.30}){sub {ital model}}]{times}10{sup 9} s{sup {minus}1} and {lambda}{sub {ital pp}}{sub {mu}}=[3.21 {plus_minus}(0.10){sub {ital stat}}{plus_minus}(0.14){sub {ital syst}}({sub {minus}0.06}{sup +0}){sub {ital model}(}]{times}10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Comparisons are made with the most recent theoretical values. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Hydrogen transfer in the formation and destruction of retrograde products in coal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillen, D.F.; Malhotra, R. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2006-06-01

    The conversion of coals to volatiles or liquids during pyrolysis and liquefaction is notoriously limited by the formation of retrograde products. Analysis of literature data for coals with grafted structures and for polymeric coal models demonstrates that the formation of volatile products from these materials does not correlate primarily with the weakness of the original bonding but correlates with the facility for retrogressive reaction. This analysis suggests further that simple recombination of resonance-stabilized radicals does not tend to yield true retrograde products, except in the case of aryloxy radicals. For pure hydrocarbon structural elements, radical addition to aromatic systems appears to be a key class of retrograde reactions, where the key factor is the kinetics of radical or H-atom loss from a cyclohexadienyl intermediate. We have used a mechanistic numerical model with a detailed set of radical reactions and thermochemically based kinetic parameters operating on a limited set of hydrocarbon structures to delineate important factors in mitigating retrograde processes. This showed that, not only the cleavage of critical bonds in the original coal structures but also the net prevention of retrogression may be due to the H-transfer-induced cleavage of strong bonds.

  4. Introducing a dark reaction to photochemistry: photocatalytic hydrogen from [FeFe] hydrogenase active site model complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomoth, Reiner; Ott, Sascha

    2009-12-07

    The light-driven splitting of water into its constituting elements gives access to a valuable fuel from an abundant substrate, using sunlight as the only energy source. Synthetic diiron complexes as functional models of the [FeFe] hydrogenase H2ase enzyme active site have moved into the centre of focus as potentially viable catalysts for the reductive side of this process, i.e. the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen. The active site of the enzyme, as well as its mimics in an artificial system, are required to accumulate two electrons from single electron transfer events and to combine them with two protons to form hydrogen. Whereas in biology this reaction is not coupled to photosynthesis and thus proceeds in the dark, additional aspects need to be considered when designing a functional artificial system for the light-driven reduction of protons. Suitable photosensitizers have to be chosen that not only provide sufficient driving force for the reduction of the synthetic diiron catalyst, but also allow for selective excitation to minimize photodegradation. Electron transfer efficiencies have to be optimized for all steps and the sequential nature of the catalyst reduction requires a sufficient stability of potentially labile intermediates of the catalytic cycle. In this perspective, systems for the light-driven conversion of protons to molecular hydrogen are discussed where the catalyst is based on model complexes of the [FeFe] H2ase active site. Covalently linked dyads, supramolecular assemblies and multi-component systems will be examined with an emphasis on mechanistic electron transfer schemes, the properties of the individual components, their scope and their potential limitations.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv ESAT-6-CFP-10 complex formation confers thermodynamic and biochemical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Akshaya K; Bal, Naresh Chandra; Chary, Kandala V R; Arora, Ashish

    2006-04-01

    The 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target (ESAT-6) and culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10), expressed from the region of deletion-1 (RD1) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, are known to play a key role in virulence. In this study, we explored the thermodynamic and biochemical changes associated with the formation of the 1 : 1 heterodimeric complex between ESAT-6 and CFP-10. Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we precisely determined the association constant and free energy change for formation of the complex to be 2 x 10(7) M(-1) and -9.95 kcal.mol(-1), respectively. Strikingly, the thermal unfolding of the ESAT-6-CFP-10 heterodimeric complex was completely reversible, with a T(m) of 53.4 degrees C and DeltaH of 69 kcal.mol(-1). Mixing of ESAT-6 and CFP-10 at any temperature below the T(m) of the complex led to induction of helical conformation, suggesting molecular recognition between specific segments of unfolded ESAT-6 and CFP-10. Enhanced biochemical stability of the complex was indicated by protection of ESAT-6 and an N-terminal fragment of CFP-10 from proteolysis with trypsin. However, the flexible C-terminal of CFP-10 in the complex, which has been shown to be responsible for binding to macrophages and monocytes, was cleaved by trypsin. In the presence of phospholipid membranes, ESAT-6, but not CFP-10 and the complex, showed an increase in alpha-helical content and enhanced thermal stability. Overall, complex formation resulted in structural changes, enhanced thermodynamic and biochemical stability, and loss of binding to phospholipid membranes. These features of complex formation probably determine the physiological role of ESAT-6, CFP-10 and/or the complex in vivo. The ITC and thermal unfolding approach described in this study can readily be applied to characterization of the 11 other pairs of ESAT-6 family proteins and for screening ESAT-6 and CFP-10 mutants.

  6. Molecular structure, hydrogen bonding and spectroscopic properties of the complex of piperidine-4-carboxylic acid with chloroacetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasa, A.; Katrusiak, A.; Szafran, M.; Barczyński, P.; Dega-Szafran, Z.

    2008-10-01

    Complex of piperidine-4-carboxylic acid with chloroacetic acid has been studied by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) calculations. In crystal the piperidine ring is protonated and adopts a chair conformation with the COOH group in the equatorial position. The COO - group of chloroacetate unit is engaged in three hydrogen bonds: O(1)-H(1)···O(3) of 2.604(2) Å, N(1)-H(12)···O(3) of 2.753(2) Å and N(1)-H(11)···O(4) of 2.760(2) Å. According to the B3LYP calculations the isolated complexes both in vacuum and H 2O solution have cyclic structures. In vacuum the molecules are connected by two H-bonds: the COOH group of chloroacetic acid is engaged with piperidine-4-carboxylic acid, one with the nitrogen atom, O(4)-H···N(1) of 2.658 Å and the second with carboxyl group, O(1)-H···O(3) of 2.860 Å. In water solution piperidine-4-carboxylic acid is protonated and forms two hydrogen bonds with the chloroacetate unit: N(1)-H···O(4) of 2.690 Å and O(1)-H···O(3) of 2.611 Å. Powder FTIR spectra of the complex and its deuterated analogue are consistent with the X-ray structure. Correlations between the experimental 1H and 13C chemical shifts of the complex investigated and the GIAO/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) calculated magnetic isotropic shielding tensors ( σcalc) in vacuum and within the conductor-like screening continuum solvation model (COSMO) in H 2O, δexp = a + b σcalc, are reported.

  7. The effects of hydrogen addition on Fenimore NO formation in low-pressure, fuel-rich-premixed, burner-stabilized CH4/O-2/N-2 flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepman, A. V.; van Essen, V. M.; Mokhov, A. V.; Levinsky, H. B.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effects of hydrogen addition on Fenimore NO formation in fuel-rich, low-pressure burner-stabilized CH4/O-2/N-2 flames. Towards this end, axial profiles of temperature and mole fractions of CH and NO are measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The experiments are performed

  8. The effects of hydrogen addition on NO formation in atmospheric-pressure, fuel-rich-premixed, burner-stabilized methane, ethane and propane flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepman, A. V.; Mokhov, A. V.; Levinsky, H. B.

    The effects of hydrogen addition on NO formation in fuel-rich, burner-stabilized methane, ethane and propane flames are reported. Profiles of temperature and NO mole fraction were obtained using spontaneous Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), respectively. Experiments were

  9. Kinetic measurements and in situ Raman spectroscopy study of the formation of TBAF semi-hydrates with hydrogen and carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trueba, A.T.; Radović, I.R.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Peters, C.J.; Kroon, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The kinetics of formation of semi-clathrate hydrates of tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride (TBAF) with hydrogen (H2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were studied in order to elucidate their potential for H 2 storage as well as for CO2 sequestration. The influence of pressure, TBAF concentration (1.8 mol% and

  10. The role of focal adhesion complexes in fibroblast mechanotransduction during scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, Kristine C; Wong, Victor W; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-10-01

    Historically, great efforts have been made to elucidate the biochemical pathways that direct the complex process of wound healing; however only recently has there been recognition of the importance that mechanical signals play in the process of tissue repair and scar formation. The body's physiologic response to injury involves a dynamic interplay between mechanical forces and biochemical cues which directs a cascade of signals leading ultimately to the formation of fibrotic scar. Fibroblasts are a highly mechanosensitive cell type and are also largely responsible for the generation of the fibrotic matrix during scar formation and are thus a critical player in the process of mechanotransduction during tissue repair. Mechanotransduction is initiated at the interface between the cell membrane and the extracellular matrix where mechanical signals are first translated into a biochemical response. Focal adhesions are dynamic multi-protein complexes through which the extracellular matrix links to the intracellular cytoskeleton. These focal adhesion complexes play an integral role in the propagation of this initial mechanical cue into an extensive network of biochemical signals leading to widespread downstream effects including the influx of inflammatory cells, stimulation of angiogenesis, keratinocyte migration, fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. Increasing evidence has demonstrated the importance of the biomechanical milieu in healing wounds and suggests that an integrated approach to the discovery of targets to decrease scar formation may prove more clinically efficacious than previous purely biochemical strategies. Copyright © 2012 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of Conditions of Pd/SnO2 Nanomaterial Formation on Properties of Hydrogen Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokovykh, E. V.; Oleksenko, L. P.; Maksymovych, N. P.; Matushko, I. P.

    2017-06-01

    Metal oxide sensors were created using nanosized tin dioxide obtained by a sol-gel method. Gas-sensitive layers of the sensors were impregnated with PdCl2 solutions of different concentrations to increase sensitivities of the proposed sensors. Influence of different temperature conditions of the sensor formation on the sensor properties was studied. It was found that decreasing duration of high-temperature sensor treatment prevents enlargement of particles of the gas-sensitive materials. It was shown that the sensors based on materials with smaller particle sizes showed higher sensor responses to 40 ppm H2. Obtained results were explained in terms of substantial influence of length of the common boundaries between the material particles of tin dioxide and palladium on the gas-sensitive properties of the sensors. The obtained sensors had possessed a fast response and recovery time and demonstrated stable characteristics during their long-term operation.

  12. Enhancement of hydrogen peroxide formation by protophores and ionophores in antimycin-supplemented mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas, Enrique; Boveris, Alberto

    1980-01-01

    Rat and pigeon heart mitochondria supplemented with antimycin produce 0.3–1.0nmol of H2O2/min per mg of protein. These rates are stimulated up to 13-fold by addition of protophores (carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, carbonyl cyanide m-chloromethoxyphenylhydrazone and pentachlorophenol). Ionophores, such as valinomycin and gramicidin, and Ca2+ also markedly stimulated H2O2 production by rat heart mitochondria. The enhancement of H2O2 generation in antimycin-supplemented mitochondria and the increased O2 uptake of the State 4-to-State 3 transition showed similar protophore, ionophore and Ca2+ concentration dependencies. Thenoyltrifluoroacetone and N-bromosuccinimide, which inhibit succinate–ubiquinone reductase activity, also decreased mitochondrial H2O2 production. Addition of cyanide to antimycin-supplemented beef heart submitochondrial particles inhibited the generation of O2−, the precursor of mitochondrial H2O2. This effect was parallel to the increase in cytochrome c reduction and it is interpreted as indicating the necessity of cytochrome c13+ to oxidize ubiquinol to ubisemiquinone, whose autoxidation yields O2−. The effect of protophores, ionophores and Ca2+ is analysed in relation to the propositions of a cyclic mechanism for the interaction of ubiquinone with succinate dehydrogenase and cytochromes b and c1 [Wikstrom & Berden (1972) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 283, 403–420; Mitchell (1976) J. Theor. Biol. 62, 337–367]. A collapse in membrane potential, increasing the rate of ubisemiquinone formation and O2− production, is proposed as the molecular mechanism for the enhancement of H2O2 formation rates observed on addition of protophores, ionophores and Ca2+. PMID:7406888

  13. Formation and reduction of thin oxide films on a stainless steel surface upon subsequent treatments with oxygen and hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozetič, M., E-mail: miran.mozetic@guest.arnes.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vesel, A.; Kovač, J.; Zaplotnik, R.; Modic, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Balat-Pichelin, M. [PROMES-CNRS Laboratory, 7 Rue du four solaire, 66120 Font Romeu Odeillo (France)

    2015-09-30

    Approximately 500-nm-thick oxide films formed on the surface of AISI 316L stainless steel samples upon brief exposure to oxygen plasma that was created by microwave discharge at approximately 500 W nominal power. During plasma treatment, the samples were simultaneously heated by concentrated solar radiation such that the temperature increased almost linearly to approximately 1100 K, after which the heating was abruptly turned off. After oxidation, the samples were exposed to hydrogen plasma in the same experimental chamber using the same heating regime to reduce the oxide films. The sample temperature was monitored using an infrared pyrometer. The result showed several knees in the signal versus treatment time due to chemical reactions between the oxidised stainless steel and the hydrogen plasma. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling were used to determine the surface and thin film modifications. The oxidation by oxygen plasma caused the formation of densely packed oxide crystallites rich in Fe and Mn on the surface followed by a rather thick chromium oxide subsurface film. The removal of oxygen from the surface film was indicated by a sudden decrease of the material emissivity that occurred in a few seconds at approximately 1300 K. Subsequent oxidation and reduction cycles caused nanostructuring of the surface morphology because evenly distributed islets of uniform lateral dimension (approximately 100 nm) were observed on the surface after the treatments. - Highlights: • Reduction of oxides from stainless steel surface in H{sub 2} plasma was studied. • The first step is removal of MnO{sub 2} followed by reduction of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • 0.5 μm thick oxide was removed in only 10 s at temperatures 1200 K–1350 K. • Nanostructuring of the surface was observed upon the oxide reduction.

  14. Amine-hydrogen halide complexes: experimental electric dipole moments and a theoretical decomposition of dipole moments and binding energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Carolyn S; Craddock, Matthew B; Kilian, Jacob; Grumstrup, Erik M; Orilall, M Christopher; Mo, Yirong; Gao, Jiali; Leopold, Kenneth R

    2006-08-24

    The Stark effect has been observed in the rotational spectra of several gas-phase amine-hydrogen halide complexes and the following electric dipole moments have been determined: H(3)(15)N-H(35)Cl (4.05865 +/- 0.00095 D), (CH(3))(3)(15)N-H(35)Cl (7.128 +/- 0.012 D), H(3)(15)N-H(79)Br (4.2577 +/- 0.0022 D), and (CH(3))(3)(15)N-H(79)Br (8.397 +/- 0.014 D). Calculations of the binding energies and electric dipole moments for the full set of complexes R(n)()(CH(3))(3)(-)(n)()N-HX (n = 0-3; X = F, Cl, Br) at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level are also reported. The block localized wave function (BLW) energy decomposition method has been used to partition the binding energies into contributions from electrostatic, exchange, distortion, polarization, and charge-transfer terms. Similarly, the calculated dipole moments have been decomposed into distortion, polarization, and charge-transfer components. The complexes studied range from hydrogen-bonded systems to proton-transferred ion pairs, and the total interaction energies vary from 7 to 17 kcal/mol across the series. The individual energy components show a much wider variation than this, but cancellation of terms accounts for the relatively narrow range of net binding energies. For both the hydrogen-bonded complexes and the proton-transferred ion pairs, the electrostatic and exchange terms have magnitudes that increase with the degree of proton transfer but are of opposite sign, leaving most of the net stabilization to arise from polarization and charge transfer. In all of the systems studied, the polarization terms contribute the most to the induced dipole moment, followed by smaller but still significant contributions from charge transfer. A significant contribution to the induced moment of the ion pairs also arises from distortion of the HX monomer.

  15. A Reaction Method for Estimating Gibbs Energy and Enthalpy of Formation of Complex Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruibing; Zhang, Tingan; Liu, Yan; Kuang, Shibo

    2017-04-01

    New and updated thermodynamic data for simple binary compounds are readily available from both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. Based on these available data, an approach is proposed to predict Gibbs energies and enthalpies of formation for complex minerals of metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial importance. The approach assumes that complex minerals are formed from binary composite oxides, which in turn, are formed from individual pure oxides. The validity of this approach is examined by comparing the calculated values of Gibbs energies and enthalpies against the experimentally measured ones reported in literature. The results show that for typical complex minerals with available experimental data, the calculated results exhibit an average residual of 0.51 pct for Gibbs energies and 0.52 pct for enthalpies, compared to the experimental results. This new approach thus correlates well with experimental approaches and can be applied to most of the complex minerals.

  16. Hydrogen Spectral Line Shape Formation in the SOL of Fusion Reactor Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery S. Lisitsa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The problems related to the spectral line-shape formation in the scrape of layer (SOL in fusion reactor plasma for typical observation chords are considered. The SOL plasma is characterized by the relatively low electron density (1012–1013 cm−3 and high temperature (from 10 eV up to 1 keV. The main effects responsible for the line-shape formation in the SOL are Doppler and Zeeman effects. The main problem is a correct modeling of the neutral atom velocity distribution function (VDF. The VDF is determined by a number of atomic processes, namely: molecular dissociation, ionization and charge exchange of neutral atoms on plasma ions, electron excitation accompanied by the charge exchange from atomic excited states, and atom reflection from the wall. All the processes take place step by step during atom motion from the wall to the plasma core. In practice, the largest contribution to the neutral atom radiation emission comes from a thin layer near the wall with typical size 10–20 cm, which is small as compared with the minor radius of modern devices including international test experimental reactor ITER (radius 2 m. The important problem is a strongly non-uniform distribution of plasma parameters (electron and ion densities and temperatures. The distributions vary for different observation chords and ITER operation regimes. In the present report, most attention is paid to the problem of the VDF calculations. The most correct method for solving the problem is an application of the Monte Carlo method for atom motion near the wall. However, the method is sometimes too complicated to be combined with other numerical codes for plasma modeling for various regimes of fusion reactor operation. Thus, it is important to develop simpler methods for neutral atom VDF in space coordinates and velocities. The efficiency of such methods has to be tested via a comparison with the Monte Carlo codes for particular plasma conditions. Here a new simplified method

  17. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun

    2017-08-03

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  18. Biomimetic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  19. 3D structure and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjoberg, Sigurd; Schmiedel, Tobias; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik H.; Galland, Oliver; Jerram, Dougal A.

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Norwegian Møre margin is regarded as a type example of a volcanic rifted margin, with its formation usually related to the influence of the Icelandic plume activity. The area is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic complexes such as extrusive lava sequences, intrusive sills and dikes, and hydrothermal vent complexes within the Møre Basin. Emplacement of hydrothermal vent complexes is accommodated by deformation of the host rock. The edges of igneous intrusions mobilize fluids by heat transfer into the sedimentary host rock (aureoles). Fluid expansion may lead to formation of piercing structures due to upward fluid migration. Hydrothermal vent complexes induce bending of overlying strata, leading to the formation of dome structures at the paleo-surface. These dome structures are important as they indicate the accommodation created for the intrusions by deformation of the upper layers of the stratigraphy, and may form important structures in many volcanic margins. Both the morphological characteristics of the upper part and the underlying feeder-structure (conduit-zone) can be imaged and studied on 3D seismic data. Seismic data from the Tulipan prospect located in the western part of the Møre Basin have been used in this study. The investigation focusses on (1) the vent complex geometries, (2) the induced surface deformation patterns, (3) the relation to the intrusions (heat source), as well as (4) the emplacement depth of the hydrothermal vent complexes. We approach this by doing a detailed 3D seismic interpretation of the Tulipan seismic data cube. The complexes formed during the initial Eocene, and are believed to be a key factor behind the rapid warming event called the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). The newly derived understanding of age, eruptive deposits, and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin enables us to contribute to the general understanding of the igneous plumbing system in volcanic basins and

  20. Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones in aqueous solution catalyzed by Rhodium(III) complexes with C2-symmetric fluorene-ligands containing chiral (1R,2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montalvo-Gonzalez, Ruben [Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Tepic, Nay (Mexico). Unidad Academica de Ciencias Quimico Biologicas y Farmaceuticas; Chavez, Daniel; Aguirre, Gerardo; Parra-Hake, Miguel; Somanathan, Ratnasamy, E-mail: somanatha@sundown.sdsu.ed [Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, B.C. (Mexico). Centro de Graduados e Investigacion

    2010-07-01

    Two C{sub 2}-symmetric bis(sulfonamide) ligands containing fluorene-chiral (1R, 2R)-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine were complexed to Rh{sup III}(Cp{sup *}) and used as catalyst to reduce aromatic ketones. The corresponding chiral secondary alcohols were obtained in 87-100% ee and 85-99% yield, under asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) conditions using aqueous sodium formate as the hydride source. With acetophenone, 94% ee and 86-97% yield was achieved with substrate/catalyst (S/C) ratio of 10,000. (author)

  1. Green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles via complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, Is; Yudha, Septian P.; Mutiara, Nur Afisa Lintang

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles(NPs) were conducted via Zn(II) complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract as template. Curcuma longa extract has the ability to form zinc ions complex with curcumin as ligating agent. Study on synthesis was conducted by monitoring thermal degradation of the material. Successful formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by employing x-ray diffraction, surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) studies. From the XRD analysis it is denoted that ZnO in hexagonal wurtzite phase was formed and particle size was varied as varied temperature. The data are also confirmed by TEM analysis which shows the particle sie at the range 20-80nm. The NPs exhibited excelent photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation and also significant antibacterial activity for Eschericia coli. The activity in methylene blue degradation was also confirmed from fast chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction.

  2. FORMATION OF METHODICAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS USING THE MULTIMEDIA METHODOLOGICAL COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Haran

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The future primary school teachers training to teach mathematics is carried out by means of the academic discipline «Methods of Teaching of Educational Branch «Mathematics»». The aim and result of the training is methodical competence formation of future primary school teachers. In the article the content and structure of methodical competence of the primary school teacher is considered, according to which statutory, variable, specifically methodical, control estimate, designing and modeling and technological components are specified . Author determined the composition of the multimedia methodical complex of discipline «Methods of Teaching of the Educational Branch «Mathematics»», including designer of presentations of lectures, bank of multimedia material for practical/laboratory work, bank of multimedia for self-activity work of students and bank of tests. The influence of multimedia that make up the components of the complex of methodical competence formation is substantiated

  3. Green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles via complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatimah, Is, E-mail: isfatimah@uii.ac.id; Yudha, Septian P.; Mutiara, Nur Afisa Lintang [Chemistry Department, Islamic University of Indonesia Kampus Terpadu UII, Jl. Kaliurang Km 14, Sleman, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles(NPs) were conducted via Zn(II) complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract as template. Curcuma longa extract has the ability to form zinc ions complex with curcumin as ligating agent. Study on synthesis was conducted by monitoring thermal degradation of the material. Successful formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by employing x-ray diffraction, surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) studies. From the XRD analysis it is denoted that ZnO in hexagonal wurtzite phase was formed and particle size was varied as varied temperature. The data are also confirmed by TEM analysis which shows the particle sie at the range 20-80nm. The NPs exhibited excelent photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation and also significant antibacterial activity for Eschericia coli. The activity in methylene blue degradation was also confirmed from fast chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction.

  4. Formation of Inclusion Complexes of Cycldextrin with Ethanol under Anhydrous Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, H; Kometani, T; Furuta, T; Watanabe, Y; Linko, Y Y; Linko, P

    1998-01-01

    Complex formation of poorly water soluble organic compounds with cyclodextrin (CD) is quite difficult in an aqueous cyclodextrin system. Formation of the inclusion complex of d-limonene, phenyl ethanol, acetophenone, or menthol was investigated in a slurry form of α-, β-, or γ-CD in organic solvents or alcohol under anhydrous conditions. Ethanol and methanol were found to be good solvents for this method. The use of ethanol as the solvent was investigated in greater detail. There existed an optimal amount of ethanol for the maximum inclusion of d-limonene as the guest compound. However, an excess of ethanol inhibited the inclusion. An adsorption model of alcohol on CD, analogous to the substrate inhibition model of enzyme kinetics, could correlate the inclusion ratio with the amount of alcohol added to CD.

  5. The formation of S0 galaxies with counter-rotating neutral and molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Robert; Bekki, Kenji; Cortese, Luca; Couch, Warrick

    2017-10-01

    The observation of counter-rotation in galaxies (i.e. gas that rotates in the opposite direction to the stellar component or two cospatial stellar populations with opposite rotation) is becoming more commonplace with modern integral field spectroscopic surveys. In this paper, we explore the emergence of counter-rotation (both stellar and gaseous) in S0 galaxies from smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulations of 1/10 mass ratio minor mergers between a ∼1010.8 M⊙ disc galaxy with a bulge-to-total ratio of 0.17 and a gas-rich companion (gas-to-stellar mass fraction of 5.0). These simulations include a self-consistent treatment of gas dynamics, star formation, the production/destruction of H2 and dust and the time evolution of the interstellar radiation field. We explore the effect of retrograde versus prograde obits, gas and bulge mass fractions of the primary galaxy, and orbital parameters of the companion. The key requirement for producing counter-rotation in stars or gas in a merger remnant is a retrograde primary, while the relative spin of the companion affects only the radial extent of the accreted gas. We also find that including a significant amount of gas in the primary can prevent the emergence of counter-rotating gas, although accreted stars retain counter-rotation. Bulge mass and orbit have a secondary effect, generally influencing the final distribution of accreted stars and gas within the framework outlined above. In addition to our primary focus of counter-rotating components in galaxies, we also make some predictions regarding the SFRs, H2 distributions, and dust in minor-merger remnants.

  6. A disymmetric terpyridine based ligand for the formation of luminescent di-aquo lanthanide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnière, Loïc J; Mameri, Samir; Flot, David; Waltz, Fanny; Zandanel, Christelle; Ziessel, Raymond F

    2007-06-14

    The synthesis of ligand H3 based on a disymmetrically substituted terpyridine core functionalised by a carboxylic acid in the 6-position and a bis(carboxymethyl)aminomethyl function in the 6''-position is described. The coordination behaviour of this heptadentate (4N/3O) ligand with lanthanide cations (Ln=Eu, Gd and Tb) was studied in solution showing the formation of complexes with [Ln] stoichiometry. Complexes with general formula [Ln(H2O)2] were isolated from neutral water solutions containing equimolar amounts of cations and ligands, and the complexes were characterized in the solid state (elemental analysis, IR) and in solution (mass spectrometry). The photo-physical properties of the luminescent complexes of Eu and Tb were studied in water solution by means of absorption, steady state and time-resolved emission spectroscopies. Evolution of the luminescence lifetimes of the Eu and Tb complexes in H2O and D2O reveals the presence of two water molecules coordinated in the first coordination sphere of the cations. Despite this important hydration number, the overall luminescence quantum yields of the complexes remained elevated, especially in the case of Tb (Phi=22.0 and 6.5% respectively for Tb and Eu). Upon crystallisation the Gd complex formed dimeric species in which two gadolinium atoms are each heptacoordinated by one ligand, the coordination sphere being completed by a single water molecule and a bridging carboxylate function, pointing to different behaviours in the solid and liquid states.

  7. EPR study of complex formation between copper (II) ions and sympathomimetic amines in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preoteasa, E.A. [Inst. of Atomic Physics, IFIN, Bucharest (Romania); Duliu, O.G.; Grecu, V.V. [Bucharest, Univ. (Romania). Dept. of Atomic and Nuclear Physics

    1997-07-01

    The complex formation between sympathomimetic amines (SA): adrenaline (AD), noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), ephedrine (ED) and p-tyramine (pTA), and Cu(II) ion in aqueous solution has been studied by X-band EPR at room temperature. Excepting pTA, all investigated SA yielded two types of complexes in different pH domains. All complexes consistent with a ligand fields having a distorted octahedral symmetry, i.e., hexacoordination of Cu(II). The covalence coefficient calculated from the isotropic g and A values has shown strong ionic sigma-type ligand bonds. A structural model with the Cu(II) ion bound by four catecholic O(hydroxy) atoms for the low pH complexes of AD, NA and DA is proposed. For the high pH complexes of the former compounds as well as for both Ed complexes, the authors suppose Cu(II) bound by two N (amino) and two O (hydroxy) atoms. The spectra are consistent to water binding on the longitudinal octahedron axis in all compounds excepting the high pH complex of Ed, where OH2- ions are bound. Possible implications for the SA-cell receptors interactions are discussed.

  8. Interplay between halogen bonds and hydrogen bonds in OH/SH···HOX···HY (X = Cl, Br; Y = F, Cl, Br) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjie; Zeng, Yanli; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xueying; Zheng, Shijun; Meng, Lingpeng

    2013-03-01

    The character of the cooperativity between the HOX···OH/SH halogen bond (XB) and the Y-H···(H)OX hydrogen bond (HB) in OH/SH···HOX···HY (X = Cl, Br; Y = F, Cl, Br) complexes has been investigated by means of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations and "quantum theory of atoms in molecules" (QTAIM) studies. The geometries of the complexes have been determined from the most negative electrostatic potentials (V (S,min)) and the most positive electrostatic potentials (V (S,max)) on the electron density contours of the individual species. The greater the V (S,max) values of HY, the larger the interaction energies of halogen-bonded HOX···OH/SH in the termolecular complexes, indicating that the ability of cooperative effect of hydrogen bond on halogen bond are determined by V (S,max) of HY. The interaction energies, binding distances, infrared vibrational frequencies, and electron densities ρ at the BCPs of the hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds prove that there is positive cooperativity between these bonds. The potentiation of hydrogen bonds on halogen bonds is greater than that of halogen bonds on hydrogen bonds. QTAIM studies have shown that the halogen bonds and hydrogen bonds are closed-shell noncovalent interactions, and both have greater electrostatic character in the termolecular species compared with the bimolecular species.

  9. [NiFe] dithiolene diphosphine complex for hydrogen gas activation: a Theoretic Insight

    CERN Document Server

    GuYan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A diphosphino-nickel-iron dithiolene complex, [Ni(bdt)(dppf)] (bdt = 1,2-benzenedithiolate, dppf = 1,1-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene), has been recently found to be reasonably active on proton reduction to dihydrogen (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 1109). Interestingly, this exceptional complex was found to be also reactive towards dihydrogen activation as indicated by the electrochemical investigation. However, a pure nickel dithiolene diphosphine theoretical mode, excluding the contributions from iron moiety, was applied to attribute the experimental catalytic observation. We have re-visited the theoretical approach in details for this [NiFe] catalyst and compared it with the non-active nickel dithiolene diphosphine complexes. We found that both nickel and iron moieties in this newly developed complex were imperative for the observed catalytic per-formance, particularly towards the activation of dihydrogen.

  10. Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ multispecies complexes formation on the Khortitsa island (Zaporizhzhya province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. О. Fedorchenko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ complexes formation under conditions of the Khortitsa National Reserve (Zaporizhzhya province are studied. The dispersion of taxonomic groups of different levels (families and species in litter mesofauna is swayed by the inter- and intrasystem factors; the largest influence has the power of litter and its humidity. The rate of ecological factors’ influence at different taxonomic levels may diverge.

  11. Simultaneous measurement of amyloid fibril formation by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence reveals complex aggregation kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Streets

    Full Text Available An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation.

  12. Formation of hydrogen-bonded chains through inter- and intra-molecular hydrogen bonds by a strong base of guanidine-like character and 5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-biphenols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, G.; Brzezinski, B.

    2002-04-01

    5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-biphenol mixtures with 7-methyl-1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene (MTBD) were studied by FTIR as well as 1H NMR spectroscopy. In chloroform, a proton transfer from DBBPh to MTBD occurs and the protonated MTBD molecule is hydrogen-bonded to the chain formed between 5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-biphenol and 5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-biphenolate molecule. In acetonitrile, the complex dissociates and hence protonated MTBD molecules and hydrogen-bonded chains formed between 5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-biphenol and 5,5'-dibromo-2,2'-biphenolate are present. The hydrogen bonds of these chains show large proton polarizability.

  13. Globular cluster formation with multiple stellar populations from hierarchical star cluster complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2017-05-01

    Most old globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy are observed to have internal chemical abundance spreads in light elements. We discuss a new GC formation scenario based on hierarchical star formation within fractal molecular clouds. In the new scenario, a cluster of bound and unbound star clusters ('star cluster complex', SCC) that have a power-law cluster mass function with a slope (β) of 2 is first formed from a massive gas clump developed in a dwarf galaxy. Such cluster complexes and β = 2 are observed and expected from hierarchical star formation. The most massive star cluster ('main cluster'), which is the progenitor of a GC, can accrete gas ejected from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars initially in the cluster and other low-mass clusters before the clusters are tidally stripped or destroyed to become field stars in the dwarf. The SCC is initially embedded in a giant gas hole created by numerous supernovae of the SCC so that cold gas outside the hole can be accreted on to the main cluster later. New stars formed from the accreted gas have chemical abundances that are different from those of the original SCC. Using hydrodynamical simulations of GC formation based on this scenario, we show that the main cluster with the initial mass as large as [2-5] × 105 M⊙ can accrete more than 105 M⊙ gas from AGB stars of the SCC. We suggest that merging of hierarchical SSCs can play key roles in stellar halo formation around GCs and self-enrichment processes in the early phase of GC formation.

  14. A Bimetallic Nickel–Gallium Complex Catalyzes CO 2 Hydrogenation via the Intermediacy of an Anionic d 10 Nickel Hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammarota, Ryan C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States; Vollmer, Matthew V. [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States; Xie, Jing [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States; Supercomputing; Ye, Jingyun [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States; Supercomputing; Linehan, John C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, MS K2-57, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Burgess, Samantha A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, MS K2-57, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Appel, Aaron M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, MS K2-57, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Gagliardi, Laura [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States; Supercomputing; Lu, Connie C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, United States

    2017-09-28

    Large-scale CO2 hydrogenation could offer a renewable stream of industrially important C1 chemicals while reducing CO2 emissions. Critical to this opportunity is the requirement for inexpensive catalysts based on earth-abundant metals instead of precious metals. We report a nickel-gallium complex featuring a Ni(0)→Ga(III) bond that shows remarkable catalytic activity for hydrogenating CO2 to formate at ambient temperature (3150 turnovers, turnover frequency = 9700 h-1), compared with prior homogeneous Ni-centred catalysts. The Lewis acidic Ga(III) ion plays a pivotal role by stabilizing reactive catalytic intermediates, including a rare anionic d10 Ni hydride. The structure of this reactive intermediate shows a terminal Ni-H, for which the hydride donor strength rivals those of precious metal-hydrides. Collectively, our experimental and computational results demonstrate that modulating a transition metal center via a direct interaction with a Lewis acidic support can be a powerful strategy for promoting new reactivity paradigms in base-metal catalysis. The work was supported as part of the Inorganometallic Catalysis Design Center, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award DE-SC0012702. R.C.C. and M.V.V. were supported by DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research and National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship programs, respectively. J.C.L., S.A.B., and A.M.A. were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Formation of stable Si–O–C submonolayers on hydrogen-terminated silicon(111 under low-temperature conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yit Lung Khung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report results of a hydrosilylation carried out on bifunctional molecules by using two different approaches, namely through thermal treatment and photochemical treatment through UV irradiation. Previously, our group also demonstrated that in a mixed alkyne/alcohol solution, surface coupling is biased towards the formation of Si–O–C linkages instead of Si–C linkages, thus indirectly supporting the kinetic model of hydrogen abstraction from the Si–H surface (Khung, Y. L. et al. Chem. – Eur. J. 2014, 20, 15151–15158. To further examine the probability of this kinetic model we compare the results from reactions with bifunctional alkynes carried out under thermal treatment (<130 °C and under UV irradiation, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements showed that under thermal conditions, the Si–H surface predominately reacts to form Si–O–C bonds from ethynylbenzyl alcohol solution while the UV photochemical route ensures that the alcohol-based alkyne may also form Si–C bonds, thus producing a monolayer of mixed linkages. The results suggested the importance of surface radicals as well as the type of terminal group as being essential towards directing the nature of surface linkage.

  16. On the stability of the hydrogen chloride complexes with ethylene and acetylene. A high resolution gas phase and ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulskiene, Birute; Gruodis, Alytis; Sablinskas, Valdas; Nelander, Bengt

    2003-03-01

    The temperature dependencies of the intensities of the HCl stretching bands of the hydrogen chloride complexes with acetylene and ethylene have been used to obtain estimates of the dissociation enthalpies of the two complexes. Quantum chemical calculations on the Hartree Fock and DFT/B3LYP levels of theory have been combined with experimental data to give estimates of the intensities of the HCl stretching vibration in the two complexes.

  17. Conductance Studies on Complex Formation between c-Methylcalix[4]resorcinarene and Titanium (III in Acetonitrile-H2O Binary Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Saadati

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Calixresorcinarenes have proved to be unique molecules for molecular recognition via hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic and ionic interactions with suitable substrates such as cations. The study of the interactions involved in the complexation of different cations with calixresorcinarenes in solvent mixtures is important for a better understanding of the mechanism of biological transport, molecular recognition, and other analytical applications. This article summarizes different aspects of the complexes of the Ti3+ metal cation with c-methylcalix[4]resorcinarene (CMCR as studied by conductometry in acetonitrile (AN–water (H2O binary mixtures at different temperatures. Conductance data show that the metal cation/ligand (ML stoichiometry of the complexes in solution is 1:1 in all cases. Non-linear behaviour was observed for the variation of logKf of the complexes vs. the composition of the binary solvent mixtures. Selectivity of CMCR for the Ti3+ cation is sensitive to solvent composition; in some cases and at certain compositions of the mixed solvent systems, the selectivity order is changed. Values of thermodynamic parameters (, for formation of the CMCR–Ti3+ complexes in AN–H2O binary systems were obtained from the temperature dependence of stability constants, and the results show that the thermodynamics of complexation reactions are affected by the nature and composition of the mixed solvents.

  18. Glycinin-gum arabic complex formation: Turbidity measurement and charge neutralization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Die; Hua, Yufei

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between glycinin and anionic polysaccharides has gained considerable attention recently because of its scientific impact on the stability of acid soymilk systems. In this study, the formation of glycinin/gum arabic complexes driven by electrostatic interactions was investigated. Turbidity titrations at different glycinin/gum arabic ratios were conducted and critical pH values (pHφ1) where insoluble complexes began forming were determined firstly. The corresponding pHφ1 values at glycinin/gum arabic ratios of 1:4, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1 were 2.85, 3.25, 3.70, 4.40, 4.85 and 5.35, respectively. Afterwards, electromobilities for glycinin and gum arabic at the pH values between 4.1 and 2.6 were measured, and charge densities (ZN) for glycinin and gum arabic were calculated based on the soft particle analysis theory. Further analysis indicated that the product of glycinin/gum arabic ratio (ρ) and ZN ratio of glycinin/gum arabic was approximate 1 at any pHφ1 values. It was revealed that charge neutralization was achieved when glycinin/gum arabic insoluble complexes began forming. NaCl displayed multiple effects on glycinin/gum arabic complex formation according to turbidity and compositional analysis. The present study could provide basic guidance in acid soymilk designing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tuning the halogen/hydrogen bond competition: a spectroscopic and conceptual DFT study of some model complexes involving CHF2I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagels, Nick; Geboes, Yannick; Pinter, Balazs; De Proft, Frank; Herrebout, Wouter A

    2014-07-01

    Insight into the key factors driving the competition of halogen and hydrogen bonds is obtained by studying the affinity of the Lewis bases trimethylamine (TMA), dimethyl ether (DME), and methyl fluoride (MF) towards difluoroiodomethane (CHF(2) I). Analysis of the infrared and Raman spectra of solutions in liquid krypton containing mixtures of TMA and CHF(2) I and of DME and CHF(2) I reveals that for these Lewis bases hydrogen and halogen-bonded complexes appear simultaneously. In contrast, only a hydrogen-bonded complex is formed for the mixtures of CHF(2) I and MF. The complexation enthalpies for the C-H⋅⋅⋅Y hydrogen-bonded complexes with TMA, DME, and MF are determined to be -14.7(2), -10.5(5) and -5.1(6) kJ mol(-1), respectively. The values for the C-I⋅⋅⋅Y halogen-bonded isomers are -19.0(3) kJ mol(-1) for TMA and -9.9(8) kJ mol(-1) for DME. Generalization of the observed trends suggests that, at least for the bases studied here, softer Lewis bases such as TMA favor halogen bonding, whereas harder bases such as MF show a substantial preference for hydrogen bonding. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Structure of solvated Fe(CO)5: complex formation during solvation in alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessing, Joshua; Li, Xiaodi; Lee, Taewoo; Rose-Petruck, Christoph G

    2008-03-20

    The equilibrium structure of iron pentacarbonyl, Fe(CO)5, solvated in various alcohols has been investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements and density functional theory calculations. This system was studied because it is prototypical of a larger class of monometallic systems, which are electronically saturated but not sterically crowded. Upon solvation, the Fe(CO)5 is not just surrounded by a solvation shell. Instead, solute-solvent complexes are formed with the oxygen of the alcohol oriented toward an axial ligand of the Fe(CO)5 giving a formation energy on the order of -5 kJ/mol. This complexation is not a chemical reaction but rather a "preassembly" of the solute molecules with a single solvent molecule. For instance, at room temperature the interaction between Fe(CO)5 and ethanol results in 87% of all Fe(CO)5 molecules being complexated with a single ethanol molecule. This complexation was found in all the alcohol systems studied in this paper. The stability of these complexes was found to depend on the alcohol chain length and branching. The observed complexation mechanism is accompanied by an electron density shift from the complexed alcohol molecule toward Fe(CO)5 where it induces a dipole moment. The finding that Fe(CO)5 forms a complex with the hydroxyl group of a single solvent molecule might have significant implications for ligand substitution reactions. This implies that ligand substitution reactions do not have to proceed via a dissociative mechanism. Instead, the reaction might proceed through a concerted mechanism with the leaving CO simultaneously being replaced by the incoming alcohol that was complexed to Fe(CO)5 prior to the photoexcitation.

  1. Collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms II. Low-energy program using the method of the exterior complex scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, Jakub; Houfek, Karel

    2014-11-01

    While collisions of electrons with hydrogen atoms pose a well studied and in some sense closed problem, there is still no free computer code ready for ;production use;, that would enable applied researchers to generate necessary data for arbitrary impact energies and scattering transitions directly if absent in on-line scattering databases. This is the second article on the Hex program package, which describes a new computer code that is, with a little setup, capable of solving the scattering equations for energies ranging from a fraction of the ionization threshold to approximately 100 eV or more, depending on the available computational resources. The program implements the exterior complex scaling method in the B-spline basis.

  2. Hydrogen atom vs electron transfer in catecholase-mimetic oxidations by superoxometal complexes. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simándi, Tatiana M; May, Zoltán; Szigyártó, Imola Cs; Simándi, László I

    2005-01-21

    Dioximato-cobalt(II), -iron(II) and -manganese(II) complexes (1)-(6), acting as functional catecholase and phenoxazinone synthase models, exhibit a deuterium kinetic isotope effect predicted by theory (k4H/k4D < or = 3) in the catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol and 2-aminophenol by O2. KIEs in the range of (k4H/k4D approximately 1.79-3.51) are observed with (1) and (2) as catalysts, pointing to hydrogen atom transfer in the rate-determining step from the substrate hydroxy group to the metal-bound superoxo ligand. Less significant KIEs (1.06-1.20) are exhibited by catalysts systems (3)-(6), indicating that proton-coupled electron transfer is the preferred route in those cases.

  3. The influence of elongational flow on hydrogen bond formation and stability of the homogeneous phase of binary hydrogen- bonded polymer blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dormidontova, Elena E.; Brinke, Gerrit ten

    2000-01-01

    Macrophase separation tendency induced by flow in binary blends of polymers capable of single hydrogen bonding between one of the chain ends is studied analytically. To describe the conformational and orientational properties of a polymer chain a simple dumbbell model is applied. It is demonstrated

  4. One-dimensional phosphinite platinum chains based on hydrogen bonding interactions and phosphinite tetranuclear platinum(II)-thallium(I) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Alvaro; Forniés, Juan; Gómez, Julio; Lalinde, Elena; Martín, Antonio; Moreno, M Teresa; Sánchez, Sergio

    2007-09-07

    The mononuclear pentafluorophenyl platinum complex containing the chelated diphenylphosphinous acid/diphenylphosphinite system [Pt(C(6)F(5)){(PPh(2)O)(2)H}(PPh(2)OH)] 1 has been prepared and characterised. 1 and the related alkynyl complex [Pt(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CBu(t)){(PPh(2)O)(2)H}(PPh(2)OH)] 2 form infinite one-dimensional chains in the solid state based on intermolecular O-H[dot dot dot]O hydrogen bonding interactions. Deprotonation reactions of [PtL{(PPh(2)O)(2)H}(PPh(2)OH)] (L = C(6)F(5), C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CBu(t), C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CPh 3) with [Tl(acac)] yields tetranuclear Pt(2)Tl(2) complexes [PtL{(PPh(2)O)(2)H}(PPh(2)O)Tl](2) (L = C(6)F(5) 4, C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CBu(t), C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CPh ). The structure of the tert-butylalkynyl derivative , established by X-ray diffraction, shows two anionic discrete units [Pt(C[triple bond, length as m-dash]CBu(t)){(PPh(2)O)(2)H}(PPh(2)O)](-) joined by two Tl(i) centres via Tl-O and Pt-Tl bonds. Despite the existence of Pt-Tl interactions, they do not show luminescence.

  5. Functional cooperation between FACT and MCM is coordinated with cell cycle and differential complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional cooperation between FACT and the MCM helicase complex constitutes an integral step during DNA replication initiation. However, mode of regulation that underlies the proper functional interaction of FACT and MCM is poorly understood. Methods & Results Here we present evidence indicating that such interaction is coordinated with cell cycle progression and differential complex formation. We first demonstrate the existence of two distinct FACT-MCM subassemblies, FACT-MCM2/4/6/7 and FACT-MCM2/3/4/5. Both complexes possess DNA unwinding activity and are subject to cell cycle-dependent enzymatic regulation. Interestingly, analysis of functional attributes further suggests that they act at distinct, and possibly sequential, steps during origin establishment and replication initiation. Moreover, we show that the phosphorylation profile of the FACT-associated MCM4 undergoes a cell cycle-dependent change, which is directly correlated with the catalytic activity of the FACT-MCM helicase complexes. Finally, at the quaternary structure level, physical interaction between FACT and MCM complexes is generally dependent on persistent cell cycle and further stabilized upon S phase entry. Cessation of mitotic cycle destabilizes the complex formation and likely leads to compromised coordination and activities. Conclusions Together, our results correlate FACT-MCM functionally and temporally with S phase and DNA replication. They further demonstrate that enzymatic activities intrinsically important for DNA replication are tightly controlled at various levels, thereby ensuring proper progression of, as well as exit from, the cell cycle and ultimately euploid gene balance.

  6. Lewis Base Complexes of Magnesium Borohydride: Enhanced Kinetics and Product Selectivity upon Hydrogen Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Chong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tetrahydofuran (THF complexed to magnesium borohydride has been found to have a positive effect on both the reactivity and selectivity, enabling release of H2 at <200 °C and forms Mg(B10H10 with high selectivity.

  7. Synergistic Formation of Radicals by Irradiation with Both Vacuum Ultraviolet and Atomic Hydrogen: A Real-Time In Situ Electron Spin Resonance Study

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Kono, Akihiko; Horibe, Hideo; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; 10.1021/jz2002937

    2012-01-01

    We report on the surface modification of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as an example of soft- and bio-materials that occur under plasma discharge by kinetics analysis of radical formation using in situ real-time electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. During irradiation with hydrogen plasma, simultaneous measurements of the gas-phase ESR signals of atomic hydrogen and the carbon dangling bond (C-DB) on PTFE were performed. Dynamic changes of the C-DB density were observed in real time, where the rate of density change was accelerated during initial irradiation and then became constant over time. It is noteworthy that C-DBs were formed synergistically by irradiation with both vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and atomic hydrogen. The in situ real-time ESR technique is useful to elucidate synergistic roles during plasma surface modification.

  8. Formation of polymerization compounds during thermal oxidation of cottonseed oil, partially hydrogenated cottonseed oil and their blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrera-Arellano, D. Laboratório de Óleos e Gorduras, Departa

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Samples of cottonseed oil, partially hydrogenated cottonseed oil and their blends, with iodine values between 60 and 110, tocopherol-stripped or not by aluminium oxide treatment, were submitted to thermal oxidation, at 180 °C, for 10 hours. Samples were collected at 0, 2, 5, 8 and 10 hours, for the determination of dimers and polymers (degradation compounds and of tocopherols. The influence of the degree of hydrogenation on the formation of dimers and polymers and the role of originally present tocopherols in the protection of fats and oils against thermal degradation was verified. The degradation curves for tocopherols showed a fast destruction rate for the tocopherols present in cottonseed fats and oil (α and γ-tocopherols, with residual levels close to zero after 10 hours under thermal oxidation conditions. Nevertheless, samples with their natural tocopherols presented a slower rate of thermal degradation. The unsaturation degree was apparently more important in the protection against thermal degradation than the content of tocopherolsMuestras de aceite de algodón, aceite de algodón parcialmente hidrogenado y sus mezclas, con índices de yodo de 60 a 110, tratadas o no con óxido de aluminio, fueron sometidas a termoxidación, a 180 °C, durante 10 horas. Se retiraron muestras en los tiempos 0, 2, 5, 8 y 10 horas, para determinación de dímeros y polímeros (compuestos de degradación y de tocoferoles. Se verificó la influencia del grado de hidrogenación sobre la formación de dímeros y polímeros, y también el papel de los tocoferoles originalmente presentes en el aceite y en las grasas, en la protección contra la degradación térmica. Las curvas de degradación de los tocoferoles mostraron una destrucción bastante rápida de los tocoferoles presentes en el aceite y en las grasas de algodón (α y γ-tocoferoles, con niveles residuales próximos a cero después de 10 horas de termoxidación. Aún así, muestras con sus

  9. Hydrogen Production from a Methanol-Water Solution Catalyzed by an Anionic Iridium Complex Bearing a Functional Bipyridonate Ligand under Weakly Basic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ken-ichi; Kawahara, Ryoko; Aikawa, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Ryohei

    2015-07-27

    An efficient catalytic system for the production of hydrogen from a methanol-water solution has been developed using a new anionic iridium complex bearing a functional bipyridonate ligand as a catalyst. This system can be operated under mild conditions [weakly basic solution (0.046 mol L(-1) NaOH) below 100 °C] without the use of an additional organic solvent. Long-term continuous hydrogen production from a methanol-water solution catalyzed by the anionic iridium complex was also achieved. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. A UV-vis study of the effects of alcohols on formation and stability of Mn(por)(O)(OAc) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajer, Daryoush; Jahanbani, Maryam

    2012-06-01

    Interactions of three different (acetato) (tetraarylporphyrinato) manganese (III) Mn(III)(por) with tetra-n-butylammonium hydrogen monopersulfate (n-Bu(4)NHSO(5)), in the presence of excess tetra-n-butylammonium acetate (n-Bu(4)NOAc) and in the absence or presence of various alcohols (alcohols=CH(3)OH, C(2)H(5)OH, i-C(3)H(7)OH, t-C(4)H(9)OH) in CH(2)Cl(2), were monitored by their UV-vis spectral changes, under identical conditions, at room temperature. (Acetato) (tetrakispentafluorophenylporphyrinato) manganese (III) Mn(III)(tpfpp)(OAc) and (acetato) (tetramesitylporphyrinato) manganese (III) Mn(III)(tmp)(OAc) produced their corresponding high valent Mn(tpfpp)(O)(OAc) and Mn(tmp)(O)(OAc) both in the absence or presence of alcohols. Whereas, (acetato) (tetraphenylporphyrinato) manganese (III) Mn(III)(tpp)(OAc) only generated Mn(tpp)(O)(OAc) in the presence of less bulky alcohols. In the absence of alcohols or in the presence of t-C(4)H(9)OH, the UV-vis spectra displayed a very weak sign of formation of Mn(tpp)(O)(OAc) complex. It was observed that alcohols generally increased the rate of formation of Mn-oxo species in accordance with their acidity or hydrogen bonding strength, and enhanced the stability of Mn-oxo complexes, as their size increases. Attempts are made to explain these effects. A mechanistic scheme is also suggested for the decomposition of HSO(5)(-) to O(2) and HSO(4)(-), through the formation and dimerization of Mn-oxo species. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Revised nomenclature and stratigraphic relationships of the Fredericksburg Complex and Quantico Formation of the Virginia Piedmont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlides, Louis

    1980-01-01

    The Fredericksburg Complex, in part a migmatitic terrane in northeast Virginia, is subdivided on the basis of lithology, as well as aeromagnetic and aeroradiometric data, into two metamorphic suites. These suites are separated by the northeast-trending Spotsylvania lineament, a rectilinear geophysical feature that is probably the trace of an old fault zone. East of the lineament, the Po River Metamorphic Suite, of Proterozoic Z and (or) early Paleozoic age, consists dominantly of biotite gneiss, generally augen gneiss, and lesser amounts of hornblende gneiss and mica schist. West of the Spotsylvania lineament is the Ta River Metamorphic Suite, composed mostly of amphibolite and amphibole gneiss. However, to the southwest, along its strike belt, the Ta River contains abundant biotite gneiss and mica schist. Both the Ta River and Po River contain abundant foliated granitoid and pegmatoid bodies as concordant tabular masses and as crosscutting dikes; these rocks are considered part of the Ta River and Po River Metamorphic Suites. The amphibolitic Holly Corner Gneiss is interpreted to be a western allochthonous equivalent of the Ta River. Both the Ta River and Holly Corner are considered to be coeval, eastern, distal facies of the Lower Cambrian(?) Chopawamsic Formation. The Paleozoic Falls Run Granite Gneiss intrudes the Ta River Metamorphic Suite and the Holly Corner Gneiss; locally the Falls Run is interpreted to have been transported westward with the Holly Corner after intrusion. The Quantico Formation, in the core of the Quantico-Columbia synclinorium, rests with angular unconformity along its northwest and southeast limbs, respectively, on the Chopawamsic Formation and the Ta River Metamorphic Suite. The Quantico Formation is assigned the same Late Ordovician age and similar stratigraphic position as the Arvonia Slate of the Arvonia syncline. The youngest rocks of the area are the granitoid and pegmatoid bodies of the Falmouth Intrusive Suite. They consist of

  12. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H. [LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Université Paris Diderot (UPD), Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Labex ESEP, Paris (France); Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T., E-mail: vvinogradoff@mnhn.fr [PIIM, Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, Université Aix-Marseille, UMR CNRS 7345, Marseille (France)

    2015-08-20

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  13. Deciphering Front-Side Complex Formation in SN2 Reactions via Dynamics Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, István; Olasz, Balázs; Czakó, Gábor

    2017-07-06

    Due to their importance in organic chemistry, the atomistic understanding of bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reactions shows exponentially growing interest. In this publication, the effect of front-side complex (FSC) formation is uncovered via quasi-classical trajectory computations combined with a novel analysis method called trajectory orthogonal projection (TOP). For both F(-) + CH3Y [Y = Cl,I] reactions, the lifetime distributions of the F(-)···YCH3 front-side complex revealed weakly trapped nucleophiles (F(-)). However, only the F(-) + CH3I reaction features strongly trapped nucleophiles in the front-side region of the prereaction well. Interestingly, both back-side and front-side attack show propensity to long-lived FSC formation. Spatial distributions of the nucleophile demonstrate more prominent FSC formation in case of the F(-) + CH3I reaction compared to F(-) + CH3Cl. The presence of front-side intermediates and the broad spatial distribution in the back-side region may explain the indirect nature of the F(-) + CH3I reaction.

  14. Development of Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems Based on Complex Metal Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten B. Ley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This review describes recent research in the development of tank systems based on complex metal hydrides for thermolysis and hydrolysis. Commercial applications using complex metal hydrides are limited, especially for thermolysis-based systems where so far only demonstration projects have been performed. Hydrolysis-based systems find their way in space, naval, military and defense applications due to their compatibility with proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cells. Tank design, modeling, and development for thermolysis and hydrolysis systems as well as commercial applications of hydrolysis systems are described in more detail in this review. For thermolysis, mostly sodium aluminum hydride containing tanks were developed, and only a few examples with nitrides, ammonia borane and alane. For hydrolysis, sodium borohydride was the preferred material whereas ammonia borane found less popularity. Recycling of the sodium borohydride spent fuel remains an important part for their commercial viability.

  15. Development of Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems Based on Complex Metal Hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Morten B.; Meggouh, Mariem; Moury, Romain; Peinecke, Kateryna; Felderhoff, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review describes recent research in the development of tank systems based on complex metal hydrides for thermolysis and hydrolysis. Commercial applications using complex metal hydrides are limited, especially for thermolysis-based systems where so far only demonstration projects have been performed. Hydrolysis-based systems find their way in space, naval, military and defense applications due to their compatibility with proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Tank design, modeling, and development for thermolysis and hydrolysis systems as well as commercial applications of hydrolysis systems are described in more detail in this review. For thermolysis, mostly sodium aluminum hydride containing tanks were developed, and only a few examples with nitrides, ammonia borane and alane. For hydrolysis, sodium borohydride was the preferred material whereas ammonia borane found less popularity. Recycling of the sodium borohydride spent fuel remains an important part for their commercial viability. PMID:28793541

  16. Synthesis and Mechanism of Formation of Hydride-Sulfide Complexes of Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnet, Nicholas A; McWilliams, Sean F; DeRosha, Daniel E; Mercado, Brandon Q; Holland, Patrick L

    2017-08-07

    Iron-sulfide complexes with hydride ligands provide an experimental precedent for spectroscopically detected hydride species on the iron-sulfur MoFe 7 S 9 C cofactor of nitrogenase. In this contribution, we expand upon our recent synthesis of the first iron sulfide hydride complex from an iron hydride and a sodium thiolate ( Arnet, N. A.; Dugan, T. R.; Menges, F. S.; Mercado, B. Q.; Brennessel, W. W.; Bill, E.; Johnson, M. A.; Holland, P. L., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015 , 137 , 13220 - 13223 ). First, we describe the isolation of an analogous iron sulfide hydride with a smaller diketiminate supporting ligand, which benefits from easier preparation of the hydride precursor and easier isolation of the product. Second, we describe mechanistic studies on the C-S bond cleavage through which the iron sulfide hydride product is formed. In a key experiment, use of cyclopropylmethanethiolate as the sulfur precursor leads to products from cyclopropane ring opening, implicating an alkyl radical as an intermediate. Combined with the results of isotopic labeling studies, the data are consistent with a mechanism in which homolytic C-S bond cleavage is followed by rebound of the alkyl radical to abstract a hydrogen atom from iron to give the observed alkane and iron-sulfide products.

  17. Hydrogen Atom Abstraction Thermodynamics of a μ-1,2-Superoxo Dicopper(II) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindermann, Nicole; Günes, Can-Jerome; Dechert, Sebastian; Meyer, Franc

    2017-07-26

    Pyrazolate-based μ-1,2-peroxo dicopper(II) complex 1 undergoes clean 1e- oxidation at low potential (-0.59 V vs Fc/Fc+) to yield the rather stable μ-1,2-superoxo dicopper(II) complex 3, which was characterized by spectroscopic methods (ν̃(O-O) = 1070 cm-1, Δ(18O-16O) = -59 cm-1) and analyzed by DFT calculations. 3 is also formed via H-atom abstraction from the corresponding μ-1,1-hydroperoxo dicopper(II) complex 2, while 3 itself is able to abstract H-atoms from weaker X-H bonds such as TEMPO-H to re-form 2. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses evidence a concerted proton-electron transfer pathway for these processes. The thermodynamic square scheme reveals a bond dissociation free energy of 71.7 ± 1.1 kcal mol-1 for the hydroperoxo OO-H bond of 2.

  18. Ruthenium(II) Complexes Containing Lutidine-Derived Pincer CNC Ligands: Synthesis, Structure, and Catalytic Hydrogenation of C-N bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Juárez, Martín; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Lara, Patricia; Morales-Cerón, Judith P; Vaquero, Mónica; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Salazar, Verónica; Suárez, Andrés

    2015-05-11

    A series of Ru complexes containing lutidine-derived pincer CNC ligands have been prepared by transmetalation with the corresponding silver-carbene derivatives. Characterization of these derivatives shows both mer and fac coordination of the CNC ligands depending on the wingtips of the N-heterocyclic carbene fragments. In the presence of tBuOK, the Ru-CNC complexes are active in the hydrogenation of a series of imines. In addition, these complexes catalyze the reversible hydrogenation of phenantridine. Detailed NMR spectroscopic studies have shown the capability of the CNC ligand to be deprotonated and get involved in ligand-assisted activation of dihydrogen. More interestingly, upon deprotonation, the Ru-CNC complex 5 e(BF4 ) is able to add aldimines to the metal-ligand framework to yield an amido complex. Finally, investigation of the mechanism of the hydrogenation of imines has been carried out by means of DFT calculations. The calculated mechanism involves outer-sphere stepwise hydrogen transfer to the C-N bond assisted either by the pincer ligand or a second coordinated H2 molecule. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The plant cell cycle: Pre-Replication complex formation and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil, Juliana Nogueira; Costa, Carinne N Monteiro; Cabral, Luiz Mors; Ferreira, Paulo C G; Hemerly, Adriana S

    2017-01-01

    The multiplication of cells in all living organisms requires a tight regulation of DNA replication. Several mechanisms take place to ensure that the DNA is replicated faithfully and just once per cell cycle in order to originate through mitoses two new daughter cells that contain exactly the same information from the previous one. A key control mechanism that occurs before cells enter S phase is the formation of a pre-replication complex (pre-RC) that is assembled at replication origins by the sequential association of the origin recognition complex, followed by Cdt1, Cdc6 and finally MCMs, licensing DNA to start replication. The identification of pre-RC members in all animal and plant species shows that this complex is conserved in eukaryotes and, more importantly, the differences between kingdoms might reflect their divergence in strategies on cell cycle regulation, as it must be integrated and adapted to the niche, ecosystem, and the organism peculiarities. Here, we provide an overview of the knowledge generated so far on the formation and the developmental controls of the pre-RC mechanism in plants, analyzing some particular aspects in comparison to other eukaryotes.

  20. Donor-Acceptor Properties of a Single-Molecule Altered by On-Surface Complex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Tobias; Pawlak, Rémy; Kawai, Shigeki; Geng, Yan; Liu, Xunshan; Decurtins, Silvio; Hapala, Prokop; Baratoff, Alexis; Liu, Shi-Xia; Jelínek, Pavel; Meyer, Ernst; Glatzel, Thilo

    2017-08-22

    Electron donor-acceptor molecules are of outstanding interest in molecular electronics and organic solar cells for their intramolecular charge transfer controlled via electrical or optical excitation. The preservation of their electronic character in the ground state upon adsorption on a surface is cardinal for their implementation in such single-molecule devices. Here, we investigate by atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy a prototypical system consisting of a π-conjugated tetrathiafulvalene-fused dipyridophenazine molecule adsorbed on thin NaCl films on Cu(111). Depending on the adsorption site, the molecule is found either in a nearly undisturbed free state or in a bound state. In the latter case, the molecule adopts a specific adsorption site, leading to the formation of a chelate complex with a single Na(+) alkali cation pulled out from the insulating film. Although expected to be electronically decoupled, the charge distribution of the complex is drastically modified, leading to the loss of the intrinsic donor-acceptor character. The chelate complex formation is reversible with respect to lateral manipulations, enabling tunable donor-acceptor molecular switches activated by on-surface coordination.

  1. Formation Mechanism of Oxide-Sulfide Complex Inclusions in High-Sulfur-Containing Steel Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Hong; Park, Joo Hyun

    2018-02-01

    The [S] content in resulfurized steel is controlled in the range of 200 to 800 ppm to ensure good machinability and workability. It is well known that "MgAl2O4(spinel)+CaS" complex inclusions are formed in molten steel during the ladle refining process, and these cause nozzle clogging during continuous casting. Thus, in the present study, the "Refractory-Slag-Metal-Inclusions (ReSMI)" multiphase reaction model was employed in conjunction with experiments to investigate the influence of slag composition and [S] content in the steel on the formation of oxide-sulfide complex inclusions. The critical [S] and [Al] contents necessary for the precipitation of CaS in the CaO-Al2O3-MgO-SiO2 (CAMS) oxide inclusions were predicted from the composition of the liquid inclusions, as observed by scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) and calculated using the ReSMI multiphase reaction model. The critical [S] content increases with increasing content of SiO2 in the slag at a given [Al] content. Formation mechanisms for spinel+CaS and spinel+MnS complex inclusions were also proposed.

  2. Complex conductivity response to microbial growth and biofilm formation on phenanthrene spiked medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Remy; Gourry, Jean Christophe; Simonnot, Marie-Odile; Leyval, Corinne

    2011-11-01

    Several laboratory studies have recently demonstrated the utility of geophysical methods for the investigation of microbial-induced changes over contaminated sites. However, it remains difficult to distinguish the effects due to the new physical properties imparted by microbial processes, to bacterial growth, or to the development of bacterial biofilm. We chose to study the influence of biofilm formation on geophysical response using complex conductivity measurements (0.1-1000 Hz) in phenanthrene-contaminated media. Biotic assays were conducted with two phenanthrene (PHE) degrading bacterial strains: Burkholderia sp (NAH1), which produced biofilm and Stenophomonas maltophilia (MATE10), which did not, and an abiotic control. Results showed that bacterial densities for NAH1 and MATE10 strains continuously increased at the same rate during the experiment. However, the complex conductivity signature showed noticeable differences between the two bacteria, with a phase shift of 50 mrad at 4 Hz for NAH1, which produced biofilm. Biofilm volume was quantified by Scanning Confocal Laser Microscopy (SCLM). Significant correlations were established between phase shift decrease and biofilm volume for NAH1 assays. Results suggest that complex conductivity measurements, specifically phase shift, can be a useful indicator of biofilm formation inside the overall signal of microbial activity on contaminated sites.

  3. Decay of Activity Complexes, Formation of Unipolar Magnetic Regions, and Coronal Holes in Their Causal Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, E. M.; Mordvinov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The peculiar development of solar activity in the current cycle resulted in an asynchronous reversal of the Sun's polar fields. The asymmetry is also observed in the formation of polar coronal holes. A stable coronal hole was first formed at the South Pole, despite the later polar-field reversal there. The aim of this study is to understand the processes making this situation possible. Synoptic magnetic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group and corresponding coronal-hole maps from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory are analyzed here to study the causal relationship between the decay of activity complexes, evolution of large-scale magnetic fields, and formation of coronal holes. Ensembles of coronal holes associated with decaying active regions and activity complexes are presented. These ensembles take part in global rearrangements of the Sun's open magnetic flux. In particular, the south polar coronal hole was formed from an ensemble of coronal holes that came into existence after the decay of multiple activity complexes observed during 2014.

  4. Influence of high flux hydrogen-plasma exposure on the thermal shock induced crack formation in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Rapp, J.; Wright, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of high flux hydrogen-plasma on the thermal shock behaviour of tungsten was investigated in a combined experiment using the linear plasma device Pilot-PSI and the electron beam facility JUDITH 1. Tungsten targets were exposed to high flux hydrogen plasma, cyclic thermal shock tests and

  5. Explicit treatment of hydrogen bonds in the universal force field: Validation and application for metal-organic frameworks, hydrates, and host-guest complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupry, Damien E.; Addicoat, Matthew A.; Heine, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    A straightforward means to include explicit hydrogen bonds within the Universal Force Field (UFF) is presented. Instead of treating hydrogen bonds as non-bonded interaction subjected to electrostatic and Lennard-Jones potentials, we introduce an explicit bond with a negligible bond order, thus maintaining the structural integrity of the H-bonded complexes and avoiding the necessity to assign arbitrary charges to the system. The explicit hydrogen bond changes the coordination number of the acceptor site and the approach is thus most suitable for systems with under-coordinated atoms, such as many metal-organic frameworks; however, it also shows an excellent performance for other systems involving a hydrogen-bonded framework. In particular, it is an excellent means for creating starting structures for molecular dynamics and for investigations employing more sophisticated methods. The approach is validated for the hydrogen bonded complexes in the S22 dataset and then employed for a set of metal-organic frameworks from the Computation-Ready Experimental database and several hydrogen bonded crystals including water ice and clathrates. We show that the direct inclusion of hydrogen bonds reduces the maximum error in predicted cell parameters from 66% to only 14%, and the mean unsigned error is similarly reduced from 14% to only 4%. We posit that with the inclusion of hydrogen bonding, the solvent-mediated breathing of frameworks such as MIL-53 is now accessible to rapid UFF calculations, which will further the aim of rapid computational scanning of metal-organic frameworks while providing better starting points for electronic structure calculations.

  6. Explicit treatment of hydrogen bonds in the universal force field: Validation and application for metal-organic frameworks, hydrates, and host-guest complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupry, Damien E; Addicoat, Matthew A; Heine, Thomas

    2017-10-28

    A straightforward means to include explicit hydrogen bonds within the Universal Force Field (UFF) is presented. Instead of treating hydrogen bonds as non-bonded interaction subjected to electrostatic and Lennard-Jones potentials, we introduce an explicit bond with a negligible bond order, thus maintaining the structural integrity of the H-bonded complexes and avoiding the necessity to assign arbitrary charges to the system. The explicit hydrogen bond changes the coordination number of the acceptor site and the approach is thus most suitable for systems with under-coordinated atoms, such as many metal-organic frameworks; however, it also shows an excellent performance for other systems involving a hydrogen-bonded framework. In particular, it is an excellent means for creating starting structures for molecular dynamics and for investigations employing more sophisticated methods. The approach is validated for the hydrogen bonded complexes in the S22 dataset and then employed for a set of metal-organic frameworks from the Computation-Ready Experimental database and several hydrogen bonded crystals including water ice and clathrates. We show that the direct inclusion of hydrogen bonds reduces the maximum error in predicted cell parameters from 66% to only 14%, and the mean unsigned error is similarly reduced from 14% to only 4%. We posit that with the inclusion of hydrogen bonding, the solvent-mediated breathing of frameworks such as MIL-53 is now accessible to rapid UFF calculations, which will further the aim of rapid computational scanning of metal-organic frameworks while providing better starting points for electronic structure calculations.

  7. Quantum-chemical analysis of formation reactions of Со2+ complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor F. Vargalyuk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of quantum chemical calculations results (GAMESS, density functional theory, B3LYP method as to coordination compounds of Co2+ions with H2O, NH3, OH–, F–, Cl–, Br–, I–, CN–, Ac–, Ak– generally given by [Co(H2O6–nLn]2+nx, it has been demonstrated that within the selected series of ligands, there is no correlation between the amount of energy of monosubstituted cobalt aqua complexes formation(∆Е and pK1,just like between the effective nuclear charge of the central atom (z*Со and pK1. According to the behavior of ∆Е and z*Со,we identified two groups of ligands. The first group (OH–, F–, Ac–, Ak–, CN–, NH3 demonstrates logical ∆Е decrease caused by the growth of z*Со. On the contrary, the second group (Cl–, Br–, I– demonstrates ∆Е increase caused by the growth of z*Со. This phenomenon is explained by the change in electronegativity and polarizability of donor atoms in groups and periods of the periodic table. It is established that linear correlations given by lgK = A + B·z*Со can be actualized only for complexes having ligands with similar donor atoms. Referring to the literature on stepwise complex formation of hydroxide, amine and chloride cobalt complexes in combination with z*Со calculations results, we determined A and B constants of lgK, z*Со-correlations for the atoms of oxygen (30.2, –17.7; nitrogen (125.4, –69.9 and chlorine (–6.3, 5.8. The existence of the detected correlation series enables us to lean on lgK,z*М–dependence parameters for the fixed donor atom and to determine Kn values for various complexes with complex-based ligands using calculations and z*М data. This applies to complexes having central atoms of the same nature as well as simple monodentate ligands. The mentioned approach was used to calculate the stability constants for acrylate cobalt complexes (lgK1 = 1.2 и lgК2 = 4.3, which are not covered in literature.

  8. The Protein Kingdom Extended: Ordered and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins, Their Folding, Supramolecular Complex Formation, and Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2010-01-01

    The native state of a protein is usually associated with a compact globular conformation possessing a rigid and highly ordered structure. At the turn of the last century certain studies arose which concluded that many proteins cannot, in principle, form a rigid globular structure in an aqueous environment, but they are still able to fulfill their specific functions — i.e., they are native. The existence of the disordered regions allows these proteins to interact with their numerous binding partners. Such interactions are often accompanied by the formation of complexes that possess a more ordered structure than the original components. The functional diversity of these proteins, combined with the variability of signals related to the various intra-and intercellular processes handled by these proteins and their capability to produce multi-variant and multi-directional responses allow them to form a unique regulatory net in a cell. The abundance of disordered proteins inside the cell is precisely controlled at the synthesis and clearance levels as well as via interaction with specific binding partners and posttranslational modifications. Another recently recognized biologically active state of proteins is the functional amyloid. The formation of such functional amyloids is tightly controlled and therefore differs from the uncontrolled formation of pathogenic amyloids which are associated with the pathogenesis of several conformational diseases, the development of which is likely to be determined by the failures of the cellular regulatory systems rather than by the formation of the proteinaceous deposits and/or by the protofibril toxicity. PMID:20097220

  9. THE FORMATION OF STUDENTS’ SOCIAL COMPETENCES IN A TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY AS A MULTILEVEL EDUCATIONAL COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Sergeyeva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article deals with the problem of expanding students’ competencies. A modern technical University must train professionals who apart from having a high special competence, also have the understanding of the common cultural issues. The solution of the problem is possible through a specially organized activity in the system of lifelong education. The formation of students’ social competences assumes a particular relevance, in the educational process, of a technical university as a multilevel educational complex in the context of the implementation of competence-based approach. Materials and Methods: the authors use the following methods of scientific research: system-structural analysis, synthesis, working with literature, summarizing the e xperience, and critical reflection. Results: the article presents a programme “The Formation of Students’ Social Competences in a Technical University as a Multilevel Educational Complex” developed by the authors. The content of the programme suggests the formation of social competence of health preservation, civic consciousness, communication and social interaction as well as the formation of competence in th e field of information technology. Discussion and Conclusions: the programme developed by the authors is one of the results of research carried out in the work of the Russian Academy of Education experimental unit, case study of Penza State Technological University. The main target of this programme is to promote engineering staff training for a regional labour market. This programme can be used in dif ferent institutions of continuing education.

  10. Turning symmetric an asymmetric hydrogen bond with the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects: the case of the [CN···H···NC]- complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Diego V; González, Sergio A; Reyes, Andrés

    2011-01-14

    Nuclear quantum effects (NQE) on the geometry, energy, and electronic structure of the [CN·L·NC](-) complex (L = H, D, T) are investigated with the recently developed APMO/MP2 code. This code implements the nuclear molecular orbital approach (NMO) at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and MP2 levels of theory for electrons and quantum nuclei. In a first study, we examined the H/D/T isotope effects on the geometry and electronic structure of the CNH molecule at NMO/HF and NMO/MP2 levels of theory. We found that when increasing the hydrogen nuclear mass there is a reduction of the R(N-H) bond distance and an increase of the electronic population on the hydrogen atom. Our calculated bond distances are in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical results. In a second investigation, we explored the hydrogen NQE on the geometry of [CNHNC](-) complex at the NMO/HF and NMO/MP2 levels of theory. We discovered that while a NMO/HF calculation presented an asymmetric hydrogen bond, the NMO/MP2 calculation revealed a symmetric H-bond. We also examined the H/D/T isotope effects on the geometry and stabilization energy of the [CNHNC](-) complex. We noted that gradual increases in hydrogen mass led to reductions of the R(NN) distance and destabilization of the hydrogen bond (H-bond). A discussion of these results is given in terms of the hydrogen nuclear delocalization effects on the electronic structure and energy components. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ab initio NMO study that reveals the importance of including nuclear quantum effects in conventional electronic structure calculations for an enhanced description of strong-low-barrier H-bonded systems.

  11. Cloud fluid compression and softening in spiral arms and the formation of giant molecular cloud complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, L. L.

    1981-04-01

    With regard to the galactodynamics of the cloudy interstellar medium, the paper considers the response of such a gas to a forcing potential in the tight-winding density wave theory. The cloud fluid is treated in the hydrodynamic limit with an equation of state which softens at high densities. It is shown that in the inner regions of the galaxy, cooling of the cloud fluid in the arms can result in gravitational instability and the formation of large bound complexes of clouds which are identified with the giant molecular clouds (GMCs). Masses, dimensions, distributions, and scale heights of the GMCs are predicted by the theory. It is suggested that the interstellar gas density in the disk is regulated by the gravitational instability mechanism in the arms which siphons material into star formation. Implications for the evolution of individual GMCs and for galactic morphology are discussed.

  12. Superoxide-mediated Fe(II) formation from organically complexed Fe(III) in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Manabu; Ito, Hiroaki; Rose, Andrew L.; Waite, T. David; Omura, Tatsuo

    2008-12-01

    Fe(III) complexed by organic ligands (Fe(III)L) is the primary form of dissolved Fe in marine and coastal environments. Superoxide, typically produced in biological and photochemical processes, is one of the reducing agents that contributes to transformation of Fe(III)L to bioavailable, free dissolved Fe(II) (Fe(II)'). In this work, the kinetics of superoxide-mediated Fe(II)' formation from Fe(III)L in a simulated coastal water system were investigated and a comprehensive kinetic model was developed using citrate and fulvic acid as exemplar Fe-binding ligands. To simulate a coastal environment in laboratory experiments, Fe(III)L samples with various ligand/Fe ratios were incubated for 5 min to 1 week in seawater medium. At each ratio and incubation time, the rate of superoxide-mediated Fe(II)' formation was determined in the presence of the strong Fe(II) binding ligand ferrozine by spectrophotometrically measuring the ferrous-ferrozine complex generated at a constant concentration of superoxide. The Fe(II)' formation rate generally decreased with incubation time, as Fe(III)L gradually dissociated to form less reactive Fe(III) oxyhydroxide. However, when the ligand/Fe ratio was sufficiently high, the dissociation of Fe(III)L (and subsequent Fe precipitation) was suppressed and Fe(II)' was formed at a higher rate. The rate of Fe(II)' produced during the experiment was explained by the kinetic model. The model confirmed that both the ligand/Fe ratio and incubation time have a significant effect on the pathway via which Fe(II)' is formed from Fe(III)-fulvic acid complexes.

  13. The coordination complex structures and hydrogen bonding in the three-dimensional alkaline earth metal salts (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) of (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D

    2017-01-01

    (4-Aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) is used as an antihelminth in veterinary applications and was earlier used in the monosodium salt dihydrate form as the antisyphilitic drug atoxyl. Examples of complexes with this acid are rare. The structures of the alkaline earth metal (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) complexes with (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) have been determined, viz. hexaaquamagnesium bis[hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonate] tetrahydrate, [Mg(H2O)6](C6H7AsNO3)·4H2O, (I), catena-poly[[[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ2-hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ(2)O:O']-[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ2-hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ(2)O:O

  14. Electrochemistry of metal complexes applications from electroplating to oxide layer formation

    CERN Document Server

    Survila, Arvydas

    2015-01-01

    This book aims to sequentially cover all the major stages of electrochemical processes (mass transport, adsorption, charge transfer), with a special emphasis on their deep interrelation. Starting with general considerations on equilibria in solutions and at interfaces as well as on mass transport, the text acquaints readers with the theory and common experimental practice for studying electrochemical reactions of metals complexes. The core part of the book deals with all important aspects of electroplating, including a systematic discussion of co-deposition of metals and formation of alloys.

  15. [Benign fibro-osseous lesions of the craniofacial complex with aneurysmal bone cyst formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldo, Ana Filipa; Mendes Dos Santos, Carolina; Tavares, Joana; Fernandes Sousa, Rita; Campos, Alexandre; Farias, João Paulo; Pimentel, José; Guedes Campos, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst are controversial osteolytic benign expansive lesions which occur more frequently in the metaphysis of long bones and spine. They are classified as primary or secondary lesions depending on the presence or absence of an associated bone pathology. The engraftment of aneurysmal bone cyst onto benign fibro-osseous lesions is established. However, in the craniofacial complex this combined lesion is rare.The authors present two histologically proven uncommon cases of benign fibro-osseous lesions (fibrous dysplasia and juvenile psammomatoid ossifying fibroma) with aneurysmal bone cyst formation, emphasizing the imaging characteristics of this hybrid entities.

  16. Methylene Blue Sensitized Photodechlorination of Isomeric Mono- and Dichloroanilines via Molecular Complex Formation Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. C. Pande

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The photosensitized dechlorination of isomeric mono- and dichloroanilines has been studied using methylene blue as photosensitizer in alkaline medium. The dechlorination products have been identified and formation of molecular complex between aniline and methylene blue has been observed. The effects of the pH, concentration of the sensitizer, concentration of the substrate, the intensity of the light and the temperature on the rate of the reaction have been studied. The quantum efficiency of the photodechlorination has been evaluated. The mechanism of the photodechlorination has been suggested.

  17. The role of Glu259 in Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu in ternary complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nautrup Pedersen, Gitte; Rattenborg, Thomas; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde

    1998-01-01

    Determination of the crystal structure of the ternary complex formed between elongation factor Tu:GTP and aminoacylated tRNA revealed three regions of interaction between elongation factor Tu and tRNA. The structure indicates that the conserved glutamic acid at position 271 in Thermus aquaticus EF...... spatially and chemically so that only a residue with almost the same size and chemical properties as glutamic acid fulfils the requirements with regard to size, salt bridge-formation potential and maintenance of the backbone conformation at the 259 position. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-Feb...

  18. The oyster genome reveals stress adaptation and complexity of shell formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guofan; Fang, Xiaodong; Guo, Ximing

    2012-01-01

    response and the proteome of the shell. The oyster genome is highly polymorphic and rich in repetitive sequences, with some transposable elements still actively shaping variation. Transcriptome studies reveal an extensive set of genes responding to environmental stress. The expansion of genes coding...... for heat shock protein 70 and inhibitors of apoptosis is probably central to the oyster's adaptation to sessile life in the highly stressful intertidal zone. Our analyses also show that shell formation in molluscs is more complex than currently understood and involves extensive participation of cells...

  19. Research paper effects of 13-HPODE on expression of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis, iodide uptake and formation of hydrogen peroxide in porcine thyrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luci, Sebastian; Bettzieche, Anja; Brandsch, Corinna; Eder, Klaus

    2006-11-01

    It has been shown that dietary oxidized fats influence thyroid function in rats and pigs. Mechanism underlying this phenomenon are unknown. This study was performed to investigate whether 13-hydroperoxy-9,11 -octadecadienic acid (13-HPODE), a primary oxidation product of linoleic acid, affects expression of gene involved in thyroid hormone synthesis and formation of hydrogen peroxide in primary porcine thyrocytes. Thyrocytes were treated with 13-HPODE in concentrations between 20 and 100 microM. Cells treated with vehicle alone ("control cells") or with equivalent concentrations of linoleic acid were considered as controls. Treatment of cells with 13-HPODE did not affect cell viability but increased the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (p < 0.05) compared to control cells or cells treated with linoleic acid. Relative mRNA concentrations of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis like sodium iodide symporter, thyrotropin receptor, and thyroid peroxidase, as well as iodide uptake, did not differ between cells treated with 13-HPODE and control cells or cells treated with linoleic acid. Treatment of cells with 13-HPODE, however, reduced the relative mRNA concentrations of dual oxidase-2 and the formation of hydrogen peroxide compared to control cells or cells treated with linoleic acid (p < 0.05). Because the production of hydrogen peroxide is rate-limiting for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, it is suggested that 13-HPODE could have an impact on the formation of thyroid hormones in the thyroid gland.

  20. A Solution Study of Complex Formation of Some Diamines with Lanthanones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Vora

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the metal ligand equilibrium in aqueous solution, the well known Irving-Rossotti titration method was used. The temperature selected is 30±0.10C at ionic strength 0.2 M (NaClO4 which was maintained constant through out the work. The binary metal complex (ML2 formation was studied. The metals selected are Sm3+, Gd3+, Dy3+ and Yb3+. The diamine ligands taken are ethylenediamine, 1,2 diamino propane, 1,3 diamino propane, N-N diethyl ethylenediamine and N-N -dimethyl ethylenediamine. Factors that affected the stability of the complexes are size and ionic potential of lanthanone ions, basicity of ligands, ring size and steric effect of ligands.

  1. Complex formation during dissolution of metal oxides in molten alkali carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Borup, Flemming; Petrushina, Irina

    1999-01-01

    Dissolution of metal oxides in molten carbonates relates directly to the stability of materials for electrodes and construction of molten carbonate fuel cells. In the present work the solubilities of PbO, NiO, Fe2O3,and Bi2O3 in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650 degrees C under...... as the partial pressure of carbon dioxide varies. By combination of solubility and electromotive force measurements, a model is constructed assuming the dissolution involves complex formation. The possible species for lead are proposed to be [Pb(CO3)(2)](-2) and/or [Pb(CO3)(3)](-4). A similar complex chemistry...

  2. Fatty acid synthetase from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes: formation of monounsaturated fatty acids by a multienzyme complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, A; Okuda, S

    1977-01-01

    A multienzyme fatty acid synthetase complex isolated from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes has been purified to a specific activity of 1440 nmol of malonyl-CoA incorporated per min/mg. The enzyme is homogeneous, as judged by gel electrophoresis on agarose gels, and has a molecular weight of 1.2 X 10(6). Both NADPH and NADH are required for activity. In contrast to other fatty acid synthetase complexes, the enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of both long-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids from malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA. The formation of unsaturated fatty acids is oxygen-independent and sharply reduced by 3-decynoyl-N-acetylcysteamine, a known inhibitor of Escherchia coli beta-hydroxydecanoyl thioester dehydrase (EC 4.2.1.60). PMID:20622

  3. Measurement of muon transfer rate {lambda}{sub pt} and molecular formation rate {lambda}{sub pp{mu}} in solid hydrogen targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulhauser, F.; Beveridge, J.L.; Douglas, J.L.; Maier, M.; Marshall, G.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility; Bailey, J.M. [EA Technology, Capenhurst (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Porcelli, T.A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Markushin, V.E. [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol`zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii; Martoff, C.J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-10-01

    The knowledge of muon transfer from protium to tritium is essentially theoretical and the different theoretical values disagree partially. Using solid hydrogen-tritium targets, with different tritium concentrations, we obtained precise experimental results for the transfer rate to tritium and the HH{mu} molecular formation rate. The time spectra of neutrons and alpha particles produced after DT{mu} fusion are used to determine the transfer rate {lambda}{sub pt} and the molecule formation rate {lambda}{sub pp{mu}}. (orig.). 27 refs.

  4. Characterisation of complex formation between members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex CFP-10/ESAT-6 protein family: towards an understanding of the rules governing complex formation and thereby functional flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Kirsty L; Renshaw, Philip S; Collins, Michelle L; Wright, Rebecca L; Hunt, Debbie M; Gordon, Stephen V; Hewinson, R Glyn; Buxton, Roger S; Williamson, Richard A; Carr, Mark D

    2004-09-01

    We have previously shown that the secreted M. tuberculosis complex proteins CFP-10 and ESAT-6 form a tight, 1:1 complex, which may represent their functional form. In the work reported here a combination of yeast two-hybrid and biochemical analysis has been used to characterise complex formation between two other pairs of CFP-10/ESAT-6 family proteins (Rv0287/Rv0288 and Rv3019c/Rv3020c) and to determine whether complexes can be formed between non-genome paired members of the family. The results clearly demonstrate that Rv0287/Rv0288 and Rv3019c/3020c form tight complexes, as initially observed for CFP-10/ESAT-6. The closely related Rv0287/Rv0288 and Rv3019c/Rv3020c proteins are also able to form non-genome paired complexes (Rv0287/Rv3019c and Rv0288/Rv3020c), but are not capable of binding to the more distantly related CFP-10/ESAT-6 proteins.

  5. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazawa, Masaharu; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Obara, Chizuka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Gotoh, Takaya; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tajima, Katsushi, E-mail: tajima@nirs.go.jp

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation.

  6. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (UVIO2 2+) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing UVIO2 2+ and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [UVIO2(O)(H)]-. Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [UVIO2(OH)]+. Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to UVO2 +. Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [UVO2(O)]-. Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H+ transfer process that leaves UVO2 + coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [UVO2(O)]-. Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2.

  7. Simulation of performance and nitrogen oxide formation of a hydrogen-enriched diesel engine with the steam injection method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Guven

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, steam injection method (SIM is implemented to a hydrogen-enriched diesel engine in order to improve the levels of performance and NO emissions. As hydrogen enrichment method increases effective efficiency, NO emissions could be increased. However, the SIM is used to control NO emissions and improve the engine performance. Due to these positive effects, hydrogen enrichment and the SIMare applied into a diesel engine by using a two-zone combustion model for30% hydrogen enrichment of the fuel volume and 20% steam ratio of the fuel mass at full load conditions. The results obtained are compared with conventional diesel engine (D, steam injected diesel engine (D+S20, hydrogen-enriched diesel engine (D+H30 and hydrogen-enriched diesel engine with steam injection (D+H30+S20 in terms of performance and NO emissions. In the results, the effective efficiency and effective power improve up to 22.8% and %3.1, as NO emissions decrease up to 22.1%. Hence, the hydrogen enrichment with steam injection method is more environmentally friendly with better performance.

  8. Formation of Multiple-Phase Catalysts for the Hydrogen Storage of Mg Nanoparticles by Adding Flowerlike NiS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiubo; Ma, Xiujuan; Liu, Peng; Shang, Jiaxiang; Li, Xingguo; Liu, Tong

    2017-02-22

    In order to enhance the hydrogen storage properties of Mg, flowerlike NiS particles have been successfully prepared by solvothermal reaction method, and are subsequently ball milled with Mg nanoparticles (NPs) to fabricate Mg-5 wt % NiS nanocomposite. The nanocomposite displays Mg/NiS core/shell structure. The NiS shell decomposes into Ni, MgS and Mg2Ni multiple-phases, decorating on the surface of the Mg NPs after the first hydrogen absorption and desorption cycle at 673 K. The Mg-MgS-Mg2Ni-Ni nanocomposite shows enhanced hydrogenation and dehydrogenation rates: it can quickly uptake 3.5 wt % H2 within 10 min at 423 K and release 3.1 wt % H2 within 10 min at 573 K. The apparent hydrogen absorption and desorption activation energies are decreased to 45.45 and 64.71 kJ mol(-1). The enhanced sorption kinetics of the nanocomposite is attributed to the synergistic catalytic effects of the in situ formed MgS, Ni and Mg2Ni multiple-phase catalysts during the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation process, the porthole effects for the volume expansion and microstrain of the phase transformation of Mg2Ni and Mg2NiH4 and the reduced hydrogen diffusion distance caused by nanosized Mg. This novel method of in situ producing multiple-phase catalysts gives a new horizon for designing high performance hydrogen storage material.

  9. Sulfide oxidation by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by iron complexes: two metal centers are better than one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekmouche, Yasmina; Hummel, Helga; Ho, Raymond Y N; Que, Lawrence; Schünemann, Volker; Thomas, Fabrice; Trautwein, Alfred X; Lebrun, Colette; Gorgy, Karine; Leprêtre, Jean-Claude; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Deronzier, Alain; Fontecave, Marc; Ménage, Stéphane

    2002-03-01

    Peroxoiron species have been proposed to be involved in catalytic cycles of iron-dependent oxygenases and in some cases as the active intermediates during oxygen-transfer reactions. The catalytic properties of a mononuclear iron complex, [Fe(II)(pb)(2)(CH(3)CN)(2)] (pb=(-)4,5-pinene-2,2'-bipyridine), have been compared to those of its related dinuclear analogue. Each system generates specific peroxo adducts, which are responsible for the oxidation of sulfides to sulfoxides. The dinuclear catalyst was found to be more reactive and (enantio)selective than its mononuclear counterpart, suggesting that a second metal site affords specific advantages for stereoselective catalysis. These results might help for the design of future enantioselective iron catalysts.

  10. Site-selective oxidation, amination and epimerization reactions of complex polyols enabled by transfer hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Christopher K.; Hartwig, John F.

    2017-12-01

    Polyoxygenated hydrocarbons that bear one or more hydroxyl groups comprise a large set of natural and synthetic compounds, often with potent biological activity. In synthetic chemistry, alcohols are important precursors to carbonyl groups, which then can be converted into a wide range of oxygen- or nitrogen-based functionality. Therefore, the selective conversion of a single hydroxyl group in natural products into a ketone would enable the selective introduction of unnatural functionality. However, the methods known to convert a simple alcohol, or even an alcohol in a molecule that contains multiple protected functional groups, are not suitable for selective reactions of complex polyol structures. We present a new ruthenium catalyst with a unique efficacy for the selective oxidation of a single hydroxyl group among many in unprotected polyol natural products. This oxidation enables the introduction of nitrogen-based functional groups into such structures that lack nitrogen atoms and enables a selective alcohol epimerization by stepwise or reversible oxidation and reduction.

  11. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  12. Cas1-Cas2 complex formation mediates spacer acquisition during CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, James K; Kranzusch, Philip J; Noeske, Jonas; Wright, Addison V; Davies, Christopher W; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    The initial stage of CRISPR-Cas immunity involves the integration of foreign DNA spacer segments into the host genomic CRISPR locus. The nucleases Cas1 and Cas2 are the only proteins conserved among all CRISPR-Cas systems, yet the molecular functions of these proteins during immunity are unknown. Here we show that Cas1 and Cas2 from Escherichia coli form a stable complex that is essential for spacer acquisition and determine the 2.3-Å-resolution crystal structure of the Cas1-Cas2 complex. Mutations that perturb Cas1-Cas2 complex formation disrupt CRISPR DNA recognition and spacer acquisition in vivo. Active site mutants of Cas2, unlike those of Cas1, can still acquire new spacers, thus indicating a nonenzymatic role of Cas2 during immunity. These results reveal the universal roles of Cas1 and Cas2 and suggest a mechanism by which Cas1-Cas2 complexes specify sites of CRISPR spacer integration.

  13. Different Mechanisms of Catalytic Complex Formation in Two L-Tryptophan Processing Dioxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Nienhaus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The human heme enzymes tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (hTDO and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (hIDO catalyze the initial step in L-tryptophan (L-Trp catabolism, the insertion of dioxygen into L-Trp. Overexpression of these enzymes causes depletion of L-Trp and accumulation of metabolic products, and thereby contributes to tumor immune tolerance and immune dysregulation in a variety of disease pathologies. Understanding the assembly of the catalytically active, ternary enzyme-substrate-ligand complexes is not yet fully resolved, but an essential prerequisite for designing efficient and selective de novo inhibitors. Evidence is mounting that the ternary complex forms by sequential binding of ligand and substrate in a specific order. In hTDO, the apolar L-Trp binds first, decreasing active-site solvation and, as a result, reducing non-productive oxidation of the heme iron by the dioxygen ligand, which may leave the substrate bound to a ferric heme iron. In hIDO, by contrast, dioxygen must first coordinate to the heme iron because a bound substrate would occlude ligand access to the heme iron, so the ternary complex can no longer form. Consequently, faster association of L-Trp at high concentrations results in substrate inhibition. Here, we summarize our present knowledge of ternary complex formation in hTDO and hIDO and relate these findings to structural peculiarities of their active sites.

  14. A rationally designed amino-borane complex in a metal organic framework: A novel reusable hydrogen storage and size-selective reduction material

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xinbo

    2015-01-01

    A novel amino-borane complex inside a stable metal organic framework was synthesized for the first time. It releases hydrogen at a temperature of 78 °C with no volatile contaminants and can be well reused. Its application as a size-selective reduction material in organic synthesis was also demonstrated. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  15. Target-stimulated metallic HgS nanostructures on a DNA-based polyion complex membrane for highly efficient impedimetric detection of dissolved hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Junyang; Fu, Libing; Lai, Wenqiang; Tang, Dianping; Chen, Guonan

    2013-12-11

    Target-stimulated metallic HgS nanostructures formed on the DNA-based polyion complex (PIC) membrane were for the first time utilized as an efficient scheme for impedimetric detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) by coupling insoluble precipitation with sensitivity enhancement.

  16. Hormad1 mutation disrupts synaptonemal complex formation, recombination, and chromosome segregation in mammalian meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hyun Shin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is unique to germ cells and essential for reproduction. During the first meiotic division, homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and form chiasmata. The homologues connect via axial elements and numerous transverse filaments to form the synaptonemal complex. The synaptonemal complex is a critical component for chromosome pairing, segregation, and recombination. We previously identified a novel germ cell-specific HORMA domain encoding gene, Hormad1, a member of the synaptonemal complex and a mammalian counterpart to the yeast meiotic HORMA domain protein Hop1. Hormad1 is essential for mammalian gametogenesis as knockout male and female mice are infertile. Hormad1 deficient (Hormad1(-/ (- testes exhibit meiotic arrest in the early pachytene stage, and synaptonemal complexes cannot be visualized by electron microscopy. Hormad1 deficiency does not affect localization of other synaptonemal complex proteins, SYCP2 and SYCP3, but disrupts homologous chromosome pairing. Double stranded break formation and early recombination events are disrupted in Hormad1(-/ (- testes and ovaries as shown by the drastic decrease in the γH2AX, DMC1, RAD51, and RPA foci. HORMAD1 co-localizes with γH2AX to the sex body during pachytene. BRCA1, ATR, and γH2AX co-localize to the sex body and participate in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing. Hormad1 deficiency abolishes γH2AX, ATR, and BRCA1 localization to the sex chromosomes and causes transcriptional de-repression on the X chromosome. Unlike testes, Hormad1(-/ (- ovaries have seemingly normal ovarian folliculogenesis after puberty. However, embryos generated from Hormad1(-/ (- oocytes are hyper- and hypodiploid at the 2 cell and 8 cell stage, and they arrest at the blastocyst stage. HORMAD1 is therefore a critical component of the synaptonemal complex that affects synapsis, recombination, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing.

  17. SSH2S: Hydrogen storage in complex hydrides for an auxiliary power unit based on high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baricco, Marcello; Bang, Mads; Fichtner, Maximilian; Hauback, Bjorn; Linder, Marc; Luetto, Carlo; Moretto, Pietro; Sgroi, Mauro

    2017-02-01

    The main objective of the SSH2S (Fuel Cell Coupled Solid State Hydrogen Storage Tank) project was to develop a solid state hydrogen storage tank based on complex hydrides and to fully integrate it with a High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cell stack. A mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system was used as the main storage material for the tank, due to its high gravimetric storage capacity and relatively low hydrogen desorption temperature. The mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system was coupled with a standard intermetallic compound to take advantage of its capability to release hydrogen at ambient temperature and to ensure a fast start-up of the system. The hydrogen storage tank was designed to feed a 1 kW HT-PEM stack for 2 h to be used for an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). A full thermal integration was possible thanks to the high operation temperature of the fuel cell and to the relative low temperature (170 °C) for hydrogen release from the mixed lithium amide/magnesium hydride system.

  18. A multi-grain reduced-complexity model for step formation and stability in steep streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletti, Matteo; Molnar, Peter; Turowski, Jens; Rickenmann, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    We present a multi-grain particle-based reduced-complexity model for the simulation of the formation and stability of step-pool morphology by specifically considering the granular interactions between sediment and river bed leading to entrainment and deposition of grains. The model CAST2 (Cellular Automaton Sediment Transport), based on the uniform-size model of Saletti et al. [2016], contains phenomenological parameterizations of sediment supply, bed load transport, particle entrainment and deposition, and granular interactions in a cellular-automaton space. CAST2 simulates the effect of different grain sizes by considering two types of particles: fine grains, which can be mobilized by any flow, and coarse grains, whose mobility is flow-dependent. The model has been applied to test the effect of granular forces on step formation and stability in step-pool channels, as hypothesized in the jammed-state framework by Church and Zimmermann [2007]. The jamming of particles in motion and their enhanced stability on the bed are modelled explicitely: in this way steps are effectively generated during high-flow periods and they are stable during low flows when sediment supply is small. Moreover, model results are used to show which are the fundamental processes required to produce and maintain steps in steep streams and these findings are consistent with field observations. Finally the effect of flood frequency on step density is investigated by means of long stochastic simulations with repeated flood events. Model results show that systems with high flood frequency are characterized by greater step density, due to the dominance of step-forming conditions. Our results show the potential of reduced-complexity models as learning tools to gain new insight into the complex feedbacks and poorly understood processes characterizing rapidly changing geomorphic systems like step-pool streams, pointing out the importance of granular effects on the formation and stability of the step

  19. Ammonia Oxidation by Abstraction of Three Hydrogen Atoms from a Mo–NH 3 Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Papri; Heiden, Zachariah M.; Wiedner, Eric S.; Raugei, Simone; Piro, Nicholas A.; Kassel, W. Scott; Bullock, R. Morris; Mock, Michael T.

    2017-02-15

    We report ammonia oxidation by homolytic cleavage of all three H atoms from a Mo-15NH3 complex using the 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl radical to afford a Mo-alkylimido (Mo=15NR) complex (R = 2,4,6-tri-t-butylcyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-one). Reductive cleavage of Mo=15NR generates a terminal Mo≡N nitride, and a [Mo-15NH]+ complex is formed by protonation. Computational analysis describes the energetic profile for the stepwise removal of three H atoms from the Mo-15NH3 complex and the formation of Mo=15NR. Acknowledgment. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Re-search Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. EPR and mass spectrometry experiments were performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL. The authors thank Dr. Eric D. Walter and Dr. Rosalie Chu for assistance in performing EPR and mass spectroscopy analysis, respectively. Computational resources provided by the National Energy Re-search Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Pacific North-west National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. DOE.

  20. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...