WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrogen closed system

  1. Sabatier Reactor System Integration with Microwave Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Post-Processor for Closed-Loop Hydrogen Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.; Williams, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) designed and developed for the International Space Station (ISS) represents the state-of-the-art in carbon dioxide reduction (CDRe) technology. The CRA produces water and methane by reducing carbon dioxide with hydrogen via the Sabatier reaction. The water is recycled to the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) and the methane is vented overboard resulting in a net loss of hydrogen. The proximity to earth and the relative ease of logistics resupply from earth allow for a semi-closed system on ISS. However, long-term manned space flight beyond low earth orbit (LEO) dictates a more thoroughly closed-loop system involving significantly higher recovery of hydrogen, and subsequent recovery of oxygen, to minimize costs associated with logistics resupply beyond LEO. The open-loop ISS system for CDRe can be made closed-loop for follow-on missions by further processing methane to recover hydrogen. For this purpose, a process technology has been developed that employs a microwave-generated plasma to reduce methane to hydrogen and acetylene resulting in 75% theoretical recovery of hydrogen. In 2009, a 1-man equivalent Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) was delivered to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for technical evaluation. The PPA has been integrated with a Sabatier Development Unit (SDU). The integrated process configuration incorporates a sorbent bed to eliminate residual carbon dioxide and water vapor in the Sabatier methane product stream before it enters the PPA. This paper provides detailed information on the stand-alone and integrated performance of both the PPA and SDU. Additionally, the integrated test stand design and anticipated future work are discussed.

  2. Low-dose hydrogen peroxide application in closed recirculating aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Good, C.; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to simulate water treatment practices with hydrogen peroxide (HP) in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). Six identical 1,700-L pilot-scale RAS were divided into two experimental groups based on daily feed allocation and operated under constant conditions...... and contradict prevailing notions that HP cannot be used safely in RAS that employ biofiltration. The development of effective new HP treatment protocols for recirculating aquaculture could reduce the current dependence on formalin to improve water quality and control parasitic loads...

  3. Selective alkyne hydrogenation over nano-metal systems: closing the gap between model and real catalysts for industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Lizana, Fernando; Crespo-Quesada, Micaela; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between catalytic response and properties of the active phase is difficult to establish in classical heterogeneous catalysis due to the number of variables that can affect catalytic performance. Ultrahigh-vacuum surface methods applied to model catalyst surfaces are useful tools to assess fundamental issues related to catalytic processes but they are limited by the significant differences with catalysts in the working state. In an attempt to overcome this issue, (unsupported) nano-metal systems with controlled size and shape have been synthesized and tested in selective alkyne hydrogenation. The results revealed a dependency of nano-particles (NPs) morphology (size and shape) and allowed the identification of the active sites for this type of reaction. The nature of the stabilizer (steric and electrostatic stabilization) used in the NPs preparation has been shown to influence catalytic performance. The tailored active phase was subsequently immobilized on suitable nano- and micro-structured inorganic (e.g. 3D sintered metal fibers) supports with controlled surface properties in order to corroborate if the results obtained on the optimized nano-metal systems could be extrapolated to real catalysts. This article highlights the advantages and limitations of the analysis of selective alkyne hydrogenation over nano-metal systems that close the gap between model and real catalysts where the main challenges that lie ahead are summarized.

  4. Comparison of hydrogen production and electrical power generation for energy capture in closed-loop ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis systems

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is an enormous amount of energy available from salinity gradients, which could be used for clean hydrogen production. Through the use of a favorable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) cathode, the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis (RED) system approached 78 W h m-3. However, if RED is operated with the less favorable (higher overpotential) hydrogen evolution electrode and hydrogen gas is harvested, the energy recovered increases by as much ∼1.5× to 118 W h m-3. Indirect hydrogen production through coupling an RED stack with an external electrolysis system was only projected to achieve 35 W h m-3 or ∼1/3 of that produced through direct hydrogen generation.

  5. Comparison of hydrogen production and electrical power generation for energy capture in closed-loop ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzell, Marta C; Ivanov, Ivan; Cusick, Roland D; Zhu, Xiuping; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-28

    Currently, there is an enormous amount of energy available from salinity gradients, which could be used for clean hydrogen production. Through the use of a favorable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) cathode, the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis (RED) system approached 78 W h m(-3). However, if RED is operated with the less favorable (higher overpotential) hydrogen evolution electrode and hydrogen gas is harvested, the energy recovered increases by as much ~1.5× to 118 W h m(-3). Indirect hydrogen production through coupling an RED stack with an external electrolysis system was only projected to achieve 35 W h m(-3) or ~1/3 of that produced through direct hydrogen generation.

  6. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  7. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  8. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  9. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to their hydride form. In addition to this experimental work, a parallel project was carried out to develop a new model of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) that could be used to define the mechanisms of the electrochemical hydrogenation reactions. The EIS technique is capable of probing complex chemical and electrochemical reactions, and our model was written into a computer code that allowed the input of experimental EIS data and the extraction of kinetic parameters based on a best-fit analysis of theoretical reaction schemes. Finally, electrochemical methods for hydrogenating organic and metallo-organic materials have been explored.

  10. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  11. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  12. Hydrogen Recovery System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Liquid hydrogen is used extensively by NASA to support cryogenic rocket testing. In addition, there are many commercial applications in which delivery and use of...

  13. Hydrogen Recovery System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rocket test operations at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) result in substantial quantities of hydrogen gas that is flared from the facility and helium gas that is...

  14. Composite material systems for hydrogen management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangborn, R. N.; Queeney, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The task of managing hydrogen entry into elevated temperature structural materials employed in turbomachinery is a critical engineering area for propulsion systems employing hydrogen or decomposable hydrocarbons as fuel. Extant structural materials, such as the Inconel series, are embrittled by the ingress of hydrogen in service, leading to a loss of endurance and general deterioration of load-bearing dependability. Although the development of hydrogen-insensitive material systems is an obvious engineering option, to date insensitive systems cannot meet the time-temperature-loading service extremes encountered. A short-term approach that is both feasible and technologically sound is the development and employment of hydrogen barrier coatings. The present project is concerned with developing, analyzing, and physically testing laminate composite hydrogen barrier systems, employing Inconel 718 as the structural material to be protected. Barrier systems will include all metallic, metallic-to-ceramic, and, eventually, metallic/ceramic composites as the lamellae. Since space propulsion implies repetitive engine firings without earth-based inspection and repair, coating durability will be closely examined, and testing regimes will include repetitive thermal cycling to simulate damage accumulation. The target accomplishments include: generation of actual hydrogen permeation data for metallic, ceramic-metallic, and hybrid metallic/ceramic composition barrier systems, practically none of which is currently extant; definition of physical damage modes imported to barrier systems due to thermal cycling, both transient temperature profiles and steady-state thermal mismatch stress states being examined as sources of damage; and computational models that incorporate general laminate schemes as described above, including manufacturing realities such as porosity, and whatever defects are introduced through service and characterized during the experimental programs.

  15. Ecological Challenges for Closed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Dempster, William; Allen, John P.

    2012-07-01

    Closed ecological systems are desirable for a number of purposes. In space life support systems, material closure allows precious life-supporting resources to be kept inside and recycled. Closure in small biospheric systems facilitates detailed measurement of global ecological processes and biogeochemical cycles. Closed testbeds facilitate research topics which require isolation from the outside (e.g. genetically modified organisms; radioisotopes) so their ecological interactions and fluxes can be studied separate from interactions with the outside environment. But to achieve and maintain closure entails solving complex ecological challenges. These challenges include being able to handle faster cycling rates and accentuated daily and seasonal fluxes of critical life elements such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, water, macro- and mico-nutrients. The problems of achieving sustainability in closed systems for life support include how to handle atmospheric dynamics including trace gases, producing a complete human diet and recycling nutrients and maintaining soil fertility, the sustaining of healthy air and water and preventing the loss of crucial elements from active circulation. In biospheric facilities the challenge is also to produce analogues to natural biomes and ecosystems, studying processes of self-organization and adaptation in systems that allow specification or determination of state variables and cycles which may be followed through all interactions from atmosphere to soils. Other challenges include the dynamics and genetics of small populations, the psychological challenges for small isolated human groups and measures and options which may be necessary to ensure long-term operation of closed ecological systems.

  16. Evolution of Close Binary Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakut, K; Eggleton, P

    2005-01-24

    We collected data on the masses, radii, etc. of three classes of close binary stars: low-temperature contact binaries (LTCBs), near-contact binaries (NCBs), and detached close binaries (DCBs). They restrict themselves to systems where (1) both components are, at least arguably, near the Main Sequence, (2) the periods are less than a day, and (3) there is both spectroscopic and photometric analysis leading to reasonably reliable data. They discuss the possible evolutionary connections between these three classes, emphasizing the roles played by mass loss and angular momentum loss in rapidly-rotating cool stars.

  17. Seasonal energy storage - PV-hydrogen systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaenen, J. [Neste Oy/NAPS (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    PV systems are widely used in remote areas e.g. in telecommunication systems. Typically lead acid batteries are used as energy storage. In northern locations seasonal storage is needed, which however is too expensive and difficult to realise with batteries. Therefore, a PV- battery system with a diesel backup is sometimes used. The disadvantages of this kind of system for very remote applications are the need of maintenance and the need to supply the fuel. To overcome these problems, it has been suggested to use hydrogen technologies to make a closed loop autonomous energy storage system

  18. INTEGRATED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEM MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B

    2007-11-16

    Hydrogen storage is recognized as a key technical hurdle that must be overcome for the realization of hydrogen powered vehicles. Metal hydrides and their doped variants have shown great promise as a storage material and significant advances have been made with this technology. In any practical storage system the rate of H2 uptake will be governed by all processes that affect the rate of mass transport through the bed and into the particles. These coupled processes include heat and mass transfer as well as chemical kinetics and equilibrium. However, with few exceptions, studies of metal hydrides have focused primarily on fundamental properties associated with hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics. A full understanding of the complex interplay of physical processes that occur during the charging and discharging of a practical storage system requires models that integrate the salient phenomena. For example, in the case of sodium alanate, the size of NaAlH4 crystals is on the order of 300nm and the size of polycrystalline particles may be approximately 10 times larger ({approx}3,000nm). For the bed volume to be as small as possible, it is necessary to densely pack the hydride particles. Even so, in packed beds composed of NaAlH{sub 4} particles alone, it has been observed that the void fraction is still approximately 50-60%. Because of the large void fraction and particle to particle thermal contact resistance, the thermal conductivity of the hydride is very low, on the order of 0.2 W/m-{sup o}C, Gross, Majzoub, Thomas and Sandrock [2002]. The chemical reaction for hydrogen loading is exothermic. Based on the data in Gross [2003], on the order of 10{sup 8}J of heat of is released for the uptake of 5 kg of H{sub 2}2 and complete conversion of NaH to NaAlH{sub 4}. Since the hydride reaction transitions from hydrogen loading to discharge at elevated temperatures, it is essential to control the temperature of the bed. However, the low thermal conductivity of the hydride

  19. Solar based hydrogen production systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dincer, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of various solar based hydrogen production systems. The book covers first-law (energy based) and second-law (exergy based) efficiencies and provides a comprehensive understanding of their implications. It will help minimize the widespread misuse of efficiencies among students and researchers in energy field by using an intuitive and unified approach for defining efficiencies. The book gives a clear understanding of the sustainability and environmental impact analysis of the above systems. The book will be particularly useful for a clear understanding

  20. Tides in Close Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, Joshua

    2014-09-01

    We consider three aspects of tidal interactions in close binary systems. 1) We first develop a framework for predicting and interpreting photometric observations of eccentric binaries, which we term tidal asteroseismology. In such systems, the Fourier transform of the observed lightcurve is expected to consist of pulsations at harmonics of the orbital frequency. We use linear stellar perturbation theory to predict the expected pulsation amplitude spectra. Our numerical model does not assume adiabaticity, and accounts for stellar rotation in the traditional approximation. We apply our model to the recently discovered Kepler system KOI-54, a 42-day face-on stellar binary with e=0.83. Our modeling yields pulsation spectra that are semi-quantitatively consistent with observations of KOI-54. KOI-54's spectrum also contains several nonharmonic pulsations, which can be explained by nonlinear three-mode coupling. 2) We next consider the situation of a white dwarf (WD) binary inspiraling due to the emission of gravitational waves. We show that resonance locks, previously considered in binaries with an early-type star, occur universally in WD binaries. In a resonance lock, the orbital and spin frequencies evolve in lockstep, so that the tidal forcing frequency is approximately constant and a particular normal mode remains resonant, producing efficient tidal dissipation and nearly synchronous rotation. We derive analytic formulas for the tidal quality factor and tidal heating rate during a g-mode resonance lock, and verify our results numerically. We apply our analysis to the 13-minute double-WD binary J0651, and show that our predictions are roughly consistent with observations. 3) Lastly, we examine the general dynamics of resonance locking in more detail. Previous analyses of resonance locking, including my own earlier work, invoke the adiabatic (a.k.a. Lorentzian) approximation for the mode amplitude, valid only in the limit of relatively strong mode damping. We relax

  1. Interaction Between Hydrogen Molecules and a Closed Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasov Egor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper assesses the state of low-energy molecules in the vicinity of the crystal structure of a closed nanotube. It is proposed to use the continuum description of the impact energy from carbon graphene structures. In this approach, a closed tube consists of an open part and two fullerene hemispheres. Calculations revealed that adsorption of gas molecules by surface crystals is not the case of capturing by a part of the nano-object surface, but that of involvement of molecules in a complex orbital motion around the particle.

  2. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  3. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  4. Closed-Cycle Hydrogen-Oxygen Regenerative Fuel Cell at the NASA Glenn Research Center-An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.; Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.

    2008-01-01

    The closed cycle hydrogen-oxygen proton exchange membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cell (RFC) at the NASA Glenn Research Center has demonstrated multiple back-to-back contiguous cycles at rated power and round-trip efficiencies up to 52 percent. It is the first fully closed cycle RFC ever demonstrated. (The entire system is sealed; nothing enters or escapes the system other than electrical power and heat.) During fiscal year fiscal year (FY) FY06 to FY07, the system s numerous modifications and internal improvements focused on reducing parasitic power, heat loss, and noise signature; increasing its functionality as an unattended automated energy storage device; and in-service reliability.

  5. Analysis of Hybrid Hydrogen Systems: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, J.; Braun, R.; Munoz, D.; Penev, M.; Kinchin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Report on biomass pathways for hydrogen production and how they can be hybridized to support renewable electricity generation. Two hybrid systems were studied in detail for process feasibility and economic performance. The best-performing system was estimated to produce hydrogen at costs ($1.67/kg) within Department of Energy targets ($2.10/kg) for central biomass-derived hydrogen production while also providing value-added energy services to the electric grid.

  6. Convergent close-coupling approach to light and heavy projectile scattering on atomic and molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, I.; Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Bailey, J. J.; Bray, A. W.; Fursa, D. V.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Rawlins, C. M.; Savage, J. S.; Stelbovics, A. T.; Zammit, M. C.

    2017-10-01

    The atomic hydrogen target has played a pivotal role in the development of quantum collision theory. The key complexities of computationally managing the countably infinite discrete states and the uncountably infinite continuum were solved by using atomic hydrogen as the prototype atomic target. In the case of positron or proton scattering the extra complexity of charge exchange was also solved using the atomic hydrogen target. Most recently, molecular hydrogen has been used successfully as a prototype molecule for developing the corresponding scattering theory. We concentrate on the convergent close-coupling computational approach to light projectiles, such as electrons and positrons, and heavy projectiles, such as protons and antiprotons, scattering on atomic and molecular hydrogen.

  7. Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-02

    An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

  8. Hydrogen Fire Detection System Features Sharp Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, C. S.

    1966-01-01

    Hydrogen fire detection system discovers fires by detecting the flickering ultraviolet radiation emitted by the OH molecule, a short-lived intermediate combustion product found in hydrogen-air flames. In a space application, the system discriminates against false signals from sunlight and rocket engine exhaust plume radiation.

  9. Microwave Plasma Hydrogen Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, James; Wheeler, Richard, Jr.; Dahl, Roger; Hadley, Neal

    2010-01-01

    A microwave plasma reactor was developed for the recovery of hydrogen contained within waste methane produced by Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA), which reclaims oxygen from CO2. Since half of the H2 reductant used by the CRA is lost as CH4, the ability to reclaim this valuable resource will simplify supply logistics for longterm manned missions. Microwave plasmas provide an extreme thermal environment within a very small and precisely controlled region of space, resulting in very high energy densities at low overall power, and thus can drive high-temperature reactions using equipment that is smaller, lighter, and less power-consuming than traditional fixed-bed and fluidized-bed catalytic reactors. The high energy density provides an economical means to conduct endothermic reactions that become thermodynamically favorable only at very high temperatures. Microwave plasma methods were developed for the effective recovery of H2 using two primary reaction schemes: (1) methane pyrolysis to H2 and solid-phase carbon, and (2) methane oligomerization to H2 and acetylene. While the carbon problem is substantially reduced using plasma methods, it is not completely eliminated. For this reason, advanced methods were developed to promote CH4 oligomerization, which recovers a maximum of 75 percent of the H2 content of methane in a single reactor pass, and virtually eliminates the carbon problem. These methods were embodied in a prototype H2 recovery system capable of sustained high-efficiency operation. NASA can incorporate the innovation into flight hardware systems for deployment in support of future long-duration exploration objectives such as a Space Station retrofit, Lunar outpost, Mars transit, or Mars base. The primary application will be for the recovery of hydrogen lost in the Sabatier process for CO2 reduction to produce water in Exploration Life Support systems. Secondarily, this process may also be used in conjunction with a Sabatier reactor employed to

  10. Hydrogen energy systems studies. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.; Kartha, S.; Iwan, L.

    1996-08-13

    The results of previous studies suggest that the use of hydrogen from natural gas might be an important first step toward a hydrogen economy based on renewables. Because of infrastructure considerations (the difficulty and cost of storing, transmitting and distributing hydrogen), hydrogen produced from natural gas at the end-user`s site could be a key feature in the early development of hydrogen energy systems. In the first chapter of this report, the authors assess the technical and economic prospects for small scale technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas (steam reformers, autothermal reformers and partial oxidation systems), addressing the following questions: (1) What are the performance, cost and emissions of small scale steam reformer technology now on the market? How does this compare to partial oxidation and autothermal systems? (2) How do the performance and cost of reformer technologies depend on scale? What critical technologies limit cost and performance of small scale hydrogen production systems? What are the prospects for potential cost reductions and performance improvements as these technologies advance? (3) How would reductions in the reformer capital cost impact the delivered cost of hydrogen transportation fuel? In the second chapter of this report the authors estimate the potential demand for hydrogen transportation fuel in Southern California.

  11. Electrochemical synthesis of hexagonal closed pack nickel: A hydrogen storage material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahiri, Abhishek; Das, Rupak; Reddy, Ramana G. [Department of Metallurgical and Material Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    An in situ hydrogen generation and storage technique is demonstrated during the electrodeposition of hexagonal closed pack (HCP) nickel from NiCl{sub 2}-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (NiCl{sub 2}-EmimCl) and NiCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O-1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (NiCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O-EmimCl) melts. During electrolysis, the dissolution of hydrogen in nickel takes place due to the electrolysis of water. This results in the production of HCP nickel. The hydrogen content of the electrodeposited nickel from NiCl{sub 2}-EmimCl was found to be 1.2 wt.%. Thermal analysis showed that the phase transformation from HCP nickel to FCC occurred at 462 C, releasing hydrogen in the process. (author)

  12. A theory of desynchronisable closed loop system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Beohar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The task of implementing a supervisory controller is non-trivial, even though different theories exist that allow automatic synthesis of these controllers in the form of automata. One of the reasons for this discord is due to the asynchronous interaction between a plant and its controller in implementations, whereas the existing supervisory control theories assume synchronous interaction. As a consequence the implementation suffer from the so-called inexact synchronisation problem. In this paper we address the issue of inexact synchronisation in a process algebraic setting, by solving a more general problem of refinement. We construct an asynchronous closed loop system by introducing a communication medium in a given synchronous closed loop system. Our goal is to find sufficient conditions under which a synchronous closed loop system is branching bisimilar to its corresponding asynchronous closed loop system.

  13. Closed suction system versus open suction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elmansoury, Ahmed; Said, Hedya

    Background: Catheter suction is used to remove tracheal secretions through the endotracheal tube in mechanically ventilated patients, which may be either closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) or open one...

  14. Closed circuit television welding alignment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darner, G.S.

    1976-09-01

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) weld targeting systems were developed to provide accurate and repeatable positioning of the electrode of an electronic arc welder with respect to the parts being joined. A sliding mirror electrode holder was developed for use with closed circuit television equipment on existing weld fixturing. A complete motorized CCTV weld alignment system was developed to provide weld targeting for even the most critical positioning requirements.

  15. Overview of interstate hydrogen pipeline systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillette, J .L.; Kolpa, R. L

    2008-02-01

    . The following discussion will focus on the similarities and differences between the two pipeline networks. Hydrogen production is currently concentrated in refining centers along the Gulf Coast and in the Farm Belt. These locations have ready access to natural gas, which is used in the steam methane reduction process to make bulk hydrogen in this country. Production centers could possibly change to lie along coastlines, rivers, lakes, or rail lines, should nuclear power or coal become a significant energy source for hydrogen production processes. Should electrolysis become a dominant process for hydrogen production, water availability would be an additional factor in the location of production facilities. Once produced, hydrogen must be transported to markets. A key obstacle to making hydrogen fuel widely available is the scale of expansion needed to serve additional markets. Developing a hydrogen transmission and distribution infrastructure would be one of the challenges to be faced if the United States is to move toward a hydrogen economy. Initial uses of hydrogen are likely to involve a variety of transmission and distribution methods. Smaller users would probably use truck transport, with the hydrogen being in either the liquid or gaseous form. Larger users, however, would likely consider using pipelines. This option would require specially constructed pipelines and the associated infrastructure. Pipeline transmission of hydrogen dates back to late 1930s. These pipelines have generally operated at less than 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi), with a good safety record. Estimates of the existing hydrogen transmission system in the United States range from about 450 to 800 miles. Estimates for Europe range from about 700 to 1,100 miles (Mohipour et al. 2004; Amos 1998). These seemingly large ranges result from using differing criteria in determining pipeline distances. For example, some analysts consider only pipelines above a certain diameter as transmission lines

  16. Safe Detection System for Hydrogen Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberman, Robert A. [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Beshay, Manal [Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States)

    2012-02-29

    Hydrogen is an "environmentally friendly" fuel for future transportation and other applications, since it produces only pure ("distilled") water when it is consumed. Thus, hydrogen-powered vehicles are beginning to proliferate, with the total number of such vehicles expected to rise to nearly 100,000 within the next few years. However, hydrogen is also an odorless, colorless, highly flammable gas. Because of this, there is an important need for hydrogen safety monitors that can warn of hazardous conditions in vehicles, storage facilities, and hydrogen production plants. To address this need, IOS has developed a unique intrinsically safe optical hydrogen sensing technology, and has embodied it in detector systems specifically developed for safety applications. The challenge of using light to detect a colorless substance was met by creating chemically-sensitized optical materials whose color changes in the presence of hydrogen. This reversible reaction provides a sensitive, reliable, way of detecting hydrogen and measuring its concentration using light from low-cost LEDs. Hydrogen sensors based on this material were developed in three completely different optical formats: point sensors ("optrodes"), integrated optic sensors ("optical chips"), and optical fibers ("distributed sensors") whose entire length responds to hydrogen. After comparing performance, cost, time-to-market, and relative market need for these sensor types, the project focused on designing a compact optrode-based single-point hydrogen safety monitor. The project ended with the fabrication of fifteen prototype units, and the selection of two specific markets: fuel cell enclosure monitoring, and refueling/storage safety. Final testing and development of control software for these markets await future support.

  17. Chemical utilization of hydrogen from fluctuating energy sources – Catalytic transfer hydrogenation from charged Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier systems

    OpenAIRE

    Geburtig, Denise; Preuster, Patrick; Bösmann, Andreas; Müller, Karsten; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier (LOHC) systems offer a very attractive way for storing and distributing hydrogen from electrolysis using excess energies from solar or wind power plants. In this contribution, an alternative, high-value utilization of such hydrogen is proposed namely its use in steady-state chemical hydrogenation processes. We here demonstrate that the hydrogen-rich form of the LOHC system dibenzyltoluene/perhydro-dibenzyltoluene can be directly applied as sole source of hydrog...

  18. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handrock, J.L.; Malinowski, M.E.; Wally, K. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a newly developed fuel cell vehicle hydride storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. An experimental test facility, the Hydride Bed Testing Laboratory (HBTL) has been designed and fabricated. The development of this facility and its use in storage system development will be reviewed. These two capabilities (analytical and experimental) form the basis of an integrated approach to storage system design and development. The initial focus of these activities has been on hydride utilization for vehicular applications.

  19. Hydrogen at the Rooftop: Compact CPV-Hydrogen system to Convert Sunlight to Hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad

    2017-12-27

    Despite being highest potential energy source, solar intermittency and low power density make it difficult for solar energy to compete with the conventional power plants. Highly efficient concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system provides best technology to be paired with the electrolytic hydrogen production, as a sustainable energy source with long term energy storage. However, the conventional gigantic design of CPV system limits its market and application to the open desert fields without any rooftop installation scope, unlike conventional PV. This makes CPV less popular among solar energy customers. This paper discusses the development of compact CPV-Hydrogen system for the rooftop application in the urban region. The in-house built compact CPV system works with hybrid solar tracking of 0.1° accuracy, ensured through proposed double lens collimator based solar tracking sensor. With PEM based electrolyser, the compact CPV-hydrogen system showed 28% CPV efficiency and 18% sunlight to hydrogen (STH) efficiency, for rooftop operation in tropical region of Singapore. For plant designers, the solar to hydrogen production rating of 217 kWh/kg has been presented with 15% STH daily average efficiency, recorded from the long term field operation of the system.

  20. Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Future Energy Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuster, Patrick; Alekseev, Alexander; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-06-07

    Future energy systems will be determined by the increasing relevance of solar and wind energy. Crude oil and gas prices are expected to increase in the long run, and penalties for CO 2 emissions will become a relevant economic factor. Solar- and wind-powered electricity will become significantly cheaper, such that hydrogen produced from electrolysis will be competitively priced against hydrogen manufactured from natural gas. However, to handle the unsteadiness of system input from fluctuating energy sources, energy storage technologies that cover the full scale of power (in megawatts) and energy storage amounts (in megawatt hours) are required. Hydrogen, in particular, is a promising secondary energy vector for storing, transporting, and distributing large and very large amounts of energy at the gigawatt-hour and terawatt-hour scales. However, we also discuss energy storage at the 120-200-kWh scale, for example, for onboard hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles using compressed hydrogen storage. This article focuses on the characteristics and development potential of hydrogen storage technologies in light of such a changing energy system and its related challenges. Technological factors that influence the dynamics, flexibility, and operating costs of unsteady operation are therefore highlighted in particular. Moreover, the potential for using renewable hydrogen in the mobility sector, industrial production, and the heat market is discussed, as this potential may determine to a significant extent the future economic value of hydrogen storage technology as it applies to other industries. This evaluation elucidates known and well-established options for hydrogen storage and may guide the development and direction of newer, less developed technologies.

  1. Development of Automotive Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainz, G.; Bartlok, G.; Bodner, P.; Casapicola, P.; Doeller, Ch.; Hofmeister, F.; Neubacher, E.; Zieger, A.

    2004-06-01

    Liquid hydrogen (LH2) takes up less storage volume than gas but requires cryogenic vessels. State-of-the-art applications for passenger vehicles consist of double-wall cylindrical tanks that hold a hydrogen storage mass of up to 10 kg. The preferred shell material of the tanks is stainless steel, since it is very resistant against hydrogen brittleness and shows negligible hydrogen permeation. Therefore, the weight of the whole tank system including valves and heat exchanger is more than 100 kg. The space between the inner and outer vessel is mainly used for thermal super-insulation purposes. Several layers of insulation foils and high vacuums of 10-3 Pa reduce the heat entry. The support structures, which keep the inner tank in position to the outer tank, are made of materials with low thermal conductivity, e.g. glass or carbon fiber reinforced plastics. The remaining heat in-leak leads to a boil-off rate of 1 to 3 percent per day. Active cooling systems to increase the stand-by time before evaporation losses occur are being studied. Currently, the production of several liquid hydrogen tanks that fulfill the draft of regulations of the European Integrated Hydrogen Project (EIHP) is being prepared. New concepts of lightweight liquid hydrogen storage tanks will be investigated.

  2. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handrock, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Results of the analytical model development portion of this project will be discussed. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a recently developed fuel cell vehicle storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use, power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. Model calibration results of fuel cell fluid inlet and exit temperatures at various fuel cell idle speeds, assumed fuel cell heat capacities, and ambient temperatures are presented. The model predicts general increases in temperature with fuel cell power and differences between inlet and exit temperatures, but under predicts absolute temperature values, especially at higher power levels.

  3. Key ecological challenges for closed systems facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Dempster, William F.; Allen, John P.

    2013-07-01

    Closed ecological systems are desirable for a number of purposes. In space life support systems, material closure allows precious life-supporting resources to be kept inside and recycled. Closure in small biospheric systems facilitates detailed measurement of global ecological processes and biogeochemical cycles. Closed testbeds facilitate research topics which require isolation from the outside (e.g. genetically modified organisms; radioisotopes) so their ecological interactions and fluxes can be studied separate from interactions with the outside environment. But to achieve and maintain closure entails solving complex ecological challenges. These challenges include being able to handle faster cycling rates and accentuated daily and seasonal fluxes of critical life elements such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, water, macro- and mico-nutrients. The problems of achieving sustainability in closed systems for life support include how to handle atmospheric dynamics including trace gases, producing a complete human diet, recycling nutrients and maintaining soil fertility, the maintenance of healthy air and water and preventing the loss of critical elements from active circulation. In biospheric facilities, the challenge is also to produce analogues to natural biomes and ecosystems, studying processes of self-organization and adaptation in systems that allow specification or determination of state variables and cycles which may be followed through all interactions from atmosphere to soils. Other challenges include the dynamics and genetics of small populations, the psychological challenges for small isolated human groups and backup technologies and strategic options which may be necessary to ensure long-term operation of closed ecological systems.

  4. Use of hydrogen peroxide vapour & plasma irradiation in combination for quick decontamination of closed chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourya, Devendra T; Shahani, Hamish C; Yadav, Pragya D; Barde, Pradip V

    2016-08-01

    Various conventional methods such as gaseous, vapour and misting systems, fogging, manual spray and wipe techniques employing a number of chemical agents are used for decontamination of enclosed spaces. Among all these methods, use of aerosolized formaldehyde is the most preferred method due to cost-effectiveness and practical aspects. However, being extremely corrosive in nature generating very irritating fumes and difficulty in maintaining a high level of gas concentration, many laboratories prefer the vaporization of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) as an alternative. We present here the results of using H 2 O 2 vapour in combination with plasma irradiation for quick decontamination of closed chambers. The present study describes a decontamination method, using plasma irradiation in combination with H 2 O 2 (5%). Effect of plasma irradiation and H 2 O 2 on the viability of bacterial spores (Bacillus subtilis), Chikungunya and Kyasanur Forest Disease viruses was assessed. Data suggest that with the combination of H 2 O 2 vapour and plasma irradiation, within short time (three minutes), decontamination of surfaces and space volume could be achieved. Although it showed damage of spores present on the strips, it did not show any penetration power. The results were encouraging, and this method was found to be efficient for achieving surface sterilization in a short time. This application may be useful in laboratories and industries particularly, those working on clean facility concept following good laboratory and manufacturing practices.

  5. Use of hydrogen peroxide vapour & plasma irradiation in combination for quick decontamination of closed chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra T Mourya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Various conventional methods such as gaseous, vapour and misting systems, fogging, manual spray and wipe techniques employing a number of chemical agents are used for decontamination of enclosed spaces. Among all these methods, use of aerosolized formaldehyde is the most preferred method due to cost-effectiveness and practical aspects. However, being extremely corrosive in nature generating very irritating fumes and difficulty in maintaining a high level of gas concentration, many laboratories prefer the vaporization of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 as an alternative. We present here the results of using H 2 O 2 vapour in combination with plasma irradiation for quick decontamination of closed chambers. Methods: The present study describes a decontamination method, using plasma irradiation in combination with H 2 O 2 (5%. Effect of plasma irradiation and H 2 O 2 on the viability of bacterial spores (Bacillus subtilis, Chikungunya and Kyasanur Forest Disease viruses was assessed. Results: Data suggest that with the combination of H 2 O 2 vapour and plasma irradiation, within short time (three minutes, decontamination of surfaces and space volume could be achieved. Although it showed damage of spores present on the strips, it did not show any penetration power. Interpretation & conclusions: The results were encouraging, and this method was found to be efficient for achieving surface sterilization in a short time. This application may be useful in laboratories and industries particularly, those working on clean facility concept following good laboratory and manufacturing practices.

  6. On closed loop transient response system identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christer Dalen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Some methods for transient closed loop step response system identification presented in the literature are reviewed. Interestingly some errors in a method published in the early 80's where propagated into a recently published method. These methods are reviewed and some improved methods are suggested and presented. The methods are compared against each other on some closed loop system examples, e.g. a well pipeline-riser severe-slugging flow regime example, using Monte Carlo simulations for comparison of the methods.

  7. Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Regenerative Fuel Cell Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to the closed cycle hydrogen-oxygen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cell (RFC), recently constructed at NASA Glenn Research Center, is presented. Illustrated with explanatory graphics and figures, this report outlines the engineering motivations for the RFC as a solar energy storage device, the system requirements, layout and hardware detail of the RFC unit at NASA Glenn, the construction history, and test experience accumulated to date with this unit.

  8. Molecular tuning of the closed shell C-H···F-C hydrogen bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Norman; Ley, Rebecca M; Cotton, Charles E; Chung, Wei-Cheng; Francisco, Joseph S; Negishi, Ei-ichi

    2013-08-29

    The existence of the rare six-membered and intramolecular C-H···F-C hydrogen-bond has been experimentally proven in the gas phase and in the solid state recently. However, the effect of the substituents on this C-H···F-C hydrogen-bond system has never been reported. In view of the importance of this type of C-H···F-C H-bonding whose weak interaction has been found critical in nanotechnology and biological systems, the nine functional groups composed of electron donating and electron withdrawing groups are inserted into this C-H···F-C interaction to study the group effect on the hydrogen bonding. Group effects on this C-H···F-C H-bonding system have been found, and their effects on the H-bonding system have been found to be tunable.

  9. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handrock, J.L.; Wally, K.; Raber, T.N. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. The purpose of this project is to develop a platform for the engineering evaluation of hydrogen storage and delivery systems with an added focus on lightweight hydride utilization. Hybrid vehicles represent the primary application area of interest, with secondary interests including such items as existing vehicles and stationary uses. The near term goal is the demonstration of an internal combustion engine/storage/delivery subsystem. The long term goal is optimization of storage technologies for both vehicular and industrial stationary uses. In this project an integrated approach is being used to couple system operating characteristics to hardware development. A model has been developed which integrates engine and storage material characteristics into the design of hydride storage and delivery systems. By specifying engine operating parameters, as well as a variety of storage/delivery design features, hydride bed sizing calculations are completed. The model allows engineering trade-off studies to be completed on various hydride material/delivery system configurations. A more generalized model is also being developed to allow the performance characteristics of various hydrogen storage and delivery systems to be compared (liquid, activated carbon, etc.). Many of the features of the hydride storage model are applicable to the development of this more generalized model.

  10. Cascaded recompression closed brayton cycle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasch, James J.

    2018-01-02

    The present disclosure is directed to a cascaded recompression closed Brayton cycle (CRCBC) system and method of operation thereof, where the CRCBC system includes a compressor for compressing the system fluid, a separator for generating fluid feed streams for each of the system's turbines, and separate segments of a heater that heat the fluid feed streams to different feed temperatures for the system's turbines. Fluid exiting each turbine is used to preheat the fluid to the turbine. In an embodiment, the amount of heat extracted is determined by operational costs.

  11. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  12. Sustainable bioreactor systems for producing hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaborsky, O.R.; Radway, J.C.; Yoza, B.A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant and Molecular Biology; Tredici, M.R. [Univ. of Florence (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze e Tecnologie Alimentari e Microbiogiche

    1998-08-01

    The overall goal of Hawaii`s BioHydrogen Program is to generate hydrogen from water using solar energy and microalgae under sustainable conditions. Specific bioprocess engineering objectives include the design, construction, testing and validation of a sustainable photobioreactor system. Specific objectives relating to biology include investigating and optimizing key physiological parameters of cyanobacteria of the genus Arthrospira (Spirulina), the organism selected for initial process development. Another objective is to disseminate the Mitsui-Miami cyanobacteria cultures, now part of the Hawaii Culture Collection (HCC), to other research groups. The approach is to use a single organisms for producing hydrogen gas from water. Key stages are the growth of the biomass, the dark induction of hydrogenase, and the subsequent generation of hydrogen in the light. The biomass production stage involves producing dense cultures of filamentous, non-heterocystous cyanobacteria and optimizing biomass productivity in innovative tubular photobioreactors. The hydrogen generation stages entail inducing the enzymes and metabolic pathways that enable both dark and light-driven hydrogen production. The focus of Year 1 has been on the construction and operation of the outdoor photobioreactor for the production of high-density mass cultures of Arthrospira. The strains in the Mitsui-Miami collection have been organized and distributed to other researchers who are beginning to report interesting results. The project is part of the International Energy Agency`s biohydrogen program.

  13. Algal Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghirardi, Maria L [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-08

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under the guidance of Drs. Michael Seibert (retired, Fellow Emeritus) and Maria Ghirardi (Fellow), led 15 years of research addressing the issue of algal H2 photoproduction. This project resulted in greatly increased rates and yields of algal hydrogen production; increased understanding of the H2 metabolism in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; expanded our knowledge of other physiological aspects relevant to sustained algal photosynthetic H2 production; led to the genetic identification, cloning and manipulation of algal hydrogenase genes; and contributed to a broader, fundamental understanding of the technical and scientific challenges to improving the conversion efficiencies in order to reach the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office’s targets. Some of the tangible results are: (i) 64 publications and 6 patents, (ii) international visibility to NREL, (iii) reinvigoration of national and international biohydrogen research, and (iv) research progress that helped stimulate new funding from other DOE and non-DOE programs, including the AFOSR and the DOE Office of Science.

  14. A novel liquid organic hydrogen carrier system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Fogler, Eran; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Iron, Mark A; Milstein, David

    2015-04-17

    Hydrogen is an efficient green fuel, but its low energy density when stored under high pressure or cryogenically, and safety issues, presents significant disadvantages; hence finding efficient and safe hydrogen carriers is a major challenge. Of special interest are liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs), which can be readily loaded and unloaded with considerable amounts of hydrogen. However, disadvantages include high hydrogen pressure requirements, high reaction temperatures for both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation steps, which require different catalysts, and high LOHC cost. Here we present a readily reversible LOHC system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation, using an inexpensive, safe and abundant organic compound with high potential capacity to store and release hydrogen, applying the same catalyst for loading and unloading hydrogen under relatively mild conditions. Mechanistic insight of the catalytic reaction is provided. We believe that these findings may lead to the development of an inexpensive, safe and clean liquid hydrogen carrier system.

  15. Artificial photosynthetic systems for production of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-01

    The rapid consumption of fossil fuels has caused unacceptable environmental problems such as the greenhouse effect, which may lead to disastrous climatic consequences. Because fossil fuels are the products of long-term photosynthesis, it is highly desirable to develop artificial photosynthetic systems for the production of renewable and clean energy such as hydrogen. This article summarizes recent advances on studies of artificial photosynthetic systems for photocatalytic production of hydrogen with hydrogenases and their functional mimics including hybrids of natural and artificial components. Because it is highly desired to convert gaseous H2 to an easily storable form, recent progress on storage of hydrogen as liquid or solid form has also been described in this article. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Distributed security in closed distributed systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez, Alejandro Mario

    in their design. There should always exist techniques for ensuring that the required security properties are met. This has been thoroughly investigated through the years, and many varied methodologies have come through. In the case of distributed systems, there are even harder issues to deal with. Many approaches...... systems. We achieve the goal of showing how this can be done, though we restrict ourselves to closed systems and with a limited set of enforceable security policies. In this setting, our approach proves to be efficient. Finally, we achieve all this by bringing together several fields of Computer Science...

  17. The Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, P. [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The present paper describes, for purposes of the Department of Energy (DoE) Hydrogen Program Review, Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) progress on the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project for the period January through June 1996. This period represents the first six months of the three year project. The estimated cost over three years is $3.9M, $1.859M of which is funded by the DoE ($600 k for fiscal year 1996). The goal of the Palm Desert Project is to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community. The project will demonstrate the practical utility of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as vehicle power plants. This transportation system will be developed in the City of Palm Desert in southern California and will include a fleet of 8 fuel cell powered vehicles, solar and wind powered hydrogen generating facilities, a consumer-ready refueling station, and a service infrastructure. The system holds the promise of a clean environment and an energy supply that is predictable, domestic, safe, and abundant. During, the first part of 1996 SERC has nearly completed building a fuel cell powered personal utility vehicle, which features an upgraded safety and computer system; they have designed and built a test bench that is able to mimic golf cart loads and test fuel cell system auxiliary components; they have begun the design of the solar hydrogen generating station; they have worked with Sandia National Laboratory on an advanced metal hydride storage system; they have increased the power density of the SERC fuel cell by as much as 50%; and they have reached out to the rest of the world with a new fact sheet, world wide web pages, a press release, video footage for a television program. and instruction within the community.

  18. Analysis of Water Hammer with Different Closing Valve Laws on Transient Flow of Hydrogen-Natural Gas Mixture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Subani, Norazlina; Amin, Norsarahaida

    2015-01-01

      Water hammer on transient flow of hydrogen-natural gas mixture in a horizontal pipeline is analysed to determine the relationship between pressure waves and different modes of closing and opening of valves...

  19. Closed Loop System Identification with Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorton, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    High performance control design for a flexible space structure is challenging since high fidelity plant models are di.cult to obtain a priori. Uncertainty in the control design models typically require a very robust, low performance control design which must be tuned on-orbit to achieve the required performance. Closed loop system identi.cation is often required to obtain a multivariable open loop plant model based on closed-loop response data. In order to provide an accurate initial plant model to guarantee convergence for standard local optimization methods, this paper presents a global parameter optimization method using genetic algorithms. A minimal representation of the state space dynamics is employed to mitigate the non-uniqueness and over-parameterization of general state space realizations. This control-relevant system identi.cation procedure stresses the joint nature of the system identi.cation and control design problem by seeking to obtain a model that minimizes the di.erence between the predicted and actual closed-loop performance.

  20. The Palm Desert renewable [hydrogen] transportation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlin, C.E.; Lehman, P. [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States). Schatz Energy Research Center

    1998-08-01

    This paper describes the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) progress on the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project for the period June 1997 through May 1998. The project began in March 1996. The goal of the Palm Desert Project is to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community. The project demonstrates the practical utility of hydrogen as a transportation fuel and the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell as a vehicle power system. The project includes designing and building 4 fuel cell powered vehicles, a solar hydrogen generating and refueling station, and a fuel cell vehicle diagnostic center. Over this last year, SERC has built a fuel cell powered neighborhood electric vehicle and delivered it to the City of Palm Desert. The design of the hydrogen refueling station is near completion and it is anticipated that construction will be complete in the fall of 1998. The vehicles are currently being refueled at a temporary refueling station. The diagnostic center is being designed and maintenance procedures as well as computer diagnostic programs for the fuel cell vehicles are being developed. City employees are driving the vehicles daily and monitoring data are being collected. The drivers are pleased with the performance of the vehicles.

  1. Economic Dispatch of Hydrogen Systems in Energy Spot Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You, Shi; Nørgård, Per Bromand

    2015-01-01

    of energy spot markets. The generic hydrogen system is comprised of an electrolysis for hydrogen production, a hydrogen storage tank and a fuel cell system for cogeneration of electricity and heat. A case study is presented with information from practical hydrogen systems and the Nordic energy markets......Hydrogen system, as a new energy carrier, could deliver clean and efficient energy services in a wide range of applications. This paper presents an economic dispatch-based mathematical model that facilitates investigations on the techno-economic feasibility of hydrogen systems in the context...

  2. FY17 Transportation and Hydrogen Systems Center Journal Publication Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-12-08

    NREL's Transportation and Hydrogen Systems Center published 39 journal articles in fiscal year 2017 highlighting recent research in advanced vehicle technology, alternative fuels, and hydrogen systems.

  3. Final Report: Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian David [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Houchins, Cassidy [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Huya-Kouadio, Jennie Moton [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); DeSantis, Daniel A. [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) has identified hydrogen storage as a key enabling technology for advancing hydrogen and fuel cell power technologies in transportation, stationary, and portable applications. Consequently, FCTO has established targets to chart the progress of developing and demonstrating viable hydrogen storage technologies for transportation and stationary applications. This cost assessment project supports the overall FCTO goals by identifying the current technology system components, performance levels, and manufacturing/assembly techniques most likely to lead to the lowest system storage cost. Furthermore, the project forecasts the cost of these systems at a variety of annual manufacturing rates to allow comparison to the overall 2017 and “Ultimate” DOE cost targets. The cost breakdown of the system components and manufacturing steps can then be used to guide future research and development (R&D) decisions. The project was led by Strategic Analysis Inc. (SA) and aided by Rajesh Ahluwalia and Thanh Hua from Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Lin Simpson at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Since SA coordinated the project activities of all three organizations, this report includes a technical description of all project activity. This report represents a summary of contract activities and findings under SA’s five year contract to the US Department of Energy (Award No. DE-EE0005253) and constitutes the “Final Scientific Report” deliverable. Project publications and presentations are listed in the Appendix.

  4. Electron Capture Supernovae from Close Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelarends, Arend J. T.; Wurtz, Scott; Tarka, James; Cole Adams, L.; Hills, Spencer T.

    2017-12-01

    We present the first detailed study of the Electron Capture Supernova Channel (ECSN Channel) for a primary star in a close binary star system. Progenitors of ECSN occupy the lower end of the mass spectrum of supernova progenitors and are thought to form the transition between white dwarf progenitors and core-collapse progenitors. The mass range for ECSN from close binary systems is thought to be wider than the range for single stars, because of the effects of mass transfer on the helium core. Using the MESA stellar evolution code, we explored the parameter space of initial primary masses between 8 and 17 {M}⊙ , using a large grid of models. We find that the initial primary mass and the mass transfer evolution are important factors in the final fate of stars in this mass range. Mass transfer due to Roche lobe overflow during and after carbon burning causes the core to cool down so that it avoids neon ignition, even in helium-free cores with masses up to 1.52 {M}⊙ , which in single stars would ignite neon. If the core is able to contract to high enough densities for electron captures to commence, we find that, for the adopted Ledoux convection criterion, the initial mass range for the primary to evolve into an ECSN is between 13.5 and 17.6 {M}⊙ . The mass ratio, initial period, and mass-loss efficiency only marginally affect the predicted ranges.

  5. Closed system for bovine oocyte vitrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Ševelová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to develop a vitrification carrier for bovine oocyte cryopreservation. The carrier was to be cheap enough, elementary in its construction and meet contemporary requirements for a safe closed system. In a closed system, a cell is prevented from direct exposure to liquid nitrogen, thus minimizing the risk of cross-contamination. Furthermore, two questions regarding the proper vitrification technique were resolved: if it is necessary to partially denude the oocytes before the vitrification process or whether intact cumulus oocyte complexes should be frozen; and if it is more advantageous to preheat the vitrification solutions to female body temperature (39 °C or to keep them at room temperature. Our results show that it is better to partially denude the oocytes prior to vitrification because cryopreserved intact cumulus oocyte complexes often proved dark, non-homogeneous or fragmented cytoplasm after warming, with many of them having visibly widened perivitelline spaces or fractured zonae pellucidae as a result of extensive damage during vitrification. Consequently, intact cumulus oocyte complexes showed significantly lower numbers of cleavage stage embryos on Day 3 compared to partially denuded oocytes (7.4% and 26%, respectively. On the other hand, the survival rate and following development of fertilized oocytes in preheated vitrification solution were equal to results reached at room temperature conditions. In conclusion, results achieved with the newly developed carrier were comparable to previously published studies and therefore they could be recommended for common use.

  6. The solar system in close-up

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkinson, John

    2016-01-01

    In response to the new information gained about the Solar System from recent space probes and space telescopes, the experienced science author Dr. John Wilkinson presents the state-of-the art knowledge on the Sun, solar system planets and small solar system objects like comets and asteroids. He also describes space missions like the New Horizon’s space probe that provided never seen before pictures of the Pluto system; the Dawn space probe, having just visited the asteroid Vesta, and the dwarf planet Ceres; and the Rosetta probe inorbit around comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko that has sent extraordinary and most exciting pictures. Those and a number of other probes are also changing our understanding of the solar system and providing a wealth of new up close photos. This book will cover all these missions and discuss observed surface features of planets and moons like their compositions, geisers, aurorae, lightning phenomena etc. Presenting the fascinating aspects of solar system astronomy this book is a c...

  7. A closed recirculated sea-water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    Study of a virus disease in the chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) necessitated the use of a marine environment to study the long range effects of the disease and to complete the life cycle of its etiologic agent. A closed recirculated sea-water system was designed for use under experimental laboratory conditions so that controlled studies of the disease could be made. As others may wish to do marine environment studies in the laboratory, the design and operation of our system are presented. Other systems currently in use have been described by Chin (1959), DeWitt and Salo (1960), McCrimmon and Berst (1966), and the authors of collected papers edited by Clark and Clark (1964). Preparatory to the design and construction of the system in use in this laboratory, visits were made to marine systems in use at the University of Washington's College of Fisheries, Seattle, -washington, and Friday Harbor Laboratory, San Juan Island, Washington; the Washington State Department of Fisheries' Point whitney Shellfish Laboratory, Brinnon, Washington; Humboldt State College, Arcata, California; and the Steinhart Aquarium of the California Academy of Science, San Francisco, California.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide generation and detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackley, M W

    1983-07-01

    A test system has been devised for generation and measurement of hydrogen sulfide/air mixtures. Such a system has numerous applications, including toxicology studies, detector badge and tube evaluation, sorbent capacity measurements, and respirator cartridge or canister breakthrough testing. The system in this study utilizes an HNU photoionization analyzer for detection of H2S concentrations of 1.0 ppm to 26.0 ppm. Generation techniques for these low concentration levels, and also for much higher H2S concentrations, have been described. Special consideration has been given to H2S permeation of transfer tubing, and to the effects of water vapor interference upon the analyzer.

  9. Hydrogen-Based Energy Conservation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sustainable Innovations is developing a technology for efficient separation and compression of hydrogen gas. The electrochemical hydrogen separator and compressor...

  10. Optimizing the closed suction surgical drainage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Katherine H; Eisemann, Bradley S; Lamp, Susan; Kocak, Ergun

    2013-01-01

    Closed suction drains are indicated in a wide array of postoperative settings, with many distinct drainage systems available to the surgeon. The purpose of this study was to compare the suction gradients achieved using 2 different sizes of suction reservoirs and 2 different techniques for generating negative pressure. Drainage reservoirs of 100 and 400 ml were chosen to evaluate their ability to achieve suction. Suction was established in both sizes of drains by pressing the sides of the reservoir together or by pushing the bottom of the reservoir toward the top. Negative pressures were recorded with the reservoir empty, and after every 10-ml addition of saline. Averages were graphed to illustrate the applied suction over a range of drain volumes. The 100-ml drainage system reached a peak suction of -117.6 mmHg, while the 400-ml drainage system reached only a peak suction of -71.4 mmHg. Both of the maximum suction readings were achieved using the full-squeeze technique. The bottom-pushed-in technique did not result in any sustained measurable levels of suction using either of the reservoir volumes. Smaller drain reservoirs are more successful in generating a high initial suction than larger reservoirs, especially when the volume of fluid in the drain is relatively low. In all sizes of drains, compressing the sides of the reservoir is a far better technique for establishing negative pressure than pressing the bottom of the drain up toward the top.

  11. Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pez, Guido Peter [Allentown, PA; Cooper, Alan Charles [Macungie, PA; Scott, Aaron Raymond [Allentown, PA

    2011-08-23

    Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

  12. Optimization of a solar hydrogen storage system: Exergetic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, E.; Isorna, F.; Rosa, F. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Ctra. S. Juan-Matalascanas, km.34, 21130 Mazagon (Huelva) (Spain)

    2007-07-15

    From production to end-users, the choice of suitable hydrogen delivery and storage systems will be essential to assure the adequate introduction and development of these facilities. This article describes the main options for hydrogen storage when produced from renewable energy, and explains different criteria to be considered in the design and building-up of stationary hydrogen storage systems, with special attention to exergy issues. An example of exergy analysis is done using data from the solar hydrogen storage facility of the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA). As expected, the main conclusions of this analysis show the advantage of low pressure hydrogen in comparison with other available methods to store hydrogen. Another interesting option, from the exergy efficiency point of view, is the storage of hydrogen in metal hydride systems. The last option, and the most inefficient, is the high pressure hydrogen storage. (author)

  13. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

    2010-12-22

    We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 – 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

  14. Control design for an autonomous wind based hydrogen production system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenciaga, F.; Evangelista, C.A. [CONICET, Laboratorio de Electronica Industrial Control e Instrumentacion (LEICI), Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CC.91, C.P. 1900, La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents a complete control scheme to efficiently manage the operation of an autonomous wind based hydrogen production system. This system comprises a wind energy generation module based on a multipolar permanent magnet synchronous generator, a lead-acid battery bank as short term energy storage and an alkaline von Hoerner electrolyzer. The control is developed in two hierarchical levels. The higher control level or supervisor control determines the general operation strategy for the whole system according to the wind conditions and the state of charge of the battery bank. On the other hand, the lower control level includes the individual controllers that regulate the respective module operation assuming the set-points determined by the supervisor control. These last controllers are approached using second-order super-twisting sliding mode techniques. The performance of the closed-loop system is assessed through representative computer simulations. (author)

  15. Present status of research on hydrogen energy and perspective of HTGR hydrogen production system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Ogawa, Masuro; Akino, Norio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-03-01

    A study was performed to make a clear positioning of research and development on hydrogen production systems with a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) under currently promoting at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute through a grasp of the present status of hydrogen energy, focussing on its production and utilization as an energy in future. The study made clear that introduction of safe distance concept for hydrogen fire and explosion was practicable for a HTGR hydrogen production system, including hydrogen properties and need to provide regulations applying to handle hydrogen. And also generalization of hydrogen production processes showed technical issues of the HTGR system. Hydrogen with HTGR was competitive to one with fossil fired system due to evaluation of production cost. Hydrogen is expected to be used as promising fuel of fuel cell cars in future. In addition, the study indicated that there were a large amount of energy demand alternative to high efficiency power generation and fossil fuel with nuclear energy through the structure of energy demand and supply in Japan. Assuming that hydrogen with HTGR meets all demand of fuel cell cars, an estimation would show introduction of the maximum number of about 30 HTGRs with capacity of 100 MWt from 2020 to 2030. (author)

  16. Helium refrigeration system for hydrogen liquefaction applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, J. Kumar, Sr.; Menon, RS; Goyal, M.; Ansari, NA; Chakravarty, A.; Joemon, V.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid hydrogen around 20 K is used as cold moderator for generating “cold neutron beam” in nuclear research reactors. A cryogenic helium refrigeration system is the core upon which such hydrogen liquefaction applications are built. A thermodynamic process based on reversed Brayton cycle with two stage expansion using high speed cryogenic turboexpanders (TEX) along with a pair of compact high effectiveness process heat exchangers (HX), is well suited for such applications. An existing helium refrigeration system, which had earlier demonstrated a refrigeration capacity of 470 W at around 20 K, is modified based on past operational experiences and newer application requirements. Modifications include addition of a new heat exchanger to simulate cryogenic process load and two other heat exchangers for controlling the temperatures of helium streams leading out to the application system. To incorporate these changes, cryogenic piping inside the cold box is suitably modified. This paper presents process simulation, sizing of new heat exchangers as well as fabrication aspects of the modified cryogenic process piping.

  17. Research Issues for Development of Hydrogen Energy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Masabumi

    It is generally considered that use of hydrogen in energy system is attractive because it produces no matters to cause air pollution or water pollution. Following this recognition, research to develop a car with low temperature fuel cell or hydrogen engine is extensively performed. The future energy system where hydrogen is used as the key material is shown in the figure below. To realize this system we must develop 1) the reasonable way to produce electricity or heat by using hydrogen as fuel, 2) the infrastructure to supply hydrogen to whole society, 3) energy sources and methods to produce huge amount of cheap hydrogen with minimum impact on nature, 4) together with assurance of resources to construct the system and 5) establishment of understanding about the basic behavior of hydrogen in various materials.

  18. Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

    2005-11-05

    Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options

  19. Hydrogen-Based Energy Conservation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA and many others often rely on delivery of cryogenic hydrogen to meet their facility needs. NASA's Stennis Space Center is one of the largest users of hydrogen,...

  20. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  1. Nonlinear Tides in Close Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Nevin N.; Arras, Phil; Quataert, Eliot; Burkart, Josh

    2012-06-01

    We study the excitation and damping of tides in close binary systems, accounting for the leading-order nonlinear corrections to linear tidal theory. These nonlinear corrections include two distinct physical effects: three-mode nonlinear interactions, i.e., the redistribution of energy among stellar modes of oscillation, and nonlinear excitation of stellar normal modes by the time-varying gravitational potential of the companion. This paper, the first in a series, presents the formalism for studying nonlinear tides and studies the nonlinear stability of the linear tidal flow. Although the formalism we present is applicable to binaries containing stars, planets, and/or compact objects, we focus on non-rotating solar-type stars with stellar or planetary companions. Our primary results include the following: (1) The linear tidal solution almost universally used in studies of binary evolution is unstable over much of the parameter space in which it is employed. More specifically, resonantly excited internal gravity waves in solar-type stars are nonlinearly unstable to parametric resonance for companion masses M' >~ 10-100 M ⊕ at orbital periods P ≈ 1-10 days. The nearly static "equilibrium" tidal distortion is, however, stable to parametric resonance except for solar binaries with P factor of ≈N faster than the standard three-wave parametric instability. These are local instabilities viewed through the lens of global analysis; the coherent global growth rate follows local rates in the regions where the shear is strongest. In solar-type stars, the dynamical tide is unstable to this collective version of the parametric instability for even sub-Jupiter companion masses with P appears particularly efficient at draining energy out of the dynamical tide and may be more important than either wave breaking or parametric resonance at determining the nonlinear dissipation of the dynamical tide.

  2. An Approach for Hydrogen Recycling in a Closed-loop Life Support Architecture to Increase Oxygen Recovery Beyond State-of-the-Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee; Greenwood, Zachary; Alvarez, Giraldo

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art atmosphere revitalization life support technology on the International Space Station is theoretically capable of recovering 50% of the oxygen from metabolic carbon dioxide via the Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA). When coupled with a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA), oxygen recovery increases dramatically, thus drastically reducing the logistical challenges associated with oxygen resupply. The PPA decomposes methane to predominantly form hydrogen and acetylene. Because of the unstable nature of acetylene, a down-stream separation system is required to remove acetylene from the hydrogen stream before it is recycled to the CRA. A new closed-loop architecture that includes a PPA and downstream Hydrogen Purification Assembly (HyPA) is proposed and discussed. Additionally, initial results of separation material testing are reported.

  3. Biogas and Hydrogen Systems Market Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bush, Brian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Melaina, Marc [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-31

    This analysis provides an overview of the market for biogas-derived hydrogen and its use in transportation applications. It examines the current hydrogen production technologies from biogas, capacity and production, infrastructure, potential and demand, as well as key market areas. It also estimates the production cost of hydrogen from biogas and provides supply curves at a national level and at point source.

  4. Analysis of Water Hammer with Different Closing Valve Laws on Transient Flow of Hydrogen-Natural Gas Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norazlina Subani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Water hammer on transient flow of hydrogen-natural gas mixture in a horizontal pipeline is analysed to determine the relationship between pressure waves and different modes of closing and opening of valves. Four types of laws applicable to closing valve, namely, instantaneous, linear, concave, and convex laws, are considered. These closure laws describe the speed variation of the hydrogen-natural gas mixture as the valve is closing. The numerical solution is obtained using the reduced order modelling technique. The results show that changes in the pressure wave profile and amplitude depend on the type of closing laws, valve closure times, and the number of polygonal segments in the closing function. The pressure wave profile varies from square to triangular and trapezoidal shape depending on the type of closing laws, while the amplitude of pressure waves reduces as the closing time is reduced and the numbers of polygonal segments are increased. The instantaneous and convex closing laws give rise to minimum and maximum pressure, respectively.

  5. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  6. Operation of metal hydride hydrogen storage systems for hydrogen compression using solar thermal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruki Endo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using a newly constructed bench-scale hydrogen energy system with renewable energy, ‘Pure Hydrogen Energy System’, the present study demonstrates the operations of a metal hydride (MH tank for hydrogen compression as implemented through the use solar thermal energy. Solar thermal energy is used to generate hot water as a heat source of the MH tank. Thus, 70 kg of LaNi5, one of the most typical alloys used for hydrogen storage, was placed in the MH tank. We present low and high hydrogen flow rate operations. Then, the operations under winter conditions are discussed along with numerical simulations conducted from the thermal point of view. Results show that a large amount of heat (>100 MJ is generated and the MH hydrogen compression is available.

  7. Renewable energy systems based on hydrogen for remote applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbossou, K.; Chahine, R.; Hamelin, J.; Laurencelle, F.; Anouar, A.; St-Arnaud, J.-M.; Bose, T. K.

    An integrated renewable energy (RE) system for powering remote communication stations and based on hydrogen is described. The system is based on the production of hydrogen by electrolysis whereby the electricity is generated by a 10 kW wind turbine (WT) and 1 kW photovoltaic (PV) array. When available, the excess power from the RE sources is used to produce and store hydrogen. When not enough energy is produced from the RE sources, the electricity is then regenerated from the stored hydrogen via a 5 kW proton exchange membrane fuel cell system. Overview results on the performances of the WT, PV, and fuel cells system are presented.

  8. Polymers for hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Rachel Reina; Simmons, Kevin L.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2013-10-01

    This document addresses polymer materials for use in hydrogen service. Section 1 summarizes the applications of polymers in hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems and identifies polymers used in these applications. Section 2 reviews the properties of polymer materials exposed to hydrogen and/or high-pressure environments, using information obtained from published, peer-reviewed literature. The effect of high pressure on physical and mechanical properties of polymers is emphasized in this section along with a summary of hydrogen transport through polymers. Section 3 identifies areas in which fuller characterization is needed in order to assess material suitability for hydrogen service.

  9. Safety Standard for Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems: Guidelines for Hydrogen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage and Transportation. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Safety Standard, which establishes a uniform process for hydrogen system design, materials selection, operation, storage, and transportation, is presented. The guidelines include suggestions for safely storing, handling, and using hydrogen in gaseous (GH2), liquid (LH2), or slush (SLH2) form whether used as a propellant or non-propellant. The handbook contains 9 chapters detailing properties and hazards, facility design, design of components, materials compatibility, detection, and transportation. Chapter 10 serves as a reference and the appendices contained therein include: assessment examples; scaling laws, explosions, blast effects, and fragmentation; codes, standards, and NASA directives; and relief devices along with a list of tables and figures, abbreviations, a glossary and an index for ease of use. The intent of the handbook is to provide enough information that it can be used alone, but at the same time, reference data sources that can provide much more detail if required.

  10. Closing the pressure gap in x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy by membrane hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delmelle, Renaud; Borgschulte, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.borgschulte@empa.ch [Laboratory for Advanced Analytical Technologies, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa), Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Laboratory for Hydrogen and Energy, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa), Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Probst, Benjamin; Alberto, Roger [Department of Chemistry, University of Zürich (UZH), CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Züttel, Andreas [Laboratory for Hydrogen and Energy, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa), Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), SB, ISIC, LMER, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bleiner, Davide [Laboratory for Advanced Analytical Technologies, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa), Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    Comprehensive studies of gas-solid reactions require the in-situ interaction of the gas at a pressure beyond the operating pressure of ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The recent progress of near ambient pressure XPS allows to dose gases to the sample up to a pressure of 20 mbar. The present work describes an alternative to this experimental challenge, with a focus on H{sub 2} as the interacting gas. Instead of exposing the sample under investigation to gaseous hydrogen, the sample is in contact with a hydrogen permeation membrane, through which hydrogen is transported from the outside to the sample as atomic hydrogen. Thereby, we can reach local hydrogen concentrations at the sample inside an UHV chamber, which is equipped with surface science tools, and this corresponds to a hydrogen pressure up to 1 bar without affecting the sensitivity or energy resolution of the spectrometer. This experimental approach is validated by two examples, that is, the reduction of a catalyst precursor for CO{sub 2} hydrogenation and the hydrogenation of a water reduction catalyst for photocatalytic H{sub 2} production, but it opens the possibility of the new in situ characterisation of energy materials and catalysts.

  11. A Hydrogen Leak Detection System for Aerospace and Commercial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Makel, D. B.; Jansa, E. D.; Patterson, G.; Cova, P. J.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, W. T.

    1995-01-01

    Leaks on the space shuttle while on the launch pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. Microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). These sensors have been integrated into hardware and software designed by Aerojet. This complete system allows for multipoint leak monitoring designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. This system is in operation in an automotive application which requires high sensitivity to hydrogen.

  12. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  13. On superintegrable systems closed to geodesic motion

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiganov, A V

    1997-01-01

    In this work we consider superintegrable systems in the classical $r$-matrix method. By using other authomorphisms of the loop algebras we construct new superintegrable systems with rational potentials from geodesic motion on $R^{2n}$.

  14. Closing open SDL-systems for model checking with DTSpin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Ioustinova (Natalia); N. Sidorova; M. Steffen

    2002-01-01

    textabstractModel checkers like Spin can handle closed reactive systems, only. Thus to handle open systems, in particular when using assume-guarantee reasoning, we need to be able to close (sub-)systems, which is commonly done by adding an environment process. For models with asynchronous

  15. Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

  16. Performance Analysis of Hybrid Solar-Hydrogen Energy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jinsheng; Guan, Xuehua

    The system of solar thermoelectric-photovoltaic hybrid generation for hydrogen production is designed in this paper. The mathematical model of the hybrid system using MATLAB/SIMULINK software is carried out. And the logic control system is designed. The current of the various sub-systems and the energy of the hydrogen storage tank are simulated and analyzed, this paper proves the solar hybrid system can be reliable and effective.

  17. Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

  18. Closed circuit TV system monitors welding operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, M.

    1967-01-01

    TV camera system that has a special vidicon tube with a gradient density filter is used in remote monitoring of TIG welding of stainless steel. The welding operations involve complex assembly welding tools and skates in areas of limited accessibility.

  19. Hydrogen recovery by novel solvent systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinnar, R.; Ludmer, Z.; Ullmann, A.

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a novel method for purification of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas. The study involved a search for suitable mixtures of solvents for their ability to separate hydrogen from the coal derived gas stream in significant concentration near their critical point of miscibility. The properties of solvent pairs identified were investigated in more detail to provide data necessary for economic evaluation and process development.

  20. Closing the water and nutrient cycles in soilless cultivation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerling, E.A.M.; Blok, C.; Maas, van der A.A.; Os, van E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Soilless cultivation systems are common in Dutch greenhouse horticulture, i.e., less than 20% of the greenhouse area is still soil grown. For long, it was assumed that in these so-called closed systems the emission of nutrients and plant protection products (PPPs) was close to zero. However, Water

  1. CLOSYS: Closed System for Water and Nutrient Management in Horticulture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, L.F.M.; Dieleman, J.A.; Boulard, T.; Garate, A.; Kittas, C.; Buschmann, C.; Brajeul, E.; Wieringa, G.; Groot, de F.; Loon, van A.; Kocsanyi, L.

    2006-01-01

    The EU project CLOSYS aimed at developing a CLOsed SYStem for water and nutrients in horticulture. The main objective was to control water and nutrients accurately such that pollution is minimized and crop quality enhanced. The closed system as developed in this project consists of crop growth

  2. 21 CFR 11.10 - Controls for closed systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ELECTRONIC RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Records § 11.10 Controls for closed systems. Persons who use closed systems to create, modify, maintain, or transmit electronic records shall employ procedures and...

  3. Methods and systems for the production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang H [Idaho Falls, ID; Kim, Eung S [Ammon, ID; Sherman, Steven R [Augusta, GA

    2012-03-13

    Methods and systems are disclosed for the production of hydrogen and the use of high-temperature heat sources in energy conversion. In one embodiment, a primary loop may include a nuclear reactor utilizing a molten salt or helium as a coolant. The nuclear reactor may provide heat energy to a power generation loop for production of electrical energy. For example, a supercritical carbon dioxide fluid may be heated by the nuclear reactor via the molten salt and then expanded in a turbine to drive a generator. An intermediate heat exchange loop may also be thermally coupled with the primary loop and provide heat energy to one or more hydrogen production facilities. A portion of the hydrogen produced by the hydrogen production facility may be diverted to a combustor to elevate the temperature of water being split into hydrogen and oxygen by the hydrogen production facility.

  4. 40 CFR 65.143 - Closed vent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a... of the equipment as frequently as practical during safe-to-inspect times. Inspection is not required...

  5. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 2 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Moreover, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be a major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  6. A manual of recommended practices for hydrogen energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoagland, W.; Leach, S. [W. Hoagland and Associates, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Technologies for the production, distribution, and use of hydrogen are rapidly maturing and the number and size of demonstration programs designed to showcase emerging hydrogen energy systems is expanding. The success of these programs is key to hydrogen commercialization. Currently there is no comprehensive set of widely-accepted codes or standards covering the installation and operation of hydrogen energy systems. This lack of codes or standards is a major obstacle to future hydrogen demonstrations in obtaining the requisite licenses, permits, insurance, and public acceptance. In a project begun in late 1996 to address this problem, W. Hoagland and Associates has been developing a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Systems intended to serve as an interim document for the design and operation of hydrogen demonstration projects. It will also serve as a starting point for some of the needed standard-setting processes. The Manual will include design guidelines for hydrogen procedures, case studies of experience at existing hydrogen demonstration projects, a bibliography of information sources, and a compilation of suppliers of hydrogen equipment and hardware. Following extensive professional review, final publication will occur later in 1997. The primary goal is to develop a draft document in the shortest possible time frame. To accomplish this, the input and guidance of technology developers, industrial organizations, government R and D and regulatory organizations and others will be sought to define the organization and content of the draft Manual, gather and evaluate available information, develop a draft document, coordinate reviews and revisions, and develop recommendations for publication, distribution, and update of the final document. The workshop, Development of a Manual of Recommended Practices for Hydrogen Energy Systems, conducted on March 11, 1997 in Alexandria, Virginia, was a first step.

  7. Technical assessment of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, T. Q.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J. K.; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (TIAX, LLC)

    2011-02-09

    The performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems has been assessed and compared to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010, 2015, and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for compressed hydrogen tanks with design pressures of 350 bar ({approx}5000 psi) and 700 bar ({approx}10,000 psi) capable of storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen. The off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen was determined for hydrogen produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR). The main conclusions of the assessment are that the 350-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet the 2010 and 2015 targets for system gravimetric capacity but will not likely meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, given our base case assumptions. The 700-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet only the 2010 target for system gravimetric capacity and is not likely to meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, despite the fact that its volumetric capacity is much higher than that of the 350-bar system. Both the 350-bar and 700-bar systems come close to meeting the Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency target, but fall short by about 5%. These results are summarized.

  8. Standard-D hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lott, D.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-24

    This document details the results of the field Acceptance Testing of the Standard-D Hydrogen Monitoring System on the waste tank exhaust stacks in 241-AW and 241-AN tank farm. The monitors will be used to measure hydrogen and ammonia from the exhaust stacks.

  9. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Hydrogen Sensors and Systems. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Sensor systems research was focused on hydrogen leak detection and smart sensors with adaptive feedback control for fuel cells. The goal was to integrate multifunction smart sensors, low-power high-efficiency wireless circuits, energy harvesting devices, and power management circuits in one module. Activities were focused on testing and demonstrating sensors in a realistic environment while also bringing them closer to production and commercial viability for eventual use in the actual operating environment.

  10. Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System (IRHUS) business plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This business plan is for a proposed legal entity named IRHUS, Inc. which is to be formed as a subsidiary of Energy Partners, L.C. (EP) of West Palm Beach, Florida. EP is a research and development company specializing in hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and systems. A fuel cell is an engine with no moving parts that takes in hydrogen and produces electricity. The purpose of IRHUS, Inc. is to develop and manufacture a self-sufficient energy system based on the fuel cell and other new technology that produces hydrogen and electricity. The product is called the Integrated renewable Hydrogen utility System (IRHUS). IRHUS, Inc. plans to start limited production of the IRHUS in 2002. The IRHUS is a unique product with an innovative concept in that it provides continuous electrical power in places with no electrical infrastructure, i.e., in remote and island locations. The IRHUS is a zero emissions, self-sufficient, hydrogen fuel generation system that produces electricity on a continuous basis by combining any renewable power source with hydrogen technology. Current plans are to produce a 10 kilowatt IRHUS MP (medium power). Future plans are to design and manufacture IRHUS models to provide power for a variety of power ranges for identified attractive market segments. The technological components of the IRHUS include an electrolyzer, hydrogen and oxygen storage subsystems, fuel cell system, and power control system. The IRHUS product is to be integrated with a variety of renewable energy technologies. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, Harold T.

    2008-03-30

    A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable

  12. A Cassette Based System for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton Wayne E.

    2006-11-29

    A hydrogen storage system is described and evaluated. This is based upon a cassette, that is a container for managing hydrogen storage materials. The container is designed to be safe, modular, adaptable to different chemistries, inexpensive, and transportable. A second module receives the cassette and provides the necessary infrastructure to deliver hydrogen from the cassette according to enduser requirements. The modular concept has a number of advantages over approaches that are all in one stand alone systems. The advantages of a cassette based system are discussed, along with results from model and laboratory testing.

  13. Management of Leaks in Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawls, G

    2006-04-27

    A systematic approach to manage hydrogen leakage from components is presented. Methods to evaluate the quantity of hydrogen leakage and permeation from a system are provided by calculation and testing sensitivities. The following technology components of a leak management program are described: (1) Methods to evaluate hydrogen gas loss through leaks; (2) Methods to calculate opening areas of crack like defects; (3) Permeation of hydrogen through metallic piping; (4) Code requirements for acceptable flammability limits; (5) Methods to detect flammable gas; (6) Requirements for adequate ventilation in the vicinity of the hydrogen system; (7) Methods to calculate dilution air requirements for flammable gas mixtures; and (8) Concepts for reduced leakage component selection and permeation barriers.

  14. Development and validation of purged thermal protection systems for liquid hydrogen fuel tanks of hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenbrook, R. D.; Colt, J. Z.

    1977-01-01

    An economical, lightweight, safe, efficient, reliable, and reusable insulation system was developed for hypersonic cruise vehicle hydrogen fuel tanks. Results indicate that, a nitrogen purged, layered insulation system with nonpermeable closed-cell insulation next to the cryogenic tank and a high service temperature fibrous insulation surrounding it, is potentially an attractive solution to the insulation problem. For the postulated hypersonic flight the average unit weight of the purged insulation system (including insulation, condensate and fuel boil off) is 6.31 kg/sq m (1.29 psf). Limited cyclic tests of large specimens of closed cell polymethacrylimide foam indicate it will withstand the expected thermal cycle.

  15. Closed-Loop Strategies for Patient Care Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    HME) on bronchial mucus transport in a closed inhalation anesthesia system. Anaesthesist. 1996;45:802–806. 23. Robinson K. Controlling bleeding in the...Cardiovasc Surg. 1985;89:115–120. 49. Chase JG, Shaw GM, Lin J, et al. Targeted glycemic reduction in critical care using closed-loop control. Diabetes

  16. Technoeconomic analysis of renewable hydrogen production, storage, and detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.; Kadam, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Technical and economic feasibility studies of different degrees of completeness and detail have been performed on several projects being funded by the Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. Work this year focused on projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, although analyses of projects at other institutions are underway or planned. Highly detailed analyses were completed on a fiber optic hydrogen leak detector and a process to produce hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis followed by steam reforming of the pyrolysis oil. Less detailed economic assessments of solar and biologically-based hydrogen production processes have been performed and focused on the steps that need to be taken to improve the competitive position of these technologies. Sensitivity analyses were conducted on all analyses to reveal the degree to which the cost results are affected by market changes and technological advances. For hydrogen storage by carbon nanotubes, a survey of the competing storage technologies was made in order to set a baseline for cost goals. A determination of the likelihood of commercialization was made for nearly all systems examined. Hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis and steam reforming was found to have significant economic potential if a coproduct option could be co-commercialized. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production may have economic potential, but only if low-cost cells can be modified to split water and to avoid surface oxidation. The use of bacteria to convert the carbon monoxide in biomass syngas to hydrogen was found to be slightly more expensive than the high end of currently commercial hydrogen, although there are significant opportunities to reduce costs. Finally, the cost of installing a fiber-optic chemochromic hydrogen detection system in passenger vehicles was found to be very low and competitive with alternative sensor systems.

  17. Standard-E hydrogen monitoring system field acceptance testprocedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that the Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems (SHMS-E) installed on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas are constructed as intended by the design.

  18. DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

    2011-06-30

    The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production

  19. Solar Hydrogen Energy Systems Science and Technology for the Hydrogen Economy

    CERN Document Server

    Zini, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    It is just a matter of time when fossil fuels will become unavailable or uneconomical to retrieve. On top of that, their environmental impact is already too severe. Renewable energy sources can be considered as the most important substitute to fossil energy, since they are inexhaustible and have a very low, if none, impact on the environment. Still, their unevenness and unpredictability are drawbacks that must be dealt with in order to guarantee a reliable and steady energy supply to the final user. Hydrogen can be the answer to these problems. This book presents the readers with the modeling, functioning and implementation of solar hydrogen energy systems, which efficiently combine different technologies to convert, store and use renewable energy. Sources like solar photovoltaic or wind, technologies like electrolysis, fuel cells, traditional and advanced hydrogen storage are discussed and evaluated together with system management and output performance. Examples are also given to show how these systems are ...

  20. Cold weather hydrogen generation system and method of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, Ken Wayne; Kowalski, Michael Thomas; Porter, Stephen Charles; Chow, Oscar Ken; Borland, Nicholas Paul; Goyette, Stephen Arthur

    2010-12-14

    A system for providing hydrogen gas is provided. The system includes a hydrogen generator that produces gas from water. One or more heat generation devices are arranged to provide heating of the enclosure during different modes of operation to prevent freezing of components. A plurality of temperature sensors are arranged and coupled to a controller to selectively activate a heat source if the temperature of the component is less than a predetermined temperature.

  1. 40 CFR 63.983 - Closed vent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Standards for Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas... the equipment as frequently as practical during safe-to-inspect times. Inspection is not required more...

  2. Structure and energetics of hydrogen-bonded networks of methanol on close packed transition metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Colin J.; Carrasco, Javier; Lawton, Timothy J.; Liriano, Melissa L.; Baber, Ashleigh E.; Lewis, Emily A.; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2014-07-01

    Methanol is a versatile chemical feedstock, fuel source, and energy storage material. Many reactions involving methanol are catalyzed by transition metal surfaces, on which hydrogen-bonded methanol overlayers form. As with water, the structure of these overlayers is expected to depend on a delicate balance of hydrogen bonding and adsorbate-substrate bonding. In contrast to water, however, relatively little is known about the structures methanol overlayers form and how these vary from one substrate to another. To address this issue, herein we analyze the hydrogen bonded networks that methanol forms as a function of coverage on three catalytically important surfaces, Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111), using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. We investigate the effect of intermolecular interactions, surface coverage, and adsorption energies on molecular assembly and compare the results to more widely studied water networks on the same surfaces. Two main factors are shown to direct the structure of methanol on the surfaces studied: the surface coverage and the competition between the methanol-methanol and methanol-surface interactions. Additionally, we report a new chiral form of buckled hexamer formed by surface bound methanol that maximizes the interactions between methanol monomers by sacrificing interactions with the surface. These results serve as a direct comparison of interaction strength, assembly, and chirality of methanol networks on Au(111), Cu(111), and Pt(111) which are catalytically relevant for methanol oxidation, steam reforming, and direct methanol fuel cells.

  3. Thermophysicochemical Reaction of ZrCo-Hydrogen-Helium System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwangjin; Kang, Hee-Seok; Yun, Sei-Hun; Chung, Hongsuk

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear fusion energy, which is clean and infinite, has been studied for more than half a century. Efforts are in progress worldwide for the demonstration and validation of nuclear fusion energy. Korea has been developing hydrogen isotope storage and delivery system (SDS) technologies including a basic scientific study on a hydrogen storage medium. An SDS bed, which is a key component of the SDS, is used for storing hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride form and supplying them to a tokamak. Thermophysicochemical properties of the ZrCo-H2-He system are investigated for the practical utilization of a hydriding alloy system. The hydriding reaction, in which ZrCoHx is composed as ZrCo absorbing hydrogen, is exothermic. The dehydriding reaction, in which ZrCoHx decomposes into ZrCo and hydrogen, is endothermic. The heat generated through the hydriding reaction interrupts the hydriding progress. The heat loss by a dehydriding reaction impedes the dehydriding progress. The tritium decay product, helium-3, covers the ZrCo and keeps the hydrogen from contact with ZrCo in the SDS bed. In this study, we designed and fabricated a ZrCo bed and its performance test rig. The helium blanketing effect on a ZrCo hydrogen reaction with 0 % to 20 % helium content in a gaseous phase and a helium blanket removal method were studied experimentally. In addition, the volumetric flow rates and temperature at the beginning of a ZrCo hydrogen reaction in a hydrogen or helium atmosphere, and the cooling of the SDS bed by radiation only and by both radiation and natural convection related to the reuse cycle, were obtained.

  4. PNNL Development and Analysis of Material-Based Hydrogen Storage Systems for the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Alvine, Kyle J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Kenneth I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Klymyshyn, Nicholas A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pires, Richard P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ronnebro, Ewa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Simmons, Kevin L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westman, Matthew P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence is a team of universities, industrial corporations, and federal laboratories with the mandate to develop lower-pressure, materials-based, hydrogen storage systems for hydrogen fuel cell light-duty vehicles. Although not engaged in the development of new hydrogen storage materials themselves, it is an engineering center that addresses engineering challenges associated with the currently available hydrogen storage materials. Three material-based approaches to hydrogen storage are being researched: 1) chemical hydrogen storage materials 2) cryo-adsorbents, and 3) metal hydrides. As a member of this Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been involved in the design and evaluation of systems developed with each of these three hydrogen storage materials. This report is a compilation of the work performed by PNNL for this Center.

  5. A new high strength alloy for hydrogen fueled propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcpherson, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high-strength alloy (1241 MPa ultimate and 1103 MPa yield, with little or no degradation in hydrogen) for application in advanced hydrogen-fueled rocket engines. Various compositions of the Fe-Ni-Co-Cr system with elemental additions of Cb, Ti and Al are discussed. After processing, notched tensile specimens were tested in 34.5-MPa hydrogen at room temperature, as the main screening test. The H2/air notch tensile ratio was used as the selection/rejection criterion. The most promising alloys are discussed.

  6. Analysis of hydrogen operation in the Danish Traffic System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1996-01-01

    The main report of a study of the utilisation of hydrogen in the Danish energy and traffic system.The report contains an overview and assessment of the potential hydrogen technologies as well as analyses of the energy and environmental effects of different applications in the Danish transport sec...... sector (passenger car, bus, van, truck). The report concludes that hydrogen along with electric and hybrid propulsion can be a very interesting element in a strategy for sustainable transport, but only if based mainly on renewable energy....

  7. HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND DELIVERY INFRASTRUCTURE AS A COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolley, George S

    2010-06-29

    large enough to noticeably affect sales penetration. A tax of $116 per metric ton makes centrally produced hydrogen profitable in the very first year but results in only 64% penetration by year 20 as opposed to the 60% penetration in the benchmark case. Provision of 15 seed stations publicly provided at the beginning of the simulation, in addition to the 15 existing stations in the benchmark case, gives sales penetration rates very close to the benchmark after 20 years, namely, 63% and 59% depending on where they are placed.

  8. Development of a Practical Hydrogen Storage System Based on Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers and a Homogeneous Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers, LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States); Brayton, Daniel [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers, LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States); Jorgensen, Scott W. [General Motors, LLC, Warren, MI (United States). Research and Development Center. Chemical and Material Systems Lab.; Hou, Peter [General Motors, LLC, Warren, MI (United States). Research and Development Center. Chemical and Material Systems Lab.

    2017-03-24

    The objectives of this project were: 1) optimize a hydrogen storage media based on LOC/homogeneous pincer catalyst (carried out at Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers, LLC) and 2) develop space, mass and energy efficient tank and reactor system to house and release hydrogen from the media (carried out at General Motor Research Center).

  9. Engineering analysis of potential photosynthetic bacterial hydrogen-production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlevich, A.; Karpuk, M. E.

    1982-06-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) are capable of generating hydrogen from organics in effluents from food processing, pulp and paper, and chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Hydrogen evolution takes place under light in the absence of air. The rate of hydrogen production is expected to range between 300 to 600 scf of hydrogen per 1000 galloons of waste stream treated per hour. This hydrogen production system has been demonstrated at a bench-scale level and is ready for engineering development. A conceptual design for a PSB hydrogen production system is described. The system is expected to be sited adjacent to a waste stream source which will be pretreated by fermentation and pH adjustment, innoculated with bacteria, and then passed into the reactor. The reactor effluent can either be discharged into a rapid infiltration system, an irrigation ditch, and/or recycled back into the reactor. Several potential reactor designs have been developed, analyzed, and costed. A large covered pond appears to be the most economical design approach.

  10. The Benchmark of Gutzwiller Density Functional Theory in Hydrogen Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yongxin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2011-01-13

    We propose an approximate form of the exchange-correlation energy functional for the Gutzwiller density functional theory. It satisfies certain physical constraints in both weak and strong electron correlation limits. We benchmark the Gutzwiller density functional approximation in the hydrogen systems, where the static correlation error is shown to be negligible. The good transferability is demonstrated by applications to the hydrogen molecule and some crystal structures. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Quantum Chem, 2012

  11. Safety of Hydrogen Systems Installed in Outdoor Enclosures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barilo, Nick F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The Hydrogen Safety Panel brings a broad cross-section of expertise from the industrial, government, and academic sectors to help advise the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office through its work in hydrogen safety, codes, and standards. The Panel’s initiatives in reviewing safety plans, conducting safety evaluations, identifying safety-related technical data gaps, and supporting safety knowledge tools and databases cover the gamut from research and development to demonstration and deployment. The Panel’s recent work has focused on the safe deployment of hydrogen and fuel cell systems in support of DOE efforts to accelerate fuel cell commercialization in early market applications: vehicle refueling, material handling equipment, backup power for warehouses and telecommunication sites, and portable power devices. This paper resulted from observations and considerations stemming from the Panel’s work on early market applications. This paper focuses on hydrogen system components that are installed in outdoor enclosures. These enclosures might alternatively be called “cabinets,” but for simplicity, they are all referred to as “enclosures” in this paper. These enclosures can provide a space where a flammable mixture of hydrogen and air might accumulate, creating the potential for a fire or explosion should an ignition occur. If the enclosure is large enough for a person to enter, and ventilation is inadequate, the hydrogen concentration could be high enough to asphyxiate a person who entered the space. Manufacturers, users, and government authorities rely on requirements described in codes to guide safe design and installation of such systems. Except for small enclosures used for hydrogen gas cylinders (gas cabinets), fuel cell power systems, and the enclosures that most people would describe as buildings, there are no hydrogen safety requirements for these enclosures, leaving gaps that must be addressed. This paper proposes that

  12. Study on a lab-scale hydrogen production by closed cycle thermo-chemical iodine-sulfur process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P.; Chen, S.Z.; Wang, L.J.; Yao, T.Y.; Xu, J.M. [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, P.O. Box 1021, Beijing (China)

    2010-10-15

    The Iodine-Sulfur (IS) thermo-chemical process for the production of hydrogen is one of the most promising approaches for use of the high temperature process heat supplied by high temperature reactor, which was developed in the Institute of nuclear and new energy technology (INET) of Tsinghua University, China, and INET initiated the fundamental studies on IS cycle since 2005. Based on the experiment results obtained by fundamental researches, a lab-scaled closed cycle loop (IS-10), which featured in electro-electrodialysis (EED) for hydriodic acid (HI) concentration, was designed and built at INET. The loop was composed of three sections, i.e., Bunsen section, HI section and sulfuric acid section. The closed cycle experiment on the loop was successfully carried out recently. In HI section, HI{sub x} produced by Bunsen reaction was continuously purified through reverse Bunsen reaction, concentrated by EED, and then HI solution was obtained by distillation. Finally HI was catalytically decomposed to H{sub 2} and I{sub 2} with the conversion of 20%. In sulfuric acid section, sulfuric acid was continuously purified, concentrated by distillation, and catalytically decomposed to SO{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O with the conversion of 75%. In Bunsen section, water, including recycled water, reacted with I{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} recycled from HI section and sulfuric acid section to form two separated acids phases, thus to form a closed cycle. The closed cycle experiment lasted for 7 h with the hydrogen production rate of 10 NL/h, with Pt loaded on activated carbon and copper chromite used as the catalysts for HI and sulfuric acid decomposition, respectively. This paper summarizes the main features of IS-10 and the main results of the closed cycle experiment. So far IS-10 is the second reported facility on which closed experiment was carried out, and the first one with EED embedded to perform a closed cycle operation. (author)

  13. Close range ISR (PRISTA) and close quarters combat (CQC) with unmanned aerial systems (UAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynell, Jon

    2010-04-01

    Ironically, the final frontiers for the UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) are the closest spaces at hand. There is an urgent operational capability gap in the area of proximate reconnaissance, intelligence, surveillance, and target acquisition (PRISTA) as well as close quarters combats (CQC). Needs for extremely close range functionality in land, sea and urban theaters remain unfilled, largely due to the challenges presented by the maneuverability and silent operating floor required to address these missions. The evolution of small, nimble and inexpensive VTOL UAV assets holds much promise in terms of filling this gap. Just as UAVs have evolved from large manned aircraft, so have MAVs (Micro Aerial Vehicles) evolved from UAVs. As unmanned aviation evolves into aerial robotics, NAV (Nano Aerial Vehicle) research will become the next hotbed of unmanned aerial systems development as these systems continue to mature in response to the need to find robotic replacements for humans in PRISTA, CQC, and many other hazardous duties.

  14. POF hydrogen detection sensor systems for launch vehicles applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Larson, David B.; Wuestling, Mark D.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the first successful Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) cable and glass fiber hydrogen detection sensor systems developed for Delta IV Launch Vehicle. Hydrogen detection in space application is very challenging; the hydrogen detection is priority for rocket industry and every transport device or any application where hydrogen is involved. H2 sensors are necessary to monitor the detection possible leak to avoid explosion, which can be highly dangerous. The hydrogen sensors had to perform in temperatures between -18° C to 60° C (0° F to 140° F). The response of the sensor in this temperature regime was characterized to ensure proper response of the sensors to fugitive hydrogen leakage during vehicle ground operations. We developed the first 75 m combination of POF and glass fiber H2 sensors. Performed detail investigation of POF-glass cables for attenuation loss, thermal, humidity, temperature, shock, accelerate testing for life expectancy. Also evaluated absorption, operating and high/low temperatures, and harsh environmental for glass-POF cables connectors. The same test procedures were performed for glass multi mode fiber part of the H2 and O2 sensors. A new optical waveguides was designed and developed to decrease the impact of both noise and long term drift of sensor. A field testing of sensors was performed at NASA Stennis on the Aerospike X-33 to quantify the element of the sensor package that was responsible for hydrogen detection and temperature.

  15. Revision of the Closed Orbit Corrector System of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Verdier, A

    2000-01-01

    The closed orbit corrector system of the LHC has been revisited in accordance with the project progress. The magnet measurement procedures are now well defined. This makes the error on the magnet strength and positioning better known than at the time the orbit correctors were specified. The LHC is in a favourable context in the sense that we have a precise knowledge of the vertical movement of the LEP tunnel and that an efficient code to detect field errors is available. Under these conditions the strength of the closed orbit correctors in the arc and in the dispersion suppressors is sufficient. The demand on closed orbit correctors in the insertions can be somewhat relaxed. The tolerances on the longitudinal positions of the dipoles and quadrupoles are easy to satisfy and do not impose further constraints on the closed orbit corrector system.

  16. Hydrogen Purification and Recycling for an Integrated Oxygen Recovery System Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary; Wall, Terry; Nur, Mononita; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Preston, Joshua; Molter, Trent

    2016-01-01

    The United States Atmosphere Revitalization life support system on the International Space Station (ISS) performs several services for the crew including oxygen generation, trace contaminant control, carbon dioxide (CO2) removal, and oxygen recovery. Oxygen recovery is performed using a Sabatier reactor developed by Hamilton Sundstrand, wherein CO2 is reduced with hydrogen in a catalytic reactor to produce methane and water. The water product is purified in the Water Purification Assembly and recycled to the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) to provide O2 to the crew. This architecture results in a theoretical maximum oxygen recovery from CO2 of approx.54% due to the loss of reactant hydrogen in Sabatier-produced methane that is currently vented outside of ISS. Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) technology, developed by Umpqua Research Company, provides the capability to further close the Atmosphere Revitalization oxygen loop by recovering hydrogen from Sabatier-produced methane. A key aspect of this technology approach is the need to purify the hydrogen from the PPA product stream which includes acetylene, unreacted methane and byproduct water and carbon monoxide. In 2015, four sub-scale hydrogen separation systems were delivered to NASA for evaluation. These included two electrolysis single-cell hydrogen purification cell stacks developed by Sustainable Innovations, LLC, a sorbent-based hydrogen purification unit using microwave power for sorbent regeneration developed by Umpqua Research Company, and a LaNi4.6Sn0.4 metal hydride produced by Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. Here we report the results of these evaluations to-date, discuss potential architecture options, and propose future work.

  17. Closed loop two-echelon repairable item systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, L.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.; Zijm, Willem H.M.

    In this paper we consider closed loop two-echelon repairable item systems with repair facilities both at a number of local service centers (called bases) and at a central location (the depot). The goal of the system is to maintain a number of production facilities (one at each base) in optimal

  18. Closed-loop two-echelon repairable item systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, L.; Zijm, Willem H.M.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we consider closed loop two-echelon repairable item systems with repair facilities both at a number of local service centers (called bases) and at a central location (the depot). The goal of the system is to maintain a number of production facilities (one at each base) in optimal

  19. Closed loop two-echelon repairable item systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, L.; van Ommeren, Jan C.W.; Zijm, Willem H.M.; Liberopoulos, G.; Papadopoulos, C.T.; Tan, B.; MacGregor Smith, J.; Gershwin, S.B.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider closed loop two-echelon epairable item systems with repair facilities both at a number of local service centers (called bases) and at a central location (the depot). The goal of the system is to maintain a number of production facilities (one at each base) in optimal

  20. Closed soilless growing systems in the Netherlands: the finishing touch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the latest developments in closed soilless growing systems in the Netherlands, where growers are obliged to invest in environmently friendly cropping systems, in order to comply with new legislation. Subjects of discussion will be the reasons for regulation, the

  1. Macro-System Model for Hydrogen Energy Systems Analysis in Transportation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diakov, V.; Ruth, M.; Sa, T. J.; Goldsby, M. E.

    2012-06-01

    The Hydrogen Macro System Model (MSM) is a simulation tool that links existing and emerging hydrogen-related models to perform rapid, cross-cutting analysis. It allows analysis of the economics, primary energy-source requirements, and emissions of hydrogen production and delivery pathways.

  2. Hydrogen based energy storage for solar energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhanen, J.P.; Hagstroem, M.T.; Lund, P.H. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Dept. of Engineering Physics and Mathematics; Leppaenen, J.R.; Nieminen, J.P. [Neste Oy (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogen based energy storage options for solar energy systems was studied in order to improve their overall performance. A 1 kW photovoltaic hydrogen (PV-H2) pilot-plant and commercial prototype were constructed and a numerical simulation program H2PHOTO for system design and optimisation was developed. Furthermore, a comprehensive understanding of conversion (electrolysers and fuel cells) and storage (metal hydrides) technologies was acquired by the project partners. The PV-H{sub 2} power system provides a self-sufficient solution for applications in remote locations far from electric grids and maintenance services. (orig.)

  3. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  4. Hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schastlivtsev, A. I.; Nazarova, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    A hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine unit is considered that can be used in both nuclear and centralized power industries. However, it is the most promising when used for power-generating plants based on renewable energy sources (RES). The basic feature of the energy storage system in question is combination of storing the energy in compressed air and hydrogen and oxygen produced by the water electrolysis. Such a process makes the energy storage more flexible, in particular, when applied to RES-based power-generating plants whose generation of power may considerably vary during the course of a day, and also reduces the specific cost of the system by decreasing the required volume of the reservoir. This will allow construction of such systems in any areas independent of the local topography in contrast to the compressed-air energy storage gas-turbine plants, which require large-sized underground reservoirs. It should be noted that, during the energy recovery, the air that arrives from the reservoir is heated by combustion of hydrogen in oxygen, which results in the gas-turbine exhaust gases practically free of substances hazardous to the health and the environment. The results of analysis of a hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are presented. Its layout and the principle of its operation are described and the basic parameters are computed. The units of the system are analyzed and their costs are assessed; the recovery factor is estimated at more than 60%. According to the obtained results, almost all main components of the hydrogen-air energy storage gas-turbine system are well known at present; therefore, no considerable R&D costs are required. A new component of the system is the H2-O2 combustion chamber; a difficulty in manufacturing it is the necessity of ensuring the combustion of hydrogen in oxygen as complete as possible and preventing formation of nitric oxides.

  5. Dynamics of closed-loop systems containing flexible bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadikonda, Sivakumar S. K.; Singh, Ramendra P.

    1991-01-01

    An important characteristic of flexible multibody systems containing closed-loop topologies is that the component modes used to describe individual bodies will no longer be independent because of loop closure constraints. Thus, the issue of component modal selection becomes even more complicated. In addition, the foreshortening effect that has been studied extensively in the literature in the context of open-loop topologies will also be present in these constraint equations. Simulation results presented demonstrate the effects of modal selection and foreshortening on the dynamic response of closed-loop flexible systems.

  6. Wet Oxidation as a Waste Treatment Method in Closed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, B. L.; Wydeven, T.

    1982-01-01

    The chemistry of the wet oxidation process was investigated in relation to production of plant nutrients from plant and human waste materials as required for a closed life support system. Hydroponically grown lettuce plants were used as a model plant waste, and oxygen gas was used as an oxidant. Organic nitrogen content was decreased 88-100%, depending on feed material. Production of ammonia and nitrogen gas accounted for all of the observed decrease in organic nitrogen content. No nitrous oxide (N2O) was detected. The implications of these results for closed life support systems are discussed.

  7. Standard-E hydrogen monitoring system shop acceptance test procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-10-02

    The purpose of this report is to document that the Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems (SHMS-E), fabricated by Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE) for installation on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas, are constructed as intended by the design. The ATP performance will verify proper system fabrication.

  8. Closed soilless growing systems in the Netherlands: the finishing touch

    OpenAIRE

    Os, van, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the latest developments in closed soilless growing systems in the Netherlands, where growers are obliged to invest in environmently friendly cropping systems, in order to comply with new legislation. Subjects of discussion will be the reasons for regulation, the growers' reaction to the proposed legislation, the methods to comply with legislation and related problems such as the availability of good water, the systems applied and the developments in the disinfe...

  9. Standard-C hydrogen monitoring system acceptance test procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1994-09-02

    The primary function of the standard-C hydrogen monitoring system (SHMS) is to monitor specifically for hydrogen in the waste tank atmosphere which may also contain (but not be limited to) unknown quantities of air, nitrous oxide, ammonia, water vapor, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and other gaseous constituents. The SHMS will consist of hydrogen specific monitors, a grab sampler to collect samples for laboratory analysis, a gas chromatograph, and the gas sample collection system necessary to support the operation of the instrumentation. This system will be located in a cabinet placed at the tank of interest. The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that the SHMS is constructed as intended by design.

  10. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocha, S.; Peterson, M.; Arent, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Photon driven, direct conversion systems consist of a light absorber and a water splitting catalyst as a monolithic system; water is split directly upon illumination. This one-step process eliminates the need to generate electricity externally and subsequently feed it to an electrolyzer. These configurations require only the piping necessary for transport of hydrogen to an external storage system or gas pipeline. This work is focused on multiphoton photoelectrochemical devices for production of hydrogen directly using sunlight and water. Two types of multijunction cells, one consisting of a-Si triple junctions and the other GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs homojunctions, were studied for the photoelectrochemical decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen from an aqueous electrolyte solution. To catalyze the water decomposition process, the illuminated surface of the device was modified either by addition of platinum colloids or by coating with ruthenium dioxide. These colloids have been characterized by gel electrophoresis.

  11. Kinematics and dynamics of robotic systems with multiple closed loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang-De

    The kinematics and dynamics of robotic systems with multiple closed loops, such as Stewart platforms, walking machines, and hybrid manipulators, are studied. In the study of kinematics, focus is on the closed-form solutions of the forward position analysis of different parallel systems. A closed-form solution means that the solution is expressed as a polynomial in one variable. If the order of the polynomial is less than or equal to four, the solution has analytical closed-form. First, the conditions of obtaining analytical closed-form solutions are studied. For a Stewart platform, the condition is found to be that one rotational degree of freedom of the output link is decoupled from the other five. Based on this condition, a class of Stewart platforms which has analytical closed-form solution is formulated. Conditions of analytical closed-form solution for other parallel systems are also studied. Closed-form solutions of forward kinematics for walking machines and multi-fingered grippers are then studied. For a parallel system with three three-degree-of-freedom subchains, there are 84 possible ways to select six independent joints among nine joints. These 84 ways can be classified into three categories: Category 3:3:0, Category 3:2:1, and Category 2:2:2. It is shown that the first category has no solutions; the solutions of the second category have analytical closed-form; and the solutions of the last category are higher order polynomials. The study is then extended to a nearly general Stewart platform. The solution is a 20th order polynomial and the Stewart platform has a maximum of 40 possible configurations. Also, the study is extended to a new class of hybrid manipulators which consists of two serially connected parallel mechanisms. In the study of dynamics, a computationally efficient method for inverse dynamics of manipulators based on the virtual work principle is developed. Although this method is comparable with the recursive Newton-Euler method for

  12. Hydrogen photoproduction by use of photosynthetic organisms and biomimetic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Kreslavski, Vladimir D; Thavasi, Velmurugan; Zharmukhamedov, Sergei K; Klimov, Vyacheslav V; Nagata, Toshi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-02-01

    Hydrogen can be important clean fuel for future. Among different technologies for hydrogen production, oxygenic natural and artificial photosyntheses using direct photochemistry in synthetic complexes have a great potential to produce hydrogen, since both use clean and cheap sources: water and solar energy. Artificial photosynthesis is one way to produce hydrogen from water using sunlight by employing biomimetic complexes. However, splitting of water into protons and oxygen is energetically demanding and chemically difficult. In oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms such as algae and cyanobacteria, water is split into electrons and protons, which during primary photosynthetic process are redirected by photosynthetic electron transport chain, and ferredoxin, to the hydrogen-producing enzymes hydrogenase or nitrogenase. By these enzymes, e- and H+ recombine and form gaseous hydrogen. Biohydrogen activity of hydrogenase can be very high but it is extremely sensitive to photosynthetic O2. In contrast, nitrogenase is insensitive to O2, but has lower activity. At the moment, the efficiency of biohydrogen production is low. However, theoretical expectations suggest that the rates of photon conversion efficiency for H2 bioproduction can be high enough (>10%). Our review examines the main pathways of H2 photoproduction by using of photosynthetic organisms and biomimetic photosynthetic systems.

  13. Renewable Energy and Hydrogen System Concepts for Remote Communities in the West Nordic Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulleberg, Oeystein; Moerkved, Andreas

    2008-02-25

    In 2003 the Nordic Council of Ministers granted the funding for the first of several studies on renewable energy and hydrogen (RE/H2) energy systems for remote communities in the West Nordic region. The objective with this report is to summarize the main findings from Phase II and III of the West Nordic project. The island Nolsoy, Faroe Islands, was selected as a case study. The main conclusion is that it makes sense to design a wind/diesel-system with thermal storage, both from a techno-economical and environmental point of view. Such systems can have close to 100% local utilization of the wind energy, and can cover up to 75% of the total annual electricity demand and 35% of the annual heat demand at a cost of energy around 0.07 - 0.09 euro/kWh. The introduction of a hydrogen system is technically feasible, but doubles the overall investment costs

  14. Development of hydrogen storage systems using sodium alanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano Martinez, Gustavo Adolfo

    2010-12-06

    In this work, hydrogen storage systems based on sodium alanate were studied, modelled and optimised, using both experimental and theoretical approaches. The experimental approach covered investigations of the material from mg scale up to kg scale in demonstration test tanks, while the theoretical approach discussed modelling and simulation of the hydrogen sorption process in a hydride bed. Both approaches demonstrated the strong effect of heat transfer on the sorption behaviour of the hydride bed and led to feasible methods to improve and optimise the volumetric and gravimetric capacities of hydrogen storage systems. The applied approaches aimed at an optimal integration of sodium alanate material in practical hydrogen storage systems. First, it was experimentally shown that the size of the hydride bed influences the hydrogen sorption behaviour of the material. This is explained by the different temperature profiles that are developed inside the hydride bed during the sorptions. In addition, in a self-constructed cell it was possible to follow the hydrogen sorptions and the developed temperature profiles within the bed. Moreover, the effective thermal conductivity of the material was estimated in-situ in this cell, given very good agreement with reported values of ex-situ measurements. It was demonstrated that the effective thermal conductivity of the hydride bed can be enhanced by the addition of expanded graphite. This enhancement promotes lower temperature peaks during the sorptions due to faster heat conduction through the bed, which in addition allows faster heat transfer during sorption. Looking towards simulations and further evaluations, empirical kinetic models for both hydrogen absorption and desorption of doped sodium alanate were developed. Based on the results of the model, the optimal theoretical pressure-temperature conditions for hydrogen sorptions were determined. A new approach is proposed for the mass balance of the reactions when implementing

  15. Alternative Energetics DC Microgrid With Hydrogen Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaļeskis Genadijs

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is related to an alternative energetics microgrid with a wind generator and a hydrogen energy storage system. The main aim of this research is the development of solutions for effective use of the wind generators in alternative energetics devices, at the same time providing uninterrupted power supply of the critical loads. In this research, it was accepted that the alternative energetics microgrid operates in an autonomous mode and the connection to the conventional power grid is not used. In the case when wind speed is low, the necessary power is provided by the energy storage system, which includes a fuel cell and a tank with stored hydrogen. The theoretical analysis of the storage system operation is made. The possible usage time of the stored hydrogen depends on the available amount of hydrogen and the consumption of the hydrogen by the fuel cell. The consumption, in turn, depends on used fuel cell power. The experimental results suggest that if the wind generator can provide only a part of the needed power, the abiding power can be provided by the fuel cell. In this case, a load filter is necessary to decrease the fuel cell current pulsations.

  16. Closed-loop System Identification with New Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, K; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with system identification of new system dynamics revealed by online introduction of new sensors in existing multi-variable linear control systems. The so-called "Hansen Scheme" utilises the dual Youla-Kucera parameterisation of all systems stabilised by a given linear controller...... to transform closed-loop system identification problems into open-loop-like problems. We show that this scheme can be formally extended to accomodate extra sensors in a nice way. The approach is illustrated on a simple simulation example....

  17. Modeling a PV-FC-Hydrogen Hybrid Power Generation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Javadpoor

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrical grid expansion onto remote areas is often not cost-effective and/or technologically feasible. Thus, isolated electrical systems are preferred in such cases. This paper focuses on a hybrid photovoltaic (PV-hydrogen/fuel cell (FC system which basic components include a PV, a FC, alkaline water electrolysis and a hydrogen gas tank. To increase the response rate, supercapacitors or small batteries are usually employed in such systems. This study focuses on the dynamics of the system. In the suggested structure, the PV is used as the main source of power. The FC is connected to the load in parallel with the PV by a transducer in order to inject the differential power while reducing power generation in relation to power consumption. An electrolyzer is used to convert the surplus power to hydrogen. This study studies a conventional hybrid photovoltaic-hydrogen/fuel cell system to evaluate different loading behaviors. Software modeling is done for the suggested hybrid system using MATLAB/SIMULINK.

  18. Closed Cycle Solar Refrigeration with the Calcium Chloride System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A closed cycle solid absorption intermittent refrigerator, using CaC12 absorbent and NH3 refrigerant, was constructed and tested to obtain the instantaneous and cumulative available overall COP. The combined collector/absorber/generator unit had double glazing of 1.14 m2 exposed areas. The system was fitted with a ...

  19. Active fault diagnosis in closed-loop uncertain systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Fault diagnosis of parametric faults in closed-loop uncertain systems by using an auxiliary input vector is considered in this paper, i.e. active fault diagnosis (AFD). The active fault diagnosis is based directly on the socalled fault signature matrix, related to the YJBK (Youla, Jabr, Bongiorno...

  20. Measurements of capillary system degradation. [liquid hydrogen propellant retention capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, R. P.; Butz, J. R.; Maytum, C. D.; Fester, D. A.; Young, G. M.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of vibration, flow transients, and warm gas pressurization on capillary acquisition system performance were evaluated. The degradation observed under wide band random and high frequency sinusoidal vibration was of a substantially different nature from that obtained under low frequency sinusoidal vibration. With the former, ingestion of small gas bubbles into the liquid region was correlated by a hydrostatic model, while the capillary stability was destroyed and liquid was lost from the liquid region with the latter. No degradation was observed as a result of flow transients in a flight-type multichannel screen device, but it was observed in a transparent laboratory device. Liquid hydrogen outflow tests were conducted with a multilayer dual-screen-liner system with both helium and hydrogen pressurant gases. The tendency towards dryout of the device with hydrogen pressurant was found to increase with increasing pressurant temperature and length of prepressurization period. Dryout did not occur with helium pressurant.

  1. A preliminary systems-engineering study of an advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.; Tison, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility concept was synthesized at a conceptual level with the objective of minimizing estimated hydrogen-production costs. The concept is a closely-integrated, fully-dedicated (only hydrogen energy is produced) system whose components and subsystems are predicted on ''1985 technology.'' The principal components are: (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating a helium-Brayton/ammonia-Rankine binary cycle with a helium reactor-core exit temperature of 980 C, (2) acyclic d-c generators, (3) high-pressure, high-current-density electrolyzers based on solid-polymer electrolyte technology. Based on an assumed 3,000 MWt HTGR the facility is capable of producing 8.7 million std cu m/day of hydrogen at pipeline conditions, 6,900 kPa. Coproduct oxygen is also available at pipeline conditions at one-half this volume. It has further been shown that the incorporation of advanced technology provides an overall efficiency of about 43 percent, as compared with 25 percent for a contemporary nuclear-electric plant powering close-coupled contemporary industrial electrolyzers.

  2. Application of ISFETs in closed-loop systems for greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieling, Th. H.; van den Vlekkert, H. H.

    In horticulture, growing in artificial substrates such as rockwool is more and more considered to be a sound alternative to growing in soil. This development enables the opportunity to create closed-loop systems which lower the waste of raw materials and reduce pollution of the environment. Applying closed-loop systems needs precise knowledge of the composition of the recirculating nutrient solution. This paper presents basic principles of a measuring system, which can monitor continuously the concentration of nutrients in water. The system is based on ion-selective field effect transistors (ISFETs). By appropriate calibration, a high accuracy is achieved for pH and potassium measurements in the nutrient solution. An accuracy of better than 10% (mMol/l) has been achieved.

  3. Durability study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2010-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale demonstration hydrogen storage system as part of a Work for Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed based on the properties and characteristics of sodium alanates which are complex metal hydrides. The technology resulting from this program was developed to enable heat and mass management during refueling and hydrogen delivery to an automotive system. During this program the Demonstration System was subjected to repeated hydriding and dehydriding cycles to enable comparison of the vehicle-scale system performance to small-scale sample data. This paper describes the experimental results of life-cycle studies of the Demonstration System. Two of the four hydrogen storage modules of the Demonstration System were used for this study. A well-controlled and repeatable sorption cycle was defined for the repeated cycling, which began after the system had already been cycled forty-one times. After the first nine repeated cycles, a significant hydrogen storage capacity loss was observed. It was suspected that the sodium alanates had been affected either morphologically or by contamination. The mechanisms leading to this initial degradation were investigated and results indicated that water and/or air contamination of the hydrogen supply may have lead to oxidation of the hydride and possibly kinetic deactivation. Subsequent cycles showed continued capacity loss indicating that the mechanism of degradation was gradual and transport or kinetically limited. A materials analysis was then conducted using established methods including treatment with carbon dioxide to react with sodium oxides that may have formed. The module tubes were sectioned to examine chemical composition and morphology as a function of axial position. The results will be discussed.

  4. CLOSED DOMAIN QUESTION ANSWERING SYSTEM USING NLP TECHNIQUES

    OpenAIRE

    Sweta P. Lende*; M. M. Raghuwanshi

    2016-01-01

    Question Answering (QA) system in information retrieval is a task of automatically answering a correct answer to the questions asked by human in natural language using either a pre-structured database or a collection of natural language documents. It presents only the requested information instead of searching full documents like search engine. This paper presents the implementation methods and experimental result with analysis for closed domain QA System which handle only documents related t...

  5. Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President; Principal Investigator, and

    2011-03-10

    H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen

  6. Estimation of Model Uncertainties in Closed-loop Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2008-01-01

    This paper describe a method for estimation of parameters or uncertainties in closed-loop systems. The method is based on an application of the dual YJBK (after Youla, Jabr, Bongiorno and Kucera) parameterization of all systems stabilized by a given controller. The dual YJBK transfer function...... is a measure for the variation in the system seen through the feedback controller. It is shown that it is possible to isolate a certain number of parameters or uncertain blocks in the system exactly. This is obtained by modifying the feedback controller through the YJBK transfer function together with pre...

  7. A novel closed system bubble column photobioreactor for detailed characterisation of micro and macroalgal growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt, Susan Løvstad; Christensen, L.; Iversen, J. J.L.

    Growth of the marine microalgae Tetraselmis striata Butcher and macroalgae Chondrus crispus Stackhouse was investigated in batch cultures in a closed system bubble column photobioreactor. A laboratory cultivation system was constructed that allowed on-line monitoring of temperature, pH and dissol......Growth of the marine microalgae Tetraselmis striata Butcher and macroalgae Chondrus crispus Stackhouse was investigated in batch cultures in a closed system bubble column photobioreactor. A laboratory cultivation system was constructed that allowed on-line monitoring of temperature, p...... produced oxygen was catalytically removed from the closed system by addition of hydrogen over a palladium catalyst to avoid photorespiration and to quantify oxygen production. In addition, the bubble column photobioreactor was well suited for cultivation of algae due to fast gas to liquid mass transfer (k......La) and fast mixing provided by split and dual sparging. Specific growth rates (SGRs) were measured using both off-line and on-line measurements. The latter was possible, because linear correlation was observed between carbon dioxide addition and optical density, which proves that carbon dioxide addition may...

  8. Technical analysis of photovoltaic/wind systems with hydrogen storage

    OpenAIRE

    Bakić Vukman V.; Pezo Milada L.; Jovanović Marina P.; Turanjanin Valentina M.; Vučićević Biljana S.

    2012-01-01

    The technical analysis of a hybrid wind-photovoltaic energy system with hydrogen gas storage was studied. The market for the distributed power generation based on renewable energy is increasing, particularly for the standalone mini-grid applications. The main design components of PV/Wind hybrid system are the PV panels, the wind turbine and an alkaline electrolyzer with tank. The technical analysis is based on the transient system simulation program TRNSYS 16. The study is realized usin...

  9. Active fault diagnosis in closed-loop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2005-01-01

    Active fault diagnosis (AFD) of parametric faults is considered in connection with closed loop feedback systems. AFD involves auxiliary signals applied on the closed loop system. A fault signature matrix is introduced in connection with AFD and it is shown that if a limited number of faults can...... occur in the system, a fault separation in the fault signature matrix can be obtained. Then the single elements in the matrix only depend of a reduced number of parametric faults. This can directly be applied for fault isolation. If it is not possible to obtain this separation, it is shown how the fault...... signature matrix can be applied for a dynamical fault isolation, i.e. fault isolation based on the dynamic characteristic of the fault signature matrix as function of the different parametric faults....

  10. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  11. Hydrogen-methane fuel control systems for turbojet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, J. S.; Bennett, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    Design, development, and test of a fuel conditioning and control system utilizing liquid methane (natural gas) and liquid hydrogen fuels for operation of a J85 jet engine were performed. The experimental program evaluated the stability and response of an engine fuel control employing liquid pumping of cryogenic fuels, gasification of the fuels at supercritical pressure, and gaseous metering and control. Acceptably stable and responsive control of the engine was demonstrated throughout the sea level power range for liquid gas fuel and up to 88 percent engine speed using liquid hydrogen fuel.

  12. Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul I. Barton; Mujid S. Kaximi; Georgios Bollas; Patricio Ramirez Munoz

    2009-07-31

    This project is part of a research effort to design a hydrogen plant and its interface with a nuclear reactor. This project developed a dynamic modeling, simulation and optimization environment for nuclear hydrogen production systems. A hybrid discrete/continuous model captures both the continuous dynamics of the nuclear plant, the hydrogen plant, and their interface, along with discrete events such as major upsets. This hybrid model makes us of accurate thermodynamic sub-models for the description of phase and reaction equilibria in the thermochemical reactor. Use of the detailed thermodynamic models will allow researchers to examine the process in detail and have confidence in the accurary of the property package they use.

  13. Analysis of hypothetical geothermal hydrogen systems in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, Marc; Penev, Mike [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Devlin, Peter [U.S. Department of Energy, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Analysis is presented for three theoretical geothermal energy systems on the Big Island of Hawaii. This preliminary study evaluates performance and economics for several strategies for enhancing integration of a geothermal renewable resource into the grid and for producing vehicle fuel by way of hydrogen production and storage. The analysis includes production of hydrogen and ammonia for use as fuels in light duty vehicles, and production of peak power using hydrogen produced off-peak, stored, and later use in a steam turbine to produce electricity during peak demand. Technological performance and costs are assessed for a near-term installation (next 2-3 years) and are compared on an apples-to-apples basis using consistent economic assumptions for two key metrics: (1) the ratio of geothermal energy product costs to comparable commodity prices, and (2) fuel costs per mile. (orig.)

  14. Helium-Hydrogen Recovery System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Immense quantities of expensive liquefied helium are required at Stennis and Kennedy Space Centers for pre-cooling rocket engine propellant systems prior to filling...

  15. The closed circuit and the low flow systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Parthasarathy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A breathing system is defined as an assembly of components, which delivers gases from the anesthesia machine to the patients′ airways. When the components are arranged as a circle, it is termed a circle system. The flow of exhaled gases is unidirectional in the system. The system contains a component (absorber, which absorbs exhaled carbon dioxide and it is not necessary to give high fresh gas flows as in Mapleson systems. When the adjustable pressure limiting (APL valve is closed and all the exhaled gases without carbon dioxide are returned to the patient, the system becomes a totally closed one. Such a circle system can be used with flows as low as 250 to 500 mL and clinically can be termed as low-flow systems. The components of the circle system can be arranged in different ways with adherence to basic rules: (1 Unidirectional valve must be present between the reservoir bag and the patient on both inspiratory and expiratory sides; (2 fresh gas must not enter the system between the expiratory unidirectional valve and the patient; and (3 the APL valve must not be placed between the patient and the inspiratory unidirectional valve. The functional analysis is explained in detail. During the function, the arrangement of components is significant only at higher fresh gas flows. With the introduction of low resistance valves, improved soda lime canisters and low dead space connectors, the use of less complicated pediatric circle systems is gaining popularity to anesthetize children. There are bidirectional flow systems with carbon dioxide absorption. The Waters to and fro system, a classic example of bidirectional flow systems with a canister to absorb carbon dioxide, is valveless and portable. It was widely used in the past and now is only of historical importance.

  16. Modeling of Nonlinear Marine Cooling Systems with Closed Circuit Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael; Stoustrup, Jakob; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of constructing a mathematical model for a specific type of marine cooling system. The system in question is used for cooling the main engine and main engine auxiliary components, such as diesel generators, turbo chargers and main engine air coolers for certain classes...... of container ships. The purpose of the model is to describe the important dynamics of the system, such as nonlinearities, transport delays and closed circuit flow dynamics to enable the model to be used for control design and simulation. The control challenge is related to the highly non-standard type of step...

  17. Closed-Loop and Robust Control of Quantum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For most practical quantum control systems, it is important and difficult to attain robustness and reliability due to unavoidable uncertainties in the system dynamics or models. Three kinds of typical approaches (e.g., closed-loop learning control, feedback control, and robust control have been proved to be effective to solve these problems. This work presents a self-contained survey on the closed-loop and robust control of quantum systems, as well as a brief introduction to a selection of basic theories and methods in this research area, to provide interested readers with a general idea for further studies. In the area of closed-loop learning control of quantum systems, we survey and introduce such learning control methods as gradient-based methods, genetic algorithms (GA, and reinforcement learning (RL methods from a unified point of view of exploring the quantum control landscapes. For the feedback control approach, the paper surveys three control strategies including Lyapunov control, measurement-based control, and coherent-feedback control. Then such topics in the field of quantum robust control as H∞ control, sliding mode control, quantum risk-sensitive control, and quantum ensemble control are reviewed. The paper concludes with a perspective of future research directions that are likely to attract more attention.

  18. A novel closed system bubble column photobioreactor for detailed characterisation of micro- and macroalgal growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt, Susan Løvstad; Christensen, L.; Iversen, J. J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Growth of the marine microalga Tetraselmis striata Butcher and the macroalga Chondrus crispus Stackhouse was investigated in batch cultures in a closed system bubble column photobioreactor. A laboratory cultivation system was constructed that allowed online monitoring of pH and dissolved oxygen...... tension and was used for characterization of photoautotrophic growth. Carbon dioxide addition regulated pH and was used to optimise irradiance. Oxygen was removed from the system by addition of hydrogen over a palladium catalyst to quantify oxygen production. In addition, the bubble column photobioreactor...... was suited for cultivation of algae due to fast gas-to-liquid mass transfer (kLa) and fast mixing provided by split and dual sparging. Specific growth rates (SGRs) were measured using both offline and online measurements. The latter was possible, because rectilinear correlation was observed between carbon...

  19. Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-10-15

    This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

  20. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaselev, O.; Bansal, A.; Kocha, S.; Turner, J.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    With an eye towards developing a photoelectrochemical system for hydrogen production using sunlight as the only energy input, two types of systems were studied, both involving multijunction devices. One set of cells consisted of a-Si triple junctions and the other a GaInP{sub 2}/GaAs tandem cell combination. Additional investigations were carried out on semiconductor surface modifications to move semiconductor band edges to more favorable energetic positions.

  1. Pilot-scale hydrogen fermentation system start-up performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chiu-Yue; Lay, Chyi-How [Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724 (China); Wu, Shu-Yii; Lin, Ping-Jei; Chang, Alex C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724 (China); Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Taichung 40724 (China); Hung, Chun-Hsiung; Cheng, Chin-Hung [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 402 (China); Lee, Kuo-Shing [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology (China); Chang, Feng-Yuan; Chu, Chen-Yeon [Research Center for Energy and Resources, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40724 (China)

    2010-12-15

    A high-rate hydrogen production process able to produce H{sub 2} at a maximum rate of 15 L/L/h was successfully developed by the Feng Chia University (FCU) biohydrogen research team. This highly efficient hydrogen fermentation system includes a 400 L pilot-scale system constructed for determining scale-up operation parameters for commercializing the bioH{sub 2} production technology. The pilot-scale system is composed of a feedstock tank, mixing system, fermentor, gas/liquid separator and automatic control system. The fermentor is fed with sucrose (20 g COD/L) and operated at 35 C. A batch strategy is used for system start-up. The fermentor was first operated in a batch mode for two days and then switched to a continuous-feeding mode (HRT 12 h) for one month. During the continuous operation, pH notably affected H{sub 2} production efficiency and bacterial community. For the first 14-day operation, the H{sub 2} production rate increased from 0.017 to 0.256 L/L/h with a pH variation from 5.0 to 7.0. The DGGE results indicate the presence of two Clostridium species (namely, Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium pasteurianum) in the fermenter. Stable hydrogen production rate was obtained at pH 5.5-6.0 when C. pasteurianum became dominant in the mixed culture. (author)

  2. Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at

  3. Metal-hydrogen systems with an exceptionally large and tunable thermodynamic destabilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngene, Peter; Longo, Alessandro; Mooij, L.P.A.; Bras, Wim; Dam, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is a key element in the energy transition. Hydrogen-metal systems have been studied for various energy-related applications, e.g., for their use in reversible hydrogen storage, catalysis, hydrogen sensing, and rechargeable batteries. These applications depend strongly on the

  4. A novel liquid organic hydrogen carrier system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Peng; Fogler, Eran; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Iron, Mark A.; Milstein, David

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is an efficient green fuel, but its low energy density when stored under high pressure or cryogenically, and safety issues, presents significant disadvantages; hence finding efficient and safe hydrogen carriers is a major challenge. Of special interest are liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs), which can be readily loaded and unloaded with considerable amounts of hydrogen. However, disadvantages include high hydrogen pressure requirements, high reaction temperatures for both hydro...

  5. Estimation of Parametric Fault in Closed-loop Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a method for estimation of parametric faults in closed-loop systems. The key technology applied in this paper is coprime factorization of both the dynamic system as well as the feedback controller. Using the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization......, it is shown that a certain matrix transfer function, the fault signature matrix, is an LFT (linear fractional transformation) of the parametric faults. Further, for limit parametric faults, the fault signature matrix transfer function can be approximated with a linear matrix function of the parametric faults....

  6. Multiple Description Coding for Closed Loop Systems over Erasure Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jan; Quevedo, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    dropouts and delays, we transmit quantized control vectors containing current control values for the decoder as well as future predicted control values. Second, we utilize multiple description coding based on forward error correction codes to further aid in the robustness towards packet erasures......In this paper, we consider robust source coding in closed-loop systems. In particular, we consider a (possibly) unstable LTI system, which is to be stabilized via a network. The network has random delays and erasures on the data-rate limited (digital) forward channel between the encoder (controller...

  7. Implementing a Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure: Storage Options and System Design

    OpenAIRE

    Ogden, Joan M; Yang, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    The development of a hydrogen infrastructure has been identified as a key barrier to implementing hydrogen as for a future transportation fuel. Several recent studies of hydrogen infrastructure have assessed near-term and long-term alternatives for hydrogen supply [1-2]. In this paper, we discuss how advances in material science related to hydrogen storage could change how a future hydrogen infrastructure is designed. Using a simplified engineering/economic model for hydrogen infrastructure d...

  8. Evaluation of Hydrogen Storage System Characteristics for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, M.; Day, K.; Brooker, A.

    2010-05-01

    This poster presentation demonstrates an approach to evaluate trade-offs among hydrogen storage system characteristic across several vehicle configurations and estimates the sensitivity of hydrogen storage system improvements on vehicle viability.

  9. Review on processing of metal-organic framework (MOF) materials towards system integration for hydrogen storage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of safe and effective hydrogen storage systems is critical for further implementation of hydrogen in fuel cell technologies. Amongst the various approaches to improve the performance of such systems, porous materials-based adsorptive...

  10. Hydrogen powered fuel cell systems : different designs for variable specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckhaus, P.; Goessling, S.; Notthoff, T.; Souzani, S.; Schoemaker, M.; Heinzel, A. [ZBT GmbH, Duisburg (Germany). Fuel Cells and Systems

    2009-07-01

    This paper discussed system designs for hydrogen-powered fuel cell systems in the sub-kilowatt range. Designs were presented for the following 3 different types of applications: (1) supplying electrical power for high efficiency drives of 60 per cent, (2) supplying power for small uninterruptible power supply (UPS) devices with high power densities and minimum start-up times in a variety of environmental conditions, and (3) providing the supply of oxygen-reduced breathing air for the high altitude training of athletes. Different control strategies and approaches to system design were discussed. The results of experimental studies conducted to test the fuel cell stack systems were also provided.

  11. Direct hydrogen fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Wang, X.

    Hybridizing a fuel cell system with an energy storage system offers an opportunity to improve the fuel economy of the vehicle through regenerative braking and possibly to increase the specific power and decrease the cost of the combined energy conversion and storage systems. Even in a hybrid configuration it is advantageous to operate the fuel cell system in a load-following mode and use the power from the energy storage system when the fuel cell alone cannot meet the power demand. This paper discusses an approach for designing load-following fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles and illustrates it by applying it to pressurized, direct hydrogen, polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for a mid-size family sedan. The vehicle level requirements relative to traction power, response time, start-up time and energy conversion efficiency are used to select the important parameters for the PEFC stack, air management system, heat rejection system and the water management system.

  12. The atomic hydrogen cloud in the saturnian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, W.-L.; Johnson, R. E.; Ip, W.-H.

    2013-09-01

    The importance of Titan's H torus shaped by solar radiation pressure and of hydrogen atoms flowing out of Saturn's atmosphere in forming the broad hydrogen cloud in Saturn's magnetosphere is still debated. Since the Saturnian system also contains a water product torus which originates from the Enceladus plumes, the icy ring particles, and the inner icy satellites, as well as Titan's H2 torus, we have carried out a global investigation of the atomic hydrogen cloud taking into account all sources. We show that the velocity and angle distributions of the hot H ejected from Saturn's atmosphere following electron-impact dissociation of H2 are modified by collisions with the ambient atmospheric H2 and H. This in turn affects the morphology of the escaping hydrogen from Saturn, as does the morphology of the ionospheric electron distribution. Although an exact agreement with the Cassini observations is not obtained, our simulations show that H directly escaping from Titan is the dominant contributor in the outer magnetosphere. Of the total number of H observed by Cassini from 1 to 5RS, ∼5.7×1034, our simulations suggest ∼20% is from dissociation in the Enceladus torus, ∼5-10% is from dissociation of H2 in the atmosphere of the main rings, and ∼50% is from Titan's H torus, implying that ∼20% comes from Saturn atmosphere.

  13. Hydrogen Flame Imaging System Soars to New, Different Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    When Judy and Dave Duncan of Auburn, Calif.-based Duncan Technologies Inc. (DTI) developed their color hydrogen flame imaging system in the early 1990's, their market prospects were limited. 'We talked about commercializing the technology in the hydrogen community, but we also looked at commercialization on a much broader aspect. While there were some hydrogen applications, the market was not large enough to suppport an entire company; also, safety issues were a concern,' said Judy Duncan, owner and CEO of Duncan Technologies. Using the basic technology developed under the Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR); DTI conducted market research, identified other applications, formulated a plan for next generation development, and implemented a far-reaching marketing strategy. 'We took that technology; reinvested our own funds and energy into a second-generation design on the overall camera electronics and deployed that basic technology intially in a series of what we call multi-spectral cameras; cameras that could image in both the visible range and the infrared,' explains Duncan. 'The SBIR program allowed us to develop the technology to do a 3CCD camera, which very few compaines in the world do, particularly not small companies. The fact that we designed our own prism and specked the coding as we had for the hydrogen application, we were able to create a custom spectral configuration which could support varying types of research and applications.' As a result, Duncan Technologies Inc. of Auburn, Ca., has achieved a milestone $ 1 million in sales.

  14. The Laboratory for Laser Energetics’ Hydrogen Isotope Separation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmayda, W.T., E-mail: wshm@lle.rochester.edu; Wittman, M.D.; Earley, R.F.; Reid, J.L.; Redden, N.P.

    2016-11-01

    The University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics has commissioned a hydrogen Isotope Separation System (ISS). The ISS uses two columns—palladium on kieselguhr and molecular sieve—that act in a complementary manner to separate the hydrogen species by mass. The 4-sL per day throughput system is compact and has no moving parts. The columns and the attendant gas storage and handling subsystems are housed in a 0.8 -m{sup 3} glovebox. The glovebox uses a helium cover gas that is continuously processed to extract oxygen and water vapor that permeates through the glovebox gloves and any tritium that is released while attaching or detaching vessels to add feedstock to or drawing product from the system. The isotopic separation process is automated and does not require manual intervention. A total of 315 TBq of tritium was extracted from 23.6 sL of hydrogen with tritium purities reaching 99.5%. Deuterium was the sole residual component in the processed gas. Raffinate contained 0.2 TBq of activity was captured for reprocessing. The total emission from the system to the environment was 0.4 GBq over three weeks.

  15. 3. A Closed Aquatic System for Space and Earth Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slenzka, K.; Duenne, M.; Jastorff, B.; Ranke, J.; Schirmer, M.

    Increased durations in space travel as well as living in extreme environments are requiring reliable life support systems in general and bioregenerative ones in detail. Waste water management, air revitalization and food production are obviously center goals in this research, however, in addition a potential influence by chemicals, drugs etc. released to the closed environment must be considered. On this basis ecotoxicological data become more and more important for CELSS (Closed Ecological Life Support System) development and performance. The experiences gained during the last years in our research group lead to the development of an aquatic habitat, called AquaHab (formerly CBRU), which is a closed, self-sustaining system with a total water volume of 9 liters. In the frame program of a R&D project funded by the state of Bremen and OHB System, AquaHab is under adaptation to become an ecotoxicological research unit containing for example Japanese Medaka or Zebra Fish, amphipods, water snails and water plants. Test runs were standardized and analytical methods were developed. Beside general biological and water chemical parameters, activity measurements of biotransforming enzymes (G6PDH, CytP450-Oxidase, Peroxidase) and cell viability tests as well as residual analysis of the applied substance and respective metabolites were selected as evaluation criteria. In a first series of tests low doses effects of TBT (Tributyltin, 0.1 to 20 μgTBT/l nominal concentration) were analyzed. The AquaHab and data obtained for applied environmental risk assessment will be presented at the assembly.

  16. Customizing Laboratory Information Systems: Closing the Functionality Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershkovich, Peter; Sinard, John H

    2015-09-01

    Highly customizable laboratory information systems help to address great variations in laboratory workflows, typical in Pathology. Often, however, built-in customization tools are not sufficient to add all of the desired functionality and improve systems interoperability. Emerging technologies and advances in medicine often create a void in functionality that we call a functionality gap. These gaps have distinct characteristics—a persuasive need to change the way a pathology group operates, the general availability of technology to address the missing functionality, the absence of this technology from your laboratory information system, and inability of built-in customization tools to address it. We emphasize the pervasive nature of these gaps, the role of pathology informatics in closing them, and suggest methods on how to achieve that. We found that a large number of the papers in the Journal of Pathology Informatics are concerned with these functionality gaps, and an even larger proportion of electronic posters and abstracts presented at the Pathology Informatics Summit conference each year deal directly with these unmet needs in pathology practice. A rapid, continuous, and sustainable approach to closing these gaps is critical for Pathology to provide the highest quality of care, adopt new technologies, and meet regulatory and financial challenges. The key element of successfully addressing functionality gaps is gap ownership—the ability to control the entire pathology information infrastructure with access to complementary systems and components. In addition, software developers with detailed domain expertise, equipped with right tools and methodology can effectively address these needs as they emerge.

  17. Hydrogen Molecule Adsorption on a Borophene-Titanium System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio

    2015-03-01

    From the synthesis of graphene have developed a wide range of researchs on their use, both theoretical and experimental. So there have been research on graphene-based electronics, but also on issues of energy, particularly hydrogen adsorption on graphene-based systems. Given the potential represented by these structures is very natural to wonder about similar structures, but based in elements near carbon. One of the lines developed very recently consider the boron as the element to build graphene-like structures. Different studies, both theoretical and experimental have been made where the studied structures are graphene type or fullerene, where boron is used in place of carbon. We will use as a starting point the proposed structures by Xiaobao and Tang. This structure is known as the borophene, which in first place will be decorated with titanium and then, this system interact with hydrogen molecule. In our calculation we use functional density theory, atomic pseudopotentials, Born approximation and molecular dynamic.

  18. Modes of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion of hydrogen/air mixtures in a closed chamber

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Xian

    2017-01-05

    Modes of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion of hydrogen/air mixtures in a closed chamber are numerically investigated using an 1-D unsteady, shock-capturing, compressible and reacting flow solver. Different combinations of reaction front propagation and end-gas combustion modes are observed, i.e., 1) deflagration without end-gas combustion, 2) deflagration to end-gas autoignition, 3) deflagration to end-gas detonation, 4) developing or developed detonation, occurring in the sequence of increasing initial temperatures. Effects of ignition location and chamber size are evaluated: the asymmetric ignition is found to promote the reactivity of unburnt mixture compared to ignitions at center/wall, due to additional heating from asymmetric pressure waves. End-gas combustion occurs earlier in smaller chambers, where end-gas temperature rise due to compression heating from the deflagration is faster. According to the ξ−ε regime diagram based on Zeldovich theory, modes of reaction front propagation are primarily determined by reactivity gradients introduced by initial ignition, while modes of end-gas combustion are influenced by the total amount of unburnt mixture at the time when autoignition occurs. A transient reactivity gradient method is provided and able to capture the occurrence of detonation.

  19. Water cycles in closed ecological systems: effects of atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rygalov, Vadim Y; Fowler, Philip A; Metz, Joannah M; Wheeler, Raymond M; Bucklin, Ray A

    2002-01-01

    In bioregenerative life support systems that use plants to generate food and oxygen, the largest mass flux between the plants and their surrounding environment will be water. This water cycle is a consequence of the continuous change of state (evaporation-condensation) from liquid to gas through the process of transpiration and the need to transfer heat (cool) and dehumidify the plant growth chamber. Evapotranspiration rates for full plant canopies can range from ~1 to 10 L m-2 d-1 (~1 to 10 mm m-2 d-1), with the rates depending primarily on the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) between the leaves and the air inside the plant growth chamber. VPD in turn is dependent on the air temperature, leaf temperature, and current value of relative humidity (RH). Concepts for developing closed plant growth systems, such as greenhouses for Mars, have been discussed for many years and the feasibility of such systems will depend on the overall system costs and reliability. One approach for reducing system costs would be to reduce the operating pressure within the greenhouse to reduce structural mass and gas leakage. But managing plant growth environments at low pressures (e.g., controlling humidity and heat exchange) may be difficult, and the effects of low-pressure environments on plant growth and system water cycling need further study. We present experimental evidence to show that water saturation pressures in air under isothermal conditions are only slightly affected by total pressure, but the overall water flux from evaporating surfaces can increase as pressure decreases. Mathematical models describing these observations are presented, along with discussion of the importance for considering "water cycles" in closed bioregenerative life support systems.

  20. Thermodynamically consistent Bayesian analysis of closed biochemical reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Garrett; Zhong, Xiaogang; Goutsias, John

    2010-11-05

    Estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry from noisy time series measurements of molecular concentrations is an important step for building predictive models of cellular function. Inference techniques currently available in the literature may produce rate constant values that defy necessary constraints imposed by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. As a result, these techniques may lead to biochemical reaction systems whose concentration dynamics could not possibly occur in nature. Therefore, development of a thermodynamically consistent approach for estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system is highly desirable. We introduce a Bayesian analysis approach for computing thermodynamically consistent estimates of the rate constants of a closed biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry given experimental data. Our method employs an appropriately designed prior probability density function that effectively integrates fundamental biophysical and thermodynamic knowledge into the inference problem. Moreover, it takes into account experimental strategies for collecting informative observations of molecular concentrations through perturbations. The proposed method employs a maximization-expectation-maximization algorithm that provides thermodynamically feasible estimates of the rate constant values and computes appropriate measures of estimation accuracy. We demonstrate various aspects of the proposed method on synthetic data obtained by simulating a subset of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling pathway, and examine its robustness under conditions that violate key assumptions. Software, coded in MATLAB®, which implements all Bayesian analysis techniques discussed in this paper, is available free of charge at http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS%20lab/software.html. Our approach provides an attractive statistical methodology for estimating thermodynamically feasible values for the rate

  1. Liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen auxiliary power system thruster investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, E. E.; Kusak, L.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and demonstration of a 111 newton (25 lb) thrust, integrated auxiliary propulsion system (IAPS) thruster for use with LH2/LO2 propellants is described. Hydrogen was supplied at a temperature range of 22 to 33 K (40 to 60 R), and oxygen from 89 to 122 K (160 to 220 R). The thruster was designed to operate in both pulse mode and steady-state modes for vehicle attitude control, space maneuvering, and as an abort backup in the event of failure of the main propulsion system. A dual-sleeve, tri-axial injection system was designed that utilizes a primary injector/combustor where 100 percent of the oxygen and 8 percent of the hydrogen is introduced; a secondary injector/combustor where 45 percent of the hydrogen is introduced to mix with the primary combustor gases; and a boundary layer injector that uses the remaining 45 percent of the hydrogen to cool the thrust throat/nozzle design. Hot-fire evaluation of this thruster with a BLC injection distance of 2.79 cm (1.10 in.) indicated that a specific impulse value of 390 sec can be attained using a coated molybdenum thrust chamber. Pulse mode tests indicated that a chamber pressure buildup to 90 percent thrust can be achieved in a time on the order of 48 msec. Some problems were encountered in achieving ignition of each pulse during pulse trains. This was interpreted to indicate that a higher delivered spark energy level ( 100 mJ) would be required to maintain ignition reliability of the plasma torch ignition system under the extra 'cold' conditions resulting during pulsing.

  2. Liquid Hydrogen Fuel System for Small Unmanned Air Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    the Office of Naval Research for support of this research. VII. References 1 R. Stroman, J.C. Kellogg, K. Swider-Lyons, “Testing of a PEM Fuel Cell ...energy storage system. The Naval Research Laboratory has been extending the duration of electric UAVs through the use of hydrogen fuel cells , which...take advantage of both the high energy of H2 fuel in combination with the high efficiency (~50%) of polymer fuel cells . In this paper, we describe

  3. A novel biological hydrogen production system. Impact of organic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafez, Hisham; Nakhla, George; El Naggar, Hesham [Western Ontario Univ. (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The patent-pending system comprises a novel biohydrogen reactor with a gravity settler for decoupling of SRT from HRT. Two biohydrogenators were operated for 220 days at 37 C, hydraulic retention time 8 h and solids retention time ranged from 1.4 to 2 days under four different glucose concentrations of 2, 8, 16, 32, 48 and 64 g/L, corresponding to organic loading rates of 6.5-206 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, and started up using anaerobically-digested sludge from the St. Marys wastewater treatment plant (St.Mary, Ontario, Canada) as the seed. The system steadily produced hydrogen with no methane. A maximum hydrogen yield of 3.1 mol H{sub 2} /mol glucose was achieved in the system for all the organic loading rates with an average of 2.8mol H{sub 2} /mol glucose. Acetate and butyrate were the main effluent liquid products at concentrations ranging from 640-7400 mg/L and 400-4600 mg/l, respectively, with no lactate detection. Microbial community analysis using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) confirmed the absence of lactate producing bacteria Lactobacillus fermentum and other non-hydrogen producing species, and the predominance of various Clostridium species. Biomass concentrations in the biohydrogenators were steady, during the runs, varying form 1500 mg/L at the OLR of 6.5 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d to 14000 mg/L at the 104 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, thus emphasizing the potential of this novel system for sustained stable hydrogen production and prevention of biomass washout. (orig.)

  4. Protonic transport through solitons in hydrogen-bonded systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavitha, L; Jayanthi, S; Muniyappan, A [Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem-636 011 (India); Gopi, D, E-mail: louiskavitha@yahoo.co.in [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Periyar University, Salem-636 011 (India)

    2011-09-15

    We offer an alternative route for investigating soliton solutions in hydrogen-bonded (HB) chains. We invoke the modified extended tangent hyperbolic function method coupled with symbolic computation to solve the governing equation of motion for proton dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of proton transfer in HB chains through bell-shaped soliton excitations, which trigger the bio-energy transport in most biological systems. This solitonic mechanism of proton transfer could play functional roles in muscular contraction, enzymatic activity and oxidative phosphorylation.

  5. High pressure in situ diffraction studies of metal-hydrogen systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yartys, V.A., E-mail: volodymyr.yartys@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller NO 2027 (Norway); Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim NO 7491 (Norway); Denys, R.V. [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller NO 2027 (Norway); Karpenko Physico-Mechanical Institute, NAS of Ukraine, Lviv 79601 (Ukraine); Webb, C.J. [Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University (Australia); Maehlen, J.P. [Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller NO 2027 (Norway); Gray, E. MacA.; Blach, T. [Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University (Australia); Isnard, O. [Institute Neel, CNRS/UJF, 38042 Grenoble (France); Barnsley, L.C. [Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University (Australia)

    2011-09-15

    Research highlights: > CeNi{sub 5}-D{sub 2} and Zr(Fe,Al){sub 2}-D{sub 2} systems were studied by in situ NPD at P up to 1000 bar. > In the hexagonal CeNi{sub 5}D{sub 6.3} deuterium atoms fill three types of interstices. > In the Zr(Fe,Al){sub 2}-based deuterides D atoms occupy the Zr(Fe,Al){sub 2} tetrahedra only D/Zr(Fe,Al){sub 2}, hysteresis and hydrides stability systematically change with Al content. - Abstract: 'Hybrid' hydrogen storage, where hydrogen is stored in both the solid material and as a high pressure gas in the void volume of the tank can improve overall system efficiency by up to 50% compared to either compressed hydrogen or solid materials alone. Thermodynamically, high equilibrium hydrogen pressures in metal-hydrogen systems correspond to low enthalpies of hydrogen absorption-desorption. This decreases the calorimetric effects of the hydride formation-decomposition processes which can assist in achieving high rates of heat exchange during hydrogen loading-removing the bottleneck in achieving low charging times and improving overall hydrogen storage efficiency of large hydrogen stores. Two systems with hydrogenation enthalpies close to -20 kJ/mol H{sub 2} were studied to investigate the hydrogenation mechanism and kinetics: CeNi{sub 5}-D{sub 2} and ZrFe{sub 2-x}Al{sub x} (x = 0.02; 0.04; 0.20)-D{sub 2}. The structure of the intermetallics and their hydrides were studied by in situ neutron powder diffraction at pressures up to 1000 bar and complementary X-ray diffraction. The deuteration of the hexagonal CeNi{sub 5} intermetallic resulted in CeNi{sub 5}D{sub 6.3} with a volume expansion of 30.1%. Deuterium absorption filled three different types of interstices, Ce{sub 2}Ni{sub 2} and Ni{sub 4} tetrahedra, and Ce{sub 2}Ni{sub 3} half-octahedra and was accompanied by a valence change for Ce. Significant hysteresis was observed between deuterium absorption and desorption which profoundly decreased on a second absorption cycle. For the Al

  6. Hydrogen and renewable energy sources integrated system for greenhouse heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Blanco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A research is under development at the Department of Agro- Environmental Sciences of the University of Bari “Aldo Moro” in order to investigate the suitable solutions of a power system based on solar energy (photovoltaic and hydrogen, integrated with a geothermal heat pump for powering a self sustained heated greenhouse. The electrical energy for heat pump operation is provided by a purpose-built array of solar photovoltaic modules, which supplies also a water electrolyser system controlled by embedded pc; the generated dry hydrogen gas is conserved in suitable pressured storage tank. The hydrogen is used to produce electricity in a fuel cell in order to meet the above mentioned heat pump power demand when the photovoltaic system is inactive during winter night-time or the solar radiation level is insufficient to meet the electrical demand. The present work reports some theoretical and observed data about the electrolyzer operation. Indeed the electrolyzer has required particular attention because during the experimental tests it did not show a stable operation and it was registered a performance not properly consistent with the predicted performance by means of the theoretical study.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide-based propulsion and power systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melof, Brian Matthew; Keese, David L.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Ruffner, Judith Alison; Escapule, William Rusty

    2004-04-01

    Less toxic, storable, hypergolic propellants are desired to replace nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and hydrazine in certain applications. Hydrogen peroxide is a very attractive replacement oxidizer, but finding acceptable replacement fuels is more challenging. The focus of this investigation is to find fuels that have short hypergolic ignition delays, high specific impulse, and desirable storage properties. The resulting hypergolic fuel/oxidizer combination would be highly desirable for virtually any high energy-density applications such as small but powerful gas generating systems, attitude control motors, or main propulsion. These systems would be implemented on platforms ranging from guided bombs to replacement of environmentally unfriendly existing systems to manned space vehicles.

  8. Particle Swarms in Fractures: Open Versus Partially Closed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    In the field, fractures may be isolated or connected to fluid reservoirs anywhere along the perimeter of a fracture. These boundaries affect fluid circulation, flow paths and communication with external reservoirs. The transport of drop like collections of colloidal-sized particles (particle swarms) in open and partially closed systems was studied. A uniform aperture synthetic fracture was constructed using two blocks (100 x 100 x 50 mm) of transparent acrylic placed parallel to each other. The fracture was fully submerged a tank filled with 100cSt silicone oil. Fracture apertures were varied from 5-80 mm. Partially closed systems were created by sealing the sides of the fracture with plastic film. The four boundary conditions study were: (Case 1) open, (Case 2) closed on the sides, (Case 3) closed on the bottom, and (Case 4) closed on both the sides and bottom of the fracture. A 15 μL dilute suspension of soda-lime glass particles in oil (2% by mass) were released into the fracture. Particle swarms were illuminated using a green (525 nm) LED array and imaged with a CCD camera. The presence of the additional boundaries modified the speed of the particle swarms (see figure). In Case 1, enhanced swarm transport was observed for a range of apertures, traveling faster than either very small or very large apertures. In Case 2, swarm velocities were enhanced over a larger range of fracture apertures than in any of the other cases. Case 3 shifted the enhanced transport regime to lower apertures and also reduced swarm speed when compared to Case 2. Finally, Case 4 eliminated the enhanced transport regime entirely. Communication between the fluid in the fracture and an external fluid reservoir resulted in enhanced swarm transport in Cases 1-3. The non-rigid nature of a swarm enables drag from the fracture walls to modify the swarm geometry. The particles composing a swarm reorganize in response to the fracture, elongating the swarm and maintaining its density. Unlike a

  9. Elliptical motions of stars in close binary systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lukyanov, L. G.; Gasanov, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    Motions of stars in close binary systems with a conservative mass exchange are examined. It is shown that Paczynski-Huang model widely used now for obtaining the semi-major axis variation of a relative stars orbit is incorrect, because it brings about large mistakes. A new model suitable for elliptical orbits of stars is proposed. Both of reactive and attractive forces between stars and a substance of the flowing jet are taken into account. A possibility of a mass exchange at presence of accr...

  10. REARING CARP LARVAE (Cyprinus carpio) IN CLOSED RECIRCULATORY SYSTEM (RAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Anđelko Opačak; Jurica Jug Dujaković; Siniša Ozimec; Ivan Stević; Dinko Jelkić; Roman Safner

    2012-01-01

    Postembryonic rearing of carp larvae in closed recirculatory system was conducted in 2009 at the fish farm Ribnjak LLC, Donji Miholjac, Croatia. The research was conducted in two test groups (A and B with three iterations in each) with a control group (C). Test group A (3 tanks x 250 l) consisted of 150 000 larvae (density of 200 larvae•l-1), test group B (3 tanks x 500 l) consisted of 600 000 larvae (density of 400 larvae•l-1), and the control group (C) was a mud fish pond T-6 which was stoc...

  11. UAV sensor systems for close-range operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroque, Clement-Serge; Thompson, Karl S.; Hickman, Duncan

    2002-07-01

    Although UAV systems have received much interest over the last few years, much of this has focused on either relatively large platforms with complex on-board equipment, or micro systems (typically 6' in every dimension). The operational use of low-cost lightweight UAVs as over-the- hill reconnaissance systems is a new concept offering additional flexibility, providing local knowledge and helping maintain operational tempo. An extensive modeling trade-off study has been performed for different sensor technologies and combinations. The model considered configurations including cooled and uncooled IR sensors, visible-band CCD sensors and image intensifiers. These mathematical models provide an evaluation of sensor performance for both navigation and the gathering of reconnaissance imagery, through Resolution Elements calculations (Johnson criteria) and Signal-to-Noise Ratios. Based upon this analysis, a system specification is presented that exploits next generation sensor technologies. Results obtained from a number of UAV trials are reported and used in order to provide model verification and validation of both the operational concepts and the sensor system modeling activities. Considering the sensor system itself, the low-altitude close-range environment ensures high ground resolved distance and signal-to-noise ratios, with low-cost sensors. Coupled with up-to-date image processing software, the imagery provided directly to the section-level units via a simple standard image interface allows a reduction of time response. Finally, future modeling and trials activities are discussed in the framework of the lightweight UAV system roadmap.

  12. Gain Scheduling Control based on Closed-Loop System Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    This paper deals with system identification and gain scheduling control of multi-variable nonlinear systems. We propose a novel scheme where a linear approximation of the system model is obtained in an operating point; then, a Youla-Kucera (YJBK) parameter specifying the difference between the fi....... In a constructive manner, we show how to use the YJBK parameterisation to achieve a smooth scheduling between the controllers. The approach is tested on a simple, but highly nonlinear model of a coal-fired power plant.......This paper deals with system identification and gain scheduling control of multi-variable nonlinear systems. We propose a novel scheme where a linear approximation of the system model is obtained in an operating point; then, a Youla-Kucera (YJBK) parameter specifying the difference between...... the first and a second operating point is identified in closed-loop using system identification methods with open-loop properties. Next, a linear controller is designed for this linearised model, and gain scheduling control can subsequently be achieved by interpolating between each controller...

  13. Seaweeds in closed systems; Zeewieren in gesloten systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, P. ' t [Koers en Vaart, Barendrecht (Netherlands); Schipper, J. [Hortimare, Heerhugowaard (Netherlands)

    2011-04-15

    Seaweed is a potential source of green raw materials. They are used for human consumption, contain specific thickening agents such as alginates and carrageenans, and can be applied as growth-promoting fertilizers, in animal feed and for the cultivation of shellfish (abalones). In addition, extracts from seaweed are used in cosmetics and pharmaceutical products and seaweeds also constitute a possible source of biofuels. Seaweed can possibly also serve as a protein platform for catering to the steadily growing demand for fish protein and soy protein. Though the Netherlands has a good reputation in offshore and hydraulic engineering as well as in seed cultivation and improvement, the knowledge of cultivating and harvesting seaweed is very limited. With the advent of wind farms in the North Sea and the commercial exploitation of the continental shelf, the opportunities for cultivating seaweed are now also being explored. Both extensive and intensive cultivation systems as used in agriculture and horticulture are being considered. Certain applications of seaweed require more controlled cultivation conditions. This is the case with specific plant substances, nutritional factors and with the propagation of seaweed for large-scale cultivation. Wherever the value of the cultivated seaweed increases, and hence the need for harvest security and risk control, closed systems are probably the best approach. As the cultivation conditions can be more easily controlled in closed systems, the yields are expected to be bigger, the quantities of plant substances more consistent and the overall quality better. In addition, pests are easier to control or prevent. In contrast with land-based seaweed cultivation, closed systems benefit from the abundant availability of clean and relatively low-mineral seawater. This makes it possible to control the temperature with the aid of seawater. The concept of seaweed in closed systems is in some ways comparable to greenhouse horticulture. Given

  14. Metal hydride hydrogen and heat storage systems as enabling technology for spacecraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reissner, Alexander, E-mail: reissner@fotec.at [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Pawelke, Roland H.; Hummel, Stefan; Cabelka, Dusan [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Gerger, Joachim [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Farnes, Jarle, E-mail: Jarle.farnes@prototech.no [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Vik, Arild; Wernhus, Ivar; Svendsen, Tjalve [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Schautz, Max, E-mail: max.schautz@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands); Geneste, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.geneste@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A metal hydride tank concept for heat and hydrogen storage is presented. • The tank is part of a closed-loop reversible fuel cell system for space application. • For several engineering issues specific to the spacecraft application, solutions have been developed. • The effect of water contamination has been approximated for Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}. • A novel heat exchanger design has been realized by Selective Laser Melting. - Abstract: The next generation of telecommunication satellites will demand a platform payload performance in the range of 30+ kW within the next 10 years. At this high power output, a Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems (RFCS) offers an efficiency advantage in specific energy density over lithium ion batteries. However, a RFCS creates a substantial amount of heat (60–70 kJ per mol H{sub 2}) during fuel cell operation. This requires a thermal hardware that accounts for up to 50% of RFCS mass budget. Thus the initial advantage in specific energy density is reduced. A metal hydride tank for combined storage of heat and hydrogen in a RFCS may overcome this constraint. Being part of a consortium in an ongoing European Space Agency project, FOTEC is building a technology demonstrator for such a combined hydrogen and heat storage system.

  15. Thermodynamic Analysis of Closed Steady or Cyclic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim McGovern

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Closed, steady or cyclic thermodynamic systems, which have temperature variations over their boundaries, can represent an extremely large range of plants, devices or natural objects, such as combined heating, cooling and power plants, computers and data centres, and planets. Energy transfer rates can occur across the boundary, which are characterized as heat or work. We focus on the finite time thermodynamics aspects, on energy-based performance parameters, on rational efficiency and on the environmental reference temperature. To do this, we examine the net work rate of a closed, steady or cyclic system bounded by thermal resistances linked to isothermal reservoirs in terms of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Citing relevant references from the literature, we propose a methodology that can improve the thermodynamic analysis of an energy-transforming or an exergy-destroying plant. Through the reflections and analysis presented, we have found an explanation of the second law that clarifies the link between the Clausius integral of heat over temperature and the reference temperature of the Gouy–Stodola theorem. With this insight and approach, the specification of the environmental reference temperature in exergy analysis becomes more solid. We have explained the relationship between the Curzon Ahlborn heat engine and an irreversible Carnot heat engine. We have outlined the nature of subsystem rational efficiencies and have found Rant’s anergy to play an important role. We postulate that heat transfer through thermal resistance is the sole basis of irreversibility.

  16. A translational platform for prototyping closed-loop neuromodulation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram eAfshar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While modulating neural activity through stimulation is an effective treatment for neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor, an opportunity for improving neuromodulation therapy remains in automatically adjusting therapy to continuously optimize patient outcomes. Practical issues associated with achieving this include the paucity of human data related to disease states, poorly validated estimators of patient state, and unknown dynamic mappings of optimal stimulation parameters based on estimated states. To overcome these challenges, we present an investigational platform including: an implanted sensing and stimulation device to collect data and run automated closed-loop algorithms; an external tool to prototype classifier and control-policy algorithms; and real-time telemetry to update the implanted device firmware and monitor its state. The prototyping system was demonstrated in a chronic large animal model studying hippocampal dynamics. We used the platform to find biomarkers of the observed states and transfer functions of different stimulation amplitudes. Data showed that moderate levels of stimulation suppress hippocampal beta activity, while high levels of stimulation produce seizure-like after-discharge activity. The biomarker and transfer function observations were mapped into classifier and control-policy algorithms, which were downloaded to the implanted device to continuously titrate stimulation amplitude for the desired network effect. The platform is designed to be a flexible prototyping tool and could be used to develop improved mechanistic models and automated closed-loop systems for a variety of neurological disorders.

  17. Hydrogen from biomass: large-scale hydrogen production based on a dual fluidized bed steam gasification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Stefan; Stidl, Martin; Proell, Tobias; Rauch, Reinhard; Hofbauer, Hermann [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Engineering-Future Energy Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-03-15

    Hydrogen is used as an important feedstock for the chemical industry. Common production technologies for the production of hydrogen from fossil fuels today cause relevant CO{sub 2} emissions. Hydrogen from renewable energy sources is discussed as an alternative option to replace traditional feedstock and can therefore be part of a low-carbon energy system. This paper describes the results of a simulation of a concept for the production of hydrogen with biomass as feedstock. The described investigations include a possible process design, the process simulation using the software IPSEpro, a description of the operation characteristics, and a profitability analysis of the applied hydrogen production concept. The simulation result shows that 61 MW of hydrogen can be produced from 100 MW wood chips and 6 MW of electricity. As a result, hydrogen production costs of 54 EUR/MWh can be estimated. For the investigated concept, the wood chip price is the most important factor for the hydrogen production cost followed by investment costs for the plant and the realized plant operation time per year. (orig.)

  18. H/D Isotope Effects in Hydrogen Bonded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Filarowski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely strong H/D isotope effect observed in hydrogen bonded A-H…B systems is connected with a reach diversity of the potential shape for the proton/deuteron motion. It is connected with the anharmonicity of the proton/deuteron vibrations and of the tunneling effect, particularly in cases of short bridges with low barrier for protonic and deuteronic jumping. Six extreme shapes of the proton motion are presented starting from the state without possibility of the proton transfer up to the state with a full ionization. The manifestations of the H/D isotope effect are best reflected in the infra-red absorption spectra. A most characteristic is the run of the relationship between the isotopic ratio nH/nD and position of the absorption band shown by using the example of NHN hydrogen bonds. One can distinguish a critical range of correlation when the isotopic ratio reaches the value of ca. 1 and then increases up to unusual values higher than . The critical range of the isotope effect is also visible in NQR and NMR spectra. In the critical region one observes a stepwise change of the NQR frequency reaching 1.1 MHz. In the case of NMR, the maximal isotope effect is reflected on the curve presenting the dependence of Δd (1H,2H on d (1H. This effect corresponds to the range of maximum on the correlation curve between dH and ΔpKa that is observed in various systems. There is a lack in the literature of quantitative information about the influence of isotopic substitution on the dielectric properties of hydrogen bond except the isotope effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in some hydrogen bonded crystals.

  19. H/D isotope effects in hydrogen bonded systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczyk, Lucjan; Obrzud, Monika; Filarowski, Aleksander

    2013-04-16

    An extremely strong H/D isotope effect observed in hydrogen bonded A-H…B systems is connected with a reach diversity of the potential shape for the proton/deuteron motion. It is connected with the anharmonicity of the proton/deuteron vibrations and of the tunneling effect, particularly in cases of short bridges with low barrier for protonic and deuteronic jumping. Six extreme shapes of the proton motion are presented starting from the state without possibility of the proton transfer up to the state with a full ionization. The manifestations of the H/D isotope effect are best reflected in the infra-red absorption spectra. A most characteristic is the run of the relationship between the isotopic ratio nH/nD and position of the absorption band shown by using the example of NHN hydrogen bonds. One can distinguish a critical range of correlation when the isotopic ratio reaches the value of ca. 1 and then increases up to unusual values higher than . The critical range of the isotope effect is also visible in NQR and NMR spectra. In the critical region one observes a stepwise change of the NQR frequency reaching 1.1 MHz. In the case of NMR, the maximal isotope effect is reflected on the curve presenting the dependence of Δd (¹H,²H) on d (¹H). This effect corresponds to the range of maximum on the correlation curve between dH and ΔpKa that is observed in various systems. There is a lack in the literature of quantitative information about the influence of isotopic substitution on the dielectric properties of hydrogen bond except the isotope effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in some hydrogen bonded crystals.

  20. Solar/hydrogen systems for the 1985-2000 time frame - A review and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, J. A.; Foster, R. W.; Escher, W. J. D.; Tison, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive state-of-the-art review of solar/hydrogen technologies has been conducted. From this, solar/hydrogen production systems which could be commercialized by the year 2000 have been characterized technically and economically. Incentives and disincentives for the early commercialization of four solar/hydrogen systems have been explored, conclusions drawn and recommendations made.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide oxidant fuel cell systems for ultra-portable applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will address the issues of using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant fuel in a miniature DMFC system. Cell performance for DMFC based fuel cells operating on hydrogen peroxide will be presented and discussed.

  2. Fiber Optic Sensors for Leak Detection and Condition Monitoring in Hydrogen Fuel Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I proposal addresses the need for explosion proof, sensitive and reliable hydrogen sensors for NASA and commercial hydrogen fuel systems. It also...

  3. Thermodynamically consistent Bayesian analysis of closed biochemical reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutsias John

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry from noisy time series measurements of molecular concentrations is an important step for building predictive models of cellular function. Inference techniques currently available in the literature may produce rate constant values that defy necessary constraints imposed by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. As a result, these techniques may lead to biochemical reaction systems whose concentration dynamics could not possibly occur in nature. Therefore, development of a thermodynamically consistent approach for estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system is highly desirable. Results We introduce a Bayesian analysis approach for computing thermodynamically consistent estimates of the rate constants of a closed biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry given experimental data. Our method employs an appropriately designed prior probability density function that effectively integrates fundamental biophysical and thermodynamic knowledge into the inference problem. Moreover, it takes into account experimental strategies for collecting informative observations of molecular concentrations through perturbations. The proposed method employs a maximization-expectation-maximization algorithm that provides thermodynamically feasible estimates of the rate constant values and computes appropriate measures of estimation accuracy. We demonstrate various aspects of the proposed method on synthetic data obtained by simulating a subset of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling pathway, and examine its robustness under conditions that violate key assumptions. Software, coded in MATLAB®, which implements all Bayesian analysis techniques discussed in this paper, is available free of charge at http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS%20lab/software.html. Conclusions Our approach provides an attractive statistical methodology for

  4. Fuel cell drive system with hydrogen generation in test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonts, B.; Bøgild Hansen, J.; Schmidt, H.; Grube, T.; Höhlein, B.; Peters, R.; Tschauder, A.

    In the future, drive systems for vehicles with polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) may be the environmentally more acceptable alternative to conventional drives with internal combustion engines. The energy carrier may not be gasoline or diesel, as in combustion engines today, but methanol, which is converted on-board into a hydrogen-rich synthesis gas in a reforming reaction with water. After removal of carbon monoxide in a gas-cleaning step, the conditioned synthesis gas is converted into electricity in a fuel cell using air as the oxidant. The electric energy thus generated serves to supply a vehicle's electric drive system. Based on the process design for a test drive system, a test facility was prepared and assembled at Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ). Final function tests with the PEMFC and the integrated compact methanol reformer (CMR) were carried out to determine the performance and the dynamic behaviour. With regard to the 50-kW(H 2)-compact methanol reformer, a special design of catalytic burner was constructed. The burner units, with a total power output of 16 kW, were built and tested under different states of constant and alternating load. If selecting a specific catalyst loading of 40 g Pt/m 2, the burner emissions are below the super ultra low emission vehicle (SULEV) standard. The stationary performance test of the CMR shows a specific hydrogen production of 6.7 m N3/(kg cat h) for a methanol conversion rate of 95% at 280°C. Measurements of the transient behaviour of the CMR clearly show a response time of about 20 s, reaching 99% of the hydrogen flow demand due to the limited performance of the test facility control system. Simulations have been carried out in order to develop a control strategy for hydrogen production by the CMR during the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Based on the NEDC, an optimized energy management for the total drive system was evaluated and the characteristic data for different peak load storage systems are

  5. Closed loop high precision position control system with optical scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Cheng-liang; Liao, Yuan; He, Zhong-wu; Luo, Zhong-xiang; Huang, Zhi-wei; Wan, Min; Hu, Xiao-yang; Fan, Guo-bin; Liang, Zheng

    2008-03-01

    With the developments of science of art, there are more and more demands on the high resolution control of position of object to be controlled, such as lathe, product line, elements in the optical resonant cavity, telescope, and so on. As one device with high resolution, the optical scale has more and more utility within the industrial and civil applications. With one optical scale and small DC servo motor, one closed loop high resolution position control system is constructed. This apparatus is used to control the position of the elements of optical system. The optical scale is attached on the object or reference guide way. The object position is sampled by a readhead of non-contact optical encoder. Control system processes the position information and control the position of object through the motion control of servo DC motor. The DC motor is controlled by one controller which is connected to an industrial computer. And the micro frictionless slide table does support the smooth motion of object to be controlled. The control algorithm of system is PID (Proportional-Integral-Differential) methods. The PID control methods have well ROBUST. The needed data to control are position, velocity and acceleration of the object. These three parameters correspond to the PID characters respectively. After the accomplishments of hardware, GUI (Graphical user interface), that is, the software of control system is also programmed. The whole system is assembled by specialized worker. Through calibration experiments, the coefficients of PID are obtained respectively. And then the precision of position control of the system is about 0.1μm.

  6. Host parasite interactions in closed and open microbial cultivation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisman, T. I.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    The study addresses interaction of bacteria and phages in the host parasite system in batch and continuous cultures. The study system consists of the auxotrophic strain of Brevibacterium Brevibacterium sp. 22L and the bacteriophage of Brevibacterium sp., isolated from the soil by the enrichment method.Closed system. In the investigation of the relationship between the time of bacterial lysis and multiplicity of phage infection it has been found that at a lower phage amount per cell it takes a longer time for the lysis of the culture to become discernible. Another important factor determining cytolysis in liquid medium is the physiological state of bacterial population. Specific growth rate of bacteria at the moment of phage infection has been chosen as an indicator of the physiological state of bacteria. It has been shown that the shortest latent period and the largest output of the phage are observed during the logarithmic growth phase of bacteria grown under favorable nutrient conditions. In the stationary phase, bacterial cells become “a bad host” for the phage, whose reproduction rate decreases, and the lysis either slows down significantly or does not occur at all.Open system. It has been found that in continuous culture, the components of the host parasite system can coexist over a long period of time. After phage infection, the sizes of the both populations vary for some time and then the density of the host population reaches the level close to that of the uninfected culture. The phage population copies the variations in the density of the host population, but in antiphase. It has been proven that the bacterium becomes resistant to the phage rather soon. It has been supposed that primary resistance is of physiological origin, because the percentage of cells that have survived lysis about 0.2% of the initial bacterial population is too high for phage-resistant mutants. Bacteria and phages cultured over extended periods of time in the host parasite system

  7. Competition of Invertebrates Mixed Culture in the Closed Aquatic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisman, Tamara

    The study considers the experimental model of interactions between invertebrates (the cilates Paramecium caudatum, Paramecium bursaria and the rotifers Brachionis plicatilis) in the closed aquatic system. The infusoria P.caudatum can feed on yeast, bacteria and chlorella; in this experiment growth and reproduction were maintained by bacteria only. The P.bursaria - zoochlorella endosymbiosis is a natural model of a simple biotic cycle. P.bursaria consumes glucose and oxygen released by zoochlorella in the process of biosynthesis and releases nitrogenous compounds and carbon dioxide necessary for algal photosynthesis. The rotifers Br. plicatilis can consume algae, bacteria and detritus. Thus in experiment with the mixed culture of invertebrates they can use different food sources. However with any initial percentage of the invertebrates the end portion of P.bursaria reaches 90-99

  8. Biodiesel production from jatropha oil in a closed system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaaban W.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of biodiesel as an alternative fuel is becoming increasingly popular nowadays due to global energy shortage. The interest in using Jatropha as a non-edible oil feedstock is rapidly growing. Biodiesel produced from crude Jatropha oil with NaOH as a catalyst is investigated. Transesterification by methanol is carried out in a closed vessel as a batch system. Factors affecting the process which included the reaction temperature and pressure, reaction time, the molar ratio of methanol to oil and catalyst amount are investigated. The maximum conversion ratio of methyl ester yield of 97.7% was recorded under the conditions of 65 °C, 1% (by mass NaOH of the oil mass and 6:1 methanol to oil ratio.

  9. Implementation of passive autocatalytic recombiner system as a hydrogen mitigation system in Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Sung, Je Joong; Ha, Sang Jun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, In Seon [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd., Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Ensuring the containment integrity during a severe accident in nuclear power reactor by maintaining the hydrogen concentration below an acceptable level has been recognized to be of critical importance since Three Mile Island and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accidents. Although there exist various mitigation measures for hydrogen risk, a passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR) has been emphasized as a viable option for the mitigation of hydrogen risk under the extended station blackout conditions due to its passive operation characteristics for the hydrogen removal. To enhance the capability of hydrogen control, the hydrogen mitigation system with various types of PARs has been implemented for all nuclear power plants in Korea. This paper presents an implementation procedure of PAR system and the analysis results to determine the location and capacity of PAR in OPR1000. Various accident scenarios have been adopted considering important event sequences from a combination of probabilistic methods, deterministic methods and sound engineering judgment. A MAAP 4.0.6+ with a multi-compartment model has been used as an analysis tool with conservative hydrogen generation and removal models. The detailed analyses have been performed for selected severe accident scenarios including sensitivity analysis with/without operations of various safety systems. The possibility of global flame acceleration (FA) and deflagration-to-detonation transient (DDT) has been assessed with sigma (flame acceleration potential) and 7-lambda (DDT potential) criterion. It is concluded that the newly designed hydrogen mitigation system with twenty-four (24) PARs can effectively remove hydrogen in the containment atmosphere and prevent global FA and DDT.

  10. [Closed irrigation system for pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis of the hand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillukat, T; Schädel-Höpfner, M; Prommersberger, K-J; van Schoonhoven, J

    2011-07-01

    Treatment of pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis within the osteofibrous channel of the thumb and finger by insertion of a closed irrigation system. Pyogenic tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons of the hand. Necrosis of the flexor tendons or flexor tendon sheath, gangrene of the finger, extensive loss of soft tissue. Insertion of a flexible irrigation catheter via a guide wire into the flexor tendon sheath and a vacuum suction drain into the finger or the palm of the hand. Extensive exploration of the flexor tendon sheath is not mandatory. On days 0-3 continuous irrigation, on day 4 change of the irrigation catheter to suction, on day 5 removal of the irrigation catheter, on day 6 removal of the suction drain, on day 7 start of exercise. Irrigation volume: about 500-1500 ml/24 h isotonic solution. Of 35 patients treated for flexor tenosynovitis by closed irrigation, 33 were reviewed. There were 19 male patients and 14 female patients. The average age at the time of surgery was 51 (8-85) years. Hospital stay was 8.9 (3-26) days on average. At the time of follow-up, the average grip strength was 84% (23-163%) of the unaffected side. Pain at rest was 0.2 (0-4), pain during exercise 1.2 (0-8) on the analogue scale, the DASH score was 16.8 (0-58) points. According to the rating system for flexor tendon function, there were one poor, one fair, five good, and 26 excellent results.

  11. Dynamics and collisional evolution of closely packed planetary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jason A.; Steffen, Jason H.; Lombardi, J. C., Jr.; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2017-10-01

    High-multiplicity Kepler systems (referred to as Kepler multis) are often tightly packed and may be on the verge of instability. Many systems of this type could have experienced past instabilities, where the compact orbits and often low densities make physical collisions likely outcomes. We use numerical simulations to study the dynamical instabilities and planet-planet interactions in a synthetically generated sample of closely packed, high-multiplicity systems. We focus specifically on systems resembling Kepler-11, a Kepler multi with six planets, and run a suite of dynamical integrations, sampling the initial orbital parameters around the nominal values reported in Lissauer et al. (2011a), finding that most of the realizations are unstable, resulting in orbit crossings and, eventually, collisions and mergers. We study in detail the dependence of stability on the orbital parameters of the planets and planet-pair characteristics to identify possible precursors to instability, compare the systems that emerge from dynamical instabilities to the observed Kepler sample (after applying observational corrections), and propose possible observable signatures of these instabilities. We examine the characteristics of each planet-planet collision, categorizing collisions by the degree of contact and collision energy, and find that grazing collisions are more common than direct impacts. Since the structure of many planets found in Kepler multis is such that the mass is dominated by a rocky core, but the volume is dominated by a low-density gaseous envelope, the sticky-sphere approximation may not be valid, and we present hydrodynamic calculations of planet-planet collisions clearly deviating from this approximation. Finally, we rerun a subset of our dynamical calculations using instead a modified prescription to handle collisions, finding, in general, higher multiplicity remnant systems.

  12. KIC 7177553: A QUADRUPLE SYSTEM OF TWO CLOSE BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, H. [Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Sternwarte 5, D-07778 Tautenburg (Germany); Borkovits, T. [Baja Astronomical Observatory of Szeged University, H-6500 Baja, Szegedi út, Kt. 766 (Hungary); Rappaport, S. A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Ngo, H. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, 1200 E. California Boulevard, MC 150-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mawet, D. [California Institute of Technology, Astronomy Dept. MC 249-17, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Csizmadia, Sz. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institut für Planeten-forschung, Rutherfordstraße 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Forgács-Dajka, E., E-mail: lehm@tls-tautenburg.de, E-mail: borko@electra.bajaobs.hu, E-mail: sar@mit.edu, E-mail: hngo@caltech.edu, E-mail: dmawet@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: szilard.csizmadia@dlr.de, E-mail: e.forgacs-dajka@astro.elte.hu [Astronomical Department, Eötvös University, H-1118 Budapest, Pázmány Péter stny. 1/A (Hungary)

    2016-03-01

    KIC 7177553 was observed by the Kepler satellite to be an eclipsing eccentric binary star system with an 18-day orbital period. Recently, an eclipse timing study of the Kepler binaries has revealed eclipse timing variations (ETVs) in this object with an amplitude of ∼100 s and an outer period of 529 days. The implied mass of the third body is that of a super-Jupiter, but below the mass of a brown dwarf. We therefore embarked on a radial velocity (RV) study of this binary to determine its system configuration and to check the hypothesis that it hosts a giant planet. From the RV measurements, it became immediately obvious that the same Kepler target contains another eccentric binary, this one with a 16.5-day orbital period. Direct imaging using adaptive optics reveals that the two binaries are separated by 0.″4 (∼167 AU) and have nearly the same magnitude (to within 2%). The close angular proximity of the two binaries and very similar γ velocities strongly suggest that KIC 7177553 is one of the rare SB4 systems consisting of two eccentric binaries where at least one system is eclipsing. Both systems consist of slowly rotating, nonevolved, solar-like stars of comparable masses. From the orbital separation and the small difference in γ velocity, we infer that the period of the outer orbit most likely lies in the range of 1000–3000 yr. New images taken over the next few years, as well as the high-precision astrometry of the Gaia satellite mission, will allow us to set much narrower constraints on the system geometry. Finally, we note that the observed ETVs in the Kepler data cannot be produced by the second binary. Further spectroscopic observations on a longer timescale will be required to prove the existence of the massive planet.

  13. Measurement of dissolved hydrogen in Al alloys and calculation of hydrogen removal efficiency of a degassing system

    OpenAIRE

    *N. Akhtar; S. Javed; 1W. Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we reported the diminution pattern of hydrogen contents in molten aluminium alloys during casting on industrial scale, and estimated the efficiency of inline rotary degassing system. The degassing parameters were tried to set constant in nearly 150 heats, so that other factors which govern the degassing efficiency of inline unit could be in-sighted well. In this study we used Leco RHEN-602 hydrogen determinator based on the principle of hot extraction carrier gas method, for the...

  14. Using Pyrolysis and its Bioproducts to Help Close the Loop in Sustainable Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, LaShelle E.

    2012-01-01

    The next step in human exploration of space is beyond low Earth orbit and possibly to sites such as the Moon and Mars. Resupply of critical life support components for missions such as these are difficult or impossible. Life support processes for closing the loop of water, oxygen and carbon have to be identified .. Currently, there are many technologies proposed for terrestrial missions for waste, water, air processing and the creation of consumables. There are a variety of different approaches, but few address all of these issues simultaneously. One candidate is pyrolysis; a method where waste streams can be heated in the absence of oxygen to undergo a thermochemical conversion producing a series of bioproducts. Bioproducts like biochar made from non-edible biomass and human solid waste can possibly provide valuable benefits such as waste reduction, regolith fertilization for increased food production, and become a consumable for water processing and air revitalization systems. Syngas containing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and cbon dioxide, can be converted to methane and dimethyl ether to create propellants. Bio-oils can be utilized as a heating fuel or fed to bioreactors that utilize oil-eating microbes. Issues such as carbon sequestration and subsequent carbon balance of the closed system and identifying ideal process methods to achieve the highest quality products, whilst being energy friendly, will also be addressed.

  15. Case Studies of integrated hydrogen systems. International Energy Agency Hydrogen Implementing Agreement, Final report for Subtask A of task 11 - Integrated Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schucan, T. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    1999-12-31

    Within the framework of the International Energy Agency Hydrogen Implementing Agreement, Task 11 was undertaken to develop tools to assist in the design and evaluation of existing and potential hydrogen demonstration projects. Emphasis was placed on integrated systems, from input energy to hydrogen end use. Included in the PDF document are the Executive Summary of the final report and the various case studies. The activities of task 11 were focused on near- and mid-term applications, with consideration for the transition from fossil-based systems to sustainable hydrogen energy systems. The participating countries were Canada, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the United States. In order for hydrogen to become a competitive energy carrier, experience and operating data need to be generated and collected through demonstration projects. A framework of scientific principles, technical expertise, and analytical evaluation and assessment needed to be developed to aid in the design and optimization of hydrogen demonstration projects to promote implementation. The task participants undertook research within the framework of three highly coordinated subtasks that focused on the collection and critical evaluation of data from existing demonstration projects around the world, the development and testing of computer models of hydrogen components and integrated systems, and the evaluation and comparison of hydrogen systems. While the Executive Summary reflects work on all three subtasks, this collection of chapters refers only to the work performed under Subtask A. Ten projects were analyzed and evaluated in detail as part of Subtask A, Case Studies. The projects and the project partners were: Solar Hydrogen Demonstration Project, Solar-Wasserstoff-Bayern, Bayernwerk, BMW, Linde, Siemens (Germany); Solar Hydrogen Plant on Residential House, M. Friedli (Switzerland); A.T. Stuart Renewable Energy Test Site; Stuart Energy Systems (Canada); PHOEBUS Juelich

  16. Role of hydrogen in future North European power system in 2060

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meibom, Peter; Karlsson, Kenneth Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The Balmorel model has been used to calculate the economic optimal energy system configuration for the Scandinavian countries and Germany in 2060 assuming a nearly 100% coverage of the energy demands in the power, heat and transport sector with renewable energy sources. Different assumptions abou...... capacities of the electricity storages provided by plug-in hybrid electric vehicles were too small to make hydrogen storage superfluous....... the heat production in heat pumps and electric heat boilers, and by varying the production of hydrogen in electrolysis plants in combination with hydrogen storage. Investment in hydrogen storage capacity corresponded to 1.2% of annual wind power production in the scenarios without a hydrogen demand from...... the transport sector, and approximately 4% in the scenarios with a hydrogen demand from the transport sector. Even the scenarios without a demand for hydrogen from the transport sector saw investments in hydrogen storage due to the need for flexibility provided by the ability to store hydrogen. The storage...

  17. Photoelectric Observations of the Close Eclipsing Binary System CW Cephei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Yong Han

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectric observations of the close eclipsing binary system CW Cep, which is well known of its apsidal motion, were made on 20 nights during August and November in 1983 using two 61cm reflectors at the Sobaeksan Observing Station of Korean National Astronomical Observatory and Ilsan Observing Station of Yonsei University Observatory. Standardized new light curves in UBV system are presented with a total of 1,422 individual observations. For the corrections of regional and instrumental differences, same standard stars were observed at the two observatories. Four new times of minimum light were determined with the method of Kwee and van Woerden (1956. With all of the collected times of minima, apsidal motion of this system was checked, but the O-C values calculated by the light elements of Nha (1975 and S derhjelm (1976 did not coincide well with new times of minima. New light elements which satisfy most times of minima better, and are deduced the apsidal period derived by the new light elements turns out to be 43 years, somewhat longer than those of values previously known.

  18. Evaluation of hydrogen demonstration systems (Task 18 of IEA Implementing Agreement on Hydrogen)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, J.N.; Carter, S.

    2005-07-01

    Task 18 aims to gather information about the integration of hydrogen into society around the world. As part of subtask B (demonstration projects), EA Technology Limited collected information and data on specific UK hydrogen demonstration projects and case studies. The work involved desk research, a literature review, telephone conversations and meetings with developers and operators of hydrogen-related projects in the UK. Various examples were identified in phase 1 that were either proposed, planned, under construction, commissioned or operational. The main demonstration activities described in the report are: the Clean Urban Transport for Europe (CUTE) refuelling station at Hornchurch in Essex; the Hydrogen and Renewables Integration (HARI) project at West Beacon Farm, Leicestershire; the Promoting Unst Renewable Energy (PURE) project on Unst in the Shetland Isles; the Hunterston Hydrogen Project in North Ayrshire, Scotland; and the Tees Valley Hydrogen Project. The CUTE, HARI and PURE projects were selected for inclusion in the overall Task 18 workplan. The report also covers developments associated with the Fuel Cell House, the Hydrogen Office, INEOS Chlor, the London Hydrogen Partnership and the Wales Hydrogen Project.

  19. Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Cyanobacterial System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyman, Philip D [J. Craig Venter Institute; Smith, Hamillton O.

    2014-12-03

    Photobiological processes are attractive routes to renewable H2 production. With the input of solar energy, photosynthetic microbes such as cyanobacteria and green algae carry out oxygenic photosynthesis, using sunlight energy to extract protons and high energy electrons from water. These protons and high energy electrons can be fed to a hydrogenase system yielding H2. However, most hydrogen-evolving hydrogenases are inhibited by O2, which is an inherent byproduct of oxygenic photosynthesis. The rate of H2 production is thus limited. Certain photosynthetic bacteria are reported to have an O2-tolerant evolving hydrogenase, yet these microbes do not split water, and require other more expensive feedstocks. To overcome these difficulties, the goal of this work has been to construct novel microbial hybrids by genetically transferring O2-tolerant hydrogenases from other bacteria into a class of photosynthetic bacteria called cyanobacteria. These hybrid organisms will use the photosynthetic machinery of the cyanobacterial hosts to perform the water-oxidation reaction with the input of solar energy, and couple the resulting protons and high energy electrons to the O2-tolerant bacterial hydrogenase, all within the same microbe (Fig. 1). The ultimate goal of this work has been to overcome the sensitivity of the hydrogenase enzyme to O2 and address one of the key technological hurdles to cost-effective photobiological H2 production which currently limits the production of hydrogen in algal systems. In pursuit of this goal, work on this project has successfully completed many subtasks leading to a greatly increased understanding of the complicated [NiFe]-hydrogenase enzymes. At the beginning of this project, [NiFe] hydrogenases had never been successfully moved across wide species barriers and had never been heterologously expressed in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, the idea that whole, functional genes could be extracted from complicated, mixed-sequence meta-genomes was not

  20. VLA Reveals a Close Pair of Potential Planetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Planets apparently can form in many more binary-star systems than previously thought, according to astronomers who used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to image protoplanetary disks around a close pair of stars. "Most stars in the universe are not alone, like our Sun, but are part of double or triple systems, so this means that the number of potential planets is greater than we realized," said Luis Rodriguez, of the National Autonomous University in Mexico City, who led an international observing team that made the discovery. The astronomers announced their results in the Sept. 24 issue of the scientific journal Nature. The researchers used the VLA to study a stellar nursery - a giant cloud of gas and dust - some 450 light-years distant in the constellation Taurus, where stars the size of the Sun or smaller are being formed. They aimed at one particular object, that, based on previous infrared and radio observations, was believed to be a very young star. The VLA observations showed that the object was not a single young star but a pair of young stars, separated only slightly more than the Sun and Pluto. The VLA images show that each star in the pair is surrounded by an orbiting disk of dust, extending out about as far as the orbit of Saturn. Such dusty disks are believed to be the material from which planets form. Similar disks are seen around single stars, but the newly-discovered disks around the stars in the binary system are about ten times smaller, their size limited by the gravitational effect of the other, nearby star. Their existence indicates, however, that such protoplanetary disks, though truncated in size, still can survive in such a close double-star system. "It was surprising to see these disks in a binary system with the stars so close together," said Rodriguez. "Each of these disks contains enough mass to form a solar system like our own," said David Wilner, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

  1. Hydrogen Macro System Model User Guide, Version 1.2.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Sa, T.; Goldsby, M.; Genung, K.; Hoseley, R.; Smith, A.; Yuzugullu, E.

    2009-07-01

    The Hydrogen Macro System Model (MSM) is a simulation tool that links existing and emerging hydrogen-related models to perform rapid, cross-cutting analysis. It allows analysis of the economics, primary energy-source requirements, and emissions of hydrogen production and delivery pathways.

  2. Development of a Hydrogen and Heat Storage System for Satellite Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissner, Alexander; Pawelke, Roland; Hummel, Stefan; Gerger, Joachim; Lutz, Matthias; Farnes, Jarle; Vik, Arild; Wernhus, Ivar; Svendsen, Tjalve; Schautz, Max; Geneste, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    Next generation telecommunication satellites will demand increasingly more power in the range of 30 kW or more within the next 10 years. Battery technology that can sustain 30 kW for an eclipse length of up to 72 minutes will represent a major impact on the total mass of the satellite, even with new Li-ion battery technologies. Regenerative fuel cell systems (RFCS) were identified years ago as a possible alternative to rechargeable batteries. They consist of a dedicated fuel cell unit for electricity generation and a dedicated electrolyser which regenerates the fuel cell reactants hydrogen and oxygen from the fuel cell reaction product water. All units are integrated in a closed loop system. Nevertheless, one major drawback has been identified by several independent system studies [4,5], namely the need to dissipate large amounts of heat from the fuel cell during Eclipse. This in turn requires massive thermal hardware (mainly large radiators) that can contribute up to 50% of the system mass. FOTEC has suggested the use of metal hydrides as combined hydrogen and heat storage system to overcome this issue and is currently manufacturing a technology demonstrator within an ongoing ESA project. The status of these developments is outlined in this paper.

  3. A closed-loop neurobotic system for fine touch sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bologna, L. L.; Pinoteau, J.; Passot, J.-B.; Garrido, J. A.; Vogel, J.; Ros Vidal, E.; Arleo, A.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Fine touch sensing relies on peripheral-to-central neurotransmission of somesthetic percepts, as well as on active motion policies shaping tactile exploration. This paper presents a novel neuroengineering framework for robotic applications based on the multistage processing of fine tactile information in the closed action-perception loop. Approach. The integrated system modules focus on (i) neural coding principles of spatiotemporal spiking patterns at the periphery of the somatosensory pathway, (ii) probabilistic decoding mechanisms mediating cortical-like tactile recognition and (iii) decision-making and low-level motor adaptation underlying active touch sensing. We probed the resulting neural architecture through a Braille reading task. Main results. Our results on the peripheral encoding of primary contact features are consistent with experimental data on human slow-adapting type I mechanoreceptors. They also suggest second-order processing by cuneate neurons may resolve perceptual ambiguities, contributing to a fast and highly performing online discrimination of Braille inputs by a downstream probabilistic decoder. The implemented multilevel adaptive control provides robustness to motion inaccuracy, while making the number of finger accelerations covariate with Braille character complexity. The resulting modulation of fingertip kinematics is coherent with that observed in human Braille readers. Significance. This work provides a basis for the design and implementation of modular neuromimetic systems for fine touch discrimination in robotics.

  4. Low-level hydrogen sulfide and central nervous system dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Kaye H; Thrasher, Jack D; Gray, Michael R

    2010-08-01

    Forty-nine adults living in Lovington, Tatum, and Artesia, the sour gas/oil sector of Southeastern New Mexico, were tested for neurobehavioral impairment. Contributing hydrogen sulfide were (1) an anaerobic sewage plant; (2) two oil refineries; (3) natural gas/oil wells and (4) a cheese-manufacturing plant and its waste lagoons. Comparisons were to unexposed Wickenburg, Arizona, adults. Neurobehavioral functions were measured in 26 Lovington adults including 23 people from Tatum and Artesia, New Mexico, and 42 unexposed Arizona people. Participants completed questionnaires including chemical exposures, symptom frequencies and the Profile of Mood States. Measurements included balance, reaction time, color discrimination, blink reflex, visual fields, grip strength, hearing, vibration, problem solving, verbal recall, long-term memory, peg placement, trail making and fingertip number writing errors (FTNWE). Average numbers of abnormalities and test scores were adjusted for age, gender, educational level, height and weight, expressed as percent predicted (% pred) and compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Ages and educational attainment of the three groups were not statistically significantly different (ssd). Mean values of Lovington residents were ssd from the unexposed Arizona people for simple and choice reaction times, balance with eyes open and closed, visual field score, hearing and grip strength. Culture Fair, digit symbol substitution, vocabulary, verbal recall, peg placement, trail making A and B, FTNWE, information, picture completion and similarities were also ssd. The Lovington adults who averaged 11.8 abnormalities were ssd from, Tatum-Artesia adults who had 3.6 and from unexposed subjects with 2.0. Multiple source community hydrogen sulfide exposures impaired neurobehavioral functions.

  5. Platinum-nickel alloy excavated nano-multipods with hexagonal close-packed structure and superior activity towards hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhenming; Chen, Qiaoli; Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Huiqi; Jiang, Yaqi; Shen, Shouyu; Fu, Gang; Lu, Bang-An; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2017-04-01

    Crystal phase regulations may endow materials with enhanced or new functionalities. However, syntheses of noble metal-based allomorphic nanomaterials are extremely difficult, and only a few successful examples have been found. Herein, we report the discovery of hexagonal close-packed Pt-Ni alloy, despite the fact that Pt-Ni alloys are typically crystallized in face-centred cubic structures. The hexagonal close-packed Pt-Ni alloy nano-multipods are synthesized via a facile one-pot solvothermal route, where the branches of nano-multipods take the shape of excavated hexagonal prisms assembled by six nanosheets of 2.5 nm thickness. The hexagonal close-packed Pt-Ni excavated nano-multipods exhibit superior catalytic property towards the hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline electrolyte. The overpotential is only 65 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode at a current density of 10 mA cm-2, and the mass current density reaches 3.03 mA μgPt-1 at -70 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode, which outperforms currently reported catalysts to the best of our knowledge.

  6. Platinum-nickel alloy excavated nano-multipods with hexagonal close-packed structure and superior activity towards hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhenming; Chen, Qiaoli; Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Huiqi; Jiang, Yaqi; Shen, Shouyu; Fu, Gang; Lu, Bang-an; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2017-01-01

    Crystal phase regulations may endow materials with enhanced or new functionalities. However, syntheses of noble metal-based allomorphic nanomaterials are extremely difficult, and only a few successful examples have been found. Herein, we report the discovery of hexagonal close-packed Pt–Ni alloy, despite the fact that Pt–Ni alloys are typically crystallized in face-centred cubic structures. The hexagonal close-packed Pt–Ni alloy nano-multipods are synthesized via a facile one-pot solvothermal route, where the branches of nano-multipods take the shape of excavated hexagonal prisms assembled by six nanosheets of 2.5 nm thickness. The hexagonal close-packed Pt–Ni excavated nano-multipods exhibit superior catalytic property towards the hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline electrolyte. The overpotential is only 65 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode at a current density of 10 mA cm−2, and the mass current density reaches 3.03 mA μgPt−1 at −70 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode, which outperforms currently reported catalysts to the best of our knowledge. PMID:28436494

  7. Solar-hydrogen energy systems: an authoritative review of water-splitting systems by solar beam and solar heat : hydrogen production, storage, and utilisation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ōta, Tokio

    1979-01-01

    ... An Authoritative Review of Watersplitting Systems by Solar Beam and Solar Heat: Hydrogen Production, Storage and Utilisation edited by TOKIO OHTA Professor of Materials Science and Energy System Yoko...

  8. Polysulfide reduction using sulfate-reducing bacteria in a photocatalytic hydrogen generation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yui; Suto, Koichi; Inoue, Chihiro; Chida, Tadashi

    2008-09-01

    A hydrogen generation process using photocatalytic reactions has been proposed. In this process, hydrogen sulfide is a source of hydrogen and is turned into polysulfide. In order to establish the cyclic operation of a photocatalytic hydrogen generation system, it is necessary to convert polysulfide back into hydrogen sulfide with a small energy input. This paper proposes the use of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) for the regeneration of hydrogen sulfide. Batch cultivation of natural source SRB samples were carried out using a culture medium containing polysulfide as the only sulfur compound source. SRB produced hydrogen sulfide from several kinds of polysulfide sources, including a photocatalytic hydrogen generation-produces solution. Production lag phase and production rate of hydrogen sulfide were affected by initial polysulfide concentration. SRB activity was inhibited at high initial polysulfide concentrations. SRB enrichment culture T2, exhibited the highest hydrogen sulfide production rate, and was able to utilize several kinds of organic matter as the electron donor. The results suggest the possibility of using large biomass sources, such as sewage sludge and the raw garbage in a hydrogen generation system. We developed speculative estimates that an SRB based hydrogen generation system is feasible.

  9. Community Energy: Analysis of Hydrogen Distributed Energy Systems with Photovoltaics for Load Leveling and Vehicle Refueling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage could complement PV electricity generation at the community level. Because PV generation is intermittent, strategies must be implemented to integrate it into the electricity system. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies offer possible PV integration strategies, including the community-level approaches analyzed in this report: (1) using hydrogen production, storage, and reconversion to electricity to level PV generation and grid loads (reconversion scenario); (2) using hydrogen production and storage to capture peak PV generation and refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) (hydrogen fueling scenario); and (3) a comparison scenario using a battery system to store electricity for EV nighttime charging (electric charging scenario).

  10. Calculation of hydrogen isotopic fractionations in biogeochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Alex L.; Hayes, John M.

    2005-02-01

    Hydrogen-isotopic data are often interpreted using mathematical approximations originally intended for other isotopes. One of the most common, apparent in literature over the last several decades, assumes that delta values of reactants and products are separated by a constant fractionation factor: δ p = δ r + ɛ p/r. Because of the large fractionations that affect hydrogen isotopes, such approximations can lead to substantial errors. Here we review and develop general equations for isotopic mass balances that include the differential fractionation of each component in a mixture and discuss their use in three geochemical applications. For the fractionation of a single component, the reactant and product are related by δ p = α p/rδ r + ɛ p/r, where α and ɛ refer to the same fractionation. Regression of δ p on δ r should give equivalent fractionations based on the intercept and slope, but this has not generally been recognized in studies of D/H fractionation. In a mixture of two components, each of which is fractionated during mixing, there is no unique solution for the three unknown variables (two fractionation factors and the elemental mixing ratio of the two hydrogen sources). The flow of H from CH 4 and H 2O to bacterial lipids in the metabolism of Methylococcus capsulatus provides an example of such a case. Data and conclusions from an earlier study of that system (Sessions et al., 2002) are reexamined here. Several constraints on the variables are available based on plausible ranges for fractionation factors. A possible refinement to current experimental procedures is the measurement of three different isotopes, which would allow unique determination of all variables.

  11. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, D.; Adams, J.A.; Kinnelly, A.A. [and others

    1997-07-01

    In partial fulfillment of the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-ACO2-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this conceptual vehicle design report addresses the design and packaging of battery augmented fuel cell powertrain vehicles. This report supplements the {open_quotes}Conceptual Vehicle Design Report - Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes} and includes a cost study of the fuel cell power system. The three classes of vehicles considered in this design and packaging exercise are the same vehicle classes that were studied in the previous report: the Aspire, representing the small vehicle class; the AIV (Aluminum Intensive Vehicle) Sable, representing the mid-size vehicle; and the E-150 Econoline, representing the van-size class. A preliminary PEM fuel cell power system manufacturing cost study is also presented. As in the case of the previous report concerning the {open_quotes}Pure Fuel Cell Powertrain Vehicle{close_quotes}, the same assumptions are made for the fuel cell power system. These assumptions are fuel cell system power densities of 0.33 kW/ka and 0.33 kW/l, platinum catalyst loading of less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total, and hydrogen tanks containing compressed gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The batteries considered for power augmentation of the fuel cell vehicle are based on the Ford Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) program. These are state-of-the-art high power lead acid batteries with power densities ranging from 0.8 kW/kg to 2 kW/kg. The results reported here show that battery augmentation provides the fuel cell vehicle with a power source to meet instant high power demand for acceleration and start-up. Based on the assumptions made in this report, the packaging of the battery augmented fuel cell vehicle appears to be as feasible as the packaging of the pure fuel cell powered vehicle.

  12. Maximized Gust Loads of a Closed-Loop, Nonlinear Aeroelastic System Using Nonlinear Systems Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of computing the maximized gust load for a nonlinear, closed-loop aeroelastic aircraft is discusses. The Volterra theory of nonlinear systems is applied in order to define a linearized system that provides a bounds on the response of the nonlinear system of interest. The method is applied to a simplified model of an Airbus A310.

  13. Hydrogen as a fuel for today and tomorrow: expectations for advanced hydrogen storage materials/systems research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Katsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    History shows that the evolution of vehicles is promoted by several environmental restraints very similar to the evolution of life. The latest environmental strain is sustainability. Transport vehicles are now facing again the need to advance to use sustainable fuels such as hydrogen. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are being prepared for commercialization in 2015. Despite intensive research by the world's scientists and engineers and recent advances in our understanding of hydrogen behavior in materials, the only engineering phase technology which will be available for 2015 is high pressure storage. Thus industry has decided to implement the high pressure tank storage system. However the necessity of smart hydrogen storage is not decreasing but rather increasing because high market penetration of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles is expected from around 2025 onward. In order to bring more vehicles onto the market, cheaper and more compact hydrogen storage is inevitable. The year 2025 seems a long way away but considering the field tests and large scale preparation required, there is little time available for research. Finding smart materials within the next 5 years is very important to the success of fuel cells towards a low carbon sustainable world.

  14. Design progress of cryogenic hydrogen system for China Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G. P.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, J.; He, C. C.; Ding, M. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Li, N.; He, K.

    2014-01-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is a large proton accelerator research facility with 100 kW beam power. Construction started in October 2011 and is expected to last 6.5 years. The cryogenic hydrogen circulation is cooled by a helium refrigerator with cooling capacity of 2200 W at 20 K and provides supercritical hydrogen to neutron moderating system. Important progresses of CSNS cryogenic system were concluded as follows. Firstly, process design of cryogenic system has been completed including helium refrigerator, hydrogen loop, gas distribution, and safety interlock. Secondly, an accumulator prototype was designed to mitigate pressure fluctuation caused by dynamic heat load from neutron moderation. Performance test of the accumulator has been carried out at room and liquid nitrogen temperature. Results show the accumulator with welding bellows regulates hydrogen pressure well. Parameters of key equipment have been identified. The contract for the helium refrigerator has been signed. Mechanical design of the hydrogen cold box has been completed, and the hydrogen pump, ortho-para hydrogen convertor, helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, hydrogen heater, and cryogenic valves are in procurement. Finally, Hydrogen safety interlock has been finished as well, including the logic of gas distribution, vacuum, hydrogen leakage and ventilation. Generally, design and construction of CSNS cryogenic system is conducted as expected.

  15. Colonic hydrogen sulfide produces portal hypertension and systemic hypotension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huc, Tomasz; Jurkowska, Halina; Wróbel, Maria; Jaworska, Kinga; Onyszkiewicz, Maksymilian; Ufnal, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, a toxic gas, at low concentrations is also a biological mediator in animals. In the colon, hydrogen sulfide is produced by intestinal tissues and gut sulfur bacteria. Gut-derived molecules undergo liver metabolism. Portal hypertension is one of the most common complications contributing to the high mortality in liver cirrhosis. We hypothesized that the colon-derived hydrogen sulfide may affect portal blood pressure. Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained either on tap water (controls) or on water solution of thioacetamide to produce liver cirrhosis (CRH-R). Hemodynamics were measured after administration of either saline or Na2S, a hydrogen sulfide donor, into (1) the colon, (2) the portal vein, or (3) the femoral vein. Expression of enzymes involved in hydrogen sulfide metabolism was measured by RT-PCR. CRH-R showed a significantly higher portal blood pressure but a lower arterial blood pressure than controls. Saline did not affect hemodynamic parameters. In controls, intracolonic hydrogen sulfide decreased arterial blood pressure and portal blood flow but increased portal blood pressure. Similarly, hydrogen sulfide administered into the portal vein decreased arterial blood pressure but increased portal blood pressure. In contrast, hydrogen sulfide administered into the systemic vein decreased both arterial and portal blood pressures. CRH-R showed significantly greater responses to hydrogen sulfide than controls. CRH-R had a significantly higher liver concentration of hydrogen sulfide but lower expression of rhodanese, an enzyme converting hydrogen sulfide to sulfate. In conclusion, colon-administered hydrogen sulfide increases portal blood pressure while decreasing the systemic arterial blood pressure. The response to hydrogen sulfide is more pronounced in cirrhotic rats which show reduced hydrogen sulfide liver metabolism. Therefore, colon-derived hydrogen sulfide may be involved in the regulation of portal blood pressure, and may contribute to

  16. Economics of Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadevan, Kathyayani

    2011-10-04

    Battelle's Economic Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems project was initiated in 2003 to evaluate the technology and markets that are near-term and potentially could support the transition to fuel cells in automotive markets. The objective of Battelle?s project was to assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for pre-automotive applications by analyzing the technical, economic, and market drivers of direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell adoption. The project was executed over a 6-year period (2003 to 2010) and a variety of analyses were completed in that period. The analyses presented in the final report include: Commercialization scenarios for stationary generation through 2015 (2004); Stakeholder feedback on technology status and performance status of fuel cell systems (2004); Development of manufacturing costs of stationary PEM fuel cell systems for backup power markets (2004); Identification of near-term and mid-term markets for PEM fuel cells (2006); Development of the value proposition and market opportunity of PEM fuel cells in near-term markets by assessing the lifecycle cost of PEM fuel cells as compared to conventional alternatives used in the marketplace and modeling market penetration (2006); Development of the value proposition of PEM fuel cells in government markets (2007); Development of the value proposition and opportunity for large fuel cell system application at data centers and wastewater treatment plants (2008); Update of the manufacturing costs of PEM fuel cells for backup power applications (2009).

  17. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  18. Hydrogen bonding-mediated dehydrogenation in the ammonia borane combined graphene oxide systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Anlong; Liu, Taijuan; Kuang, Minquan; Yang, Ruifeng; Huang, Rui; Wang, Guangzhao; Yuan, Hongkuan; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xiaolan

    2018-03-01

    The dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB) adsorbed on three different graphene oxide (GO) sheets is investigated within the ab initio density functional theory. The energy barriers to direct combination the hydrogens of hydroxyl groups and the hydridic hydrogens of AB to release H2 are relatively high, indicating that the process is energetically unfavorable. Our theoretical study demonstrates that the dehydrogenation mechanism of the AB-GO systems has undergone two critical steps, first, there is the formation of the hydrogen bond (O-H-O) between two hydroxyl groups, and then, the hydrogen bond further react with the hydridic hydrogens of AB to release H2 with low reaction barriers.

  19. Production of hydrogen in non oxygen-evolving systems: co-produced hydrogen as a bonus in the photodegradation of organic pollutants and hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartoretti, C. Jorand; Ulmann, M.; Augustynski, J. (Electrochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Geneva (CH)); Linkous, C.A. (Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida (US))

    2000-01-01

    This report was prepared as part of the documentation of Annex 10 (Photoproduction of Hydrogen) of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement. Subtask A of this Annex concerned photo-electrochemical hydrogen production, with an emphasis on direct water splitting. However, studies of non oxygen-evolving systems were also included in view of their interesting potential for combined hydrogen production and waste degradation. Annex 10 was operative from 1 March 1995 until 1 October 1998. One of the collaborative projects involved scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Bern, and the Federal Institute of Technology in Laussane, Switzerland. A device consisting of a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC) with a WO{sub 3} photoanode connected in series with a so-called Grazel cell (a dye sensitized liquid junction photovoltaic cell) was developed and studied in this project. Part of these studies concerned the combination of hydrogen production with degradation of organic pollutants, as described in Chapter 3 of this report. For completeness, a review of the state of the art of organic waste treatment is included in Chapter 2. Most of the work at the University of Geneva, under the supervision of Prof. J. Augustynski, was focused on the development and testing of efficient WO{sub 3} photoanodes for the photoelectrochemical degradation of organic waste solutions. Two types of WO{sub 3} anodes were developed: non transparent bulk photoanodes and non-particle-based transparent film photoanodes. Both types were tested for degradation and proved to be very efficient in dilute solutions. For instance, a solar-to-chemical energy conversion efficiency of 9% was obtained by operating the device in a 0.01M solution of methanol (as compared to about 4% obtained for direct water splitting with the same device). These organic compounds are oxidized to CO{sub 2} by the photocurrent produced by the photoanode. The advantages of this procedure over conventional electrolytic degradation are that much (an

  20. Transition from closed system to Internet of Things: A study in standardizing building lighting systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathews, E.; Muller, G.

    2016-01-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) is triggering changes in lighting industry from the traditional closed and propriety systems to flexible, interoperable and service oriented systems. To address the challenges of this transition and catering the specific requirements of lighting networks, an Open

  1. Closed and Open Systems: The Tavistock Group from a General System Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugel, Robert P.

    1991-01-01

    Describes phases in the life of a Tavistock group composed of college students using concepts from Von Bertalanffy's general systems theory, MacKenzie's role theory, and Kantor's family theory. Discusses early, middle, and late phases of typical 16-session group as it moves from a closed to an open system. (Author/NB)

  2. Hydrogen storage methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas

    system mass ratio close to one. The highest volumetric densities of hydrogen are found in metal hydrides. Many metals and alloys are capable of reversibly absorbing large amounts of hydrogen. Charging can be done using molecular hydrogen gas or hydrogen atoms from an electrolyte. The group one, two and three light metals (e.g. Li, Mg, B, Al) can combine with hydrogen to form a large variety of metal-hydrogen complexes. These are especially interesting because of their light weight and because of the number of hydrogen atoms per metal atom, which is two in many cases. Hydrogen can also be stored indirectly in reactive metals such as Li, Na, Al or Zn. These metals easily react with water to the corresponding hydroxide and liberate the hydrogen from the water. Since water is the product of the combustion of hydrogen with either oxygen or air, it can be recycled in a closed loop and react with the metal. Finally, the metal hydroxides can be thermally reduced to metals in a solar furnace. This paper reviews the various storage methods for hydrogen and highlights their potential for improvement and their physical limitations.

  3. Technical analysis of photovoltaic/wind systems with hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakić Vukman V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The technical analysis of a hybrid wind-photovoltaic energy system with hydrogen gas storage was studied. The market for the distributed power generation based on renewable energy is increasing, particularly for the standalone mini-grid applications. The main design components of PV/Wind hybrid system are the PV panels, the wind turbine and an alkaline electrolyzer with tank. The technical analysis is based on the transient system simulation program TRNSYS 16. The study is realized using the meteorological data for a Typical Metrological Year (TMY for region of Novi Sad, Belgrade cities and Kopaonik national park in Serbia. The purpose of the study is to design a realistic energy system that maximizes the use of renewable energy and minimizes the use of fossil fuels. The reduction in the CO2 emissions is also analyzed in the paper. [Acknowledgment. This paper is the result of the investigations carried out within the scientific project TR33036 supported by the Ministry of Science of the Republic of Serbia.

  4. Integrated Hydrogen and Intelligent Transportation Systems Evaluation for the California Department of Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    Lipman, Timothy; Shaheen, Susan

    2005-01-01

    This "Integrated Hydrogen/Intelligent Transportation Systems Evaluation for the California Department of Transportation" project was conceived to investigate hydrogen activities in the State and around the U.S. that might impact the California Department of Transportation's (Caltrans) operations. The project is intended to review these activities and to suggest potential interesting applications of combined hydrogen and intelligent transportation system (ITS) technologies. This project was co...

  5. Potential of hydrogen fuel for future air transportation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, W. J.; Fetterman, D. E.; Bonner, T. F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that hydrogen fuel can yield spectacular improvements in aircraft performance in addition to its more widely discussed environmental advantages. The characteristics of subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic transport aircraft using hydrogen fuel are discussed, and their performance and environmental impact are compared to that of similar aircraft using conventional fuel. The possibilities of developing hydrogen-fueled supersonic and hypersonic vehicles with sonic boom levels acceptable for overland flight are also explored.

  6. Long-Term Cycling of the Magnesium Hydrogen System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1984-01-01

    Magnesium powder with a grain size of approximately 50γm was hydrogenated for 30 min and dehydrogenated the same time at 390°C, 515 times. A moderate loss in hydrogen storage capacity was observed and was ascribed to a measured decrease in reaction kinetics as the cycle number increased. The time...... for maximum hydrogen absorption was found to depend significantly on cycle number while the time for maximum desorption was found to be virtually independent of cycle number....

  7. Development of Electrolysis System Powered by Solar-Cell Array to Supply Hydrogen Gas for Fuel-Cell Energy Resource Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priambodo, Purnomo Sidi; Yusivar, Feri; Subiantoro, Aries; Gunawan, Ridwan

    2009-09-01

    The huge demand of energy worldwide and the depletion of fossil based energy, is a strong reason to rapidly develop any kind of renewable energy resources, which has economical advantages and zero pollution effect. One of the renewable energy technologies aimed in this paper is the generation of electric-energy based on fuel-cell technology, where the input hydrogen (H2) gas is supplied by electrolysis system powered by renewable energy system based on solar cell. In this paper, the authors explain the development of electrolysis system which is powered by solar cell array to supply hydrogen for fuel-cell system. The authors explain in detail how to design an efficient electrolysis system to obtain high ratio conversion of electric energy to hydrogen gas volume. It includes the explanation of the usage of multiple anodes with a single cathode for many solar cell inputs in a single electrolysis system. Hereinafter this is referred as multiple anode electrolysis system. This multiple anode electrolysis system makes the management of hydrogen gas becomes more efficient and effective by using only a single hydrogen gas storage system. This paper also explain the careful design of the resistance value of the electrolysis system to protect or avoid the solar cell panel to deliver excessive current to the electrolysis system which can cause damage on the solar cell panel. Moreover, the electrolyte volume detector is applied on the system as a tool to measure the electrolyte concentration to assure the system resistance is still in the allowed range. Further, the hydrogen gas produced by electrolysis system is stored into the gas storage which consists of silica-gel purifier, first stage low pressure gas bottle, vacuum pump, and second stage high pressure gas bottle. In the first step, the pump will vacuum the first bottle. The first bottle will collect the hydrogen from the electrolysis system through the silica gel to get rid of water vapor. When the first bottle

  8. Sunlight to hydrogen conversion: Design optimization and energy management of concentrated photovoltaic (CPV-Hydrogen) system using micro genetic algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad

    2016-02-14

    Owing to the intermittent solar irradiance from cloud cover in the diurnal period and unavailability at night time, the practical design of a solar system requires energy backup storage for an uninterrupted supply or for off-grid operation. However, for highly efficient CPV (concentrated photovoltaic) system, the literature is lacking for energy management and optimization algorithm and tool for standalone operation. In this paper, a system with CPV and electrolyser is presented where beam irradiance of sunlight is harnessed to convert the instantaneously generated electricity into useful Hydrogen/Oxygen gas, where they can be stored and re-used for downstream applications such as the fuel cells, etc. The multi-variable design and multi-objective optimization strategies are proposed and presented for a standalone operation of the CPV-Hydrogen system as well as their system performances, particularly electrical rating of CPV based upon the real weather data of Singapore. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. 40 CFR 63.450 - Standards for enclosures and closed-vent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for enclosures and closed... Standards for enclosures and closed-vent systems. (a) Each enclosure and closed-vent system specified in... shall meet the requirements specified in paragraphs (b) through (d) of this section. (b) Each enclosure...

  10. Evaluation of a wind-hydrogen system; Bewertung eines Wind-Wasserstoff-Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasz, J.; Sykula, P. [Technische Univ. Szczecin, Lehrstuhl fuer Waermetechnik, Szczecin (Poland)

    2004-07-01

    Developments during the past few years have shown that hydrogen may be an alternative to coal and nuclear power. A particularly interesting option is the combination of a wind power system and a conventional hydrogen generation system, with storage of the generated power in the form of hydrogen. This will ensure frequency-relevant stability of the electricity grid and the possibility of emergency power supply in a given region. (orig.) [German] Die Entwicklungen der letzten Jahre weisen immer deutlich darauf hin, dass nach der Zeit der Steinkohle und des Erdoels die Wasserstofftechnologie eine Alternative fuer die zukuenftige, verstaerkte Kernenergienutzung bilden kann. Als besonders interessant scheinen hier die Koppelung einer Windkraftanlage mit einem konventionellen Wasserstofferzeuger und die Speicherung der ueber die Windkraft erzeugten Elektroenergie in Form von Wasserstoff. Unter dem Gesichtspunkt der frequenzrelevanten Stabilitaet der oeffentlichen Elektroenergienetze oder der elektroenergetischen bzw. waermetechnischen Noteinspeisung eines bestimmten Versorgungsgebietes scheint diese Art von Koppelung der beiden Energietechnologien in der letzten Zeit an Bedeutung zu gewinnen. (orig.)

  11. REARING CARP LARVAE (Cyprinus carpio IN CLOSED RECIRCULATORY SYSTEM (RAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelko Opačak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Postembryonic rearing of carp larvae in closed recirculatory system was conducted in 2009 at the fish farm Ribnjak LLC, Donji Miholjac, Croatia. The research was conducted in two test groups (A and B with three iterations in each with a control group (C. Test group A (3 tanks x 250 l consisted of 150 000 larvae (density of 200 larvae•l-1, test group B (3 tanks x 500 l consisted of 600 000 larvae (density of 400 larvae•l-1, and the control group (C was a mud fish pond T-6 which was stocked by 800 000 larvae•ha-1 under standard production conditions. In this research, basic physical and chemical water parameters were controlled (temperature, oxygen, pH, total ammonia and nitrites. Initial measuring of carp larvae total length (TL was conducted prior to their placement into tanks (N=120. On the fourth, sixth, eighth and tenth day of research 20 larvae (N=140 were taken out of every tank as well as out of control group and measured. Feeding with live feed began on the third day after hatching (larval TL 6.00±0.36 mm. Ten minutes after feeding live feed to larvae for the first time, 20 larvae (N=120 were taken out of every tank and a high portion of larvae that accepted live feed (89.17±3.76% was determined by a magnifying glass. Feeding artificial feed began on the seventh day after the hatching. After ten minutes, a high portion of larvae who accepted artificial feed (96.67±2.58% was determined. Since the end of the research, the determined length increment (ITL per day was 0.41±0.04 mm, a very high survival rate was established (group A: 96%, group B: 93%. Feeding frequency was four times a day in five-hour intervals (at 06:00, 11:00,16:00 and 21:00 hours. The research was terminated after ten feeding days due to deteriorating condition of zoohygienic filter. The total of 3807 g of live feed and 1080 g of artificial feed was used.

  12. A Hydrogen Ignition Mechanism for Explosions in Nuclear Facility Piping Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, Robert A.

    2013-09-18

    Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein. Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions may occur. Pipe ruptures in nuclear reactor cooling systems were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents, an ignition source for hydrogen was not clearly demonstrated, but these accidents demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. A new theory to identify an ignition source and explosion cause is presented here, and further research is recommended to fully understand this explosion mechanism.

  13. Possibility of hydrogen supply by shared residential fuel cell systems for fuel cell vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ono Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Residential polymer electrolyte fuel cells cogeneration systems (residential PEFC systems produce hydrogen from city gas by internal gas-reformer, and generate electricity, the hot water at the same time. From the viewpoint of the operation, it is known that residential PEFC systems do not continuously work but stop for long time, because the systems generate enough hot water for short operation time. In other words, currently residential PEFC systems are dominated by the amount of hot water demand. This study focuses on the idle time of residential PEFC systems. Since their gas-reformers are free, the systems have potential to produce hydrogen during the partial load operations. The authors expect that residential PEFC systems can take a role to supply hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles (FCVs before hydrogen fueling stations are distributed enough. From this perspective, the objective of this study is to evaluate the hydrogen production potential of residential PEFC systems. A residential PEFC system was modeled by the mixed integer linear programming to optimize the operation including hydrogen supply for FCV. The objective function represents annual system cost to be minimized with the constraints of energy balance. It should be noted that the partial load characteristics of the gas-reformer and the fuel cell stack are taken into account to derive the optimal operation. The model was employed to estimate the possible amount of hydrogen supply by a residential PEFC system. The results indicated that the system could satisfy at least hydrogen demand for transportation of 8000 km which is as far as the average annual mileage of a passenger car in Japan. Furthermore, hydrogen production by sharing a residential PEFC system with two households is more effective to reduce primary energy consumption with hydrogen supply for FCV than the case of introducing PEFC in each household.

  14. Closed-pore Insulation Thermal Protection System Design Concept Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varisco, A.; Harris, H. G.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a unique closed-pore ceramic foam insulation (CPI) produced from low cost fly ash cenospheres is reported for space shuttle external thermal protection. Two basic design approaches were developed: bonded and mechanically fastened. A description of the concepts is presented in addition to fabrication and test results.

  15. Commissioning of the cryogenic hydrogen system in J-PARC: Preliminary operation by helium gas

    CERN Document Server

    Aso, T; Hasegawa, S; Ohtsu, K; Uehara, T; Kawakami, Y; Sakurayama, H; Maekawa, F; Futakawa, M; Ushijima, I

    2009-01-01

    A cryogenic hydrogen circulation system to cool the moderators for the spallation neutron source in J-PARC has been constructed. This system provides supercritical hydrogen at the temperature of 20 K and the pressure of 1.5 MPa to three moderators and absorbs nuclear heating produced in the moderators. The cryogenic hydrogen system commissioning was started. In January 2008, for the first time, we carried out a cryogenic test of the whole system, in which helium gas was used in stead of hydrogen. The cryogenic hydrogen system can be cooled down to 18 K within 30 hours, and be kept to be the rated condition for 36 hours without any problems. We confirmed the soundness of each component such as circulation pump and operation control system.

  16. Recent experimental and analytical results on hydrogen combustion at RRC {open_quotes}Kurchatov Institute{close_quotes}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorofeev, S.B.; Efimenko, A.A.; Kochurko, A.S.; Sidorov, V.P. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-03-01

    A review of hydrogen combustion research at Kurchatov Institute is presented. Criterion for spontaneous detonation onset possibility and its application to severe accidents in a nuclear power plant is discussed. Theoretical and experimental results on spontaneous detonation onset conditions are summarized. Three series of large scale turbulent jet initiation experiments have been carried out in KOPER facility (50 m{sup 3} and 150 m{sup 3}). Series of jet initiation experiments in initially confined H{sub 2} - air mixtures have been carried out in KOPER facility (20-46 m{sup 3}). Turbulent deflagration/DDT experiments were carried out in large scale confined volume of 480 m{sup 3} in RUT facility. Results showed, that the characteristic volume size should be used for conservative estimates in accident analysis. Series of experiments on detonation transition from one mixture to another of lower sensitivity has been carried in DRIVER facility. The experiments were aimed on the estimation of the minimum size of a detonation kernel. The received results are in a good agreement with the 7 cell width criterion. Results of combined hydrogen injection/ignition experiments are presented. The experiments are aimed on the investigation of possible consequences of deliberate ignition at dynamic conditions. Analysis of the experimental data showed applicability of 7 cell width criterion to dynamic conditions. The sum of the results on the scaling of spontaneous detonations is discussed in connection with the strategy of hydrogen mitigation at severe accidents.

  17. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia Purpura: How Close Is Close Enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar A. Perez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is an uncommon life-threatening disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, commonly associated with infections, malignancy, drugs, and autoimmune diseases. We report a case of 19-year-old previously healthy female that presents with anemia and thrombocytopenia diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura that was treated successfully with plasmapheresis and corticosteroids. Laboratory findings also revealed antinuclear antibodies and antibodies to double-stranded DNA. Two weeks after presentation developed inflammatory arthritis, fulfilling diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with plasma exchange and corticosteroids should be instituted as soon as the diagnosis of TTP is suspected, even if other diagnoses, including lupus, are possible. When present, the coexistence of these two etiologies can have a higher mortality than either disease alone. An underlying diagnosis of SLE should be considered in all patients presenting TTP and the study of this association may provide a better understanding of their immune-mediated pathophysiology.

  18. Development of a simple bio-hydrogen production system through dark fermentation by using unique microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Akihiro; Bando, Yukiko; Fujimoto, Naoshi; Suzuki, Masaharu [Department of Fermentation Science, Faculty of Applied Bio-Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture, 1-1 Sakuragaoka 1-chome, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8502 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    In order to ensure efficient functioning of hydrogen fermentation systems that use Clostridium as the dominant hydrogen producer, energy-intensive process such as heat pretreatment of inoculum and/or substrate, continuous injection, and control of anaerobic conditions are required. Here, we describe a simple hydrogen fermentation system designed using microflora from leaf-litter cattle-waste compost. Hydrogen and volatile fatty acid production was measured at various hydraulic retention times, and bacterial genera were determined by PCR amplification and sequencing. Although hydrogen fermentation yield was approximately one-third of values reported in previous studies, this system requires no additional treatment and thus may be advantageous in terms of cost and operational control. Interestingly, Clostridium was absent from this system. Instead, Megasphaera elsdenii was the dominant hydrogen-producing bacterium, and lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) were prevalent. This study is the first to characterize M. elsdenii as a useful hydrogen producer in hydrogen fermentation systems. These results demonstrate that pretreatment is not necessary for stable hydrogen fermentation using food waste. (author)

  19. Multi-criteria analysis on how to select solar radiation hydrogen production system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, G.; Naghiu, G. S.; Felseghi, R.-A.; Rǎboacǎ, S.; Aşchilean, I.; Giurca, I.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a method of selecting hydrogen-production systems using the electric power obtained in photovoltaic systems, and as a selecting method, we suggest the use of the Advanced Multi-Criteria Analysis based on the FRISCO formula. According to the case study on how to select the solar radiation hydrogen production system, the most convenient alternative is the alternative A4, namely the technical solution involving a hydrogen production system based on the electrolysis of water vapor obtained with concentrated solar thermal systems and electrical power obtained using concentrating photovoltaic systems.

  20. Two step novel hydrogen system using additives to enhance hydrogen release from the hydrolysis of alane and activated aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Motyka, Theodore

    2015-12-01

    A system for the generation of hydrogen for use in portable power systems is set forth utilizing a two-step process that involves the thermal decomposition of AlH.sub.3 (10 wt % H.sub.2) followed by the hydrolysis of the activated aluminum (Al*) byproduct to release additional H.sub.2. Additionally, a process in which water is added directly without prior history to the AlH.sub.3:PA composite is also disclosed.

  1. Protein S-sulfhydration by hydrogen sulfide in cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guoliang; Zhao, Shuang; Xie, Liping; Han, Yi; Ji, Yong

    2017-04-22

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S), independently of any specific transporters, has a number of biological effects on the cardiovascular system. However, until now, the detailed mechanism of H2 S was not clear. Recently, a novel post-translational modification induced by H2 S, named S-sulfhydration, has been proposed. S-sulfhydration is the chemical modification of specific cysteine residues of target proteins by H2 S. There are several methods for detecting S-sulfhydration, such as the modified biotin switch assay, maleimide assay with fluorescent thiol modifying regents, tag-switch method and mass spectrometry. H2 S induces S-sulfhydration on enzymes or receptors (such as p66Shc, phospholamban, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and ATP synthase subunit α), transcription factors (such as specific protein-1, kelch-like ECH-associating protein 1, NF-κB and interferon regulatory factor-1), and ion channels (such as voltage-activated Ca2+ channels, transient receptor potential channels and ATP-sensitive K+ channels) in the cardiovascular system. Although significant progress has been achieved in delineating the role of protein S-sulfhydration by H2 S in the cardiovascular system, more proteins with detailed cysteine sites of S-sulfhydration as well as physiological function need to be investigated in further studies. This review mainly summarizes the role and possible mechanism of S-sulfhydration in the cardiovascular system. The S-sulfhydrated proteins may be potential novel targets for therapeutic intervention and drug design in the cardiovascular system, which may accelerate the development and application of H2 S-related drugs in the future. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Study on system layout and component design in the HTTR hydrogen production system. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishihara, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tanihira, Masanori [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Shoji [Advanced Reactor Technology Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    The global warming becomes a significant issue in the world so that it needs to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission. It is expected that hydrogen is in place of the fossil fuels such as coal and oil, and plays the important role to resolve the global warming. There are several hydrogen making processes such as water electrolysis and steam reforming of hydrocarbon. Steam reforming of hydrocarbon is a major hydrogen making process because of economy in industry. It utilizes the fossil fuels as process heat for chemical reaction and results in a large CO{sub 2} emission. New steam reforming system without fossil fuel can contribute to resolve the global warming. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) has a unique feature to be able to supply a hot helium gas whose temperature is approximately 950degC at the reactor outlet. This makes HTGR possible to utilize for not only power generation but also process heat utilization. JAERI constructed the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) that is a sort of HTGR in Oarai establishment and starts operation. Nuclear heat utilization is one of the R and D items of the HTTR. The steam reforming system coupling to the HTTR for hydrogen production has been designed. This report represents the system layout and design specification of key components in HTTR steam reforming system. (author)

  3. System-of-Systems Framework for the Future Hydrogen-Based Transportation Economy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffy, M.; Sandor, D.

    2008-06-01

    From a supply chain view, this paper traces the flow of transportation fuels through required systems and addresses the current petroleum-based economy, DOE's vision for a future hydrogen-based transportation economy, and the challenges of a massive market and infrastructure transformation.

  4. Novel Applications of the Methyltrioxorhenium/Hydrogen Peroxide Catalytic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, Sasa [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-09-12

    Methylrhenium trioxide (MTO), CH3Re03, was first prepared in 1979. An improved synthetic route to MTO was devised from dirhenium heptoxide and tetramethyltin in the presence of hexafluoro glutaric anhydride was reported by Herrmann in 1992. During the course of research on this dissertation we uncovered other reactions where the presence or absence of pyridine can, in some cases dramatically, affect the reaction outcome. This dissertation consists of four chapters. The first two chapters deal with the ,oxidation of water sensitive olefinic compounds with the hydrogen perox’ide/MTO system. Chapters 111 and IV focus on the oxidation of hydrazones with the same catalytic system. Chapter I has been published in The Journal of Organic Chemistry and Chapter III in Chemical Communications. Chapters II and IV have been submitted for publication in The Journal of Organic Chemistry. Each section is selfcontained with its own equations, tables, figures and references. All of the work in this dissertation was performed by this author.

  5. Metal-hydrogen systems with an exceptionally large and tunable thermodynamic destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngene, Peter; Longo, Alessandro; Mooij, Lennard; Bras, Wim; Dam, Bernard

    2017-11-29

    Hydrogen is a key element in the energy transition. Hydrogen-metal systems have been studied for various energy-related applications, e.g., for their use in reversible hydrogen storage, catalysis, hydrogen sensing, and rechargeable batteries. These applications depend strongly on the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen system. Therefore, tailoring the thermodynamics of metal-hydrogen interactions is crucial for tuning the properties of metal hydrides. Here we present a case of large metal hydride destabilization by elastic strain. The addition of small amounts of zirconium to yttrium leads to a compression of the yttrium lattice, which is maintained during (de)hydrogenation cycles. As a result, the equilibrium hydrogen pressure of YH2 ↔ YH3 can be rationally and precisely tuned up to five orders of magnitude at room temperature. This allows us to realize a hydrogen sensor which indicates the ambient hydrogen pressure over four orders of magnitude by an eye-visible color change.

  6. Numerical Analysis of Combined Well and Open-Closed Loops Geothermal (CWG) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu-Chul

    2016-04-01

    Open-loop geothermal heat pump (GHP) system and closed-loop heat pump systems have been used in Korea to reduce emission of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2). The GHP systems have the pros and cons, for example, the open-loop GHP system is good energy-efficient and the closed-loop GHP system requires minimum maintenance costs. The open-loop GHP system can be used practically only with large amount of groundwater supply. The closed-loop GHP system can be used with high costs of initial installation. The performance and efficiency of the GHP system depend on the characteristics of the GHP system itself in addition to the geologic conditions. To overcome the cons of open-loop or closed-loop GHP system, the combined well and open-closed loops geothermal (CWG) system was designed. The open-loop GHP system is surrounded with closed-loop GHP systems in the CWG system. The geothermal energy in closed-loop GHP systems is supplied by the groundwater pumped by the open-loop GHP system. In this study, 2 different types of the CWG systems (small aperture hybrid CWG system and large aperture CWG system) are estimated using numerical simulation models in the aspect of energy efficiency. This work was supported by the New & Renewable Energy Core Technology Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP), granted financial resource from the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy, Republic of Korea. (No.20153030111120).

  7. H2 at Scale: Benefitting our Future Energy System - Update for the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark

    2016-12-06

    Hydrogen is a flexible, clean energy carrying intermediate that enables aggressive market penetration of renewables while deeply decarbonizing our energy system. H2 at Scale is a concept that supports the electricity grid by utilizing energy without other demands at any given time and also supports transportation and industry by providing low-priced hydrogen to them. This presentation is an update to the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC).

  8. Environmental and health impact assessment of Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier (LOHC) systems – challenges and preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Markiewicz, M.; Y. Q. Zhang; Bösmann, A.; Brückner, N. (Nadine); Thöming, J.; Wasserscheid, P.; Stolte, S.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier (LOHC) systems offer a very attractive way to store and transport hydrogen, a technical feature that is highly desirable to link unsteady energy production from renewables with the vision of a sustainable, CO2-free, hydrogen-based energy system. LOHCs can be charged and discharged with considerable amounts of hydrogen in cyclic, catalytic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation processes. As their physico-chemical properties are very similar to diesel, today's infras...

  9. Closed ecological life-support systems and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitelson, Josef I.

    The advent of man-made closed ecosystems (CES) is a solution of the fundamental problem-egress of humans beyond the Earth's biosphere, providing biological basis for exploitation of Space and celestial bodies. Yet, before proceeding to these ambitious project elements of closed life-support biotechnologies, there can be found diverse applications on Earth in human settlements providing for high quality of life under extreme environment conditions: high latitudes, deserts, mountains and industrially polluted areas. This presentation considers these variations of terrestrial applications of CELSS technologies. The version of CES under development is based on making direct use of the light energy in plant photosynthesis. In this case life support of one man on the Earth orbit requires solar light collected from 5-10m2. Among terrestrial applications of prime importance is the development of an ecohome designed to provide people with a high quality of life in Arctic and Antarctic territories. The developed technology of cascade employment of energy makes possible (expending 10-15 kw of installed power per a house-3-5 member family) to provide for: permanent supply of fresh vitamin-full vegetables, absorption and processing oaf excreta, purification of water and air in the living quarters, habitual colour and light conditions in the premises in winter making up to sensorial deprivation and, finally, psychological comfort of close contact with the plants during the long polar night. Ecohabitat based on the technology described in realistic today and depends only on the energy available and the resolution and readiness (sagacity) of the decision-makers to be committed with ecohome assigning. The ecological and economical significance of construction of ecohabitats for the northern territories of Canada, Alaska and Russia is apparent. This principle can be used (with considerable economy of energy and construction costs) to maintain normal partial pressure of oxygen inside

  10. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-07-14

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  11. Highly efficient hydrogen storage system based on ammonium bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium over palladium nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji; Yang, Lisha; Lu, Mi; Lin, Hongfei

    2015-03-01

    A highly efficient, reversible hydrogen storage-evolution process has been developed based on the ammonium bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium over the same carbon-supported palladium nanocatalyst. This heterogeneously catalyzed hydrogen storage system is comparable to the counterpart homogeneous systems and has shown fast reaction kinetics of both the hydrogenation of ammonium bicarbonate and the dehydrogenation of ammonium formate under mild operating conditions. By adjusting temperature and pressure, the extent of hydrogen storage and evolution can be well controlled in the same catalytic system. Moreover, the hydrogen storage system based on aqueous-phase ammonium formate is advantageous owing to its high volumetric energy density. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Hydrogen generation systems utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2017-06-06

    Systems, devices, and methods combine reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Multiple inlets of varied placement geometries deliver aqueous solution to the reaction. The reactant materials and aqueous solution are churned to control the state of the reaction. The aqueous solution can be recycled and returned to the reaction. One system operates over a range of temperatures and pressures and includes a hydrogen separator, a heat removal mechanism, and state of reaction control devices. The systems, devices, and methods of generating hydrogen provide thermally stable solids, near-instant reaction with the aqueous solutions, and a non-toxic liquid by-product.

  13. Method and apparatus for operating a powertrain system upon detecting a stuck-closed clutch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R. Anthony

    2014-02-18

    A powertrain system includes a multi-mode transmission having a plurality of torque machines. A method for controlling the powertrain system includes identifying all presently applied clutches including commanded applied clutches and the stuck-closed clutch upon detecting one of the torque-transfer clutches is in a stuck-closed condition. A closed-loop control system is employed to control operation of the multi-mode transmission accounting for all the presently applied clutches.

  14. Design and Development of New Carbon-Based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-03

    This is a summary for work performed under cooperative agreement DE FC36 04GO14006 (Design and Development of New Carbon-based Sorbent Systems for an Effective Containment of Hydrogen). The project was directed to discover new solid and liquid materials that use reversible catalytic hydrogenation as the mechanism for hydrogen capture and storage. After a short period of investigation of solid materials, the inherent advantages of storing and transporting hydrogen using liquid-phase materials focused our attention exclusively on organic liquid hydrogen carriers (liquid carriers). While liquid carriers such as decalin and methylcyclohexane were known in the literature, these carriers suffer from practical disadvantages such as the need for very high temperatures to release hydrogen from the carriers and difficult separation of the carriers from the hydrogen. In this project, we were successful in using the prediction of reaction thermodynamics to discover liquid carriers that operate at temperatures up to 150 C lower than the previously known carriers. The means for modifying the thermodynamics of liquid carriers involved the use of certain molecular structures and incorporation of elements other than carbon into the carrier structure. The temperature decrease due to the more favorable reaction thermodynamics results in less energy input to release hydrogen from the carriers. For the first time, the catalytic reaction required to release hydrogen from the carriers could be conducted with the carrier remaining in the liquid phase. This has the beneficial effect of providing a simple means to separate the hydrogen from the carrier.

  15. A system close to a threshold of instability

    CERN Document Server

    Floriani, E; Lima, R

    2003-01-01

    We propose a probabilistic model for a system at a threshold of instability. The distribution of residence times below the threshold that characterizes the properties of the system is studied analytically in various cases.

  16. Long term hydrogen production potential of concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system in tropical weather of Singapore

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad

    2016-08-23

    Concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system provides highest solar energy conversion efficiency among all the photovoltaic technologies and provides the most suitable option to convert solar energy into hydrogen, as future sustainable energy carrier. So far, only conventional flat plate PV systems are being used for almost all of the commercial applications. However, most of the studies have only shown the maximum efficiency of hydrogen production using CPV. In actual field conditions, the performance of CPV-Hydrogen system is affected by many parameter and it changes continuously during whole day operation. In this paper, the daily average and long term performances are proposed to analyze the real field potential of the CPV-Hydrogen system, which is of main interest for designers and consumers. An experimental setup is developed and a performance model is proposed to investigate the average and long term production potential of CPV-Hydrogen system. The study is carried out in tropical weather of Singapore. The maximum CPV efficiency of 27-28% and solar to hydrogen (STH) efficiency of 18%, were recorded. In addition, the CPV-Hydrogen system showed the long term average efficiency of 15.5%, for period of one year (12-months), with electrolyser rating of 47 kWh/kg and STH production potential of 218 kWh/kg. Based upon the DNI availability, the system showed hydrogen production potential of 0.153-0.553 kg/m/month, with average production of 0.43 kg/m/month. However, CPV-Hydrogen system has shown annual hydrogen production potential of 5.162 kg/m/year in tropical weather of Singapore.

  17. Incremental Closed-loop Identification of Linear Parameter Varying Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with system identification for control of linear parameter varying systems. In practical applications, it is often important to be able to identify small plant changes in an incremental manner without shutting down the system and/or disconnecting the controller; unfortunately, cl...

  18. Hydrogen recovery by novel solvent systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinnar, R.; Ludmer, Z.; Ullmann, A.

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a novel method for purification of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas. The study involved a search for suitable mixtures of solvents for their ability to separate hydrogen from the coal derived gas stream in significant concentration near their critical point of miscibility. The properties of solvent pairs identified were investigated in more detail to provide data necessary for economic evaluation and process development.

  19. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Thanh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kromer, Matt [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Lasher, Stephen [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, Kurtis [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Law, Karen [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, Jayanti [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab) and high-volume manufacturing cost (by TIAX LLC) were estimated for compressed hydrogen storage tanks. The results were compared to DOE's 2010, 2015, and ultimate full fleet hydrogen storage targets. The Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency as well as the off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen were also documented in the report.

  20. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

    2009-03-01

    The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

  1. Catalysts based on platinum–tin and platinum–gallium in close contact for the selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837598; van Asten, D.M.P.; van der Eerden, A.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304840483; Mäki-Arvela, P.; Murzin, D.Y.; de Jong, K.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; Bitter, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/160581435

    2009-01-01

    Bimetallic platinum–tin and platinum–gallium catalysts supported on carbon nanofibers (CNF) were prepared via reductive deposition precipitation and impregnation. Detailed EXAFS, TEM-EDX and XPS studies showed that reductive deposition precipitation resulted in a close contact of tin with platinum.

  2. Optimization and field demonstration of hybrid hydrogen generator/high efficiency furnace system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entchev, E.; Coyle, I.; Szadkowski, F. [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A-1M1 (Canada); Manning, M.; Swinton, M. [National Research Council Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Graydon, J.; Kirk, D. [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogen is seen as an energy carrier of the future and significant research on hydrogen generation, storage and utilization is accomplished around the world. However, an appropriate intermediate step before wide hydrogen introduction will be blending conventional fuels such as natural gas, oil or diesel with hydrogen and follow up combustion through conventional means. Due to changes in the combustion and flame characteristics of the system additional research is needed to access the limits and the impact of the fuel mix on the combustion systems performance. The hybrid system consists of a 5 kW{sub el} electrolyzer and a residential 15 kW{sub th} high efficiency gas fired furnace. The electrolyzer was integrated with the furnace gas supply and setup to replace 5-25% of the furnace natural gas flow with hydrogen. A mean for proper mixing of hydrogen with natural gas was provided and a control system for safe system operation was developed. Prior to the start of the field trial the hybrid system was investigated in laboratory environment. It was subjected to a variety of steady state and cycling conditions and a detailed performance and optimization analysis was performed with a range of hydrogen/natural gas mixtures. The optimized system was then installed at the Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies (CCHT) Experimental research house. The energy performance of the hybrid system was compared to the energy performance of an identical high efficiency furnace in the Control research house next door. (author)

  3. Optimizing investments in coupled offshore wind -electrolytic hydrogen storage systems in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Peng; Enevoldsen, Peter; Eichman, Joshua; Hu, Weihao; Jacobson, Mark Z.; Chen, Zhe

    2017-08-01

    In response to electricity markets with growing levels of wind energy production and varying electricity prices, this research examines incentives for investments in integrated renewable energy power systems. A strategy for using optimization methods for a power system consisting of wind turbines, electrolyzers, and hydrogen fuel cells is explored. This research reveals the investment potential of coupling offshore wind farms with different hydrogen systems. The benefits in terms of a return on investment are demonstrated with data from the Danish electricity markets. This research also investigates the tradeoffs between selling the hydrogen directly to customers or using it as a storage medium to re-generate electricity at a time when it is more valuable. This research finds that the most beneficial configuration is to produce hydrogen at a time that complements the wind farm and sell the hydrogen directly to end users.

  4. Proceedings of the DOE chemical/hydrogen energy systems contractor review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-05-01

    This volume contains 45 papers as well as overviews of the two main project areas: the NASA Hydrogen Energy Storage Technology Project and Brookhaven National Laboratory's program on Electrolysis-Based Hydrogen Storage Systems. Forty-six project summaries are included. Individual papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  5. Artificial neural networks and neuro-fuzzy inference systems as virtual sensors for hydrogen safety prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karri, Vishy; Ho, Tien [School of Engineering, University of Tasmania, GPO Box 252-65, Hobart, Tasmania 7001 (Australia); Madsen, Ole [Department of Production, Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 16, DK-9220 Aalborg (Denmark)

    2008-06-15

    Hydrogen is increasingly investigated as an alternative fuel to petroleum products in running internal combustion engines and as powering remote area power systems using generators. The safety issues related to hydrogen gas are further exasperated by expensive instrumentation required to measure the percentage of explosive limits, flow rates and production pressure. This paper investigates the use of model based virtual sensors (rather than expensive physical sensors) in connection with hydrogen production with a Hogen 20 electrolyzer system. The virtual sensors are used to predict relevant hydrogen safety parameters, such as the percentage of lower explosive limit, hydrogen pressure and hydrogen flow rate as a function of different input conditions of power supplied (voltage and current), the feed of de-ionized water and Hogen 20 electrolyzer system parameters. The virtual sensors are developed by means of the application of various Artificial Intelligent techniques. To train and appraise the neural network models as virtual sensors, the Hogen 20 electrolyzer is instrumented with necessary sensors to gather experimental data which together with MATLAB neural networks toolbox and tailor made adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) were used as predictive tools to estimate hydrogen safety parameters. It was shown that using the neural networks hydrogen safety parameters were predicted to less than 3% of percentage average root mean square error. The most accurate prediction was achieved by using ANFIS. (author)

  6. The elusive ≡C-H···O complex in the hydrogen bonded systems of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Hydrogen-bonded complexes of phenylacetylene (PhAc) with methanol (MeOH) and diethylether. (DEE) were studied using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. This study specifically searched for the ≡C-. H···O hydrogen bonded complex in these systems, which manifest a n-σ* interaction and which is a local.

  7. The elusive≡ CH··· O complex in the hydrogen bonded systems of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen-bonded complexes of phenylacetylene (PhAc) with methanol (MeOH) and diethylether (DEE) were studied using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. This study specifically searched for the ≡CH · · ·O hydrogen bonded complex in these systems, which manifest a n-σ* interaction and which is a local minimum ...

  8. Design approach of closed loop food systems in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mas, J.L.; Vanrobaeys, X.; Hagenbeek, D.; Chaerle, L.; Straeten, D. van der; Kassel, R.; Janssen, E.G.O.N.; Hovland, S.

    2005-01-01

    Interest on food production systems based on the cultivation of vegetables for future planetary exploration missions is increasing as these units can help overcoming difficult and costly re-supply logistics. In addition to producing edible biomass by growing vegetable species, these systems can be

  9. Closed-Loop Tension Control System for Injection Moulding Machine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In any of these processes, the system was to ensure significant tension control in the filament. The design system process began by selection of components with justification. These components were then assembled and tested using Arduino platform with C-programming and finally, conclusion and recommendation were ...

  10. Interconnection of subsystems in closed-loop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2009-01-01

    The focus in this paper is analysis of stability and controller design for interconnected systems. This includes both the case with known and unknown interconnected sub-system. The key element in both the stability analysis and controller design is the application of the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kuce...

  11. Interfacial Properties of an Ir/TiO2 System and Their Relevance in Crotonaldehyde Hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López Granados, M.; Melián-Cabrera, I.; Aguirre, M.C.; Reyes, P.; Fierro, J.L.G.

    2002-01-01

    Titania-supported iridium catalysts were prereduced in a hydrogen flow at 473 K (LT) and 723 K (HT). Metal particle sizes determined by H2 chemisorption and by direct observation of metal particles by transmission electron microscopy were quite similar for LT treatment, and close to 3.0 nm. For the

  12. Cassini Begins Close-Up Examination of Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2004-07-01

    The international Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan already has returned some initial results which will help to re-write science textbooks, and some astounding images. The spacecraft entered orbit around Saturn on 30 June following a successful 96-minute engine burn as the spacecraft flew between the planet's F and G rings. Robert Mitchell, the Cassini program manager with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said the spacecraft could have been damaged if it had been hit by a grain of dust the size of a pea while crossing through the ring plane. Prior to the burn, he said flight controllers would ``chew their nails'' in nervousness as they awaited indication that the Saturn orbit insertion was successful. Mitchell added that the spacecraft did not fly through the rings due to any sort of scientific preference, but rather that the flyby was ``a combination of getting close enough to make the propellant cost one we could afford, and still be in a region as safe as we could make it.''

  13. Intelligent closed-loop insulin delivery systems for ICU patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youqing; Xie, Hongzhi; Jiang, Xu; Liu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Good glycemic control through insulin administration among intensive care unit (ICU) patients can reduce mortality significantly; however, it remains a big challenge because of scarcity of individualized models for ICU patients. To deal with this challenge, a new combination of particle swarm optimization (PSO) and model predictive control (MPC) has been proposed to identify the model online as well as to optimally design the input, i.e., the insulin delivery rate automatically. According to the population distribution, ten typical linear dynamic models were selected such that any patient's model could be approximated by a linear combination of these ten typical models. PSO was used to update the weight coefficients while MPC was used to design the insulin delivery rate based on the combination model identified by using PSO. The proposed strategy was compared with the Yale protocol on 30 virtual subjects. According to the control-variability grid analysis, the percentage values in A + B zone were, respectively, 100% under the proposed strategy and while 51% under the Yale protocol, which demonstrates the superior performance of the proposed strategy. As a good candidate for the full closed-loop insulin delivery method, this new combination can control the glucose level by bringing it to a safe range promptly thereby reducing the risk of death.

  14. Microcontroller Based Closed Loop PMDC Motor Position Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata CHATTOPADHYAY

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The position control systems used in different applications need to meet the high performance, accuracy and reliability to achieve the desired output. Microcontrollers can be used as suitable means for meeting these needs. The PMDC motor is a low cost electrical device, which can be used for precise position control system. In the present paper, a DC chopper, driven by a PWM signal has been utilized for position control of a PMDC motor. Controlling the duty cycle of the PWM signals has been implemented by microcontroller as equivalent to controlling the motor terminal voltage, which in turn adjusts directly the motor rotational movement. Experimental characteristics have been reported which revels the satisfactory performance of PMDC motor in position control system. The system has good repeatability and the percentage deviation of position of motor is within tolerable limit.

  15. Variable flow controls of closed system pumps for energy savings in maritime power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Chun-Lien; Liao, Chi-Hsiang; Chou, Tso-Chu

    2016-01-01

    Pumps are extensively used in maritime industries as marine vessels utilize a wide range of pumps and pumping techniques to transfer and distribute all types of air and fluids. The electrical energy consumed by the various motors accounts for about 70% of a vessel’s total power consumption......, and this presents a problem in unique marine environments. Such situations are especially conducive to energy-saving strategies using variable frequency drives (VFDs) in centrifugal load service. This paper presents the design and results of applying variable frequency constant pressure technology in closed system...... pumps on marine vessels. The existing problem of traditional control methods for closed system pumps is analyzed and a mathematical model for variable flow controls with the appropriate control settings is derived. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated and verified through experimental...

  16. Evaluation of Lighting Systems, Carbon Sources, and Bacteria Cultures on Photofermentative Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengcheng; Choy, Sing-Ying; Giannis, Apostolos

    2017-11-10

    Fluorescent and incandescent lighting systems were applied for batch photofermentative hydrogen production by four purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria (PNSB). The hydrogen production efficiency of Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodobacter capsulatus, and Rhodospirillum rubrum was evaluated using different carbon sources (acetate, butyrate, lactate, and malate). Incandescent light was found to be more effective for bacteria cell growth and hydrogen production. It was observed that PNSB followed substrate selection criteria for hydrogen production. Only R. palustris was able to produce hydrogen using most carbon sources. Cell density was almost constant, but cell growth rate and hydrogen production were significantly varied under the different lighting systems. The kinetics study suggested that initial substrate concentration had a positive correlation with lag phase duration. Among the PNSB, R. palustris grew faster and had higher hydrogen yields of 1.58, 4.92, and 2.57 mol H2/mol using acetate, butyrate, and lactate, respectively. In the integrative approach with dark fermentation effluents rich in organic acids, R. palustris should be enriched in the phototrophic microbial consortium of the continuous hydrogen production system.

  17. Thermodynamically consistent Bayesian analysis of closed biochemical reaction systems

    OpenAIRE

    Goutsias John; Zhong Xiaogang; Jenkinson Garrett

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Estimating the rate constants of a biochemical reaction system with known stoichiometry from noisy time series measurements of molecular concentrations is an important step for building predictive models of cellular function. Inference techniques currently available in the literature may produce rate constant values that defy necessary constraints imposed by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. As a result, these techniques may lead to biochemical reaction systems whose...

  18. The role of hydrogen sulfide in renal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Cao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has gained recognition as the third gaseous signaling molecule after nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. This review surveys the emerging role of H2S in mammalian renal system, with emphasis on both renal physiology and diseases. H2S is produced redundantly by four pathways in kidney, indicating the abundance of this gaseous molecule in the organ. In physiological conditions, H2S was found to regulate the excretory function of the kidney possibly by the inhibitory effect on sodium transporters on renal tubular cells. Likewise, it also influences the release of renin from juxtaglomerular (JG cells and thereby modulates blood pressure. A possible role of H2S as an oxygen sensor has also been discussed, especially at renal medulla. Alternation of H2S level has been implicated in various pathological conditions such as renal ischemia/reperfusion, obstructive nephropathy, diabetic nephropathy and hypertensive nephropathy. Moreover, H2S donors exhibit broad beneficial effects in renal diseases although a few conflicts need to be resolved. Further research reveals that multiple mechanisms are underlying the protective effects of H2S, including anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation and anti-apoptosis. In the review, several research directions are also proposed including the role of mitochondrial H2S in renal diseases, H2S delivery to kidney by targeting D-amino acid oxidase/3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (DAO/3-MST pathway, effect of drug-like H2S donors in kidney diseases and understanding the molecular mechanism of H2S. The completion of the studies in these directions will not only improves our understanding of renal H2S functions but may also be critical to translate H2S to be a new therapy for renal diseases.

  19. Combined heat and power (cogeneration) plant based on renewable energy sources and electrochemical hydrogen systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, S. A.; Grigor'ev, A. S.; Kuleshov, N. V.; Fateev, V. N.; Kuleshov, V. N.

    2015-02-01

    The layout of a combined heat and power (cogeneration) plant based on renewable energy sources (RESs) and hydrogen electrochemical systems for the accumulation of energy via the direct and inverse conversion of the electrical energy from RESs into the chemical energy of hydrogen with the storage of the latter is described. Some efficient technical solutions on the use of electrochemical hydrogen systems in power engineering for the storage of energy with a cyclic energy conversion efficiency of more than 40% are proposed. It is shown that the storage of energy in the form of hydrogen is environmentally safe and considerably surpasses traditional accumulator batteries by its capacitance characteristics, being especially topical in the prolonged absence of energy supply from RESs, e.g., under the conditions of polar night and breathless weather. To provide the required heat consumption of an object during the peak period, it is proposed to burn some hydrogen in a boiler house.

  20. Transfer Hydrogenation: Employing a Simple, In Situ Prepared Catalytic System

    KAUST Repository

    Ang, Eleanor Pei Ling

    2017-04-01

    Transfer hydrogenation has been recognized to be an important synthetic method in both academic and industrial research to obtain valuable products including alcohols. Transition metal catalysts based on precious metals, such as Ru, Rh and Ir, are typically employed for this process. In recent years, iron-based catalysts have attracted considerable attention as a greener and more sustainable alternative since iron is earth abundant, inexpensive and non-toxic. In this work, a combination of iron disulfide with chelating bipyridine ligand was found to be effective for the transfer hydrogenation of a variety of ketones to the corresponding alcohols in the presence of a simple base. It provided a convenient and economical way to conduct transfer hydrogenation. A plausible role of sulfide next to the metal center in facilitating the catalytic reaction is demonstrated.

  1. Kasza: Design of a closed water system for the greenhouse horticulture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der R.T.; Voogt, W.; Pickhardt, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    The need for a closed and sustainable water system in greenhouse areas is stimulated by the implementation in the Netherlands of the European Framework Directive. The Dutch national project Kasza: Design of a Closed Water System for the Greenhouse Horticulture will provide information how the water

  2. Cyanobacteria to Link Closed Ecological Systems and In-Situ Resources Utilization Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Igor

    cyanobacterial species. In parallel, it was found that rocks stimulated the production of 2-ketoglutaric acid, which has chelation properties, by those species. TEM studies revealed that siderophilic CB accumulate colloidal iron in or on cyanobacterial cells. Recent observation suggested that siderophilic CB Leptolyngbya sp. with expressed litholitic activity is also capable to generate hydrogen, which also is a valuable product for use on the Moon and Mars. Conclusion: Despite the harsh lunar environmental conditions, it seems possible to cultivate photosynthetic mi-croorganisms using a closed bioreactor illuminated and heated by solar energy and to produce in-situ geochemical resources. Such bioprocessing might be simultaneously employed in critical ISRU and life support functions, e.g. air revitalization, propellant (oxygen and methane) and food production, as well as divalent cation extraction. The most critical conclusion is that a semi-closed life support system tied to an ISRU facility might be more efficient for sup-port of an extraterrestrial outpost than closed environmental systems. Such a synthesis of technological capability could decrease the demand for energy, transfer mass and cost of future exploration.

  3. Closed-cycle power supply for fluidic control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiet, O.; Mangion, C.

    1972-01-01

    Power supply utilizes small quantities of two-phase fluid of suitable thermodynamic properties for circulation in a capillary-pumped heat transfer loop. Fluid is vaporized in evaporator, passed through fluidic system load, condensed, pumped by multistage capillary pump, and returned to the evaporator.

  4. Rate-distortion in Closed-Loop LTI Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Eduardo; Derpich, Milan; Østergaard, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We consider a networked LTI system subject to an average data-rate constraint in the feedback path.We provide upper bounds to the minimal source coding rate required to achieve mean square stability and a desired level of performance. In the quadratic Gaussian case, an almost complete rate-distor...

  5. Time scale analysis of a closed-loop discrete optimal control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, D. S.; Price, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    A two-time scale discrete control system is considered. The closed-loop optimal linear quadratic (LQ) regulator for the system requires the solution of a full-order algebraic matrix Riccati equation. Alternatively, the original system is decomposed into reduced-order slow and fast subsystems. The closed-loop optimal control of the subsystems requires the solution of two algebraic matrix Riccati equations of order lower than that required for the full-order system. A composite, closed-loop suboptimal control is created from the sum of the slow and fast feedback optimal controls. Numerical results obtained for an aircraft model show a very close agreement between the exact (optimal) solutions and computationally simpler composite (suboptimal) solutions. The main advantage of the method is the considerable reduction in the overall computational requirements for the closed-loop optimal control of digital flight systems.

  6. Evaluation of two closed-system drug transfer device in the antineoplastic drug elaboration process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandra Gómez-Álvarez; Begoña Porta-Oltra; Marta Hernandez-Griso; Francisca Pérez-Labaña; Mónica Climente-Martí

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to assess the impact of two closed-system drug transfer device on the local and environmental contamination and preparation times in the process of preparation of parenteral chemotherapy compared to the standard system. Method...

  7. Kasza: design of a closed water system for the greenhouse horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Raphaël T; Voogt, Wim; Pickhardt, Pieter W

    2008-01-01

    The need for a closed and sustainable water system in greenhouse areas is stimulated by the implementation in the Netherlands of the European Framework Directive. The Dutch national project Kasza: Design of a Closed Water System for the Greenhouse Horticulture will provide information how the water system in a greenhouse horticulture area can be closed. In this paper the conceptual design of two systems to close the water cycle in a greenhouse area is described. The first system with reverse osmosis system can be used in areas where desalination is required in order to be able to use the recycle water for irrigation of all crops. The second system with advanced oxidation using UV and peroxide can be applied in areas with more salt tolerant crops and good (low sodium) water sources for irrigation. Both systems are financially feasible in new greenhouse areas with substantial available recycle water. (c) IWA Publishing 2008.

  8. Efficient Reversible Hydrogen Carrier System Based on Amine Reforming of Methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothandaraman, Jotheeswari; Kar, Sayan; Sen, Raktim; Goeppert, Alain; Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya

    2017-02-22

    A novel hydrogen storage system based on the hydrogen release from catalytic dehydrogenative coupling of methanol and 1,2-diamine is demonstrated. The products of this reaction, N-formamide and N,N'-diformamide, are hydrogenated back to the free amine and methanol by a simple hydrogen pressure swing. Thus, an efficient one-pot hydrogen carrier system has been developed. The H2 generating step can be termed as "amine reforming of methanol" in analogy to the traditional steam reforming. It acts as a clean source of hydrogen without concurrent production of CO2 (unlike steam reforming) or CO (by complete methanol dehydrogenation). Therefore, a carbon neutral cycle is essentially achieved where no carbon capture is necessary as the carbon is trapped in the form of formamide (or urea in the case of primary amine). In theory, a hydrogen storage capacity as high as 6.6 wt % is achievable. Dehydrogenative coupling and the subsequent amide hydrogenation proceed with good yields (90% and >95% respectively, with methanol and N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine as dehydrogenative coupling partners).

  9. Achieving ethanol-type fermentation for hydrogen production in a granular sludge system by aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Liu, Min; Chen, Ying; Pan, Yu-Ting

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of aeration on hydrogen-producing granular system, experiments were performed in two laboratory-scale anaerobic internal circulation hydrogen production (AICHP) reactors. The preliminary experiment of Reactor 1 showed that direct aeration was beneficial to enhancing hydrogen production. After the direct aeration was implied in Reactor 2, hydrogen production rate (HPR) and hydrogen content were increased by 100% and 60%, respectively. In addition, mixed-acid fermentation was transformed into typical ethanol-type fermentation (ETF). Illumina MiSeq sequencing shows that the direct aeration did not change the species of hydrogen-producing bacteria but altered their abundance. Hydrogen-producing bacteria and ethanol-type fermentative bacteria were increased by 24.5% and 146.3%, respectively. Ethanoligenens sp. sharply increased by 162.2% and turned into predominant bacteria in the system. These findings indicated that appropriate direct aeration might be a novel and promising way to obtain ETF and enhance hydrogen production in practical use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A synergetic use of hydrogen and fuel cells in human spaceflight power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, S.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen is very flexible in different fields of application of energy conversion. It can be generated by water electrolysis. Stored in tanks it is available for re-electrification by fuel cells. But it is not only the power system, which benefits from use of hydrogen, but also the life support system, which can contain hydrogen consuming technologies for recycling management (e.g. carbon dioxide removal and waste combustion processes). This paper points out various fields of hydrogen use in a human spaceflight system. Depending on mission scenarios, shadow phases, and the need of energy storage, regenerative fuel cell systems can be more efficient than secondary batteries. Here, different power storage concepts are compared by equivalent system mass calculation, thus including impact in the peripheral structure (volume, thermal management, etc.) on the space system. It is also focused on the technical integration aspect, e.g. which peripheral components have to be adapted when hydrogen is also used for life support technologies and what system mass benefit can be expected. Finally, a recommendation is given for the following development steps for a synergetic use of hydrogen and fuel cells in human spaceflight power systems.

  11. Evaluation of two closed-system drug transfer device in the antineoplastic drug elaboration process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Gómez-Álvarez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the impact of two closed-system drug transfer device on the local and environmental contamination and preparation times in the process of preparation of parenteral chemotherapy compared to the standard system. Method: prospective observational study. Two different closed- systems providers, Care Fusion® and Icu Medical®, were compared to standard preparation. 15 nurses of Pharmacy Department prepared 5 preparations each one, one with the standard procedure and four using closed-systems. To evaluate the contamination, a fluorescein solution 0.5% was prepared. Two kind of contamination were evaluated, local (three points connection: closed-system connect vial, syringe and final infusion bags and environmental (gloves and countertop. Percentage of contaminated preparations was obtained in each one. Time taken by each nurse in each preparation was recorded. Results: 75 preparations were prepared. Local contamination was reduced 21% and 75% in closed-system Icu Medical® and Care Fusion® respectively. Care Fusion® closed system, local contamination was significantly lower than the standard system to the vial, syringe and final package, while Icu Medical® closed-systems only was significantly lower in the connection to the vial. Time of preparation was increased significantly with the use of closed-system between 23.4 and 30.5 seconds. Conclusions: both closed-systems drug transfer device have shown an improvement in contamination than the use of the standard system. However, preparation time has been significantly increased with the use of both systems

  12. Disturbing the solar system. Impacts, close encounters, and coming attractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    The solar system is not akin to a well-oiled machine whose parts move smartly along prescribed paths. It has always been - and continues to be - a messy place in which gravity wreaks havoc. Moons form, asteroids and comets crash into planets, ice ages commence, and dinosaurs disappear. By describing the dramatic consequences of such disturbances, this fascinating book reveals the fundamental interconnectedness of the solar system - and what it means for life on its most interesting planet. After relating a brief history of the solar system, Alan Rubin describes how astronomers determined our location in the Milky Way. He provides succinct and up-to-date accounts of the energetic interactions among planetary bodies, the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, the effects of other solar-system objects on our climate, the moon's genesis, the heating of asteroids, and the origin of the mysterious tektites. Along the way, Rubin introduces us to the individual scientists - including the famous, the now obscure, and the newest generation of researchers - who have enhanced our understanding of the galactic neighborhood. He shows how scientific discoveries are made; he discusses the uncertainty that presides over the boundaries of knowledge as well as the occasional reluctance of scientists to change their minds even when confronted by compelling evidence. This fresh historical perspective reveals science as it is: an imperfect but self-correcting enterprise. Journeying to the frontiers of knowledge, Rubin concludes with the exciting realm of astrobiology. He chronicles the history of the search for life on Mars and describes cutting-edge lines of astrobiological inquiry, including panspermia (the possible transfer of life from planet to planet), the likelihood of technologically advanced alien civilizations in our galaxy, and our probable responses to alien contact.

  13. Blending of hydrogen in natural gas distribution systems. Volume I. Gas blends flow in distribution system, mixing points, and regulatory standards. Final report, June 1, 1976--August 30, 1977. [10 and 20% hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-09-01

    This volume of the subject study ''Blending of Hydrogen in Natural Gas Distribution Systems'' describes studies on the determination of gas distribution system flows with hydrogen - natural gas blends, potential hydrogen admission points to gas distribution systems, and the impact of hydrogen - natural gas blends on regulatory standards for gas distribution systems. The studies resulted in the following principal findings: (1) Most existing natural gas distribution systems could adequately transport 20% blends of hydrogen by volume with little or no modification. (2) The best point of admission of the hydrogen into a natural gas distribution system would be at the meter and regulating stations supplying a particular distribution system. (3) The impact of hydrogen - natural gas blends on state regulatory standards appears to be minimal for PSE and G, but requires further study for various National Codes and for other states.

  14. Integrated Microchannel Reformer/Hydrogen Purifier for Fuel Cell Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering, Inc. (MEI) and Colorado School of Mines (CSM) propose to develop an integrated hydrogen generator and purifier system for conversion of in-situ...

  15. Efficiency of Small Autonomous Wind/Diesel/Hydrogen Systems in Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Marchenko, Oleg; Solomin, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of storing energy in the form of hydrogen in the small autonomous wind/diesel/hydrogen power systems that include wind turbines, diesel generator, electrolyzer, hydrogen tank and fuel cells are analyzed. The paper presents the zones of economic efficiency of the system (set of parameters that provide its competitiveness) depending on load, fuel price and long-term average annual wind speed.At low wind speed and low price of fuel it is reasonable to use only diesel generator to...

  16. Modeling and control for closed environment plant production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, David H.; Ting, K. C.; Janes, H. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A computer program was developed to study multiple crop production and control in controlled environment plant production systems. The program simulates crop growth and development under nominal and off-nominal environments. Time-series crop models for wheat (Triticum aestivum), soybean (Glycine max), and white potato (Solanum tuberosum) are integrated with a model-based predictive controller. The controller evaluates and compensates for effects of environmental disturbances on crop production scheduling. The crop models consist of a set of nonlinear polynomial equations, six for each crop, developed using multivariate polynomial regression (MPR). Simulated data from DSSAT crop models, previously modified for crop production in controlled environments with hydroponics under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, were used for the MPR fitting. The model-based predictive controller adjusts light intensity, air temperature, and carbon dioxide concentration set points in response to environmental perturbations. Control signals are determined from minimization of a cost function, which is based on the weighted control effort and squared-error between the system response and desired reference signal.

  17. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. The water cycle in closed ecological systems: perspectives from the Biosphere 2 and Laboratory Biosphere systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Dempster, William; Allen, John P.

    To achieve sustainable and healthy closed ecological systems requires successful solutions to the challenge of closing the water cycle - recycling wastewater/soil leachate and evaporateed water and supplying water of required quality as needed for different needs within the facility. Engineering Biosphere 2, the first multi-biome closed ecological system, total footprint of the airtight area is 12,700 m2 with a combined volume of 200,000 m3 with a total water capacity of some 6 x 106 liters of water presented a complex challenge because it included human inhabitants, their agricultural and technical systems, as well as a range of analogue ecosystems ranging from rainforest to desert, freshwater ecologies to mini-ocean coral reef ecosystems. By contrast, the Laboratory Biosphere - a small (40m3 volume) soil-based plant growth facility with a footprint of 15m3 - is a very simplified system, but with some similar issues such as salinity management and the provision of water quality sufficient for plant growth. In Biosphere 2, water needs included supplying potable water for people and domestic animals, irrigation water for a wide variety of food crops, and recycling and recovering soil nutrients from wastewater. In the wilderness biomes, adequately freshwater was needed for terrestrial ecosystems and maintaining appropriate salinity and pH in aquatic/marine ecosystems. The largest reservoirs in Biosphere 2 were the ocean/marsh with some 4x106 liters, soil with 2 x 106 liters, primary storage tanks with a capacity for up to 8 x 105 liters and storage tanks for condensate collection and mixing tanks with 1.5 x 105 liters to supply irrigation for farm and wilderness ecosystems. Other reservoirs were far smaller - humidity in the atmosphere (2 x 103 liters), streams in the rainforest and savannah, and seasonal pools in the desert were orders of magnitude smaller (8 x 103 liters). Key technologies included condensation from humidity in the airhandlers and from the glass

  19. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hua, T. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kromer, M. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Lasher, S. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, K. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Law, K. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, J. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2011-06-21

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and costing the systems discussed here and in the Appendices.

  20. The Origin of the Non-Additivity in Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bond Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuhui; Zhang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Wei; Mo, Yirong

    2017-11-09

    The concept of resonance-assisted hydrogen bond (RAHB) has been widely accepted, and its impact on structures and energetics can be best studied computationally using the block-localized wave function (BLW) method, which is a variant of ab initio valence bond (VB) theory and able to derive strictly electron-localized structures self-consistently. In this work, we use the BLW method to examine a few molecules that result from the merging of two malonaldehyde molecules. As each of these molecules contains two hydrogen bonds, these intramolecular hydrogen bonds may be cooperative or anticooperative, depended on their relative orientations, and compared with the hydrogen bond in malonaldehyde. Apart from quantitatively confirming the concept of RAHB, the comparison of the computations with and without π resonance shows that both σ-framework and π-resonance contribute to the nonadditivity in these RAHB systems with multiple hydrogen bonds.

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for systemic gas embolism after hydrogen peroxide ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Brendan; Sherwin, Robert; Courage, Cheryl; Baylor, Alfred; Dolcourt, Bram; Brudzewski, Jacek R; Mosteller, Jeffrey; Wilson, Robert F

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a commonly available product and its ingestion has been demonstrated to produce in vivo gas bubbles, which can embolize to devastating effect. We report two cases of hydrogen peroxide ingestion with resultant gas embolization, one to the portal system and one cerebral embolus, which were successfully treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO), and review the literature. Two individuals presented to our center after unintentional ingestion of concentrated hydrogen peroxide solutions. Symptoms were consistent with portal gas emboli (Patient A) and cerebral gas emboli (Patient B), which were demonstrated on imaging. They were successfully treated with HBO and recovered without event. As demonstrated by both our experience as well as the current literature, HBO has been used to successfully treat gas emboli associated with hydrogen peroxide ingestion. We recommend consideration of HBO in any cases of significant hydrogen peroxide ingestion with a clinical picture compatible with gas emboli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Apsidal Motion Study of Close Binary System CW Cephei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonyong Han

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available New observations for the times of minimum lights of a well-known apsidal motion star CW Cephei were made using a 0.6 m wide field telescope at Jincheon station of Chungbuk National University Observatory, Korea during the 2015 observational season. We determined new times of minimum lights from these observations and analyzed O-C diagrams together with collected times of minima to study both the apsidal motion and the Light Time Effect (LTE suggested in the system. The new periods of the apsidal motion and the LTE were calculated as 46.6 and 39.3 years, respectively, which were similar but improved accuracy than earlier ones investigated by Han et al. (2002, Erdem et al. (2004 and Wolf et al. (2006.

  3. Embedded system based on PWM control of hydrogen generator with SEPIC converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Cheikh; Setiawan, Eko; Habibi, Muhammad Afnan; Hodaka, Ichijo

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to design and to produce a micro electrical plant system based on fuel cell for teaching material-embedded systems in technical vocational training center. Based on this, the student can experience generating hydrogen by fuel cells, controlling the rate of hydrogen generation by the duty ration of single-ended primary-inductor converter(SEPIC), drawing the curve rate of hydrogen to duty ratio, generating electrical power by using hydrogen, and calculating the fuel cell efficiency when it is used as electrical energy generator. This project is of great importance insofar as students will need to acquire several skills to be able to realize it such as continuous DC DC conversion and the scientific concept behind the converter, the regulation of systems with integral proportional controllers, the installation of photovoltaic cells, the use of high-tech sensors, microcontroller programming, object-oriented programming, mastery of the fuel cell syste

  4. High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

    2007-07-27

    This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

  5. Advancement of Systems Designs and Key Engineering Technologies for Materials Based Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hassel, Bart A. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2015-09-18

    UTRC lead the development of the Simulink Framework model that enables a comparison of different hydrogen storage systems on a common basis. The Simulink Framework model was disseminated on the www.HSECoE.org website that is hosted by NREL. UTRC contributed to a better understanding of the safety aspects of the proposed hydrogen storage systems. UTRC also participated in the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of both the chemical- and the adsorbent-based hydrogen storage system during Phase 2 of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. UTRC designed a hydrogen storage system with a reversible metal hydride material in a compacted form for light-duty vehicles with a 5.6 kg H2 storage capacity, giving it a 300 miles range. It contains a heat exchanger that enables efficient cooling of the metal hydride material during hydrogen absorption in order to meet the 3.3 minute refueling time target. It has been shown through computation that the kinetics of hydrogen absorption of Ti-catalyzed NaAlH4 was ultimately limiting the rate of hydrogen absorption to 85% of the material capacity in 3.3 minutes. An inverse analysis was performed in order to determine the material property requirements in order for a metal hydride based hydrogen storage system to meet the DOE targets. Work on metal hydride storage systems was halted after the Phase 1 to Phase 2 review due to the lack of metal hydride materials with the required material properties. UTRC contributed to the design of a chemical hydrogen storage system by developing an adsorbent for removing the impurity ammonia from the hydrogen gas, by developing a system to meter the transport of Ammonia Borane (AB) powder to a thermolysis reactor, and by developing a gas-liquid-separator (GLS) for the separation of hydrogen gas from AB slurry in silicone oil. Stripping impurities from hydrogen gas is essential for a long life of the fuel cell system on board of a vehicle. Work on solid transport of AB was halted after the

  6. Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  7. Feasibility analysis of a hydrogen backup power system for Russian telecom market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzenko, V. I.; Dunikov, D. O.

    2017-11-01

    We performed feasibility analysis of 10 kW hydrogen backup power system (H2BS) consisting of a water electrolyzer, a metal hydride hydrogen storage and a fuel cell. Capital investments in H2BS are mostly determined by the costs of the PEM electrolyzer, the fuel cell and solid state hydrogen storage materials, for single unit or small series manufacture the cost of AB5-type intermetallic compound can reach 50% of total system cost. Today the capital investments in H2BS are 3 times higher than in conventional lead-acid system of the same capacity. Wide distribution of fuel cell hydrogen vehicles, development of hydrogen infrastructure, and mass production of hydrogen power systems will for sure lower capital investments in fuel cell backup power. Operational expenditures for H2BS is only 15% from the expenditures for lead acid systems, and after 4-5 years of exploitation the total cost of ownership will become lower than for batteries.

  8. The Assessment of Hydrogen Energy Systems for Fuel Cell Vehicles Using Principal Componenet Analysis and Cluster Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Tan, Shiyu; Dong, Lichun

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen energy which has been recognized as an alternative instead of fossil fuel has been developed rapidly in fuel cell vehicles. Different hydrogen energy systems have different performances on environmental, economic, and energy aspects. A methodology for the quantitative evaluation...... to verify the correctness and accuracy of the principal components (PCs) determined by PCA in this paper. A case including 11 different hydrogen energy systems for fuel cell vehicles has been studied in this paper, and the system using steam reforming of natural gas for hydrogen production, pipeline...... for transportation of hydrogen, hydrogen gas tank for the storage of hydrogen at refueling stations, and gaseous hydrogen as power energy for fuel cell vehicles has been recognized as the best scenario. Also, the clustering results calculated by CA are consistent with those determined by PCA, denoting...

  9. Hourly energy management for grid-connected wind-hydrogen systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernal-Agustin, Jose L.; Dufo-Lopez, Rodolfo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Zaragoza, Calle Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2008-11-15

    This paper is a complete technical-economic analysis of the hourly energy management of the energy generated in wind-hydrogen systems. Wind power generation depends on the unpredictable nature of the wind. If the wind-power penetration becomes high in the Spanish electrical grid, energy management will be necessary for some wind farms. A method is proposed in this paper to adjust the generation curve to the demand curve, consisting of the generation of hydrogen and storing it in a hydrogen tank during off-peak (low demand) hours, while during the rest of the hours (peak hours, high demand) the stored hydrogen can be used to generate electricity. After revising the results obtained in this paper, for the current values of efficiency of the electricity-hydrogen-electricity conversion (approximately 30%) and due to the high cost of the hydrogen components, for a wind-hydrogen system to be economically viable the price of the sale of the energy generated by the fuel cell would be very high (approximately 171 cEUR/kWh). (author)

  10. Hydrogen production methods efficiency coupled to an advanced high temperature accelerator driven system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Daniel González; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Fernández, Carlos García, E-mail: danielgonro@gmail.com, E-mail: mmhamada@ipen.br [Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    The hydrogen economy is one of the most promising concepts for the energy future. In this scenario, oil is replaced by hydrogen as an energy carrier. This hydrogen, rather than oil, must be produced in volumes not provided by the currently employed methods. In this work two high temperature hydrogen production methods coupled to an advanced nuclear system are presented. A new design of a pebbled-bed accelerator nuclear driven system called TADSEA is chosen because of the advantages it has in matters of transmutation and safety. For the conceptual design of the high temperature electrolysis process a detailed computational fluid dynamics model was developed to analyze the solid oxide electrolytic cell that has a huge influence on the process efficiency. A detailed flowsheet of the high temperature electrolysis process coupled to TADSEA through a Brayton gas cycle was developed using chemical process simulation software: Aspen HYSYS®. The model with optimized operating conditions produces 0.1627 kg/s of hydrogen, resulting in an overall process efficiency of 34.51%, a value in the range of results reported by other authors. A conceptual design of the iodine-sulfur thermochemical water splitting cycle was also developed. The overall efficiency of the process was calculated performing an energy balance resulting in 22.56%. The values of efficiency, hydrogen production rate and energy consumption of the proposed models are in the values considered acceptable in the hydrogen economy concept, being also compatible with the TADSEA design parameters. (author)

  11. [The Effect of Hydrogen Bonding on the Spectrum of HPAM in Various Systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    IR and UV-Vis was employed to analyzed the spectrum effect of hydrogen bonding on the partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide polymer(HPAM). The study reveals that, the characteristic absorption peak of free amino group moves to the low frequency due to the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding between amide group and carboxyl group. In the water solution, intramolecular hydrogen bonding is the main factor that shifted maximal absorption towards long wavelength. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding and intermolecular hydrogen bonds exist at the same time in the water solution contains intermediate sodium and calcium ions. While in the high concentration solution, the main form between amide group and carboxyl group is intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The effect of hydrogen bonding on the spectrum of HPAM demonstrates different extent in various systems. In the water solution, the maximum absorption wavelength red shifts 8 nm. In the system contains sodium ions, this shift is 4 nm. And this shift is only 2 nm in the solution contains both sodium ions and calcium ions.

  12. Analysis Method for Licensing Application of Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner System as a Hydrogen Mitigation System of OPR-1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Changhyun; Sung, Jejoong; Ha, Sangjun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Inseon [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    As a result, for some plants, dual hydrogen mitigation systems are prepared with a combination of PARs and igniters that each system has a 100% of full capacity for hydrogen control for postulated severe accident conditions. In the original design of OPR-1000, hydrogen mitigation systems consist of a thermal recombiner and twenty glow-type igniters, which are used for design basis accident and severe accident, respectively. This paper presents an analysis method for licensing application in Korea to determine the capacity and locations of PARs for the design of a hydrogen mitigation system with PAR. A licensed analysis method of OPR-1000 has been presented to determine the capacity and locations of PAR for the design of a hydrogen mitigation system with PAR. A lumped parameter code of MAAP 4.0.6+ has been adopted to simulate various severe accident scenarios with a 26 multi-compartment containment model. Hydrogen generations were analysed and required capacity and locations of PAR were determined for six accident scenarios selected from a combination of probabilistic and deterministic considerations. A total of twenty-four PARs in the containment dome, steam generator rooms, annulus and adjacent areas was designed and the adequacy of this system has been confirmed through detailed analyses including sensitivity analyses with/without operations of safety systems such as containment heat removal systems, reactor coolant depressurization system and safety injection by accumulator, etc. Through the assessment on the possibility of global FA and DDT, it has been concluded that new PAR system with twenty-four recombiners can remove hydrogen effectively in the containment atmosphere and prevent from global FA and DDT. Further works are required in the future to develop a well-balanced analysis methodology with a combination of lumped and CFD tools focusing on the optimum locations of recombiners and local hydrogen behaviour in containment compartments.

  13. Slurry-Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Semelsberger, Troy; Simmons, Kevin L.; Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2014-05-30

    In this paper, the system designs for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen materials in an 80 kWe fuel cell, light-duty vehicle are described. Ammonia borane and alane are used for these designs to represent the general classes of exothermic and endothermic materials. The designs are then compared to the USDRIVE/DOE developed set of system level targets for on-board storage. While most of the DOE targets are predicted to be achieved based on the modeling, the system gravimetric and volumetric densities were more challenging and became the focus of this work. The resulting system evaluation determined that the slurry is majority of the system mass. Only modest reductions in the system mass can be expected with improvements in the balance of plant components. Most of the gravimetric improvements will require developing materials with higher inherent storage capacity or by increasing the solids loading of the chemical hydrogen storage material in the slurry.

  14. Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC

    2010-03-03

    On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage has been assessed and compared to the DOE 2010, 2015 and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The Gen-3 prototype system of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was modeled to project the performance of a scaled-down 5.6-kg usable hydrogen storage system. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers 1.5 kg/min of liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm (4000 psi). The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) and by central electrolysis using electricity from renewable sources. The main conclusions from the assessment are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity and the 2015 target for system volumetric capacity (see Table I). The system compares favorably with targets for durability and operability although additional work is needed to understand failure modes for combined pressure and temperature cycling. The system may meet the targets for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. The high-volume manufacturing cost is projected to be 2-4 times the current 2010 target of $4/kWh. For the reference conditions considered most applicable, the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production and liquid H{sub 2} delivery scenario is 60%-140% higher than the current target of $2-$3/gge while the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

  15. Hydrogen generation systems and methods utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2017-12-19

    Systems, devices, and methods combine thermally stable reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen and a non-toxic liquid by-product. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Springs and other pressurization mechanisms pressurize and deliver an aqueous solution to the reaction. A check valve and other pressure regulation mechanisms regulate the pressure of the aqueous solution delivered to the reactant fuel material in the reactor based upon characteristics of the pressurization mechanisms and can regulate the pressure of the delivered aqueous solution as a steady decay associated with the pressurization force. The pressure regulation mechanism can also prevent hydrogen gas from deflecting the pressure regulation mechanism.

  16. Hydrogen generation systems and methods utilizing sodium silicide and sodium silica gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P.; Melack, John M.; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2015-08-11

    Systems, devices, and methods combine thermally stable reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen and a non-toxic liquid by-product. The reactant materials can sodium silicide or sodium silica gel. The hydrogen generation devices are used in fuels cells and other industrial applications. One system combines cooling, pumping, water storage, and other devices to sense and control reactions between reactant materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. Springs and other pressurization mechanisms pressurize and deliver an aqueous solution to the reaction. A check valve and other pressure regulation mechanisms regulate the pressure of the aqueous solution delivered to the reactant fuel material in the reactor based upon characteristics of the pressurization mechanisms and can regulate the pressure of the delivered aqueous solution as a steady decay associated with the pressurization force. The pressure regulation mechanism can also prevent hydrogen gas from deflecting the pressure regulation mechanism.

  17. A structured and qualitative systems approach to analysing hydrogen transitions: Key changes and actor mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh, Michael J.; Yetano Roche, Maria [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (IDMEC), Pav. De Mecanica 1-2, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bennett, Simon J. [Imperial College Centre for Energy Policy and Technology (ICCEPT), Imperial College London, Fourth Floor RSM Building, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    A number of 'roadmapping' activities are being carried out internationally with the aim of planning and facilitating transitions to hydrogen energy systems. However, there is an evident discrepancy between the treatment of quantitative and qualitative information in the majority of roadmapping efforts. Whilst quantitative information is frequently analysed in numerical and computational models, conversely qualitative information tends to be incorporated on a significantly more ad hoc basis. Previous attempts at incorporating qualitative considerations have not usually been systematised. In this paper we present a methodology aimed at increasing the rigour with which qualitative information is treated in hydrogen roadmapping activities. The key changes and actor mapping (KCAM) methodology was developed as the primary qualitative component of the European Hydrogen Energy Roadmap project 'HyWays'. KCAM, developed from a well known general systems development model, constitutes a means of qualitatively analysing variable hydrogen supply chains that is structured, systematic and flexible. (author)

  18. System studies of coal fired-closed cycle MHD for central station power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauderer, B.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the closed-cycle MHD results obtained in a recent study of various advanced energy-conversion power systems. The direct coal-fired MHD topping-steam bottoming cycle was established as the current choice for central station power generation. Emphasis is placed on the background assumptions and the conclusions that can be drawn from the closed-cycle MHD analysis. It is concluded that closed-cycle MHD has efficiencies comparable to that of open-cycle MHD. Its cost will possibly be slightly higher than that of the open-cycle MHD system. Also, with reasonable fuel escalation assumptions, both systems can produce lower-cost electricity than conventional steam power plants. Suggestions for further work in closed-cycle MHD components and systems are made.

  19. Blade Vibration Measurement System for Characterization of Closely Spaced Modes and Mistuning Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There are several ongoing challenges in non-contacting blade vibration and stress measurement systems that can address closely spaced modes and blade-to-blade...

  20. Blade Vibration Measurement System for Characterization of Closely Spaced Modes and Mistuning Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I project successfully demonstrated that the advanced non-contacting stress measurement system (NSMS) was able to address closely spaced modes and...

  1. Developing an effective corrective action process : lessons learned from operating a confidential close call reporting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    In 2007, the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) launched : C3RS, the Confidential Close Call Reporting System, as a : demonstration project to learn how to facilitate the effective : reporting and implementation of corrective actions, and assess t...

  2. 40 CFR 63.693 - Standards: Closed-vent systems and control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Whenever gases or vapors containing HAP are vented through a closed-vent system connected to a control... of such devices include, but are not limited to, a car-seal or a lock-and-key configuration valve. (d...

  3. Control of water supply and specific nutrient application in closed growing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieling, T.H.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords:Tichelmann layout, constant drain flow, constant drain concentration, mass-flow, diffusion flow, sensor, Isfet, Chemfet, closed growing system, robust control, loopshaping, Simulink

  4. Hydrogen sulphide in cardiovascular system: A cascade from interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Jie; Cai, Wen-Jie; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-05-15

    As a gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulphide exerts its extensive physiological and pathophysiological effects in mammals. The interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules forms a cascade that modulates cellular functions and homeostasis. In this review, we focus on the signalling mechanism underlying the effect of hydrogen sulphide in the cardiovascular system and metabolism as well as the biological relevance to human diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sizing and economic analysis of stand alone photovoltaic system with hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, N. D.; Rahman, H. A.

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a design steps in sizing of standalone photovoltaic system with hydrogen storage using intuitive method. The main advantage of this method is it uses a direct mathematical approach to find system’s size based on daily load consumption and average irradiation data. The keys of system design are to satisfy a pre-determined load requirement and maintain hydrogen storage’s state of charge during low solar irradiation period. To test the effectiveness of the proposed method, a case study is conducted using Kuala Lumpur’s generated meteorological data and rural area’s typical daily load profile of 2.215 kWh. In addition, an economic analysis is performed to appraise the proposed system feasibility. The finding shows that the levelized cost of energy for proposed system is RM 1.98 kWh. However, based on sizing results obtained using a published method with AGM battery as back-up supply, the system cost is lower and more economically viable. The feasibility of PV system with hydrogen storage can be improved if the efficiency of hydrogen storage technologies significantly increases in the future. Hence, a sensitivity analysis is performed to verify the effect of electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies towards levelized cost of energy. Efficiencies of electrolyzer and fuel cell available in current market are validated using laboratory’s experimental data. This finding is needed to envisage the applicability of photovoltaic system with hydrogen storage as a future power supply source in Malaysia.

  6. OH stretching frequencies in systems with intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens; Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    OH stretching wavenumbers were investigated for 30 species with intramolecularly hydrogen bonded hydroxyl groups, covering the range from 3600 to ca. 1900 cm-1. Theoretical wavenumbers were predicted with B3LYP/6-31G(d) density functional theory using the standard harmonic approximation, as well....... This is significant in view of the fact that the full anharmonic PT2 analysis requires orders-of-magnitude more computing time than the harmonic analysis. νOH also correlates with OH chemical shifts....

  7. Tethered Transition Metals Promoted Photocatalytic System for Efficient Hydrogen Evolutions

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-03-05

    The present invention is directed, at least in part, to a process for improving the efficiency of a photocatalyst (a semiconductor photocatalyst) by tethering (depositing) a metal (e.g., metal ions of a late transition metal, such as nickel) to the semiconductor (photocatalyst) surface through the use of an organic ligand. More specifically, 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) functions as an excellent molecular linker (organic ligand) to attach a transition metal complex (e.g., nickel (Ni.sup.2+ ions)) to the semiconductor surface, which can be in the form of a cadmium sulfide surface. The photocatalyst has particular utility in generating hydrogen from H.sub.2S.

  8. Separation of gaseous hydrogen from a water-hydrogen mixture in a fuel cell power system operating in a weightless environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, William E. (Inventor); Suljak, George T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A fuel cell power system for use in a weightless environment, such as in space, includes a device for removing water from a water-hydrogen mixture condensed from the exhaust from the fuel cell power section of the system. Water is removed from the mixture in a centrifugal separator, and is fed into a holding, pressure operated water discharge valve via a Pitot tube. Entrained nondissolved hydrogen is removed from the Pitot tube by a bleed orifice in the Pitot tube before the water reaches the water discharge valve. Water discharged from the valve thus has a substantially reduced hydrogen content.

  9. Hydrogen Fuel System Design Trades for High-Altitude Long-Endurance Remotely- Operated Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, Marc G.; Tornabene, Robert T.; Jurns, John M.; Guynn, Mark D.; Tomsik, Thomas M.; VanOverbeke, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary design trades are presented for liquid hydrogen fuel systems for remotely-operated, high-altitude aircraft that accommodate three different propulsion options: internal combustion engines, and electric motors powered by either polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells or solid oxide fuel cells. Mission goal is sustained cruise at 60,000 ft altitude, with duration-aloft a key parameter. The subject aircraft specifies an engine power of 143 to 148 hp, gross liftoff weight of 9270 to 9450 lb, payload of 440 lb, and a hydrogen fuel capacity of 2650 to 2755 lb stored in two spherical tanks (8.5 ft inside diameter), each with a dry mass goal of 316 lb. Hydrogen schematics for all three propulsion options are provided. Each employs vacuum-jacketed tanks with multilayer insulation, augmented with a helium pressurant system, and using electric motor driven hydrogen pumps. The most significant schematic differences involve the heat exchangers and hydrogen reclamation equipment. Heat balances indicate that mission durations of 10 to 16 days appear achievable. The dry mass for the hydrogen system is estimated to be 1900 lb, including 645 lb for each tank. This tank mass is roughly twice that of the advanced tanks assumed in the initial conceptual vehicle. Control strategies are not addressed, nor are procedures for filling and draining the tanks.

  10. Beyond Waste Reduction: Creating Value with Information Systems in Closed-Loop Supply Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Koppius, Otto; Ozdemir, Oznur; Laan, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe study the role of information systems in enabling closed-loop supply chains. Past research in green IS and closed-loop supply chains has shown that it can result in substantial cost savings and waste reduction. We complement this research by showing that the effects are more than that: using information systems can also create business value for a firm in closed-loop supply chains. We make a novel distinction between four types of value: sourcing value, environmental value, cus...

  11. Closed-loop artificial pancreas systems: physiological input to enhance next-generation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Yogish C; Carter, Rickey E; Cobelli, Claudio; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda

    2014-01-01

    To provide an understanding of both the preclinical and clinical aspects of closed-loop artificial pancreas systems, we provide a discussion of this topic as part of this two-part Bench to Clinic narrative. Here, the Bench narrative provides an in-depth understanding of insulin-glucose-glucagon physiology in conditions that mimic the free-living situation to the extent possible in type 1 diabetes that will help refine and improve future closed-loop system algorithms. In the Clinic narrative, Doyle and colleagues compare and evaluate technology used in current closed-loop studies to gain further momentum toward outpatient trials and eventual approval for widespread use.

  12. Estimating changes in urban ozone concentrations due to life cycle emissions from hydrogen transportation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.; Chang, Daniel P. Y.

    Hydrogen has been proposed as a low polluting alternative transportation fuel that could help improve urban air quality. This paper examines the potential impact of introducing a hydrogen-based transportation system on urban ambient ozone concentrations. This paper considers two scenarios, where significant numbers of new hydrogen vehicles are added to a constant number of gasoline vehicles. In our scenarios hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) are introduced in Sacramento, California at market penetrations of 9% and 20%. From a life cycle analysis (LCA) perspective, considering all the emissions involved in producing, transporting, and using hydrogen, this research compares three hypothetical natural gas to hydrogen pathways: (1) on-site hydrogen production; (2) central hydrogen production with pipeline delivery; and (3) central hydrogen production with liquid hydrogen truck delivery. Using a regression model, this research shows that the daily maximum temperature correlates well with atmospheric ozone formation. However, increases in initial VOC and NO x concentrations do not necessarily increase the peak ozone concentration, and may even cause it to decrease. It is found that ozone formation is generally limited by NO x in the summer and is mostly limited by VOC in the fall in Sacramento. Of the three hydrogen pathways, the truck delivery pathway contributes the most to ozone precursor emissions. Ozone precursor emissions from the truck pathway at 9% market penetration can cause additional 3-h average VOC (or NO x) concentrations up to approximately 0.05% (or 1%) of current pollution levels, and at 20% market penetration up to approximately 0.1% (or 2%) of current pollution levels. However, all of the hydrogen pathways would result in very small (either negative or positive) changes in ozone air quality. In some cases they will result in worse ozone air quality (mostly in July, August, and September), and in some cases they will result in better ozone air quality

  13. Control analysis of renewable energy system with hydrogen storage for residential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, A.; Agbossou, K.

    The combination of an electrolyzer and a fuel cell can provide peak power control in a decentralized/distributed power system. The electrolyzer produces hydrogen and oxygen from off-peak electricity generated by the renewable energy sources (wind turbine and photovoltaic array), for later use in the fuel cell to produce on-peak electricity. An issue related to this system is the control of the hydrogen loop (electrolyzer, tank, fuel cell). A number of control algorithms were developed to decide when to produce hydrogen and when to convert it back to electricity, most of them assuming that the electrolyzer and the fuel cell run alternatively to provide nominal power (full power). This paper presents a complete model of a stand-alone renewable energy system with hydrogen storage controlled by a dynamic fuzzy logic controller (FLC). In this system, batteries are used as energy buffers and for short time storage. To study the behavior of such a system, a complete model is developed by integrating the individual sub-models of the fuel cell, the electrolyzer, the power conditioning units, the hydrogen storage system, and the batteries. An analysis of the performances of the dynamic fuzzy logic controller is then presented. This model is useful for building efficient peak power control.

  14. Reference concepts for a space-based hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator, burst power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edenburn, M.W.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes reference concepts for a hydrogen-oxygen combustion, turboalternator power system that supplies power during battle engagement to a space-based, ballistic missile defense platform. All of the concepts are open''; that is, they exhaust hydrogen or a mixture of hydrogen and water vapor into space. We considered the situation where hydrogen is presumed to be free to the power system because it is also needed to cool the platform's weapon and the situation where hydrogen is not free and its mass must be added to that of the power system. We also considered the situation where water vapor is an acceptable exhaust and the situation where it is not. The combination of these two sets of situations required four different power generation systems, and this report describes each, suggests parameter values, and estimates masses for each of the four. These reference concepts are expected to serve as a baseline'' to which other types of power systems can be compared, and they are expected to help guide technology development efforts in that they suggest parameter value ranges that will lead to optimum system designs. 7 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Continuous quantum mechanics of single particles in closed and quasi-closed systems: Pt. 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brieger, M. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Physik

    2004-07-01

    The established statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics never envisioned our today's ability to handle and investigate single particles in trap devices. After scrutinizing the development of quantum mechanics, we point out that Schroedinger's equation establishes an energy representation, which obtains the energy eigenvalues as extrema of the energy curve or on the energy hypersurface, respectively. We also strongly emphasize its never exhausted capability of accounting in classical terms and full detail for the dynamics of single particles in closed systems. This is demonstrated for several familiar examples. They show that the eigensolutions to Schroedinger's equation must not blindly be identified with physically stationary states. The gained insight into the true dynamics allows to describe, without involving QED, the time evolution of a complete spontaneous transition as being driven by unbalanced internal dynamics. This mechanism relies on the fact that perfect balances are only possible in the exact extrema of the total energy and that any deviation, which is characterized by nonstationary states, makes multipole moments oscillate and emit electromagnetic radiation. (orig.)

  16. 77 FR 1666 - Information Systems, Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems, Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on January 25 and... technical questions that affect the level of export controls applicable to information systems equipment and...

  17. 77 FR 37652 - Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on July 25, 2012, 9... controls applicable to information systems equipment and technology. Wednesday, July 25 Open Session 1...

  18. 78 FR 1198 - Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-08

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on January 23 and... on technical questions that affect the level of export controls applicable to information systems...

  19. 78 FR 24160 - Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on May 7 and 8... information systems equipment and technology. Tuesday, May 7 Open Session 1. Welcome and Introductions. 2...

  20. 78 FR 42753 - Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on July 31 and... applicable to information systems equipment and technology. Wednesday, July 31 Open Session: 1. Welcome and...

  1. 76 FR 64895 - Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on November 2 and 3... information systems equipment and technology. Wednesday, November 2 Public Session 1. Welcome and...

  2. 76 FR 39845 - Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on July 27 and 28... information systems equipment and technology. Wednesday, July 27 Public Session 1. Welcome and Introductions...

  3. 75 FR 1339 - Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on January 27 and... applicable to information systems equipment and technology. Wednesday, January 27 Open Session 1. Welcome and...

  4. 78 FR 63162 - Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on November 6 and 7... information systems equipment and technology. Wednesday, November 6 Open Session 1. Welcome and Introductions...

  5. 76 FR 323 - Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on January 26 and... applicable to information systems equipment and technology. Wednesday, January 26 Open Session 1. Welcome and...

  6. 75 FR 39919 - Information Systems, Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems, Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on July 28 and 29... information systems equipment and technology. Wednesday, July 28 Public Session 1. Welcome and Introductions...

  7. 75 FR 64258 - Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on November 3 and 4... information systems equipment and technology. Wednesday, November 3 Public Session 1. Welcome and...

  8. 77 FR 24178 - Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Information Systems Technical Advisory Committee (ISTAC) will meet on May 8 and 9... information systems equipment and technology. Tuesday, May 8 Open Session 1. Welcome and Introductions 2...

  9. The water cycle in closed ecological systems: Perspectives from the Biosphere 2 and Laboratory Biosphere systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Dempster, W. F.; Allen, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    To achieve sustainable, healthy closed ecological systems requires solutions to challenges of closing the water cycle - recycling wastewater/irrigation water/soil medium leachate and evaporated water and supplying water of required quality as needed for different needs within the facility. Engineering Biosphere 2, the first multi-biome closed ecological system within a total airtight footprint of 12,700 m 2 with a combined volume of 200,000 m 3 with a total water capacity of some 6 × 10 6 L of water was especially challenging because it included human inhabitants, their agricultural and technical systems, as well as five analogue ecosystems ranging from rainforest to desert, freshwater ecologies to saltwater systems like mangrove and mini-ocean coral reef ecosystems. By contrast, the Laboratory Biosphere - a small (40 m 3 volume) soil-based plant growth facility with a footprint of 15 m 2 - is a very simplified system, but with similar challenges re salinity management and provision of water quality suitable for plant growth. In Biosphere 2, water needs included supplying potable water for people and domestic animals, irrigation water for a wide variety of food crops, and recycling and recovering soil nutrients from wastewater. In the wilderness biomes, providing adequately low salinity freshwater terrestrial ecosystems and maintaining appropriate salinity and pH in aquatic/marine ecosystems were challenges. The largest reservoirs in Biosphere 2 were the ocean/marsh with some 4 × 10 6 L, soil with 1 to 2 × 10 6 l, primary storage tank with 0 to 8 × 10 5 L and storage tanks for condensate and soil leachate collection and mixing tanks with a capacity of 1.6 × 10 5 L to supply irrigation for farm and wilderness ecosystems. Other reservoirs were far smaller - humidity in the atmosphere (2 × 10 3 L), streams in the rainforest and savannah, and seasonal pools in the desert were orders of magnitude smaller (8 × 10 4 L). Key technologies included condensation from

  10. Gas-Phase Reaction Pathways and Rate Coefficients for the Dichlorosilane-Hydrogen and Trichlorosilane-Hydrogen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Walch, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    As part of NASA Ames Research Center's Integrated Process Team on Device/Process Modeling and Nanotechnology our goal is to create/contribute to a gas-phase chemical database for use in modeling microelectronics devices. In particular, we use ab initio methods to determine chemical reaction pathways and to evaluate reaction rate coefficients. Our initial studies concern reactions involved in the dichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H2--H2) and trichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H-H2) systems. Reactant, saddle point (transition state), and product geometries and their vibrational harmonic frequencies are determined using the complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure method with the correlation consistent polarized valence double-zeta basis set (cc-pVDZ). Reaction pathways are constructed by following the imaginary frequency mode of the saddle point to both the reactant and product. Accurate energetics are determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations (CCSD(T)) extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Using the data from the electronic structure calculations, reaction rate coefficients are obtained using conventional and variational transition state and RRKM theories.

  11. Materials for hydrogen storage and the Na-Mg-B-H system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphiny Pottmaier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review on materials for hydrogen storage in the solid state gives a brief discussion underlying reasons and driving forces of this specific field of research and development (the why question. This scenario is followed by an outline of the main materials investigated as options for hydrogen storage (the what exactly. Then, it moves into breakthroughs in the specific case of solid state storage of hydrogen, regarding both materials (where to store it and properties (how it works. Finally, one of early model systems, namely NaBH4/MgH2 (the case study, is discussed more comprehensively to better elucidate some of the issues and drawbacks of its use in solid state hydrogen storage.

  12. Performance analysis for queueing systems with close down periods and server under maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Kumar, B.; Anbarasu, S.; Lakshmi, S. R. Anantha

    2015-01-01

    A single server queue subject to maintenance of the server and the close down period is considered. We obtain explicit expressions for the transient probabilities of the system size, the server under maintenance state and the close down period. The time-dependent performance measures of the system and the probability density function of the first-passage-time to reach the maintenance state are discussed. The corresponding steady state analysis and key performance measures of the system are also presented. Finally, the effect of various parameters on system performance measures is demonstrated by a numerical example.

  13. Optimizing investments in coupled offshore wind -electrolytic hydrogen storage systems in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Peng; Enevoldsen, Peter; Eichman, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    , electrolyzers, and hydrogen fuel cells is explored. This research reveals the investment potential of coupling offshore wind farms with different hydrogen systems. The benefits in terms of a return on investment are demonstrated with data from the Danish electricity markets. This research also investigates......In response to electricity markets with growing levels of wind energy production and varying electricity prices, this research examines incentives for investments in integrated renewable energy power systems. A strategy for using optimization methods for a power system consisting of wind turbines...

  14. Polyvinylpyrrolidone surface modification with SiOx containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/SiOx) and nitrogen-doped a-C:H/SiOx films using Hall-type closed drift ion beam source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazauskas, A.; Grigaliunas, V.; Guobiene, A.; Puiso, J.; Prosycevas, I.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    In this study SiOx containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/SiOx) and nitrogen-doped a-C:H/SiOx (a-C:H:N/SiOx) films were deposited on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) templates of variable thickness using a Hall-type closed drift ion beam source with constant irradiation parameters. A detailed

  15. An Experimental Study of Laboratory Hybrid Power System with the Hydrogen Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Minarik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents very small laboratory hybrid photovoltaic-hydrogen power system. The system was primarily assembled to verify the operability of the control algorithms and practical deployment of available commercial hydrogen technologies that are directly usable for storage of electricity produced from renewable energy sources in a small island system. This energetic system was installed and tested in Laboratory of fuel cells that is located in the university campus of VSB-Technical University of Ostrava. The energetic system consists of several basic components: a photovoltaic field, accumulators bank, water commercial electrolyzer and compact fuel cell system. The weather conditions recorded in two different weeks as model weather and solar conditions are used as case studies to test the energetic system and the results for two different cases are compared each other. The results show and illustrate selected behaviour curves of the power system and also average energy storage efficiency for accumulation subsystem based on hydrogen technologies or at the energetic system embedded components. On the basis of real measurement and its evaluation the ideal parameters of the photovoltaic field were calculated as well as the hydrogen technologies for supposed purpose and the power requirements.

  16. Two Closely Related Organic Charge-Transfer Complexes Based on Tetrathiafulvalene and 9H-fluorenone Derivatives. Competition between Hydrogen Bonding and Stacking Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Salmerón-Valverde

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Two 1:1 charge-transfer organic complexes were formed using tetrathiafulvalene as a donor and a 9H-fluorenone derivative as acceptor: 4,5,7-trinitro-9H-fluoren-9-one-2-carboxylic acid (complex 1 or 4,5,7-trinitro-9H-fluoren-9-one-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester (complex 2. Both systems crystallize with alternated donor and acceptor stacks. However, the crystal structure of 1 is influenced by classical hydrogen bonds involving carboxylic acid groups, which force to arrange acceptors as centrosymmetric dimers in the crystal, via R2 2(8 ring motifs, while such a restriction is no longer present in the case of 2, affording thus a different crystal structure. This main difference is reflected in stacking interactions, and, in turn, in the degree of charge transfer observed in the complexes. The degree of charge transfer, estimated using Raman spectroscopy, is δ1 = 0.07 for 1 and δ2 = 0.14 for 2. It thus seems that, at least for the studied complexes, hydrogen bonding is an unfavorable factor for charge transfer.

  17. Biomimetic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  18. Hydrogen release properties of lithium alanate for application to fuel cell propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, P.; Migliardini, F.; Veneri, O.

    In this paper the results of an experimental study on LiAlH 4 (lithium alanate) as hydrogen source for fuel cell propulsion systems are reported. The compound examined in this work was selected as reference material for light metal hydrides, because of its high hydrogen content (10.5 wt.%) and interesting desorption kinetic properties at moderate temperatures. Thermal dynamic and kinetic of hydrogen release from this hydride were investigated using a fixed bed reactor to evaluate the effect of heating procedure, carrier gas flow rate and sample form. The aim of this study was to characterize the lithium alanate decomposition through the reaction steps leading to the formation of Li 3AlH 6 and LiH. A hydrogen tank was designed and realized to contain pellets of lithium alanate as feeding for a fuel cell propulsion system based on a 2-kW Polymeric Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) stack. The fuel cell system was integrated into the power train comprising DC-DC converter, energy storage systems and electric drive for moped applications (3 kW). The experiments on the power train were conducted on a test bench able to simulate the vehicle behaviour and road characteristics on specific driving cycles. In particular the efficiencies of individual components and overall power train were analyzed evidencing the energy requirements of the hydrogen storage material.

  19. Closed and Open Loop Subspace System Identification of the Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Di Ruscio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Some methods for consistent closed loop subspace system identification presented in the literature are analyzed and compared to a recently published subspace algorithm for both open as well as for closed loop data, the DSR_e algorithm. Some new variants of this algorithm are presented and discussed. Simulation experiments are included in order to illustrate if the algorithms are variance efficient or not.

  20. Cost-effectiveness study of closed system transfer devices for the preparation of antineoplastic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Calzado-Gómez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Most cytostatic drugs cannot be administered directly to patients in their marketed presentation, but require previous reconstitution conducted in the Pharmacy Unit areas for cytostatic preparation. There are systems that allow drug reconstitution and transfer once it has been diluted, in order to protect staff from any potential contamination during handling. These are commonly known as Closed Systems, and generally have a piece for vial attachment and a syringe adapter with a built-in filter, that replace the traditional needles. Closed systems feature different characteristics and costs which is necessary to analyze in order to determine the most efficient one

  1. Continuous hydrogen and methane production in a two-stage cheese whey fermentation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota-Navarro, C B; Carrillo-Reyes, J; Davila-Vazquez, G; Alatriste-Mondragón, F; Razo-Flores, E

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of integrating biological hydrogen and methane production in a two-stage process using mixed cultures and cheese whey powder (CWP) as substrate was studied. The effect of operational parameters such as hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR) on the volumetric hydrogen (VHPR) and methane (VMPR) production rates was assessed. The highest VHPR was 28 L H2/L/d, obtained during stable operation in a CSTR at HRT and OLR of 6 h and 142 g lactose/ L/d, respectively. Moreover, hydrogen (13 L/L/d) was produced even at HRT as low as 3.5 h and OLR of 163 g lactose/L/d, nonetheless, the reactor operation was not stable. Regarding methane production in an UASB reactor, the acidified effluent from the hydrogen-producing bioreactor was efficiently treated obtaining COD removals above 90% at OLR and HRT of 20 g COD/L/d and 6 h, respectively. The two-stage process for continuous production of hydrogen and methane recovered over 70% of the energy present in the substrate. This study demonstrated that hydrogen production can be efficiently coupled to methane production in a two-stage system and that CWP is an adequate substrate for energy production.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of valveless pumping in a closed microfluidic tube-system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.S.; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Lemarchard, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study the flow which is generated by a valveless pumping mechanism in a closed tube-system consistent of two tubes with different radii. This remarkable system has been investigated by Ottesen [J. T. Ottesen, J. Math. Biol. 46(2003) 309-332] on a macroscopic level and we find...

  3. Closing the Digital Divide: Education Telecommunications Systems and Possibilities in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad, Sue

    2007-01-01

    The research reported in this paper considers the current telecommunications network for the three education systems of state, independent and catholic schools in Western Australia as well as drawing on the personal experiences of teachers in these systems as the government attempts to close the digital divide with its Networking the Nation…

  4. Feasibility of a bihormonal closed-loop system to control postexercise and postprandial glucose excursions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bon, Arianne C.; Jonker, Lisanne D.; Koebrugge, Rob; Koops, Robin; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of a bihormonal (glucagon and insulin) closed-loop (CL) system by challenging the system with two meals and 30 min exercise. Ten patients with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion underwent a standardized

  5. Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostival, A.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.

    2013-11-01

    Pressure relief devices (PRDs) are viewed as essential safety measures for high-pressure gas storage and distribution systems. These devices are used to prevent the over-pressurization of gas storage vessels and distribution equipment, except in the application of certain toxic gases. PRDs play a critical role in the implementation of most high-pressure gas storage systems and anyone working with these devices should understand their function so they can be designed, installed, and maintained properly to prevent any potentially dangerous or fatal incidents. As such, the intention of this report is to introduce the reader to the function of the common types of PRDs currently used in industry. Since high-pressure hydrogen gas storage systems are being developed to support the growing hydrogen energy infrastructure, several recent failure incidents, specifically involving hydrogen, will be examined to demonstrate the results and possible mechanisms of a device failure. The applicable codes and standards, developed to minimize the risk of failure for PRDs, will also be reviewed. Finally, because PRDs are a critical component for the development of a successful hydrogen energy infrastructure, important considerations for pressure relief devices applied in a hydrogen gas environment will be explored.

  6. GEOMETRY, HEAT REMOVAL AND KINETICS SCOPING MODELS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, B

    2007-11-16

    It is recognized that detailed models of proposed hydrogen storage systems are essential to gain insight into the complex processes occurring during the charging and discharging processes. Such insight is an invaluable asset for both assessing the viability of a particular system and/or for improving its design. The detailed models, however, require time to develop and run. Clearly, it is much more efficient to begin a modeling effort with a good system design and to progress from that point. To facilitate this approach, it is useful to have simplified models that can quickly estimate optimal loading and discharge kinetics, effective hydrogen capacities, system dimensions and heat removal requirements. Parameters obtained from these models can then be input to the detailed models to obtain an accurate assessment of system performance that includes more complete integration of the physical processes. This report describes three scoping models that assess preliminary system design prior to invoking a more detailed finite element analysis. The three models address the kinetics, the scaling and heat removal parameters of the system, respectively. The kinetics model is used to evaluate the effect of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the loading and discharge kinetics. As part of the kinetics calculations, the model also determines the mass of stored hydrogen per mass of hydride (in a particular reference form). As such, the model can determine the optimal loading and discharge rates for a particular hydride and the maximum achievable loading (over an infinite period of time). The kinetics model developed with the Mathcad{reg_sign} solver, runs in a mater of seconds and can quickly be used to identify the optimal temperature and pressure for either the loading or discharge processes. The geometry scoping model is used to calculate the size of the system, the optimal placement of heat transfer elements, and the gravimetric and volumetric capacities for a particular

  7. TRADITIONAL CANISTER-BASED OPEN WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM VERSUS CLOSED SYSTEM: HAZARDOUS EXPOSURE PREVENTION AND OPERATING THEATRE STAFF SATISFACTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, M; Patel, N; MacLellan, D M; Millard, N

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to blood and body fluids is a major concern to health care professionals working in operating rooms (ORs). Thus, it is essential that hospitals use fluid waste management systems that minimise risk to staff, while maximising efficiency. The current study compared the utility of a 'closed' system with a traditional canister-based 'open' system in the OR in a private hospital setting. A total of 30 arthroscopy, urology, and orthopaedic cases were observed. The closed system was used in five, four, and six cases, respectively and the open system was used in nine, two, and four cases, respectively. The average number of opportunities for staff to be exposed to hazardous fluids were fewer for the closed system when compared to the open during arthroscopy and urology procedures. The open system required nearly 3.5 times as much staff time for set-up, maintenance during procedures, and post-procedure disposal of waste. Theatre staff expressed greater satisfaction with the closed system than with the open. In conclusion, compared with the open system, the closed system offers a less hazardous and more efficient method of disposing of fluid waste generated in the OR.

  8. A Theoretical Study of two Novel Concept Systems for Maximum Thermal-Chemical Conversion of Biomass to Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob N. Chung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two concept systems that are based on the thermochemical process of high-temperature steam gasification of lignocellulosic biomass and municipal solid waste are introduced. The primary objectives of the concept systems are 1 to develop the best scientific, engineering, and technology solutions for converting lignocellulosic biomass, as well as agricultural, forest and municipal waste to clean energy (pure hydrogen fuel, and 2 to minimize water consumption and detrimental impacts of energy production on the environment (air pollution and global warming. The production of superheated steam is by hydrogen combustion using recycled hydrogen produced in the first concept system while in the second concept system concentrated solar energy is used for the steam production. A membrane reactor that performs the hydrogen separation and water gas shift reaction is involved in both systems for producing more pure hydrogen and CO2 sequestration. Based on obtaining the maximum hydrogen production rate the hydrogen recycled ratio is around 20% for the hydrogen combustion steam heating system. Combined with pure hydrogen production, both high temperature steam gasification systems potentially possess more than 80% in first law overall system thermodynamic efficiencies.

  9. A digital wireless system for closed-loop inhibition of nociceptive signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Yang, Xiaofei; Wang, Yang; Hagains, Christopher E.; Li, Ai-Ling; Peng, Yuan B.; Chiao, J.-C.

    2012-10-01

    Neurostimulation of the spinal cord or brain has been used to inhibit nociceptive signals in pain management applications. Nevertheless, most of the current neurostimulation models are based on open-loop system designs. There is a lack of closed-loop systems for neurostimulation in research with small freely-moving animals and in future clinical applications. Based on our previously developed analog wireless system for closed-loop neurostimulation, a digital wireless system with real-time feedback between recorder and stimulator modules has been developed to achieve multi-channel communication. The wireless system includes a wearable recording module, a wearable stimulation module and a transceiver connected to a computer for real-time and off-line data processing, display and storage. To validate our system, wide dynamic range neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn have been recorded from anesthetized rats in response to graded mechanical stimuli (brush, pressure and pinch) applied in the hind paw. The identified nociceptive signals were used to automatically trigger electrical stimulation at the periaqueductal gray in real time to inhibit their own activities by the closed-loop design. Our digital wireless closed-loop system has provided a simplified and efficient method for further study of pain processing in freely-moving animals and potential clinical application in patients. Groups 1, 2 and 3 contributed equally to this project.

  10. Prospects for using a full-scale installation for wet combustion of organic wastes in closed life support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Sergey V; Kudenko, Yurii A; Tikhomirov, Alexander A

    2015-11-01

    The issue of recycling organic wastes in closed life support systems (CLSS) includes both fundamental aspects of environmental safety of the recycled products and their effective involvement in material cycles and technical aspects related to the structure of the system and the crew's demands. This study estimates the effectiveness of wet combustion of different amounts of organic wastes in hydrogen peroxide under application of an alternating current electric field. The study also addresses the possibility of controlling the process automatically. The results show that processing of greater amounts of wastes reduces specific power consumption and shortens the duration of the process, without significantly affecting the level of oxidation of the products. An automatic control system for a semi-commercial installation has been constructed and tested experimentally. The solution of mineralized human wastes prepared in the automatically controlled process in this installation was successfully used to grow radish plants, with the main production parameters being similar to those of the control. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Economic Efficiency Assessment of Autonomous Wind/Diesel/Hydrogen Systems in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Marchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The economic efficiency of harnessing wind energy in the autonomous power systems of Russia is analyzed. Wind turbines are shown to be competitive for many considered variants (groups of consumers, placement areas, and climatic and meteorological conditions. The authors study the possibility of storing energy in the form of hydrogen in the autonomous wind/diesel/hydrogen power systems that include wind turbines, diesel generator, electrolyzer, hydrogen tank, and fuel cells. The paper presents the zones of economic efficiency of the system (set of parameters that provide its competitiveness depending on load, fuel price, and long-term average annual wind speed. At low wind speed and low price of fuel, it is reasonable to use only diesel generator to supply power to consumers. When the fuel price and wind speed increase, first it becomes more economical to use a wind-diesel system and then wind turbines with a hydrogen system. In the latter case, according to the optimization results, diesel generator is excluded from the system.

  12. Conceptual design of an extraction system for cryogenic hydrogen isotopes distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamfirache, M.; Stefanescu, I.; Bornea, A.; Balteanu, O.; Bidica, N.

    2007-07-01

    One of the main problems of the hydrogen isotopes separation by cryogenic distillation is represented by the extraction of the heavy fraction from a distillation column. This can be achieved by an optimal design of the cycle scheme. The main problem consist of the possibility to make an extraction from a distillation column when the mixture that feed the column is made from one prevalent isotope as hydrogen and small amounts of other two isotopes (deuterium and/or tritium). Another problem that affects the design of the extraction system is the relation between the hold-up of the cryogenic distillation column and the extraction flow rate. The present study is focused on the realization of the conceptual design for the extraction system from a cryogenic distillation column used in the hydrogen isotopes separation process. In the hydrogen distillation process by cryogenic distillation, the heavy fraction (DT,T{sub 2}) is separated and increase in the bottom of the distillation column. The extraction will be made in gas phase in the bottom of the column. The extraction system from a cryogenic column is used for the temporary extraction inside a vessel filled with adsorption material, and also the system has the possibility to provide samples to a gas chromatographer. The paper presents the conceptual design of the extraction system, and also the connection to all the process systems as automatization, gas analysis devices and storage. (orig.)

  13. Study of degenerate parabolic system modeling the hydrogen displacement in a nuclear waste repository

    KAUST Repository

    Caro, Florian

    2013-09-01

    Our goal is the mathematical analysis of a two phase (liquid and gas) two components (water and hydrogen) system modeling the hydrogen displacement in a storage site for radioactive waste. We suppose that the water is only in the liquid phase and is incompressible. The hydrogen in the gas phase is supposed compressible and could be dissolved into the water with the Henry law. The flow is described by the conservation of the mass of each components. The model is treated without simplified assumptions on the gas density. This model is degenerated due to vanishing terms. We establish an existence result for the nonlinear degenerate parabolic system based on new energy estimate on pressures.

  14. Calibrating the Helium Pressurization System for the Space Shuttle Liquid-Hydrogen Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of the results from the STS-114 tanking tests and subsequent launch called into question existing thermal and mass models of helium pressurization of the liquid hydrogen tank. This hydrogen tank, which makes up the bottom two-thirds of the External Tank, is pressurized prior to launch to avoid cavitation in the Shuttle Main Engine pumps. At about 2 minutes prior to launch, the main vent valve is closed, and pressurized helium flows into the tank ullage space to achieve set point pressure. As the helium gas cools, its pressure drops, calling for additional helium. Subsequent helium flows are provided in short, timed pulses. The number of pulses is taken as a rough leak indicator. An analysis of thermal models by Marshall Space Flight Center showed considerable uncertainty in the pressure-versus-time behavior of the helium ullage space and the ability to predict the number of pulses normally expected. Kennedy Space Center proposed to calibrate the dime-sized orifice, which together with valves, controls the helium flow quantity (Figure 1). Pressure and temperature sensors were installed to provide upstream and downstream measurements necessary to compute flow rate based on the orifice discharge coefficient. An assessment of flow testing with helium indicated an extremely costly use of this critical resource. In order to reduce costs, we proposed removing the orifices from each Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) and asking Colorado Engineering Experiment Station Inc. (CEESI) to calibrate the flow. CEESI has a high-pressure air flow system with traceable flow meters capable of handling the large flow rates. However, literature research indicated that square-edged orifices of small diameters often exhibit significant hysteresis and nonrepeatability in the vicinity of choked or sonic flow. Fortunately, the MLP orifices behaved relatively well in testing (Figure 2). Using curve fitting of the air-flow data, in conjunction with ASME orifice modeling equations, a

  15. Effect of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of lactoperoxidase system (LP-system) in temporary preservation of raw milk has been found useful particularly in places where refrigeration is not feasible. The activity of this system, however, varies from species to species and there are no reports on its effect in camel milk. This study was conducted to investigate ...

  16. Sputtered Pd as Hydrogen Storage for a Chip-Integrated Microenergy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Slavcheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The work presents a research on preparation and physical and electrochemical characterisation of dc magnetron sputtered Pd films envisaged for application as hydrogen storage in a chip-integrated hydrogen microenergy system. The influence of the changes in the sputtering pressure on the surface structure, morphology, and roughness was analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and atomic force microscopy (AMF. The electrochemical activity towards hydrogen adsorption/desorption and formation of PdH were investigated in 0.5 M H2SO4 using the methods of cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic polarisation. The changes in the electrical properties of the films as a function of the sputtering pressure and the level of hydrogenation were evaluated before and immediately after the electrochemical charging tests, using a four-probe technique. The research resulted in establishment of optimal sputter regime, ensuring fully reproducible Pd layers with highly developed surface, moderate porosity, and mechanical stability. Selected samples were integrated as hydrogen storage in a newly developed unitized microenergy system and tested in charging (water electrolysis and discharging (fuel cell operative mode at ambient conditions demonstrating a stable recycling performance.

  17. Sputtered Pd as hydrogen storage for a chip-integrated microenergy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavcheva, E; Ganske, G; Schnakenberg, U

    2014-01-01

    The work presents a research on preparation and physical and electrochemical characterisation of dc magnetron sputtered Pd films envisaged for application as hydrogen storage in a chip-integrated hydrogen microenergy system. The influence of the changes in the sputtering pressure on the surface structure, morphology, and roughness was analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AMF). The electrochemical activity towards hydrogen adsorption/desorption and formation of PdH were investigated in 0.5 M H2SO4 using the methods of cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic polarisation. The changes in the electrical properties of the films as a function of the sputtering pressure and the level of hydrogenation were evaluated before and immediately after the electrochemical charging tests, using a four-probe technique. The research resulted in establishment of optimal sputter regime, ensuring fully reproducible Pd layers with highly developed surface, moderate porosity, and mechanical stability. Selected samples were integrated as hydrogen storage in a newly developed unitized microenergy system and tested in charging (water electrolysis) and discharging (fuel cell) operative mode at ambient conditions demonstrating a stable recycling performance.

  18. A review of control strategies in closed-loop neuroprosthetic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Wright

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been widely recognized that closed-loop neuroprosthetic systems achieve more favorable outcomes for users then equivalent open-loop devices. Improved performance of tasks, better usability and greater embodiment have all been reported in systems utilizing some form of feedback. However the interdisciplinary work on neuroprosthetic systems can lead to miscommunication due to similarities in well established nomenclature in different fields. Here we present a review of control strategies in existing experimental, investigational and clinical neuroprosthetic systems in order to establish a baseline and promote a common understanding of different feedback modes and closed-loop controllers. The first section provides a brief discussion of feedback control and control theory. The second section reviews the control strategies of recent Brain Machine Interfaces, neuromodulatory implants, neuroprosthetic systems and assistive neurorobotic devices. The final section examines the different approaches to feedback in current neuroprosthetic and neurorobotic systems.

  19. A Review of Control Strategies in Closed-Loop Neuroprosthetic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James; Macefield, Vaughan G; van Schaik, André; Tapson, Jonathan C

    2016-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that closed-loop neuroprosthetic systems achieve more favorable outcomes for users then equivalent open-loop devices. Improved performance of tasks, better usability, and greater embodiment have all been reported in systems utilizing some form of feedback. However, the interdisciplinary work on neuroprosthetic systems can lead to miscommunication due to similarities in well-established nomenclature in different fields. Here we present a review of control strategies in existing experimental, investigational and clinical neuroprosthetic systems in order to establish a baseline and promote a common understanding of different feedback modes and closed-loop controllers. The first section provides a brief discussion of feedback control and control theory. The second section reviews the control strategies of recent Brain Machine Interfaces, neuromodulatory implants, neuroprosthetic systems, and assistive neurorobotic devices. The final section examines the different approaches to feedback in current neuroprosthetic and neurorobotic systems.

  20. The Assessment of Hydrogen Energy Systems for Fuel Cell Vehicles Using Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Jing-Zheng; Tan, Shi-yu; Dong, Li-chun

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen energy which has been recognized as an alternative instead of fossil fuel has been developed rapidly in fuel cell vehicles. Different hydrogen energy systems have different performances on environmental, economic, and energy aspects. A methodology for the quantitative evaluation and analysis of the hydrogen systems is meaningful for decision makers to select the best scenario. principal component analysis (PCA) has been used to evaluate the integrated performance of different hydroge...

  1. Heuristic algorithms and a spatial decision support system for locating hydrogen-refueling stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seow

    The vision of using hydrogen energy to replace fossil fuels as the primary energy carrier for our transportation infrastructure has been gaining recognition in recent years. The obstacles facing the hydrogen economy vision are technological feasibilities and the cost of infrastructure buildup. Technological feasibilities include the production, storage, distribution, and refueling of hydrogen energy in a safe and economical manner. The cost of infrastructure development includes the building of production plants, storage facilities, distribution network, and refueling stations of hydrogen energy. The purpose of the research is to develop heuristic algorithms and a spatial decision support system (SDSS) to facilitate efficient planning of the refueling infrastructure of hydrogen energy. Facility location-allocation models, specifically the Flow Refueling Location Model (FRLM), have been applied to determine the combination of refueling stations to be built in order to maximize the flow covered with a fixed investment cost. A mixed-integer programming version of the model has been formulated and published. While the mixed-integer programming model could be used to obtain an optimal solution for a problem, it is slow and inefficient in solving problems with a large network and large number of candidate facilities. In this research, heuristics algorithms, specifically the greedy adding, greedy adding with substitution, and genetic algorithm, are developed and applied to solve the FRLM problem. These algorithms are shown to be effective and efficient in solving complex FRLM-problems. The SDSS presented in this research integrates geographical information systems (GIS) and heuristic search algorithms to provide a flexible and powerful system for selecting the locations of hydrogen refueling stations in a real-world scenario. GIS is used to gather and process the input for the model, such as the candidate facilities and traffic flows. The SDSS also uses GIS to display and

  2. Closed-Loop Artificial Pancreas Systems: Physiological Input to Enhance Next-Generation Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Kudva, Yogish C.; Carter, Rickey E.; Cobelli, Claudio; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda

    2014-01-01

    To provide an understanding of both the preclinical and clinical aspects of closed-loop artificial pancreas systems, we provide a discussion of this topic as part of this two-part Bench to Clinic narrative. Here, the Bench narrative provides an in-depth understanding of insulin-glucose-glucagon physiology in conditions that mimic the free-living situation to the extent possible in type 1 diabetes that will help refine and improve future closed-loop system algorithms. In the Clinic narrative, ...

  3. Model for energy conversion in renewable energy system with hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kélouwani, S.; Agbossou, K.; Chahine, R.

    A dynamic model for a stand-alone renewable energy system with hydrogen storage (RESHS) is developed. In this system, surplus energy available from a photovoltaic array and a wind turbine generator is stored in the form of hydrogen, produced via an electrolyzer. When the energy production from the wind turbine and the photovoltaic array is not enough to meet the load demand, the stored hydrogen can then be converted by a fuel cell to produce electricity. In this system, batteries are used as energy buffers or for short time storage. To study the behavior of such a system, a complete model is developed by integrating individual sub-models of the fuel cell, the electrolyzer, the power conditioning units, the hydrogen storage system, and the batteries (used as an energy buffer). The sub-models are valid for transient and steady state analysis as a function of voltage, current, and temperature. A comparison between experimental measurements and simulation results is given. The model is useful for building effective algorithms for the management, control and optimization of stand-alone RESHSs.

  4. Quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms on graphene. I. System-bath modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfanti, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bonfanti@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jackson, Bret [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Hughes, Keith H. [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Martinazzo, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.martinazzo@unimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, Consiglio Nazionale delle Richerche, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-09-28

    An accurate system-bath model to investigate the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms chemisorbed on graphene is presented. The system comprises a hydrogen atom and the carbon atom from graphene that forms the covalent bond, and it is described by a previously developed 4D potential energy surface based on density functional theory ab initio data. The bath describes the rest of the carbon lattice and is obtained from an empirical force field through inversion of a classical equilibrium correlation function describing the hydrogen motion. By construction, model building easily accommodates improvements coming from the use of higher level electronic structure theory for the system. Further, it is well suited to a determination of the system-environment coupling by means of ab initio molecular dynamics. This paper details the system-bath modeling and shows its application to the quantum dynamics of vibrational relaxation of a chemisorbed hydrogen atom, which is here investigated at T = 0 K with the help of the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. Paper II deals with the sticking dynamics.

  5. DESIGN, SYNTHESIS AND STUDY OF MULTI-COMPONENT AND INTEGRATED SYSTEMS FOR LIGHT-DRIVEN HYDROGEN GENERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Richard Eisenberg

    2012-07-18

    The research focussed on fundamental problems in the conversion of light to stored chemical energy. Specifically, work was completed on the design, synthesis and study of multi-component super- and supramolecular systems for photoinduced charge separation, one of the key steps in artificial photosynthesis, and on the use of these and related systems for the photochemical generation of H2 from water. At the center of these systems are chromophores comprised of square planar coordinated Pt(II) ions with arylacetylide and either diimine or terpyridyl ligands. Previous work had shown that the chromophores are photoluminescent in fluid solution with long-lived metal-to-ligand charge transfer (3MLCT) excited states that are necessarily directional. An advance which set the stage for a number of proposed studies was the light-driven production of hydrogen from water using a Pt(terpyridyl)(arylacetylide)+ chromophore and a sacrificial electron donor. The reaction is catalytic and appears to rival previously reported ruthenium bipyridyl systems in terms of H2 production. Variation of system components and mechanistic studies were conducted to understand better the individual steps in the overall process and how to improve its efficiency. Success with light driven H2 generation was employed as a key probe as new systems were constructed consisting of triads for photoinduced charge separation placed in close proximity to the H2 generating catalyst - a Pt colloid - through direct linkage or supramolecular interactions with the polymer used to stabilize the colloid. In order to prepare new donor-chromophore-acceptor (D-C-A) triads and associated D-C and C-A dyads, new ligands were synthesized having functional groups for different coupling reactions such as simple amide formation and Pd-catalyzed coupling. In these systems, the donor was attached to the arylacetylide ligands and the acceptor was linked to the diimine or terpyridyl chelate. Research under the contract proved

  6. Fumigation of a laboratory-scale HVAC system with hydrogen peroxide for decontamination following a biological contamination incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K M; Calfee, M W; Wood, J P; Mickelsen, L; Attwood, B; Clayton, M; Touati, A; Delafield, R

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate hydrogen peroxide vapour (H2 O2 ) for its ability to inactivate Bacillus spores within a laboratory-scale heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) duct system. Experiments were conducted in a closed-loop duct system, constructed of either internally lined or unlined galvanized metal. Bacterial spores were aerosol-deposited onto 18-mm-diameter test material coupons and strategically placed at several locations within the duct environment. Various concentrations of H2 O2 and exposure times were evaluated to determine the sporicidal efficacy and minimum exposure needed for decontamination. For the unlined duct, high variability was observed in the recovery of spores between sample locations, likely due to complex, unpredictable flow patterns within the ducts. In comparison, the lined duct exhibited a significant desorption of the H2 O2 following the fumigant dwell period and thus resulted in complete decontamination at all sampling locations. These findings suggest that decontamination of Bacillus spore-contaminated unlined HVAC ducts by hydrogen peroxide fumigation may require more stringent conditions (higher concentrations, longer dwell duration) than internally insulated ductwork. These data may help emergency responders when developing remediation plans during building decontamination. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Shared symmetries of the hydrogen atom and the two-bit system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, A. R. P.; Alber, G.

    2017-12-01

    The hydrogen atom is the simplest system of atomic and molecular physics, while a two-qubit system is the simplest of quantum information. Remarkably, they share common symmetry aspects which are described in this paper, based on a correspondence between the four-dimensional unitary group and the six-dimensional rotational group with its non-compact extensions. Both systems involve 15 basic operators. Reductions to Lorentz and Poincare space–time group symmetries of a free particle are also discussed.

  8. Modification and development of the external tank hydrogen vent umbilical system for the space shuttle vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatem, Bemis C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The design and development of a new T-O lock and secondary release mechanism which is being introduced to the ET Hydrogen Vent Umbilical System for the next launch of the Space Shuttle Vehicle is described. Critical analysis of the system in early 1986 indicated the need for an improvement in the secondary release system. The new T-O lock increases the clearance with the vehicle during secondary disconnect and is described.

  9. Observations on gas exchange and element recycle within a gas-closed algal-mouse system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smernoff, D. T.; Wharton, R. A., Jr.; Averner, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    Life support systems based on bioregeneration rely on the control and manipulation of organisms. Algae are potentially useful for a variety of Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) functions including the revitalization of atmospheres, production of food and for nitrogen fixation. The results of experiments conducted with a gas-closed algal-mouse system designed to investigate gas exchange phenomena under varying algal environmental conditions, and the ability of algae to utilize oxidized mouse solid waste are reported. Inherent instabilities exist between the uptake and release of carbon dioxide (CO2) and oxygen (O2) by the mouse and algae in a gas-closed system. Variations in light intensity and cell density alter the photosynthetic rate of the algae and enable short-term steady-state concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O2. Different nitrogen sources (urea and nitrate) result in different algal assimilatory quotients (AQ). Combinations of photosynthetic rate and AQ ratio manipulations were examined for their potential in stabilizing atmospheric gas concentrations in the gas-closed algal-mouse system.

  10. Closed-loop system in the management of diabetes: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Viral N; Shoskes, Aaron; Tawfik, Beshoy; Garg, Satish K

    2014-08-01

    Intensive insulin therapy (IIT) has been shown to reduce micro- and macrovascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, IIT is associated with a significant increase in severe hypoglycemic events, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Optimization of glycemic control without hypoglycemia (especially nocturnal) should be the next major goal for subjects on insulin treatment. The use of insulin pumps along with continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) has made it easier but requires significant resources and patient education. Research is ongoing to close the loop by integrating the pump and the CGM using different algorithms. The currently available closed-loop system is the threshold suspend. Steps needed to achieve a near-perfect closed-loop are (1) a control-to-range system that will reduce the incidence and/or severity of hyper- and/or hypoglycemia by adjusting the insulin dose and (2) a control-to-target system, a fully automated or hybrid system that sets target glucose levels to individual needs and maintains glucose levels throughout the day using insulin (unihormonal) alone or with other hormones such as glucagon or possibly pramlintide (bihormonal). Future research is also focusing on better insulin delivery devices (pumps), more accurate CGMs, better predictive algorithms, and ultra-rapid-acting insulin analogs to make the closed-loop system as physiological as possible.

  11. Entropic uncertainty measures for large dimensional hydrogenic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Puertas-Centeno; N.M. Temme (Nico); I.V. Toranzo; J.S. Dehesa

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe entropic moments of the probability density of a quantum system in position and momentum spaces describe not only some fundamental and/or experimentally accessible quantities of the system but also the entropic uncertainty measures of Rényi type, which allow one to find the most

  12. Short evaluations on hydroponic systems with closed cycle; Prime valutazioni su sistemi idroponici a ciclo chiuso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martignon, G. [ENEL DSR, Centro Ricerche Ambiente e Materiali, Milan (Italy); Venezia, A. [MIRAAF, Istituto Sperimentale per l`Orticultura (Italy) Sezione di Montanaso Lombardo

    1996-01-01

    In the experimental station at Tavazzano from 1993 to 1995 several trials were carried out growing vegetables, cut flowers and ornamental species with soil less culture. Different soil less techniques were utilized (on substrate in begs with open system; NFT, Ebb-Flood, sub irrigation on substrate in pot with closed system). The results obtained till now give the possibility to make some comments about management and problems of the soil less systems. The paper shows aspects related to the management of plant nutrition (nutrient solution, irrigation, substrates)and to fruit or flower production. The environmental effects of the different closed soil less culture systems tested are described, with respect to the cultivation on substrate in beg with open system, still generally utilized.

  13. A design study of hydrogen isotope separation system for ITER-FEAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Yasunori; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Nishi, Masataka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Preliminary design study of the hydrogen isotope separation system (ISS) for the fuel cycle of the ITER-FEAT, a fusion experimental reactor, was carried out based on the substantial reduction of hydrogen flow to the ISS resulting from the design study for scale reduction of the formerly-designed ITER. Three feed streams (plasma exhaust gas stream, streams from the water detritiation system and that from the neutral beam injectors) are fed to the ISS, and three product streams (high purity tritium gas, high purity deuterium gas and hydrogen gas) are made in it by the method of cryogenic distillation. In this study, an original four-column cascade was proposed to the ISS cryogenic distillation column system considering simplification and the operation scenario of the ITER-FEAT. Substantial reduction of tritium inventory in the ISS was found to be possible in the progress of investigation concerning of the corresponding flow rate of tritium product stream (T>90 %) for pellet injector which depends upon the operation condition. And it was found that tritium concentration in the released hydrogen stream into environment from the ISS could easily fluctuate with current design of column arrangement due to the small disturbance in mass flow balance in the ISS. To solve this problem, two-column system for treatment of this flow was proposed. (author)

  14. Construction and commissioning of a hydrogen cryogenic distillation system for tritium recovery at ICIT Rm. Valcea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ana, George, E-mail: george.ana@icsi.ro [Institute for Cryogenic and Isotopic Technologies, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Cristescu, Ion [Karlsruhe Istitute for Technologies, Tritium Laboratory, Eggenstein-Leopoldshaffen (Germany); Draghia, Mirela [ISTECH, Timisoara (Romania); Bucur, Ciprian; Balteanu, Ovidiu; Vijulie, Mihai; Popescu, Gheorghe; Costeanu, Claudiu; Sofilca, Nicolae; Stefan, Iulia; Daramus, Robert; Niculescu, Alina; Oubraham, Anisoara; Spiridon, Ionut; Vasut, Felicia; Moraru, Carmen; Brad, Sebastian [Institute for Cryogenic and Isotopic Technologies, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Pasca, Gheorghe [ISTECH, Timisoara (Romania)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Cryogenic distillation (CD) process is being employed for tritium separation from tritiated hydrogen mixtures. • Process control and safety phylosophy with the detritiation plant from Rm. Vâlcea. • Tests undertaken prior to commissioning of the CD system from Rm. Vâlcea. • Preliminary experiments with the CD system (non-radiological). - Abstract: Cryogenic distillation (CD) of hydrogen in combination with Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) or Combined Electrolytic Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process is used for tritium removal/recovery from tritiated water. Tritiated water is being obtained after long time operation of CANDU reactors, or in case of ITER mainly by the Detritiation System (DS). The cryogenic distillation system (CDS) used to remove/recover tritium from a hydrogen stream consists of a cascade of cryogenic distillation columns and a refrigeration unit which provides the cooling capacity for the condensers of CD columns. The columns, together with the condensers and the process heat-exchangers are accommodated in a vacuumed cold box. In the particularly case of the ICIT Plant, the cryogenic distillation cascade consists of four columns with diameters between 100–7 mm and it has been designed to process up to 10 mc/h of tritiated deuterium. This paper will present the steps undertaken for construction and commissioning of a pilot plant for tritium removal/recovery by cryogenic distillation of hydrogen. The paper will show besides preliminary data obtained during commissioning, also general characteristics of the plant and its equipments.

  15. Understanding the build-up of a technological innovation system around hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suurs, R.A.A.; Hekkert, M.P.; Smits, R.E.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study provides insight into the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in the Netherlands (1980-2007). This is done by applying a Technological Innovation System (TIS) approach. This approach takes the perspective that a technology is shaped by a surrounding network of actors,

  16. The development of a computational platform to design and simulate on-board hydrogen storage systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    A computational platform is developed in the Modelica® language within the Dymola™ environment to provide a tool for the design and performance comparison of on-board hydrogen storage systems. The platform has been coupled with an open source library for hydrogen fueling stations to investigate t...... to a storage capacity four times larger than a tube-in-tube solution of the same size. The volumetric and gravimetric densities of the shell and tube are 2.46% and 1.25% respectively. The dehydriding ability of this solution is proven to withstand intense discharging conditions....

  17. Integration of phase change materials in compressed hydrogen gas systems: Modelling and parametric analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rothuizen, Erasmus; Jørgensen, Jens-Erik

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic fueling model is built to simulate the fueling process of a hydrogen tank with an integrated passive cooling system. The study investigates the possibility of absorbing a part of the heat of compression in the high latent-heat material during melting, with the aim of saving the monetary...... temperature. Results show that a 10-mm-thick layer of paraffin wax can absorb enough heat to reduce the adiabatic temperature by 20 K when compared to a standard Type IV tank, but its influence on the hydrogen peak temperature that occurs at the end of refueling is modest. The heat transfer from the gas...

  18. A compressed hydrogen gas storage system with an integrated phase change material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Jørgensen, Jens Erik

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic fueling model is built to simulate the fueling process of a hydrogen tank with an integrated passive cooling system. The study investigates the possibility of absorbing a part of the heat of compression in the high latent-heat material during melting, with the aim of keeping the walls...... below the critical temperature of 85 °C, while filling the hydrogen at ambient temperature. Results show that a 10-mm-thick layer of paraffin wax can absorb enough heat to reduce the adiabatic temperature by 20 K when compared to a standard Type IV tank. The heat transfer from the gas to the phase...

  19. Method of Hydrogenous Fuel Usage to Increase the Efficiency in Tandem Diverse Temperature Oxidation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubkova Marina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of estimation energy efficiency, the collation data of thermodynamic calculations and data on material balance for an assessment of electric and thermal components in considered ways to use convention products, performance enhancement in the tandem system containing the high-temperature fuel cell and the low-temperature fuel cell with full heat regeneration for hydrogenous fuel (CH4. The overall effective efficiency (ηΣef. making full use of the recovered heat considered tandem system depends on the efficiency of its constituent fuel cells. The overall effective efficiency of the tandem installation including the fuel converter, separating system, high-temperature oxidation system, and hydrogen disposal system in case of fuel use in the low-temperature fuel cell, is higher than for each of the fuel cell elements separately.

  20. The Economic Potential of Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems Producing Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cutler, Dylan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stark, Greg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-04-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that Idaho National Laboratory and the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis are publishing that address the technical and economic aspects of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs). This report discusses an analysis of the economic potential of a tightly coupled N-R HES that produces electricity and hydrogen. Both low and high temperature electrolysis options are considered in the analysis. Low-temperature electrolysis requires only electricity to convert water to hydrogen. High temperature electrolysis requires less electricity because it uses both electricity and heat to provide the energy necessary to electrolyze water. The study finds that, to be profitable, the examined high-temperature electrosis and low-temperature electrosis N-R HES configurations that produce hydrogen require higher electricity prices, more electricity price volatility, higher natural gas prices, or higher capacity payments than the reference case values of these parameters considered in this analysis.

  1. Integration and dynamics of a renewable regenerative hydrogen fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Alvin Peter

    2008-10-01

    This thesis explores the integration and dynamics of residential scale renewable-regenerative energy systems which employ hydrogen for energy buffering. The development of the Integrated Renewable Energy Experiment (IRENE) test-bed is presented. IRENE is a laboratory-scale distributed energy system with a modular structure which can be readily re-configured to test newly developed components for generic regenerative systems. Key aspects include renewable energy conversion, electrolysis, hydrogen and electricity storage, and fuel cells. A special design feature of this test bed is the ability to accept dynamic inputs from and provide dynamic loads to real devices as well as from simulated energy sources/sinks. The integration issues encountered while developing IRENE and innovative solutions devised to overcome these barriers are discussed. Renewable energy systems that employ a regenerative approach to enable intermittent energy sources to service time varying loads rely on the efficient transfer of energy through the storage media. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the hydrogen energy buffer under a range of dynamic operating conditions. Results indicate that the operating characteristics of the electrolyser under transient conditions limit the production of hydrogen from excess renewable input power. These characteristics must be considered when designing or modeling a renewable-regenerative system. Strategies to mitigate performance degradation due to interruptions in the renewable power supply are discussed. Experiments were conducted to determine the response of the IRENE system to operating conditions that are representative of a residential scale, solar based, renewable-regenerative system. A control algorithm, employing bus voltage constraints and device current limitations, was developed to guide system operation. Results for a two week operating period that indicate that the system response is very dynamic but repeatable are

  2. Metabolites, their decomposition, production of tomato and bioassays from open and closed rockwool systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreij, de C.; Runia, W.T.; Burg, van der A.M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Growth, decrease in yield and other, undefined problems are reported to be due to the recirculation of the nutrient solution, which is compulsory for crops grown on substrates in the Netherlands. In a trial with tomato grown on rockwool, open and closed systems were compared. Drain water from both

  3. Behavioral analysis of differential Hebbian learning in closed-loop systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulvicius, Tomas; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Tamosiunaite, Minija

    2010-01-01

    measuring information of inputs. In this study we analyze a specific type of closed loop system by looking at the input as well as the output space. For this, we investigate simulated agents that perform differential Hebbian learning (STDP). In the first part we show that analytical solutions can be found...

  4. Numerical study of flow-induced pulsations in pipe systems with closed branches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Lera, P.; Golliard, J.; Schram, C.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a numerical technique based on two-dimensional incompressible computations and vortex sound theory is applied to investigate the flow-acoustic interaction in T-joints, which can lead to resonances in piping systems with closed side branches. The impact of aspects such as the flow

  5. Foam application from a closed system – a study of machine and foam parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmen, Jacques T.E.; Groot Wassink, Jan

    1990-01-01

    An attempt has been made to gain a greater insight into the interaction between foam and a moving textile substrate. The effects of changing wet pick–up, fabric velocity, liquid viscosity, foam density and mode of application on penetration have been studied. Application from a closed system makes

  6. Prevention of root diseases in closed soilless growing systems by microbial optimisation and slow sand filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.; Postma, J.

    2000-01-01

    Closed hydroponic systems are good alternatives for soil grown crops using methyl bromide in protected cultivation. Root-infecting pathogens may be dispersed over the nursery by the circulating nutrient solution, which was reason to disinfect the nutrient solution. The natural microflora in the

  7. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  8. NASA's Hydrogen Outpost: The Rocket Systems Area at Plum Brook Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    "There was pretty much a general knowledge about hydrogen and its capabilities," recalled former researcher Robert Graham. "The question was, could you use it in a rocket engine? Do we have the technology to handle it? How will it cool? Will it produce so much heat release that we can't cool the engine? These were the questions that we had to address." The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Glenn Research Center, referred to historically as the Lewis Research Center, made a concerted effort to answer these and related questions in the 1950s and 1960s. The center played a critical role transforming hydrogen's theoretical potential into a flight-ready propellant. Since then NASA has utilized liquid hydrogen to send humans and robots to the Moon, propel dozens of spacecraft across the universe, orbit scores of satellite systems, and power 135 space shuttle flights. Rocket pioneers had recognized hydrogen's potential early on, but its extremely low boiling temperature and low density made it impracticable as a fuel. The Lewis laboratory first demonstrated that liquid hydrogen could be safely utilized in rocket and aircraft propulsion systems, then perfected techniques to store, pump, and cleanly burn the fuel, as well as use it to cool the engine. The Rocket Systems Area at Lewis's remote testing area, Plum Brook Station, played a little known, but important role in the center's hydrogen research efforts. This publication focuses on the activities at the Rocket Systems Area, but it also discusses hydrogen's role in NASA's space program and Lewis's overall hydrogen work. The Rocket Systems Area included nine physically modest test sites and three test stands dedicated to liquid-hydrogen-related research. In 1962 Cleveland Plain Dealer reporter Karl Abram claimed, "The rocket facility looks more like a petroleum refinery. Its test rigs sprout pipes, valves and tanks. During the night test runs, excess hydrogen is burned from special stacks in the best

  9. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  10. Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.E. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

  11. Androgynous, Reconfigurable Closed Loop Feedback Controlled Low Impact Docking System With Load Sensing Electromagnetic Capture Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James L. (Inventor); Carroll, Monty B. (Inventor); Morales, Ray H. (Inventor); Le, Thang D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a fully androgynous, reconfigurable closed loop feedback controlled low impact docking system with load sensing electromagnetic capture ring. The docking system of the present invention preferably comprises two Docking- assemblies, each docking assembly comprising a load sensing ring having an outer face, one of more electromagnets, one or more load cells coupled to said load sensing ring. The docking assembly further comprises a plurality of actuator arms coupled to said load sensing ring and capable of dynamically adjusting the orientation of said load sensing ring and a reconfigurable closed loop control system capable of analyzing signals originating from said plurality of load cells and of outputting real time control for each of the actuators. The docking assembly of the present invention incorporates an active load sensing system to automatically dynamically adjust the load sensing ring during capture instead of requiring significant force to push and realign the ring.

  12. Simultaneous Hydrogen Generation and Waste Acid Neutralization in a Reverse Electrodialysis System

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-09-02

    Waste acid streams produced at industrial sites are often co-located with large sources of waste heat (e.g., industrial exhaust gases, cooling water, and heated equipment). Reverse electrodialysis (RED) systems can be used to generate electrical power and hydrogen gas using waste heat-derived solutions, but high electrode overpotentials limit system performance. We show here that an ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) RED system can achieve simultaneous waste acid neutralization and in situ hydrogen production, while capturing energy from excess waste heat. The rate of acid neutralization was dependent on stack flow rate and increased 50× (from 0.06 ± 0.04 to 3.0 ± 0.32 pH units min -1 m-2 membrane), as the flow rate increased 6× (from 100 to 600 mL min-1). Acid neutralization primarily took place due to ammonium electromigration (37 ± 4%) and proton diffusion (60 ± 5%). The use of a synthetic waste acid stream as a catholyte (pH ≈ 2) also increased hydrogen production rates by 65% (from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 8.7 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3 catholyte day -1) compared to an AmB electrolyte (pH ≈ 8.5). These findings highlight the potential use of dissimilar electrolytes (e.g., basic anolyte and acidic catholyte) for enhanced power and hydrogen production in RED stacks. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  13. Seasonal energy storage system based on hydrogen for self sufficient living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielmann, M.; Vogt, U. F.; Zimmermann, M.; Züttel, A.

    SELF is a resource independent living and working environment. By on-board renewable electricity generation and storage, it accounts for all aspects of living, such as space heating and cooking as well as providing a purified rainwater supply and wastewater treatment, excluding food supply. Uninterrupted, on-demand energy and water supply are the key challenges. Off-grid renewable power supply fluctuations on daily and seasonal time scales impose production gaps that have to be served by local storage, a function normally fulfilled by the grid. While daily variations only obligate a small storage capacity, requirements for seasonal storage are substantial. The energy supply for SELF is reviewed based on real meteorological data and demand patterns for Zurich, Switzerland. A battery system with propane for cooking serves as a reference for battery-only and hybrid battery/hydrogen systems. In the latter, hydrogen is used for cooking and electricity generation. The analysis shows that hydrogen is ideal for long term bulk energy storage on a seasonal timescale, while batteries are best suited for short term energy storage. Although the efficiency penalty from hydrogen generation is substantial, in off-grid systems, this parameter is tolerable since the harvesting ratio of photovoltaic energy is limited by storage capacity.

  14. Fiscal 1998 research report on International Clean Energy Network using Hydrogen Conversion (WE-NET). Subtask 2. Research on promotion of international cooperation (research on standardization of hydrogen energy technologies); 1998 nendo suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET) sub task. 2. Kokusai kyoryoku suishin no tame no chosa kento (suiso energy gijutsu hyojunka ni kansuru chosa kento)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal 1998 research result on the basic research on standardization of hydrogen energy technologies, and ISO/TC197. As for the standardization, in relation to the hydrogen station in the WE-NET second phase research, the laws related to handling of gaseous hydrogen, and the basic issues on facility and safe handling were studied. As for ISO/TC197, the following draft standards were examined: Fuel supply system interface for liquid hydrogen vehicles, fuel tank for liquid hydrogen vehicles, container for liquid hydrogen transport, specification of hydrogen fuel, hydrogen fuel supply facility for air ports, gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen mixture fuel system for vehicles, gaseous hydrogen fuel connector for vehicles, gaseous hydrogen fuel tank for vehicles, and basic items for hydrogen system safety. Final examination of the fuel supply system interface for liquid hydrogen vehicles, and the specification of hydrogen fuel was finished, and these are scheduled to be registered for ISO. (NEDO)

  15. Hydrogen based energy storage for solar energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhanen, J.; Hagstroem, M.; Lund, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Advanced Energy Systems

    1998-10-01

    The main technical constraint in solar energy systems which operate around the year is the lack of suitable long-term energy storage. Conventional solutions to overcome the problem of seasonal storage in PV power systems are to use oversized batteries as a seasonal energy storage, or to use a diesel back-up generator. However, affordable lead-acid batteries are not very suitable for seasonal energy storage because of a high self-discharge rate and enhanced deterioration and divergence of the single cells during prolonged periods of low state of charge in times of low irradiation. These disadvantages can be avoided by a back-up system, e.g. a diesel generator, which car supply energy to the loads and charge the battery to the full state of charge to avoid the above mentioned disadvantages. Unfortunately, diesel generators have several disadvantages, e.g. poor starting reliability, frequent need for maintenance and noise

  16. Novel Hydrogen Production Systems Operative at Thermodynamic Extremes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsalus, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We have employed a suite of molecular, bioinformatics, and biochemical tools to interrogate the thermodynamically limiting steps of H{sub 2} production from fatty acids in syntrophic communities. We also developed a new microbial model system that generates high H{sub 2} concentrations (over 17% of the gas phase) with high H{sub 2} yields of over 3 moles H{sub 2} per mole glucose. Lastly, a systems-based study of biohydrogen production in model anaerobic consortia was performed to begin identifying key regulated steps as a precursor to modeling co-metabolism. The results of these studies significantly expand our ability to predict and model systems for H{sub 2} production in novel anaerobes that are currently very poorly documented or understood.

  17. Hydrogen isotope distillation for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlit, J.R.; Denton, W.H.; Sherman, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    A system of four, interlinked, cryogenic fractional distillation columns has been designed as a prototype for fuel processing for fusion power reactors. The distillation system will continuously separate a feedstream of 360 g moles/day of roughly 50-50 deuterium-tritium containing approximately 1% H into four product streams: (1) a tritium-free stream of HD for waste disposal; (2) a stream of high-purity D/sub 2/ for simulated neutral beam injection; (3) a stream of DT for simulated reactor refueling; and (4) a stream of high purity T/sub 2/ for refueling and studies on properties of tritium and effects of tritium on materials.

  18. Experimental reconstruction of work distribution and study of fluctuation relations in a closed quantum system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalhão, Tiago B; Souza, Alexandre M; Mazzola, Laura; Auccaise, Ruben; Sarthour, Roberto S; Oliveira, Ivan S; Goold, John; De Chiara, Gabriele; Paternostro, Mauro; Serra, Roberto M

    2014-10-03

    We report the experimental reconstruction of the nonequilibrium work probability distribution in a closed quantum system, and the study of the corresponding quantum fluctuation relations. The experiment uses a liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance platform that offers full control on the preparation and dynamics of the system. Our endeavors enable the characterization of the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of a quantum spin from a finite-time thermodynamics viewpoint.

  19. Compact fuel cell system utilizing a combination of hydrogen storage materials for optimized performance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Jennifer P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Gross, Karl J.; Ng, Greg L.

    2004-12-01

    An entirely new class of light-weight reversible hydrides was recently discovered (the Ti-doped alanates)[1]. These NaAIH{sub 4}-based materials have demonstrated reversible hydrogen storage capacities of up to 5 wt%, nearly 4 times the gravimetrically density of commercial metal hydrides. For this reason, they have been considered a breakthrough for hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles. This project is the first to publish the use of alanates for the generation of electrical power and the first demonstration of a hydride-fueled elevated-temperature PEM Fuel Cell. Because the kinetics of hydrogen uptake and release by the alanate improves with elevated temperatures, novel concepts were tested for the purpose of developing a highly efficient stand-alone power system. A major focus of this work was on the modeling, design, construction and testing of an integrated fuel cell stack and hydrogen storage system that eliminates the need of complicated heat transfer systems and media. After extensive modeling efforts, a proof-of-concept system was built that employs an integrated fuel cell stack and hydride beds that balancing the generation of fuel cell waste heat with the endothermic release of hydrogen from the alanates. Our demonstration unit was capable of greater than one hour of operation on a single charge of hydrogen from the integrated 173 gram alanate bed. In addition, composite hydride materials with synergistic reaction heats were evaluated and tested to enhance the operational performance of the alanates. The composites provide a unique opportunity to utilize the heat produced from hydriding classic metal hydrides to improve both absorption and desorption rates of the alanates. A particular focus of the mixed storage materials work was to balance the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydrides for start-up conditions. Modeling of the sorption properties proved invaluable in evaluating the optimum composition of hydrides. The modeling efforts were followed

  20. Analysis of Energy Storage System with Distributed Hydrogen Production and Gas Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotowicz, Janusz; Bartela, Łukasz; Dubiel-Jurgaś, Klaudia

    2017-12-01

    Paper presents the concept of energy storage system based on power-to-gas-to-power (P2G2P) technology. The system consists of a gas turbine co-firing hydrogen, which is supplied from a distributed electrolysis installations, powered by the wind farms located a short distance from the potential construction site of the gas turbine. In the paper the location of this type of investment was selected. As part of the analyses, the area of wind farms covered by the storage system and the share of the electricity production which is subjected storage has been changed. The dependence of the changed quantities on the potential of the hydrogen production and the operating time of the gas turbine was analyzed. Additionally, preliminary economic analyses of the proposed energy storage system were carried out.

  1. Analysis of Energy Storage System with Distributed Hydrogen Production and Gas Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotowicz Janusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents the concept of energy storage system based on power-to-gas-to-power (P2G2P technology. The system consists of a gas turbine co-firing hydrogen, which is supplied from a distributed electrolysis installations, powered by the wind farms located a short distance from the potential construction site of the gas turbine. In the paper the location of this type of investment was selected. As part of the analyses, the area of wind farms covered by the storage system and the share of the electricity production which is subjected storage has been changed. The dependence of the changed quantities on the potential of the hydrogen production and the operating time of the gas turbine was analyzed. Additionally, preliminary economic analyses of the proposed energy storage system were carried out.

  2. Modeling, simulation, and optimization of a front-end system for acetylene hydrogenation reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gobbo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The modeling, simulation, and dynamic optimization of an industrial reaction system for acetylene hydrogenation are discussed in the present work. The process consists of three adiabatic fixed-bed reactors, in series, with interstage cooling. These reactors are located after the compression and the caustic scrubbing sections of an ethylene plant, characterizing a front-end system; in contrast to the tail-end system where the reactors are placed after the de-ethanizer unit. The acetylene conversion and selectivity profiles for the reactors are optimized, taking into account catalyst deactivation and process constraints. A dynamic optimal temperature profile that maximizes ethylene production and meets product specifications is obtained by controlling the feed and intercoolers temperatures. An industrial acetylene hydrogenation system is used to provide the necessary data to adjust kinetics and transport parameters and to validate the approach.

  3. Load control of a wind-hydrogen stand-alone power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miland, Harald; Gloeckner, Ronny [Institute of Energy Technology (IFE), P.O. Box 40, 2027 Kjeller (Norway); Taylor, Phil [Econnect, 19 Haugh Lane Ind Est, Hexham NE46 3PU (United Kingdom); Jarle Aaberg, Rolf [Statkraft SF, PB 200 Lilleaker, 0216 Oslo (Norway); Hagen, Georg [Department of Materials Technology, NTNU, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2006-08-15

    A new generation of load controllers enable stand-alone power systems (SAPS) to use one or many standard (grid connected) wind turbines. The controllers use fuzzy logic software algorithms. The strategy is to use the control loads to balance the flow of active power in the system and hence control system frequency. The dynamic supply of reactive power by a synchronous compensator maintains the system voltage within the limits specified in EN50160. The resistive controller loads produce a certain amount of heat that is exchanged down to the end user (hot water). It was decided to investigate the implementation of a hydrogen subsystem into the SAPS that can work in parallel with the Distributed Intelligent Load Controller (DILC). The hydrogen subsystem can then function as energy storage on long-term basis and an active load controller on short-term basis. (author)

  4. Evaluation testing of a closed Brayton-cycle electrical-power-conversion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, T. E.; Mcgee, J. M.; Luksa, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the design and testing of a recuperated, closed Brayton-cycle, electrical power conversion system designated the Brayton Cycle Demonstrator (BCD). The system uses electrical heaters as a heat source, argon as the cycle working fluid, and gas-lubricated foil-type bearings. Objectives of the test program include (1) evaluation of the overall system performance characteristics and influences on spacecraft integration, (2) familiarization of personnel with operational methods, and (3) determination of system flexibility by operating at a number of off-design conditions. Results obtained to date are discussed.

  5. Autologous fat grafting: use of closed syringe microcannula system for enhanced autologous structural grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander RW

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Robert W Alexander,1 David Harrell2 1Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Harvest-Terumo Inc, Plymouth, MA, USA Objectives: Provide background for use of acquiring autologous adipose tissue as a tissue graft and source of adult progenitor cells for use in cosmetic plastic surgery. Discuss the background and mechanisms of action of closed syringe vacuum lipoaspiration, with emphasis on accessing adipose-derived mesenchymal/stromal cells and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF for use in aesthetic, structural reconstruction and regenerative applications. Explain a proven protocol for acquiring high-quality autologous fat grafts (AFG with use of disposable, microcannula systems. Design: Explain the components and advantage of use of the patented super luer-lock and microcannulas system for use with the closed-syringe system. A sequential explanation of equipment selection for minimally traumatic lipoaspiration in small volumes is presented, including use of blunt injection cannulas to reduce risk of embolism. Results: Thousands of AFG have proven safe and efficacious for lipoaspiration techniques for large and small structural fat grafting procedures. The importance and advantages of gentle harvesting of the adipose tissue complex has become very clear in the past 5 years. The closed-syringe system offers a minimally invasive, gentle system with which to mobilize subdermal fat tissues in a suspension form. Resulting total nuclear counting of undifferentiated cells of the adipose-derived -SVF suggests that the yield achieved is better than use of always-on, constant mechanical pump applied vacuum systems. Conclusion: Use of a closed-syringe lipoaspiration system featuring disposable microcannulas offers a safe and effective means of harvesting small volumes of nonmanipulated adipose tissues and its accompanying progenitor cells within the SVF. Closed syringes and microcannulas are

  6. Proton and hydrogen atom detection efficiency of resistance strip magnetic electron multiplier particle-counting system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehrenberg, P.J.; Clark, K.C.

    1976-10-01

    The absolute detection efficiency for protons and for hydrogen atoms in the energy range 5--60 keV is determined for a resistance strip magnetic electron multiplier particle-counting system. Significant history-dependent gain variations are discussed. The detector system is suitable for use in coincidence experiments requiring particle-counting rates to 1.0 MHz and timing accuracies of 3.0 nsec. (AIP)

  7. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hua, T. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Peng, J. -K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lasher, S. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); McKenney, Kurtis [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States); Sinha, J. [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the potential to meet DOE onboard storage targets, as well as independent reviews of system cost and energy analyses of the technology paired with delivery costs.

  8. Final Technical Report for GO15056 Millennium Cell: Development of an Advanced Chemical Hydrogen Storage and Generation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Oscar [Millennium Cell Inc., Eatontown, NJ (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The objectives of this project are to increase system storage capacity by improving hydrogen generation from concentrated sodium borohydride, with emphasis on reactor and system engineering; to complete a conceptual system design based on sodium borohydride that will include key technology improvements to enable a hydrogen fuel system that will meet the systembased storage capacity of 1.2 kWh/L (36 g H2/L) and 1.5 kWh/kg (45 g H2/kg), by the end of FY 2007; and to utilize engineering expertise to guide Center research in both off-board chemical hydride regeneration and on-board hydrogen generation systems.

  9. Technical and economic evaluation of hydrogen storage systems based on light metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepsen, Julian

    2014-07-01

    Novel developments regarding materials for solid-state hydrogen storage show promising prospects. These complex hydrides exhibit high mass-related storage capacities and thus great technical potential to store hydrogen in an efficient and safe way. However, a comprehensive evaluation of economic competitiveness is still lacking, especially in the case of the LiBH4 / MgH2 storage material. In this study, an assessment with respect to the economic feasibility of implementing complex hydrides as hydrogen storage materials is presented. The cost structure of hydrogen storage systems based on NaAlH4 and LiBH4 / MgH2 is discussed and compared with the conventional high pressure (700 bar) and liquid storage systems. Furthermore, the properties of LiBH4 / MgH2, so-called Li-RHC (Reactive Hydride Composite), are scientifically compared and evaluated on the lab and pilot plant scale. To enhance the reaction rate, the addition of TiCl3 is investigated and high energy ball milling is evaluated as processing technique. The effect of the additive in combination with the processing technique is described in detail. Finally, an optimum set of processing parameters and additive content are identified and can be applied for scaled-up production of the material based on simple models considering energy input during processing. Furthermore, thermodynamic, heat transfer and kinetic properties are experimentally determined by different techniques and analysed as a basis for modelling and designing scaled-up storage systems. The results are analysed and discussed with respect to the reaction mechanisms and reversibility of the system. Heat transfer properties are assessed with respect to the scale-up for larger hydrogen storage systems. Further improvements of the heat transfer were achieved by compacting the material. In this regard, the influence of the compaction pressure on the apparent density, thermal conductivity and sorption behaviour, was investigated in detail. Finally, scaled

  10. Simulating pH and hydrogen sulfide in a distributed collection system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Le Guennec, Anne; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2013-01-01

    A concept for modeling the pH in distributed sewer systems is presented. The concept is an extension of the existing sewer process model WATS, which simulates physical, chemical and biological processes in wastewater, biofilms, sediments, and sewer headspace, as well as water flow, gas flow...... was calibrated to the conveyance system of Tangier, Morocco, and was able to simulate the observed variation in pH as well as the observed levels of hydrogen sulfide in the network. For the sewer system of Tangier, the most important buffer system was the carbonate system, followed by ammonia and amino groups...

  11. Thermodynamics of the hexagonal close-packed iron-nitrogen system from first-principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakkedal, Morten Bjørn

    is assumed fixed.The models are developed entirely from first-principles calculations based on fundamen-tal quantum mechanical calculation through the density functional theory approach with the atomic numbers and crystal structures as the only input parameters. A complete thermody-namic description should......First-principles thermodynamic models are developed for the hexagonal close-packed ε-Fe-N system. The system can be considered as a hexagonal close-packed host lattice of iron atoms and with the nitrogen atoms residing on a sublattice formed by the octahedral interstices. The iron host lattice...... to hexagonal systems and a numerically tractable extended equation of state is developed to describe thermody-namic equilibrium properties at finite temperature.The model is applied to ε-Fe3N specifically. Through the versatility of the model, equi-librium lattice parameters, the bulk modulus, and the thermal...

  12. Tidal Interaction among Red Giants Close Binary Systems in APOGEE Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meng; Arras, Phil; Majewski, Steven R.; Troup, Nicholas William; Weinberg, Nevin N.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by the newly discovered close binary systems in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1), the tidal evolution of binaries containing a red giant branch (RGB) star with a stellar or substellar companion was investigated. The tide raised by the companion in the RGB star leads to exchange of angular momentum between the orbit and the stellar spin, causing the orbit to contract. The tidal dissipation rate is computed using turbulent viscosity acting on the equilibrium tidal flow, where careful attention is paid to the effects of reduced viscosity for close-in companions. Evolutionary models for the RGB stars, from the zero-age main sequence to the present, were acquired from the MESA code. "Standard" turbulent viscosity gives rise to such a large orbital decay that many observed systems have decay times much shorter than the RGB evolution time. Several theories for "reduced" turbulent viscosity are investigated, and reduce the number of systems with uncomfortably short decay times.

  13. Disturbance rejection performance analyses of closed loop control systems by reference to disturbance ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagoz, Baris Baykant; Deniz, Furkan Nur; Keles, Cemal; Tan, Nusret

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems by means of reference to disturbance ratio (RDR). The RDR analysis calculates the ratio of reference signal energy to disturbance signal energy at the system output and provides a quantitative evaluation of disturbance rejection performance of control systems on the bases of communication channel limitations. Essentially, RDR provides a straightforward analytical method for the comparison and improvement of implicit disturbance rejection capacity of closed loop control systems. Theoretical analyses demonstrate us that RDR of the negative feedback closed loop control systems are determined by energy spectral density of controller transfer function. In this manner, authors derived design criteria for specifications of disturbance rejection performances of PID and fractional order PID (FOPID) controller structures. RDR spectra are calculated for investigation of frequency dependence of disturbance rejection capacity and spectral RDR analyses are carried out for PID and FOPID controllers. For the validation of theoretical results, simulation examples are presented. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Host-parasite interactions in closed and open microbial cultivation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisman, T. I.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    We studied interaction between bacteria and phages within a host-parasite system the members of the system being continuously and closely cultivated The objects of our research were auxotrophic strain Brevibacterium 22L and bacteriophage Brevibacterium sp strain A discovered in the soil of the Soviet Union Republic of Latvia using enrichment method 1 Closed system We investigated the dependence of bacteriolysis time upon the multiplicity of phage infection It was shown that reduction of phage amount by one bacterium leads to increase of marked lysis Another important factor determining cytolysis in fluid medium is the physiological state of bacterial population Specific growth rate of bacteria at the moment of phage infection was chosen as the index of the physiological state of bacteria It was revealed that the shortest latent period and the maximal phage burst is observed when the bacteria located in a favorable nutrient medium are in the logarithmic phase If the bacterial population has already passed from the logarithmic phase to the stationary one the cells become a bad host for phage reproduction and lysis occurs very slowly or even never starts at all 2 Open system In the process of continuous cultivation the members of the host-parasite system showed an ability to coexist over a long period of time After phage infection there were variations in the size of both populations and then the density of the host population reached the level close to that of the uninfected culture In this situation the phage population

  15. A head-to-head comparison of hydrogen peroxide vapor and aerosol room decontamination systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmdahl, T; Lanbeck, P; Wullt, M; Walder, M H

    2011-09-01

    New technologies have emerged in recent years for the disinfection of hospital rooms and equipment that may not be disinfected adequately using conventional methods. There are several hydrogen peroxide-based area decontamination technologies on the market, but no head-to-head studies have been performed. We conducted a head-to-head in vitro comparison of a hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV) system (Bioquell) and an aerosolized hydrogen peroxide (aHP) system (Sterinis). The tests were conducted in a purpose-built 136-m(3) test room. One HPV generator and 2 aHP machines were used, following recommendations of the manufacturers. Three repeated tests were performed for each system. The microbiological efficacy of the 2 systems was tested using 6-log Tyvek-pouched Geobacillus stearothermophilus biological indicators (BIs). The indicators were placed at 20 locations in the first test and 14 locations in the subsequent 2 tests for each system. All BIs were inactivated for the 3 HPV tests, compared with only 10% in the first aHP test and 79% in the other 2 aHP tests. The peak hydrogen peroxide concentration was 338 ppm for HPV and 160 ppm for aHP. The total cycle time (including aeration) was 3 and 3.5 hours for the 3 HPV tests and the 3 aHP tests, respectively. Monitoring around the perimeter of the enclosure with a handheld sensor during tests of both systems did not identify leakage. One HPV generator was more effective than 2 aHP machines for the inactivation of G. stearothermophilus BIs, and cycle times were faster for the HPV system.

  16. Influence of Hydrogen-Based Storage Systems on Self-Consumption and Self-Sufficiency of Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Pötzinger; Markus Preißinger; Dieter Brüggemann

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the behavior of residential solar-powered electrical energy storage systems. For this purpose, a simulation model based on MATLAB/Simulink is developed. Investigating both short-time and seasonal hydrogen-based storage systems, simulations on the basis of real weather data are processed on a timescale of 15 min for a consideration period of 3 years. A sensitivity analysis is conducted in order to identify the most important system parameters concerning the proportion of co...

  17. A Review: Using Pyrolysis and its Bioproducts to Help Close the Loop in Sustainable Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, LaShelle E.

    2013-01-01

    The next step in human exploration of space is beyond low Earth orbit and possibly to sites such as the Moon and Mars. Resupply of critical life support components for missions such as these are difficult or impossible. Life support processes for closing the loop of water, oxygen and carbon have to be identified. Currently, there are many technologies proposed for terrestrial missions for waste, water, air processing. and the creation of consumables. There are a variety of different approaches, but few address all of these issues simultaneously. One candidate is pyrolysis; a method where waste streams can be heated in the absence of oxygen to undergo a thermochemical conversion producing a series of bioproducts. Bioproducts like biochar made from non-edible biomass and human solid waste can possibly provide valuable benefits such as waste reduction, regolith fertilization for increased food production, and become a consumable for water processing and air revitalization systems. Syngas containing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, can be converted to methane and dimethyl ether to create propellants. Bio-oils can be utilized as a heating fuel or fed to bioreactors that utilize oil-eating microbes.

  18. Hydrogen production by model systems including hydrogenases from phototrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogotov, I.N.; Zorin, N.A.; Serebriakova, L.T. (AN SSSR, Pushchino (SU). Inst. of Soil Science and Photosynthesis)

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogenases of purple (Rhodobacter capsulatus, Thiocapsa roseopersicina) and green (Chlorobium limicola, Chloroflexus aurantiacus) bacteria catalyse the reactions of H{sub 2} evolution (uptake) and isotopic exchange in the system D{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at a high rate (20-60 units mg{sup -1} protein; 30{sup o}C). The enzyme active center includes a proton-accepting group, an (FeS) cluster and nickel. The data proving the direct participation of nickel in H{sub 2} activation are obtained. The hydrogenases from phototrophic bacteria are characterized by a high stability to denaturing factors. Thiocapsa roseopersicina hydrogenase absorbed at the carbon electrode accelerates electrochemical H{sub 2} oxidation and evolution. Biocatalytic systems containing chloroplasts, ferredoxin and hydrogenase produce H{sub 2} at a rate up to 100{mu}mol (h mg Chl){sup -1} but exhibit low stability. Thiocapsa roseopersicina hydrogenase adsorbed on the particles of inorganic semiconductor TiO{sub 2} carries out H{sub 2} photoproduction. (author).

  19. Study of Systems and Technology for Liquid Hydrogen Production Independent of Fossil Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprafka, R. J.; Escher, W. J. D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Shingleton, J.; Moore, J. S.; Baker, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Based on Kennedy Space Center siting and logistics requirements and the nonfossil energy resources at the Center, a number of applicable technologies and system candidates for hydrogen production were identified and characterized. A two stage screening of these technologies in the light of specific criteria identified two leading candidates as nonfossil system approaches. Conceptual design and costing of two solar-operated, stand alone systems, one photovoltaic based on and the other involving the power tower approach reveals their technical feasibility as sited as KSC, and the potential for product cost competitiveness with conventional supply approaches in the 1990 to 1210 time period. Conventional water hydrolysis and hydrogen liquefaction subsystems are integrated with the solar subsystems.

  20. Stand-alone power systems for the future: Optimal design, operation and control of solar-hydrogen energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulleberg, Oeystein

    1998-12-31

    This thesis gives a systematic review of the fundamentals of energy systems, the governing physical and chemical laws related to energy, inherent characteristics of energy system, and the availability of the earth`s energy. It shows clearly why solar-hydrogen systems are one of the most viable options for the future. The main subject discussed is the modelling of SAPS (Stand-Alone Power Systems), with focus on photovoltaic-hydrogen energy systems. Simulation models for a transient simulation program are developed for PV-H{sub 2} components, including models for photovoltaics, water electrolysis, hydrogen storage, fuel cells, and secondary batteries. A PV-H{sub 2} demonstration plant in Juelich, Germany, is studied as a reference plant and the models validated against data from this plant. Most of the models developed were found to be sufficiently accurate to perform short-term system simulations, while all were more than accurate enough to perform long-term simulations. Finally, the verified simulation models are used to find the optimal operation and control strategies of an existing PV-H{sub 2} system. The main conclusion is that the simulation methods can be successfully used to find optimal operation and control strategies for a system with fixed design, and similar methods could be used to find alternative system designs. 148 refs., 78 figs., 31 tabs.

  1. Microbiota of radish plants, cultivated in closed and open ecological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirranen, L. S.

    It is common knowledge that microorganisms respond to environmental changes faster than other representatives of the living world. The major aim of this work was to examine and analyze the characteristics of the microbiota of radish culture, cultivated in the closed ecological system of human life-support Bios-3 and in an open system in different experiments. Microbial community of near-root, root zone and phyllosphere of radish were studied at the phases of seedlings, root formation, technical ripeness—by washing-off method—like microbiota of the substrate (expanded clay aggregate) and of the seeds of radish culture. Inoculation on appropriate media was made to count total quantity of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria, bacteria of coliform group, spore-forming, Proteus group, fluorescent, phytopathogenic bacteria, growing on Fermi medium, yeasts, microscopic fungi, Actinomyces. It was revealed that formation of the microbiota of radish plants depends on the age, plant cultivation technology and the specific conditions of the closed system. Composition of microbial conveyor-cultivated in phytotrons varied in quality and in quantity with plant growth phases—in the same manner as cultivation of even-aged soil and hydroponics monocultures which was determined by different qualitative and quantitative composition of root emissions in the course of plant vegetation. The higher plant component formed its own microbial complex different from that formed prior to closure. The microbial complex of vegetable polyculture is more diverse and stable than the monoculture of radish. We registered the changes in the species composition and microorganism quantity during plant cultivation in the closed system on a long-used solution. It was demonstrated that during the short-term (7 days) use of the nutrient solution in the experiments without system closing, the species composition of the microbiota of radish plants was more diverse in a multiple-aged vegetable polyculture (61

  2. Effects of open and closed suction systems on the haemodynamic parameters in cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özden, Dilek; Görgülü, Refia S

    2015-05-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of open and closed suction systems on haemodynamic parameters of the patients who underwent open heart surgery. Nurses should work meticulously and carefully as many complications may develop if the method used to perform suctioning is not appropriate. The quasi-experimental study design was used. The study sample comprised 120 patients who underwent open heart surgery in the cardiovascular surgery intensive care unit of a state hospital in Turkey. Haemodynamic parameters were determined just before, right after, at the 5th and 15th minute after suctioning. The data were evaluated with the One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for Repeated Measures, independent t-test and Bonferroni's test for further analysis (post hoc). The difference between heart rate (HR) and mean blood pressure, mean PaO2 and PaCO2 , SaO2 and pH values measured before, right after and at the 5th and 15th minute after suctioning was found to be significant in patients who underwent the open suctioning procedure. It was determined that the difference between mean PaO2 values was not significant and that SaO2 versus SpO2 values increased in patients who underwent the closed suctioning procedure. When the open and closed suction systems were compared, statistically significant difference was determined in terms of MAP, SpO2 . It was determined that HR, arterial blood pressure and arterial blood gases of the patients who underwent open heart surgery were negatively affected by the open suction system but did not increase significantly as soon as suctioning was over during the closed suctioning procedure. The data obtained indicate that closed system suctioning, compared with open system suctioning, can be used safely on this patient group. The closed suction system is recommended since it contributes to the enhancement of patient safety and the quality of nursing care. © 2014 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care published by John Wiley & Sons

  3. A double closed loop to enhance the quality of life of Parkinson's Disease patients: REMPARK system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samà, Albert; Pérez-López, Carlos; Rodríguez-Martín, Daniel; Moreno-Aróstegui, J Manuel; Rovira, Jordi; Ahlrichs, Claas; Castro, Rui; Cevada, João; Graça, Ricardo; Guimarães, Vânia; Pina, Bernardo; Counihan, Timothy; Lewy, Hadas; Annicchiarico, Roberta; Bayés, Angels; Rodríguez-Molinero, Alejandro; Cabestany, Joan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents REMPARK system, a novel approach to deal with Parkinson's Disease (PD). REMPARK system comprises two closed loops of actuation onto PD. The first loop consists in a wearable system that, based on a belt-worn movement sensor, detects movement alterations that activate an auditory cueing system controlled by a smartphone in order to improve patient's gait. The belt-worn sensor analyzes patient's movement through real-time learning algorithms that were developed on the basis of a database previously collected from 93 PD patients. The second loop consists in disease management based on the data collected during long periods and that enables neurologists to tailor medication of their PD patients and follow the disease evolution. REMPARK system is going to be tested in 40 PD patients in Spain, Ireland, Italy and Israel. This paper describes the approach followed to obtain this system, its components, functionalities and trials in which the system will be validated.

  4. Hydrogen-based energy storage unit for stand alone PV systems; L'hydrogene electrolytique comme moyen de stockage d'electricite pour systemes photovoltaiques isoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbe, J

    2006-12-15

    Stand alone systems supplied only by a photovoltaic generator need an energy storage unit to be fully self sufficient. Lead acid batteries are commonly used to store energy because of their low cost, despite several operational constraints. A hydrogen-based energy storage unit (HESU) could be another candidate, including an electrolyser, a fuel cell and a hydrogen tank. However many efforts still need to be carried out for this technology to reach an industrial stage. In particular, market outlets must be clearly identified. The study of small stationary applications (few kW) is performed by numerical simulations. A simulator is developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment. It is mainly composed of a photovoltaic field and a storage unit (lead acid batteries, HESU, or hybrid storage HESU/batteries). The system component sizing is achieved in order to ensure the complete system autonomy over a whole year of operation. The simulator is tested with 160 load profiles (1 kW as a yearly mean value) and three locations (Algeria, France and Norway). Two coefficients are set in order to quantify the correlation between the power consumption of the end user and the renewable resource availability at both daily and yearly scales. Among the tested cases, a limit value of the yearly correlation coefficient came out, enabling to recommend the use of the most adapted storage to a considered case. There are cases for which using HESU instead of lead acid batteries can increase the system efficiency, decrease the size of the photovoltaic field and improve the exploitation of the renewable resource. In addition, hybridization of HESU with batteries always leads to system enhancements regarding its sizing and performance, with an efficiency increase by 10 to 40 % depending on the considered location. The good agreement between the simulation data and field data gathered on real systems enabled the validation of the models used in this study. (author)

  5. Competition of the natural and mammade biotic cycles in the closed aquatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisman, T.; Somova, L.

    The study addresses the competition of the Paramecium bursaria endosymbiosis and the infusoria Paramecium caudatum in the closed aquatic system. The P. bursaria - zoochlorella endosymbiosis is a natural model of a simple biotic cycle. P. bursaria consumes glucose and oxygen released by zoochlorella in the process of biosynthesis and releases nitrogenous compounds and carbon dioxide necessary for algal photosynthesis. P. caudatum was fed on bacteria. It was shown that populations of infusoria of closely allied species could coexist in a closed aquatic system during 60 days, if two food sources (algae and bacteria) were available. However, the infusoria P. bursaria united in one cycle with Chlorella have a higher competitive ability than P. caudatum. Coexistence occurs in the mixed culture of infusoria whatever their initial proportions. The end portion of P. bursaria amounts to 90 - 95%, which is significantly higher than the end portion of the P. caudatum population. It is assumed that the sustenance expenditures of P. caudatum are greater than those of paramecia in endosymbiosis, i.e. the closing of the components into a biotic cycle leads to a decrease in the sustenance expenditures.

  6. Enhanced clinical-scale manufacturing of TCR transduced T-cells using closed culture system modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jianjian; Gkitsas, Nikolaos; Fellowes, Vicki S; Ren, Jiaqiang; Feldman, Steven A; Hinrichs, Christian S; Stroncek, David F; Highfill, Steven L

    2018-01-24

    Genetic engineering of T-cells to express specific T cell receptors (TCR) has emerged as a novel strategy to treat various malignancies. More widespread utilization of these types of therapies has been somewhat constrained by the lack of closed culture processes capable of expanding sufficient numbers of T-cells for clinical application. Here, we evaluate a process for robust clinical grade manufacturing of TCR gene engineered T-cells. TCRs that target human papillomavirus E6 and E7 were independently tested. A 21 day process was divided into a transduction phase (7 days) and a rapid expansion phase (14 days). This process was evaluated using two healthy donor samples and four samples obtained from patients with epithelial cancers. The process resulted in ~ 2000-fold increase in viable nucleated cells and high transduction efficiencies (64-92%). At the end of culture, functional assays demonstrated that these cells were potent and specific in their ability to kill tumor cells bearing target and secrete large quantities of interferon and tumor necrosis factor. Both phases of culture were contained within closed or semi-closed modules, which include automated density gradient separation and cell culture bags for the first phase and closed GREX culture devices and wash/concentrate systems for the second phase. Large-scale manufacturing using modular systems and semi-automated devices resulted in highly functional clinical-grade TCR transduced T-cells. This process is now in use in actively accruing clinical trials and the NIH Clinical Center and can be utilized at other cell therapy manufacturing sites that wish to scale-up and optimize their processing using closed systems.

  7. Development of a Hydrogen Energy System as a Grid Frequency Management Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewan, Mitch [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Rocheleau, Richard [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Swider-Lyons, Karen [U.S. Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Virji, Meheboob [GRandalytics, Honolulu, HI (United States); Randolph, Guenter [Hydrogen Renewable Energy System Analysis, Pickering, ON (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    The Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) is conducting research to assess the technical potential of using an electrolyzer-based hydrogen (H2) production and storage system as a grid demand response tool using battery data from a 200 MW grid to show the kind of response required. The hydrogen produced by the electrolyzer is used for transportation. A 65 kg/day hydrogen energy system (HES) consisting of a PEM electrolyzer, 35 bar buffer tank, 450 bar compressor, and associated chiller systems was purchased and installed at the Hawaii Natural Energy Laboratory Hawaii Authority (NELHA) to demonstrate long-term durability of the electrolyzer under cyclic operation required for frequency regulation on an island grid system. The excess hydrogen was stored for use by three fuel-cell buses to be operated at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park (HAVO) and by the County of Hawai‘i Mass Transit Agency (MTA). This paper describes the site selection and equipment commissioning, plus a comprehensive test plan that was developed to characterize the performance and durability of the electrolyzer under dynamic load conditions. The controls were modified for the operating envelope and dynamic limits of the electrolyzer. While the data showed these modifications significantly improved the system response time, it is not fast enough to match a BESS response time for grid frequency management. The electrolyzer can only be used for slower acting changes (1 to 0.5 Hz). A potential solution is to design an electrolyzer/BESS hybrid system and develop a modeling program to find the optimum mix of battery and electrolyzer to provide the maximum grid regulation services at minimum cost.

  8. Development of a prototype Open-close positron emission tomography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Ogata, Yoshimune; Kato, Katsuhiko [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya (Japan); Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    We developed a prototype positron emission tomography (PET) system based on a new concept called Open-close PET, which has two modes: open and close-modes. In the open-mode, the detector ring is separated into two halved rings and subject is imaged with the open space and projection image is formed. In the close-mode, the detector ring is closed to be a regular circular ring, and the subject can be imaged without an open space, and so reconstructed images can be made without artifacts. The block detector of the Open-close PET system consists of two scintillator blocks that use two types of gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) scintillators with different decay times, angled optical fiber-based image guides, and a flat panel photomultiplier tube. The GSO pixel size was 1.6 × 2.4 × 7 mm and 8 mm for fast (35 ns) and slow (60 ns) GSOs, respectively. These GSOs were arranged into an 11 × 15 matrix and optically coupled in the depth direction to form a depth-of-interaction detector. The angled optical fiber-based image guides were used to arrange the two scintillator blocks at 22.5° so that they can be arranged in a hexadecagonal shape with eight block detectors to simplify the reconstruction algorithm. The detector ring was divided into two halves to realize the open-mode and set on a mechanical stand with which the distance between the two parts can be manually changed. The spatial resolution in the close-mode was 2.4-mm FWHM, and the sensitivity was 1.7% at the center of the field-of-view. In both the close- and open-modes, we made sagittal (y-z plane) projection images between the two halved detector rings. We obtained reconstructed and projection images of {sup 18}F-NaF rat studies and proton-irradiated phantom images. These results indicate that our developed Open-close PET is useful for some applications such as proton therapy as well as other applications such as molecular imaging.

  9. Development of a prototype Open-close positron emission tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Okumura, Satoshi; Watabe, Tadashi; Ikeda, Hayato; Kanai, Yasukazu; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Komori, Masataka; Ogata, Yoshimune; Kato, Katsuhiko; Hatazawa, Jun

    2015-08-01

    We developed a prototype positron emission tomography (PET) system based on a new concept called Open-close PET, which has two modes: open and close-modes. In the open-mode, the detector ring is separated into two halved rings and subject is imaged with the open space and projection image is formed. In the close-mode, the detector ring is closed to be a regular circular ring, and the subject can be imaged without an open space, and so reconstructed images can be made without artifacts. The block detector of the Open-close PET system consists of two scintillator blocks that use two types of gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) scintillators with different decay times, angled optical fiber-based image guides, and a flat panel photomultiplier tube. The GSO pixel size was 1.6 × 2.4 × 7 mm and 8 mm for fast (35 ns) and slow (60 ns) GSOs, respectively. These GSOs were arranged into an 11 × 15 matrix and optically coupled in the depth direction to form a depth-of-interaction detector. The angled optical fiber-based image guides were used to arrange the two scintillator blocks at 22.5° so that they can be arranged in a hexadecagonal shape with eight block detectors to simplify the reconstruction algorithm. The detector ring was divided into two halves to realize the open-mode and set on a mechanical stand with which the distance between the two parts can be manually changed. The spatial resolution in the close-mode was 2.4-mm FWHM, and the sensitivity was 1.7% at the center of the field-of-view. In both the close- and open-modes, we made sagittal (y-z plane) projection images between the two halved detector rings. We obtained reconstructed and projection images of 18F-NaF rat studies and proton-irradiated phantom images. These results indicate that our developed Open-close PET is useful for some applications such as proton therapy as well as other applications such as molecular imaging.

  10. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  11. Closed loop chemical systems for energy storage and transmission (chemical heat pipe). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakil, H.B.; Flock, J.W.

    1978-02-01

    The work documents the anlaysis of closed loop chemical systems for energy storage and transmission, commonly referred to as the Chemical Heat Pipe (CHP). Among the various chemical reaction systems and sources investigated, the two best systems were determined to be the high temperature methane/steam reforming reaction (HTCHP) coupled to a Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR) and the lower temperature, cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction (LTCHP) coupled to existing sources such as coal or light water reactors. Solar and other developing technologies can best be coupled to the LTCHP. The preliminary economic and technical analyses show that both systems could transport heat at an incremental cost of approximately $1.50/GJ/160 km (in excess of the primary heat cost of $2.50/GJ), at system efficiencies above 80%. Solar heat can be transported at an incremental cost of $3/GJ/160 km. The use of the mixed feed evaporator concept developed in this work contributes significantly to reducing the transportation cost and increasing the efficiency of the system. The LTCHP shows the most promise of the two systems if the technical feasibility of the cyclic closed loop chemical reaction system can be established. An experimental program for establishing this feasibility is recommended. Since the VHTR is several years away from commercial demonstration and the HTCHP chemical technology is well developed, future HTCHP programs should be aimed at VHTR and interface problems.

  12. A Closed-Form Technique for the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Wind Turbine Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Dueñas-Osorio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a closed-form method to evaluate wind turbine system reliability and associated failure consequences. Monte Carlo simulation, a widely used approach for system reliability assessment, usually requires large numbers of computational experiments, while existing analytical methods are limited to simple system event configurations with a focus on average values of reliability metrics. By analyzing a wind turbine system and its components in a combinatorial yet computationally efficient form, the proposed approach provides an entire probability distribution of system failure that contains all possible configurations of component failure and survival events. The approach is also capable of handling unique component attributes such as downtime and repair cost needed for risk estimations, and enables sensitivity analysis for quantifying the criticality of individual components to wind turbine system reliability. Applications of the technique are illustrated by assessing the reliability of a 12-subassembly turbine system. In addition, component downtimes and repair costs of components are embedded in the formulation to compute expected annual wind turbine unavailability and repair cost probabilities, and component importance metrics useful for maintenance planning and research prioritization. Furthermore, this paper introduces a recursive solution to closed-form method and applies this to a 45-component turbine system. The proposed approach proves to be computationally efficient and yields vital reliability information that could be readily used by wind farm stakeholders for decision making and risk management.

  13. Closed-Form Equation of Data Dependent Jitter in First Order Low Pass System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangjin Byun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a closed-form equation of data dependent jitter (DDJ in first order low pass systems. The DDJ relates to the system bandwidth, the bit rate, the input rise/fall time, and the number of maximum consecutive identical bits of the data pattern. To confirm the derived equation, simulations have been done with a first order RC low pass circuit for various system bandwidths, bit rates, input rise/fall times, and data patterns. The simulation results agree well with the calculated DDJ values by the derived equation.

  14. Condition Monitoring System Designing of GIS Based on Trip/close Coil Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dongliang; Wang, Zhi; Xue, Feng; Li, Haitao

    2017-05-01

    In this article, the types and characteristics of the faults from GIS were analyzed that the major failures were caused by its operating mechanism and auxiliary control circuits. While a useful parameter to effectively diagnose the mechanical failures of GIS is the trip/close coil current which is accessible and easy-to-measure. A portable system has been design to monitor the condition of GIS by detecting the coil current. This system was fulfilled with functions like signal sampling, processing, transmitting and performing. DSP and ARM11 carrying WINCE 6.0 have been used to construct the system. The feasibility and reliability were validated through several repeated experiments.

  15. Gen2 RFID-Based System Framework for Resource Circulation in Closed-Loop Supply Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-woo Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Product recycling has become a mandatory activity under extended producer responsibility. Therefore, it is important to operate a closed-loop supply chain that integrates sourcing, production, delivery, and recycling to achieve not only environmental sustainability, but also economic benefits. However, this goal is affected by chronic problems caused by uncertainties relating to the return timing, quantity, and quality of returned items. Many studies proved that information visibility could solve these problems. In this context, a system framework for closed-loop supply chain management is proposed that gathers real-time information within a supply chain and product lifecycle by using the Internet-of-Things, including radio frequency identification (RFID. Specifically, the most recent Gen2 RFID protocol, which provides new features to create new positive effects, is considered. Additionally, an information system is designed, including RFID tag encoding, which supports the operation of the proposed system. Finally, the lifecycle benefits are examined, such as counterfeit prevention, real-time monitoring and maintenance in the middle-of-life phase, and reverse process streamlining. The ultimate aim is to design a system that facilitates the profitable and environmentally friendly operation of the closed-loop supply chain.

  16. Algal Hydrogen Production -- Stand Alone or Integrated System?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghirardi, Maria L.; Maness, Pin Ching; Kosourovo, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria and green algae photoproduce H2. but do so utilizing different catalysts and substrates. Green algae use reductant generate mostly by water oxidation to catalyze the reduction of protons to H2 gas, while photosynthetic bacteria catalyze H2 production from organic acids using the nitrogenase enzyme. Moreover, these two organisms utilize different regions of the solar spectrum to perform photosynthesis: green algae's light harvesting antenna is comprised of chlorophyll molecules that absorb mostly blue and red light; photosynthetic bacteria harvest blue and far-red light through their light-harvesting pigments to run its non-oxygenic photosynthetic reactions. There is thus an opportunity to increase the range of solar spectrum used to photoproduce H2 by combining the light-harvesting and catalytic properties of these two organisms in a single process. In the current manuscript, we describe an experimental system that validates this hypothesis and demonstrates quantitatively the advantages of a two organism process for production of higher amounts of H2 and thus achieving solar light conversion efficiencies.

  17. The legacy of Biosphere 2 for the study of biospherics and closed ecological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J P; Nelson, M; Alling, A

    2003-01-01

    The unprecedented challenges of creating Biosphere 2, the world's first laboratory for biospherics, the study of global ecology and long-term closed ecological system dynamics, led to breakthrough developments in many fields, and a deeper understanding of the opportunities and difficulties of material closure. This paper will review accomplishments and challenges, citing some of the key research findings and publications that have resulted from the experiments in Biosphere 2. Engineering accomplishments included development of a technique for variable volume to deal with pressure differences between the facility and outside environment, developing methods of atmospheric leak detection and sealing, while achieving new standards of closure, with an annual atmospheric leakrate of less than 10%, or less than 300 ppm per day. This degree of closure permitted detailed tracking of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and trace gases such as nitrous oxide and ethylene over the seasonal variability of two years. Full closure also necessitated developing new approaches and technologies for complete air, water, and wastewater recycle and reuse within the facility. The development of a soil-based highly productive agricultural system was a first in closed ecological systems, and much was learned about managing a wide variety of crops using non-chemical means of pest and disease control. Closed ecological systems have different temporal biogeochemical cycling and ranges of atmospheric components because of their smaller reservoirs of air, water and soil, and higher concentration of biomass, and Biosphere 2 provided detailed examination and modeling of these accelerated cycles over a period of closure which measured in years. Medical research inside Biosphere 2 included the effects on humans of lowered oxygen: the discovery that human productivity can be maintained with good health with lowered atmospheric oxygen levels could lead to major economies on the design of space stations and

  18. The legacy of biosphere 2 for the study of biospherics and closed ecological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. P.; Nelson, M.; Alling, A.

    The unprecedented challenges of creating Biosphere 2, the world's first laboratory for biospherics, the study of global ecology and long-term closed ecological system dynamics, led to breakthrough developments in many fields, and a deeper understanding of the opportunities and difficulties of material closure. This paper will review accomplishments and challenges, citing some of the key research findings and publications that have resulted from the experiments in Biosphere 2. Engineering accomplishments included development of a technique for variable volume to deal with pressure differences between the facility and outside environment, developing methods of atmospheric leak detection and sealing, while achieving new standards of closure, with an annual atmospheric leakrate of less than 10%, or less than 300 ppm per day. This degree of closure permitted detailed tracking of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and trice gases such as nitrous oxide and ethylene over the seasonal variability of two years. Full closure also necessitated developing new approaches and technologies for complete air, water, and wastewater recycle and reuse within the facility. The development of a soil-based highly productive agricultural system was a first in closed ecological systems, and much was learned about managing a wide variety of crops using non-chemical means of pest and disease control. Closed ecological systems have different temporal biogeochemical cycling and ranges of atmospheric components because of their smaller reservoirs of air, water and soil, and higher concentration of biomass, and Biosphere 2 provided detailed examination and modeling of these accelerated cycles over a period of closure which measured in years. Medical research inside Biosphere 2 included the effects on humans of lowered oxygen: the discovery that human productivity can be maintained with good health with lowered atmospheric oxygen levels could lead to major economies on the design of space stations and

  19. A Self-Supported Direct Borohydride-Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cell System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K. Shukla

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A self-supported direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell system with internal manifolds and an auxiliary control unit is reported. The system, while operating under ambient conditions, delivers a peak power of 40 W with about 2 W to run the auxiliary control unit. A critical cause and effect analysis, on the data for single cells and stack, suggests the optimum concentrations of fuel and oxidant to be 8 wt. % NaBH4 and 2 M H2O2, respectively in extending the operating time of the system. Such a fuel cell system is ideally suited for submersible and aerospace applications where anaerobic conditions prevail.

  20. A closed-loop system for frequency tracking of piezoresistive cantilever sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Zhang, Qing; Merzsch, Stephan; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2013-05-01

    A closed loop circuit capable of tracking resonant frequencies for MEMS-based piezoresistive cantilever resonators is developed in this work. The proposed closed-loop system is mainly based on a phase locked loop (PLL) circuit. In order to lock onto the resonant frequency of the resonator, an actuation signal generated from a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) is locked to the phase of the input reference signal of the cantilever sensor. In addition to the PLL component, an instrumentation amplifier and an active low pass filter (LPF) are connected to the system for gaining the amplitude and reducing the noise of the cantilever output signals. The LPF can transform a rectangular signal into a sinusoidal signal with voltage amplitudes ranging from 5 to 10 V which are sufficient for a piezoactuator input (i.e., maintaining a large output signal of the cantilever sensor). To demonstrate the functionality of the system, a self-sensing silicon cantilever resonator with a built-in piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge is fabricated and integrated with the circuit. A piezoactuator is utilized for actuating the cantilever into resonance. Implementation of this closed loop system is used to track the resonant frequency of a silicon cantilever-based sensor resonating at 9.4 kHz under a cross-sensitivity test of ambient temperature. The changes of the resonant frequency are interpreted using a frequency counter connected to the system. From the experimental results, the temperature sensitivity and coefficient of the employed sensor are 0.3 Hz/°C and 32.8 ppm/°C, respectively. The frequency stability of the system can reach up to 0.08 Hz. The development of this system will enable real-time nanoparticle monitoring systems and provide a miniaturization of the instrumentation modules for cantilever-based nanoparticle detectors.